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Sample records for clay water systems

  1. Applications of fractional calculus to diffusion transport in clay-water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the low-frequency conductivity spectra of the clay-water mixtures is presented. The conductivity spectra for samples at different water content values are shown to collapse to a single master curve when appropriately rescaled. The frequency dependence of the conductivity is shown to follow the power-law with the exponent η=0,67 before reaching the frequency-independent part. It is argued that the observed conductivity dispersion is a consequence of the anomalously diffusing ions in the clay-water system. The fractional Langevin equation is then used to describe the stochastic dynamics of the single ion. (author)

  2. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  3. Boom clay pore water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, geological disposal in clay is the primary option for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel from the biosphere. The Boom Clay is studied as the potential host rock for methodological studies on the geological disposal of radioactive waste. It is present under the facilities of the SCK-CEN at Mol, at a depth of 190 to 293 m. The current R and D programme focuses on the feasibility and safety of radioactive waste disposal in the Boom Clay. In this framework, a detailed characterisation of the clay is performed (mechanical, physico-chemical and hydrogeological properties, variability, role of organic matter,...). In addition, high priority is given to the understanding of the basic phenomena which control the retention o f radionuclides in the clay. Therefore, it is very important to characterise and understand the pore water composition in the host rock. All the available information from previous studies on the Boom Clay pore water chemistry was synthesise d in a 'state of the art' report, status 2004. This report describes the pore water sampling and analytical techniques, the results, and interpretation of a series of studies carried out in-situ in the HADES URF and in the laboratories. The objective of this study was to evaluate the most reliable technique(s) to obtain representative pore water samples, to determine the variation of the pore water composition in the Boom Clay, to present a coherent geochemical model for explaining the mechanisms controlling the Boom Clay pore water composition, and to propose a reference pore water composition to be used in the laboratory experiments, for speciation calculations, and for assessments of perturbation that might influence the Boom Clay pore water. The main conclusions will be presented here. (authors)

  4. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundie, P. [Envirotech (Scotland) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Environmental Resource Industries Disposal Pty Ltd., Perth (Australia); McLeod, N. [Envirotreat Ltd., Kingswinford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  5. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal in the Recirculating Aquaculture System with Water Treatment Tank containing Baked Clay Beads and Chinese Cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aeknarin Thanakitpairin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to describe the nitrogen and phosphorus removal in Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS by crop plants biomass production. The 3 experiment systems consisted of 1 treatment (fish tank + baked clay beads + Chinese cabbage and 2 controls as control-1 (fish tank only and control-2 (fish tank + baked clay beads, were performed. With all experimental RAS, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus was cultured at 2 kg/m3 density. The baked clay beads (8-16 mm in diameter were filled as a layer of 10 cm in the water treatment tank of control-2. While in the treatment tank, Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis was planted at 334 plants/m2 in baked clay beads layer. During 35 days of experiment, the average fish wet-weight in control-1, control-2 and treatment systems increased from 16.31±1.49, 15.18±1.28 and 11.31±1.49 g to 29.43±7.06, 28.65±3.12 and 27.20±6.56 g, respectively. It was found that the growth rate of 0.45±0.15 g-wet weight/day in a treatment tank was higher than in those 2 controls, which were rather similar at 0.37±0.16 and 0.38±0.05 g-wet weight/day, respectively. The fish survival rate of all experimental units was 100%. The average Chinese cabbage wet-weight in treatment system increased from 0.15±0.02 g to 1.00±0.38 g. For water quality, all parameters were within the acceptable range for aquaculture. The assimilation inorganic nitrogen in a treatment tank showed a slower rate and lower nitrite accumulation relative to those in control tanks. The nitrogen and phosphorus balance analysis illustrated that most of the nitrogen and phosphorus input in all systems was from feed (82-87% and 21-87% while at the final day of experiments, nitrogen and phosphorus in tilapia culture revealed at 15-19% and 4-13%. The accumulation of nitrogen and phosphorus in the water, up to 56% and 70%, was found in control-1 while water in the tank with baked clay beads had substantial lower nitrogen and phosphorus concentration. The

  6. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal in the Recirculating Aquaculture System with Water Treatment Tank containing Baked Clay Beads and Chinese Cabbage

    OpenAIRE

    Aeknarin Thanakitpairin; Wiboonluk Pungrasmi; Sorawit Powtongsook

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to describe the nitrogen and phosphorus removal in Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS) by crop plants biomass production. The 3 experiment systems consisted of 1 treatment (fish tank + baked clay beads + Chinese cabbage) and 2 controls as control-1 (fish tank only) and control-2 (fish tank + baked clay beads), were performed. With all experimental RAS, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was cultured at 2 kg/m3 density. The baked clay beads (8-16 mm in diameter) were fi...

  7. Water-clay interactions. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals contribute to the chemical composition of soil and sediment groundwaters via surface and dissolution/precipitation reactions. The understanding of those processes is still today fragmentary. In this context, our experimental purpose is to identify the contribution of each reaction in the chemical composition of water in a water/clay System. Kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite are the reference clays. After a fine mineralogical study, the exchange equilibria between K+ and H+ are characterised. Different exchange sites are identified and the exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients are quantified. Then, mixtures of the three clays are equilibrated with acidic and basic (I≤10-2 M) solutions at 25 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C, during 320 days. The System evolution is observed by chemical analysis of the solutions and mineralogical analysis by TEM. We show that montmorillonite is unstable compared to the kaolinite/amorphous silica assemblage for solutions of pH<7. Aqueous silica is probably controlled by the kinetics of dissolution of the montmorillonite in moderate pH media. In more acidic solutions, amorphous silica precipitates. Al is under control of 'kaolinite' neo-formations. The use of the selectivity coefficients in a numerical simulation shows that K+ concentration depends on exchange reactions. The pH has a more complicated evolution, which is not completely understood. This evolution depends on both exchange equilibria and organic acid occurrence. In this type of experiments, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium equations between smectite and kaolinite are inexact. The problem of the thermodynamic nature of clays remains and is not resolved by these solubility experiments. (author)

  8. Preparation of nanocomposites polyurethane water bone with clay montmorillonite sodica and organophilic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocomposites based on water bone polyurethane (NWPU's) were synthesized based on poli(propylene glycol), dimethylolpropionic acid (DMPA), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and hydrazine (HYD), as chain extender. Two kinds of clays were employed: hydrophilic and organophilic. The nanocomposites were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and the mechanical properties were evaluated. The FTIR results showed the presence of specific groups of clay and the XRD suggested that occurred their intercalation/exfoliation through polyurethane matrix. The mechanical resistance of the systems showed significant increase when compared to water dispersions synthesized without clay. (author)

  9. Organically modified clay removes oil from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When bentonite or other clays and zeolites are modified with quaternary amines, they become organophilic. Such modified bentonites are used to remove mechanically emulsified oil and grease, and other sparingly soluble organics. If the organoclay is granulated, it is placed into a liquid phase carbon filter vessel to remove FOG's and chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this application the clay is mixed with anthrazite to prevent early plugging of the filter by oil or grease droplets. In batch systems a powered organoclay is employed. Types of oil found in water can include fats, lubricants, cutting fluids, heavy hydrocarbons such as tars, grease, crude oil, diesel oils; and light hydrocarbons such as kerosene, jet fuel, and gasoline

  10. A possible role of fluctuating clay-water systems in the production of ordered prebiotic oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, N.; White, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    A model is proposed for the intermediate stages of prebiotic evolution, based on the characteristics of the adsorption and condensation of amino acids and nucleotides on the surface area of clay minerals in a fluctuating environment. Template replication and translation of adsorbed oligonucleotides and catalytic effects by peptide products on further condensation are proposed, due to specific properties of hypohydrous clay surfaces as well as the biomolecules themselves. Experimental evidence supports some of the proposed interactions, and all of them can be tested experimentally.

  11. Water vapour permeability of clay bricks

    OpenAIRE

    Dondi, M.; Principi, P.; Raimondo, M.; Zanarini, G.

    2003-01-01

    The water vapour permeability of clay bricks has been experimentally measured in order to draw a representative outline of industrial products without pore-forming additives. The correlations between water vapour permeability and the main compositional and microstructural parameters of both bricks and clay bodies have been investigated. A statistical model was set up in order to predict with reasonable precision and reliability, the water vapour permeability on the basis of open porosity, bul...

  12. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  13. Nanotubular Halloysite Clay as Efficient Water Filtration System for Removal of Cationic and Anionic Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yafei; Abdullayev, Elshad; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    Halloysite nanotubes, chemically similar to kaolinite, are formed by rolling of kaolinite layers in tubes with diameter of 50 nm and length of ca. 1 μm. Halloysite has negative SiO2 outermost and positive Al2O3 inner lumen surface, which enables it to be used as potential absorbent for both cationic and anionic dyes due to the efficient bivalent adsorbancy. An adsorption study using cationic Rhodamine 6G and anionic Chrome azurol S has shown approximately two times better dye removal for halloysite as compared to kaolinite. Halloysite filters have been effectively regenerated up to 50 times by burning the adsorbed dyes. Overall removal efficiency of anionic Chrome azurol S exceeded 99.9% for 5th regeneration cycle of halloysite. Chrome azurol S adsorption capacity decreases with the increase of ionic strength, temperature and pH. For cationic Rhodamine 6G, higher ionic strength, temperature and initial solution concentration were favorable to enhanced adsorption with optimal pH 8. These results indicate a potential to utilize halloysite for the removal of ionic dyes from environmental waters.

  14. Impact factors on the structuration and the rheological behavior of the clay-water system for smectite dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smectite are swelling clays widely used in industry. Their mechanical properties are unequal according to their mineralogical and physico-chemical characteristics. The aim of this study is to improve the knowledge of the interlayer cation impact on the structure built by the smectite-water system according to the concentration. Homo-ionic (Na+ et Ca2+) and bi-ionic systems are observed. This study cross checks mineralogical methods, physicochemical analysis and broad range of rheometric tests. At low concentration (less than 60 g/l) the calcium dispersions are shear thinning and few viscous due to the layer association in huge deformable flocks. The sodium smectite layers are dispersed; the dispersions are highly viscous. The lowest viscosity is detected for mix of 20 % of sodium smectite and 80 % of calcium smectite. At higher concentration (60 to 100 g/l), the yield stress and viscoelastic properties are studied by creep-recovery tests, oscillatory tests and imposed shear step. At the liquid state, the flow is first heterogeneous with a shear banding effect then homogeneous. The results make it possible to define the concentration area characteristic of each mechanical behavior (viscosity, shear thinning and yield stress) according to the saturation cation. The thixotropic properties are characterized with de-structuring-restructuring tests. Two kinetics are determined. Finally we realize a data base with 12 natural and industrial bentonite. The rheograms would be efficient to differentiate the natural calcium bentonite (Newtonian law), natural sodium bentonite (Herschel-Bulkley law) and activated calcium bentonite (Bingham law). (author)

  15. Clay-biodegradable polymer combination for pollutant removal from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Mohd Amin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new treatment alternative is investigated to remove micropollutants from wastewater effectively and in a more cost-effective way. A potential solution is the use of clay in combination with biodegradable polymeric flocculants. Flocculation is viewed as the best method to get the optimum outcome from the combination of clay with starch. Clay is naturally abundantly available and relatively inexpensive compared to the conventional adsorbents used. Experimental studies were carried out with four different clays to select the best clay for further optimisation. The atrazine removal achieved is in the range of 10–99 % based on the clay concentration of 10–50 g L−1. Optimisation of the best clay performer leads towards atrazine reduction of > 99 % with a dosage of 100 mg L−1. The best and underperforming clays were then tested in other experiments with the addition of cationic starch flocculants. In this experiment, the addition of a polymer increased the atrazine removal for the underperforming clay to 46 % with only 10 mg L−1 clay dosages. The clay flocculation test was also performed to test the flocculation efficiency of clays by the polymer. Approximately 80–84 % of the clay is flocculated, which shows exceptional flocculation efficiency in removing both clays and atrazine from the water matrices.

  16. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  17. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  18. Water diffusion in clays with added organic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tensoactive agents may decrease water absorption in clay products like adobes. They modify the characteristics of the surface of clay particles. Characterization of water diffusion through the pores of modified clays is important to apply appropriate surface modifiers and to improve their performance. We established a simple model for water diffusion in test samples of defined dimensions to estimate real physical parameters and their effect on water absorption. Adsorption mechanisms are examined based on experimental results. The fitting of the experimental data to the model provides a deep understanding of water adsorption in chemically modified clays. A better agreement between the model and the experimental data is achieved for complex molecules

  19. Dynamics of water confined in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the O-D stretching mode of dilute HOD in H2O probes the local environment and the hydrogen bond network of confined water. The dynamics of water molecules confined in the interlayer space of montmorillonites (Mt) and in interaction with two types of cations (Li+ and Ca2+) but also with the negatively charged siloxane surface are studied. The results evidence that the OD vibrational dynamics is significantly slowed down in confined media: it goes from 1.7 ps in neat water to 2.6 Ps in the case of Li+ cations with two water pseudo-layers (2.2-2.3 ps in the case of Ca2+ cations) and to 4.7 ps in the case of Li+ cations with one water pseudo-layer. No significant difference between the two cations is noticed. In this 2D confined geometry (the interlayer space being about 0.6 nm for two water pseudo-layers), the relaxation time constants obtained are comparable to the ones measured in analogous concentrated salt solutions. Nevertheless, and in strong opposition to the observations performed in the liquid phase, anisotropy experiments evidence the absence of rotational motions on a 5 ps time scale, proving that the hydrogen bond network in the interlayer space of the clay mineral is locked at this time scale. (authors)

  20. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    55Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the Bt-development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of 55Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for 55Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  1. Hydration states of clays followed by water and hydroxyls vibrational analyses in the near infrared: application to saponite and bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the feasibility of a deep geological disposal facility conducted by ANDRA - the French national radioactive waste management agency -, requires the knowledge of water status and water content in clays. Thanks to an original lab-built device coupling vibrational spectroscopies and water adsorption isotherms, adsorbed water and clay's structure are described quantitatively and qualitatively. A multidisciplinary approach allows the description of hydration mechanisms and water molecules network in the inter lamellar space of synthetic saponites. The effects of density and nature of inter-foliar cations and the influence of temperature on hydration are presented. Using mechanisms and important parameters established on saponites, hydration of bentonite MX80 is carried out. In order to describe and quantify simultaneously two different water states, a simple but relevant method of spectra analysis was developed. (author)

  2. Extraction of Water Treatment Coagulant from Locally Abundant Kaolin Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Fidelis Chigondo; Benias Chomunorwa Nyamunda; Vuyo Bhebhe

    2015-01-01

    Rapid industrialisation is contributing to water pollution. There is a need to identify cheaper and efficient methods of removing contaminants as the demand for clean water rises. A study is carried out to investigate the extraction of alum from locally abundant kaolin clays using sulphuric acid. Alum is a coagulant that is used for raw water treatment. The kaolin clay and alum were characterized by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of particle size, calcination...

  3. The ternary system U(VI) / humic acid / Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Claudia

    2013-07-23

    The storage of nuclear waste in deep geological formations is discussed worldwide as the main strategy for nuclear waste management. To ensure the confinement of the nuclear waste, a multiple barrier system which consists of engineered, geo-engineered, and geological barriers will be applied. Thereby, in Germany the definition of the isolating rock zone represents an important safety function indicator. Clay rock is internationally investigated as potential host rock for a repository and represents a part of the geological barrier. In the present work, the natural clay rock Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri rock laboratory, Switzerland, was studied. In Germany, the direct disposal of the spent nuclear fuel without the reprocessing of the spent fuel is preferred. In case of water ingress, radionuclides can be released from the nuclear waste repository into its surroundings, namely the host rock of the repository. Humic acids, ubiquitous in nature, can be found associated with the inorganic components in natural clay rock (1.5 x 10{sup -3} wt.% in Opalinus Clay). They can be released under certain conditions. Due to their variety of functional groups, humic acids are very strong complexing agents for metal ions. They have inherent redox abilities and a colloidal conformation in solution. Because of these characteristics, humic acids can affect the mobility of metal ions such as actinides. Furthermore, in the near-field of a repository elevated temperatures have to be considered due to the heat production resulting from the radioactive decay of the various radionuclides in the nuclear waste. This work focuses on the interaction of uranium, as main component of spent nuclear fuel, with Opalinus Clay and studies the influence of humic acid and elevated temperature on this interaction. Thus, the collected sorption and diffusion data are not only relevant for safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories but also for any clay-containing system present in the environment

  4. The ternary system U(VI) / humic acid / Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The storage of nuclear waste in deep geological formations is discussed worldwide as the main strategy for nuclear waste management. To ensure the confinement of the nuclear waste, a multiple barrier system which consists of engineered, geo-engineered, and geological barriers will be applied. Thereby, in Germany the definition of the isolating rock zone represents an important safety function indicator. Clay rock is internationally investigated as potential host rock for a repository and represents a part of the geological barrier. In the present work, the natural clay rock Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri rock laboratory, Switzerland, was studied. In Germany, the direct disposal of the spent nuclear fuel without the reprocessing of the spent fuel is preferred. In case of water ingress, radionuclides can be released from the nuclear waste repository into its surroundings, namely the host rock of the repository. Humic acids, ubiquitous in nature, can be found associated with the inorganic components in natural clay rock (1.5 x 10-3 wt.% in Opalinus Clay). They can be released under certain conditions. Due to their variety of functional groups, humic acids are very strong complexing agents for metal ions. They have inherent redox abilities and a colloidal conformation in solution. Because of these characteristics, humic acids can affect the mobility of metal ions such as actinides. Furthermore, in the near-field of a repository elevated temperatures have to be considered due to the heat production resulting from the radioactive decay of the various radionuclides in the nuclear waste. This work focuses on the interaction of uranium, as main component of spent nuclear fuel, with Opalinus Clay and studies the influence of humic acid and elevated temperature on this interaction. Thus, the collected sorption and diffusion data are not only relevant for safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories but also for any clay-containing system present in the environment

  5. Mechanical dispersion of clay from soil into water: readily-dispersed and spontaneously-dispersed clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the experimental determination of the amount of clay dispersed from soil into water is described. The method was evaluated using soil samples from agricultural fields in 18 locations in Poland. Soil particle size distributions, contents of organic matter and exchangeable cations were measured by standard methods. Sub-samples were placed in distilled water and were subjected to four different energy inputs obtained by different numbers of inversions (end-over-end movements). The amounts of clay that dispersed into suspension were measured by light scattering (turbidimetry). An empirical equation was developed that provided an approximate fit to the experimental data for turbidity as a function of number of inversions. It is suggested that extrapolation of the fitted equation to zero inversions enables the amount of spontaneously-dispersed clay to be estimated. This method introduces the possibility of replacing the existing subjective, qualitative method of determining spontaneously-dispersed clay with a quantitative, objective method. Even though the dispersed clay is measured under saturated conditions, soil samples retain a `memory' of the water contents at which they have been stored.

  6. Extraction of Water Treatment Coagulant from Locally Abundant Kaolin Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidelis Chigondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid industrialisation is contributing to water pollution. There is a need to identify cheaper and efficient methods of removing contaminants as the demand for clean water rises. A study is carried out to investigate the extraction of alum from locally abundant kaolin clays using sulphuric acid. Alum is a coagulant that is used for raw water treatment. The kaolin clay and alum were characterized by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The effects of particle size, calcination temperature, calcination time, acid-kaolin clay ratio, acid concentration, leaching temperature, and leaching time on extraction efficiency were investigated. The optimum leaching conditions for the calcined kaolin clay were found to be particle size 100 µm, acid-kaolin clay weight ratio 6 : 1, acid concentration 4 M, leaching temperature 100°C, and leaching time 90 min. Under optimised conditions, 66.95% (w/w aluminum sulphate was extracted. The results showed that sulphuric acid could be used on a large scale to extract alum from kaolin clay. The extracted alum showed similar structural and physical characteristics compared with commercial alum. A dosage of 40 mg/L of the extracted alum showed effective coagulant properties with a great potential of treating raw water.

  7. Estimation of soil clay content from hygroscopic water content measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wuddivira, Mark N.; Robinson, David A.; Lebron, Inma; Brechet, Laëtitia; Atwell, Melissa; De Caires, Sunshine; Oatham, Michael; Jones, Scott B.; Abdu, Hiruy; Verma, Aditya K.; Tuller, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Soil texture and the soil water characteristic are key properties used to estimate flow and transport parameters. Determination of clay content is therefore critical for understanding of plot-scale soil heterogeneity. With increasing interest in proximal soil sensing, there is the need to relate obtained signals to soil properties of interest. Inference of soil texture, especially clay mineral content, from instrument response from electromagnetic induction and radiometric methods is of subst...

  8. Clay mineral liner system for leachates containing organic contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Sreedharan, Vandana; Sivapullaiah, PV

    2011-01-01

    A conventional liner with a good performance against inorganic contaminants with a minimal hydraulic conductivity does not usually perform well for retention/removal of leachates containing organic contaminants. Organic modification of clay can render the naturally organophobic clay tobe organophilic. Incorporation of modified organo clay along with unmodified inorganic clay in liner systems can overcome the inherent incompatibility of conventional liners to organic contaminants and can incre...

  9. Quantification of Water Content Across a Cement-clay Interface Using High Resolution Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafizadeh, A.; Gimmi, T.; Van Loon, L.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Maeder, U. K.; Churakov, S. V.

    In many designs for radioactive waste repositories, cement and clay will come into direct contact. The geochemical contrast between cement and clay will lead to mass fluxes across the interface, which consequently results in alteration of structural and transport properties of both materials that may affect the performance of the multi-barrier system. We present an experimental approach to study cement-clay interactions with a cell to accommodate small samples of cement and clay. The cell design allows both in situ measurement of water content across the sample using neutron radiography and measurement of transport parameters using through-diffusion tracer experiments. The aim of the high-resolution neutron radiography experiments was to monitor changes in water content (porosity) and their spatial extent. Neutron radiographs of several evolving cement-clay interfaces delivered quantitative data which allow resolving local water contents within the sample domain. In the present work we explored the uncertainties of the derived water contents with regard to various input parameters and with regard to the applied image correction procedures. Temporal variation of measurement conditions created absolute uncertainty of the water content in the order of ±0.1 (m3/m3), which could not be fully accounted for by correction procedures. Smaller relative changes in water content between two images can be derived by specific calibrations to two sample regions with different, invariant water contents.

  10. Boom clay pore water geochemistry at Mol site - State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of most elements at the base of the Putte Member reflects the presence of the 'double band', i.e. two coarser (silty) layers at this location. A coherent geochemical model was proposed by De Craen et al. (2004) to account for the pore water chemistry observed in the MORPHEUS piezometer (installed vertically downward from HADES URF). The model, assuming mineral dissolution/precipitation and cation exchange reactions as the principal processes, could reasonably well reproduce the observed data ranges. However, due to technical difficulties to measure reliably in situ pH and pCO2 at the time, these parameters were fitted by the model. In addition, the observed data ranges covered only a limited part of the Boom Clay and thus were not necessarily representative of the whole Boom Clay Formation. Recent progress in the optimisation of the sampling and measurement procedures led to the installation of a new circulation system around the PRACLAY gallery and an in-house routine application of gas analyses. In addition, a systematic screen for microbial activity became an integral part of the sampling campaigns in the piezometers around PRACLAY to verify the absence of microbial interference with the observed geochemical data. Today, we are able to probe in situ pH, pCO2 and pore water chemistry simultaneously. In this context, we can test, improve and further develop the present Boom Clay pore water geochemical model. Also, the use of additional piezometers for pore water sampling provides complementary data on larger scale thus better representing the overall natural variations in the Boom Clay pore water at Mol site. The modelling effort focuses on explaining the variations in the pore water chemistry observed in the Boom Clay at the formation scale. In-situ measured pH and pCO2 will serve as independent controllers to verify the robustness of the updated model. (authors)

  11. Static dissolution of UO2 in interstitial Boom Clay water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Static dissolution experiments were performed with unirradiated UO2 in Boom Clay water. The objectives were (1) to measure the solubility of uranium species in Boom Clay water, with UO2 as the solid phase, and (2) to assess the impact of dissolved organic matter and carbonate concentration on this solubility. The tests were supported by calculations with geochemical codes to indicate possibly solubility controlling solid phases. The tests were performed in anoxic and reducing conditions, at 20 and 25 C. The following conclusions could be drawn: (1) Within 2 months in anoxic conditions, the uranium concentrations appear to approach saturation. (2) The near-saturation concentrations are between 2.4 and 7.8x10-7 M. (3) The influence of the carbonate concentration and humic acids on the uranium concentration was apparently small, but the interpretation is hampered by pH and Eh and/or pH conditions; this can probably be explained by small differences in experimental conditions. (5) The measured near steady-state uranium concentration in the real clay water agrees relatively well with the solubility calculated for uraninite. (6) Addition of sulfide species reduced the redox potential, but not the uranium concentrations, except in real Boom Clay water

  12. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND CYCLODEXTRIN-CLAY SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational and experimental techniques are combined in order to better understand interactions involving organic compounds and cyclodextrin (CD)-clay systems. CD-clay systems may have great potential in the containment of organic contaminants in the environment. This study w...

  13. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  14. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  15. Modelling unfrozen water content in a silty clay permafrost deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    permafrost core of material properties similar to the test soil. The calibration for 5°C is seen to make a good fit to the permafrost core data. Further experiments should be performed in order to extend the range of water contents tested and hence the range of validity of the calibration equation.......The mechanical properties of both unfrozen soils and permafrost soils are influenced by the amount of unfrozen water in the pore space. When dealing with foundation engineering in permafrost areas it is essential to estimate the unfrozen water content (wu). This paper deals with the establishing of...... a calibration equation for determining the unfrozen water content of a Greenlandic silty clay permafrost deposit. Calibration experiments have been conducted for water contents in the interval 0 – 10 % at both 5 °C and 22 °C. Calibration equations are verified against permittivity data from a...

  16. Geology, Surficial - CLAY_ILITH_IN: Total Thickness of Clay in Indiana, Derived from the iLITH Water-Well Database (Indiana Geological Survey, Grid)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — CLAY_ILITH_IN is a grid that shows total thickness of clay, as derived from logs of water wells in the state of Indiana. (It presents the same data as shown in a...

  17. Geology, Surficial - CLAY_ILITH_PTS_IN: Total Thickness of Clay in Indiana, Derived from the iLITH Water-Well Database (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — CLAY_ILITH_PTS_IN is a point shapefile that shows total thickness of clay, as derived from logs of water wells in the state of Indiana. (It presents the source data...

  18. An Aquifer Reflections on Deep Clay Conditions for Water Quantity Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabariah Musa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the on-site testing of deep clay area through the well response and aquifer reflection analysis. The analysis was conducted using AQTESOLV software on pumping and recovery data to determine the well responses and aquifer characteristics of deep clay area. A simple experimental model was installed at the site using deep well of REWES (Recharge Well System model assists with four monitoring wells around the model. The monitoring wells were located at 4m, 10m, 20m and 35m from the model. The site has been identified identified to have the unconfined aquifer with deep compacted clay. Due to flatten and low flow, pumping analysis and ground water response were used to evaluate water quantity and potential prospective of circulate water cycle for urban stormwater management. As reflection on water cycle, almost 20% from withdrawal capacity able to refill the ground system with limited space. It was found that the available storage, S and hydraulic conductivity, K  of the clayey area are 0.001 and 32 m/day respectively. Therefore, the response on water cycle indicate some potential space to restore and withdrawal at peak time and thus, the  water can be used in safely conditions.

  19. Determination of geochemical characters of insterstitial waters of pleistocene Italian clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geochemical characters of clay formations and of their pore water are fundamental with regards to the mobility of the radionuclides as well as to the corrosion processes on enginered barriers. Experimental researches have been carried out in different types of clay, which represent Italian formations, for the characterization of pore water. A squeezer system, which reaches 1500 Kg/cm2 in pressure, and an analytical micro-scale methodology, for the determination of dissolved constituents in pore water, were set up. The extracted pore water ranges from 60% to 85% in relation to consolidation state of clay. The chemical composition of the extracted fluid has been checked during the squeezing. During this step the observed variations were smaller than those between the different specimens of the same sample. The comparison between the results obtained by squeezing and by a multiple washing technique, using increasing water/sediment ratios, shows that the last one does not give reliable results on the chemical composition of pore water. This is due to the presence of easily weatherable minerals and to the exchange processes between the clayey minerals and the solution. Nevertheless both these techniques have supplied complementary information about geochemical processes in water-rock interaction. The salinity of pore water ranges from 0.45 g/l to 24.5 g/l and the chemism always shows a high content of calcium-magnesium sulfate, or sodium chloride or calcium-magnesium-sulfate with sodium chloride. The correlation between geochemical composition of pore water and mineralogical composition of clay is not significant

  20. Effect of Water on Elastic and Creep Properties of Self-Standing Clay Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Benoit; Vandamme, Matthieu; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Bornert, Michel; Ferrage, Eric; Hubert, Fabien; Van Damme, Henri

    2016-02-01

    We characterized experimentally the elastic and creep properties of thin self-standing clay films, and how their mechanical properties evolved with relative humidity and water content. The films were made of clay montmorillonite SWy-2, obtained by evaporation of a clay suspension. Three types of films were manufactured, which differed by their interlayer cation: sodium, calcium, or a mixture of sodium with calcium. The orientational order of the films was characterized by X-ray diffractometry. The films were mechanically solicited in tension, the resulting strains being measured by digital image correlation. We measured the Young's modulus and the creep over a variety of relative humidities, on a full cycle of adsorption-desorption for what concerns the Young's modulus. Increasing relative humidity made the films less stiff and made them creep more. Both the elastic and creep properties depended significantly on the interlayer cation. For the Young's modulus, this dependence must originate from a scale greater than the scale of the clay layer. Also, hysteresis disappeared when plotting the Young's modulus versus water content instead of relative humidity. Independent of interlayer cation and of relative humidity greater than 60%, after a transient period, the creep of the films was always a logarithmic function of time. The experimental data gathered on these mesoscale systems can be of value for modelers who aim at predicting the mechanical behavior of clay-based materials (e.g., shales) at the engineering macroscopic scale from the one at the atomistic scale, for them to validate the first steps of their upscaling scheme. They provide also valuable reference data for bioinspired clay-based hybrid materials. PMID:26752345

  1. Probing Contaminant Transport to and from Clay Surfaces in Organic Solvents and Water Using Solution Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmohammadbagher, Amin; Shaw, John M

    2015-09-15

    Clays, in tailings, are a significant ongoing environmental concern in the mining and oilsands production industries, and clay rehabilitation following contamination poses challenges episodically. Understanding the fundamentals of clay behavior can lead to better environmental impact mitigation strategies. Systematic calorimetric measurements are shown to provide a framework for parsing the synergistic and antagonistic impacts of trace (i.e., parts per million level) components on the surface compositions of clays. The enthalpy of solution of as-received and "contaminated" clays, in as-received and "contaminated" organic solvents and water, at 60 °C and atmospheric pressure, provides important illustrative examples. Clay contamination included pre-saturation of clays with water and organic liquids. Solvent contamination included the addition of trace water to organic solvents and trace organic liquids to water. Enthalpy of solution outcomes are interpreted using a quantitative mass and energy balance modeling framework that isolates terms for solvent and trace contaminant sorption/desorption and surface energy effects. Underlying surface energies are shown to dominate the energetics of the solvent-clay interaction, and organic liquids as solvents or as trace contaminants are shown to displace water from as-received clay surfaces. This approach can be readily extended to include pH, salts, or other effects and is expected to provide mechanistic and quantitative insights underlying the stability of clays in tailings ponds and the behaviors of clays in diverse industrial and natural environments. PMID:26296102

  2. Quantification of water content across a cement-clay interface using high resolution neutron radiography

    OpenAIRE

    Shafizadeh, A; Gimmi, Thomas; Van Loon, L.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E; Mäder, Urs; Churakov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    In many designs for radioactive waste repositories, cement and clay will come into direct contact. The geochemical contrast between cement and clay will lead to mass fluxes across the interface, which consequently results in alteration of structural and transport properties of both materials that may affect the performance of the multi-barrier system. We present an experimental approach to study cement-clay interactions with a cell to accommodate small samples of cement and clay. The cell des...

  3. Boom clay pore water, home of a diverse microbial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste for over two decades, thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. A reference composition for synthetic clay water has been derived earlier by modelling and spatial calibration efforts, mainly based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay. However, since microbial activity is found in a range of extreme circumstances, the possibility of microbes interacting with future radioactive waste in a host formation like Boom Clay, cannot be ignored. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by a complementary set of microbiological and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant microorganisms. Similar to the previous characterization of the 'average' BCPW chemical composition, the primary aim of this microbiological study is to determine a representative BCPW microbial community which can be used in laboratory studies. Secondly, the in situ activity and the metabolic properties of members of this community were addressed, aiming to assess their survival and proliferation chances in repository conditions. In a first approach, total microbial DNA of the community was extracted from the BCPW samples. This molecular approach allows a broad insight in the total microbial ecology of the BCPW samples. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the highly conserved 16S rRNA genes in this DNA pool and subsequent sequencing and bio-informatics analysis, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) could be assigned to the microbial community. The bacterial community was found to be quite diverse, with OTUs belonging to 8 different phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Spirochetes, Chloroflexi and Deinococcus-Thermus). These results provide an overall view of the

  4. Procedure for preparation of high-water-content hydrogels using clay and a dendritic molecular binder

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes a facile, quick and reproducible preparation of hydrogels. The protocol requires four components: water, clay nanosheets (Clay-NS), a dendritic macromolecule (Gn-binder; n = generation number) and sodium polyacrylate (ASAP). Upon mixing with ASAP in water, Clay-NS, which are heavily entangled with one another, are exfoliated and dispersed homogenously because of a possible site-specific wrapping of their positive-charged edge parts with anionic ASAP. Meanwhile, Gn-bind...

  5. Electrical properties of water in clay and silty soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarenketo, Timo

    1998-10-01

    In order to better understand ground penetrating radar (GPR) results obtained in road surveys and site investigations, the dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of four silt and clay soils were measured at different densities and moisture contents ranging from oven dry material to the plastic state. The real parts K' and imaginary parts K″ of the relative dielectric permittivity values of the soils were measured with an HP Surface Network Analyzer over a frequency range from 30 MHz to 3.0 GHz. A dielectric and electrical conductivity meter produced by Adek was also used. The results suggest that water in soils can be classified according to its electrical properties as: (1) an adsorption water layer, also known as the hygroscopic water layer; (2) a viscous or capillary water layer; and (3) free water. The measurements also showed that the adsorption water layer can be divided into inner and outer layers in accordance with the electrical double layer theory. The imaginary part of the dielectric value of the material is formed mainly in the outer layer and partly in the viscous (capillary) water layer, which also has two layers with differing electrical properties. The measurements also clearly showed that if the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) of a material is low, the water molecules are orderly arranged around the soil particles and the dielectric values of the bound water layers remain almost independent of frequency. If the CEC increases, the molecular structure of the bound water layers is disturbed and the water molecules more easily follow the changing AC field so that the dielectric value is higher. These materials are also highly dielectrically dispersive, especially at GPR frequencies below 400 MHz. Increasing CEC correlates well with increasing imaginary part of the adsorption water layer. Measured ohmic electrical conductivities were low at low moisture content and increased as the outer viscous water layer developed with higher moisture

  6. Clay-biodegradable polymer combination for pollutant removal from water

    OpenAIRE

    M. F. Mohd Amin; S. G. J. Heijman; L. C. Rietveld

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new treatment alternative is investigated to remove micropollutants from wastewater effectively and in a more cost-effective way. A potential solution is the use of clay in combination with biodegradable polymeric flocculants. Flocculation is viewed as the best method to get the optimum outcome from the combination of clay with starch. Clay is naturally abundantly available and relatively inexpensive compared to the conven...

  7. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low cost bentonite clay was chemically modified using magnesium chloride in order to enhance its fluoride removal capacity. The magnesium incorporated bentonite (MB) was characterized by using XRD and SEM techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study and optimize various operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, effect of co-ions and initial fluoride concentration. It was observed that the MB works effectively over wide range of pH and showed a maximum fluoride removal capacity of 2.26 mg g-1 at an initial fluoride concentration of 5 mg L-1, which is much better than the unmodified bentonite. The experimental data fitted well into Langmuir adsorption isotherm and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Thermodynamic study suggests that fluoride adsorption on MB is reasonably spontaneous and an endothermic process. MB showed significantly high fluoride removal in synthetic water as compared to field water. Desorption study of MB suggest that almost all the loaded fluoride was desorbed (∼97%) using 1 M NaOH solution however maximum fluoride removal decreases from 95.47 to 73 (%) after regeneration. From the experimental results, it may be inferred that chemical modification enhances the fluoride removal efficiency of bentonite and it works as an effective adsorbent for defluoridation of water.

  8. Evaluation of the Efficiency of Clay Pots in Removal of Water Impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Naddafi , AH Mahvi, S Nasseri, M Mokhtari, H Zeraati

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, inexpensive technologies for drinking water supply in small communities are highly considered in developing countries. One of these technologies is the application of ceramic filters that are usually made of diatomaceous earth or clay soil. This research was carried out to determine the efficiency of clay pots (as a filter in removing water impurities. Pilot and the related clay parts were manufactured and its efficiency in removing TDS, hardness, NO3-, color and turbidity was measured by passing water through the clay pipes. The results showed that the clay filters had not the potential to remove hardness, EC, TDS and nitrate of water. However, they showed excellent efficiency in turbidity removal (≥ 90% and could significantly decrease the color of the water (≥ 60%.

  9. Improving the Hydraulic Performance of Stormwater Infiltration Systems in Clay Tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockhorn, Britta

    Many cities of the Northern Hemisphere are covered by low permeable clay tills, which pose a challenge for stormwater infiltration practices. However, clay tills are amongst the most heterogeneous types of sediments and hydraulic conductivities can vary by several orders of magnitude. This Ph......D study was initiated with the objective to test and evaluate if the hydraulic performance of stormwater infiltration systems can be significantly improved if the site-specific geological heterogeneity is incorporated into the design and siting of such systems. The assessment is based on different field...... investigations on two typical Danish clay till sites, and one modeling study with the integrated surface water and groundwater model HydroGeoSphere. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is the most critical soil physical parameter when it comes to sizing stormwater infiltration systems. In the first study...

  10. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, E.; Tuller, M.; Møldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    (average RMSE = 5.0%, ME = 2.4%) prediction of clay contents. However, the model for soils with small OC contents showed only minor improvement when compared with recently published models. Three main sources of prediction errors, namely large OC and silt contents, and a prevalence of 1:1 clay minerals......Soil texture, in particular the clay fraction, governs numerous environmental, agricultural and engineering soil processes. Traditional measurement methods for clay content are laborious and impractical for large-scale soil surveys. Consequently, clay prediction models that are based on water...... for estimating clay content from hygroscopic water at different relative humidity (RH) levels while considering hysteresis and organic matter content. Continuous adsorption/desorption vapour sorption isotherm loops were measured for 150 differently textured soils with a state-of-the-art vapour...

  11. Impact factors on the structuration and the rheological behavior of the clay-water system for smectite dispersions; Facteurs determinant l'organisation et la rheologie du systeme argile-eau pour des suspensions de smectites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, S

    2007-11-15

    Smectite are swelling clays widely used in industry. Their mechanical properties are unequal according to their mineralogical and physico-chemical characteristics. The aim of this study is to improve the knowledge of the interlayer cation impact on the structure built by the smectite-water system according to the concentration. Homo-ionic (Na{sup +} et Ca{sup 2+}) and bi-ionic systems are observed. This study cross checks mineralogical methods, physicochemical analysis and broad range of rheometric tests. At low concentration (less than 60 g/l) the calcium dispersions are shear thinning and few viscous due to the layer association in huge deformable flocks. The sodium smectite layers are dispersed; the dispersions are highly viscous. The lowest viscosity is detected for mix of 20 % of sodium smectite and 80 % of calcium smectite. At higher concentration (60 to 100 g/l), the yield stress and viscoelastic properties are studied by creep-recovery tests, oscillatory tests and imposed shear step. At the liquid state, the flow is first heterogeneous with a shear banding effect then homogeneous. The results make it possible to define the concentration area characteristic of each mechanical behavior (viscosity, shear thinning and yield stress) according to the saturation cation. The thixotropic properties are characterized with de-structuring-restructuring tests. Two kinetics are determined. Finally we realize a data base with 12 natural and industrial bentonite. The rheograms would be efficient to differentiate the natural calcium bentonite (Newtonian law), natural sodium bentonite (Herschel-Bulkley law) and activated calcium bentonite (Bingham law). (author)

  12. Brazilian clay organophilization aiming its use in oil / water removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clays when subjected to modification with the addition of organic surfactant are called organoclays acquire hydrophobic character, they have an affinity for organic compounds. The organoclays can be used as adsorbents are considered promising agents in environmental control. The objective is to prepare organoclays clays from commercial use in order to remove organic contaminants. The clay used was gray, as polycationic, supplied by Süd-Chemie company and the quaternary ammonium salt was cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (Cetremide). The fresh samples and organoclay were characterized by the technique of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Cation Exchange Capacity, testing expansion and affinity with organic compounds: Swelling of Foster and adsorption capacity. The results showed appropriate conditions organophilic process. Through XRD confirmed the increase in basal spacing for the modified clay in relation to the clay in nature. (author)

  13. Effect of Ionic Soil Stabilizers on Soil-Water Characteristic of Special Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The engineering properties of special clay are conventionally improved through the use of chemical additive such as ionic soil stabilizer (ISS). Such special clays are often referred to as stabilized or treated clays. The soil-water characteristic curves (SWCC) of special clays from Henan province and Hubei province were measured both in natural and stabilized conditions using the pressure plate apparatus in the suction range of 0-500 kPa. The SWCC results are used to interpret the special clays behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationships were developed between the basic clay and stabilized properties such as specific surface area and pore size distribution. The analysis showed that specific surface area decreases, cumulative pore volume and average pore size diameter decrease, dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. The research data and interpretation analysis presented here can be extended to understand the water film change behaviors influencing the mechanical and physical properties of stabilized special clay soils. KEY WORDS: ionic soil stabilizer, special clay, pore size diameter, specific surface area, soil water characteristic curve, water film

  14. Influence of ionic strength on the transport parameters of tritiated water and iodide in boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To fulfil its role as main barrier for High and Medium Level radioactive waste (HLW and MLW), Boom Clay relies on its advantageous capacity to minimise radionuclide transport by its slow diffusion and high retention properties. One of the key parameters in the radionuclide dispersion process is the diffusion accessible porosity (ηacc). Diffusion accessible porosity, is a transport parameter that is linked to the properties of each dispersing radionuclide and the geochemical conditions of Boom Clay. Disposing radioactive waste in Boom Clay will inevitably cause perturbations of which some can generate changes in the Boom Clay pore water chemistry. One effect of these chemical perturbations will be the increase of ionic strength of the pore water in the vicinity of a repository. This paper synthesises the results of the experimental work done to obtain the transport parameters of tritiated water and iodide for Boom Clay at different ionic strengths. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of natural clay Brasgel as adsorbent in removal of lead in synthetic waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The smectite clays have high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. Due to its chemical and physical characteristics, they can be effectively used as adsorbent of pollutants (such as metal ions). The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Brasgel through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method), seeking its use in removing lead (Pb2+) from synthetic effluents. System was used in finite bath to assess the potential removal of lead (Pb2+), following a 22 factorial experimental design with three center point experiments, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of lead (Pb2+). The clay has Brasgel clay in its composition that characterize it as a smectite clay. By having a large surface area, this clay showed great potential on the adsorption of metal ions. (author)

  16. Multi scale experimental study of water and ionic transport in porous charged media: clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clays are porous media of industrial interest. Due to their retention capacities and low permeability to water, they are the principal candidate for the conception of engineered barriers radioactive waste disposal. The main interest of this study is the experimental determination of the cationic and water dynamics in montmorillonite and fluoro-hectorite at low water contents This latter synthetic smectite has been used as a model clay to help the interpretation of the results issued from the first natural one. After a summary on the clayey system, this work reports the many experimental techniques (Atomic Force Microscopy, Photo-Correlation Spectroscopy, Micro-calorimetry, Powder Diffraction) used during the preliminary study concerning structural characterisation of the samples. The study of the sodic form of smectites with the use of a combination of quasi-elastic neutron scattering techniques (Time of Flight and Spin Echo) succeeded to water diffusion coefficients but also to a discernment of the limits of such techniques. Experiments with montmorillonite samples are in agreement with the simulations, so tending to a validation of the models. Experimental data obtained from synthetic hectorites will be in the near future compared to simulations In the last part, this work shows the application of Broad Band Dielectric Spectroscopy for the investigation of ionic dynamic in these porous media. Many models have been developed for the interpretation of the experimental raw data obtained with this technique. (author)

  17. Assessment of efficience of purification of chromic waster water with application of spondyle green clay

    OpenAIRE

    Франчук, Г. М.; Національний авіаційний університет; Бовсуновський, Є.О.; Національний авіаційний університет; Рябчевський, О.В.; Національний авіаційний університет

    2010-01-01

    Results of conducted experiments on spondyle green clay applying as a natural ecologically safe coagulant for waste water purification from Cr ions was presented. Optimal quantity of coagulant that provides the maximum level of purification was defined.

  18. Assessment of efficience of purification of chromic waster water with application of spondyle green clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г.М. Франчук

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Results of conducted experiments on spondyle green clay applying as a natural ecologically safe coagulant for waste water purification from Cr ions was presented. Optimal quantity of coagulant that provides the maximum level of purification was defined.

  19. Dielectric properties of clay-rock and their influence on water content measurement with TDR probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clays constitute major components for radioactive waste repositories managed by Andra. Water content monitoring is one of the indicators chosen to evaluate the health of the structure. In this perspective, several TDR probes have been installed in various structures, made of three types of clay materials: the bentonite, the clay-rock (Callovo-Oxfordian mud-stone) and the compacted crushed clay-rock. . The technique consists of a time-of-flight measurement of an electric pulse along the TDR probes. To convert flight time propagation delay into water content, calibrations are required. This conversion is however neither accurate, nor generalizable for other mixtures. For precise understanding and modeling of the sensing chain, a better knowledge the complex permittivity of clay materials is necessary. Chosen TDR sensing lines make use of a step electric pulse (such as Campbell TDR100). Considering the rise time of this system, the frequency content of the measured TDR wave form extends from about 20 kHz to roughly 1.5 GHz. Material dielectric must thus be characterized over a broad band frequency. The determination of the electromagnetic properties using non resonant method is fundamentally deduced from their impedance and the wave velocities in the materials. This kind of technique relies on a device able to direct the electromagnetic energy towards a material and to collect the reflected and transmitted parts. In a first step, we designed a transmission line to provide electromagnetic characterizations of clay material. The clay material under test is inserted into a brass coaxial cell specifically designed for our purposes. Two conical transition units surround the specimen holder. The electromagnetic properties of the sample are based on the reflection from the material and the transmission through the material measured by a vector network analyser (VNA). The determination of the electromagnetic properties from

  20. The ternary system U(VI) / humic acid / Opalinus Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The storage of nuclear waste in deep geological formations is discussed worldwide as the main strategy for nuclear waste management. To ensure the confinement of the nuclear waste, a multiple barrier system which consists of engineered, geo-engineered, and geological barriers will be applied. Thereby, in Germany the definition of the isolating rock zone represents an important safety function indicator. Clay rock is internationally investigated as potential host rock for a repository and repr...

  1. Soil-Water Characteristic Curves of Red Clay treated by Ionic Soil Stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship of red clay particle with water is an important factor to produce geological disaster and environmental damage. In order to reduce the role of adsorbed water of red clay in WuHan, Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) was used to treat the red clay. Soil Moisture Equipment made in U.S.A was used to measure soil-water characteristic curve of red clay both in natural and stabilized conditions in the suction range of 0-500kPa. The SWCC results were used to interpret the red clay behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationship were compared between the basic soil and stabilizer properties such as water content, dry density, liquid limit, plastic limit, moisture absorption rate and stabilizer dosages. The analysis showed that the particle density and specific surface area increase, the dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. After treatment with the ISS, the geological disasters caused by the adsorbed water of red clay can be effectively inhibited.

  2. Effect of Initial Water Content on Undrained Shear Behaviour of Reconstituted Clays

    OpenAIRE

    HONG, Zhenshun; Cui, Yu Jun; Gao, Yufeng; Zeng, Ling-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Isotropically consolidated undrained triaxial compression shear tests were performed on three reconstituted clays to investigate the effect of initial water content w 0 on undrained strength behaviour. The values of w 0 were adjusted within the range of 1·0–2·0 times the liquid limit. The predominant clay mineral is identified as illite for the considered clays, based on a semi-quantitative analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns. The laboratory tests show that the stress–strai...

  3. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis of the soil water characteristic (SWC) has been extensively studied for matric potentials between zero and −1.5 MPa. However, little information is available on how to quantify, evaluate, and identify the causes of hysteresis at potentials below −10 MPa where vapor sorption plays an...... important role. It is clear that modeling physical and biological soil processes is more accurate when SWC hysteresis is considered, particularly at low potentials where small differences in water content are associated with large changes in potential energy. The objectives of the presented study were to......: (i) evaluate and compare recently developed methods (MBET-n, Dh and SPN) for quantifying hysteresis in soils and pure clays, and (ii) investigate the role of organic matter (OM) and clay content and type on hysteresis. Five pure clays and two sets of soils with gradients in organic matter and clay...

  4. Coupled modelling (transport-reaction) of the fluid-clay interactions and their feed back on the physical properties of the bentonite engineered clay barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The originality of this work is to process feed back effects of mineralogical and chemical modifications of clays, in storage conditions, on their physical properties and therefore on their transport characteristics (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). These feed back effects are modelled using the KIRMAT code (Kinetic of Reaction and MAss Transfer) developed from the kinetic code KINDIS by adding the effect of water renewal in the mineral-solution reactive cells. KIRMAT resolves mass balance equations associated with mass transport together with the geochemical reactions in a 1D approach. After 100 000 years of simulated interaction at 100 C, with the fluid of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological level (COX) and with iron provided by the steel overpack corrosion, the montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed (into illite, chlorite, saponite...). Only outer parts of the modelled profile seem to be significantly affected by smectite dissolution processes, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. The modifications of physical properties show a closure of the porosity at the boundaries of the barrier, by creating a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion, essentially at the interface with the iron. Permeability laws applied to this system show a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity correlated with the porosity evolution. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier decreases. In the major part of the modelled profile, the engineered clay barrier system seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure) and functionalities. (author)

  5. Pore characteristics and their emergent effect on water adsorption and transport in clays using small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2013-12-01

    In nuclear waste management, clays are canonical materials in the construction of engineered barriers. They are also naturally occurring reactive minerals which play an important role in retention and colloidal facilitated reactive transport in subsurface systems. Knowledge of total and accessible porosity in clays is crucial in determining fluids transport behavior in clays. It will provide fundamental insight on the performance efficiency of specific clays as a barrier material and their role in regulating radionuclide transport in subsurface environments. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the change in pore characteristics of clays as function of moisture content, and to determine their pore character in relation to their water retention capacity. Recent developments in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques allow quantitative measurement of pore morphology and size distribution of various materials in their pristine state under various sample environments (exposure to solution, high temperature, and so on). Furthermore, due to dramatic different neutron scattering properties of hydrogen and deuterium, one can readily use contrast variation, which is the isotopic labeling with various ratios of H and D (e.g. mixture of H2O/D2O) to highlight or suppress features of the sample. This is particularly useful in the study of complex pore system such as clays. In this study, we have characterized the pore structures for a number of clays including clay minerals and field samples which are relevant to high-level waste systems under various sample environments (e.g., humidity, temperature and pressure) using SANS. Our results suggest that different clays show unique pore features under various sample environments. To distinguish between accessible/non-accessible pores and the nature of pore filling (e.g. the quantity of H2O adsorbed by clays, and the distribution of H2O in relation to pore character) to water, clays were exposed for

  6. Evaluation of a new ICP- AES instrument for Boom Clay waters Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) is the work-horse for routine analyses within our analytical chemistry laboratories. A new spectrometer was purchased and installed at the end of 2005 to replace an ageing model. This new instrument is the IRIS Intrepid II XDL from Thermo Electron, which was chosen after a thorough comparison of several models offered by various manufacturers.Due to different performance characteristics, compared to the old apparatus, a complete new validation was required.We validated the method for different sample types: reactor loop waters and Boom Clay pore waters (further referred to as Boom Clay waters). This report is confined to the latter, which constitutes a significant proportion of our routine analyses, and are samples from experiments performed within the framework of geological disposal and radio-active waste projects. Boom Clay water is derived either from piezometers installed in the HADES underground research facility or from the squeezing or leaching of clay cores. Water samples from radionuclide migration experiments within Boom Clay are also analysed.Validation is the process of demonstrating that the method is fit for the intended purpose. So in this case it means quantifying the performance parameters of the method used for analysing Boom Clay waters and verifying that the values obtained are acceptable.The validation results must be as representative as possible for the matrix under investigation, which was achieved by using the remainders of previously analysed Boom Clay waters. The possibility to perform a specific validation for this particular matrix and the ability to measure such radionuclide containing samples are just two of the advantages of having an analytical service within SCK-CEN

  7. A large-scale laboratory investigation into the movement of gas and water through clay barriers exposed to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a large scale laboratory investigation into the movements of gas and water through clay barriers exposed to the environment. The test beds, each 3m square were constructed and filled with clay to a depth of 400 mm, after compaction. One test bed contained London Clay, the other Glacial Till. The clays were subjected to accelerated environmental cycling and tests carried out on samples of the clays at appropriate intervals. The tests included measurements of the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the clays and their permeability to gas and water. Gas permeability emerged as the more appropriate for the clays being investigated. The report discusses the difficulties of measuring the permeability of partially saturated clays and the need to define the measuring techniques when specifying limiting acceptability values. 55 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs., 27 plates

  8. Investigation of isothermal water infiltration into fired clay brick by scattered neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method based on neutron scattering was proposed to investigate isothermal water infiltration in porous media. Two different kinds of fired clay bricks were investigated. While the sample absorb water, scattered neutrons from the different wetted regions, along the flow direction were continuously recorded. The results were discussed in terms of the theory of water infiltration in unsaturated porous media as well as by an anomalous diffusion approach. It was shown that the infiltration process in the Canadian clay brick (CCB) is Fickian and the water diffusivity was analytically determined, while it is non-Fickian in the Egyptian clay brick (ECB). The infiltration process in ECB can be modeled as a two stage Fickian process, at the low and high absorption times. The anomalous diffusion approach failed to describe the diffusion process in the ECB at all water contents. (author)

  9. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Warr, Laurence N.; André Friese; Florian Schwarz; Frieder Schauer; Portier, Ralph J.; Basirico, Laura M.; Gregory M. Olson

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contai...

  10. Integrated modelling of the glass-iron-clay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of integrated calculations on the near-field evolution in the VHLW/steel/bentonite/clay system. The calculations of the near-field evolution include different components: the vitrified waste packages, the steel container, the bentonite-based EBS (optional), the EDZ and the geological medium. Coupled reaction-transport (X-T) is used to simulate the corrosion of the steel canister and the glass alteration phase in presence of corrosion products (CPs), looking at mass transfer for chemical elements, especially iron and silica, pH, and porosity change. Calculations as performed give actual parameters for PA calculations: rate of glass alteration (through the calculated pH) as a function of time, extension of altered zone for iron-clay interactions with their own transport parameters, nature of CPs, effect on porosity distribution. According to the operational model currently used at the CEA and the calculations performed on the glass-iron-clay system, the alteration rate of glass and the evolution of the system strongly depend on the timing of CPs saturation with respect to silica sorption. The fate of silica which can be sorbed or precipitate is crucial to the lifetime of glass and to the overall evolution of the system. The other process that might influence the glass is the porosity decrease due to the precipitation of CPs and silica rich phases. However, it is difficult to assign a safety functions to clogging. It is scarcely observed in experiments, either because the conditions are not met for clogging or because the timescale of experiments does not allow for observable clogging. Moreover, the effect of mechanical stress in the NF has to be accounted for in the assessment of the effect of porosity changes. (author)

  11. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence N. Warr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98% of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  12. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:23864952

  13. Investigating the pore-water chemistry effects on the volume change behaviour of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Essen site has been chosen as an alternative site for nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. The soil formation involved at this site is the same as at Mol site: Boom clay. However, owing to its geographical situation closer to the sea, Boom clay at Essen presents a pore water salinity 4-5 times higher than Boom clay at Mol. This study aims at studying the effects of pore water salinity on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay. Specific odometer cells were used allowing 'flushing' the pore water in soil specimen by synthetic pore water or distilled water. The synthetic pore water used was prepared with the chemistry as that for the site water: 5.037 g/L for core Ess83 and 5.578 g/L for core Ess96. Mechanical loading was then carried out on the soil specimen after flushing. The results show that water salinity effect on the liquid limit is negligible. The saturation or pore water replacement under the in situ effective stress of 2.4 MPa does not induce significant volume change. For Ess83, hydro-mechanical behaviour was found to be slightly influenced by the water salinity; on the contrary, no obvious effect was identified on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Ess96. This can be attributed to the higher smectite content in Ess83 than in Ess96. (authors)

  14. Investigating the pore-water chemistry effects on the volume change behaviour of Boom clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. F.; Cui, Y. J.; Tang, A. M.; Nguyen, X. P.; Li, X. L.; Van Geet, M.

    The Essen site has been chosen as an alternative site for nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. The soil formation involved at this site is the same as at Mol site: Boom clay. However, owing to its geographical situation closer to the sea, Boom clay at Essen presents a pore water salinity 4-5 times higher than Boom clay at Mol. This study aims at studying the effects of pore water salinity on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay. Specific oedometer cells were used allowing “flushing” the pore water in soil specimen by synthetic pore water or distilled water. The synthetic pore water used was prepared with the chemistry as that for the site water: 5.037 g/L for core Ess83 and 5.578 g/L for core Ess96. Mechanical loading was then carried out on the soil specimen after flushing. The results show that water salinity effect on the liquid limit is negligible. The saturation or pore water replacement under the in situ effective stress of 2.4 MPa does not induce significant volume change. For Ess83, hydro-mechanical behaviour was found to be slightly influenced by the water salinity; on the contrary, no obvious effect was identified on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Ess96. This can be attributed to the higher smectite content in Ess83 than in Ess96.

  15. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  16. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  17. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  18. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  19. Alteration, adsorption and nucleation processes on clay-water interfaces: Mechanisms for the retention of uranium by altered clay surfaces on the nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Michael; Legrand, Christine A.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2015-03-01

    Nano-scale processes on the solid-water interface of clay minerals control the mobility of metals in the environment. These processes can occur in confined pore spaces of clay buffers and barriers as well as in contaminated sediments and involve a combination of alteration, adsorption and nucleation processes of multiple species and phases. This study characterizes nano-scale processes on the interface between clay minerals and uranyl-bearing solution near neutral pH. Samples of clay minerals with a contact pH of ∼6.7 are collected from a U mill and mine tailings at Key Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada. The tailings material contains Cu-, As-, Co-, Mo-, Ni-, Se-bearing polymetallic phases and has been deposited with a surplus of Ca(OH)2 and Na2CO3 slaked lime. Small volumes of mill-process solutions containing sulfuric acid and U are occasionally discharged onto the surface of the tailings and are neutralized after discharge by reactions with the slaked lime. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with the focused ion beam (FIB) technique and other analytical methods (SEM, XRD, XRF and ICP-OES) are used to characterize the chemical and mineralogical composition of phases within confined pore spaces of the clay minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite and in the surrounding tailings material. Alteration zones around the clay minerals are characterized by different generations of secondary silicates containing variable proportions of adsorbed uranyl- and arsenate-species and by the intergrowth of the silicates with the uranyl-minerals cuprosklodowskite, Cu[(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2](H2O)6 and metazeunerite, Cu[(UO2)(AsO4)2](H2O)8. The majority of alteration phases such as illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and vermiculite have been most likely formed in the sedimentary basin of the U-ore deposit and contain low amounts of Fe (10 at.%) formed most likely in the limed tailings at high contact pH (∼10.5) and their structure is characterized by a low degree of long

  20. Characterization of interstitial waters and ionic exchange in the clay formations through monitoring of drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay is a very complex material which has a great variability in its mineralogical composition and allows several kind of interactions with fluid environment. The investigations of clay formations are focussed on the reactivity of clay samples and the hydraulic properties of the formations. It is however difficult to describe the geochemical properties of the whole formation. This paper presents the experiments of chemical monitoring of drilling fluids which have been carried out in two wells in Ardeche (France) by the French BRGM (Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres) with the support of ANDRA. The basic principle of the method is the use of drilling fluids to obtain informations about the clay strata included in the Triassic formations of the Southeast basin of France. Drilling fluids constitute a loop from the surface down to the geological formation and back to the surface. The fluids interact with the formation which is crushed at the bottom of the hole and their chemical composition is modified. Since the well wall rapidly collapses, the rock-drilling fluids interaction is permanently renewed and real-time information is returned to the surface by the drilling fluids. In particular, it is possible to outline Ca-Mg exchange between the clay and the drilling fluid. This study shows that the interstitial waters of clay strata are mainly sea-water derived and have been modified by diagenesis reactions. (J.S.). 15 refs., 8 figs

  1. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  2. Modified Liu-Carter Compression Model for Natural Clays with Various Initial Water Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial water content has a significant effect on the compression behaviour of reconstituted clays. This effect has to be considered in the Liu-Carter model to ensure the addition voids ratio only related to soil structure. A modified Liu-Carter compression model is proposed by introducing the empirical equations for reconstituted clays at different initial water contents into the Liu-Carter model. The proposed model is verified against the experimental results from the literature. The simulations by the proposed method are also compared with that by old method where the influence of initial water content is not considered. The results show that the predicted virgin compression curves of natural clays are similar, but the values of b and Δey may be very different.

  3. Water-mineral interaction in hygromechanics of clays exposed to environmental loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water-mineral interaction in narrow interstices (<3 nm) in dense, saturated clays is discussed in view of recent experimental findings and molecular dynamics simulations. Consequences to the macroscopic behavior are considered. A mixture theory for two interacting constituents is developed. Effects of temperature and chemicals are discussed. A postulate of mass transfer of absorbed water from solid to fluid fraction caused by thermal or chemical load is then discussed. Theory of plasticity of clays affected by heat or chemicals is developed to deal with the effects of thermal and chemical consolidation

  4. Advances in Application of Natural Clay and Its Composites in Removal of Biological, Organic, and Inorganic Contaminants from Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural clays are abundantly available low-cost natural resource which is nontoxic to ecosystem. Over the recent years, research on the modification of clay to increase their adsorbent capacity to remove other contaminants from drinking water other than metals is in progress. This paper reviews the recent development of natural clays and their modified forms as adsorbing agents for treating drinking water and their sources. This paper describes the versatile nature of natural clay and their ability to adsorb variety of contaminants ranging from inorganic to emerging, which are present in the drinking water. The properties and modification of the natural clay and its significance in removing a specific type of contaminant are described. The adsorbing efficiency of the natural and modified clay in the purification of drinking water, when compared to existing technologies, materials, and methods was found to be significantly higher or comparable.

  5. Se behaviour in the Boom Clay system: spectroscopic evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Breynaert, Eric; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Maes, André

    2009-01-01

    In Belgium, the Boom Clay formation is studied as a reference host formation for the geological disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste for more than 30 years. This formation mainly consists of mixed clay minerals (illite, interstratified illite-smectite), pyrite and immobile and dissolved natural organic matter. Since it provides good sorption capacities, very low permeability, and chemically reducing conditions due to the presence of pyrite (FeS2), the Boom clay formation it...

  6. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part E - Equilibrium controls on chemistry of pore water from the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Equilibrium models of water-rock reactions in clay rocks are reviewed. → Analyses of pore waters of the Opalinus Clay from boreholes in the Mont Terri URL, Switzerland, are tabulated. → Results of modelling with various mineral controls are compared with the analyses. → Best agreement results with calcite, dolomite and siderite or daphnite saturation, Na-K-Ca-Mg exchange and/or kaolinite, illite, quartz and celestite saturation. → This approach allows calculation of the chemistry of pore water in clays too impermeable to yield water samples. - Abstract: The chemistry of pore water (particularly pH and ionic strength) is an important property of clay rocks being considered as host rocks for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Pore waters in clay-rich rocks generally cannot be sampled directly. Instead, their chemistry must be found using laboratory-measured properties of core samples and geochemical modelling. Many such measurements have been made on samples from the Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Several boreholes in that URL yielded water samples against which pore water models have been calibrated. Following a first synthesis report published in 2003, this paper presents the evolution of the modelling approaches developed within Mont Terri URL scientific programs through the last decade (1997-2009). Models are compared to the composition of waters sampled during dedicated borehole experiments. Reanalysis of the models, parameters and database enabled the principal shortcomings of the previous modelling efforts to be overcome. The inability to model the K concentrations correctly with the measured cation exchange properties was found to be due to the use of an inappropriate selectivity coefficient for Na-K exchange; the inability to reproduce the measured carbonate chemistry and pH of the pore waters using mineral-water reactions alone was corrected by considering clay mineral equilibria. Re

  7. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part E - Equilibrium controls on chemistry of pore water from the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, F.J., E-mail: fjpearson@gmail.com [Ground-Water Geochemistry, 5108 Trent Woods Dr., New Bern, NC 28562 (United States); Tournassat, Christophe; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Equilibrium models of water-rock reactions in clay rocks are reviewed. > Analyses of pore waters of the Opalinus Clay from boreholes in the Mont Terri URL, Switzerland, are tabulated. > Results of modelling with various mineral controls are compared with the analyses. > Best agreement results with calcite, dolomite and siderite or daphnite saturation, Na-K-Ca-Mg exchange and/or kaolinite, illite, quartz and celestite saturation. > This approach allows calculation of the chemistry of pore water in clays too impermeable to yield water samples. - Abstract: The chemistry of pore water (particularly pH and ionic strength) is an important property of clay rocks being considered as host rocks for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Pore waters in clay-rich rocks generally cannot be sampled directly. Instead, their chemistry must be found using laboratory-measured properties of core samples and geochemical modelling. Many such measurements have been made on samples from the Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Several boreholes in that URL yielded water samples against which pore water models have been calibrated. Following a first synthesis report published in 2003, this paper presents the evolution of the modelling approaches developed within Mont Terri URL scientific programs through the last decade (1997-2009). Models are compared to the composition of waters sampled during dedicated borehole experiments. Reanalysis of the models, parameters and database enabled the principal shortcomings of the previous modelling efforts to be overcome. The inability to model the K concentrations correctly with the measured cation exchange properties was found to be due to the use of an inappropriate selectivity coefficient for Na-K exchange; the inability to reproduce the measured carbonate chemistry and pH of the pore waters using mineral-water reactions alone was corrected by considering clay mineral equilibria. Re

  8. Effects of clay amendment on adsorption and desorption of copper in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, X.; Stagnitti, F.; Allinson, G.; Turoczy, N.; Li, P.; LeBlanc, M.; Cann, M.A.; Doerr, S.H.; Steenhuis, M.M.; Parlange, J.Y.; Rooij, de G.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an important micronutrient and trace amounts are essential for crop growth. However, high concentrations of copper will produce toxic effects. Australia is increasingly developing production of crops in water repellent soils. Clay amendment, a common amelioration techniques used in Austral

  9. Water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the coolant chemistry and its consequences for 1300 MWsub(e) KWU PWR plants. Some selected systems, i.e. primary heat transport system, steam water cycle and cooling water arrangements, are chosen for this description. Various aspects of coolant chemistry regarding general corrosion, selective types of corrosion and deposits on heat transfer surfaces have been discussed. The water supply systems necessary to fulfill the requirements of the coolant chemistry are discussed as well. It has been concluded that a good operating performance can only be achieved when - beside other factors - the water chemistry has been given sufficient consideration. (orig./RW)

  10. Water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the coolant chemistry and its consequences for 1300 MWsub(e) KWU PWR plants. Some selected systems, i.e. primary heat transport system, steam water cycle and cooling water arrangements, are chosen for this description. Various aspects of coolant chemistry regarding general corrosion, selective types of corrosion and deposits on heat transfer surface have been discussed. The water supply systems necessary to fulfill the requirements of the coolant chemistry are discussed as well. It has been concluded that a good operating performance can only be achieved when - beside other factors - the water chemistry has been given sufficient consideration. (orig./RW)

  11. Kinetic modeling of interactions between iron, clay and water: Comparison with data from batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Modeling the batch experiments investigating the interactions between iron, clay and water at 90 °C. • The reaction pathways are accurately reproduced by the geochemical code KINDIS: • (1) The formation of Fe-rich silicates and the absence of magnetite. • (2) The pH in the system is stabilized around 7 by the dominant mineral, i.e. calcite. • Corrosion rate and kinetic data associated with quartz and illite play an important role. - Abstract: It has been proposed that a carbon steel overpack is used as part of the engineered barrier system for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes developed by Andra. The direct contact of the iron with the geological environment creates potential physical and chemical changes in the near field environment of the repository. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the mineralogical/chemical evolution caused by the interactions of iron with clay is necessary to the assessment of the performance of the geological disposal. Geochemical models have been developed (using the code KINDIS) to simulate batch experiments on iron–claystone interactions. The experiments included iron power and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) claystone that were reacted at temperature of 90 °C for 90 days. The overall objective of this modeling work aims at an enhanced mechanistic understanding of clay–iron interactions observed in experimental studies and possible implications for engineered barrier performance. The experimental observations were successfully reproduced by the model regarding geochemical evolution and mineralogical transformations. For example, the stability of pH around 7 and total dissolved carbon in the aqueous solution, which are controlled by saturation state of carbonates in the system, are predicted accurately. In addition, the model predicts that during the interactions between iron and clays greenalite, chukanovite, and saponite form as the main secondary minerals. Moreover, the destabilization of some

  12. The interaction between Synroc-C and pure water or Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated the interaction between Synroc-C and deionized water or Boom clay disposal media. The authors used powdered Synroc-C to achieve high SA/V (surface area to volume) conditions (100, 1,000, 10,000 m-1). The temperature was 90 C. Reaction progress up to 10-+6 days/m was reached. They conclude that dissolution in DW is mainly controlled by initial ion exchange, followed by matrix dissolution. In both Boom clay media (a 500 g/l and a 2,000 g/l clay/claywater mixture) matrix dissolution is dominating. The depletion depth of the main Synroc constituent Ti is below 250 mn in the clay media, and below 2 nm in DW after 110 days corrosion at 100 m-1. The corrosion rates are very small, though the authors cannot present meaningful values. The effect of Boom clay is mainly to increase the solubility of Ti, Zr and the rare earths in solution

  13. Multi-scale modeling of the behaviour of water and ions clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predicting the fate of radioactive waste stored in a clay formation requires a good understanding of the transport properties of water and ions in clays. Their diffusion in this charged porous medium is described by empirical parameters such as their partitioning coefficient Kd which accounts for the interactions with the mineral surfaces. The present work deals with the relevance of this concept and its definition based on microscopic grounds. We have first modeled the ionic contribution to the dielectric properties of clays and suggested an experimental determination of Kd from dielectric spectroscopy measurements. Using microscopic simulations (Monte-Carlo and Molecular Dynamics), we then have computed the Gibbs free energy and enthalpy for ionic exchange in the case of alkaline cations. They control the value of Kd and its evolution with the temperature. The results for cesium are in good agreement with both microcalorimetric measurements and the determination of Kd at different temperatures. We have participated in the development of a new lattice simulation method (Lattice Fokker-Planck), which we have then used to link explicitly the microscopic dynamics of ions to the diffusion-reaction model underlying the definition of Kd. Finally, we have used Molecular Dynamics to investigate the kinetics of exchange of water and ions between clay particles (interlayer) and the extra-particle porosity. The results confirm the generally admitted idea that water and ions can explore the whole porosity, whereas anions are excluded from the interlayers. (author)

  14. Porosity, pore structure and binding state of water in opalinus clay, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow and transport properties of an argillaceous rock are largely determined by its microstructure, that is by the spatial arrangement of solids and pore water. Our goal was to characterise the pore structure of Opalinus Clay and to derive parameters relevant for solute transport, such as porosity, mobility of the pore water, and accessibility of the pore water for a given tracer. Opalinus Clay is a moderately consolidated argillaceous formation of middle Jurassic age and occurs throughout northern Switzerland and southern Germany. Maximum burial (ca. 1650 m b.g. at the Benken site in NE Switzerland) was reached during the Miocene; since then, about 1000 m were eroded. The pore space is largely unaffected by diagenetic cementation, with the exception of sandy/calcareous laminae that are strongly cemented by calcite. (authors)

  15. Refinements of water parameters for molecular dynamics: Simulations of adsorption at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, L.; Yu, C.; Teppen, B.J.;

    1999-01-01

    In the context of a long-term program involving molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption phenomena at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface, we are testing the viability of combining a force field that we developed specificially for clays with other, independently derived potential...... parameters for molecular species which are important in clay adsorption. For the current study the importance of variations in the potential parameters of water were investigated and polarization effects on oxygen studied as a function of intermolecular interactions. For this purpose ab initio MP2/6-311GG...... hydrated clays is described....

  16. Radionuclide transport in the Neogene aquifer system located in the environment of the Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework the Belgian research program on the long term management of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste coordinated by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Boom Clay is considered as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in NE-Belgium (Campine area). In the frame of the performance assessments of a disposal system located in the Boom Clay Formation, the transport of radionuclides diffusing through the clay barrier into the aquifers located above is modelled. The transport model for the Neogene aquifer is based on a series of groundwater flow models simulating the aquifer systems in the surroundings of the Boom Clay. This series of groundwater models include the regional north-eastern Belgium model simulating flow both above and below the Boom Clay, the recently updated deep-aquifer pumping model, simulating transient flow in the over-exploited aquifers below the Boom Clay and finally the catchment-scale Neogene aquifer model, simulating flow in the aquifer system above the Boom Clay. The Neogene aquifer system consists of two main aquifers. The Pliocene aquifer is located at the top, separated from the underlying Miocene aquifer by the Kasterlee Clay aquitard. The Miocene aquifer consists of three hydrostratigraphic units: the Diest, Berchem and Voort Formations; with the last two having a lower hydraulic conductivity than the Diest unit. The transport model for the Neogene aquifer represents a fraction of the catchment-scale Neogene aquifer model. It stretches from the local divide between the Grote and Kleine Nete Rivers up to the Kleine Nete River, representing the main model sink. The boundary conditions and the sources/sinks in the Pliocene aquifer are defined mostly by the surface water features, such as the rivers, brooks, lakes and canals. In the partially confined Miocene aquifer, the effect of the surface water features is dampened and the heads at the model

  17. Hydrogen peroxide formation and decay in γ-irradiated clay water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of the radiolytic formation and disappearance of hydrogen peroxide in aerated clay water was studied. The yield of H2O2 formation in clay water in an air atmosphere is equal to 0.25 μmol J-1. When initially present in the solution, hydrogen peroxide disappears with a yield dependent upon the concentration and the dose rate. In both cases a steady state is reached dependent on the dose rate. In order to define more precisely the role of OH free radicals in this process, the reaction of these free radicals in clay water was studied by pulse radiolysis. As expected, OH is scavenged by different solutes, therefore, it cannot react with hydrogen peroxide. A kinetic scheme based upon these results is proposed. Using a minimal equation set (nine equations), it is possible to simulate the [H2O2] evolution with a very good accuracy, for doses going up to 20,000 Gy. It is also demonstrated that the reaction of H2 with OH does not occur in such conditions, which is consistent with the accumulation of dihydrogen during the radiolysis of ground water. (author)

  18. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Brake, B.; M. J. van der Ploeg; Rooij, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil) by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geo...

  19. Simulation Of Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination For Remediation Of Tce In A Fractured Clay System: A New Model Approach And Application To Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Christiansen, Camilla Maymann; Broholm, Mette Martina; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Binning, Philip John

    2010-01-01

    An innovative model is developed for Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD) of chlorinated solvents in a fractured glacial till. The model consists of three components: hydraulics, transport and degradation. The hydraulic component calculates the flow of water through a fractured clay till with...... interspersed sand lenses and stringers. The transport model couples diffusion dominated transport in the clay matrix, with advective‐dispersive transport in the fractures and higher permeability sand lenses. The reactive model calculates sequential reductive dechlorination of TCE (trichloroethylene) to its...... model results. The spatial extent of remediation and downstream impact of the technology is evaluated. Perspectives for enhanced bioremediation technologies in fractured clay systems are discussed....

  20. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    Science.gov (United States)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  1. Effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and EGME vapors on montmorillonite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Rutherford, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) vapors on montmorillonite have been studied on SAz-1 and SWy-1 source clays, each exchanged respectively with Ca, Na, K, Cs and tetramethylammonium (TMA) cations. The corresponding lattice expansions were also determined, and the corresponding N2 adsorption data were provided for comparison. For clays exchanged with cations of low hydrating powers (such as K, Cs and TMA), water shows a notably lower uptake than does N2 at low relative pressures (P/P0). By contrast, EGME shows higher uptakes than N2 on all exchanged clays at all P/P0. The anomaly for water is attributed to its relatively low attraction for siloxane surfaces of montmorillonite because of its high cohesive energy density. In addition to solvating cations and expanding interlayers, water and EGME vapors condense into small clay pores and interlayer voids created by interlayer expansion. The initial (dry) interlayer separation varies more significantly with cation type than with layer charge; the water-saturated interlayer separation varies more with cation type than the EGME-saturated interlayer separation. Because of the differences in surface adsorption and interlayer expansion for water and EGME, no general correspondence is found between the isotherms of water and EGME on exchanged clays, nor is a simple relation observed between the overall uptake of either vapor and the cation solvating power. The excess interlayer capacities of water and of EGME that result from lattice expansion of the exchanged clays are estimated by correcting for amounts of vapor adsorption on planar clay surfaces and of vapor condensation into intrinsic clay pores. The resulting data follow more closely the relative solvating powers of the exchanged cations.

  2. Considering Organic Carbon for Improved Predictions of Clay Content from Water Vapor Sorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per; Karup Jensen, Dan; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2014-01-01

    Accurate determination of the soil clay fraction (CF) is of crucial importance for characterization of numerous environmental, agricultural, and engineering processes. Because traditional methods for measurement of the CF are laborious and susceptible to errors, regression models relating the CF to...... carbon (OC) content and propose a modification to improve prediction accuracy. Evaluation of the CF prediction accuracy for 29 soils with clay contents ranging from 6 to 25% and with OC contents from 2.0 to 8.4% showed that the models worked reasonably well for all soils when the OC content was below 2...... water vapor sorption isotherms that can be rapidly measured with a fully automated vapor sorption analyzer are a viable alternative. In this presentation we evaluate the performance of recently developed regression models based on comparison with standard CF measurements for soils with high organic...

  3. Water dynamics in hectorite clays: Influence of temperature studied by coupling neutron spin echo and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the wider context of water behavior in soils, and with a particular emphasis on clays surrounding underground radioactive waste packages, we present here the translational dynamics of water in clays in low hydrated states as studied by coupling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments by neutron spin echo (NSE). A natural montmorillonite clay of interest is modeled by a synthetic clay which allows us to understand the determining parameters from MD simulations by comparison with the experimental values.We focus on temperatures between 300 and 350 K, i.e., the range relevant to the highlighted application. The activation energy Ea experimentally determined is 6.6 kJ/mol higher than that for bulk water. Simulations are in good agreement with experiments for the relevant set of conditions, and they give more insight into the origin of the observed dynamics. (authors)

  4. The ARCHIMEDE-ARGILE project: acquisition and regulation of the water chemistry in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first aim of the CEC/ANDRA project known as ARCHIMEDE-ARGILE is to gain an understanding on the mechanisms of acquisition and regulation of the water chemistry in a clay environment. This step is essential for predicting both the behaviour and the migration in solution of artificial elements which are initially absent in clay formation. The second aim is to assess sampling methodology and data collection techniques for key physico-chemical parameters (pH, Eh, pCO2, CEC, alkalinity...) which are the basis of the geochemical modelling of the behaviour of natural and artificial radioelements. Six drill holes have been performed in 1992 in the sliding ribs gallery in the Underground Research Facility (URF) at Mol. The study has demonstrated the importance of in situ measurements for key parameters that cannot be rigorously evaluated otherwise: redox, pH, pCO2. Fluid geochemistry can realistically be modelled using equilibrium models, in which cation exchange must be taken into account. Bacterial studies have revealed the importance of human activity on the microbial equilibrium of the formation. This paper presents the main results obtained during the first two years of the project with emphasis on determination of the hydrochemical characteristics of the Boom clay. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Adsorption of phenthoate and acetochlor from water by clays and organoclays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Min; XIE Xiao-mei

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption of phenthoate and acetochlor onto kaolin, montmorillonite, bentonite clays and respective organoclays prepared by the exchange of quaternary ammonium as tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide(TTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide(DTAB), and cetylpyridinium chloride(CPC) were studied. The adsorption equilibrium data points were fitted to Freundlich isotherm equations. The adsorption of phenthoate and acetochlor were significantly enhanced by surfactant treatment of the clays. The amount of both pesticides adsorbed per unit mass of organoclay followed the order of TTA-kaolin TTA(C14)-montmorillonite > DTA(C12)-montmorillonite. Phenthoate is adsorbed to greater extent than acetochlor by each adsorbent, which may be due to the higher hydrophobicity of phenthoate, indicating considerable hydrophobic interaction between adsorbent/adsorbate systems.

  6. Organic waste treatment with organically modified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of organically modified clays in hazardous waste management applications offers a significant new and untapped potential. These clays may be used in the stabilization of organic wastes and organically contaminated soils, for waste water treatment, for oil spill control, for liner systems beneath fuel oil storage tanks, and as a component within liner systems of hazardous waste storage treatment and disposal facilities. Organically modified clays (organophilic clays) may be employed in each of these systems to adsorb organic waste constituents, enhancing the performance of the applications

  7. Study of adsorption of zinc in clay smectite type Bofe in system of finite bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clays are demonstrably excellent adsorbents, both for their physical and chemical characteristics and the wide coverage and low cost. Among the various groups of clay minerals, the smectite are noted for having large surface areas. The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Bofe through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET). To evaluate the adsorption of metal ions zinc (synthetic sewage), we used a system in finite bath, following a factorial design 22, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of zinc (Zn2 +) and output variables: percentage removal and removal capacity. The characterization results showed that Bofe clay belongs to the family of smectite and therefore has great potential for adsorption. (author)

  8. Irrigation with saline-sodic water: effects on two clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Cucci; Giovanni Lacolla

    2013-01-01

    The results of a 4-year experiment aimed at evaluating the effect of irrigation with saline-sodic water on the soil are reported. The research was carried out at the Campus of the Agricultural Faculty of Bari University (Italy) on 2 clay soils (Bologna – T1 and Locorotondo – T2). The soils were cropped to borlotto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), capsicum (Capsicum annuum L.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), wheat (Triticum durum Desf) grown in succession; the crops were irrigated with 9 salin...

  9. Nitrate concentrations in drainage water in marine clay areas : exploratory research of the causes of increased nitrate concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Boekel, van, M.A.J.S.; Roelsma, J.; Massop, H.T.L.; R. F. A. Hendriks; Goedhart, P.W.; Jansen, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    The nitrate concentrations measured in drainage water and groundwater at LMM farms (farms participating in the National Manure Policy Effects Measurement Network (LLM)) in marine clay areas have decreased with 50% since the mid-nineties. The nitrate concentrations in marine clay areas are on average below 50 mg/L EU target value. A geographical analysis of the monitoring results shows, however, that the nitrate concentrations in 22% of the measurements, mainly taken in the south-western and c...

  10. The Use of Converter Slag (Magnetite and Bentonite Clay for Amoxicillin Adsorption from Polluted Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maichin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of pharmaceuticals compounds in the aquatic environment has attracted much interest from the academic community, since these compounds are potential endocrine disrupters and persist in the environment causing irreversible damage to the ecosystem. In Brazil little research has been conducted to measure, treat and remove β-lactam antibiotics such as amoxicillin present in surface water. Thus, the development and implementation of new treatment method which allow the removal or reduction of these compounds in surface waters are need. This study, focus on the development of low cost adsorbent material composed by steel manufacture converter slag (magnetite and bentonite clay to adsorb and remove amoxicillin (amox from water under laboratory conditions. To demonstrate the favorable aspects, the study was performed by experimental calculations of thermodynamics, kinetic and empirical model. The obtained results were similar with others found in literature which indicate the steel industry residue -magnetite and bentonite clay can be use to remove amoxicillin, with approximately 50% of removal percentage.

  11. Removal of organic pollutants in model water and thermal wastewater using clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Emese; Vajda, Krisztina; Veréb, Gábor; Dombi, András; Mogyorósi, Károly; Ábrahám, Imre; Májer, Marcell

    2011-01-01

    Water treatment method was developed for the removal of different anionic dyes such as methyl orange and indigo carmine, and also for thymol applying sodium bentonite and cationic surfactant - hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) - or polyelectrolytes (polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride, poly-DADMAC and poly-amines). The removal efficiency of these model substrates was examined in model water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, HPLC and TOC analysis. The clay mineral and HTAB were added in one step to the polluted model water in Jar-test experiments. The influence of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the applied clay mineral and the presence of polyaluminium chloride coagulant (BOPAC) were also tested for the water treatment process. The structures of the in situ produced and pre-prepared organoclay composites were compared by XRD analysis. The rapid formation of organoclay adsorbents provided very efficient removal of the dyes (65-90 % in 3-10 mg/L TOC(0) range) with 200 mg/L sodium bentonite dose, however thymol was less efficiently separated. Adsorption efficiencies of the composites were compared at different levels of ion exchange such as at 40, 60 and 100 %. In the case of thymol, the elimination of inorganic carbon from the model water before the TOC analysis resulted in some loss of the analysed volatile compound therefore the HPLC analysis was found to be the most suitable tool for the evaluation of the process. This one-step adsorption method using in situ formed organoclay was better performing than the conventional process in which the montmorillonite-surfactant composite is pre-preapared and subsequently added to the polluted water. The purification performance of this method was also evaluated on raw and artificially polluted thermal wastewater samples containing added thymol. PMID:21929471

  12. Adsorption of cobalt ions from waste water on activated Saudi clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jlil, Saad A.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to remove the Cobalt ions from wastewater by three types of Saudi clay. These were collected from Tabbuk city (Tabbuk clay), Khiber city (Khiber clay), and Bahhah city (Bahhah clay). The paper also examined the effect of different activators on the enhancement of adsorption capacity of clays for cobalt ions. The results showed minor enhancement in the adsorption capacities of cobalt ions on three types of clays activated by acid treatment. The adsorption capacity of clays improved particularly for Tabbuk clay when treated with hydrogen peroxide as an activator. The adsorption capacity increased from 3.94 to 12.9 mg/g for the untreated and treated Tabbuk clay, respectively. Also, the adsorption capacity of Bahhah clay increased by activating with sodium chloride from 3.44 to 12.55 mg/g for untreated and treated sample, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data were correlated using five equilibrium equations, namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, BET, and Toth isotherm equations. Langmuir isotherm agreed well with the experimental data of Khiber and Bahhah clay, while Freundlich model and Langmuir-Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk and Bahhah clay activated by NaCl. The results showed that Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk clay when activated by H2O2 and H2SO4. Finally, the BET model did not describe the experimental data well for the three types of clay after activation.

  13. Simulation of water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a heavy clay soil using the MACRO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Besien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dual-porosity MACRO model has been used to investigate methods of reducing leaching of isoproturon from a structured heavy clay soil. The MACRO model was applied to a pesticide leaching data-set generated from a plot scale experiment on a heavy clay soil at the Oxford University Farm, Wytham, England. The field drain was found to be the most important outflow from the plot in terms of pesticide removal. Therefore, this modelling exercise concentrated on simulating field drain flow. With calibration of field-saturated and micropore saturated hydraulic conductivity, the drain flow hydrographs were simulated during extended periods of above average rainfall, with both the hydrograph shape and peak flows agreeing well. Over the whole field season, the observed drain flow water budget was well simulated. However, the first and second drain flow events after pesticide application were not simulated satisfactorily. This is believed to be due to a poor simulation of evapotranspiration during a period of low rainfall around the pesticide application day. Apart from an initial rapid drop in the observed isoproturon soil residue, the model simulated isoproturon residues during the 100 days after pesticide application reasonably well. Finally, the calibrated model was used to show that changes in agricultural practice (deep ploughing, creating fine consolidated seed beds and organic matter applications could potentially reduce pesticide leaching to surface waters by up to 60%.

  14. Content and distribution of fluorine in rock, clay and water in fluorosis area Zhaotong, Yunnan Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, K.; Li, H.; Feng, F. (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2007-04-15

    About 160 samples of coal, pyritic coal balls, coal seam gangue, clay, corn, capsicum and drinking water were collected from the endemic fluorosis area of Zhenxiong and Weixin county, China to determine the fluorine content, distribution pattern and source in this fluorosis area. The study shows that the average fluorine content in the coal samples collected from 3 coal mines of the Late Permian coals in Zhenxiong and Weixin county, Zhaotong City, which are the main mining coals there, is 77.13 mg/kg. The average fluorine content coals collected form thee typical fluorosis villages in 72.56 mg/kg. Both of them are close to the world average and little low than the Chinese average. The fluorine content of drinking water is lower than 0.35 mg/L, the clay used as an additive for coal-burning and as a binfer in briquette-making by local residents has a high content of fluorine, ranging from 367-2,435 mg/kg, with the majority higher than 600 mg/kg and an average of 1,084.2 mg/kg. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  16. Oxygen Isotope Fractionation Effects in Soil Water via Cations Adsorbed to High-CEC Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerter, E.; Finstad, K.; Schaefer, J.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Dawson, T. E.; Amundson, R.

    2012-12-01

    In isotope-based approaches to hydrology, soil and sediment are implicitly considered to be an inert matrix in which water resides or moves. Yet, this assumption is inconsistent with the fact that soils contain a wide range of solutes, and highly variable concentrations of chemically reactive clay particles, all of which may react with bulk water and create pools of energetically differing water with varying isotope compositions. The empirical basis of this hypothesis is the work of Sofer and Gat (1972, EPSL, 15(3)), who showed that the formation of hydration spheres around cations in aqueous solutions fractionate oxygen isotopes of water in ways that appear to be dependent on the cation's ionic potential and concentration. Because soil solutions commonly have high solid to fluid ratios, the potential for solids to create substantial pools of low free energy water, with corresponding isotope fractionation of the free and low energy waters, may be a common process. The potential for this to create measurable isotopic effects would be most evident in soils with high Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). In order to test this hypothesis, montmorillonite (CEC ≈ 100 meq/100g), kaolinite (CEC≈10) and quartz (CEC≈0) mineral powders were saturated with 3M MgCl2 and KCl solutions (separately), rinsed with methanol and dried to saturate all available CEC sites with either Mg or K cations. Triplicate sets of monominerallic-deionized water mixtures were created at 5, 25, 50, 75 and 95% gravimetric water content. Each set of samples was then subjected to one of three water extraction techniques designed to access specific "pools" of soil water: (1) direct equilibration with CO2 to sample the soil's "free water", i.e. water not adsorbed to cations via hydration spheres; (2) centrifugation to simulate permanent wilting point conditions, thereby yielding most micro-pore, macro-pore, and free water; and (3) cryogenic vacuum distillation to recover all the soil water (free, pore and

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Confined Water and CO2 in Clays under Supercritical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezakou, V.; Lee, M.; Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Davidson, C.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) driven enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted fractured shale gas reservoirs has the potential for producing economic benefits and providing long term storage options for anthropogenic derived CO2 emissions. However key scientific processes related to CO2:CH4 exchange rates, mineral volume changes, organic mobility, and mineral stability in the presence of acid gas injections are not well understood. In this paper, we conduct atomistic simulations to examine interactions occurring between model clay minerals and supercritical CO2 equilibrated with water or brines to identify parameters controlling adsorption and desorption of gases. Integrated within these simulations are results derived from a set of newly developed experimental techniques designed to characterize physico-chemical reactions at reservoir conditions. In a series of cell optimizations under pressures relevant to sequestration scenarios, molecular simulations within the NVT and NPT ensembles with varying water/CO2 ratios showed a range of interlayer expansion for specific cation-saturated smectites. In conjunction with experimental in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD), semi-quantitative concentrations of interlayer H2O and CO2 were established. For example, Ca saturated smectites maintaining sub-single to single hydration states (CO2. In contrast, for single to double hydration states (1W-2W), the simulations indicate formation of a quasi-single, metastable state, leading to a reduced interlayer spacing. Partial dehydration of the interlayer spacing while in contact with CO2 is due to a reduction of the interlayer cation coordination number. Structural analysis of the intercalated species shows an increase in the hydrogen bonding between waters during CO2 intercalation coincident with a decrease in the coordination population around the cations. Power spectra reveal rotationally constrained CO2 molecules over the silica layer of the Ca-smectite surface due to the

  18. Water uptake by a clay bulkhead installed in the tunnel sealing experiment at Atomic Energy of Canada's underground research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A.; Martino, J.B.; Chandler, N.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., AECL, Pinawa, MB (Canada); Sugita, Y. [Japan Nuclear Cycle, Development Institute, JNC, Tokai (Japan); Vignal, B. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2003-07-01

    A major international experiment, demonstrating technologies for tunnel sealing at full-scale, is being conducted at Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) with participation by organizations from Canada, Japan, France and the U.S.A. Two bulkheads, one composed of high performance concrete and the other of highly compacted sand-bentonite material, have been constructed in a tunnel in unfractured granitic rock at the URL. The results from the Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) are being used to characterize the performance of the two bulkheads under applied hydraulic pressures. The chamber between the two bulkheads has been pressurized to 4 MPa, a value representative of the natural hydrostatic heads at the 420 m depth below the ground surface. Instrumentation has been installed throughout the clay bulkhead to monitor stress development, bulkhead strain, moisture conditions, temperature, and water transport through this clay-based barrier. Construction was completed in 1998 October, and the sand-filled chamber between the clay and concrete bulkheads was filled and pressurized with water. Full pressure of 4 MPa was achieved in 2001 September and by 2002 June nearly complete saturation of the clay bulkhead was indicated. The rapid rate of saturation of the bulkhead (<5 years) is attributed initial large-flow events that caused a full perimeter water supply and allowed input of a considerable volume of water into the core of the bulkhead. Seepage through the clay bulkhead has been measured to be approximately 1.1 L/day under a 4 MPa pressure gradient across the 3.5 x 4.4 x 2.7 m length bulkhead. The majority of the seepage appears to be via the lower density outer perimeter of the bulkhead. Tracer tests have been completed which allow for assessment of flow times and pathways within the clay bulkhead. On achieving essentially full saturation, Phase 1 of the TSX was completed. A second phase of this experiment has recently (2002 June) begun with the

  19. NOM removal from drinking water by chitosan coagulation and filtration through lightweight expanded clay aggregate filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikebrokk, B.; Saltnes, T. [SINTEF, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Water & Wastewater, Applied Chemistry

    2002-09-01

    Recent innovations in Norway regarding coagulation-contact filtration for the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) include chitosan as a natural and biodegradable coagulant, and filter media based on lightweight expanded clay aggregates (Filtralite). The main advantages associated with chitosan are: reduced solids production compared with conventional coagulants; and treatment and disposal of natural, biodegradable sludge, which does not contain metal hydroxides from metal-based coagulants. Filtralite can be produced with an inverse relationship between grain size thus allowing an approximation to the ideal situation of decreasing grain size and density, in the direction of flow. Traditionally, this important property of a filter bed is utilised in up-flow filters, or in dual or multimedia down-flow filters with combinations of two or more filter media. This paper presents experimental results from pilot-scale treatment of NOM-containing raw waters using chitosan for coagulation and expanded clay aggregates as filter media. A dual media anthracite-sand filter and alum coagulant was used as a reference for comparison with conventional process configurations.

  20. Study of smectite clays of the city Pedra Lavrada - PB for use in water-based drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraiba has large reserves of bentonite clays, with the largest deposits in Boa Vista, PB. Recently new deposits were discovered in the cities of Cubati and Pedra Lavrada-PB, creating great expectations for further expansion of reserves for industrial production. The aim of this work is the study of smectite clays from the city of Pedra Lavrada, PB for use in drilling fluids water based. The characterization was made by the diffraction of laser (AG), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), chemical composition by X-ray fluorescence (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), exchange capacity of cations (ECC) and surface area (SA). The results obtained so far showed that the samples presented at its mineral composition smectite, kaolinite and quartz. In relation to rheological properties showed that the bentonite clay sample Dark presents promising features for use in water based drilling fluids. (author)

  1. Synthesis and characterization of a PbO2-clay nanocomposite: Removal of lead from water using montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The replacement of Na by Pb in the interlayer space of the smectite leads to a decrease in the intensity of the the (0 0 1) reflection as the concentration of lead nitrate increases. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading probably to the exfoliation of the caly. In addition, the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities is significantly influenced. This leads to a lowering of the water content and a decrease in the ionic conductivity of the clay. Highlights: ► In the clay, Pb replaces Na ions and a significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed. ► Pb influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the clay with regard to its dehydration. ► In the interlayer space, the exchange of Na by Pb leads to a decrease in the protonic conductivity. ► A PbO2-clay nanocomposite material with good conductivity is synthesized. -- Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained with Pb(II) sorption on an Algerian Clay. The experiments were carried out using a batch process. Powder X-rays diffraction patterns (PXRD) prove that in the montmorillonite Pb replaces Na ions. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading to the disappearance of the d001 reflection of the clay at high concentrations of lead. The replacement of hydrated Na with Pb ions influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities with a lowering of the water content. A PbO2-clay composite material with good electrical conductivity is synthesized.

  2. Microwave-Assisted Preparation of Biodegradable Water Absorbent Polyacrylonitrile/Montmorillonite Clay Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prafulla K. Sahoo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile (PAN/Montmorillonite (MMT clay nanocomposite was prepared in a microwave oven using a transition metal Co(III complex taking ammonium persulfate (APS as initiator with a motive of converting hydrophobic PAN into hydrophilic nanocomposite material via nanotechnology by the inclusion of MMT to the virgin polymer. UV-visible spectral analysis revealed various interactions between the developed complex with other reaction components. The formation of the PAN/MMT nanocomposites was characterized by FTIR. Furthermore, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, the composite so obtained was found to have nano-order. XRD and TEM were suggesting that montmorillonite layers were exfoliated during the polymerization process. An increasing in the thermal stability for the developed nanocomposite was recorded by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The water absorption and biodegradation properties were carried out for its ecofriendly nature and better commercialization.

  3. Underground openings in clay formations - Technical requirements on drifting technology and support systems for underground openings and their impact on retreat systems for the installation of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Several countries are currently investigating the possibility of long-term storage of nuclear waste in clay formations, with a special focus on mud-stone formations. During the last decades extensive research has been conducted on the suitability of mud-stone as repository and the related special requirements of the clay matrix - with significant success. The knowledge base on the behaviour of the host formations during the mining phase of the excavations on the other hand is relatively limited compared to that of other investigated host rock formations, e.g. salt. With the low value of mud-stone and its relatively limited industrial application range, there have not been any large scale commercial underground mining activities in recent years to provide a significant and independent database on the behaviour of the selected mud-stone formations or their geological analogue during mining activities. Most information currently used for the assessment of this type of sediment and the planning of the mining activities has been gathered either during the execution of logistics and tunneling projects or during the excavation of today's underground laboratories. There is, however, a database on a vast variety of clay deposit types and morphologies available from commercial underground clay mining activities worldwide. The data available on commercial clay mining shows significant differences for each and every technological stage of clay mining as compared to the stages of any other mining operation. This is, amongst other things, due to the high and partly extreme ductility and creeping properties of typical clay formations, especially when considering their sensitiveness to a changing water content. In general the technical and technological differences include the applicable mining technology for the excavation of underground openings, the need for an advancement of any available technology to waterless variants as

  4. Irrigation with saline-sodic water: effects on two clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of a 4-year experiment aimed at evaluating the effect of irrigation with saline-sodic water on the soil are reported. The research was carried out at the Campus of the Agricultural Faculty of Bari University (Italy on 2 clay soils (Bologna – T1 and Locorotondo – T2. The soils were cropped to borlotto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., capsicum (Capsicum annuum L., sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., wheat (Triticum durum Desf grown in succession; the crops were irrigated with 9 saline-sodic types of water and subjected to two different leaching fractions (10% and 20% of the watering volume. The 9 solutions were obtained dissolving in de-ionised water weighted amounts of sodium chloride (NaCl and calcium chloride (CaCl2, deriving from the combination of 3 saline concentrations and 3 sodicity levels. The crops were irrigated whenever the water lost by evapotranspiration from the soil contained in the pots was equal to 30% of the soil maximum available water. The results showed that, though the soils were leached during the watering period, they showed a high salt accumulation. Consequently, the saturated soil extract electrical conductivity increased from initial values of 0.65 and 0.68 dS m-1 to 11.24 and 13.61 dS m-1 at the end of the experiment, for the soils T1 and T2, respectively. The saline concentration increase in irrigation water caused in both soils a progressive increase in exchangeable sodium, and a decrease in exchangeable calcium and non-significant variations in exchangeable potassium (K and magnesium (Mg.

  5. Treatment with coated layer double hydroxide clays decreases the toxicity of copper-contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Deanne; Nar, Mangesh; D'Souza, Nandika Anne; Glenn, J Brad; Klaine, Stephen J; Roberts, Aaron P

    2014-05-01

    Copper is a common pollutant found in watersheds that exerts toxic effects on both invertebrates and vertebrates. Layer double hydroxide (LDH) clays are able to adsorb a wide range of contaminants through ion-exchange mechanisms. Coating LDH clays with various materials alters the aggregation of clay particles into the nano-size range, thus increasing relative surface area and offering great potential for contaminant remediation. The goal of this study was to determine if treatment with coated LDH clays decreases the toxicity of copper-containing solutions to Daphnia magna. Four LDH clays with different coatings used to alter hydrophobicity were as follows: used: Na(+) montmorillonite, Zn-Al LDH-nitrate, Zn-Al LDH-stearate, and Zn-Al LDH-carbonate. It was determined that coated LDH clays decreased copper toxicity by decreasing bioavailability and that smaller aggregate sizes decreased bioavailability the most. 96 h LC50 values increased by as much as 4.2 times with the treatment of the solutions with 100 mg/L LDH clay. Copper analysis of the clay and solutions indicated that the clays work by decreasing copper bioavailability by way of a binding mechanism. Coated LDH clays hold promise as a small-scale remediation tool or as an innovative tool for toxicity identification and evaluation characterization of metals. PMID:24442186

  6. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  7. Evidence and characteristics of a diverse and metabolically active microbial community in deep subsurface clay borehole water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Boven, Patrick; Leys, Natalie

    2013-12-01

    The Boom Clay in Belgium is investigated in the context of geological nuclear waste disposal, making use of the High Activity Disposal Experimental Site (HADES) underground research facility. This facility, located in the Boom Clay at a depth of 225 m below the surface, offers a unique access to a microbial community in an environment, of which all geological and geochemical characteristics are being thoroughly studied. This study presents the first elaborate description of a microbial community in water samples retrieved from a Boom Clay piezometer (borehole water). Using an integrated approach of microscopy, metagenomics, activity screening and cultivation, the presence and activity of this community are disclosed. Despite the presumed low-energy environment, microscopy and molecular analyses show a large bacterial diversity and richness, tending to correlate positively with the organic matter content of the environment. Among 10 borehole water samples, a core bacterial community comprising seven bacterial phyla is defined, including both aerobic and anaerobic genera with a range of metabolic preferences. In addition, a corresponding large fraction of this community is found cultivable and active. In conclusion, this study shows the possibility of a microbial community of relative complexity to persist in subsurface Boom Clay borehole water. PMID:23802615

  8. Adsorption potential of bentonite and attapulgite clays applied for the desalination of sea water

    OpenAIRE

    Nel, Monica; Waanders, Frans B.; Fosso-Kankeu, Elvis

    2014-01-01

    A possible new process for the partial desalination of seawater is to use bentonite clay or attapulgite as an adsorbent. The ion exchange property of these clays, which is a result of the characteristic t-o-t layer structure, enables the use of these materials as adsorbents. This technique has the opportunity to be used as a pre-treatment as current commercial seawater desalination processes are very expensive. The clay was characterized using XRD, XRF and SEM analyses. ...

  9. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. te Brake

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geometry factor was applied. The relative overestimation made by assuming constant isotropic shrinkage in the linear (basic shrinkage phase was 26.4% (17.5 mm for the actively shrinking layer between 0 and 60 cm. Aggregate-scale water storage and volume change revealed a linear relation for layers ≥ 30 cm depth. The range of basic shrinkage in the bulk soil was limited by delayed drying of deep soil layers, and maximum water loss in the structural shrinkage phase was 40% of total water loss in the 0–60 cm layer, and over 60% in deeper layers. In the dry period, fitted slopes of the ΔV–ΔW relationship ranged from 0.41 to 0.56 (EC-5 and 0.42 to 0.55 (CS616. Under a dynamic drying and wetting regime, slopes ranged from 0.21 to 0.38 (EC-5 and 0.22 to 0.36 (CS616. Alternating shrinkage and incomplete swelling resulted in limited volume change relative to water storage change. The slope of the ΔV–ΔW relationship depended on the drying regime, measurement scale and combined effect of different soil layers. Therefore, solely relying on surface level elevation changes to infer soil water storage changes will lead to large underestimations. Recent and future developments might provide a basis for application of shrinkage relations to field situations, but in situ observations will be required to do so.

  10. Microbial analyses of clay and water from different samples from the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (RL), Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Exploration of deep subsurface microbial life has increased for very diverse motives. One of them is that these environments are potential host rocks for radioactive waste repositories and that microorganisms may influence geochemical conditions around such sites and migration properties of radionuclides. The pore water Chemistry experiment (PC) was conducted at the Mont Terri-RL to measure in situ the pH, Eh, and other geochemical parameters within the pore water of the Opalinus Clay formation. The borehole for PC was drilled with N2 under clean but not aseptic conditions, filled immediately with synthetic pore water, which was circulated and monitored for five years. Soon after initiation of PC it was evident that microbial activity affected the borehole water geochemistry. Microbial analyses, including molecular biology and culturing methods, were performed repeatedly during PC (2003-2006), with detailed analysis of water and over-core clay upon termination in 2007. Results indicated the presence of heterotrophic aerobes and anaerobes, nitrate-reducers, iron-reducers, sulphate-reducers and Archaea, which together with geochemical data suggested a reducing environment with sulphate reduction in the water and adjacent clay. A black precipitate containing pyrite and a strong H2S smell confirmed the occurrence of sulphate reduction. Specific species identified (> 98% similarity) in PC water included Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus licheniformis, and Desulfosporosinus sp., with similar and additional species (e.g., Trichococcus sp.; Koccuria sp.) in the clay. The origin of these (mostly anaerobic) species cannot be determined with certainty. Some species likely resulted from contamination, but others could be revived species indigenous in the Opalinus Clay. The microbial processes that occurred in PC are not representative of the processes in the undisturbed formation but illustrate the potential for microbial

  11. Modelling the opalinus clay response in the heating experiment. Rock damage and pore water pressure generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heating Experiment (HE) was designed to examine the response of Opalinus Clay against a radial heating pulse generated in a single vertical borehole. A highly compacted bentonite ring, located around the centered heater introduced also a strong radial pressure on the borehole wall when it became saturated. Some monitoring instruments, such as temperature sensors, piezometers and inclinometers located in boreholes perforated around the heating borehole provided data on the rock reaction against the heating action and the buffer swelling. The experiment involve three main stages: Test buffer emplacement and bentonite hydration, a heating period and a cooling period. Four and a half years of the monitoring records are available. Opalinus shale is a brittle rock which is damaged by mechanical and environmental actions (suction cycles). It has been simulated by means of an elastoplastic constitutive model which introduces a degradation mechanism as irreversible deformations accumulate. Model parameters where adjusted by means of the back-analysis of available triaxial test data. The determination of hydraulic parameters of the rock was based on water retention and permeability tests performed at the UPC Geotechnical Laboratory. The analysis has provided a complete THM response of the rock. Of particular interest was the comparison of pore water pressure development and dissipation during the heating and cooling stages. The actual pore water pressure evolution depends on the rate of temperature change, the rock porosity, the dilation coefficient of water and rock skeleton and the stiffness and permeability of the rock. It was found that the pore water response was captured reasonably well by the model using the basic parameters determined for the rock. However, some material parameters, and in particular, the rock permeability have a strong influence on the results. A sensibility analysis performed shows the role of the different parameters on pore water pressure

  12. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Bore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  13. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  14. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  15. Diffusion and electromigration in clay bricks influenced by differences in the pore system resulting from firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2012-01-01

    effective diffusion coefficient was empirically determined for chloride and sodium through the application of an electric DC field across the bricks. The lowest effective diffusion coefficient was found for the dark colored brick, increasing for the medium and bright colored respectively. This finding...... pore system to contribute to an overall understanding of ion transport in porous materials.The pore system in bricks are influenced by the firing degree, clay mixture composition and ion content. The present paper focuses on the pore system and effects from clay mixture composition and ion content were...... neglected by using the same brick type from the same brickwork (delivered at the same pallet). The used bricks were fired in a circular kiln were uneven heating during firing occurs. Significant color differences were visible between the bricks in the pallet and for the investigation purpose they were...

  16. Preparation of Waterborne Coatings Containing Water Swellable Clay and Its Characteristics of the Printed-paper Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk Kee [Department of Industrial Chemistry (Korea); Kim, Myung Chul [College of General Education, Kyungil University, Kyungsan (Korea); Lee, Byung Kyo [Department of Inorganic Materials Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Four different composition of waterborne coating (WBC) were prepared by compounding of bentonite and synthetic hectorite (SHEC), a water swellable clay, with acrylic latex and coating additives. The rheological properties of WBC and the properties of the films casted by WBC were measured. The physical properties of the film surface of WBC on a printed paper were also investigated. WBC-3 and WBC-4 containing SHEC showed the phase transition of sol and gel with the shear rate, the thixotropic property, and accordingly, the dispersion and storage stability increased. The initial decomposition temperature and the transmittance of WBC films, which contained the water swellable clay, increased in range of 32.2 {approx} 54.7 degree C, and this was 5.9 {approx} 7.4% more than the commercial MC-21W. The domain size of water swellable clay in the WBC films decreased in the order of WBC-4 > WBC-3 > WBC-2. The water-resistance and the adhesion force of the film on the coated paper increased in the following order: MC-21W < WBC-4 < WBC-3 < WBC-2 < WBC-1, and MC-21W < WBC-2 {<=} WBC-4 = WBC-3 {<=} WBC-1, respectively. From these results, WBC-4, a WBC on the printed paper, containing 8 phr SHEC showed the maximum physical property excluding the water-resistance characteristics. 14 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Polymer/clay systems: affect of temperature and shear rate on intercalation/exfoliation state

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peprníček, T.; Měřínská, D.; Šimoník, J.; Zatloukal, M.; Pleštil, Josef; Pavlova, E. N.

    Prague: Consortium for Research of Nanostructured and Crosslinked Polymeric Materials, 2005. s. 62-63. [Workshop Nanofun-Poly on Chemistry, Processing Structure, Properties and Applications of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites, Life-Cycle Engineering, Gender Issues /3./. 11.11.2005-12.11.2005, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer/clay systems * nanocomposites Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  18. Application of molecular orbital calculation for evaluating binding force of water molecules sorbed on surface of 2:1 type clay mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate the bonding force subjecting on the water molecule sorbed on the surface of 2:1 type clay mineral by using semi-empirical molecular orbital calculation, and compare it with the binding forces of solid and liquid phases of water. We can consider that molecular orbital calculation is a useful and helpful tool for characterizing the properties of water molecules present in the clay minerals. (author)

  19. Water Retention and Structure Stability in Smectitic or Kaolinitic Loam and Clay Soils Affected by Polyacrylamide Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Amirakh; Levy, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Studying the effects of polyacrylamide (PAM) on soil aggregate and structure stability is important in developing effective soil and water conservation practices and in sustaining soil and water quality. Five concentrations of an anionic PAM (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg L-1) with a high molecular weight were tested on loam and clay soils having either a predominant smectitic or kaolinitic clay mineralogy. The effects of the PAM and of soil texture on soil water retention at near saturation and on aggregate and structure stability were investigated using the high energy moisture characteristic (HEMC) method. The S-shaped water retention curves obtained by the HEMC method were characterized by the modified van Genuchten (1980) model that provided: (i) the model parameters α and n, which represent the location of the inflection point and the steepness of the water retention curve, respectively; and (ii) the soil structure index, SI =VDP/MS, where VDP is the volume of drainable pores, an indicator of the quantity of water released by a soil over the range of applied suctions (0-5 J kg-1), and MS is the modal suction representing the most frequent pore sizes (> 60 μm). In general, the treatments tested (clay mineralogy, soil type and PAM concentration) resulted in: (i) a considerable modification of the shape of the water retention curves as indicated by the changes in the α and n values; and; (ii) substantial effects on the stability indices and other model parameters. The contribution of PAM concentration to soil structure stability depended on the clay mineralogy, being more effective in the smectitic soils than in the kaolinitic ones. Although kaolinitic soils are usually more stable than smectitic soils, when the latter were treated with PAM (25-200 mg L-1) the opposite trend was observed. In the loam soils, increasing the PAM concentration notably decreased the differences between values of the stability indices of the smectitic and kaolinitic samples. The

  20. Outline of models of water and gas flow through smectite clay buffers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructure analyses of natural clays with hydrous mica or smectite as major clay mineral have demonstrated that there are large variations in pore size, and that a few wide pores may be responsible for the great majority of the permeation. A similar behavior may be valid also for 'artificially' produced smectite clays which are formed from powdered Na bentonite. A model is derived for such clays in which the powder grains are regarded as anisotropic aggregates which swell on wetting and form a network with pores that are successively filled with a clay gel that emanates from the aggregates. The density and hydraulic conductivity of the gel is a function of the pore size and distribution as well as of the porewater chemistry. Applying the model to three 'reference' clay types of different bulk density, it is shown that realistic data for the hydraulic and gas conductivities as well as for the ratio of the anion and cation diffusion capacities are arrived at. The model is therefore taken as a basis for further development. (orig./HP)

  1. General corrosion of Ti in hot water and water saturated bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium has been proposed as one of the candidates for canister materials for storing spent nuclear fuel in the Swedish bed-rock. The deposition milieu was simulated on a laboratory scale by embedding titanium in compacted bentonite and the general corrosion rate was investigated. More fundamental studies were also performed where titanium was exposed to water in which special attention was paid to the NaCl content and oxygen content. In reaction cells designed according to high vacuum principles it was possible to reduce the oxygen content to very low values. The exposure time ranged between 1 min. and 6 months. Analysis of the corrosion products was performed mainly with ESCA. In water at 95 degrees C the oxide growth follows a direct logarithmic law: y equals 8.7 + 3.65 ln t. Oxygen and salt do not influence the rate of the oxide growth significantly. The general corrosion rate is approximately the same as the oxide growth rate since the dissolution of Ti into the water-solution is very low. The oxide consists of an outer layer of TiO2 and a few atomic layers of suboxide close to the oxide/metal interface. Transmission electron microscopy studies of the water-formed oxides indicate that these are amorphous. The oxides formed on Ti exposed in bentonite is 70-100 Aa thick for exposure times ranging between 4 months and 2 years. It is shown, that montmorillonite - the main constituent in bentonite - is absorbed in the TiO2 formed on these samples. If it is assumed that a logarithmic growth law is valid even for long-term exposure in bentonite, the growth law which will give the highest growth rate is y equals 5.5 ln t. An oxide thickness of 160 Aa is obtained if this law is extrapolated to 100.000 years exposure. (Author)

  2. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  3. Multi scale experimental study of water and ionic transport in porous charged media: clays; Etude experimentale multiechelle du transport ionique et aqueux en milieu poreux charge: argiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadene, A

    2005-10-15

    Clays are porous media of industrial interest. Due to their retention capacities and low permeability to water, they are the principal candidate for the conception of engineered barriers radioactive waste disposal. The main interest of this study is the experimental determination of the cationic and water dynamics in montmorillonite and fluoro-hectorite at low water contents This latter synthetic smectite has been used as a model clay to help the interpretation of the results issued from the first natural one. After a summary on the clayey system, this work reports the many experimental techniques (Atomic Force Microscopy, Photo-Correlation Spectroscopy, Micro-calorimetry, Powder Diffraction) used during the preliminary study concerning structural characterisation of the samples. The study of the sodic form of smectites with the use of a combination of quasi-elastic neutron scattering techniques (Time of Flight and Spin Echo) succeeded to water diffusion coefficients but also to a discernment of the limits of such techniques. Experiments with montmorillonite samples are in agreement with the simulations, so tending to a validation of the models. Experimental data obtained from synthetic hectorites will be in the near future compared to simulations In the last part, this work shows the application of Broad Band Dielectric Spectroscopy for the investigation of ionic dynamic in these porous media. Many models have been developed for the interpretation of the experimental raw data obtained with this technique. (author)

  4. Assessment of the combined effects of temperature increase, water convection, migration of radionuclides, and radiolysis on the safety of nuclear waste repository in the Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a potential repository in the Boom clay formation at 220 m beneath the nuclear research center at Mol, Belgium, extensive temperature calculations have been done for several repository configurations. Taking into account, near field and far field temperature limitations, an acceptable heat load of 2.5 w/m2, and a cooling time of 50 years prior to disposal, have been derived. Hydrological phenomena in the water tables surrounding the Boom clay layer have been studied by installing a piezometric observation network over a surface of 2500 km2. A mathematical model has been developed to tern and the water transfer through the low impermeability clay layer. Verification of these results has been attempted by dating of the groundwaters and the interstitial clay water. A unidirectional analytical model has been developed that takes into account radioactive decay and water convection by a pressure gradient and assumes concentration equilibrium between the mobile and the stagnant fraction of the liquid phase

  5. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consum

  6. Salinity control in a clay soil beneath an orchard irrigated with treated waste water in the presence of a high water table: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, David; Laufer, Asher; Bardhan, Gopali; Levy, Guy J.

    2015-12-01

    A citrus orchard planted on a structured, clay soil associated with a high water table, irrigated by drip irrigation system using treated waste water (TWW) and local well water (LWW) was considered here. The scope of the present study was to analyze transport of mixed-ion, interacting salts in a combined vadose zone-groundwater flow system focusing on the following issues: (i) long-term effects of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system, identifying the main factors (e.g., soil salinity, soil sodicity) that control these effects, and (ii) salinity control aiming at improving both crop productivity and groundwater quality. To pursue this two-fold goal, 3-D numerical simulations of field-scale flow and transport were performed for an extended period of time, considering realistic features of the soil, water table, crop, weather and irrigation, and the coupling between the flow and the transport through the dependence of the soil hydraulic functions, K(ψ) and θ(ψ), on soil solution concentration C, and sodium adsorption ratio, SAR. Results of the analyses suggest that in the case studied, the long-term effect of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system is attributed to the enhanced salinity of the TWW, and not to the increase in soil sodicity. The latter findings are attributed to: (i) the negative effect of soil salinity on water uptake, and the tradeoff between water uptake and drainage flux, and, concurrently, solute discharge below the root zone; and, (ii) the tradeoff between the effects of C and SAR on K(ψ) and θ(ψ). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that a data-driven protocol for soil salinity control, based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water, guided by the soil solution salinity at the centroid of the soil volume active in water uptake, may lead to a substantial increase in crop yield, and to a substantial decrease in the salinity load in the groundwater.

  7. Performance assessment of geological isolation systems for radioactive waste. Disposal in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the PAGIS project of the CEC Research Programme on radioactive waste, performance assessment studies have been undertaken on the geological disposal of vitrified high-level waste in clay layers at a reference site at Mol (B) and a variant site at Harwell (UK). The calculations performed for the reference site shown that most radionuclides decay to negligible levels within the first meters of the clay barrier. The maximum dose rates arising from the geological disposal of HLW, as evaluated by the deterministic approach are about 10-11 Sv/y for river pathways. If the sinking of a water well into the 150 m deep aquifer layer in the vicinity of the repository is considered together with a climatic change, the maximum calculated dose rate rises to a value of 3.10-7 Sv/y. The calculated maxima arise between 1 million and 15 million years after disposal. The maximum dose rates evaluated by stochastic calculations are about one order of magnitude higher due to the considerable uncertainties in the model parameters. In the case of the Boom clay the estimated consequences of a fault scenario are of the same order of magnitude as the results obtained for the normal evolution scenario. The maximum risk is estimated from stochastic calculations to be about 4.10-8 per year. For the variant site the case of the normal evolution scenario has been evaluated. The maximum dose rates calculated deterministically are about 1.10-6 Sv/y for river pathways and 6.10-5 Sv/y for a water well pathways; these doses would occur after about 1 million years. This document is one of a set of 5 reports covering a relevant project of the European Community on a nuclear safety subject having very wide interest. The five volumes are: the summary (EUR 11775-EN), the clay (EUR 11776-EN), the granite (EUR 11777-FR), the salt (EUR 11778-EN) and the sub-seabed (EUR 11779-EN)

  8. Dynamics of water and ions in clays of type montmorillonite by microscopic simulation and quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montmorillonite clays in low hydration states, with Na+ and Cs+ compensating counter ions, are investigated by a combination of microscopic simulation and quasi-elastic neutron scattering to obtain information on the local structure and dynamics of water and ions in the interlayer. At first predictions of simulation into the dynamics of water and ions at elevate temperatures are shown (0 deg C 80 deg C, pertinent for the radioactive waste disposal scenario) Marked difference is observed between the modes of diffusion of the Na+ and C+ counter ions. In water dynamics, a significant step towards bulk water behaviour is seen on transition from the mono- to bilayer states. Secondly, a detailed comparison between simulation and quasi-elastic neutron scattering (Neutron Spin Echo and Time-of-Flight) regarding ambient temperature water dynamics is presented. Overall, the approaches are found to be in good agreement with each other and limitations of each of the methods are clearly shown. (author)

  9. Gas migration through bentonitic engineered barrier systems and through non-indurated clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This extended abstract summarises briefly the main conclusions and perspectives of the research work carried out in the frame of gas migration from a radioactive waste disposal through bentonitic engineered barrier systems (EBS) and non-indurated natural clay formations. After a description of the most important experimental results and the conceptual model evolution, we will focus on the safety relevant issues and the way the gas migration through such media is currently treated in performance assessment for different types of waste. Finally, the remaining open questions will be addressed at the end of this paper. Further insights are provided in the EC/NEA status report. (authors)

  10. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium...... have been tested successfully. At a natural water content of w=40-45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k...

  11. Water and clay based drilling fluids: rheologic, filtration and lubricity behavior; Fluidos hidroargilosos: comportamento reologico, de filtracao e lubricidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Luciana V.; Pereira, Melquesedek S.; Ferreira, Heber C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work is to provide continuity for UFCG studies presenting results of rheological, filtration and the lubricity behaviors obtained with fluids prepared with bentonite clays from Paraiba, in binary compositions, after treatment with lubricants agents. It was selected two samples of bentonite clays and four lubricants (Lub 1, Lub 2, Lub 3 and Lub 4). The results showed that: depending on the composition, the drilling fluids presented bingham and pseudo plastic rheological behaviors, and with the additives bingham behavior; among the rheological and filtration properties evaluated, the apparent viscosity, yield limiting and the water loss are the have changes with the addition of lubricants; the values of the lubricity coefficient (LC) of fluids without additives were next of 0.50, independent of the composition of the bentonite clay mixture; after addition of the lubricants, the LC of fluids reduced for values next to 0,11, independent of its concentration and lubricants the best-performing are the Lub 2 and Lub 4. (author)

  12. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  13. River water quality of the River Cherwell: an agricultural clay-dominated catchment in the upper Thames Basin, southeastern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Hill, Linda; Wickham, Heather

    2006-05-01

    The water quality of the River Cherwell and a tributary of it, the Ray, are described in terms of point and diffuse sources of pollution, for this rural area of the upper Thames Basin. Point sources of pollution dominate at the critical ecological low flow periods of high biological activity. Although the surface geology is predominantly clay, base flow is partly supplied from springs in underlying carbonate-bearing strata, which influences the water quality particularly with regards to calcium and alkalinity. The hydrogeochemistry of the river is outlined and the overall importance of urban point sources even in what would normally be considered to be rural catchments is stressed in relation to the European Unions Water Framework Directive. Issues of phosphorus stripping at sewage treatment works are also considered: such stripping on the Cherwell has reduced phosphorus concentrations by about a factor of two, but this is insufficient for the needs of the Water Framework Directive. PMID:16253306

  14. Efficiency of advanced wastewater treatment plant system and laboratory-scale micelle-clay filtration for the removal of ibuprofen residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Samer; Al-Rimawi, Fuad; Khamis, Mustafa; Zimmerman, Dikla; Shuali, Uri; Nir, Shlomo; Scrano, Laura; Bufo, Sabino A; Karaman, Rafik

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of Al-Quds Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP), which includes sequential elements as activated sludge, ultrafiltration, activated carbon column and reverse osmosis, to remove spiked ibuprofen, a non steroid anti inflammatory drug (NSAID), was investigated. Kinetic studies in pure water and in the activated sludge indicated that the drug was stable during one month of observation. Besides, the overall performance of the integrated plant showed complete removal of ibuprofen from wastewater. Activated carbon column, which was the last element in the sequence before the reverse osmosis system, yielded 95.7% removal of ibuprofen. Batch adsorptions of the drug by using either activated charcoal or composite micelle-clay system were determined at 25°C and well described by Langmuir isotherms. Octadecyltrimethylammonium (ODTMA) bromide and montmorillonite were used to prepare the micelle-clay adsorbent, for which the adsorption kinetics are much faster than activated charcoal. Results suggest that integrating clay-micelle complex filters within the existing WWTP may be promising in improving removal efficiency of the NSAID. PMID:23688232

  15. Sustainable Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklas Scholz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable water systems often comprise complex combinations of traditional and new system components that mimic natural processes. These green systems aim to protect public health and safety, and restore natural and human landscapes. Green infrastructure elements such as most sustainable drainage systems trap storm water but may contaminate groundwater. There is a need to summarize recent trends in sustainable water systems management in a focused document. The aim of this special issue is therefore to disseminate and share scientific findings on novel sustainable water systems addressing recent problems and opportunities. This special issue focuses on the following key topics: climate change adaptation and vulnerability assessment of water resources systems; holistic water management; carbon credits; potable water savings; sustainable water technologies; nutrient management; holistic storm water reuse; water and wastewater infrastructure planning; ecological status of watercourses defined by the Water Framework Directive. The combined knowledge output advances the understanding of sustainable water, wastewater and storm water systems in the developed and developing world. The research highlights the need for integrated decision-support frameworks addressing the impact of climate change on local and national water resources management strategies involving all relevant stakeholders at all levels.

  16. Use of Clay Deposits in Water Management of Calcareous Sandy Soils Under-surface and Sub-surface Drip Irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of irrigation (levels and methods) and type of clay deposits on lettuce yield, water use efficiency WUE and the distributions of soil moisture and salts in the root zone of sandy calcareous soils. A field experiment was conducted at the college experimental station in 2002-2003. It consists of three clay deposits, three rates (0, 1.0 and 2.0%), and four total irrigation applied water levels, 360 mm (T1), 520 mm (T2), 635 mm (T3) and 822 mm (T4), using surface and subsurface drip irrigation. Results indicated that yield was significantly increased with the increase of irrigation level, whereas WUE significantly decreased with increase of irrigation level. The average yield increased by 9.30% in a high irrigation level compared to a moderate irrigation level, and decreased by 14.2% at the more stressed irrigation level. WUE decreased by 49.0% at a moderate irrigation level and yield was significantly affected by amendment rates. The difference between surface and subsurface drip on yields and WUE were also significant. Results indicated that the moisture content of the subsurface treated layer increased dramatically, while salts were accumulated at the surface and away from the emitters in subsurface drip irrigation. The advantages of surface drip irrigation were related to the relative decrease in salt accumulation in the root zone area where the plant roots were active and the water content was relatively high. (author)

  17. Sustainable Water Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Miklas Scholz

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable water systems often comprise complex combinations of traditional and new system components that mimic natural processes. These green systems aim to protect public health and safety, and restore natural and human landscapes. Green infrastructure elements such as most sustainable drainage systems trap storm water but may contaminate groundwater. There is a need to summarize recent trends in sustainable water systems management in a focused document. The aim of this special issue is ...

  18. Ground-water quality and its relation to hydrogeology, land use, and surface-water quality in the Red Clay Creek basin, Piedmont Physiographic Province, Pennsylvania and Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    The Red Clay Creek Basin in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Pennsylvania and Delaware is a 54-square-mile area underlain by a structurally complex assemblage of fractured metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks that form a water-table aquifer. Ground-water-flow systems generally are local, and ground water discharges to streams. Both ground water and surface water in the basin are used for drinking-water supply. Ground-water quality and the relation between ground-water quality and hydrogeologic and land-use factors were assessed in 1993 in bedrock aquifers of the basin. A total of 82 wells were sampled from July to November 1993 using a stratified random sampling scheme that included 8 hydrogeologic and 4 land-use categories to distribute the samples evenly over the area of the basin. The eight hydrogeologic units were determined by formation or lithology. The land-use categories were (1) forested, open, and undeveloped; (2) agricultural; (3) residential; and (4) industrial and commercial. Well-water samples were analyzed for major and minor ions, nutrients, volatile organic compounds (VOC's), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCB's), and radon-222. Concentrations of some constituents exceeded maximum contaminant levels (MCL) or secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Concentrations of nitrate were greater than the MCL of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as nitrogen (N) in water from 11 (13 percent) of 82 wells sampled; the maximum concentration was 38 mg/L as N. Water from only 1 of 82 wells sampled contained VOC's or pesticides that exceeded a MCL; water from that well contained 3 mg/L chlordane and 1 mg/L of PCB's. Constituents or properties of well-water samples that exceeded SMCL's included iron, manganese, dissolved solids, pH, and corrosivity. Water from 70 (85 percent) of the 82 wells sampled contained radon-222 activities greater than the proposed MCL of

  19. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  20. Static and dynamic filtrations of different clay, electrolytes, polymer systems; Filtrations statiques et dynamiques de differents systemes argile, electrolytes, polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.

    1996-04-16

    Filtration properties of model drilling fluids composed of water, clays, electrolytes and water soluble polymers have been studied in static and dynamic conditions on paper filters and rock slices. Filtration experiments combined with cake observations by cryo-S.E.M. and T.E.M., show the influence of the size shape of clay particles as well as their associating mode in suspension, on the texture of the cake, its permeability, and relaxation properties. These parameters depend on the nature of the electrolyte. The polymer reduces the cake permeability by enhancing the dispersion of the clay within the suspension, but mainly by plugging the porous network due its auto aggregation properties. The cake construction in dynamic conditions, is related to the state of aggregation of the initial suspension, its poly-dispersity, its sensitivity to shear rates, and also, to the permeability of the cake built at the beginning of the filtration. In all cases, the rate of thickening of the cake is slower and larger filtrate volumes are obtained compared to the static conditions. Shear rate has two effects: first, to dissociate the weak aggregates in suspension, second, to impose a size selection of the particles in the case of a poly-dispersed suspension. At high shear rates, a cake of constant thin thickness is quickly obtained. The thickness of this limiting cake depends on the fraction of small particles present in suspension, or that can be formed by dissociation of weak aggregates under shear rate. The permeability of this limiting cake formed in dynamic conditions is, as in static conditions, controlled by the size and the shape of the particles that form the cake or by the presence of a build loss reducer water soluble polymer. Filtrations carried out on Fontainebleau sandstones allow to visualize the internal cake and to precise the risks of formation damage by the drilling fluid. (author) 127 refs.

  1. The electrochemistry of carbon steel in simulated concrete pore water in boom clay repository environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosas-Camacho O.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of corrosion damage of canisters to experimentally inaccessible times is vitally important in assessing various concepts for the disposal of High Level Nuclear Waste. Such prediction can only be made using deterministic models, whose predictions are constrained by the time-invariant natural laws. In this paper, we describe the measurement of experimental electrochemical data that will allow the prediction of damage to the carbon steel overpack of the super container in Belgium’s proposed Boom Clay repository by using the Point Defect Model (PDM. PDM parameter values are obtained by optimizing the model on experimental, wide-band electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data.

  2. The electrochemistry of carbon steel in simulated concrete pore water in boom clay repository environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, D. D.; Saleh, A.; Lee, S. K.; Azizi, O.; Rosas-Camacho, O.; Al-Marzooqi, A.; Taylor, M.

    2011-04-01

    The prediction of corrosion damage of canisters to experimentally inaccessible times is vitally important in assessing various concepts for the disposal of High Level Nuclear Waste. Such prediction can only be made using deterministic models, whose predictions are constrained by the time-invariant natural laws. In this paper, we describe the measurement of experimental electrochemical data that will allow the prediction of damage to the carbon steel overpack of the super container in Belgium's proposed Boom Clay repository by using the Point Defect Model (PDM). PDM parameter values are obtained by optimizing the model on experimental, wide-band electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data.

  3. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Jiménez, María Del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i.) in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for encapsulation and

  4. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del Carmen Galán-Jiménez

    Full Text Available A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ, mesotrione (MS and flurtamone (FL, whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i neutral: two berols (B048, B266 and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202; (ii cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15. Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i. in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for

  5. Barrier properties of natural clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Дудар, Т.В.; С.П. Бугера; В.М. Кадошніков; Б.П. Злобенко

    2009-01-01

     Clay minerals is a perfect material for geochemical barrier due to their high water resistivity, plasticity, high sorbing capacity, well developed surface and cheapness in extraction and processing. This work studies the peculiarities of uranium sorbtion on clay minerals on the example of bentonite and palygorskite clay from Cherkassy deposit, and clay usage as a barrier material.

  6. Barrier properties of natural clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.В. Дудар

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available  Clay minerals is a perfect material for geochemical barrier due to their high water resistivity, plasticity, high sorbing capacity, well developed surface and cheapness in extraction and processing. This work studies the peculiarities of uranium sorbtion on clay minerals on the example of bentonite and palygorskite clay from Cherkassy deposit, and clay usage as a barrier material.

  7. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in shallow, recently recharged ground water -- Input data set for clay sediment (gwava-s_clay)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the amount of clay sediment in the soil, in percent times 1000, in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data...

  8. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  9. The ARCHIMEDE-ARGILE project: Acquisition and regulation of the water chemistry in a clay formation, within the geochemical programme of ANDRA for geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay formations are candidate host environments for high level radioactive waste disposal. The radioelements could be partially released from the waste into the host geological formation after a very long time. Understanding the behaviour of the natural elements is considered a fundamental prerequisite to studying the disturbed system. Additional laboratory studies are also essential in order to forecast, by analogy, the behaviour of radioelements released from the waste repository. The ARCHIMEDE-ARGILE project has two main goals. The first is to gain an understanding of the mechanisms of acquisition and regulation of the water chemistry in a clay environment. This step is essential to predicting both the behaviour and the migration in solution of artificial elements which are initially absent in the clay formation. The second is to test and validate in clay the measured physicochemical parameters which are the basis for the geochemical modelling of the behaviour of natural and artificial radioelements. The paper presents the main results previously obtained on granitic waters and the research strategy established for the project. (author). 2 refs, 2 figs

  10. The Rb-Sr isotope system as an index of origin and diagenetic evolution of southern Pacific red clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological, mineralogical, chemical and Rb-Sr isotopic studies have been made on Fe-smectites (nontronites) from southern Pacific red clays cored near the Marquisas Islands. These minerals have at the top of the core, an 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.70917 +- 0.00007, which indicates an authigenic origin in isotopic equilibrium with seawater. Weak leaching experiments with 1N HCl show that the nontronites also contain a volcanic component with a lower 87Sr/86Sr ratio which, combined with the morphology of the particles, suggests a transportation by bottom currents of clay formed elsewhere. During burial, the nontronites experience diagenetic modifications resulting in an increase in Fe, K and Rb contents, a concomitant decrease of Mg, Ca, Ti, Na and Sr, and a preferential migration of radiogenic 87Sr from the clays into the surrounding pore waters. The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of the Sr adsorbed on the outermost surfaces of the nontronites does not change with depth in the core, and is, therefore, independent of diagenetic influence, which is rather characterized by the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the interstitial waters. The isotopic composition of both the adsorbed Sr and that of the pore fluids may yield useful information on the crystallization environment and subsequent history of deep sea red clays. (author)

  11. The 1.7- to 4.2-micron spectrum of asteroid 1 Ceres - Evidence for structural water in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Feierberg, M. A.; Larson, H. P.; Johnson, J. R.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier spectrum (1.7-3.5 microns) and medium-resolution spectrophotometry (2.7-4.2 microns) were obtained for Asteroid 1 Ceres. The presence of the 3-micron absorption feature due to water of hydration was confirmed. The 3-micron feature is compared with the 3-micron bands due to water of hydration in clays and salts. It is concluded that the spectrum of Ceres shows a strong absorption at 2.7-2.8 microns due to structural OH groups in clay minerals. The dominant minerals on the surface of Ceres are therefore hydrated clay minerals structurally similar to terrestrial montmorillonites. There is also a narrow absorption feature at 3.1 microns which is attributable to a very small amount of water ice on Ceres. This is the first evidence for ice on the surface of an asteroid.

  12. Planning of experimental removal of cadmium in finite bath system using the chocolate clay B as adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The smectite clays are characterized by having a high cation exchange capacity and ability to remove metal ions. They have great industrial importance, for its abundance and low cost. The first part of this work was to characterize the clay called Chocolate B through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive Physical Adsorption of Nitrogen. The second part of the work aims to evaluate the significance of the variables: pH and initial concentration on removal of cadmium in a batch system. In the experimental design used was a 22 factorial analysis with the addition at the central point, and evaluated the percentage of removal (Rem%) and removal capacity (EQF). XRD results corroborating the chemical analysis (EDX), characterized as a B Chocolate smectite clays. Statistical analysis showed a strong influence of variable pH on the removal of cadmium. (author)

  13. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos;

    2016-01-01

    -and-eighty-seven undisturbed soil columns 20 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter were sampled from six conventionally managed agricultural fields in Denmark. The soils exhibited a wide range in texture, with clay contents and organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.03 to 0.41 kg kg-1 and 0.01 to 0.08 kg kg-1, respectively...... (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curve (BTC), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability of the......Solute transport through the soil matrix is heterogeneous and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. Hundred...

  14. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  15. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO2 geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  16. Desaturation of a clay-stone around a ventilated gallery: numerical modelling of pressures and water contents under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. We present simulation tests focusing on the drying process around a gallery in an initially saturated (water-filled) porous clay rock, in the framework of a research on the isolation properties and hydro-mechanical behaviour of a clayey geologic repository for radioactive waste. The saturated/unsaturated hydrodynamic parameters used in these tests correspond to a hypothetical clay-stone, similar to the 130 m thick Callovo-Oxfordian formation located between depths 400 m and 600 m at the Meuse / Haute-Marne (MHM) Underground Research Laboratory (URL), operated by ANDRA (Bure, France). The simulations tests were designed according to 3 'types' of computational geometries. The drying period was extended to very long time scales in some cases. The clay rock was taken homogeneous in many tests, but the damaged zone was represented in some (Type III) tests. Type (I) tests are conducted in a simplified non circular geometry. Assuming a square cross-section for the drift, the drying process is obtained by imposing a fixed suction on a flat piece of wall at the roof. The bottom of the porous domain coincides with the roof of the drift. The imposed suction at the roof affects the near field pressure both horizontally and vertically. Type (II) tests reproduce the circular cylindrical geometry of a partially or perfectly filled gallery, with drying conditions imposed at both ends of the drift. Finally, Type (III) tests consider the case of an empty ventilated cylindrical drift with circular cross-section. In this case the drying is imposed on the curved walls of the drift via a transmission mechanism thanks the 'macro-porous immersion' method. In all cases, the drying of the porous clay rock is modeled by imposing a suction condition (ψ), obtained from relative air humidity (HR) via Kelvin's law (ψ). Briefly, the macro-porous immersion method consists in the following interrelated procedures. First, the volumetric excavation

  17. Impact of Air Oxidation on Dissolved Organic Matter from Boom Clay: Comparison Between Natural and Artificial Oxidation Series and In Situ Piezometers Water From Hades Galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Boom Clay is considered by the Belgian radioactive waste management agency Ondraf/Niras as a possible host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The drilling of galleries and corings in the Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium) leads to perturbations of the initial physical and chemical conditions. In piezometers, the DOC may show considerable and irregular variations through time, with values ranging from 80 to 425 mg/L. The origin and bio-physico-chemical controls of such variations are yet unknown but oxidation and biodegradation were considered as most likely. Three categories of samples were collected with the aim of determining and quantifying different molecular markers representative for the oxidation process: - Fresh as well as air-oxidized Boom Clay samples were collected in the Underground Research Facility HADES of EURIDICE (Mol, Belgium): they represent a natural series of oxidation; - A fresh Boom Clay sample was submitted to laboratory air oxidation (artificial series). In these experiments, powdered clay was heated at 80 deg. C under air flow during 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 months; - Four water samples were collected during January 2010 from different horizons in the Boom Clay by means of piezometers located in the Underground Research Facility. The DOM (dissolved organic matter) of Boom Clay samples (artificial and natural series) was isolated by Soxhlet using pure water as well as by leaching experiments. The quantitative analysis shows an increasing in DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon) content with oxidation. Qualitative characterizations including spectroscopic (3D-fluorescence) as well as molecular analyses (flash pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (PyGC-MS) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC-HPLC)) show an evolution of the DOM chemistry with oxidation: - An enrichment in oxygen bearing molecules (acidic poly functional groups); - A decrease in

  18. Performance Evaluation of Different Tillage Systems in a Clay Loam Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments were conducted to assess the performance of different tillage systems in a clay loam soil. A completely randomized block design with four treatments i.e., conventional tillage (CT), minimum tillage (MT), zero tillage (ZT) and controlled traffic farming (CTF) was carried out to evaluate the performance of tillage systems. Results indicated that the soil pulverization was higher (P<0.05) under MT and lower under CT treatments while, it was non-significant between MT and CTF treatments. Similarly, soil volume disturbed and effective ploughing depth was maximum (P<0.05) under CT followed by MT, CTF and minimum under ZT. Similarly the operating speed was significantly higher (P<0.05) under CTF and lower under CT whereas, wheel slippage/travel reduction was significantly minimum (P<0.05) under CTF and maximum under CT. Significantly, higher field capacity was recorded under CTF and lower (P<0.05) under CT. The maximum fuel consumption (P<0.05) was recorded under CT while it was minimum under ZT. Almost similar trends were observed for all parameters in 2012 and 2013. The results suggested that the control traffic system was more efficient tillage system in terms of soil pulverization, operating speed, travel reduction and over all field capacity. While, zero tillage had minimum fuel consumption and conventional tillage had higher working depth hence, more soil volume was disturbed under this treatment. (author)

  19. Characterisation and engineering properties of Tiller clay

    OpenAIRE

    Gylland, A.; Long, Michael; Emdal, A.; et al.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed characterisation of the quick clay underlying the NTNU research site at Tiller, Trondheim is presented. The objective of the work is to provide guidance on quick clay parameters to engineers and researchers working with similar clays in Scandinavia and North America especially on landslide hazard assessment. The material is lightly overconsolidated and is characterised by its high degree of structure and very high sensitivity (quick clay). Clay and water contents are both about 40%...

  20. Tropical dryland agroforestry on clay soils: : Analysis of systems based on Acacia senegal in the Blue Nile region, Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Raddad, Elamin Yousif Abdalla

    2006-01-01

    Acacia senegal, the gum arabic producing tree, is the most important component in traditional dryland agroforestry systems in the Blue Nile region, Sudan. The aim of the present study was to provide new knowledge on the potential use of A. senegal in dryland agroforestry systems on clay soils, as well as information on tree/crop interaction, and on silvicultural and management tools, with consideration on system productivity, nutrient cycling and sustainability. Moreover, the aim was also to ...

  1. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karup, Dan; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Greve, Mogens H.; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-09-01

    Solute transport through the soil matrix is non-uniform and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. Attempts have been made in previous studies to use infiltration experiments to identify the degree of preferential flow, but these attempts have often been based on small datasets or data collected from literature with differing initial and boundary conditions. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. From six agricultural fields in Denmark, 193 intact surface soil columns 20 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter were collected. The soils exhibited a wide range in texture, with clay and organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.03 to 0.41 and 0.01 to 0.08 kg kg- 1, respectively. All experiments were carried out under the same initial and boundary conditions using tritium as a conservative tracer. The breakthrough characteristics ranged from being near normally distributed to gradually skewed to the right along with an increase in the content of the mineral fines (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5% and up to 50% of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. Predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points as a function of time up to 50% of applied tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical advection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer

  2. Dissolution Behaviour of UO2 in Anoxic Conditions: Comparison of Ca-Bentonite and Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine in how far the clay properties influence the dissolution of spent fuel, experiments were carried out with depleted UO2 in the presence of either compacted dry Ca-bentonite with Boom Clay groundwater (KB-BCW) or compacted dry Boom Clay with Boom Clay groundwater (BC-BCW). The leach tests were performed at 25 deg. C in anoxic atmosphere for 2 years. The U concentrations in the clay water were followed during these 2 years, and the amount of U in the clay was determined after 2 years in order to determine the UO2 dissolution rate. The uranium concentration after 0.45 μm filtration was 50 times higher in the Boom Clay with Boom Clay water (2.0 x 10-7 mol.L-1) than in Ca-bentonite with Boom Clay water (6.5 x 10-9 mol.L-1), probably due to colloid formation in the Boom Clay system. Most released uranium was found in the clay. The fraction of uranium, dissolved from the UO2 pellet and found on the clay represents about 42 % of total uranium release in the system BC-BCW and more than 76 % in the system KB-BCW. The higher uranium retention of Boom Clay goes together with a higher dissolution rate. Global dissolution rates were estimated at about 2.0 x 10-2 μg.cm-2.d-1 for the BCBCW system and 3.4 x 10-3 μg.cm-2.d-1 for the KB-BCW system. This is not much lower than for similar tests with spent fuel, reported in literature. (authors)

  3. radiochemical studies on the use of local clays and some other sorbents for water purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the search for clean water is a problem for every body where without water there is no life, no agriculture, no industry. in many fresh waters, metals concentrations are elevated by domestic and industrial sewage or other sources. some metals are essential for organisms, but they are toxic in high concentrations. the presence of trace elements and heavy metals in drinking waters is of concern from a health-related aspect, since these elements have been linked to the occurrence of human cancer in many instances, in addition to the probable toxicity. the search of methods for decontamination of water is of great concern. the use of pottery for refrigeration of water is an old traditional famous method used for many centuries. people used pottery for refrigeration did not realize that this material is a good decontaminating sorbent and their water is purified from the harmful metal ions. therefore, the aim of this thesis is to examine the use of different kinds of pottery, as natural cheap sorbent, for decontamination of water from heavy and toxic metallic ions such as; Co2+,fe3+,Cs+,Cd2+,Cr3+, zn2+, Pb2+, Mg2+, and Cu2+, and to find the effect of some additives known to be present in water, such as humic acid and fulvic acid or those added to water for refining and sterilization such as alum, chlorine and KMnO4. four water supplies and three kinds of pottery were selected for the study

  4. Multinuclear and pulsed gradient magnetic resonance studies of sodium cations and of water reorientation at the interface of a clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, J.; Laszlo, P.

    Knowledge of the microdynamics of adsorbates is an important prerequisite to the understanding ofcatalysis of organic reactions by inorganic solids, such as phyllosilicates. We have studied gels formed by a bentonite suspended in an aqueous solution of p-cresol. We have applied the techniques of 1H, 2H, 13C, 17O, and 23Na NMR to this system. We have also determined by proton spin echoes, using pulsed gradients, the self-diffusion coefficients under the same conditions. A description by a two-site system with fast chemical exchange accounts for the measurements and for their temperature dependence from 278 to 320 K. One site is the bulk solvent. The other site, for which we have obtained the limiting parameters, is at the clay interface. A third contribution from exchange between two sites close to the solid interface is relatively minor.

  5. Development of shot-clay system to construct high-quality buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the result of an experiment of shot-clay method which has been developed to construct the high-quality buffer materials in a radioactive waste disposal facility. The shot-clay method is a construction method which is conducted by shooting particle-like bentonite material with the supplied energy of high-pressured air. This paper includes a basic idea of this method, features, and results of its key experiments. (authors)

  6. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... advective ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay...... coefficient being much lower than anticipated using the total porosity. These properties are of major importance to the future use of clay membranes for containment of hazardous waste. In order to explain these properties microstrutural investigations were initiated to establish boundary conditions for...

  7. NMR and Electrochemical Investigation of the Transport Properties of Methanol and Water in Nafion and Clay-Nanocomposites Membranes for DMFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Baglio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water and methanol transport behavior, solvents adsorption and electrochemical properties of filler-free Nafion and nanocomposites based on two smectite clays, were investigated using impedance spectroscopy, DMFC tests and NMR methods, including spin-lattice relaxation and pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE diffusion under variable temperature conditions. Synthetic (Laponite and natural (Swy-2 smectite clays, with different structural and physical parameters, were incorporated into the Nafion for the creation of exfoliated nanocomposites. Transport mechanism of water and methanol appears to be influenced from the dimensions of the dispersed platelike silicate layers as well as from their cation exchange capacity (CEC. The details of the NMR results and the effect of the methanol solution concentration are discussed. Clays particles, and in particular Swy-2, demonstrate to be a potential physical barrier for methanol cross-over, reducing the methanol diffusion with an evident blocking effect yet nevertheless ensuring a high water mobility up to 130 °C and for several hours, proving the exceptional water retention property of these materials and their possible use in the DMFCs applications. Electrochemical behavior is investigated by cell resistance and polarization measurements. From these analyses it is derived that the addition of clay materials to recast Nafion decreases the ohmic losses at high temperatures extending in this way the operating range of a direct methanol fuel cell.

  8. Lake responses following lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock) application: an analysis of water column lanthanum data from 16 case study lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, B.M.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Yasseri, S.; Castro-Castellon, A.T.; Gibbs, M.; Meis, S.; McDonald, C.; McIntosh, J.; Sleep, D.; Oosterhout, van F.

    2013-01-01

    Phoslock is a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay that is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of legacy phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. This study investigates the potential for negative ecological impacts from elevated La concentr

  9. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists

  10. Coupled modelling (transport-reaction) of the fluid-clay interactions and their feed back on the physical properties of the bentonite engineered clay barrier system; Modelisation couplee (transport - reaction) des interactions fluides - argiles et de leurs effets en retour sur les proprietes physiques de barrieres ouvragees en bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, N

    2006-11-15

    The originality of this work is to process feed back effects of mineralogical and chemical modifications of clays, in storage conditions, on their physical properties and therefore on their transport characteristics (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). These feed back effects are modelled using the KIRMAT code (Kinetic of Reaction and MAss Transfer) developed from the kinetic code KINDIS by adding the effect of water renewal in the mineral-solution reactive cells. KIRMAT resolves mass balance equations associated with mass transport together with the geochemical reactions in a 1D approach. After 100 000 years of simulated interaction at 100 C, with the fluid of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological level (COX) and with iron provided by the steel overpack corrosion, the montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed (into illite, chlorite, saponite...). Only outer parts of the modelled profile seem to be significantly affected by smectite dissolution processes, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. The modifications of physical properties show a closure of the porosity at the boundaries of the barrier, by creating a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion, essentially at the interface with the iron. Permeability laws applied to this system show a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity correlated with the porosity evolution. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier decreases. In the major part of the modelled profile, the engineered clay barrier system seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure) and functionalities. (author)

  11. Separation of components of a broad 1H-NMR composite signal by means of nutation experiments under low amplitude radiofrequency fields. Application to the water signal in synthetic clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, geologic nuclear waste storage is envisioned according to a multi-layer model which implies clays. The latter exhibit retention capacities and low permeability to water; that is why they are considered as a good candidate for engineered barriers to radioactive waste disposal. The present work here aims at studying transport phenomena which involve water molecules in three samples of synthetic clays (two of them exhibiting a Pake doublet) by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The first chapter describes structural properties of clays and presents the state-of-art of NMR and other experimental techniques used for such systems. The second chapter deals with the interpretation and the simulation of each conventional proton spectrum. These simulations allow us to evidence and to characterize a chemical exchange phenomenon. The third chapter is dedicated to original nutation experiments performed under low radiofrequency field in the case of broad NMR signal. It is shown that this type of NMR experiment can yield the number and the proportion of each species contributing to the whole signal. These results are exploited in the fourth chapter for processing relaxation and diffusion experiments. Finally, the diffusion coefficients obtained by NMR are divided by a factor 4 with respect to pure water while relaxation rates are two orders of magnitude greater. (author)

  12. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.R. [Reclamation Technology, Inc., Athens, GA (United States); Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Johnson, D.O. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -1} cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems.

  13. Application of clay-based sorbents for cleaning radioactively contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under a special program of ecological rehabilitation of surface water bodies radioactively contaminated due to nuclear tests a study is in progress to investigate properties of various sorbents to remove radionuclides from water running out of tunnels. Search for and application of natural sorbents locally available are preferable. (author)

  14. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  15. Performance of polymeric films based thermoplastic starch and organophilic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was the development and investigation of the properties of flat films of LDPE/corn thermoplastic starch (TPS). A bentonite clay (Argel) was organophilized and characterized by XRD. This clay (1%) in both pristine and organophilic forms was added to the matrix (LDPE) and to LDPE/TPS systems with TPS contents varying from 5-20% w/w. The films manufactured (LDPE, LDPE/Clay, LDPE/TPS, LDPE/TPS/Clay) were characterized. Results indicate that water vapor permeability is dependent and increases with TPS content which was attributed to the higher affinity of water by TPS. TPS and Clay addition to LDPE led to significant changes in film properties with respect to the neat LDPE. In general,tensile and perforation forces increased with clay and TPS contents; the strength of thermo sealed films lowered with natural clay addition and increased with TPS and organoclay incorporation and, in general, dynamic friction coefficient decrease with organoclay and TPS addition. Best overall properties were obtained for the systems containing the organoclay and optimal properties were achieved for the 5%TPS10 LDPE1% ANO system. (author)

  16. On the Cation Dependence of Inter-lamellar and Inter-particular Water and Swelling in Smectite Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M. [CEA Cadarache, DTN Cadarache, DEN, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance (France); Salles, F.; Douillard, J. M. [Univ Montpellier 2, Inst Charles Gerhardt, F-34095 Montpellier 5, (France); Raynal, J. [CEA Cadarache, DEC Cadarache, DEN, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance (France); Van Damme, H. [UPMC, ESPCI, CNRS, UMR 7615, ESPCI Paris Tech, F-75231 Paris 05 (France); Van Damme, H. [Univ Paris Est, Lab Cent Ponts and Chaussees, F-75232 Paris 15 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The osmotic character of long-range inter-lamellar swelling in smectite clays is widely accepted and has been evidenced in the interlayer space by X-ray diffraction. Such a behavior in meso-pores was not experimentally confirmed until the determination of the meso-pore size distribution in Na-montmorillonite prepared from MX80 bentonite using thermo-poro-metry experiments. This is confirmed here for other montmorillonite samples where the interlayer cations are alkaline and Ca{sup 2+} cations. The nature of the interlayer cation is found as strongly influencing the behavior of the size and the swelling of meso-pores. These results are supported by the BJH (Barrett, Joyner and Halenda) pore radius values issued from the nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms at the dry state. Thermo-poro-metry results as a function of relative humidity ranging from 11% to 97% have shown an evolution of the meso-pore sizes for a purified Na-montmorillonite. New thermo-poro-metry data are presented in this article and confirm that the interparticle spaces in K-, Cs-, or Ca-montmorillonites are not strongly modified for all the range of relative humidity: the swelling is not observed or is strongly limited. It appears in contrast that only Li- and Na-montmorillonites undergo a meso-pore swelling, distinct from the interlayer swelling. More generally, our results confirm the possibility to use thermo-poro-metry or differential scanning calorimetry to study the structure and the evolution of swelling materials in wetting conditions such as natural clays or biological cells. In this paper, we describe the different key steps of the hydration of swelling clays such as montmorillonites saturated with alkaline cations. Using thermo-poro-metry results combined with X-ray diffraction data, we distinguish the evolution of the porosity at the two different scales and propose a sequence of hydration dependent on the interlayer cation. From this study, it is shown that the interlayer spaces are

  17. Hydrogen solubility in pore water of partially saturated argillites: Application to Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock in the context of a nuclear waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear waste geological disposals, large amounts of hydrogen (H2) are expected to be produced by different (bio-)geochemical processes. Depending on the pressure generated by such a process, H2 could be produced as a gas phase and displace the neighbouring pore water. As a consequence, a water-unsaturated zone could be created around the waste and possibly affect the physical and physic-chemical properties of the disposal and the excavation disturbed zone around it. The present study is the first part of an ongoing research program aimed at evaluating the possible chemical evolution of the pore water-minerals-gas system in such a context. The goal of this study was to evaluate, in terms of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the geochemical disturbance of the pore water due to variations in hydrogen pressure, temperature and relative humidity. No heterogeneous reactions involving mineral phases of the clay-rock or reactive surface sites were taken into account in the thermodynamic analysis. In the case sulphate reduction reaction is allowed, geochemical modelling results indicate that the main disturbance is the increase in pH (from around 7 up to more than 10) and an important decrease in the redox potential (Eh) related to hydrogen dissolution. This occurs from relatively low H2 partial pressures (∼1 bar and above). Then, temperature and relative humidity (expressed in terms of capillary pressure) further displace the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, namely the pH and the aqueous speciation as well as saturation indices of mineral phases. Finally, the results suggest that the generation of hydrogen, combined with an increase in temperature (between 30 deg. C and 80 deg. C) and a decrease in relative humidity (from 100% to 30%), should increase the chemical reactivity of the pore water-rock-gas system. (authors)

  18. Molecular modelling studies of clay-exopolysaccharide complexes: Soil aggregation and water retention phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In soils, the bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPS) aggregate mineral particles, enhancing their cohesion and their ability to retain water. These phenomena have been studied at the atomic scale by molecular modelling; we have considered seven rhizospheric polysaccharides interacting with the basal surfaces of montmorillonite. Models accounted for the aggregation phenomena induced by EPS: some segments of the polysaccharide were adsorbed on the mineral surfaces while others formed loops and bridges linking two surfaces. Adsorption energies were favourable and depended mostly on the interacting area. Cohesion of aggregates was estimated by the adhesion work, predicted values differed from one EPS to the other, suggesting that the chemical structure influences interaction strength with the mineral surface. Mechanisms of water uptake and release have also been investigated: hydration energies revealed that EPS strongly retain water at low water concentrations.

  19. Practical designs for clay based engineered barrier systems for heat emitting radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the present designs of repositories for radioactive wastes derive from generic feasibility studies which emphasize post-closure safety. These include little (or no) treatment of the practicality of safe and quality-assured construction of engineered barriers under the conditions (humidity, dust, etc.) and requirements (emplacement rate, remote handling, etc.) of an operational underground facility. Indeed, as soon as attempts are made to demonstrate such concepts in-situ at full scale, considerable practical problems are encountered and, in many cases, additional engineering components are introduced (liners, borehole caps, grouts, rock-bolts, drainage systems, etc.) which could be detrimental to - or at leas t complicate - the long-term safety case. As the discrepancy between the idealized concepts illustrated in performance assessment and the actual systems which are shown to be feasible grows, there is a critical need for design rationalization. Such a process needs to include careful balancing of factors influencing safety during the operational phase - which should not be compromised - with those which contribute to potential hazards which occur only in the distant future. Apart from such almost philosophical considerations, the robustness of the EBS construction procedure to possible operational perturbations needs serious consideration. Even if closed and sealed repositories are very insensitive to disruptive events such as earthquakes, hurricanes, industrial actions and terrorist actions, the operational system may be more vulnerable to perturbation. Designs should be introduced which, to the greatest extent possible, not only fail safe, but are also easy to remedy (or reverse) in case the assurance of EBS quality is lost. This paper will expand on ideas for a second generation of clay-based EBS designs, which are both practical and safe. Associated requirements for R and D and performance assessment model development will also be outlined, with a

  20. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features

  1. Water quality diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a water quality diagnosis system for always monitoring the state of pipeline component materials and equipments in a power plant to previously detect abnormality. That is, it comprises a water quality sensor for measuring conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, metal concentration, metal composition, chemical form and radioactive concentration, and a computer system. The computer system comprises an abnormal event simulation calculation section based on an abnormality prediction model, intelligence data base reflecting experience and knowledge with reference to corrosion and leaching of metals, water quality data base accumulating base data with reference to corrosion of metals and material data with reference to all over the entire systems of the structural components of the plant and a reasoning engine. Then, the condition and the speed of corrosion for all over the system are determined to forecast the normal state by using the water quality data inputted periodically from the water quality sensor. The condition of abnormality is determined based on the intelligence base and the reasoning engine. (I.S.)

  2. Water Purification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Clearwater Pool Technologies employs NASA-developed silver/copper ionization to purify turtle and dolphin tanks, cooling towers, spas, water recycling systems, etc. The pool purifier consists of a microcomputer to monitor water conditions, a pair of metallic electrodes, and a rheostat controller. Ions are generated by passing a low voltage current through the electrodes; the silver ions kill the bacteria, and the copper ions kill algae. This technology has found broad application because it offers an alternative to chemical disinfectants. It was originally developed to purify water on Apollo spacecraft. Caribbean Clear has been using NASA's silver ionization technology for water purification for more than a decade. Two new products incorporate advancements of the basic technology. One is the AquaKing, a system designed for areas with no source of acceptable drinking water. Another is the Caribbean Clear Controller, designed for commercial pool and water park applications where sanitizing is combined with feedback control of pH and an oxidizer, chlorine or bromine. The technology was originally developed to purify water on Apollo spacecraft.

  3. Non-selective oxidation of humic acid in heterogeneous aqueous systems: a comparative investigation on the effect of clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavurmaci, Sibel Sen; Bekbolet, Miray

    2014-01-01

    Application of photocatalysis for degradation of natural organic matter (NOM) has received wide interest during the last decades. Besides NOM, model compounds more specifically humic acids (HAs) were also studied. As a continuation of the previous research, TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of HA was investigated in the presence of clay minerals, i.e., montmorillonite (Mt) and kaolinite (Kt). Degradation of HA was expressed by the pseudo-first-order kinetic modelling of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV-VIS parameters (Colour436 and UV254). A slight rate enhancement was attained for Colour436 and UV254 in the presence of either Mt or Kt. The presence of clay particles did not significantly change the DOC degradation rate of HA. The effect of ionic strength (Ca2+ loading from 5 x 10(-4) M to 5 x 1(-3) M) was also assessed for the photocatalytic degradation of sole HA and HA in the presence of either Mt or Kt. Following photocatalytic treatment, molecular size distribution profiles of HA were presented. Besides the effective removal of higher molecular size fractions (100 and 30 kDa fractions), transformation to lower molecular size fractions (TiO2 and Mt or Kt both prior to and following photocatalysis. This study demonstrated that photocatalysis could be applicable for DOC degradation in the presence of clay minerals in natural waters. PMID:25145193

  4. Imaging beneath the skin of large tropical rivers: Clay controls on system morphodynamics revealed by novel CHIRP sub-surface sonar and deep coring along the Fly and Strickland Rivers, Papua New Guinea (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, R. E.; Grenfell, M.; Lauer, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical rivers dominate Earth’s fluvial fluxes for water, carbon, and mineral sediment. They are characterized by large channels and floodplains, old system histories (in comparison to many temperate rivers), frequent and prolonged periods of flooding, and a clay-dominated sediment flux transported above a sandy bed. However, limited insight is available regarding the underlying bed & floodplain strata -- material that underpins system mobility and morphodynamics. Available data commonly stems from “skin-deep” approaches such as GIS analysis of imagery, shallow sampling of a surface veneer, & topographic profiling during lower river stages. Given the large temporal & spatial scales of such systems, new approaches are needed to see below lag deposits on mobile sandy beds & deep into expansive floodbasins. Furthermore, such data are needed to test whether we can usefully interpret large tropical river morphology using direct analogies to observations from small temperate sytems. Systems responding to sea level rise, pending avulsions, or an increase/contrast in sediment load would provide especially valuable insight. We conducted a field campaign along the Fly and Strickland Rivers in Papua New Guinea (discharge ~ 5,400 CMS). Immediate results were obtained using a dual-frequency CHIRP sub-bottom profiler optimized for fluvial environments, with which we were able to image 10-20m below the river/lake bed. We were able to distinguish sandy deposits from harder clay and silt lenses and also collected bed grab samples to verify our sonar results. Deep borehole samples (5-15m), push cores, and cutbank profiles of material strength confirmed observations from the sonar profiling. We simultaneously collected side-scan sonar imagery plus DGPS water/bed elevations. Findings include: 1) The prevalence of hard clay beneath the bed at many locations along the Lower Fly and Strickland Rivers, retarding migration; 2) Unusual bed morphology along the lower Middle Fly River

  5. Distribution of trace elements between clays and zeolites and aqueous solutions similar to sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of solid-solution partitioning during mineral crystallization in sea water have been investigated for Rb, Cs, Co, Sr, U, Th and lanthanides as trace elements, and Fe, Mg-chlorite/smectites and Na-zeolites as solid phases. These minerals have been synthesized by alteration at 40oC in saline solutions of silicate glasses of appropriate compositions. The variation of the distribution coefficients (D) with the concentration of the elements as well as competition mechanisms between elements of analogous crystallochemical properties have been studied. The ''trapping'' of trace elements is shown to be governed by two mechanisms, according to D values or to water-rock ratios. At low values of D the incorporation of elements is controlled only by D, whereas at high values it is controlled by the number of available crystallochemical sites. (Author)

  6. Effective stress and water pressure in saturated clays during heating-cooling cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments with heating and cooling cycles in undrained constant total stress conditions in triaxial apparatus are presented. Heating induces a large pore-water pressure increase, which eventually leads to a large irreversible strain and possible mechanical failure. Subsequent cooling produces a drop in water pressure. In one test the drop during cooling was more than two times higher than the previous increase during heating, reaching values of up to 2.30 MPa. An analysis of these findings in terms of a thermoplastic model is presented. The interpretation of these tests relies heavily on the kind of stress-partitioning hypothesis that is used. It was found that the phenomena described can be quantitatively dealt with using the classical effective stress principle, if the shear stress and consolidation are described in terms of temperature-dependent plastic yield limit

  7. Rocks, Clays, Water, and Salts: Highly Durable, Infinitely Rechargeable, Eminently Controllable Thermal Batteries for Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Rempel, Alan W.; Alexandra R. Rempel

    2013-01-01

    Materials that store the energy of warm days, to return that heat during cool nights, have been fundamental to vernacular building since ancient times. Although building with thermally rechargeable materials became a niche pursuit with the advent of fossil fuel-based heating and cooling, energy and climate change concerns have sparked new enthusiasm for these substances of high heat capacity and moderate thermal conductivity: stone, adobe, rammed earth, brick, water, concrete, and more recent...

  8. Modeling multi-component transport and enhanced anaerobic dechlorination processes in a single fracture-clay matrix system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Broholm, Mette Martina; Binning, Philip John;

    2010-01-01

    Clayey tills contaminated with chlorinated solvents are a threat to groundwater and are difficult to remediate. A numerical model is developed for assessing leaching processes and for simulating the remediation via enhanced anaerobic dechlorination. The model simulates the transport...... to the physical processes, mainly diffusion in the matrix, than to the biogeochemical processes, when dechlorination is assumed to take place in a limited reaction zone only. The inclusion of sequential dechlorination in clay fracture transport models is crucial, as the contaminant flux to the aquifer...... of a contaminant in a single fracture-clay matrix system coupled with a reactive model for anaerobic dechlorination. The model takes into account microbially driven anaerobic dechlorination, where sequential Monod kinetics with competitive inhibition is used to model the reaction rates, and degradation...

  9. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees

    OpenAIRE

    Vernon Reynolds; Andrew W Lloyd; English, Christopher J.; Peter Lyons; Howard Dodd; Catherine Hobaiter; Nicholas Newton-Fisher; Caroline Mullins; Noemie Lamon; Anne Marijke Schel; Brittany Fallon

    2015-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 06/07/2015 Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay ea...

  10. Rocks, Clays, Water, and Salts: Highly Durable, Infinitely Rechargeable, Eminently Controllable Thermal Batteries for Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Rempel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials that store the energy of warm days, to return that heat during cool nights, have been fundamental to vernacular building since ancient times. Although building with thermally rechargeable materials became a niche pursuit with the advent of fossil fuel-based heating and cooling, energy and climate change concerns have sparked new enthusiasm for these substances of high heat capacity and moderate thermal conductivity: stone, adobe, rammed earth, brick, water, concrete, and more recently, phase-change materials. While broadly similar, these substances absorb and release heat in unique patterns characteristic of their mineralogies, densities, fluidities, emissivities, and latent heats of fusion. Current architectural practice, however, shows little awareness of these differences and the resulting potential to match materials to desired thermal performance. This investigation explores that potential, illustrating the correspondence between physical parameters and thermal storage-and-release patterns in direct-, indirect-, and isolated-gain passive solar configurations. Focusing on heating applications, results demonstrate the superiority of water walls for daytime warmth, the tunability of granite and concrete for evening warmth, and the exceptional ability of phase-change materials to sustain near-constant heat delivery throughout the night.

  11. Defining an exposure-response relationship for suspended kaolin clay particulates and aquatic organisms: work toward defining a water quality guideline for suspended solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Andrew K; Palmer, Carolyn G

    2015-04-01

    Water quality guidelines for suspended solids generally rely on the percentage departure from reference condition, an approach that has been criticized. Attempts to develop a biological effects-base guideline have, however, been confounded by low data availability. Furthermore, the high biological response variability to suspended solids exposure suggests that organisms are responding not only to exposure concentration and duration but also to other mechanisms of effect associated with suspended particles (e.g., size, shape, and geochemical composition). An alternative option is to develop more situation and site specific guidelines by generating biological effects data to suspended particles of a particular geochemistry and restricted size range. With this in mind, aquatic organism responses to kaolin clay particle exposure were collated from the literature and incorporated into 2 exposure-response relationship approaches. The species sensitivity distribution approach produced a hazardous concentration affecting 5% of species estimate of 58 mg/L for mortality responses, and 36 mg/L for sublethal data. The severity-of-ill-effect approach produced similar estimates for lethal and sublethal data. These results suggest that aquatic organisms are slightly more tolerant of kaolin clay particles than particles from barite or bentonite clays, based on results from previous studies on these clay types. This type of information can enable better estimates of the risk faced by aquatic organisms exposed to suspended solids. For example, when the sediments of a particular water body are dominated by a particular type of clay particle, then the most appropriate exposure-response relationship can be applied. PMID:25711545

  12. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.M. Whitworth; Liangxiong Li

    2002-09-15

    This report describes work performed during the first year of the project ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Waters.'' This research project has two objectives. The first objective is to test the use of clay membranes in the treatment of produced waters by reverse osmosis. The second objective is to test the ability of a system patented by the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation to remove salts from reverse osmosis waste streams as a solid. We performed 12 experiments using clay membranes in cross-flow experimental cells. We found that, due to dispersion in the porous frit used adjacent to the membrane, the concentration polarization layer seems to be completely (or nearly completely) destroyed at low flow rates. This observation suggests that clay membranes used with porous frit material many reach optimum rejection rates at lower pumping rates than required for use with synthetic membranes. The solute rejection efficiency decreases with increasing solution concentration. For the membranes and experiments reported here, the rejection efficiency ranged from 71% with 0.01 M NaCl solution down to 12% with 2.3 M NaCl solution. More compacted clay membranes will have higher rejection capabilities. The clay membranes used in our experiments were relatively thick (approximately 0.5 mm). The active layer of most synthetic membranes is only 0.04 {micro}m (0.00004 mm), approximately 1250 times thinner than the clay membranes used in these experiments. Yet clay membranes as thin as 12 {micro}m have been constructed (Fritz and Eady, 1985). Since Darcy's law states that the flow through a material of constant permeability is inversely proportional to it's the material's thickness, then, based on these experimental observations, a very thin clay membrane would be expected to have much higher flow rates than the ones used in these experiments. Future experiments will focus on testing very thin clay membranes. The

  13. GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS) IN LANDFILL COVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low permeability, compacted clay linters are commonly required as a barrier to water infiltration in landfill covers. elatively new material, known as geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), has been proposed as an alternative to a compacted clay liner. CL has the practical advantages of ...

  14. Study on adsorption of uranium(VI) on clay and its significance for control of ground water pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The batch experiments for adsorption of uranium (VI) on clay collected from the bottom of a huge mill-tailing in southern China were conducted. The results show that the adsorption of uranium (VI) on clay is a obviously nonlinear function of pH in solution, leaching a maximum around neutral pH and decreasing rapidly towards more acidic or alkaline conditions. The diffuse layer model (DLM) which describes the adsorption of uranium (VI) on clay was established according to the surface complexation approach, and it simulates the experimental data successfully. The calibration displays that the model has strong capacity to predict uranium (VI) sorption behavior under different thermodynamic condition. The simulating results indicate that U(VI) adsorption on clay is affected by solid-liquid ratio (M/V) obviously at low pH and controlled by HCO3- and Co32- in solution at high pH

  15. Sorption of water vapour by the Na+-exchanged clay-sized fractions of some tropical soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water vapour sorption isotherms at 299K for the Na+-exchanged clay-sized (≤ 2μm e.s.d.) fraction of two sets of samples taken at three different depths from a tropical soil profile have been studied. One set of samples was treated (with H2O2) for the removal of much of the organic matter (OM); the other set (of the same samples) was not so treated. The isotherms obtained were all of type II and analyses by the BET method yielded values for the Specific Surface Areas (SSA) and for the average energy of adsorption of the first layer of adsorbate (Ea). OM content and SSA for the untreated samples were found to decrease with depth. Whereas removal of organic matter made negligible difference to the SSA of the top/surface soil, the same treatment produced a significant increase in the SSA of the samples taken from the middle and from the lower depths in the profile; the resulting increase was more pronounced for the subsoil. It has been deduced from these results that OM in the surface soil was less involved with the inorganic soil colloids than that in the subsoil. The increase in surface area which resulted from the removal of OM from the subsoil was most probably due to disaggregation. Values of Ea obtained show that for all the samples the adsorption of water vapour became more energetic after the oxidative removal of organic matter; the resulting ΔEa also increased with depth. This suggests that in the dry state, the ''cleaned'' surface of the inorganic soil colloids was more energetic than the ''organic-matter-coater surface''. These data provide strong support for the deduction that OM in the subsoil was in a more ''combined'' state than that in the surface soil. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  16. DFT theoretical and FT-IR spectroscopic investigations of the plasticity of clay minerals dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzhitskii, A.; Lazorenko, G.; Yavna, V.; Daniel, Ph.

    2016-04-01

    Plasticity is the most important property of dispersions of clay minerals that determine the character of participation of these systems in many natural and technological processes. We report on the results of studies of hydration mechanism in typical clay minerals making part of natural dispersions of sedimentation masses by means of IR spectroscopy and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) methods. X-ray diffraction analysis of clay minerals of Millerovo mineral deposit (Russian Federation) is carried out. Regularities and peculiarities of interaction of water molecules with kaolinite basal planes (001) and (00 1 bar) are analyzed. The role of water in the formation of plasticity of clay minerals dispersions is revealed. The modes of water molecules placement and their state and structure in the system "clay mineral-water" is defined. Phase transition processes of clay minerals dispersion into plastic and liquid state and their influence on spectral characteristics of the systems are investigated. The interpretation of clay minerals phase transitions into plastic and fluid state based on the results of DFT simulation is given. The relation is established between specific variation of spectral characteristics and phase transitions of clay minerals dispersions into plastic and liquid state.

  17. Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow-Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore Tsotsis

    2010-01-08

    Arsenic (As) and Selenium (Se) are found in water in the form of oxyanions. Relatively high concentrations of As and Se have been reported both in power plant discharges, as well as, in fresh water supplies. The International Agency for Research on Cancer currently classifies As as a group 1 chemical, that is considered to be carcinogenic to humans. In Phase I of this project we studied the adsorption of As and Se by uncalcined and calcined layered double hydroxide (LDH). The focus of the present work is a systematic study of the adsorption of As and Se by conditioned LDH adsorbents. Conditioning the adsorbent significantly reduced the Mg and Al dissolution observed with uncalcined and calcined LDH. The adsorption rates and isotherms have been investigated in batch experiments using particles of four different particle size ranges. As(V) adsorption is shown to follow a Sips-type adsorption isotherm. The As(V) adsorption rate on conditioned LDH increases with decreasing adsorbent particle size; the adsorption capacity, on the other hand, is independent of the particle size. A homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) and a bi-disperse pore model (BPM) - the latter viewing the LDH particles as assemblages of microparticles and taking into account bulk diffusion in the intraparticle pore space, and surface diffusion within the microparticles themselves - were used to fit the experimental kinetic data. The HSDM estimated diffusivity values dependent on the particle size, whereas the BPM predicted an intracrystalline diffusivity, which is fairly invariant with particle size. The removal of As(V) on conditioned LDH adsorbents was also investigated in flow columns, where the impact of important solution and operational parameters such as influent As concentration, pH, sorbent particle size and flow rate were studied. An early breakthrough and saturation was observed at higher flow rates and at higher influent concentrations, whereas a decrease in the sorbent particle

  18. Stiff clay masses: big storages of fossil and renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilotro, Giuseppe; Fidelibus, Maria Dolores; Qeraxhiu, Lydra; Argentiero, Ilenia; Pellicani, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    The crystalline structure of the clay and its behaviour at the micro and macro scale have been and are still the object of studies in different fields of earth science: mineralogy, geotechnics, etc. It has been known for several decades that the volumetric equilibrium of a well-defined clay (mono mineralogical or mineralogical melange, with or without the mixing with other fines), depends on the salinity of the interstitial fluid (in terms of concentration of one or more kind of salts) under a stress field. The mechanism is very complex involving many chemical and physical topics, but may be easy to understand: the elementary structures of a two faced crystals are electrically negative charged with the interstitial fluid as the dielectric of a capacitor. Consequently, an electrical field is generated whose intensity depends on the electric charge and the properties of the dielectric. Such electric field can produce mechanical work, enlarging the faces of the capacitor, unless external forces prevent it. If external forces exceed the internal ones, the system behaves as a loaded spring, which stores energy of deformation to give back as soon as the external force weakens. The clay of marine sedimentation incorporates interstitial salt water of composition derived and similar to those of sea water. Such type of interstitial water chemically has high concentration of dissolved ions, mainly Na, which generates in the dielectric spaces a low electrical field, compared with that given in identical situation by low salt concentration in interstitial water. In nature, as well described in geoscience, the turning between the two interstitial water types is very common and driven by ion diffusion processes like, surface fresh water interacting with salt interstitial water of old marine clays. The latter, either by the overburden of younger sedimentary layers, but mainly by very strong capillary forces activated by surface drainage and EVT from sun and dry wind, undergo

  19. Proceedings of the NEA Clay Club Workshop on Clay characterisation from nanoscopic to microscopic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide spectrum of argillaceous media are being considered in Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) member countries as potential host rocks for the final, safe disposal of radioactive waste, and/or as major constituent of repository systems in which wastes will be emplaced. In this context, the NEA established the Working Group on the 'Characterisation, the Understanding and the Performance of Argillaceous Rocks as Repository Host Formations' in 1990, informally known as the 'Clay Club'. The Clay Club examines various argillaceous rocks that are being considered for the underground disposal of radioactive waste, ranging from soft clays to indurated shales. Very generally speaking, these clay rocks are composed of fine-grained minerals showing pore sizes from < 2 nm (micropores) up to > 50 nm (macro-pores). The water flow, solute transport and mechanical properties are largely determined by this microstructure, the spatial arrangement of the minerals and the chemical pore water composition. Examples include anion accessible ('geochemical') porosity and macroscopic membrane effects (chemical osmosis, hyper-filtration), geomechanical properties and the characteristics of two-phase flow properties (relevant for gas transport). At the current level of knowledge, there is a strong need to improve the nanoscale description of the phenomena observed at a more macroscopic scale. However, based on the scale of individual clay-minerals and pore sizes, for most of the imaging techniques this resolution is a clear challenge. The workshop, hosted by the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in the Akademiehotel Karlsruhe (Germany) from 6 to 8 September 2011, was intended to give, inter alia, a discussion platform on: - The current state-of-the-art of different spectro-microscopic methods - New developments addressing the above mentioned knowledge gaps in clays. - The perception of the interplay between geometry

  20. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  1. A Time Resolved XANES Study of an Organo-Clay Redox System

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, W.; Hunter, D.; Nuessle, P.; Bertsch, P.

    1997-01-01

    In situ, time-resolved X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements of tetraphenylboron (TPB)-treated Fe-bearing clay minerals were conducted to investigate whether smectite structural Fe was reduced during surface-enhanced oxidative degradation of TPB. Reference samples were prepared by reducing varying amounts of structural Fe with Na-dithionite in an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Kα X-ray fluorescence near edge structure of reference and TPB-treated samples w...

  2. In situ synthesis of nano clay filled polyethylene using polymer support metallocenes catalyst system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ ethylene polymerizations were performed using bis(cyclopentadiene)titanium dichloride supported on poly ethersulfone as catalyst. The bis(cyclopentadiene)titanium dichloride supported on poly ethersulfone catalyst activity estimated by ethylene polymerization was 360 kg PE/mol Ti/h. During polymerization the fillers used were montmorillonite nano clays having surface modifications with 35-45 wt % dimethyl dialkyl(14-18)amine (FA) and 25-30 wt % trimethyl stearyl ammonium (FB). These fillers were pretreated with methylaluminoxine (MAO; co catalyst) for better dispersion onto the polymer matrix. The formation of polyethylene within the whole matrix was confirmed by FTIR studies. It was found that the nature of nano filler did not have any remarkable effect on the melting characteristics of the polymer. TGA study indicates that nano clay FB filled polyethylene has higher thermal stability than nano clay FA filled polyethylene. The melting temperature of the obtained polyethylenes was 142 degree C, which corresponds to that synthesized by the polyether sulfone supported catalyst. (author)

  3. Physicochemical and Analytical Data for Tributary Water, Lake Water, and Lake Sediment, Lake Arrowhead, Clay and Archer Counties, Texas, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Haynie, Monti M.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Lake Arrowhead is a reservoir about 24 kilometers southeast of Wichita Falls, Texas, that provides drinking water for the city of Wichita Falls and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, did a study in 2006 to assess conditions contributing to elevated arsenic concentrations in Lake Arrowhead. This report describes the sampling and analytical methods, quality assurance, and physicochemical and analytical data. Physiochemical properties were measured in and water samples were collected from five tributaries to Lake Arrowhead (Little Wichita River, West Little Post Oak Creek, East Little Post Oak Creek, Deer Creek, and an unnamed tributary) immediately after storms. Lake water measuring and sampling were done approximately monthly from January through September 2006 at three deep-water sites and seasonally, in January and August 2006, at three shallow-water sites. Cores of lake bottom sediment were collected from five sites on August 30, 2006. Arsenic concentrations in tributary water samples ranged from 1.5 to 6.3 and 0.5 to 4.8 micrograms per liter for unfiltered and filtered samples, respectively. The highest arsenic concentrations were in samples collected from the West Little Post Oak Creek sampling site. Physicochemical properties in lake water varied with depth and season. Dissolved arsenite plus arsenate concentrations in lake water samples generally were between 3 and 5 micrograms per liter. Arsenite concentrations typically were below the laboratory reporting level of 0.6 microgram per liter. There were no detections of monomethylarsonate or dimethylarsinate. The concentration of arsenic in lake sediment samples ranged from 4.4 to 11.2 milligrams per kilogram, with a median of 6.4 milligrams per kilogram. The median arsenic concentration of the five top-interval sediment samples was 8.8 milligrams per kilogram, which generally is higher than the concentrations estimated to be on suspended sediment in

  4. Evaluation of natural clay Brasgel as adsorbent in removal of lead in synthetic waste water; Avaliacao da argila Brasgel natural como adsorvente na remocao de chumbo de efluentes sinteticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Mota, M.F.; Patricio, A.C.L.; Silva, M.M., E-mail: wsl_20@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LABNOV/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Desenvolvimento de Novos Materiais

    2012-07-01

    The smectite clays have high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. Due to its chemical and physical characteristics, they can be effectively used as adsorbent of pollutants (such as metal ions). The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Brasgel through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method), seeking its use in removing lead (Pb{sup 2+}) from synthetic effluents. System was used in finite bath to assess the potential removal of lead (Pb{sup 2+}), following a 2{sup 2} factorial experimental design with three center point experiments, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of lead (Pb{sup 2+}). The clay has Brasgel clay in its composition that characterize it as a smectite clay. By having a large surface area, this clay showed great potential on the adsorption of metal ions. (author)

  5. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.M. Whitworth; Liangxiong Li

    2002-09-15

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project ''Modified reverse osmosis system for treatment of produced waters.'' We performed two series of reverse osmosis experiments using very thin bentonite clay membranes compacted to differing degrees. The first series of 10 experiments used NaCl solutions with membranes that ranged between 0.041 and 0.064mm in thickness. Our results showed compaction of such ultra-thin clay membranes to be problematic. The thickness of the membranes was exceeded by the dimensional variation in the machined experimental cell and this is believed to have resulted in local bypassing of the membrane with a resultant decrease in solute rejection efficiency. In two of the experiments, permeate flow was varied as a percentage of the total flow to investigate results of changing permeate flow on solute rejection. In one experiment, the permeate flow was varied between 2.4 and 10.3% of the total flow with no change in solute rejection. In another experiment, the permeate flow was varied between 24.6 and 52.5% of the total flow. In this experiment, the solute rejection rate decreased as the permeate occupied greater fractions of the total flow. This suggests a maximum solute rejection efficiency for these clay membranes for a permeate flow of between 10.3 and 24.6% of the total; flow. Solute rejection was found to decrease with increasing salt concentration and ranged between 62.9% and 19.7% for chloride and between 61.5 and 16.8% for sodium. Due to problems with the compaction procedure and potential membrane bypassing, these rejection rates are probably not the upper limit for NaCl rejection by bentonite membranes. The second series of four reverse osmosis experiments was conducted with a 0.057mm-thick bentonite membrane and dilutions of a produced water sample with an original TDS of 196,250 mg/l obtained from a facility near Loco Hill, New Mexico, operated by an independent. These experiments

  6. Effect of clay organic modifier on the final performance of PCL/clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luduena, L.N., E-mail: luduena@fi.mdp.edu.ar [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology (INTEMA), Engineering Faculty, National University of Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302 B7608FDQ, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Kenny, J.M. [Institute of Polymers Science and Technology, ICTP, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vazquez, A., E-mail: avazquez@fi.uba.ar [INTECIN (UBA-CONICET), Polymer and Composite Group, Engineering Faculty, University of Buenos Aires, Las Heras 2214 C1063ACV, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, V.A., E-mail: alvarezvera@fi.mdp.edu.ar [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology (INTEMA), Engineering Faculty, National University of Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302 B7608FDQ, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} The degradation of clay organo-modifiers during processing affect clay dispersion degree and clay content inside the matrix. {yields} Isothermal thermogravimetrical analysis was used to simulate the thermal degradation of clay organo-modifiers in extrusion. {yields} Improving polymer-clay compatibility may not be the main factor to achieve the best mechanical performance. {yields} The best combination between PCL/clay compatibility and thermal resistance of the clay, was obtained for C20A. - Abstract: The effect of un-modified and several organo-modified montmorillonites on the morphology, mechanical properties and thermal behavior of polycaprolactone (PCL) based nanocomposites prepared by melt intercalation was studied. The study was centered on the analysis of the clay characteristics that have influence on the final properties of PCL/clay nanocomposites. Polymer/clay compatibility was analyzed studying both bulk and surface polarity degree of the clays by means of water absorption tests (bulk) and contact angle measurements (surface). The thermal stability of the clays was analyzed by dynamic thermogravimetrical tests (TGA). The degradation of the clay organo-modifiers during processing was simulated by isothermal TGA. The clay dispersion degree inside the nanocomposites was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The melt rheology was used as a method to compare the dispersion degree of the clay by means of the shear thinning exponent, n{sub Rh}. The tensile mechanical properties were measured and theoretically analyzed by means of several micro-mechanical models. It was found that the thermal stability of the clay organo-modifiers is a critical factor that can modify the final clay content and the clay dispersion degree inside the nanocomposite, demonstrating that the enhancement of the polymer-clay compatibility may not be the main factor to achieve the best mechanical performance when shear forces during processing, i.e. extrusion

  7. Public Water Supply Systems (PWS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset includes boundaries for most public water supply systems (PWS) in Kansas (525 municipalities, 289 rural water districts and 13 public wholesale water...

  8. Hydro-mechanical coupling and permeability of an unsaturated swelling clay under hydrous and thermal stress: sorption curve and water permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of swelling clay for engineered safety barriers of radioactive waste disposal require the understanding of its thermal-hydro-mechanical behaviour. This work concerns particularly the characterization and the modelling of the behaviour of one of these clays: the FoCa7 clay. The characteristics of the studied material are: the sorption (desorption) curve and the water permeability. For each of them, new experiments have allowed to acquire data in fields still few explored: in temperature (between 20 and 80 C) for the sorption curve and in the unsaturated field for the water permeability. The analysis of these results and of bibliographic data has allowed in one hand to estimate the importance of the hysteresis phenomenon and the temperature influence on the sorption curve and in another hand, to establish the requirement to introduce in the modelling of the sorption curve, a plastic parameter due to the irreversible deformations occurring during the compaction. Moreover, the tests carried out for data acquirement have been used too to give validation elements to the non linear behaviour laws proposed by O. Coussy and P. Dangla for the non saturated porous media. The particularity of these laws is to suppose the existence of an effective constraint in the non saturated field, this shows the importance of the validation elements presented here. (O.M.)

  9. Carbon sequestration in clay and silt fractions of Brazilian soils under conventional and no-tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Estima Sacramento dos Reis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of soils to sequestrate carbon (C is mainly related to the formation of organo-mineral complexes. In this study, we investigated the influence of soil management systems on the C retention capacity of soil with an emphasis on the silt and clay fractions of two subtropical soils with different mineralogy and climate. Samples from a Humic Hapludox and a Rhodic Hapludox, clayey soils cultivated for approximately 30 years under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT were collected from six layers distributed within 100-cm soil depth from each site and from an adjacent native forest. After the removal of particulate organic matter (POM, the suspension (<53 µm was sonicated, the silt and clay fractions were separated in accordance with Stokes' law and the carbon content of whole soil and physical fractions was determined. In the Humic Hapludox, the clay and silt fractions under NT showed a higher maximum C retention (72 and 52 g kg-1, respectively in comparison to those under CT (54 and 38 g kg-1, respectively. Moreover, the C concentration increase in both fractions under NT occurred mainly in the topsoil (up to 5 cm. The C retention in physical fractions of Rhodic Hapludox varied from 25 to 32 g kg-1, and no difference was observed whether under an NT or a CT management system. The predominance of goethite and gibbsite in the Humic Hapludox, as well as its exposure to a colder climate, may have contributed to its greater C retention capacity. In addition to the organo-mineral interaction, a mechanism of organic matter self-assemblage, enhanced by longer periods of soil non-disturbance, seems to have contributed to the carbon stabilization in both soils.

  10. Effects of clay dispersion on aquifer storage and recovery in coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, L.F.; August, L.L.; Voss, C.I.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic injection, storage, and withdrawal of freshwater in brackish aquifers is a form of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) that can beneficially supplement water supplies in coastal areas. A 1970s field experiment in Norfolk, Virginia, showed that clay dispersion in the unconsolidated sedimentary aquifer occurred because of cation exchange on clay minerals as freshwater displaced brackish formation water. Migration of interstitial clay particles clogged pores, reduced permeability, and decreased recovery efficiency, but a calcium preflush was found to reduce clay dispersion and lead to a higher recovery efficiency. Column experiments were performed in this study to quantify the relations between permeability changes and clay mineralogy, clay content, and initial water salinity. The results of these experiments indicate that dispersion of montmorillonite clay is a primary contributor to formation damage. The reduction in permeability by clay dispersion may be expressed as a linear function of chloride content. Incorporating these simple functions into a radial, cross-sectional, variable-density, ground-water flow and transport model yielded a satisfactory simulation of the Norfolk field test - and represented an improvement over the model that ignored changes in permeability. This type of model offers a useful planning and design tool for ASR operations in coastal clastic aquifer systems.

  11. Evaluation of Turf-Grass and Prairie-Vegetated Rain Gardens in a Clay and Sand Soil, Madison, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Balster, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with a consortium of 19 cities, towns, and villages in Dane County, Wis., undertook a study to compare the capability of rain gardens with different vegetative species and soil types to infiltrate stormwater runoff from the roof of an adjacent structure. Two rain gardens, one planted with turf grass and the other with native prairie species, were constructed side-by-side in 2003 at two locations with different dominant soil types, either sand or clay. Each rain garden was sized to a ratio of approximately 5:1 contributing area to receiving area and to a depth of 0.5 foot. Each rain garden, regardless of vegetation or soil type, was capable of storing and infiltrating most of the runoff over the 5-year study period. Both rain gardens in sand, as well as the prairie rain garden in clay, retained and infiltrated 100 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during water years 2004-07. The turf rain garden in clay occasionally had runoff exceed its confining boundaries, but was still able to retain 96 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during the same time period. Precipitation intensity and number of antecedent dry days were important variables that influenced when the storage capacity of underlying soils would become saturated, which resulted in pooled water in the rain gardens. Because the rooftop area that drained runoff to each rain garden was approximately five times larger than the area of the rain garden itself, evapotranspiration was a small percentage of the annual water budget. For example, during water year 2005, the maximum evapotranspiration of total influent volume ranged from 21 percent for the turf rain garden in clay to 25 percent for the turf rain garden in sand, and the minimum ranged from 12 percent for the prairie rain garden in clay to 19 percent for the prairie rain garden in sand. Little to no runoff left each rain garden as effluent and a small percentage of runoff returned to the

  12. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part A - Overview, experimental design and water data of an experiment in the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P., E-mail: paul.wersin@gruner.ch [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Gruner Ltd., Gellertstrasse 55, 4020 Basel (Switzerland); Leupin, O.X. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland); Mettler, S. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Solexperts Ltd., Mettlenbachstrasse 25, 8617 Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Gaucher, E.C. [BRGM, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Maeder, U. [University of Bern, Institute of Geological Sciences, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); De Canniere, P. [SCK.CEN, Waste and Disposal Project, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA, Laboratoire de Recherche Souterrain de Meuse/Haute-Marne, RD960 BP9, 55290 Bure (France); Gaebler, H.E. [BGR, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Kunimaro, T. [JAEA, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kiho, K. [CRIEPI, 1646 Abiko, Abiko-city Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, 85301 Schweitenkirchen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > The composition was affected by the complex interplay of diffusion, mineral and surface reactions. > The {sup 13}C signals for carbon species showed significant variations which could only be partly explained. > The main cations remained remarkably constant during the experiment. > This underlines the strong buffering via cation exchange and carbonate dissolution/precipitation. - Abstract: An in situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed porewater chemistry (PC) experiment, was carried out for a period of 5 years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby a traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed-off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions of the porewater, but because of unexpected microbiologically-induced redox reactions, the objective was extended to elucidate the biogeochemical processes occurring in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO{sub 2} and porewater chemistry in the low permeability clay formation. The behaviour of the conservative tracers {sup 2}H and Br{sup -} could be explained by diffusive dilution in the clay and moreover the results showed that diffusive equilibration between the borehole water and the formation occurred within about 3 year's time. However, the composition and pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions differed considerably from those of the in situ porewater. Thus, pH was lower and pCO{sub 2} was higher than indicated by complementary laboratory investigations. The noted differences are explained by microbiologically-induced redox reactions occurring in the borehole and in the interfacial wall area which were caused by an organic source released from the equipment material. The degradation of this source was accompanied by sulfate reduction and - to a lesser extent - by methane generation, which induced a high rate of acetogenic reactions

  13. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  14. Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of French green clays used for healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L.B.; Haydel, S.E.; Giese, R.F.; Eberl, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    The worldwide emergence of infectious diseases, together with the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, elevate the need to properly detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. The overuse and misuse of common antibiotics in recent decades stimulates the need to identify new inhibitory agents. Therefore, natural products like clays, that display antibacterial properties, are of particular interest. The absorptive properties of clay minerals are well documented for healing skin and gastrointestinal ailments. However, the antibacterial properties of clays have received less scientific attention. French green clays have recently been shown to heal Buruli ulcer, a necrotic or 'flesh-eating' infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Assessing the antibacterial properties of these clays could provide an inexpensive treatment for Buruli ulcer and other skin infections. Antimicrobial testing of the two clays on a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens showed that one clay promotes bacterial growth (possibly provoking a response from the natural immune system), while another kills bacteria or significantly inhibits bacterial growth. This paper compares the mineralogy and chemical composition of the two French green clays used in the treatment of Buruli ulcer. Mineralogically, the two clays are dominated by 1Md illite and Fe-smectite. Comparing the chemistry of the clay minerals and exchangeable ions, we conclude that the chemistry of the clay, and the surface properties that affect pH and oxidation state, control the chemistry of the water used to moisten the clay poultices and contribute the critical antibacterial agent(s) that ultimately debilitate the bacteria. Copyright ?? 2008, The Clay Minerals Society.

  15. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  16. 黏土渗透性能测试系统设计%Design of Permeability Testing System for Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨世凤; 唐培成

    2011-01-01

    基于LabVIEW虚拟仪器技术开发平台,构建了黏土渗透性能测试系统.该系统由压力传感器、单片机、串口通信和计算机组成,采用LabVIEW编程实现数据实时采集与分析、历史数据的储存与查询等系统功能.将压力数据转换为液位数据,通过计算得到黏土的渗透系数.实验表明,该系统稳定可靠,可为工程建设提供有效数据参考.%Based on the platform of Lab VIEW virtual instrument technology, the clay permeability testing system was constructed. It was composed of pressure sensors, microcontroller, serial communication, and computers. By Lab VIEW technology.it achieved the functions of Real-time data collection and analysis, historical data storage and query. It changes pressure data into Level data, and achieves permeability coefficient of clay by the formula. Results show that the system is reliable and can provide effective data for project construction.

  17. Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses through water-saturated vertically oriented columns packed with glass beads: Gravity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2016-03-01

    The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (ΚGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both vertical up (VU) and vertical down (VD) flow directions. In the presence of KGa-1b, estimated mass recovery values for both viruses were higher for VD than VU flow direction, while in the presence of STx-1b the opposite was observed. However, for all cases examined, the produced mass of viruses attached onto suspended clay particles were higher for VD than VU flow direction, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influences virus attachment onto clays, as well as packed column retention of viruses attached onto suspended clays. KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow, while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow directions. Moreover, KGa-1b and STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in most of the cases examined except of the case where KGa-1b was present under VD flow. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages and virus surface concentrations generated by virus diffusion-limited attachment, as well as virus attachment due to sedimentation. Both sedimentation and diffusion limited virus attachment were higher for VD than VU flow, except the case of MS2 and STx-1b cotransport. The diffusion-limited attachment was higher for MS2 than ΦΧ174 for all cases examined. PMID:26747984

  18. Gardening in Clay Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Katie; Kuhns, Michael; Cardon, Grant

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet covers the basics of clay, silt and sand soils with an emphasis on gardening in soils with a high clay content. It includes information on the composition of clay soils, gardening tips for managing clay soils, and the types of plants that grow best in clay soils.

  19. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS2), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  20. Content of arsenic, selenium, mercury in the coal, food, clay and drinking water on the Zhaotong fluorosis area, eastern Yunnan Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Kun-li; Li Hui-jie; Chen Tong-bin (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research

    2008-03-15

    About 160 samples of coal, corn, capsicum and drinking water were collected from the endemic fluorosis area of Zhenxiong and Weixin County, Zhaotong City of Yunnan Province, to determine the arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) content by AAF-800. The study found that the As content in the main coal seam from the Late Permian coal mines in Zhaotong City is 8.84 mg/kg and some civil coal can reach 89.09 mg/kg. The Se and Hg in the coal samples of Late Permian is lower, but Se and Hg are more concentrated in the pyritic coal balls and the pyritic gangue of the coal seam. The As content in corn and capsicum dried by coal-burning is more than 0.7 mg/kg, the natural standard amount of arsenic content permitted in food by China. The Se and Hg content in corn dried by coal-burning is lower than the natural standard of Se and Hg content in food in China but the Se and Hg content of capsicum dried by coal-burning exceeds the amount permitted by the natural standard for food in China. Clay, used as an additive for the coal-burning process and as a binder in making briquettes, contains a high content of As, generally more than 16 mg/kg. However, the Se and Hg content of clay itself are low. The As, Se and Hg content of drinking water are lower than the natural standard of As, Se and Hg content in the drinking water. So, there is high-As content coal and high-As content dried corn and capsicum in the endemic fluorosis area of Zhaotong City of Yunnan Province. The high As content of the dried corn and capsicum might have originated from the high arsenic content of burnt coal and clay. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Development and Characterisation of Nanoclays from Indian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    S. Manocha; Nikesh Patel; L. M. Manocha

    2008-01-01

    Indian clays are known for their smecticity. One such clay sample collected from Bhuj (Gujarat)was characterised and modified by successive sedimentation processes for different time intervals.The non-plastic components of clay, viz., quartz, illite, iron oxide, CaO, MgO, and organic matterwere removed in different steps, as the heavy impurities in the clay-water suspensions, settledown during sedimentation. The free iron oxide present in clay suspension was reduced bygiving sodium citrate-bi...

  2. The Boom Clay geochemistry: Natural evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, the Boom Clay is studied as the reference formation for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. As the Boom Clay is considered as the main barrier for radionuclide migration/retention, a thorough characterisation of the clay and its pore water was done. This facilitates better understanding of the long-term geological processes and the distribution of the trace elements and radionuclides. From a mineralogical/geochemical point of view, the Boom Clay is considered as a rather homogeneous sediment, vertically as well as laterally. It is composed of detrital minerals, organic matter and fossils. Minerals are mainly clay minerals, quartz and feldspars. Minor amounts of pyrite and carbonates are also present. Small variations in mineralogical/geochemical composition are related to granulometrical variations. The radiochemical study indicates that the Boom Clay is in a state of secular radioactive equilibrium, meaning that the Boom Clay has not been disturbed for a very long time. Pore water sampling is done in situ from various piezometers, or by the squeezing or leaching of clay cores in the laboratory. These three pore water sampling techniques have been compared and evaluated. Boom Clay pore water is a NaHCO3 solution of 15 mM, containing 115 mg·l-1 of dissolved natural organic carbon. Some slight variations in pore water composition have been observed and can be explained by principles of chemical equilibrium. (author)

  3. Automated Water-Purification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Harlow G.; Hames, Peter S.; Menninger, Fredrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Reverse-osmosis system operates and maintains itself with minimal human attention, using programmable controller. In purifier, membranes surround hollow cores through which clean product water flows out of reverse-osmosis unit. No chemical reactions or phase changes involved. Reject water, in which dissolved solids concentrated, emerges from outer membrane material on same side water entered. Flow controls maintain ratio of 50 percent product water and 50 percent reject water. Membranes expected to last from 3 to 15 years.

  4. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  5. General strategy, clay based disposal concepts and integration (GSI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This session gathers 20 articles (posters) dealing with: the assessment of backfill materials and methods for deposition tunnels; HTV-1: a semi technical scale testing of a multi-layer hydraulic shaft sealing system; the development of water content adjust method by mixing powdered-ice and chilled bentonite: application to the construction of bentonite engineered barriers by shot-clay method; repository design issues related to the thermal impact induced by heat emitting radioactive waste; pillared clays, using Romanian montmorillonite; the simulation of differential settlements of clay based engineered barrier systems in a geo-centrifuge; the critical issues regarding clay behaviour in the KBS-3H repository design; an alternative buffer material experiment; assessing the performance of a swelling clay tunnel seal and issues identified in the course of its operation; the activation of a Ca-bentonite as buffer material; a large diameter borehole type repository in the clays for radioactive waste long term storage; the erosion of backfill materials during the installation phase; the behaviour of the clay cover of a site for very low level nuclear waste: field flexion tests; the laboratory tests made on three different backfill candidates for the Swedish KBS- 3V concept; the engineering geological clay research for radioactive waste repository in Slovakia; the ESDRED project, module 1 - Design, fabrication, assembly, handling and packaging of buffer rings; the laboratory experiments on the sealing ability of bentonite pellets; the screening of bentonite resources for use as an engineered barrier component in deep geologic repositories; the assessment of the radionuclide release from the near-field environment of a spent nuclear fuel geological repository; and the emplacement tests with granular bentonite

  6. Structural studies of pillared clays and modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrado, K.A.; Thompson, A.R.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1987-11-01

    The long-range order of pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) after acid activation with 0.05N HCl has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The data show that long-range order in PILCs decreases as AlCH-PB = ZrCH-PB much greater than Zr/AlCH-PB = Cr/AlCH-PB (PB = pillared bentonite; MCH = metal chlorohydroxy pillaring agent, where M = Al, Zr or Cr). Apparently, pure oxide clusters are more stable than mixed oxide clusters. Treatment of PILCs with dilute HCl at 25/sup 0/C is less damaging than at reflux temperature, and calcined PILCs are more stable than air-dried materials. More structural damage occurs with 3M sulfuric acid treatment than with dilute HCl. Treatment with a weak base also causes some degradation of the pillars. /sup 27/Al-MAS NMR has been used to study pillared hectorite (PH), as well as other clay systems. The large increase of the observable octahedral aluminum (Al(VI)) resonance seen after pillaring is explained by loss of water from the (Al/sub 13/O/sub 4/(OH)/sub 24/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 12/)/sup 7 +/ (Al/sub 13/) cation. /sup 27/Al spectra of PILCs derived from different pillaring agents and exposed to various heat and acid treatments are remarkably similar. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. CHEMICAL AND MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FRENCH GREEN CLAYS USED FOR HEALING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B; Haydel, Shelley E; Giese, Rossman F; Eberl, Dennis D

    2008-08-01

    The worldwide emergence of infectious diseases, together with the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, elevate the need to properly detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. The overuse and misuse of common antibiotics in recent decades stimulates the need to identify new inhibitory agents. Therefore, natural products like clays, that display antibacterial properties, are of particular interest.The absorptive properties of clay minerals are well documented for healing skin and gastrointestinal ailments. However, the antibacterial properties of clays have received less scientific attention. French green clays have recently been shown to heal Buruli ulcer, a necrotic or 'flesh-eating' infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Assessing the antibacterial properties of these clays could provide an inexpensive treatment for Buruli ulcer and other skin infections.Antimicrobial testing of the two clays on a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens showed that one clay promotes bacterial growth (possibly provoking a response from the natural immune system), while another kills bacteria or significantly inhibits bacterial growth. This paper compares the mineralogy and chemical composition of the two French green clays used in the treatment of Buruli ulcer.Mineralogically, the two clays are dominated by 1Md illite and Fe-smectite. Comparing the chemistry of the clay minerals and exchangeable ions, we conclude that the chemistry of the clay, and the surface properties that affect pH and oxidation state, control the chemistry of the water used to moisten the clay poultices and contribute the critical antibacterial agent(s) that ultimately debilitate the bacteria. PMID:19079803

  8. Clay-based Nanocomposites Possibilities and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    In the last decades, clay mineral based nanocomposites and polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNC) have been proposed as very useful materials for many uses including photocatalysis, medicinal uses as tissue engineering or modified drug delivery systems. Clay minerals and especially montmorillonite, kaolinite, halloysite palygorskite and sepiolite are the most used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, colloidal dimensions of their particles and other properties. This lecture aims at reporting on very recent developments in the use of clay minerals and PCNC as materials with photocatalytic and medical interest.

  9. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-07-01

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  10. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  11. Modification of Water Circulation in Demineralized Water System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long lifetime and efficient are expected for demineralized water system. Therefore, water circulation system for demineralized water system was made by modifying water distillation system, include building circulation water system for water efficiency and equipment installation, such as: ion exchanger for demineralized water process, cooling system, water circulation semiautomatic system and Compressor ETC-100 device for automatic cooling machine. This modified system was able to produce demineralized water with conductivity 0,8 – 0,9μs (microsiemen), reduce incrustations in distillation equipment which can longer the lifetime and water saving. (author)

  12. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Jelínek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC, the cis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC are expected in the trans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water – bentonite interaction and the swelling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as well as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  13. Planning of experimental removal of cadmium in finite bath system using the chocolate clay B as adsorbent; Caracterizacao de adsorvente (argila chocolate B) visando a remocao de cadmio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, J.D.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Lima, W.S.; Souza, R.S., E-mail: wsl_20@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: meiry@deq.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LABNOV/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Desenvolvimento de Novos Materiais

    2012-07-01

    The smectite clays are characterized by having a high cation exchange capacity and ability to remove metal ions. They have great industrial importance, for its abundance and low cost. The first part of this work was to characterize the clay called Chocolate B through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive Physical Adsorption of Nitrogen. The second part of the work aims to evaluate the significance of the variables: pH and initial concentration on removal of cadmium in a batch system. In the experimental design used was a 2{sup 2} factorial analysis with the addition at the central point, and evaluated the percentage of removal (Rem%) and removal capacity (EQF). XRD results corroborating the chemical analysis (EDX), characterized as a B Chocolate smectite clays. Statistical analysis showed a strong influence of variable pH on the removal of cadmium. (author)

  14. Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents research results using IT-Tools for CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design of water hydraulic actuators for motion control of machines, lifts, cranes and robots. Matlab/Simulink and CATIA are used as IT-Tools. The contributions include results from on......-going research projects on fluid power and mechatronics based on tap water hydraulic servovalves and linear servo actuators and rotary vane actuators for motion control and power transmission. Development and design a novel water hydraulic rotary vane actuator for robot manipulators. Proposed mathematical...... modelling, control and simulation of a water hydraulic rotary vane actuator applied to power and control a two-links manipulator and evaluate performance. The results include engineering design and test of the proposed simulation models compared with IHA Tampere University’s presentation of research...

  15. Efficient visible light driven photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using attapulgite clay sensitized by CdS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen production through water splitting using photocatalysts with solar energy can produce clean fuel from renewable resources. In this study, CdS nanoparticle sensitized attapulgite (ATP) nanocomposites were successfully prepared by a facile approach. Under visible-light irradiation, the as-prepared photocatalysts were used for photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions containing Na2SO3 and Na2S as sacrificial reagents even without the noble metals. Photocatalytic hydrogen production activity is ascribed to the presence of CdS nanocrystals that alter the energy levels of the conduction band and valence band in the coupled semiconductor system. Furthermore, the theoretical calculations show that the natural Fe doping (two ATP cells sharing one Fe atom) can promote the photocatalytic process. (paper)

  16. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. PMID:26057987

  17. Water Treatment Technology - Distribution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on distribution systems provides instructional materials for six competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: types of pipe for distribution systems, types…

  18. Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loenen, A.; van Dijk, M.; van Verseveld, W.; Berger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the Dutch large rivers, canals and lakes are controlled by the Dutch water authorities. The main reasons concern safety, navigation and fresh water supply. Historically the separate water bodies have been controlled locally. For optimizating management of these water systems an integrated approach was required. Presented is a platform which integrates data from all control objects for monitoring and control purposes. The Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems (IWP) is an implementation of Delft-FEWS which supports operational control of water systems and actively gives advice. One of the main characteristics of IWP is that is real-time collects, transforms and presents different types of data, which all add to the operational water management. Next to that, hydrodynamic models and intelligent decision support tools are added to support the water managers during their daily control activities. An important advantage of IWP is that it uses the Delft-FEWS framework, therefore processes like central data collection, transformations, data processing and presentation are simply configured. At all control locations the same information is readily available. The operational water management itself gains from this information, but it can also contribute to cost efficiency (no unnecessary pumping), better use of available storage and advise during (water polution) calamities.

  19. Water Supply Infrastructure System Surety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EKMAN,MARK E.; ISBELL,DARYL

    2000-01-06

    The executive branch of the United States government has acknowledged and identified threats to the water supply infrastructure of the United States. These threats include contamination of the water supply, aging infrastructure components, and malicious attack. Government recognition of the importance of providing safe, secure, and reliable water supplies has a historical precedence in the water works of the ancient Romans, who recognized the same basic threats to their water supply infrastructure the United States acknowledges today. System surety is the philosophy of ''designing for threats, planning for failure, and managing for success'' in system design and implementation. System surety is an alternative to traditional compliance-based approaches to safety, security, and reliability. Four types of surety are recognized: reactive surety; proactive surety, preventative surety; and fundamental, inherent surety. The five steps of the system surety approach can be used to establish the type of surety needed for the water infrastructure and the methods used to realize a sure water infrastructure. The benefit to the water industry of using the system surety approach to infrastructure design and assessment is a proactive approach to safety, security, and reliability for water transmission, treatment, distribution, and wastewater collection and treatment.

  20. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  1. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm-1.0C-1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  2. Heavy water extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the present invention the tray for extracting liquid effluent from the humidifier section of the process is located in an intermediate position in the section, having a plurality of the trays of the section thereabove, with a balancing flow of heated water being admitted to the section beneath the extraction tray, to maintain substantially uniform loading of the trays in the humidifier section. The water being admitted in heat providing relation to the humidifier is divided into first and second portions, with the first portion admitted at the top of the humidifier section and the second portion substantially equal to the quantity of effluent extracted being admitted to the section beneath the extraction tray so as to maintain balance in the trays. The deuterium content of the gas, in passing through the trays above the extracting tray, is increased. The second water portion of the heater circuit is passed in heat exchanging relation with the effluent, to raise the temperature of the effluent prior to entry into the gas stripping portion of the plant wherein H2S gas is recovered for recycling. (author)

  3. Clay iron interactions under high ph conditions: an experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many designs for geological disposal facilities for radioactive and toxic wastes envisage the use of clay-rich rock as engineering barriers. It is thus necessary to evaluate changes that can affect the long-term behaviour of the clay. In some instances, clay may be in contact with cement and/or a metallic iron canister. The saturation of cements with groundwater produces an alkaline pore fluid with a pH in the range 10-13,5. This fluid may enter the clay barrier and significantly modifies the pH of the interstitial waters, and subsequently alters, the clay and its physical and chemical properties. Studies have already observed various modifications of the clay mineralogy in alkaline conditions: dissolution of smectite, formation of illite, of calcium silicate hydrates, of zeolites and of lizardite. But the presence of an iron canister might induce other mechanisms and transformations. Clay-iron interactions under alkaline conditions have been studied experimentally using a bentonite (MX-80) as starting product. The presence of an iron canister has been simulated by introducing iron oxide powder (magnetite), metallic iron powder and metallic iron plate. The presence of a cement pore fluid has been simulated by an alkaline and Ca, Na-rich fluid prepared from analytical grade chemicals. The fluid pH was 12,3. Solid/solution systems were prepared under argon atmosphere in a glove box to obtain oxygen-free systems and put in autoclaves at 80 C, 150 C and 300 C. The durations of the experiments were 3,6 and 9 months, the vessels being completely static during experiments with the iron plate at the bottom to obtain information on the spatial changes as a function to the distance to the metallic iron plate. For each vessel, the sample was parted under argon atmosphere: one part collected close to the iron plate and the other part far from the iron plate; the iron plate itself was collected separately. (authors)

  4. The Exploration Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORourke, Mary Jane E.; Carter, Layne; Holder, Donald W.; Tomes, Kristin M.

    2006-01-01

    The Exploration Water Recovery System is designed towards fulfillment of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration, which will require elevation of existing technologies to higher levels of optimization. This new system, designed for application to the Exploration infrastructure, presents a novel combination of proven air and water purification technologies. The integration of unit operations is modified from that of the current state-of-the-art water recovery system so as to optimize treatment of the various waste water streams, contaminant loads, and flow rates. Optimization is achieved primarily through the removal of volatile organic contaminants from the vapor phase prior to their absorption into the liquid phase. In the current state-of-the-art system, the water vapor in the cabin atmosphere is condensed, and the volatile organic contaminants present in that atmosphere are absorbed into the aqueous phase. Removal of contaminants the5 occurs via catalytic oxidation in the liquid phase. Oxidation kinetics, however, dictate that removal of volatile organic contaminants from the vapor phase can inherently be more efficient than their removal from the aqueous phase. Taking advantage of this efficiency reduces the complexity of the water recovery system. This reduction in system complexity is accompanied by reductions in the weight, volume, power, and resupply requirements of the system. Vapor compression distillation technology is used to treat the urine, condensate, and hygiene waste streams. This contributes to the reduction in resupply, as incorporation of vapor compression distillation technology at this point in the process reduces reliance on the expendable ion exchange and adsorption media used in the current state-of-the-art water recovery system. Other proven technologies that are incorporated into the Exploration Water Recovery System include the Trace Contaminant Control System and the Volatile Removal Assembly.

  5. Study of smectite clays of the city Pedra Lavrada - PB for use in water-based drilling fluids; Estudo das argilas esmectiticas do municipio de Pedra Lavrada-PB para uso em fluidos de perfuracao base agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, I.A. da; Costa, J.M.R.; Cardoso, M.A.F.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C., E-mail: isabelle_albuquerquecg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Ferreira, H.S. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (DEMAT/CT/UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Paraiba has large reserves of bentonite clays, with the largest deposits in Boa Vista, PB. Recently new deposits were discovered in the cities of Cubati and Pedra Lavrada-PB, creating great expectations for further expansion of reserves for industrial production. The aim of this work is the study of smectite clays from the city of Pedra Lavrada, PB for use in drilling fluids water based. The characterization was made by the diffraction of laser (AG), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), chemical composition by X-ray fluorescence (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), exchange capacity of cations (ECC) and surface area (SA). The results obtained so far showed that the samples presented at its mineral composition smectite, kaolinite and quartz. In relation to rheological properties showed that the bentonite clay sample Dark presents promising features for use in water based drilling fluids. (author)

  6. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  7. Fine-grained clay fraction (,0.2 {mu}m): An interesting tool to approach the present thermal and permeability state in active geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrier, P.; Papapanagiotou, P.; Beaufort, D.; Traineau, H.; Bril, H.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated by X-ray diffraction the very fine grained secondary minerals (< 0.2 {micro}m) developed in geothermal systems, in relation with their present thermal and permeability state. Because the smallest particles are the most reactive part of a rock, they are the youngest mineral phases of the geothermal fields. This study has been performed on two active geothermal fields: Milos field, Greece (130 < T < 320 C) and Chipilapa field, Salvador (90 < T < 215 C). In the Milos field, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fraction observed in the reservoir strongly differs from the overlying altered metamorphic schists in the presence of abundant quantities of saponite and talc/saponite interstratified minerals at unusually high temperature. These phases are considered to be kinetically control-led ''metastable'' minerals which rapidly evolve towards actinolite and talc for present temperatures higher than 300 C. Their occurrence is a good indicator of discharge in highly permeable zones. In the geothermal field of Chipilapa, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fractions fairly agrees with the temperatures presently measured in the wells, whereas several discrepancies may be pointed out from the compositions of coarser clay fractions (< 5 {micro}m) which contain minerals inherited from higher temperature stages. Permeable zones may be evidenced from an increase of expandable components in the interstratified minerals and a decrease of the coherent domain of the unexpandable clay particles (chlorite).

  8. Philosophy of Education: A Thorn in the (Clay) Foot of the Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetard, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The article tries to defend the thesis that our educational systems are not doing well (which is not at all original), that the philosophy of education, more often than not, accompanies, justifies and reinforces the malaise of the system (which is already more original), and that it should, without a doubt, question itself in order to know how to…

  9. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Drinking Water Treatment Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about drinking water treatment systems. This fact sheet discusses different types of water treatment systems available to homeowners. It includes a table with water contaminants or problems, possible causes of the problem, and solutions.

  10. Predicted performance of clay-barrier landfill covers in arid and semi-arid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, S; Ghanimeh, S; El-Fadel, M

    2007-01-01

    Conventional landfill cover systems for municipal solid waste include low-permeability compacted clay barriers to minimize infiltration into the landfilled waste. Such layers are vulnerable in climates where arid to semi-arid conditions prevail, whereby the clay cover tends to desiccate and crack, resulting in drastically higher infiltration, i.e., lower cover efficiency. To date, this phenomenon, which has been reported in field observations, has not been adequately assessed. In this paper, the performance of a cover system solely relying on a clay barrier was simulated using a numerical finite element formulation to capture changes in the clay layer and the corresponding modified hydraulic characteristics. The cover system was guided by USEPA Subtitle-D minimum requirements and consisted of a clay layer underlying a protective vegetated soil. The intrinsic characteristics of the clay barrier and vegetative soil cover, including their saturated hydraulic conductivities and their soil-water characteristic curves, were varied as warranted to simulate intact or "cracked" conditions as determined through the numerical analyses within the proposed methodology. The results indicate that the levels of percolation through the compromised or cracked cover were up to two times greater than those obtained for intact covers, starting with an intact clay hydraulic conductivity of 10(-5)cm/s. PMID:16987648

  11. Gas migration through bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas produced by irradiation of pore water in the highly compacted bentonite that surrounds the copper canisters according to the KBS 2 and 3 concepts, may escape from the clay/copper interface if the gas pressure is higher than the groundwater pressure. A reasonable physical model predicts that gas may penetrate wider capillary passages that actually exist in the very dense clay, although these passages are still of microscopic size. In the large majority of the clay voids, the capillary action is sufficient, however, to resist gas penetration, and this suggests that a possible mechanism of gas migration is that of a finger-like pattern of tortuous gas passages extending from the canisters if radiolysis takes place at all. Two series of experiments have been run at gas pressures up to about 10 MPa. Nitrogen as well as hydrogen were used in these tests which seem to confirm, in principle, the validity of the physical model. (authors)

  12. Biodegradation behaviors and water adsorption of poly(vinyl alcohol)/starch/carboxymethyl cellulose/clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Mohammad Taghi; Sabouri, Narges

    2013-09-01

    The focus of this work is to study the effect of sodium montmorillonite (MMT-Na) clay content on the rate and extent of enzymatic hydrolysis polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/starch (S)/carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) blends using enzyme cellulase. The rate of glucose production from each nanocomposite substrates was most rapid for the substrate without MMT-Na and decreased with the addition of MMT-Na for PVA/S/CMC blend (51.5 μg/ml h), PVA/S/CMC/1% MMT (45.4 μg/ml h), PVA/S/CMC/3% MMT (42.8 μg/ml h), and PVA/S/CMC/5% MMT (39.2 μg/ml h). The results of this study have revealed that films with MMT-Na content at 5 wt.% exhibited a significantly reduced rate and extent of hydrolysis. Enzymatic degradation behavior of MMT-Na containing nanocomposites of PVA/S/CMC was based on the determinations of weight loss and the reducing sugars. The degraded residues have been characterized by various analytical techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  14. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement - 4. International meeting. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    proposed within the Strategic Research Agenda, elaborated through the Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP). The conference offers a particular opportunity to present the more recent developments and main outputs of research carried out within the framework of national and international cooperative experiments and dedicated European projects. Contributions coming from fields other than radioactive waste disposal; like geological storage of natural gas, sequestration of CO2, energy storage in underground, chemical waste isolation, etc., also taking advantage of the properties of the clay material, were encouraged. This conference covers all topics concerning the natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay-based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties) and monitoring. General strategy for clay based repository concepts Examples of research programmes (national or international) concerning the role of natural and engineered clay barriers for radioactive waste confinement including repository designs, safety assessment, full-scale demonstrations and implementations (e.g. heater tests). Geology and clay characterisation Clay mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in clay rock, fracturing, self-sealing processes, role of organic matters and microbiological processes, micro and nano characterisation of clay minerals and argillaceous rocks. Geochemistry Pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry. Mass transfer Water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space

  15. Universal scaling of the formation factor in clays: Example from the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Hugh; Ghanbarian, Behzad; Henry, Pierre; Conin, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    Electrical conductivity is a fundamental characteristic describing how strongly a network opposes flow of electrical current. In fully water-saturated porous media the conductivity, represented by the formation factor, is mainly controlled by porosity, connectivity of the conducting phases, and the tortuosity of electrical current paths. Previous work has shown that universal scaling derived from percolation and effective medium theories accurately describes the relationship between formation factor and porosity when the percolation threshold is taken account, as well as the porosity value at which the scaling switches from percolation theory to effective medium theory. We determined the formation factor in clay-rich sediments based on cation exchange capacity measurements on samples from five scientific ocean drilling sites in the Nankai Trough. We then compared the results to predictions from universal scaling after determining the volume of clay-bound water and the percolation threshold. We found that the previously reported universal scaling relations hold in these clay-rich sediments once the corrections are made for the clay-bound water and that percolation scaling appears to be valid over the entire range of observed porosities, probably due to relatively broad pore size distributions or low pore system connectivity. Our results show that universal scaling can be applied to describe the porosity dependence of the formation factor in clay-rich sediments when appropriate corrections are made for the presence of clay-bound water.

  16. Production Management Systems, Bricks or clay in the Hand of Social Actors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    Production Management Systems (PMS)is a technology developing in Denmark And Internationally. The chapter argues that technological development should be interpreted as a incremental process.It Discusses two danish cases and used the concept of the company specific social constitution to explain ...

  17. Clay Minerals and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrahman Dalgıç; Orhan Kavak

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine clay minerals, which take very importantplace in relationships of minerals and human health. They have high areadensity, adsorption capacity, rheological properties, chemical inertia and verylow or nontoxic effects to human health. So, they are widely used in medicaltreatments. Commercially used clay minerals are; smectit, polygrstite, caoliniteand talc. The other clay minerals are under investigations for medicaltreatments.

  18. Lake responses following lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock®) application: an analysis of water column lanthanum data from 16 case study lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Bryan M; Lürling, Miquel; Yasseri, Said; Castro-Castellon, Ana T; Gibbs, Max; Meis, Sebastian; McDonald, Claire; McIntosh, John; Sleep, Darren; Van Oosterhout, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Phoslock(®) is a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay that is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of legacy phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. This study investigates the potential for negative ecological impacts from elevated La concentrations associated with the use of Phoslock(®) across 16 case study lakes. Impact-recovery trajectories associated with total lanthanum (TLa) and filterable La (FLa) concentrations in surface and bottom waters were quantified over a period of up to 60 months following Phoslock(®) application. Both surface and bottom water TLa and FLa concentrations were 0.8 mEq L(-1)), but higher (up to 0.12 mg L(-1)) in lakes characterised by very low alkalinity. The effects of elevated La(3+) concentrations following Phoslock(®) applications in lakes of very low alkalinity requires further evaluation. The implications for the use of Phoslock(®) in eutrophication management are discussed. PMID:23911225

  19. Semi-permeable vesicles composed of natural clay

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Anand B.; Wan, Jiandi; Gopinath, Arvind; Stone, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple route to form robust, inorganic, semi-permeable compartments composed of montmorillonite, a natural plate-like clay mineral that occurs widely in the environment. Mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap assemble clay nanoplates from an aqueous suspension onto air bubbles. Translucent vesicles suspended in a single-phase liquid are produced when the clay-covered air bubbles are exposed to a variety of water-miscible organic liquids. These vesicles of clay are mechanic...

  20. ALCOHOL FLUSHING FOR REMOVING DNAPL'S FROM CLAY AND SAND LAYERED AQUIFER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.J. Hayden; P. Padgett; C. Farrell; J. Diebold; X. Zhou; M. Hood

    1999-08-01

    Alcohol flushing, also called cosolvent flushing, is a relatively new in-situ remediation technology that shows promise for removing organic solvents from the soil and groundwater. Soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents and petroleum products is one of the most serious and widespread environmental problems of our time. Most of the DOE facilities and inactive sites are experiencing soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents. These water immiscible solvents have entered the subsurface from leaking underground storage tanks and piping, and from past waste handling and disposal practices such as leaking lagoons, holding ponds and landfills. In many cases, they have traveled hundreds of feet down into the saturated zone. If left in the soil, these chemicals may pose a significant environmental and human health risk. Alcohol flushing has potential for application to spilled solvents located deep within the saturated zone which are difficult if not impossible to remove by current remediation strategies, thus, greatly expediting restoration time, reducing total remediation cost and reducing risk.

  1. Montmorillonite Clay-Based Polyurethane Nanocomposite As Local Triamcinolone Acetonide Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia Carmo Horta Pinto; Armando Silva-Cunha; Gerson Antônio Pianetti; Eliane Ayres; Rodrigo Lambert Oréfice; Gisele Rodrigues Da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane was synthesized by preparing aqueous polyurethane dispersion having poly(caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) as soft segments. Montmorillonite particles were delaminated within the waterborne polyurethane to produce a nanocomposite. The triamcinolone acetonide (TA), an important corticoid drug, was dispersed into the nanocomposite followed by a drying step to produce an implantable drug delivery system. Infrared (FTIR) results demonstrated that the original chem...

  2. Effect of aging on rheology of ball clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonthai, Tienchai

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of clay-water suspensions such as deflocculation or rheological properties are not constant but change with time. Aging has been recognized for changing the rheological properties of clay suspensions. This work provided information about the effects of the moisture contents in ball clay lumps and clay air exposure time on their processability. Dynamic oscillatory rheometry using a vane-in-cup geometry was used to characterize the rheological behavior of ball clay suspensions in terms of elastic modulus, viscous modulus and yield stress as a function of aging time. A light scattering size analyzer was used to examine the agglomerate size distribution of ball clay suspensions which affected the rheological behavior. Soluble ion release (both cations and anions) in the filtrate of suspensions was measured by ion chromatography. Low and high lignitic ball clay suspensions were dispersed with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) or sodium polyacrylate at specific gravity 1.3 and 1.6 in two dispersion states: fully deflocculated (minimum viscosity) and under deflocculated. Suspensions prepared using freshly mined ball clays required more dispersant than suspensions prepared using dry ball clays to achieve minimum viscosity due to a difference in agglomerate size distribution. The agglomerate size distribution of suspensions prepared using dry clays was broader than that of suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays. In suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays, there were many uniformly small agglomerates having loose water inside, while in suspensions prepared using dry clays, the capillary effect and bonding between clay particles resulting from drying broke clay aggregates apart into agglomerate structures composed of a few to many clay particles. For suspensions prepared using dry clays after one day suspension aging, the elastic modulus and yield stress decreased due to the change in agglomerate size distribution of suspensions but increased for

  3. Onsite Waste Water Treatment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs have evolved from the pit privies used widely throughout history to installations capable of producing a disinfected effluent that is fit for human consumption. Although achieving such a level of effluent quality is seldom necessary, the ability of onsite systems to remove settles able solids, floatable grease and scum, nutrients, and pathogens. From wastewater discharges defines their importance in protecting human health and environmental resources. In the modern era, the typical onsite system has consisted primarily of a septic tank and a soil absorption field, also known as a subsurface wastewater infiltration system, or SWIS. In this manual, such systems are referred to as conventional systems. Septic tanks remove most settle able and floatable material and function as an anaerobic bioreactor that promotes partial digestion of retained organic matter. Septic tank effluent, which contains significant concentrations of pathogens and nutrients, has traditionally been discharged to soil, sand, or other media absorption fields (SWISs for further treatment through biological processes, adsorption, filtration, and infiltration into underlying soils. Conventional systems work well if they are installed in areas with appropriate soils and hydraulic capacities; designed to treat the incoming waste load to meet public health, ground water, and surface water performance standards; installed properly; and maintained to ensure long-term performance. These criteria, however, are often not met. Only about one-third of the land area in the United States has soils suited for conventional subsurface soil absorption fields. System densities in some areas exceed the capacity of even suitable soils to assimilate wastewater flows and retain and transform their contaminants. In addition, many systems are located too close to ground water or surface waters and others, particularly in rural areas with newly installed public

  4. Nanomechanical characterization of clay micro flocs

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guoping; Yin, Hang; Reed, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Clay flocs are abundant in natural soils (a particulate material) and water-borne sediments. As the basic microscale, loading-bearing fundamental units, their mechanical properties control the macroscopic response of bulk soils and sediment transport. Owing to their tiny size and extremely soft consistency (especially for suspended water-borne flocs), significant difficulties and challenges exist for mechanical characterization of clay micro flocs. A novel nanomechanical characterization tech...

  5. Assessment on reliability of water quality in water distribution systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍悦滨; 田海; 王龙岩

    2004-01-01

    Water leaving the treatment works is usually of a high quality but its properties change during the transportation stage. Increasing awareness of the quality of the service provided within the water industry today and assessing the reliability of the water quality in a distribution system has become a major significance for decision on system operation based on water quality in distribution networks. Using together a water age model, a chlorine decay model and a model of acceptable maximum water age can assess the reliability of the water quality in a distribution system. First, the nodal water age values in a certain complex distribution system can be calculated by the water age model. Then, the acceptable maximum water age value in the distribution system is obtained based on the chlorine decay model. The nodes at which the water age values are below the maximum value are regarded as reliable nodes. Finally, the reliability index on the percentile weighted by the nodal demands reflects the reliability of the water quality in the distribution system. The approach has been applied in a real water distribution network. The contour plot based on the water age values determines a surface of the reliability of the water quality. At any time, this surface is used to locate high water age but poor reliability areas, which identify parts of the network that may be of poor water quality. As a result, the contour water age provides a valuable aid for a straight insight into the water quality in the distribution system.

  6. Potential for Recycling Nutrients from Biosolids Amended with Clay and Lime in Coarse-Textured Water Repellence, Acidic Soils of Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjutha Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biosolids in soils is an efficient method of recycling nutrients from biosolids and it is considered even safer when it is modified after mixing and diluting with other suitable soil organic amendments. A variety of soil organic amendments, such as green manures and composts, are used for modifying and co-composting with biosolids. However, these may not be considered as appropriate biosolids disposal and remedial measures for soils with unique problems such as low soil pH, water repellence nature, and poor water and nutrient retention capacities due to soil textural issues. Historically, soil amendments such as lime, clay, and recently biochar are being applied for such problematic soils at Western Australia and these researches focused mostly on improvement in soil physical and chemical properties. However, studies with potential for applying modified biosolids with these amendments are not complete yet. This review focused on identifying such gaps in these studies from over 170 peer-reviewed key research and review articles published over decades to latest in these areas.

  7. Water drilling fluids: evaluation of lubricity and clay swelling control; Fluidos de perfuracao a base de agua: avaliacao de lubricidade e controle de inchamento de argilas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Thiago de Freitas; Arruda, Jefferson Teixeira; Medeiros, Ana Catarina; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    During the oil well drilling, drilling fluids are used in order to transport the cuttings until the surface. This fluid is also responsible for the mechanical sustentation of the well walls, the control of undesirable production of fluids in the formation, the lubricity and the cooling of the bit. The drilling fluids based on water are extensively applied due to their lower cost, thermal stability, biodegradability, easiness of pumping and treatment, resulting in smaller environmental impacts. However, some situations, such as hydrophilic shale drilling, request the use of additives to avoid the hydration of them and, consequently, the tool imprisonment or migration (filtration) of the drilling fluids into the rock. The goal of this work was to develop and test formulations of water-base drilling fluids with high capacity of inhibition of clay swelling and lubricity, obtaining drillings with larger penetration rate and calipers without enlargements. The results showed that the appropriate combination of commonly used commercial products can promote the obtaining of fluids with equal or better performance than those used by world companies. (author)

  8. Automatic Water Sensor Window Opening System

    KAUST Repository

    Percher, Michael

    2013-12-05

    A system can automatically open at least one window of a vehicle when the vehicle is being submerged in water. The system can include a water collector and a water sensor, and when the water sensor detects water in the water collector, at least one window of the vehicle opens.

  9. Characterization of Swelling Clays as Components of the Engineered Barrier System for Geological Repositories. Results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the Member States, the IAEA coordinates research into subjects of common interest in the context of the peaceful application of nuclear technology. The coordinated research projects (CRPs) are intended to promote knowledge and technology transfer between Member States and are largely focused on subjects of prime interest to the international nuclear community. This report presents the results of a CRP carried out between 2002 and 2007 on the subject of swelling clays proposed for use as a component in the engineered barrier system (EBS) of the multibarrier concept for disposal of radioactive waste. In 2002, under the auspices of the IAEA, a number of Member States came together to form a Network of Centres of Excellence on Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities (URF Network). This network identified the general subject of the application of high swelling clays to seal repositories for radioactive waste, with specific emphasis on the isolation of high level radioactive waste from the biosphere, as being suitable for a CRP. Existing concepts for geological repositories for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel require the use of EBSs to ensure effective isolation of the radioactive waste. There are two major materials proposed for use in the EBS, swelling clay based materials and cementitious/concrete materials. These materials will be placed between the perimeter of the excavation and the waste container to fill the existing gap and ensure isolation of the waste within the canister (also referred to as a container in some EBS concepts) by supporting safety through retardation and confinement. Cementitious materials are industrially manufactured to consistent standards and are readily available in most locations and therefore their evaluation is of less value to Member States than that of swelling clays. There exists a considerable range of programme development regarding

  10. Swelling transition of a clay induced by heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E L; Hemmen, H; Fonseca, D M; Coutant, C; Knudsen, K D; Plivelic, T S; Bonn, D; Fossum, J O

    2012-01-01

    Clays are of paramount importance for soil stability, but also in applications ranging from oil recovery to composites and hydrogels. Generically, clays are divided into two subclasses: macroscopically swelling, 'active' clays that have the capacity for taking up large amounts of water to form stable gels, and 'passive' or non-swelling clays; the former stabilize soils whereas the latter are known to lead to landslides. However, it has been unclear so far what mechanisms underlie clay swelling. Here, we report the first observation of a temperature-induced transition from a passive to an active, swelling clay. We propose a simple description of the swelling transition; while net attractive interactions are dominant at low temperatures so that the clay particles remain attached to each other in stacks, at higher temperatures it is energetically favourable for the clay to swell due to the entropy that is gained by counterions which are liberated during swelling. PMID:22943004

  11. The Water System and Water Chain in Dutch Water and Environmental Legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Pieter Jong

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with Dutch legislation on the water system and water chain. In brief, the water system is the totality of surface water and ground water, which belong together to the natural environment; while the water chain lies in the sphere of public utilities, comprising the pathway from drinking-water supply to wastewater treatment. The water system is regulated in legislation for which the M inistry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management is responsible. The water chain is reg...

  12. Immobilization of fungal laccase onto a nonionic surfactant-modified clay material: application to PAH degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Liu, Keng-Hua; Liao, Yi-Fen; Yang, Vivian

    2016-03-01

    Nonionic surfactant-modified clay is a useful absorbent material that effectively removes hydrophobic organic compounds from soil/groundwater. We developed a novel material by applying an immobilized fungal laccase onto nonionic surfactant-modified clay. Low-water-solubility polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (naphthalene/phenanthrene) were degraded in the presence of this bioactive material. PAH degradation by free laccase was higher than degradation by immobilized laccase when the surfactant concentration was allowed to form micelles. PAH degradation by immobilized laccase on TX-100-modified clay was higher than on Brij35-modified clay. Strong laccase degradation of PAH can be maintained by adding surfactant monomers or micelles. The physical adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto clay plays an important role in PAH degradation by laccase, which can be explained by the structure and molecular interactions of the surfactant with the clay and enzyme. A system where laccase is immobilized onto TX-100-monomer-modified clay is a good candidate bioactive material for in situ PAHs bioremediation. PMID:25739840

  13. Hydro-mechanical properties of the red salt clay (T4) - Natural analogue of a clay barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste in deep geologic formations is worldwide the only accepted solution to warranty long term safety. Besides clay and crystalline rocks, salt is one of the potential host-rock candidates, mainly favored in Germany. As salts rocks are highly soluble their barrier integrity against water inflow from the cap rock is questionable. Argillaceous cap rocks or intercalated clay layers may act as protective shield in the hanging wall above a repository, thus providing a multi-barrier system. The aims of our study are twofold: 1) to characterize the mineralogical, hydraulic and rock-mechanical properties of the so-called Red Salt Clay (T4) as natural analogue of a clay barriers represented by different states of induration corresponding to various depth of burial diagenesis; 2) to demonstrate the favoured barrier properties of an argillaceous layer in the top of a salt formation undergoing dynamic processes such as rock bursts. The so-called Red Salt Clay (T4) is deposited as clay rich clastic sediment at the base of the Aller-series forming a persistent lateral layer above the lower Zechstein-series. The thickness of the clay-formation becomes smaller with decreasing distance from the border of the basin, i.e. from ∼15 m at Rossleben, over 7 m at Bernburg to 3.5 m at Zielitz, all in Saxony-Anhalt, D). The mineralogical composition of the Red Salt Clay varies, e.g. average composition for the Teutschenthal area: clay minerals 54% (Chlorite: 8%; Illite/Muscovite: 46%); quartz: 22%; anhydrite: 15%; accessory gypsum; Halite: 6%, Hematite: ∼ 2%). The geochemical and mineralogical composition of the Red Salt Clay represents a final state of natural salt-clay-systems, thus standing as a natural analogue for bentonite-based sealing systems in contact with high-saline solutions (e.g. saturated NaCl-solution, solutions with various Mg2+ -, K+ -, SO42- - concentrations). The

  14. Influence of natural mobile organic matter on europium retention on Bure clay rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bure clay rock (CR) was chosen as host rock for the French high and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste repository. This choice is mostly explained by the retention ability of the Callovo-Oxfordian rock (COx). Bure clay rock contains natural organic matter (OM) that could have an influence on radionuclide retention. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of natural mobile OM on the retention of Eu on clay rock. Eu was chosen as a chemical model for trivalent actinides contained in vitrified waste. Three organic molecules were studied: suberic, sorbic and tiglic acids, small organic acids identified in COx pore water. All the experiments were carried out in an environment recreating COx water (pH=7.5; I=0.1 mol/L; PCO2 =10-2 bar).Clay rock sample characterization showed that the sample used in this work was similar to those previously extracted from the area of interest and that it was necessary to maintain pH at 7.5 to avoid altering the clay rock. The Eu-OM system study indicated that organic acids had no influence on Eu speciation in COx water. The Eu-CR system experimental study confirmed that retention implied sorption on CR (C(Eu)≤6.10-6 mol/L) and precipitation in COx water (C(Eu)≥6.10-6 mol/L). Distribution coefficient Rd (quantifying sorption) was estimated at 170 ± 30 L/g. This high value is consistent with literature values obtained on clay rocks. The ternary Eu-OM-CR system study showed a slight increase of sorption in the presence of organic matter. This synergistic effect is very satisfactory in terms of storage security: the presence of small organic acids in clay rock does not question retention properties with respect to europium and trivalent actinides. (author)

  15. Effects of Different Factors on Water Flow and Solute Transport Investigated by Time Domain Reflectometry in Sandy Clay Loam Field Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-09-01

    Factors affecting preferential flow and transport in the vadose zone need to be investigated by experiments and simulations to protect groundwater against surface applied chemicals. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of several factors (soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate) and their interactions on the extent of preferential flow and transport in a sandy clay loam field soil using the time domain reflectometry (TDR) for measuring SWC and electrical conductivity (EC) in 12 treatments, modeling (by HYDRUS-1D and VS2DTI) the measured SWC and EC, and conducting statistical tests for comparing the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) obtained by inversely fitting in the CXTFIT program. The study results showed that the applied solution moved faster in the undisturbed, wet initial SWC, and higher application rate experimental conditions than in the disturbed, dry initial SWC, and lower application rate, respectively, based on the analysis of the changes in TDR measured SWC and EC with depth at 1, 2, 5, and 15 h of the experiments. However, the effects of interactive factors or treatments on water flow and solute transport were not clear enough. The modeling results showed that HYDRUS-1D was better than VS2DTI in the estimation of EC and especially SWC, but overall the models had relatively low performances in the simulations. Statistical test results also showed that the treatments had different flow and transport characteristics because they were divided into different groups in terms of the means of SWC and EC and solute transport parameters. These results suggest that similar experiments with more distinct interactions and modeling studies with different approaches need to be considered for better understanding the complex flow and transport processes in the vadose zone. PMID:23002311

  16. Attenuation of xenobiotic organic leachate compounds from a landfill to surface water:Transition in clay till settings

    OpenAIRE

    Milosevic, Nemanja; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Elsner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Numerous landfill sites worldwide have been recognized as a threat to clean water resources. Many environmental legal acts have been issued and improved to tackle this problem. The main concern is caused by slow degradation of the disposed waste and the high complexity of field conditions (landfill history, geology and hydrogeology), which together result in a virtually unique setting at each landfill site. Nevertheless, many general principles derived from research sites and case studies in ...

  17. Drinking Water Temperature Modelling in Domestic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, A.; Blokker, M.; Vreeburg, J.; Van der Hoek, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic water supply systems are the final stage of the transport process to deliver potable water to the customers’ tap. Under the influence of temperature, residence time and pipe materials the drinking water quality can change while the water passes the domestic drinking water system. According

  18. A water-quality assessment of the Busseron Creek watershed, Sullivan, Vigo, Greene, and Clay Counties, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenberry, Stephen E.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical quality of surface water in the 237-square mile Busseron Creek watershed, in Indiana, is significantly affected by drainage from coal mines and municipalities. Drainage from coal mines is primarily a problem of higher than normal dissolved-solids concentration, whereas, drainage from municipalities is generally a problem of bacteria and phytoplankton. Generally, the water is calcium bicarbonate type, except in streams affected by drainage from coal mines, where the water is a mixed calcium and magnesium sulfate type. Ranges of concentration (in milligrams per liter) of dissolved solids and of some of the chemical constituents dissolved in streams from September 1975 to July 1976 were: dissolved solids, from 104 to 2,610; iron, from 0.00 to 150; sulfate, from 14 to 1,900; chloride, from 3.3 to 130; nitrate (as nitroglen), from 0.01 to 5.3; phosphate (as phosphorus), from 0.1 to 1.7; and total organic carbon, from 2.4 to 60. Range of pH was from 2.7 to 9.6 Ranges of concentration of chlorinated hydrocarbons (in micrograms per kilogram) detected in bed material of streams were: aldrin, from 0.2 to 0.4; chlordane, from 0 to 13; DDE, from 0.0 to 0.3; dieldrin, from 0.0 to 9.8; and heptachlor epoxide, from 0 to 1.0. Streams draining municipalities had high populations of fecal coliform bacteria (as many as 46,000 colonies per 100 milliliter) and phytoplankton (as many as 190 ,000 cells per milliliter). Dissolved-oxygen concentration ranged from 2.8 to 15.0 milligrams per liter. 

  19. Physicochemical reactivity in clay-rich materials: tools for safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural or engineered clay-rich materials are ubiquitous when it comes to achieving sequestration of acid gas, confinement of pollutants or high level radioactive waste (HLRW), and trapping hydrocarbon oil and gas in geological settings. The sequestration, confinement, and trapping functions rely on properties such as low permeability, high sorption and ion exchange capacity, and, in some cases, on swelling abilities. Clay-rich materials contain specific clay minerals possessing these properties due to the small size and high tortuosity of the pores as well as the very high specific surface area and the surface charge of these minerals (especially smectites). For performance and safety purposes, the persistence of this initial sealing function has to be ensured over time, as the clay minerals of interest and the foreign anthropogenic materials (concrete, steel, and other clay materials in situ) will undergo physicochemical interactions and may lead to irreversible transformations. The clay minerals will also be subjected to perturbations due to the heat release of waste packages in the case of HLRW repository, and liquid water and vapour transfers. To tackle the complexity of these phenomena, we combine multi-scale and multi-technique characterisation (middle and far Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) on samples coming from laboratory experiments and natural analogues, and integrate the results through reactive transport modelling. As an example, the characterisation methodology is used to establish the illitisation of clay-stones due to a basaltic dyke intrusion. The approach is compared with classical ones and the application to diagenetic clay sequences for petroleum exploration is discussed. We also explore the high sensitivity of smectic (gel phase)/smectite properties as a function of water content/composition and temperature by investigating the interactions between

  20. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  1. Drinking Water Temperature Modelling in Domestic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moerman, A; Blokker, M.; Vreeburg, J.; J. P. van der Hoek

    2014-01-01

    Domestic water supply systems are the final stage of the transport process to deliver potable water to the customers’ tap. Under the influence of temperature, residence time and pipe materials the drinking water quality can change while the water passes the domestic drinking water system. According to the Dutch Drinking Water Act the drinking water temperature may not exceed the 25 °C threshold at point-of-use level. This paper provides a mathematical approach to model the heating of drinking...

  2. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Galán Jiménez, C.; Mishael, Y. G.; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo González, Esmeralda; Undabeytia López, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active i...

  3. Factors Affecting the Design of Slow Release Formulations of Herbicides Based on Clay-Surfactant Systems. A Methodological Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Galán-Jiménez, María del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a...

  4. Propulsion Systems in Water Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Fujisawa

    1995-01-01

    agreement with the field experiment with prototype craft. Measurements are also made for the losses in the intake and the nozzle. The optimization study of the water jet systems is conducted by simulating the change of the nozzle outlet diameter with the variable nozzle arrangement. It is suggested that the nozzle outlet diameter should be decreased as the craft velocity increases to obtain an optimum propulsive efficiency in a wide range of craft velocity.

  5. Kaolinitic clay-based grouting demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative Kaolinitic Clay-Based Grouting Demonstration was performed under the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP), funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by the EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of the technology was to demonstrate the effectiveness of kaolinitic clay-based grouting in reducing/eliminating infiltration of surface and shallow groundwater through fractured bedrock into underground mine workings. In 1993, the Mike Horse Mine was selected as a demonstration site for the field implementation and evaluation of the grouting technology. The mine portal discharge ranged between 114 to 454 liters per minute (30 to 120 gpm) of water containing iron, zinc, manganese, and cadmium at levels exceeding the National Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Levels. The grout formulation was designed by the developer Morrison Knudsen Corporation/Spetstamponazhgeologia (MK/STG), in May 1994. Grout injection was performed by Hayward Baker, Inc. under the directive of MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE-TA) during fall of 1994. The grout was injected into directionally-drilled grout holes to form a grout curtain at the project site. Post grout observations suggest the grout was successful in reducing the infiltration of the surface and shallow groundwater from entering the underground mine workings. The proceeding paper describes the demonstration and technology used to form the subsurface barrier in the fracture system

  6. Evaluation by design of experiments of active clay specimens behavior in the presence of distilled water, saline solutions and cationic inhibitors; Avaliacao por analise estatistica experimental do comportamento de corpos de prova de argila aditivada na presenca de agua destilada, solucoes salinas e inibidores cationicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Emanuella Layne Ferreira; Araujo, Bruno Alysson Barbosa Duarte; Borges, Mauricio Rodrigues; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    During the drilling, in general, there are layers of clays which water absorption easily as smectites. In drilling with clays swelling when is applied water-base fluid there is necessary the use of the clay inhibitors to avoid the incorporation of the cutting to the drilling fluid. The most used chemical inhibitors in drilling fluids are sodium and potassium chlorides. However, the cationic inhibitors have been used as alternative form to increase the inhibition power of the drilling fluids. In this work was evaluated the behaviour of the activated clay test bodies in the presence of distilled water, aqueous solution potassium chlorides, and cationic inhibitors. The solutions were submitted at Capillary Suction Timer tests to evaluation the capacity of the water retention in activated clay samples. At the interpretation of the results was used Design of Experiments (DOE) by Response Surface Methodology (RSM), using Umetrics MODDE 7.0{sup TM} programme. It was observed that the clay samples when in contact with the solutions presented lower water retention than in the presence of distilled water only. This result indicates that the clay was inhibited. (author)

  7. Clay mineral variations near Pennsylvanian sandstone channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large linear sandstone bodies in the Illinois Basin have been interpreted as representing fresh water river channels that flowed through generally marine to brackish Pennsylvanian deltaic environments; fresh water from such channels could have affected deposition of adjacent coal-bearing rocks. Low-sulfur coals are commonly associated with the sandstone bodies, which may also host petroleum, uranium, fresh water, or other resources. Thus techniques to locate such channels would be economically useful. Previous studies have shown that clay mineral distributions and bulk chemistries of clay-rich sediments are affected when fresh waters mix with sea water. Such changes associated laterally with freshwater channels might have caused distinctive clay mineral or chemical patterns to develop around the channels. Mineralogies and chemical compositions of more than 500 mudrock samples taken immediately above the springfield Coal Member of the Petersburg Formation from 52 sections located from channel margins to 63 miles distant were determined to discern patterns that could aid in finding channels

  8. Clay smear: Review of mechanisms and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolijk, Peter J.; Urai, Janos L.; Kettermann, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Clay smear is a collection of fault processes and resulting fault structures that form when normal faults deform layered sedimentary sections. These elusive structures have attracted deep interest from researchers interested in subsurface fluid flow, particularly in the oil and gas industry. In the four decades since the association between clay-smear structures and oil and gas accumulations was introduced, there has been extensive research into the fault processes that create clay smear and the resulting effects of that clay smear on fluid flow. We undertake a critical review of the literature associated with outcrop studies, laboratory and numerical modeling, and subsurface field studies of clay smear and propose a comprehensive summary that encompasses all of these elements. Important fault processes that contribute to clay smear are defined in the context of the ratio of rock strength and in situ effective stresses, the geometric evolution of fault systems, and the composition of the faulted section. We find that although there has been progress in all avenues pursued, progress has been uneven, and the processes that disrupt clay smears are mostly overlooked. We highlight those research areas that we think will yield the greatest benefit and suggest that taking these emerging results within a more process-based framework presented here will lead to a new generation of clay smear models.

  9. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  10. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay

  11. Crystalline structure and morphological properties of porous cellulose/clay composites: The effect of water and ethanol as coagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, Safoura; Desobry, Stephane; Keramat, Javad; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-05-01

    In this study, cellulose foams incorporated with surface-modified montmorillonite (SM-MMT) were prepared following NaOH dissolution and regeneration into water and ethanol. According to the SEM images, the type of coagulating agent significantly affected the morphological properties of composite foams. The crystalline parameters were evaluated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), which showed an increase in crystal size as the effect of SM-MMT; however, the crystal size decreased for the samples treated with ethanol. The distribution of hydrogen bond types was also investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Resolving the hydrogen-bonded OH stretching band at around 3340 into five bands indicated that presence of SM-MMT caused the shift of OH-stretching vibration band to lower wave number due to new hydrogen bonds between cellulose and SM-MMT. In general, the results indicated a change in the contents of the intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds when the coagulant was changed or SM-MMT was incorporated. PMID:26877015

  12. Modeling crude oil droplet-sediment aggregation in nearshore waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Michael C; Bonner, James S; Page, Cheryl A; Fuller, Christopher B; Ernest, Andrew N S; Autenrieth, Robin L

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes a modeling approach that simulates changes in particle size distribution and density due to aggregation by extending the Smoluchowski aggregation kinetic model to particles of different density. Batch flocculation studies were conducted for clay, colloidal silica, crude oil, clay-crude oil, and silica-crude oil systems. A parameter estimation algorithm was used to estimate homogeneous collision efficiencies (alphaHOMO) for single-particle-type systems and heterogeneous collision efficiencies (alphaHET) for two-particle-type systems. Homogeneous collision efficiency values (alphaHOMO) were greater for clay (0.7) and for crude oil (0.3) than for silica (0.01). Thus, clay and crude oil were classified as cohesive particles while silica was classified as noncohesive. Heterogeneous collision efficiencies were similar for oil-clay (0.4) and oil-silica (0.3) systems. Thus, crude oil increases the aggregation of noncohesive particles. Data from the calibrated aggregation model were used to estimate apparent first-order flocculation rates (K') for oil, clay, and silica and apparent second-order flocculation rates (K'') for oil and clay in oil-clay systems and for oil and silica in oil-silica systems. For oil or clay systems, aggregation Damköhler numbers ranged from 0.1 to 1.0, suggesting that droplet coalescence and clay aggregation can occur on the same time scales as oil resurfacing and clay settling, respectively. For mixed oil-clay systems, the relative time scales of clay settling and clay-oil aggregation were also within an order of magnitude. Thus, oil-clay aggregation should be considered when modeling crude oil transport in nearshore waters. PMID:15461172

  13. Effect of humic acid on pyrene removal from water by polycation-clay mineral composites and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radian, Adi; Mishael, Yael

    2012-06-01

    Pyrene removal by polycation-montmorillonite (MMT) composites and granulated activated carbon (GAC) in the presence of humic acid (HA) was examined. Pyrene, HA, and sorbent interactions were characterized by FTIR, fluorescence and zeta measurements, adsorption, and column filtration experiments. Pyrene binding coefficients to the macromolecules were in the order of PVPcoS (poly-4-vinylpiridine-co-styrene) > HA > PDADMAC (poly diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium-chloride), correlating to pyrene-macromolecules compatibility. Electrostatic interactions explained the high adsorption of HA to both composites (∼100%), whereas HA adsorption by GAC was low. Pyrene removal by the composites, unlike GAC, was enhanced in the presence of HA; removal by PDADMAC-MMT increased from ∼50 (k(d) = 2.2 × 10(3) kg/L) to ∼70% (k(d) = 2.4 × 10(3) kg/L) in the presence of HA. This improvement was attributed to the adsorption of pyrene-HA complexes. PVPcoS-MMT was most efficient in removing pyrene (k(d) = 1.1 × 10(4) kg/L, >95% removal) which was explained in terms of specific π donor-π acceptor interactions. Pyrene uptake by column filters of GAC reached ∼50% and decreased to ∼30% in the presence of HA. Pyrene removal by the PVPcoS-MMT filter was significantly higher (100-85% removal), exhibiting only a small decrease in the presence of HA. The utilization of HA as an enhancing agent in pollutant removal is novel and of major importance in water treatment. PMID:22545663

  14. California community water systems inventory dataset, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This data set contains information about all Community Water Systems in California. Data are derived from California Office of Drinking Water (ODW) Water Quality...

  15. Water management - management actions applied to water resources system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper are presented a general description of water resource systems, a systematisation of the management tasks and the approaches for solution, including a review of methods used for solution of water management tasks and the fundamental postulates in the management. The management of water resources is a synonym for the management actions applied to water resource systems. It is a general term that unites planning and exploitation of the systems. The modern planning assumes separating the water racecourse part from the hydro technical part of the project. The water resource study is concerned with the solution for the resource problem. This means the parameters of the system are determined in parallel with the definition of the water utilisation regime. The hydro-technical part of the project is the design of structures necessary for the water resource solution. (Original)

  16. Study of adsorption of zinc in clay smectite type Bofe in system of finite bath; Estudo da adsorcao de zinco na argila esmectita do tipo Bofe em sistema de banho finito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, R.S.; Mota, J.D.; Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F., E-mail: rocheliachel@hotmail.com, E-mail: meiry@deq.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LABNOV//LABGER/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Desenvolvimento de Novos Materiais e Lab. de Gestao Ambiental e Tratamento de Residuos

    2012-07-01

    Clays are demonstrably excellent adsorbents, both for their physical and chemical characteristics and the wide coverage and low cost. Among the various groups of clay minerals, the smectite are noted for having large surface areas. The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Bofe through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET). To evaluate the adsorption of metal ions zinc (synthetic sewage), we used a system in finite bath, following a factorial design 2{sup 2}, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of zinc (Zn2 +) and output variables: percentage removal and removal capacity. The characterization results showed that Bofe clay belongs to the family of smectite and therefore has great potential for adsorption. (author)

  17. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    Water distribution systems (WDS) worldwide face increasing challenges as population growth strains a limited water supply in many areas. In the United States, existing water infrastructure systems require significant investments to refurbish an aging stock of assets. Much of this investment is required in drinking water transmission and distribution, where a substantial amount of material and economic inputs are lost as a result of pipeline leaks. With growing worldwide concern for reducing e...

  18. Behavior of compacted clay-concrete interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.R. SHAKIR; Jungao ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Tests of interface between compacted clay and concrete were conducted systematically using interface simple shear test apparatus. The samples, having same dry density with different water content ratio, were prepared.Two types of concrete with different surface roughness, i.e., relatively smooth and relatively rough surface rough-ness, were also prepared. The main objectives of this paper are to show the effect of water content, normal stress and rough surface on the shear stress-shear displacement relationship of clay-concrete interface. The following were concluded in this study: 1) the interface shear sliding dominates the interface shear displacement behavior for both cases of relatively rough and smooth concrete surface except when the clay water content is greater than 16% for the case of rough concrete surface where the shear failure occurs in the body of the clay sample; 2) the results of interface shear strength obtained by direct shear test were different from that of simple shear test for the case of rough concrete surface; 3) two types of interface failure mechanism may change each other with different water content ratio; 4) the interface shear strength increases with increasing water content ratio especially for the case of clay-rough concrete surface interface.

  19. Thermo-hydro-mechanical characterization of the Spanish reference clay material for engineered barrier for granite and clay HLW repository: laboratory and small mock up testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report refers to the work carried out by Technic Geologic Division of CIEMAT (CIEMAT.DT.TG) coordinated by SCK/CEN (Belgium), participating besides UPC-DIT and University of Wales on the framework of CEC Contract F12W-CT91-0102 (DOEO). It presents the results obtained. The total results on the project will be published by CE in the EUR series. The role of CIEMAT in this project was to carry out tests in which the conditions of the clay barrier in the repository were simulated. The interaction of heat coming from the wastes and of water coming from the geological medium has been reproduced on compacted clay blocks. For the performance of tests on high density compacted clay blocks (Task 2.1) and for the cementation and chemical-mineralogical transformation studies two different cells were designed and constructed in stainless steel: a thermohydraulic cell and an alteration cell. The experiments performed in these cells have provided us with a better knowledge of the heat source, hydration system and sensors, as well as interesting data on heat and water diffusion. A revision of the experiments performed on the thermohydraulic cell was presented at the ''International Workshop on Thermomechanics of Clays and Clay Barriers'' held in Bergamo in October'93 (Villar et al. 1993)

  20. Electroporation System for Sterilizing Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype of an electroporation system for sterilizing wastewater or drinking water has been developed. In electroporation, applied electric fields cause transient and/or permanent changes in the porosities of living cells. Electroporation at lower field strengths can be exploited to increase the efficiency of chemical disinfection (as in chlorination). Electroporation at higher field strengths is capable of inactivating and even killing bacteria and other pathogens, without use of chemicals. Hence, electroporation is at least a partial alternative to chlorination. The transient changes that occur in micro-organisms at lower electric-field strengths include significantly increased uptake of ions and molecules. Such increased uptake makes it possible to achieve disinfection at lower doses of chemicals (e.g., chlorine or ozone) than would otherwise be needed. Lower doses translate to lower costs and reduced concentrations of such carcinogenic chemical byproducts as trichloromethane. Higher electric fields cause cell membranes to lose semipermeability and thereby become unable to function as selective osmotic barriers between the cells and the environment. This loss of function is the cause of the cell death at higher electric-field intensities. Experimental evidence does not indicate cell lysis but, rather, combined leaking of cell proteins out of the cells as well as invasion of foreign chemical compounds into the cells. The concept of electroporation is not new: it has been applied in molecular biology and genetic engineering for decades. However, the laboratory-scale electroporators used heretofore have been built around small (400-microliter) cuvettes, partly because the smallness facilitates the generation of electric fields of sufficient magnitude to cause electroporation. Moreover, most laboratory- scale electroporators have been designed for testing static water. In contrast, the treatment cell in the present system is much larger and features a flow

  1. Soil Water Repellency of Sands and Clay as Affected by Particle Size%砂土和黏土的颗粒差异对土壤斥水性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨松; 吴珺华; 董红艳; 张燕明

    2016-01-01

    斥水性土壤广泛存在于自然界中,并且对土壤环境和作物生长等有重要影响。建立理想化的土壤颗粒模型对砂土和黏土的斥水特性进行计算分析。结果表明:当接触角很小时,砂土中不存在斥水现象。随着接触角的增大,砂土斥水性与含水率密切相关,砂土的密实度对其斥水性也有重要影响,当砂土比较密实时,土壤的“亲水”与“斥水”特性对含水率特别敏感,随着含水率的变化,砂土可能由亲水性较好的土壤转变为斥水性土壤;当砂土比较松散时,土壤颗粒的斥水性对含水率并不敏感。当黏土接触角略小于90°且湿润半径b也较小时,黏土也存在斥水现象。如果黏土颗粒的接触角较小或接触角小于90°且湿润半径b较大,黏土总是亲水的。黏土含水率较大时,斥水特性由土壤颗粒的接触角决定。%Water-repellent soils,existing widely in nature,have some important effects on soil environment and crop growth. In order to analyze water repellency of sand and clay,models of sand and clay different in particle size were built. Results showed that no phenomenon of water repellency was found in sand soil when the contact angle of water with sand was small. Water repellency of sand soil was closely related to soil water content when the sand-water contact angle was big. Compactness of the soil was another important factor affecting soil water repellency. When the sand soil was highly compacted,whether the soil was hydrophilic or hydrophobic was very sensitive to water content,and it might switch from one state to another with changing soil water content. When the sand soil was quite loose,it was no longer sensitive to soil water content. In clay soil with soil-water contact angle being slightly less than 90°and wetting radius b being small,the phenomenon of water repellency was observed. But when the clay soil was much smaller than 90°in soil-water and

  2. Validation of glass dissolution and Si diffusion parameters with a combined glass dissolution-diffusion experiment in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Existing knowledge on glass dissolution and silica diffusion in Boom Clay is validated by experiments where both phenomena could be studied simultaneously. SON68 glass coupons, doped with radioactive 32Si, were sandwiched between two cores of fresh humid Boom Clay and heated to 30 deg. C. At the end of the experiment, the system was dismantled, the mass loss of the glass coupon was measured, and the clay core was sliced to determine the diffusion profile of the 32Si dissolved from the glass. These data were completed with analyses of the clay water and surface analyses for analogous tests with undoped glass. The results are interpreted by assuming congruent glass dissolution at a constant rate, with a glass silica saturation concentration between 14 and 20 mg/l, a forward glass dissolution rate (at zero silica concentration) of 0.028 g.m-2day-1, an apparent silica diffusion coefficient in the clay of 1.4 10-12 m2sec-1, and a distribution coefficient for silica on Boom Clay between 0.010 and 0.075 m3kg-1. These parameter values are close to the range found in literature. It was not necessary to consider diffusion through the gel, precipitation or detailed geochemical reactions. The modeling exercise shows that the existing knowledge about the subsystems glass and clay can successfully be integrated to describe the coupled processes in the whole system. (author)

  3. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  4. Safety Problems of Small Water Supply Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchórzewska-Cieślak Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents issues related to risks associated with the operation of small water supply systems on the background of water consumer safety assessment made on the basis of risk analysis. Definition of water consumer safety loss as a risk associated with the water consumption of poor quality or water lack was proposed. For this purpose, a three-parameter matrix is implemented with the parameters of the probability of a representative accident scenario, the losses of the water consumers and their protection. Risk management, together with the implementation of protective barriers of small water supply system against threats is a fundamental condition for the continued operation of the system.

  5. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  6. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills. PMID:26542073

  7. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  8. Processes of cation migration in clay-rocks: Final Scientific Report of the CatClay European Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the feasibility studies on the radioactive waste disposal in deep argillaceous formations, it is now well established that the transport properties of solutes in clay rocks, i.e. parameter values for Fick's law, are mainly governed by the negatively charged clay mineral surface. While a good understanding of the diffusive behaviour of non-reactive anionic and neutral species is now achieved, much effort has to be placed on improving understanding of coupled sorption/diffusion phenomena for sorbing cations. Indeed, several cations known to form highly stable surface complexes with sites on mineral surfaces migrate more deeply into clay rock than expected. Therefore, the overall objective of the EC CatClay project is to address this issue, using a 'bottom-up' approach, in which simpler, analogous systems (here a compacted clay, 'pure' illite) are experimentally studied and modelled, and then the transferability of these results to more complex materials, i.e. the clay rocks under consideration in France, Switzerland and Belgium for hosting radioactive waste disposal facilities, is verified. The cations of interest were chosen for covering a representative range of cations families: from a moderately sorbing cation, the strontium, to three strongly sorbing cations, Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III). For the 4 years of this project, much effort was devoted to developing and applying specific experimental methods needed for acquiring the high precision, reliable data needed to test the alternative hypotheses represented by different conceptual-numerical models. The enhanced diffusion of the sorbing cations of interest was confirmed both in the simpler analogous illite system for Sr2+, Co(II) and Zn(II), but also in the natural clay rocks, except for Eu(III). First modelling approach including diffusion in the diffuse double layer (DDL) promisingly succeeded in reproducing the experimental data under the various conditions both in

  9. Organophilic clay suspension medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, G.G.; Parlman, R.M.; Stewart, W.

    1989-10-24

    This patent describes an improved liquid suspension medium for particulate solids. The suspension medium having been formed by admixing an organophilic clay wherein the clay is selected from the group consisting of bentonite, attapulgite, sepiolite and hectorite and admixtures thereof present in the quantity of about 0.5-8 weight percent with a liquid hydrocarbon present in the quantity of about 99-70 weight percent and at least one activator selected from the group consisting of phenyl hydroxyalkyl ethers.

  10. Biofilm formation in a hot water system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagh, L.K.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik; Ovesen, K.

    2002-01-01

    The biofilm formation rate was measured in situ in a hot water system in an apartment building by specially designed sampling equipment, and the net growth of the suspended bacteria was measured by incubation of water samples with the indigeneous bacteria. The biofilm formation rate reached a...... higher level in the hot water distribution system (2.1 d–1 to 2.3 d–1) than in the hot water tank (1.4 d–1 to 2.2 d–1) indicating an important area for surface associated growth. The net growth rate of the suspended bacteria measured in hot water from the top, middle and bottom of the hot water tank, in...... the sludge, or in the water from the distribution system was negligible. This indicated that bacterial growth took place on the inner surfaces in the hot water system and biofilm formation and detachment of bacteria could account for most of the suspended bacteria actually measured in hot water...

  11. Soil-water characteristics and pore-size distribution of lateritic clay%红黏土的土水特性及其孔隙分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙德安; 高游; 刘文捷; 韦昌富; 张升

    2015-01-01

    The pressure plate method, filter paper method and vapor equilibrium technique with saturated salt solution and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests on Guilin lateritic clay are used to investigate the soil-water characteristics and pore-size distribution of undisturbed and compacted specimens in full suction range. The test results show that the undisturbed specimen has lower water content and saturation degree than the compacted one in the suction ranging from 0 kPa to 10 MPa because of the development of internal crack of undisturbed specimen with the increasing suction. When the suction is higher than 10 MPa, the soil-water characteristic curves (SWCC) coincide with each other. In the transition zone, the SWCCs of the undisturbed and compacted specimens are different from the typical ones. The undisturbed natural specimens exhibit a unimodal pore-size distribution, and the compacted ones usually have a double-porosity microstructure. The stability of shrinkage of the undisturbed natural specimen is larger than that of the compacted one. The compacted specimens with different dry densities also have the same pore-size distribution between particles, while the inter-aggregate pore distribution differ between the compacted specimens with different dry densities. It explains that when it is expressed by the relation between suction and water content, the SWCC is independent of dry density in the high suction range. When it is expressed by the relation between suction and saturation degree, the SWCC with high dry density is higher than that with the small one.%以桂林红黏土为研究对象,采用压力板法、滤纸法和饱和盐溶液蒸气平衡法3种方法研究在全吸力范围内原状样和压实样的土水特性,并结合压汞试验研究其孔隙分布。试验结果表明:当吸力约小于10 MPa时原状样的土水特征曲线略低于压实样,主要原因是原状样内部裂隙随吸力的增加而不断发展;当吸力约大于10

  12. The Effects of High Salinity Groundwater on the Performance of Clay Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David [Quintessa Ltd., Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Potential changes in groundwater chemistry during the operational or post-closure periods of the Swedish repository for spent fuel could affect the performance of both the bentonite buffer and repository backfill. For example, the up-coning of saline groundwater could lead to decreased swelling pressures in both the bentonite buffer and tunnel backfills, and could also induce 'piping'. SKB is considering these issues as part of its 'SR-Can' safety assessment. This report reviews evidence for the behaviour of swelling clays in groundwaters of varying salinity with special relevance to the SKB programme. Smectite clays can absorb water into clay inter-layers with the most important parameters being: the surface density of charge of the clay; the charge and solvation behaviour of the inter-layer ions; and the electrolyte concentration or activity of water. Two categories of swelling are generally observed: innercrystalline swelling caused by the hydration of the exchangeable cations in the dry clay; and osmotic swelling, resulting from concentration gradients in ion concentrations between clay surfaces and pore water. Several models exist to interpret and predict the swelling behaviour of clays. SKB currently prefer an interpretation of clay swelling pressure where clay particles are viewed as 'macro-ions' and the entire clay-water system can be considered as a 'polyelectrolyte'. SKB use the term 'Donnan exclusion' to estimate the amount of introduced ions into the clay and hence the amount of reduced swelling pressure due to contact with a saline solution. Donnan exclusion is the process whereby the migration of anions through the narrow aqueous film surrounding clay platelets is restricted due to the repulsion by the negative charge of the clay platelets. SKB's experimental work shows that: There is an exponential relation between swelling pressure and mean basal interlamellar spacing of the clay. Ions from the

  13. Joint project. Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems. Subproject 2. Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the presence of repository-relevant organics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeide, Katja; Fritsch, Katharina; Lippold, Holger [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Ressource Ecology; and others

    2016-08-01

    retention at these minerals could be attributed to surface-mediated reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). An influence of ionic strength was not observed. The influence of ionic strength (up to 3 mol/kg) and background electrolyte (NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}, MgCl{sub 2}) on U(VI) sorption onto montmorillonite was studied. The U(VI) sorption is influenced by the background electrolyte, the influence of ionic strength is small. Surface complexation modeling was performed applying the 2SPNE SC/CE model. Surface complexation constants were determined for the NaCl and CaCl{sub 2} system and were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. Surface complexation in mixed electrolytes can be modeled applying surface complexation constants derived for pure electrolytes. The influence of citrate on U(VI) diffusion in Opalinus Clay was studied using Opalinus Clay pore water as background electrolyte. The diffusion parameter values obtained for the HTO through-diffusion and the U(VI) in-diffusion in the absence of citric acid were in agreement with literature data. In the presence of citric acid, U(VI) diffusion was significantly retarded, which was attributed to a change in speciation, probably U(VI) was reduced to U(IV). Larger-scale heterogeneous material effects on diffusive transport were investigated with PET. Diffusion parameters were derived by optimum fit of a FEM-model to the measurement. These parameters are in accordance with the results from 1D-through-diffusion experiments. Deviations from the simple transversal-isotropic behavior, which are identified as residuals from the model, are indications for heterogeneous transport on the mm-scale. PET measurements were also conducted in order to display the improvement of the EDZ with waterglass injections. These experiments enable to draw conclusions on the complex reactive transport process and thus an estimation of the achieved improvement of the barrier function. The image reconstruction procedure was largely improved, mainly with the aid of

  14. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  15. Combined air and water pollution control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Billy C. (Inventor); Jarrell, Lamont (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A bioaquatic air pollution control system for controlling both water and atmospheric pollution is disclosed. The pollution control system includes an exhaust for directing polluted gases out of a furnace and a fluid circulating system which circulates fluid, such as waste water, from a source, past the furnace where the fluid flow entrains the pollutants from the furnace. The combined fluid and pollutants are then directed through a rock/plant/microbial filtering system. A suction pump pumps the treated waste water from the filter system past the exhaust to again entrain more pollutants from the furnace where they are combined with the fluid (waste water) and directed to the filter system.

  16. Performance of polymeric films based thermoplastic starch and organophilic clay; Efeito da incorporacao de argila no desempenho de filmes de amido termoplastico/PEBD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipriano, P.B.; Costa, A.N.M.; Araujo, S.S.; Araujo, A.R.A.; Canedo, E.L.; Carvalho, L.H., E-mail: pamufcg@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was the development and investigation of the properties of flat films of LDPE/corn thermoplastic starch (TPS). A bentonite clay (Argel) was organophilized and characterized by XRD. This clay (1%) in both pristine and organophilic forms was added to the matrix (LDPE) and to LDPE/TPS systems with TPS contents varying from 5-20% w/w. The films manufactured (LDPE, LDPE/Clay, LDPE/TPS, LDPE/TPS/Clay) were characterized. Results indicate that water vapor permeability is dependent and increases with TPS content which was attributed to the higher affinity of water by TPS. TPS and Clay addition to LDPE led to significant changes in film properties with respect to the neat LDPE. In general,tensile and perforation forces increased with clay and TPS contents; the strength of thermo sealed films lowered with natural clay addition and increased with TPS and organoclay incorporation and, in general, dynamic friction coefficient decrease with organoclay and TPS addition. Best overall properties were obtained for the systems containing the organoclay and optimal properties were achieved for the 5%TPS10 LDPE1% ANO system. (author)

  17. Engineering property test of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志彬; 刘松玉; 蔡奕

    2015-01-01

    Engineering property of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil was studied through a series of laboratory experiments. Oil contents (mass fraction) of 4%, 8%, 12%, 16% and 20% were selected to represent different contamination degrees, and the soil specimens were manually prepared through mixing and static compaction method. Initial water content and dry density of the test kaolin clay were controlled at 10% and 1.58 g/cm3, respectively. Test results indicate that since part of the diesel oil will be released from soil by evaporation, the real water content should be derived through calibration of the quasi water content obtained by traditional test method. As contamination degree of the kaolin clay increases, both liquid limit and plastic limit decrease, but there’s only a slight increase for plasticity index. Swelling pressure of contaminated kaolin clay under confined condition will be lowered when oil-content gets higher. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of the oil-contaminated kaolin clay is influenced by not only oil content but also curing period. Increase of contamination degree will continually lower UCS of the kaolin clay specimen. In addition, electrical resistivity of the contaminated kaolin clay with given water content decreases with the increase of oil content. However, soil resistivity is in good relationship with oil content and UCS. Finally, oil content of 8% is found to be a critical value for engineering property of kaolin clay to transit from water-dominated towards oil-dominated characteristics.

  18. Calculation of the debris flow concentration based on clay content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Ningsheng; CUI; Peng; LIU; Zhonggang; WEI; Fangqiang

    2003-01-01

    The debris flow clay content has very tremendous influence on its concentration (γC). It is reported that the concentration can be calculated by applying the relative polynomial based on the clay content. Here one polynomial model and one logarithm model to calculate the concentration based on the clay content for both the ordinary debris flow and viscous debris flow are obtained. The result derives from the statistics and analysis of the relationship between the debris flow concentrations and clay content in 45 debris flow sites located in the southwest of China. The models can be applied for the concentration calculation to those debris flows that are impossible to observe. The models are available to calculate the debris flow concentration, the principles of which are in the clay content affecting on the debris flow formation, movement and suspending particle diameter. The mechanism of the relationship of the clay content and concentration is clear and reliable. The debris flow is usually of micro-viscous when the clay content is low (<3%), by analyzing the developing tendency on the basics of the relationship between the clay content and debris flow concentration. Indeed, the less the clay content, the less the concentration for most debris flows. The debris flow tends to become the water rock flow or the hyperconcentrated flow with the clay content decrease. Through statistics it is apt to transform the soil into the viscous debris flow when the clay content of ranges is in 3%-18%. Its concentration increases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 5% and 10%. But the value decreases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 10% and 18%. It is apt to transform the soil into the mudflow, when the clay content exceeds 18%. The concentration of the mudflow usually decreases with the increase of the clay content, and this developing tendency reverses to that of the micro-viscous debris flow. There is

  19. Implementing slab solar water heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendran, S. K.; Shen, C. Q.

    2015-08-01

    Water heating contributes a significant part of energy consumption in typical household. One of the most employed technologies today that helps in reducing the energy consumption of water heating would be conventional solar water heating system. However, this system is expensive and less affordable by most family. The main objective of this project is to design and implement an alternative type of solar water heating system that utilize only passive solar energy which is known as slab solar water heating system. Slab solar water heating system is a system that heat up cold water using the solar radiance from the sun. The unique part of this system is that it does not require any form of electricity in order to operate. Solar radiance is converted into heat energy through convection method and cold water will be heated up by using conduction method [1]. The design of this system is governed by the criteria of low implementation cost and energy saving. Selection of material in the construction of a slab solar water heating system is important as it will directly affect the efficiency and performance of the system. A prototype has been built to realize the idea and it had been proven that this system was able to provide sufficient hot water supply for typical household usage at any given time.

  20. Sustainable Soil Water Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Basch, G.; Kassam, A.; Friedrich, T; Santos, F. L.; Gubiani, P.I.; Calegari, A.; J. M. Reichert; dos Santos, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Soil quality and its management must be considered as key elements for an effective management of water resources, given that the hydrological cycle and land management are intimately linked (Bossio et al. 2007). Soil degradation has been described by Bossio et al. (2010) as the starting point of a negative cycle of soil-water relationships, creating a positive, self-accelerating feedback loop with important negative impacts on water cycling and water productivity. Therefore, sustainable soil...

  1. Separation of components of a broad 1H-NMR composite signal by means of nutation experiments under low amplitude radiofrequency fields. Application to the water signal in synthetic clays; Developpement et mise en oeuvre d'une nouvelle methode fondee sur le phenomene de nutation pour la decomposition d'un signal composite de resonance magnetique nucleaire. Application au signal 1h de l'eau dans des argiles synthetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trausch, G

    2006-11-15

    Nowadays, geologic nuclear waste storage is envisioned according to a multi-layer model which implies clays. The latter exhibit retention capacities and low permeability to water; that is why they are considered as a good candidate for engineered barriers to radioactive waste disposal. The present work here aims at studying transport phenomena which involve water molecules in three samples of synthetic clays (two of them exhibiting a Pake doublet) by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The first chapter describes structural properties of clays and presents the state-of-art of NMR and other experimental techniques used for such systems. The second chapter deals with the interpretation and the simulation of each conventional proton spectrum. These simulations allow us to evidence and to characterize a chemical exchange phenomenon. The third chapter is dedicated to original nutation experiments performed under low radiofrequency field in the case of broad NMR signal. It is shown that this type of NMR experiment can yield the number and the proportion of each species contributing to the whole signal. These results are exploited in the fourth chapter for processing relaxation and diffusion experiments. Finally, the diffusion coefficients obtained by NMR are divided by a factor 4 with respect to pure water while relaxation rates are two orders of magnitude greater. (author)

  2. Improving bioavailability of phosphorous from cattle dung by using phosphatase immobilized on natural clay and nanoclay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabi-Floody, Marcela; Velásquez, Gabriela; Gianfreda, Liliana; Saggar, Surinder; Bolan, Nanthi; Rumpel, Cornelia; Mora, María Luz

    2012-10-01

    The high P retention of acidic Andisols makes necessary to increase our technological approaches in pasture management in the animal system production. Here, we evaluated the clay- or nanoclay-acid phosphatase complexes for improving phosphorus mineralization from degraded cattle dung. We implemented an immobilization mechanism of acid phosphatase (AP) using natural clays (allophanic and montmorillonite) and nanoclays as support materials. Also, we evaluated the mineralization of organic P containing in decomposed cattle dung with clay- and nanoclay-AP complexes by incubation studies. Clays and nanoclays were characterized by microscopy techniques as atomic force and confocal-laser scanning microscopy. We found that these support materials stabilized AP by encapsulation. Our results showed that immobilization on allophanic or montmorillonite materials improved both the specific activity (4-48%) and the V(max) (28-38%) of AP. Moreover, the enzyme had a better performance when immobilized on clay and nanoclay from Andisol than on montmorillonite materials. Phosphorous mineralization of cattle dung was regulated by water-soluble P present in the dung and P re-adsorption on allophanic materials. However, we were able to detect a potential capacity of AP immobilized on allophanic nanoclays as the best alternative for P mineralization. Further research with initially low water-soluble P containing organic materials is required to quantify the P mineralization potential and bioavailability of P from dung. PMID:22776253

  3. ASPECTS OF OPTIMIZATION OF WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. BEILICCI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Water management system include all activities and works which providing the administration of public domain of water, with local / national interest, and qualitative, quantitative and sustainable management of water resources. Hydrotechnical arrangements, consisting of a set of hydraulic structures, produce both a favorable and unfavorable influences on environment. Their different constructive and exploitation solutions exercise a significantly impact on the environment. Therefore the advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be weighed and determined to materialize one or other of them seriously argued.The optimization of water management systems is needed to meet current and future requirements in the field of rational water management in the context of integrated water resources management. Optimization process of complex water management systems includes several components related to environmental protection, technical side and the business side. This paper summarizes the main aspects and possibilities of optimization of existing water management systems and those that are to be achieved.

  4. Water masers in the Kronian system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pogrebenko, Sergei V.; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Elitzur, Moshe; Cosmovici, Cristiano B.; Avruch, Ian M.; Pluchino, Salvatore; Montebugnoli, Stelio; Salerno, Emma; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Mujunen, Ari; Ritakari, Jouko; Molera, Guifre; Wagner, Jan; Uunila, Minttu; Cimo, Giuseppe; Schilliro, Francesco; Bartolini, Marco; Fernández, J. A.; Lazzaro, D.; Prialnik, D.; Schulz, R.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of water has been considered for a long time as a key condition for life in planetary environments. The Cassini mission discovered water vapour in the Kronian system by detecting absorption of

  5. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  6. 土基改性固沙植草材料抑制地表水分蒸发%Inhibiting water evaporation of ground surface by clay-based sand-fixing and grass-planting materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王博涛; 张增志

    2012-01-01

    针对固沙生态恢复中面临的有效水分涵养难题,采用Span-80乳化木蜡改性黏土制备了固沙植草喷膜材料.研究了材料在模拟荒漠化环境气候中的保水性能,采用紫外-可见光分光光度分析、扫描电子显微镜分析、傅里叶红外光谱分析、X射线衍射分析、热重分析等手段对制备的材料进行分析和表征.结果表明:该固沙植草喷膜材料具有良好的保水性能,改性后黏土的层间结构未发生变化,木蜡均匀涂覆在土壤颗粒表面,颗粒间的孔隙由亲水孔转变为憎水孔从而抑制了水分的蒸发;植草试验表明当植草喷膜材料中木蜡、黏土、Span-80 3种组分质量比为1:6:24时固沙植草材料既能很好地抑制水分蒸发又能保持较好的透气性,草籽发芽率从对照组的5%提高至45%.%According to the problem of available water conservation in sand consolidation, the sand-fixing and grass-planting materials were prepared with clay modified by emulsifying vegetable waxes and octylphenol polyoxyethylene ether (Span-80). The water retention property was studied in simulated desertification environmental climate and the materials were characterized by means of UV-Vis, SEM, FTIR, XRD and TA measurements. The results showed that the materials had excellent water retention properties, which owning to that vegetable waxes adhering evenly to clay particle surfaces, making the clay pores changing from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and so inhibiting the water evaporation. Grass-planting experiment showed that with reasonable mass ratio of vegetable waxes, clay and surfactant at 1:6:24, the materials not only inhibited water evaporation but also maintained sound air permeability so that the germination rate of grass seed was significantly improved from 5% to 45%.

  7. Final Report (BMWi Project No.: 02 E 10971): Joint project: Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems - Subproject 2: Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the prese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Fritsch, Katharina [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Lippold, Holger [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Poetsch, Maria [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Kulenkampff, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Jordan, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Joseph, Claudia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Bader, Miriam [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2016-02-29

    The objective of this project was to study the influence of increased salinities on interaction processes in the system radionuclide – organics – clay – aquifer. For this, complexation, redox, sorption, and diffusion studies were performed under variation of the ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg-1) and the background electrolyte (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2).

  8. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  9. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  10. Clay Minerals as Solid Acids and Their Catalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses catalytic properties of clays, attributed to acidity of the clay surface. The formation of carbonium ions on montmorillonite is used as a demonstration of the presence of surface acidity, the enhanced dissociation of water molecules when polarized by cations, and the way the surface can interact with organic substances. (Author/JN)

  11. Dredging Processes I: The Cutting of Sand, Clay & Rock - Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of cutting theories. It starts with a generic model, which is valid for all types of soil (sand, clay and rock) after which the specifics of dry sand, water saturated sand, clay, rock and hyperbaric rock are covered. For each soil type small blade angles and large blade a

  12. Modification and characterization of montmorillonite clay for the extraction of zearalenone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Kerri-Ann Alicia

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of organisms belonging to the fungus kingdom. The cost associated with mycotoxin contamination in the USA and Canada is approximately US $5 billion. Zearalenone (ZEN), a resorcylic acid lactone, is produced by various members of the genus Fusarium . These fungi often colonize a variety of foods and feedstuffs including, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, barley, and other cereal grains. This metabolite has estrogenic effects in farm animals with pigs being the most sensitive. ZEN induces hyperestrogenism and can cause infertility, reduced sex drive, fetal mummification, and abortions. Clays have successfully been used in the animal feed industry as an adsorbent and binders for certain small, water soluble mycotoxins. These mycotoxins are attracted to the electrical imbalance between the layers of the clays caused by isomorphic substitution of structural atoms. The mycotoxins are sequestered in the clay layers and pass harmlessly through the animal. However, ZEN is water insoluble and is not extracted easily with aluminosilicate clays. Therefore the modification of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) clays with organic cations has been proposed to render the clays hydrophobic and increase the ZEN binding capacity. The goal of this study was to develop a safe and cost effective organophilic material able to bind and extract zearalenone, to investigate the factors most important to extraction, and to investigate the fundamental properties between the clay-surfactant-mycotoxin systems that lead to extraction. The clay was modified by cation exchange reactions with tricaprylmethylammonium (TCMA) chloride and generic corn oil. The organophilic clays were then characterized using XRD, FTIR, and TGA analytical techniques. These techniques were used to determine the change in fundamental clay properties that would lead to the extraction of ZEN. Desorption studies were performed to determine any increase in toxicity that might be

  13. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  14. Modernity and putty-clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  15. Aspects of clay/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste management, both clay-based materials and concrete are proposed for use as barriers, seals or supporting structures. The main concern when clays and concrete are in proximity is the generation of a high-pH environment by concrete since clay minerals are relatively unstable at high pH. Here we examine the OH--generating capacity of two high-performance concretes when in contact with several solutions. We also investigate various aspects of claylconcrete interactions. They are: (1) the alkalimetric titration of clay suspensions, (2) the effect of Ca(OH)2 (portlandite) on the swelling and hydraulic properties of compacted bentonite, and (3) the influence of cement grout on a backfill clay retrieved from the 900-d Buffer/Container Experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory of AECL. The results indicate that although high-performance concretes establish significantly lower poresolution pH (9 to 10) than does ordinary portland cement, the pH is still somewhat higher than that of clay/groundwater systems of about pH 8. Hence, even if high-performance concrete is used in a disposal vault, the potential still exists for clay minerals to alter over long periods of time if in contact with this concrete. The data show, however, that clays have a substantial buffering capacity, and clay-based barriers can thus neutralize much of the OH- potentially released from concrete in a vault. Moreover, even after reacting for 120 d at 85oC with up to 5 wt.% Ca(OH)2, compacted bentonite (dry density = 1.2 Mg/m3 ) retains much of its swelling capacity and has a permeability low enough (hydraulic conductivity ≤ 10-11 m/s) to ensure that molecular diffusion will be the main transport mechanism through compacted clay-based barriers. Furthermore, according to X-ray diffractometry, the clay mineral component of backfill was not altered by contact with a cement grout for 900 d in the Buffer/Container Experiment

  16. Geotechnical studies of Jaitapur marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.

    characterisEd. by high water content and high Atterberg limits. Undrained shear strength varied from 1.8 to 6 KPa. These were moderately sensitive clays. Carbonate content which varied from 3 to 27%, was found to influence engineering properties of the soil...

  17. ASPECTS OF OPTIMIZATION OF WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    E. BEILICCI; R. BEILICCI

    2013-01-01

    Water management system include all activities and works which providing the administration of public domain of water, with local / national interest, and qualitative, quantitative and sustainable management of water resources. Hydrotechnical arrangements, consisting of a set of hydraulic structures, produce both a favorable and unfavorable influences on environment. Their different constructive and exploitation solutions exercise a significantly impact on the environment. Therefore the advan...

  18. Study of polymeric hydrogels with inorganic nanoparticles of clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscience has been applied in research of intelligent systems for drug delivery. The use of biodegradable synthetic polymers and in diagnostics and therapy has stimulated the application of nanotechnology in polymeric systems with new structures and new materials composing among these materials are hydrogels. Hydrogel with dispersed clay is a new class of materials that combine flexible and permeability of the hydrogels with the high efficiency of the clay to adsorb different substances. We evaluated the behaviour of swelling, gel fraction and thermal stability among the hydrogels obtained by poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVAl) with clay and poly (N-2-vinyl-pyrrolidone) (PVP) with clay. While, observed that the hydrogels showed swelling clay PVAl meaningful, the clay PVP hydrogels showed swelling more consistent after four hours of testing

  19. Hydrothermal field test with french candidate clay embedding steel heater in the Stripa mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments with French kaolinite/smectite clay heated up to 170 degrees C in boreholes in granite were conducted for 8 months and 4 years. The clay heated for 8 months has a considerably higher water content and it had undergone much less changes in mineralogy and physical properties than the clay exposed to heating for 4 years. The drying of the latter clay was probably caused by hydrogen gas from corrosion of the heater. The clay next to the heater turned into clay-stone despite conversion of the kaolinite component to smectite. (42 refs)

  20. Clay modified crushed salt for shaft sealing elements. Material optimization and evaluation in field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salt-based materials are intended to use for backfill and sealing systems in geotechnical barriers in underground HLW-repositories. Due to the creep of the saliniferous host rock, the salt backfill will be compacted during several hundreds or thousands years of operation to a minimum of porosity resp. permeability. To raise the sealing potential of a salt-based backfill, the porosity after construction should be minimized by optimal material performance and compaction performance. A procedure to optimize the grain size distribution of crushed salt and its water and clay content is described. The optimized salt fraction gets a better compaction behavior than straight mine-run salt. The addition of a filler-like material (e.g. Friedland Clay Powder) reduces the total porosity and permeability. Backfill columns made from crushed salt and clay probably include an instant sealing function.

  1. Clay modified crushed salt for shaft sealing elements. Material optimization and evaluation in field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaubach, Uwe; Hofmann, Martin; Gruner, Matthias; Kudla, Wolfram [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. of Mining and Special Civil Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Salt-based materials are intended to use for backfill and sealing systems in geotechnical barriers in underground HLW-repositories. Due to the creep of the saliniferous host rock, the salt backfill will be compacted during several hundreds or thousands years of operation to a minimum of porosity resp. permeability. To raise the sealing potential of a salt-based backfill, the porosity after construction should be minimized by optimal material performance and compaction performance. A procedure to optimize the grain size distribution of crushed salt and its water and clay content is described. The optimized salt fraction gets a better compaction behavior than straight mine-run salt. The addition of a filler-like material (e.g. Friedland Clay Powder) reduces the total porosity and permeability. Backfill columns made from crushed salt and clay probably include an instant sealing function.

  2. NEXAFS microscopy studies of the association of hydrocarbon thin films with fine clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of organic species associated with clay minerals plays a significant role in several processes, from hydrocarbon recovery in oil sands to contaminated soil remediation and water treatment. In this work, we address the use of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) in conjunction with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to study the microstructure and chemistry of organic-clay associations in situ. A model system based on methylene blue and illite is used to explore the sensitivity of NEXAFS microscopy to these interactions, and to identify and resolve experimental challenges in these measurements. We find that sample contamination from X-ray induced photodeposition is a significant problem in STXM microscopy, but also that this problem can be substantially reduced with a liquid nitrogen cooled anticontaminator. With appropriate sample preparation and experimental procedures, we find that STXM microscopy is sensitive to thin carbon adsorbates on clay surfaces.

  3. Water masers in the Saturnian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrebenko, S. V.; Gurvits, L. I.; Elitzur, M.; Cosmovici, C. B.; Avruch, I. M.; Montebugnoli, S.; Salerno, E.; Pluchino, S.; Maccaferri, G.; Mujunen, A.; Ritakari, J.; Wagner, J.; Molera, G.; Uunila, M.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The presence of water has long been seen as a key condition for life in planetary environments. The Cassini spacecraft discovered water vapour in the Saturnian system by detecting absorption of UV emission from a background star. Investigating other possible manifestations of water is essential, one of which, provided physical conditions are suitable, is maser emission. Aims: We report detection of water maser emission at 22 GHz associated with several Kronian satellites using Earth-based radio telescopes. Methods: We searched for water maser emission in the Saturnian system in an observing campaign using the Metsähovi and Medicina radio telescopes. Spectral data were Doppler-corrected over orbital phase for the Saturnian satellites, yielding detections of water maser emission associated with the moons Hyperion, Titan, Enceladus, and Atlas. Results: The detection of Saturnian water molecules by remote astronomical observation can be combined with in situ spacecraft measurements to harmonise the physical model of the Saturnian system.

  4. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  5. Origin of the high sensitivity of Chinese red clay soils to drought : significance of the clay characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Benoît; Bruand, Ary; Qin, Jiangtao; Peng, Xihnua; Hartmann, Christian; Bo, Sun; Hao, Hongtao; Rozenbaum, Olivier; Muller, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The red clay soils which are widespread in China are known to be highly sensitive to drought during the dry season but the origin of this high sensitivity to drought remains unclear. Several red clay soils were selected in the Hunan province for study. We studied their basic physico-chemical properties and clay mineralogy, their structure and shrinkage properties, as well as their water retention properties. Results show that the amount of water available between -330 and -15 000 hPa water po...

  6. Gas migration and breakthrough pressure in a compacted clay for the engineered barrier of a deep disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the law of December 30, 1991, France is studying the feasibility of high level vitrified waste (HLW) disposal in deep geological formations. The reference disposal concept is based on a multi-barrier system (waste package, steel overpack, clay engineered barrier, geological barrier). During the disposal lifetime, gases could be generated (mainly H2 issued from anaerobic corrosion of steel) and could disturb the near field around waste packages. To confirm the stability and long term safety of the disposal, it is necessary to know the impact of gases, in particular on the clay engineered barrier. Recent studies carried out by CEA on gas migration in Fo-Ca clay (candidate material for the engineered barrier) are presented here. Main results concern the H2 permeability of clay taking into account its dry density as well as its water saturation degree. Gas breakthrough phenomenon is also investigated. From a general point of view, permeability data are well organised: the higher dry density and water saturation degree, the lower the H2 permeability. Concerning the behaviour of compacted Fo-Ca clay under high H2 pressure, two kinds of gas transport threshold pressures, critical and breakthrough pressures are determined. The critical pressure (or gas entry pressure) is the gas pressure under which no gas flow is detected. The gas breakthrough pressure is detected when the gas flow rate gas permeability show a drastic change. In accordance with updated interpretations, this pressure is associated to high conductivity pathways aperture in the compacted clay. The critical and breakthrough pressure concept is essential to understand gas migration in compacted clays. It allows to determine pressure domains for which gas migration will be possible without damaging the clay engineered barrier and those for which major discontinuities could occur in the material, altering its performance. (author)

  7. Kansas Water Quality Action Targeting System (KATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This system is a revision of the original KATS system developed in 1990 as a tool to aid resource managers target Kansas valuable and vulnerable water resources for...

  8. Water system models in virtual environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gosar, Leon

    2008-01-01

    The water system elements can not be illustrated with spatial data with constant geometry. A three-dimensional abstraction, through which spatial data on water bodies can be examined, is composed of dynamic structures with complex geometry and topology. A three-dimensional visualisation of surfaces does not suffice to define the meaning of individual elements of space in which water bodies are included. Maps rules for water management contents have been drawn for decades. Due to the developme...

  9. Effect of air injection under subsurface drip irrigation on yield and water use efficiency of corn in a sandy clay loam soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abuarab; Ehab Mostafa; Mohamed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) can substantially reduce the amount of irrigation water needed for corn production. However, corn yields need to be improved to offset the initial cost of drip installation. Air-injection is at least potentially applicable to the (SDI) system. However, the vertical stream of emitted air moving above the emitter outlet directly toward the surface creates a chimney effect, which should be avoided, and to ensure that there are adequate oxygen for root respiration...

  10. Characterization of aquifer heterogeneity in a complex fluvial hydrogeologic system to evaluate migration in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogeology and extent of ground water contamination were characterized at a site in northern California. Wood preserving compounds, primarily pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote, have been detected in the soil and ground water. A plume of dissolved PCP up to 1.5 miles long has been identified south of the plant. The aquifer consists of a complex multizonal system of permeable gravels and sands composed of units from four geologic formations deposited by the ancestral Feather River. Fluvial channel gravels form the principal aquifer zones and contain overbank clay and silt deposits which locally form clay lenses or more continuous aquitards. The geometric mean horizontal hydraulic conductivities for channel gravels range between 120 to 530 feet/day. Mean vertical aquitard hydraulic conductivity is 0.07 feet/day. Ground water flow is generally southward with a velocity ranging from 470 to 1000 feet/year. The spatial distribution of dissolved PCP in the aquifer documents the interactions between major permeable zones. Hydrostratigraphic evidence pointing to the separation of aquifer zones is supported by the major ion chemistry of ground water. The sodium and calcium-magnesium bicarbonate-rich water present in the upper aquifer zones is significantly different in chemical composition from the predominantly sodium chloride-rich water present in the deeper permeable zone. This indicates that hydrodynamic separation exists between the upper and lower zones of the aquifer, limiting the vertical movement of the PCP plume. A numerical ground water model, based on this conceptual hydrogeologic model, was developed to evaluate groundwater transport pathways and for use in the design of a ground water extraction and treatment system. (9 refs., 7 figs., tab.)

  11. Synthesis and properties of P(NIPA-co-NVP)-clay hydrogel by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeric hydrogels are unique materials that can absorb and retain large amounts of water. The cross-linking of polymer chain makes them insoluble, soft and elastic. They are stimuli-responsive, displaying phase transitions in response to small changes in temperature, pH, electric field and light. The temperature-sensitive hydrogels have potential applications in gel-based separation processes and in biomedicine, e.g., preparation of drug delivery systems and separation of cells. Thermo-sensitive character of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) hydrogels shrinking or swelling below or above lower critical solution temperature (LCST) has widely been investigated in recent years. However, some of their potential applications are hindered by their low mechanical strength, low swelling ratio, bad biocompatibility and low purity, owing to the use of catalysts or additives in chemosynthesis. Liang synthesized clay/PNIPAm composite hydrogel to improve its mechanical strength. In this work, hydrogels of P (NIPA-co-NVP)-Clay were synthesized by 60Co γ-ray irradiation. Different thermo-sensitive hydrogels were made under different experimental conditions such as dose, dose rate, monomer concentration, monomer ratio and content of clay. X-ray diffraction shows that the layer distance of Na-clay is changed from 1.6nm to 2.7nm because Na-clay pieces can be intercalated or exfoliated by HTMAB, and P(NIPA-co-NVP) -clay pieces is 3.4nm. The swelling property tests show that the LCST of PNIPA is 32 degree C, the LCST of P(NIPA-co-NVP) is higher than PNIPA. With the increase of NVP content, LCST is higher. As the ratio of NIPA/NVP is 95/5, hydrogel shows the best swelling property and LCST is 37 degree C. LCST of P(NIPA-co-NVP)-clay Hydrogel is not changed, but the strength and swelling properties are better. (authors)

  12. Defect and Innovation of Water Rights System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Bin

    2008-01-01

    The rare deposition of water resources conflicts with its limitless demand. This determined the existence of the water rights transaction system. The implementation of the water rights transaction system requires clarifying the definition of water re-source fight above all distinctly. At present, it is a kind of common right system arrangement which needs the Chinese government to dispose of water resources. Though a series of management sys-tems guaranteed the government's supply of water resource, it hindered the development of the water market seriously and caused the utilization of water resources to stay in the inefficient or low efficient state for a long time. Thus, we should change the government's leading role in the resource distribution and really rely on the market to carry on the water rights trade and transac-tion. In this way, the water rights could become a kind of private property right relatively, and circulate freely in the market. As a result of this, we should overcome the defects of common right, make its external performance internalized maximally and achieve the optimized water resource disposition and use it more effec-tively.

  13. Solar PV energy for water pumping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper provides an introduction into understanding the relative merits, characteristics, including economics, of photovoltically powered water pumping systems. Although more than 10,000 photovoltaic pumping systems are known to be operating through out the world, many potential users do not know how to decide weather feasibility assessment, and system procurement so that the reader can made an informed decision about water pumping systems, especially those powered with photovoltaics. (author)

  14. Simulation of the long term alteration of clay minerals in engineered bentonite barriers: nucleation and growth of secondary clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    with elevated temperature. Thermodynamic effects are then combined with solubility products and kinetic effects on nucleation and growth of precipitated particles. It is a real challenge for geo-chemists to be able to account for precipitation kinetics in water-rock interaction models, particularly considering systems on short to mid terms (x 1000 y) compared to geological timescales. The recently developed code NANOKIN models dissolution processes of primary minerals as well as the kinetics of precipitation of secondary minerals taking into account the first steps of nucleation and growth and the subsequent evolution of the classes of particles precipitated. With these modellings the predicted evolution of the clay phase gives information on the crystal size distribution of secondary particles precipitated as a function of time. The model also examines the state of the aqueous solution with various mineral phases and combines the classical theory of crystal nucleation with size and morphology dependent kinetic rate laws for growth and/or dissolution of particles i.e. Oswald ripening processes. Ion exchange in mineral phases, and particularly in clay minerals has to be considered as a possible geochemical process taking place in clay barriers under storage conditions. This process might control first the transfer or the fixation of the major cations present in aqueous solutions (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+ mainly but also H+, Fe2+, Al3+) but also radionuclide cations if they might diffuse in the barriers after corrosion of the canisters on long term. When one considers this process from the simulation point of view, the challenge is not so easy. The same simulation has to combine kinetic processes with largely different time scales: near equilibrium cationic exchange reactions, which can be considered as quasi-instantaneous, and clay mineral precipitation which occurs on longer term in over-saturation state with respect to the solution. We have extended the code NANOKIN, in

  15. Environmental management of water systems under uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Baresel, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Hydrological drainage/river basins constitute highly heterogeneous systems of coupled natural and anthropogenic water and pollutant flows across political, national and international boundaries. These flows need to be appropriately understood, quantified and communicated to stakeholders, in order to appropriately guide environmental water system management. In this thesis, various uncertainties about water and pollutant flows in drainage/river basins and their implications for effective and e...

  16. Water balance in fuel cells systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cell systems are attractive for their high efficiency (i.e., electric power generated per weight/volume of fuel,) and lower emissions. These systems are being developed for applications that include transportation (propulsion and auxiliary), remote stationary, and portable. Where these systems use on-board fuel processing of available fuels, the fuel processor requires high-purity water. For utility applications, this water may be available on-site, but for most applications, the process water must be recovered from the fuel cell system exhaust gas. For such applications, it is critically important that the fuel cell system be a net water-producing device. A variety of environmental conditions (e.g., ambient temperature, pressure), fuel cell system design, and operating conditions determine whether the fuel cell system is water-producing or water-consuming. This paper will review and discuss the conditions that determine the net-water balance of a generic fuel cell system and identify some options that will help meet the water needs of the fuel processor

  17. Solar-powered hot-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-water system requires no external power except solar energy. System is completely self-controlling. It includes solar-powered pump, solar-thermally and hydrothermally operated valves, and storage tank filled with open-celled foam, to maintain thermal stratification in stored water.

  18. Rattles of Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  19. Polyethylene/clay nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Měřínská, D.; Kovářová, L.; Kalendová, A.; Chmielová, M.; Weiss, Z.; Hromádková, Jiřina; Šimoník, J.

    Akron: Polymer Processing Society, 2004. s. 245. [Polymer Processing Society Annual Meeting. 20.06.2004-24.06.2004, Akron] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Keywords : polyethylene * clay * polymer nanotechnology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  20. Impact of the changes in the chemical composition of pore water on chemical and physical stability of natural clays. A review of natural cases and related laboratory experiments and the ideas on natural analogues for bentonite erosion/non-erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scientific literature survey was compiled with the specific objective to find information for smectite mobilization and/or retention in natural clay formations caused by contact with water with low ionic concentrations such as can be expected during and after an ice age. Evidence was sought if smectite particles are lost from the clay to the water and if accessory minerals that remain could form a growing filter slowing down or stopping further loss of smectite. Bentonites are present in geological layers for hundreds of millions of years. There is limited exchange with surrounding layers, eg K transported into the bentonite layer from surrounding shale layers leading to the increased illite % in smectite-illite of the bentonite. Another process is silicification of surrounding layers leading to lowered permeability of surrounding rocks. Geological literature data on historical bentonites do not consider colloid formation in low ionic strength water as relevant mechanism for smectite mobilization. However there are no studied cases where this could be a relevant mechanism (as proposed by colloid release scenario). Soil researchers have studied the mechanism of colloid release in laboratory experiments and have found that there has to be an abrupt change in infiltrating water quality leading to 'osmotic explosion'. Clogging the pores in the lower part of the soil column has followed, leading to dramatic decrease of hydraulic conductivity in vertical profile and increased surface runoff. So, although limited, there are literature evidences of clay colloids release from bentonites/smectites caused by low-ionic circumneutral water. The geological settings to look for natural analogue studies include (1) Bentonite/smectite similar to what is used in repository. (2) Water similar to the composition of glacial meltwater. (3) Scenario similar to what is proposed in the bentonite erosion project. The problem related to the study of historical bentonite profiles is the

  1. Impact of the changes in the chemical composition of pore water on chemical and physical stability of natural clays. A review of natural cases and related laboratory experiments and the ideas on natural analogues for bentonite erosion/non-erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puura, Erik (Eridicon OUe, Tartu (Estonia)); Kirsimaee, Kalle (Univ. of Tartu, Inst. of Ecology and Earth Sciences, Tartu (Estonia))

    2010-01-15

    A scientific literature survey was compiled with the specific objective to find information for smectite mobilization and/or retention in natural clay formations caused by contact with water with low ionic concentrations such as can be expected during and after an ice age. Evidence was sought if smectite particles are lost from the clay to the water and if accessory minerals that remain could form a growing filter slowing down or stopping further loss of smectite. Bentonites are present in geological layers for hundreds of millions of years. There is limited exchange with surrounding layers, eg K transported into the bentonite layer from surrounding shale layers leading to the increased illite % in smectite-illite of the bentonite. Another process is silicification of surrounding layers leading to lowered permeability of surrounding rocks. Geological literature data on historical bentonites do not consider colloid formation in low ionic strength water as relevant mechanism for smectite mobilization. However there are no studied cases where this could be a relevant mechanism (as proposed by colloid release scenario). Soil researchers have studied the mechanism of colloid release in laboratory experiments and have found that there has to be an abrupt change in infiltrating water quality leading to 'osmotic explosion'. Clogging the pores in the lower part of the soil column has followed, leading to dramatic decrease of hydraulic conductivity in vertical profile and increased surface runoff. So, although limited, there are literature evidences of clay colloids release from bentonites/smectites caused by low-ionic circumneutral water. The geological settings to look for natural analogue studies include (1) Bentonite/smectite similar to what is used in repository. (2) Water similar to the composition of glacial meltwater. (3) Scenario similar to what is proposed in the bentonite erosion project. The problem related to the study of historical bentonite profiles

  2. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  3. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ishaq Ahmad; Ernst-Ulrich Hartge; Joachim Werther; and Reiner Wischnewski

    2014-01-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  4. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  5. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert L. Lee; Junghan Dong

    2004-06-03

    This final report of ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Water,'' DOE project No. DE-FC26-00BC15326 describes work performed in the third year of the project. Several good results were obtained, which are documented in this report. The compacted bentonite membranes were replaced by supported bentonite membranes, which exhibited the same salt rejection capability. Unfortunately, it also inherited the clay expansion problem due to water invasion into the interlayer spaces of the compacted bentonite membranes. We noted that the supported bentonite membrane developed in the project was the first of its kind reported in the literature. An {alpha}-alumina-supported MFI-type zeolite membrane synthesized by in-situ crystallization was fabricated and tested. Unlike the bentonite clay membranes, the zeolite membranes maintained stability and high salt rejection rate even for a highly saline solution. Actual produced brines from gas and oil fields were then tested. For gas fields producing brine, the 18,300 ppm TDS (total dissolved solids) in the produced brine was reduced to 3060 ppm, an 83.3% rejection rate of 15,240 ppm salt rejection. For oilfield brine, while the TDS was reduced from 181,600 ppm to 148,900 ppm, an 18% rejection rate of 32,700 ppm reduction, the zeolite membrane was stable. Preliminary results show the dissolved organics, mainly hydrocarbons, did not affect the salt rejection. However, the rejection of organics was inconclusive at this point. Finally, the by-product of this project, the {alpha}-alumina-supported Pt-Co/Na Y catalytic zeolite membrane was developed and demonstrated for overcoming the two-step limitation of nonoxidation methane (CH{sub 4}) conversion to higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2+}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Detailed experiments to obtain quantitative results of H{sub 2} generation for various conditions are now being conducted. Technology transfer efforts included five manuscripts submitted to

  6. Soft Matter Physics of Clays and Clay suspensions: structural arrest, ordering, and host-guest interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Lindbo, Hansen

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains fundamental experimental studies in soft matter physics, focusing on plate-shaped hectorite and uorohectorite clays as nanomaterials with applications in the formation of glasses, gels and liquid crystals, as naturally occurring minerals, as drug carrier systems, and as hosts for CO2 storage.The first part presents fundamental studies on the physics of dispersions of clays in aqueous solvents. We find that gravity induces phase separation in aqueous suspensions of the syn...

  7. Corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the Tournemire clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon steels are possible materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal in argillaceous environments. Experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of such materials has been conducted in various conditions. Concerning the numerous laboratory experiments, these conditions (water and clay mixture or compacted clay) mainly concern the bentonite clay that would be used for the engineered barrier. On the opposite, only few in-situ experiments has been conducted directly in the local clay of the repository site (such as Boom clay, etc.). In order to better estimate the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in natural clay site conditions, an experimental study has been conducted jointly by EDF and IRSN in the argillaceous French site of Tournemire. In this study, A42 carbon steel specimens have been exposed in 3 different zones of the Tournemire clay formation. The first type of environmental conditions concerns a zone where the clay has not been affected by the excavation (EDZ) of the main tunnel neither by the main fracture zone of the clay formation. The second and third ones are located in the EDZ of the tunnel. In the second zone, an additional aerated water flows from the tunnel, whereas it does not in the third place. Some carbon steel specimens have been extracted after several years of exposure to these conditions. The average corrosion rate has been measured by the weight loss technique and the pitting corrosion depth has been evaluated under an optical microscope. Corrosion products have also been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Results are then discussed regarding the surrounding environmental conditions. Calculations of the oxygen transport from the tunnel through the clay and of the clay re-saturation can explain, in a first approach, the corrosion behaviour of the carbon steel in the different tested zones. (authors)

  8. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  9. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... successfully. At natural watercontent w = 40 to 45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k conductivity measured in oedometer tests used for establishing swell and deformation properties showed...

  10. Water turbine system and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2010-06-15

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  11. Preoperational test report, raw water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Raw Water System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system supplies makeup water to the W-030 recirculation evaporative cooling towers for tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. The Raw Water pipe riser and associated strainer and valving is located in the W-030 diesel generator building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  12. Preoperational test report, raw water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Raw Water System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system supplies makeup water to the W-030 recirculation evaporative cooling towers for tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. The Raw Water pipe riser and associated strainer and valving is located in the W-030 diesel generator building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  13. Water turbine system and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2011-05-10

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  14. Phosphorus speciation in Swedish agricultural clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Ann Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important element for crop production, but build-up of excess soil P can promote P leaching and eutrophication of surface waters. To better understand the dynamics of P release from soil to waters, more knowledge is needed about sorption patterns and P speciation in agricultural soils. Two new indices were developed to assess the importance of P sorption to hydroxy-interlayered clay minerals, and to evaluate the amount of hydroxy-interlayering and hydroxy-interlayer ...

  15. Elastic deformation behaviour of Palaeogene clay from Fehmarn Belt area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awadalkarim, Ahmed; Foged, Niels Nielsen; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    , bulk density, porosity, water content and saturation, elastic wave velocities, electrical resistivity and strain caused by mechanical loading. They were used together to interpret the geotechnical data. We aimed to see which physical property is a main controlling factor for the elasticity of the...... this study. Results of odometer tests done by Jessen et al. (2011) show that when Palaeogene clay is mounted in an odometer cell without access to water and loaded to its in-situ vertical effective stress and then saturated with its native salt water, the clay absorbs water and swells. This behaviour...... indicates that the Palaeogene clay in nature should expand at its mean effective in-situ stress. A study by Krogsbøll et al. (2012) provides some important clues about the deformation behaviour during unloading and swelling of the Palaeogene clay. In this study, we mainly focused on the elastic properties...

  16. Screening reactor steam/water piping systems for water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A steam/water system possessing a certain combination of thermal, hydraulic and operational states, can, in certain geometries, lead to a steam bubble collapse induced water hammer. These states, operations, and geometries are identified. A procedure that can be used for identifying whether an unbuilt reactor system is prone to water hammer is proposed. For the most common water hammer, steam bubble collapse induced water hammer, six conditions must be met in order for one to occur. These are: (1) the pipe must be almost horizontal; (2) the subcooling must be greater than 20 C; (3) the L/D must be greater than 24; (4) the velocity must be low enough so that the pipe does not run full, i.e., the Froude number must be less than one; (5) there should be void nearby; (6) the pressure must be high enough so that significant damage occurs, that is the pressure should be above 10 atmospheres. Recommendations on how to avoid this kind of water hammer in both the design and the operation of the reactor system are made

  17. Zeta Potential Measurements on Three Clays from Turkey and Effects of Clays on Coal Flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain; Dem&idot;rc&idot;; özbayoğlu

    1996-12-25

    There is a growing trend of characterizing coal and coal wastes in order to study the effect of clays present in them during coal washing. Coarse wastes from the Zonguldak Coal Washery, Turkey, were characterized and found to contain kaolinite, illite, and chlorite. These three clays, obtained in almost pure form from various locations in Turkey, have been subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to assess their purity and zeta potential measurements in order to evaluate their properties in terms of their surface charge and point of zero charge (pzc) values. It was found from XRD data that these clays were almost pure and their electrokinetic potential should therefore be representative of their colloidal behavior. All three clay minerals were negatively charged over the range from pH 2.5 to 11. Chlorite and illite have pzc at pH 3 and pH 2.5, respectively, whereas kaolinite has no pzc. The effect of these clays in Zonguldak coal, wastes, and black waters on coal flotation was studied by floating artificial mixtures of Zonguldak clean coal (4.5% ash) and individual clay. The flotation tests on coal/individual clay revealed that each clay influences coal flotation differently according to its type and amount. Illite had the worst effect on coal floated, followed by chlorite and kaolinite. The loss of yield in coal was found to be 18% for kaolinite, 20% for chlorite, and 28% for illite, indicating the worst effect of illite and least for kaolinite during coal flotation. PMID:8978557

  18. Development of novel composite membranes using quaternized chitosan and Na+-MMT clay for the pervaporation dehydration of isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Santosh K; Kariduraganavar, Mahadevappa Y

    2009-10-01

    Novel polymer-clay-based composite membranes were prepared by incorporating sodium montmorillonite (Na(+)-MMT) clay into quaternized chitosan. The resulting membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXAD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of membrane swelling was studied by varying the water concentration in the feed. The membranes were employed for the pervaporation dehydration of isopropanol in terms of feed composition and Na(+)-MMT clay loading. The experimental results demonstrated that membrane containing 10 mass% of Na(+)-MMT clay showed the highest separation selectivity of 14,992 with a flux of 14.23x10(-2) kg/m(2) h at 30 degrees C for 10 mass% of water in the feed. The total flux and flux of water are found to be overlapping each other particularly for clay-incorporated membranes, signifying that the composite membranes developed in the present study involving quaternized chitosan and Na(+)-MMT clay are highly selective toward water. From the temperature-dependent diffusion and permeation values, the Arrhenius activation parameters were estimated. The resulting activation energy values obtained for water permeation (E(pw)) are much lower than those of isopropanol permeation (E(pIPA)), suggesting that the developed composite membranes have higher separation efficiency for the water-isopropanol system. The estimated E(p) and E(D) values ranged between 8.97 and 11.89, and 7.56 and 9.88 kJ/mol, respectively. The positive heat of sorption (DeltaH(s)) values were obtained for all the membranes, suggesting that Henry's mode of sorption is predominant in the process. PMID:19570544

  19. Reactor water level control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A BWR type reactor comprises a control valve disposed in a reactor water draining pipelines and undergoing an instruction to control the opening degree, an operation board having a setting device for generating the instruction and a control board for giving the instruction generated by the setting device to the control valve. The instruction is supplied from the setting device to the control valve by way of a control circuit to adjust the opening degree of the control valve thereby controlling the water level in the reactor. In addition, a controller generating an instruction independent of the setting device and a signal transmission channel for signal-transmitting the instruction independent of the control circuit are disposed, to connect the controller electrically to the signal transmission. The signal transmission channel and the control circuit are electrically connected to the control valve switchably with each other. Since instruction can be given to the control valve even at a periodical inspection or modification when the setting device and the control circuit can not be used, the reactor water level can be controlled automatically. Then, operator's working efficiency upon inspection can be improved remarkably. (N.H.)

  20. CO2 production from the Boom clay under thermal load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boom Clay kerogen is about 55 mg/g of kerogen (∼72 mg/g TOC) according to Deniau et al. (2005) and 49 mg/g of organic carbon based on the data of Lorant et al. (2008). However, these results were derived from anhydrous closed system experiments using purified kerogen without mineral matrix. Therefore they reflect only parts of the reactive properties of organic matter in repository conditions. More recently, pyrolyses tests were performed at 150-200 C on both isolated kerogen and bulk Boom Clay samples in the presence of liquid phase in order to account for potential role of water and minerals on the formation of CO2. The absolute amount of CO2 appeared higher in the bulk Boom Clay compared to CO2 released from the kerogen for the same set of experimental conditions. Furthermore, the shapes of the CO2 production curves are clearly different for the two studied cases. In the bulk samples, CO2 production curves follow reversal trends, while typical steady-state curves are observed in case of isolated kerogen. Whether or not CO2-carbonate equilibrium reactions interfered with CO2 production from organic matter in the bulk rock Boom Clay samples is a hypothesis being tested. Long-term batch experiments at 80 C are currently running at SCK.CEN to shed more light on the CO2 production from the bulk rock suspensions. The gas analysis confirmed that CO2 is by far the major gaseous component formed upon heating. The concentrations of methane are systematically below detection limit indicating that no significant C-C cleavage took place and thus internal structure of kerogen remained intact. The gas quantities fall within the range of 44-60 mgCO2/g TOC as measured on three independent cells. Taking into account the used high L/S ratio, the produced CO2 quantities are considered as the maximum capacity of the Boom Clay to release CO2 gas at 80 C. An overview of CO2 amounts produced by heating of BC kerogen and bulk rock samples from various experiments is given in Figure 1. The

  1. 某泥塑殿消防设施方案选择分析%Analysis on the design plan of some clay hall's fire extinguishing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王巍

    2013-01-01

    Against the decision of fire extinguishing system for some clay hall of national key cultural relics protection units,choose 4 index including fire extinguishing effect,secondary disaster,difficulty of installation and maintain,quantity of structural renovation project,and use risk assessment and fuzzy mathematics to analyze 4 common fire extinguishing system.Results showed that the most suitable one is ABC fine dry powder fire extinguishing system,and then IG541 gas fire extinguishing system,automatic sprinkler system,and ordinary ABC dry powder fire extinguishing system.After considering the protection of cultural relics,decide to choose cabinet fine dry powder fire extinguishing system,and fire control methods were put forward.%针对某全国重点文物保护单位泥塑殿拟选用的灭火系统,选择灭火效果、灭火系统产生的次生灾害、安装维护难度、结构改造工程量4个指标,应用风险评价方法和模糊数学理论对4种常见灭火系统进行分析得知,最适用于大殿的灭火系统是ABC超细干粉灭火系统,其次是IG541气体灭火系统、自动喷水预作用系统、普通ABC干粉灭火系统.进一步考虑文物保护等因素,指出大殿宜选择柜式ABC超细干粉灭火装置,并提出了现阶段大殿火灾防控措施.

  2. Integrated waste and water management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R. W.; Sauer, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance requirements of the NASA Space Station have prompted a reexamination of a previously developed integrated waste and water management system that used distillation and catalytic oxydation to purify waste water, and microbial digestion and incineration for waste solids disposal. This system successfully operated continuously for 206 days, for a 4-man equivalent load of urine, feces, wash water, condensate, and trash. Attention is given to synergisms that could be established with other life support systems, in the cases of thermal integration, design commonality, and novel technologies.

  3. Geochemical simulation of the evolution of granitic rocks and clay minerals submitted to a temperature increase in the vicinity of a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alteration of a granitic rock around a repository for spent nuclear fuel has been simulated considering the effect of an increase of temperature due to this kind of induced geothermal system. The results of the simulation have been interpreted in terms of mass transfer and volumic consequences. The alteration proceeds by dissolution of minerals (with an increase of the volumes of fissures and cracks) and precipitation of secondary miminerals as calcite and clay minerals particularly (with a decrease of the porosity). The increase of the temperature from 10 degrees C to about 100 degrees C will favour the alteration of the granitic rock around the repository by the solution filling the porosity. The rock is characterized by a very low fissure porosity and a consequent very low water velocity. This too, favours intense water rock interactions and production of secondary clays and the total possible mass transfer will decrease the porosity. A combination of these thermodynamic mass balance calculations with a kinetic approach of mineral dissolutions gives a first attempt to calibrate the modelling in the time scale: the decrease of porosity can be roughly estimated between 2 and 20% for 100,000 years. The particular problem of Na-bentonites behaviour in the proximate vicinity of the repository has been studied too. One must distinguish between two types of clay-water interactions: -within the rock around the repository, Na-bentonites should evolute with illitization in slighltly open system with low clay/water ratios, -within the repository itself, the clay reacts in a closed system for a long time with high clay/water ratios and a self-buffering effect should maintain the bentonite type. This chemical buffering effect is a positive point for the use of this clay as chemical barrier. (Author)

  4. Water delivery in the Early Solar System

    OpenAIRE

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Eggl, Siegfried; Süli, Áron; Sándor, Zsolt; Galiazzo, Mattia; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2015-01-01

    As part of the national scientific network 'Pathways to Habitable Worlds' the delivery of water onto terrestrial planets is a key question since water is essential for the development of life as we know it. After summarizing the state of the art we show some first results of the transport of water in the early Solar System for scattered main belt objects. Hereby we investigate the questions whether planetesimals and planetesimal fragments which have gained considerable inclination due to the ...

  5. Corrosion evaluation of service water system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability and reliability of the service water system is critical for safe operation of a nuclear power plant. Degradation of the system piping and components has forced utilities to re-evaluate the corrosion behavior of current and alternative system materials, to support assessments of the remaining service life of the service water system, selection of replacement materials, implementation of corrosion protection methods and corrosion monitoring programs, and identification of maintenance and operational constraints consistent with the materials used. TU Electric and Stone and Webster developed a service water materials evaluation program for the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station. Because of the length of exposure and the generic interest in this program by the nuclear power industry, EPRI joined TU to co-sponsor the test program. The program was designed to evaluate the corrosion behavior of current system materials and candidate replacement materials and to determine the operational and design changes which could improve the corrosion performance of the system. Although the test program was designed to be representative of service water system materials and environments targeted to conditions at Comanche Peak, these conditions are typical of and relevant to other fresh water cooled nuclear service water systems. Testing was performed in raw water and water treated with biocide under typical service water operating conditions including continuous flow, intermittent flow, and stagnant conditions. The test program evaluated the 300 Series and 6% molybdenum stainless steels, copper-nickel, titanium, carbon steel, and a formed-in-place nonmetallic pipe lining to determine susceptibility to general, crevice, and microbiologically influenced corrosion and pitting attack. This report presents the results of the test program after 4 years of exposure

  6. In situ analysis of microbial reduction of a nitrate plume in Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    nitrate and nitrite concentrations and pH, an on-line UV spectrophotometer and pH electrode are installed in the water circuit of one of the intervals. In a first series of tests, the biogeochemical evolution of the artificial Opalinus Clay pore water in the intervals was investigated after injection of low concentrations of nitrate or nitrate and acetate, simulating the BDP. The results of these tests indicate that microbial reduction of nitrate and nitrite can occur in the Opalinus Clay artificial water in the borehole, using acetate and/or clay components as electron donors. In these tests, nitrate was reduced to nitrite, ammonium and/or nitrogenous gases. Comparing the evolution in nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the absence or presence of acetate, clearly indicates faster reaction rates of microbial nitrate reduction when the system is fueled with acetate. When easily degradable organic compounds like acetate were added to the nitrate containing artificial pore water, these compounds were preferentially used as electron donors for nitrate reduction by heterotrophic microorganisms. Afterwards, alternative electron donors have been used originating either from the clay rock, e.g. pyrite, siderite, clay minerals, and/or dissolved natural organic matter, or from the stainless steel equipment, i.e. Fe0 and/or Fe2+. Furthermore, high concentrations of nitrate reducing prokaryotes were detected after injection of the intervals with nitrate, indicating that the nitrate and nitrite reduction, observed during all tests, was microbially mediated. Based on the results of the microbiological analyses, these nitrate reducers have most likely been introduced during the first injection or installation of the downhole equipment. The nature of the nitrate reduction reaction prevailing in the system appears to be depending on the microbial populations active in the borehole and on the electron donors and carbon sources present in the interval. Furthermore, the history of the

  7. Residential hot water distribution systems: Roundtablesession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, James D.; Klein, Gary; Springer, David; Howard, Bion D.

    2002-08-01

    Residential building practice currently ignores the lossesof energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. Theselosses include: combustion and standby losses from water heaters, thewaste of water (and energy) while waiting for hot water to get to thepoint of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distributionsystem after a draw; heat losses from recirculation systems and thediscarded warmth of waste water as it runs down the drain. Severaltechnologies are available that save energy (and water) by reducing theselosses or by passively recovering heat from wastewater streams and othersources. Energy savings from some individual technologies are reported tobe as much as 30 percent. Savings calculations of prototype systemsincluding bundles of technologies have been reported above 50 percent.This roundtable session will describe the current practices, summarizethe results of past and ongoing studies, discuss ways to think about hotwater system efficiency, and point to areas of future study. We will alsorecommend further steps to reduce unnecessary losses from hot waterdistribution systems.

  8. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Some considerations on a borehole in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A borehole has been drilled in the clay formation underlying the Trisaia Nuclear Research Center (CNEN) in Southern Italy. The local stratigraphic series includes 850 m of marly clay of Pliocene-Calabrian age. The drilling operation has been interrupted at about -400 m, due to the occurrence of methane gas. The presence of gas, the reducing conditions of the clay and the lack of water in fracture zones testify the extremely low permeability of this clay formation. Reducing conditions may prevent the migration of many radionuclides. The occurrence of some sandy levels and lenses is due to the coastal character of the paleosedimentary environment. Previsions on the homogeneity of clay bodies may be indirectly inferred by examination of feeder paleobasins

  10. Recyclable hydrotalcite clay catalysed Baylis-Hillman reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek Srivastava

    2013-09-01

    The Baylis-Hillman reaction using ionic liquid/hydrotalcite clay catalytic system has been observed to be more reactive in terms of yield and reaction rate than DABCO/acetonitrile system. During the process, the reactants enjoy ionic liquid/hydrotalcite clay catalytic system and gives corresponding Baylis-Hillman reaction products in good yield. The application of our catalytic system has been diversifying for the synthesis of lactone ceramide analogue from (S)-Garner aldehyde-methyl acrylate using Baylis-Hillman reaction. Recycling of ionic liquid/hydrotalcite clay catalytic system has also been demonstrated in this report.

  11. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was...

  12. Environmental Control and Life Support System, Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Group of the Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space Station (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. This is a close-up view of ECLSS Water Recovery System (WRS) racks. The MSFC's ECLSS Group overseas much of the development of the hardware that will allow a constant supply of clean water for four to six crewmembers aboard the ISS. The WRS provides clean water through the reclamation of wastewaters, including water obtained from the Space Shuttle's fuel cells, crewmember urine, used shower, handwash and oral hygiene water cabin humidity condensate, and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) wastes. The WRS is comprised of a Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), and a Water Processor Assembly (WPA). The UPA accepts and processes pretreated crewmember urine to allow it to be processed along with other wastewaters in the WPA, which removes free gas, organic, and nonorganic constituents before the water goes through a series of multifiltration beds for further purification. Product water quality is monitored primarily through conductivity measurements. Unacceptable water is sent back through the WPA for reprocessing. Clean water is sent to a storage tank. The water must meet stringent purity standards before consumption by the crew. The UPA provided by the MSFC and the WRA is provided by the prime contractor, Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems, International (HSSSI) from Cornecticut.

  13. The Impact of Leachate From Clean Coal Technology Waste on the Stability of Clay and Synthetic Liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was developed to provide design criteria for landfill disposal sites used for sludges such as those generated using the Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) tested at the Public Service Company of Colorado's Arapahoe Power Plant. The CCT wastes used were produced at the Arapahoe Plant Unit No. 4 that was equipped with the integrated dry NOx/S2 emissions control system installed under the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The investigation emphasized the potential impact of clean coal technology materials (sodium and calcium injection systems, and urea injection) on the permeability and stability characteristics of clay liner materials and the stability of synthetic liner materials. Flexible-wall permeameters were used to determine the hydraulic conductivities (HC) of the clay liner materials impacted by various compactive conditions. Tests were conducted using the waste materials overlying the clay liner materials under wet/dry cycles, freeze/thaw cycles, and over 120-day periods. The impact of CCT materials on the characteristics of the clay liner materials studied in this project was minimal The HC measurements of the waste/clay liner systems were similar to the water/clay liner systems. HC decreased for clay liners compacted at moisture levels slightly higher than optimum (standard Procter) and increased for liners compacted at moisture levels lower than optimum (standard Procter). Although some swelling was evident in the sodium materials, the sludge materials did not have a negative impact on the integrity of the liners over 120-day tests. Wet/dry cycles tended to result in lower HC, while freeze/thaw cycles substantially increased HC for the liners tested

  14. Cold Vacuum Drying facility potable water system design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) potable water (PW) system. The PW system provides potable water to the CVDF for supply to sinks, water closets, urinals, showers, custodial service sinks, drinking fountains, the decontamination shower, supply water to the non-PW systems, and makeup water for the de-ionized water system

  15. Renewable Energy Powered Water Treatment Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Bryce S.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    There are many motivations for choosing renewable energy technologies to provide the necessary energy to power water treatment systems for reuse and desalination. These range from the lack of an existing electricity grid, particularly in remote areas, to securing future energy and water supplies, to purely financial incentives. While many renewable energy technologies exist the two dominant ones used for powering desalination systems are PV modules and wind turbines. While wave...

  16. Evaluating the geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage of the near-field host clay rock using a THC model and the diffuse double layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L.; Liu, H.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Houseworth, J. E.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    One advantage of emplacing nuclear waste in a clay formation is the potential self-sealing capability due to clay swelling. The swelling properties of the near-field host clay rock can be altered due to geochemical factors, including changes in groundwater geochemistry, proportions of exchangeable cations, and swelling clay mineral abundances. The clay host rock can also undergo geochemical changes due to the interaction with the engineered barrier system (EBS) materials. In this paper, coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) models are linked with a swelling model based on diffuse double layer (DDL) theory and changes in the swelling properties of clay host rocks in the near field area are evaluated. Findings based on THC simulations using the reaction-transport code TOUGHREACT include: 1) Significant changes in the swelling pressure could be expected depending on various hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions. The change of hydration rate of the EBS (via the adjustment of tortuosity) could have significant effect on the swelling pressure. 2) Geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage only occurs in the near-field area, within a few meters from the EBS interface. 3) Swelling/shrinkage induced porosity change is generally much smaller than that caused by mineral precipitation/dissolution. 4) The geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage of host clay rock is the combined effect of variation in the pore water geochemistry, exchangeable cations, and smectite abundance. Neglecting any of these three latter factors might lead to a miscalculation of the geochemically-induced swelling pressure.

  17. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. van der Spek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and cut through by fissures. The hydraulic conductivity of the clay layers is negligible compared to the silt layers. It is conceptualized that fissures form a hydraulic connection between the colluvium and the varved clays. Groundwater recharge flows through the colluvium into the fissures where water is exchanged horizontally between the fissure and the silt layers of the varved clays. Groundwater flow in the colluvium is simulated with the Boussinesq equation while flow in the silt layers of the varved clays is simulated with the Richards' equation. Longitudinal outflow from the fissure is simulated with a linear-reservoir model. Scattered data of relatively short monitoring periods is available for several landslides in the region. A good similarity between observed and simulated heads is obtained, especially when considering the lack of important physical parameters such as the fissure width and the distance between the monitoring point and the fissure. A simulation for the period 1959–2004 showed some correlation between peaks in the simulated heads and the recorded occurrence of landslides while the bottom of the varved clays remained saturated during the entire simulation period.

  18. Study on hydrodynamics associated with quality of water in water distribution system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李欣; 顾大明; 赵洪宾; 袁一星

    2002-01-01

    The quality of water in water distribution system may vary with both location and time. Water quality models were used to predict spatial and temporal variation of water quality throughout the water system. Before analyzing the variations of water quality, it is necessary to determine the hydrodynamics in water distribution system. Analytical methods for the flow path from water sources to the observed point and water age of every observed node are proposed. This paper makes a further study on water supply route of multi-sources water supply network system. These studies have been applied to an actual water distribution system.

  19. Clays, clay minerals and cordierite ceramics - a review

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Valaskova

    2015-01-01

    The conventional methods for the synthesis of cordierite ceramics include the solid-state sintering of individual oxides of magnesium, aluminium and silicon of the corresponding chemical composition of cordierite, or sintering of the natural raw materials. Clays are used in the ceramics industries largely because of their contribution to the molding and drying properties. The most effective use of clays meets with the problems of the improvement of the working properties of clays and...

  20. Upgrades to the ISS Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayatin, Matthew J.; Carter, Donald L.; Schunk, Richard G.; Pruitt, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station Water Recovery System (WRS) is comprised of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The WRS produces potable water from a combination of crew urine (first processed through the UPA), crew latent, and Sabatier product water. Though the WRS has performed well since operations began in November 2008, several modifications have been identified to improve the overall system performance. These modifications can reduce resupply and improve overall system reliability, which is beneficial for the ongoing ISS mission as well as for future NASA manned missions. The following paper details efforts to reduce the resupply mass of the WPA Multifiltration Bed, develop improved catalyst for the WPA Catalytic Reactor, evaluate optimum operation of UPA through parametric testing, and improve reliability of the UPA fluids pump and Distillation Assembly.

  1. Hanford 200 area (sanitary) waste water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Site is approximately 1,450 sq. km (560 sq. mi) of semiarid land set aside for activities of the DOE. The reactor fuel processing and waste management facilities are located in the 200 Areas. Over the last 50 years at Hanford dicard of hazardous and sanitary waste water has resulted in billions of liters of waste water discharged to the ground. As part of the TPA, discharges of hazardous waste water to the ground and waters of Washington State are to be eliminated in 1995. Currently sanitary waste water from the 200 Area Plateau is handled with on-site septic tank and subsurface disposal systems, many of which were constructed in the 1940s and most do not meet current standards. Features unique to the proposed new sanitary waste water handling systems include: (1) cost effective operation of the treatment system as evaporative lagoons with state-of-the-art liner systems, and (2) routing collection lines to avoid historic contamination zones. The paper focuses on the challenges met in planning and designing the collection system

  2. Amoxicillin in a biological water recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharmaceuticals are new contaminants of concern in the aquatic environment, having been identified in groundwater, surface water, and residential tap water. Possible sources of pharmaceuticals include household wastewaters, runoff from feedlots, or waste discharges from pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. When surface water or groundwater supplies impacted by pharmaceuticals are used in drinking water production, the contaminants may reduce drinking water quality. Many pharmaceuticals, such as amoxicillin, pass through the body largely unmetabolized and directly enter wastewater collection systems. Pharmaceuticals are designed to persist in the body long enough to have the desired therapeutic effect. Therefore, they may also have the ability to persist in the environment (Seiler et al, 1999). The purpose of this work is to determine the overall transformation potential of a candidate pharmaceutical in wastewater treatment with specific emphasis on recycle systems. Amoxicillin is the selected pharmaceutical agent, an orally absorbed broad-spectrum antibiotic with a variety of clinical uses including ear, nose, and throat infections and lower respiratory tract infections. Experiments were conducted using an anaerobic reactor (with NO3- and NO2- as the e- acceptors) followed by a two-phase nitrifying tubular reactor. Influent composed of water, urine and surfactant was spiked with amoxicillin and fed into the wastewater recycle system. The concentration of amoxicillin in the feed and effluent was quantified using an HPLC. Results from this study include potential for long-term buildup in recycled systems, accumulation of breakdown products and possible transfer of antibiotic resistance to microorganisms in the system effluent. In addition, the results of this study may provide information on contamination potential for communities that are considering supplementing drinking water supplies with recovered wastewater or for entities considering a closed loop wastewater

  3. Amoxicillin in a biological water recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, A.; Jackson, A.; Rainwater, K. [Texas Tech Univ., Water Resources Center, Lubbock, Texas (United States); Pickering, K. [Johnson Space Center, NASA, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2002-06-15

    Pharmaceuticals are new contaminants of concern in the aquatic environment, having been identified in groundwater, surface water, and residential tap water. Possible sources of pharmaceuticals include household wastewaters, runoff from feedlots, or waste discharges from pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. When surface water or groundwater supplies impacted by pharmaceuticals are used in drinking water production, the contaminants may reduce drinking water quality. Many pharmaceuticals, such as amoxicillin, pass through the body largely unmetabolized and directly enter wastewater collection systems. Pharmaceuticals are designed to persist in the body long enough to have the desired therapeutic effect. Therefore, they may also have the ability to persist in the environment (Seiler et al, 1999). The purpose of this work is to determine the overall transformation potential of a candidate pharmaceutical in wastewater treatment with specific emphasis on recycle systems. Amoxicillin is the selected pharmaceutical agent, an orally absorbed broad-spectrum antibiotic with a variety of clinical uses including ear, nose, and throat infections and lower respiratory tract infections. Experiments were conducted using an anaerobic reactor (with NO{sub 3}{sup -} and NO{sub 2}{sup -} as the e{sup -} acceptors) followed by a two-phase nitrifying tubular reactor. Influent composed of water, urine and surfactant was spiked with amoxicillin and fed into the wastewater recycle system. The concentration of amoxicillin in the feed and effluent was quantified using an HPLC. Results from this study include potential for long-term buildup in recycled systems, accumulation of breakdown products and possible transfer of antibiotic resistance to microorganisms in the system effluent. In addition, the results of this study may provide information on contamination potential for communities that are considering supplementing drinking water supplies with recovered wastewater or for entities

  4. Modeling water uptake by a root system growing in a fixed soil volume

    CERN Document Server

    Albrieu, J L Blengino; Tarzia, D A

    2015-01-01

    The water uptake by roots of plants is examined for an ideal situation, with an approximation that resembles plants growing in pots, meaning that the total soil volume is fixed. We propose a coupled water uptake-root growth model. A one-dimensional model for water flux and water uptake by a root system growing uniformly distributed in the soil is presented, and the Van Genuchten model for the transport of water in soil is used. The governing equations are represented by a moving boundary model for which the root length, as a function of time, is prescribed. The solution of the model is obtained by front-fixing and finite element methods. Model predictions for water uptake by a same plant growing in loam, silt and clay soils are obtained and compared. A sensitivity analysis to determine relative effects on water uptake when system parameters are changed is also presented and shows that the model and numerical method proposed are more sensitive to the root growth rate than to the rest of the parameters. This se...

  5. Developments in modelling of thermohydro-geomechanical behaviour of Boom clay and clay-based buffer materials (Volume 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of two years of research on thermomechanics of clays performed within CEC contract Fl1W/0150 are described herein. Previous studies (research contracts with CEC/WAS/380.83.7 l) performed by ISMES have evidenced the need for an improved modelling of the volumetric response of natural clays. In a coupled approach, this leads to an improved prediction of pore-pressure development and dissipation. This is crucial for assessing conditions of a possible local thermal failure as verified in laboratory tests done at ISMES. The first part of the study lays the foundations of a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the interaction between water and soil skeleton. It consists in: (a) developing a framework for inclusion of water/soil particle thermally induced interaction into a thermodynamically consistent mixture theory approach (Section 2); (b) studying possible modelling approaches of considering the effective thermal expansion coefficient of pore water dependency on pore water status (Section 2); (c) testing artificial clays to assess pore water thermal expansion dependence on temperature in the presence of different amounts of active clay minerals and also Boom clay (Section 3); (d) performing a laboratory test campaign on Boom clay with special attention to the response in the overconsolidated domain (Section 4). 89 figs., 18 tabs., 102 refs

  6. Experimental study on the hydro-mechanical coupling behaviour of highly compacted expansive clay

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Anh-Minh; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Highly compacted expansive clays have been usually considered as a possible material for sealing and backfill in deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. In this condition, the material is simultaneously subjected to water infiltration from the geological barrier and stresses generated by the swelling of engineered barriers in confined conditions. Its behaviour under hydro-mechanical loading is essential to the safe design of the whole storage system. In the present work, MX80 bentonite...

  7. On the thermal behaviour of Boom clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delage, P.; Cui Yu Jun [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, Paris (France); Sultan, N. [IFREMER, Brest (France)

    2004-07-01

    When temperature is increased, the various phenomena that occur in a saturated natural potential host clay for nuclear waste disposal (Boom clay from SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium) were experimentally investigated in a temperature controlled high stress triaxial cell. Firstly, the pore pressure build-up due to the difference in thermal dilation of both water and minerals was investigated through thermal consolidation tests. Interesting information was obtained about the dissipation of thermally induced pore pressure in Boom clay, based on the standard Terzaghi consolidation theory. Secondly, the volume change behaviour in drained conditions (i.e. under a very slow temperature increase) confirmed that the clay overconsolidation ratio (OCR) controlled the nature of the volume changes. Whereas overconsolidated soils use to dilate as any material when temperature is elevated, normally consolidated soils present a decrease in volume, which is less common. The principles of a coupled thermo-elasto-plastic model that was specifically developed to model this particular behaviour are finally presented. Obviously, it appears necessary to account in detail for these thermal phenomena in order to properly understand the response of the geological barrier in the near field once nuclear waste has been stored. (orig.)

  8. On the thermal behaviour of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When temperature is increased, the various phenomena that occur in a saturated natural potential host clay for nuclear waste disposal (Boom clay from SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium) were experimentally investigated in a temperature controlled high stress triaxial cell. Firstly, the pore pressure build-up due to the difference in thermal dilation of both water and minerals was investigated through thermal consolidation tests. Interesting information was obtained about the dissipation of thermally induced pore pressure in Boom clay, based on the standard Terzaghi consolidation theory. Secondly, the volume change behaviour in drained conditions (i.e. under a very slow temperature increase) confirmed that the clay overconsolidation ratio (OCR) controlled the nature of the volume changes. Whereas overconsolidated soils use to dilate as any material when temperature is elevated, normally consolidated soils present a decrease in volume, which is less common. The principles of a coupled thermo-elasto-plastic model that was specifically developed to model this particular behaviour are finally presented. Obviously, it appears necessary to account in detail for these thermal phenomena in order to properly understand the response of the geological barrier in the near field once nuclear waste has been stored. (orig.)

  9. Remote decontamination system for contaminated water tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experience of decontamination works and achievements of construction with remote- handling/unmanned technologies, Obayashi Corporation has developed technologies for the decontamination of contaminated water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi NPS as an entity to implement with subsidies the 'Validation of technologies for contaminated water management' project in the FY2013 Supplementary Budget. Our remote decontamination system requires no manned operation inside tanks during decontamination work and contributes to exposure reduction. The decontamination performance and system practicality have been confirmed by full-scale demonstration test. This report describes the technology outline of present system and its demonstration test results. (author)

  10. Space Station Freedom regenerative water recovery system configuration selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reysa, R.; Edwards, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) must recover water from various waste water sources to reduce 90 day water resupply demands for a four/eight person crew. The water recovery system options considered are summarized together with system configuration merits and demerits, resource advantages and disadvantages, and water quality considerations used to select the SSF water recovery system.

  11. TORR system polishes oily water clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TORR (total oil recovery and remediation) system utilizes a specially patented polymer material, similar to styrofoam, which is used to get rid of non-soluble hydrocarbons from water. An application in Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, is described where it was used to recover diesel oil, which had been seeping into the groundwater over a period of 20 years. About 100,000 gallons of heating oil had leached into the water; TORR removed the non-soluble hydrocarbons, while another piece of equipment removed the soluble portions. After treatment the water tested consistently at non-detectable levels and was clean enough to be discharged into the town's sewer system. The system is considered ideal for oil spills clean-up underground, onshore, or the open sea, but it also has many potentially useful applications in industrial and oilfield applications. Water used in steam injection and water floods to produce heavy oil and SAGD applications are some of the obvious ones that come to mind. Cleaning up the huge tailings ponds at the mining and processing of oil sands, and removing diluent from water that is used to thin out bitumen in pipelines so that it can be transported to processing plants, are other promising areas of application. Several field trials to test the effectiveness of the system in these type of applications are scheduled for the summer and fall of 2002

  12. Characterization of clay minerals; Caracterizacion de minerales arcillosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A. [Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  13. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  14. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay; Preparacao de caracterizacao de argilas bentonitas organofilicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Almeida Neto, A.F. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Engenharia Ambiental; Silva, M.G.C., E-mail: meuris@feq.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  15. Radon in water aeration system operational performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North East Environmental Products, Inc. is a manufacturer of residential scale aeration systems for removal of radon and volatile organic chemicals from private water supplies. This paper is a review of the operational history of residential scale point of entry (POE) radon aeration systems. Emphasis is placed on the difficulties and solutions encountered in actual installations caused by both mechanical difficulties and water quality parameters. A summary of radon reduction efficiency is presented for wells with radon concentrations from 21,000 to 2,600,000 pCi/L. A discussion of customer concerns and attitudes is presented along with other areas for further technical improvement. Training techniques for dealers and installers are also discussed. An update of the current status of the radon in water industry includes current sales volumes as compared to the potential market and an update on the radon in water MCL standard setting process from an industry perspective

  16. Biologically-Inspired Water Propulsion System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej Sioma

    2013-01-01

    Most propulsion systems of vehicles travelling in the aquatic environment are equipped with propellers.Observations of nature,however,show that the absolute majority of organisms travel through water using wave motion,paddling or using water jet power.Inspired by these observations of nature,an innovative propulsion system working in aquatic environment was developed.This paper presents the design of the water propulsion system.Particular attention was paid to the use of paddling techniques and water jet power.A group of organisms that use those mechanisms to travel through water was selected and analysed.The results of research were used in the design of a propulsion system modelled simultaneously on two methods of movement in the aquatic environment.A method for modelling a propulsion system using a combination of the two solutions and the result were described.A conceptual design and a prototype constructed based on the solution were presented.With respect to the solution developed,studies and analyses of selected parameters of the prototype were described.

  17. Alternative Electrochemical Systems for Ozonation of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Craig C.; Murphy, Oliver J.

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical systems that are especially well suited for the small-scale generation of ozone and ozonated water for local use have been invented. These systems can operate with very little maintenance, and the only inputs needed during operation are electric power and water. Ozonated water produced by these systems can be used in diverse industrial applications: A few examples include sterilization in the brewing industry, general disinfection, and treatment of sewage and recycled water. The basic principle of operation admits of several alternative system configurations. The heart of the system is a stack of electrolytic cells, each containing a proton-exchange membrane (which serves as a solid electrolyte) sandwiched between a catalytic anode and a catalytic cathode. Preferably, the proton-exchange membrane is made of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid polymer. During electrolysis, a mixture of O2 and O3 gases is generated at the anode and H2 is generated at the cathode. Some of the O3 generated at the anode becomes dissolved in the water. The proportion of O3 in the O2/O3 mixture can be maximized by the selection of suitable electrode materials and the use of a high overpotential. Although the proton-exchange membrane conducts protons, it does not conduct electrons. It is also impermeable by gases; consequently, it maintains separation between the O2/O3 mixture evolved at the anode and the H2 evolved at the cathode.

  18. Build-up the new essential service water system (TVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    n this paper there is description of the service water system reconstruction goals, description of the service water system before reconstruction, and description of the essential service water system in NPP V-1 Jaslovske Bohunice after reconstruction. (author)

  19. Water injected fuel cell system compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepierski, James S.; Moore, Barbara S.; Hoch, Martin Monroe

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

  20. Design software for solar water heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Ruicheng; Li Zhong; He Tao; Zhange Xinyu; Feng Airong; Sun Zhifeng [Inst. of Air Conditioning, China Academy of Building Research, BJ (China)

    2008-07-01

    It is introduced that the ''Design Software for Solar Water Heating Systems'' which is the first design software suitable to China's weather condition and product's performance in the paper. The software developed by IAC, CABR independently and has CABR own knowledge property right. There are three databases and four function modules in the software and the capacity of the software is both of system design and system effect analysis. (orig.)

  1. Textile dye removal by natural clay--case study of Fouchana Tunisian clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errais, E; Duplay, J; Darragi, F

    2010-04-01

    A significant amount of unused dyes remain in textile industry wastewater, the treatment of which presents a great challenge, particularly in semi-arid countries where water resources are of great concern. Liquid-phase adsorption is highly efficient for the removal of dyes and adsorbents, for example, activated carbons are used to treat wastewater, but are expensive. Clays are cheaper and several works have showed their high pollutant adsorption capacity in cases of environmental problems. The aim of this work is to present the use of clay as a means of textile wastewater treatment and colour adsorption. The adsorbent used in this study is natural clay from the Fouchana region (Tunisia), which contains 60% smectites, 30% kaolinite and 10% illite, in which the cation-exchange capacity is about 50 meq/ 100 g of clay. Two types of waters were treated: one from a leaching textile industry and another from a dyeing industry. Moreover the treatment by clay was compared to the treatment by a coagulation flocculation standard method. The experimental results show that the treatment by natural clay is more efficient than the conventional treatment by coagulation flocculation. It allowed decolorization of the dye effluent and a decrease down to 97% for biochemical demand for oxygen, 93% for suspended matter, 95% for chemical demand for oxygen and 76% for the spectral absorption coefficient. Thus, the quality of dye wastewater has reached the Tunisian standards of releases (NT 106.02 and 106.03, 1989), and as such it makes it possible to test wastewater at the industrial scale. PMID:20450111

  2. Cyclic Shearing Deformation Behavior of Saturated Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The apparatus for static and dynamic universal triaxial and torsional shear soil testing is employed to perform stress-controlled cyclic single-direction torsional shear tests and two-direction coupled shear tests under unconsolidated-undrained conditions. Through a series of tests on saturated clay, the effects of initial shear stress and stress reversal on the clay's strain-stress behavior are examined, and the behavior of pore water pressure is studied. The experimental results indicate that the patterns of stress-strain relations are distinctly influenced by the initial shear stress in the cyclic single-direction shear tests. When the initial shear stress is large and no stress reversal occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by an accumulative effect. When the initial shear stress is zero and symmetrical cyclic stress occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by a cyclic effect. The pore water pressure fluctuates around the confining pressure with the increase of cycle number. It seems that the fluctuating amplitude increases with the increase of the cyclic stress. But a buildup of pore water pressure does not occur. The deformations of clay samples under the complex initial and the cyclic coupled stress conditions include the normal deviatoric deformation and horizontal shear deformation, the average deformation and cyclic deformation. A general strain failure criterion taking into account these deformations is recommended and is proved more stable and suitable compared to the strain failure criteria currently used.

  3. Characteristics of Trihalomethanes in Water Distribution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming; ZHANG Jie; ZHANG Xin-yu; ZHENG Shuang-ying; LI Xin

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in an actual water distribution system using the raw water with high bromide ion concentration, the composition and concentration of trihalomethanes (THMs) formed by chlorination of the water in the presence of bromide ion were measured in a city water distribution system during one year. The results show that brominated THMs contributed a great part (83%89%) to the index for additive toxicity (ATI) and resulted in the ATI of most of the samples exceeding WHO guideline standard for total THMs (TTHMs), especially during the summer (rainy season). This indicates that the chlorination of water in the presence of bromide ion leaded to high ratios of brominated THMs to TTHMs. However, a visible increase in the concentration of THMs with increasing residence time in the distribution system was not observed. Additionally, based on alternatives analysis, packed tower aeration method is proposed to reduce THMs level of the finished water leaving the treatment plant.

  4. Cation exchange and adsorption on clays and clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Ammann, Lars

    2003-01-01

    The specific surface area of a clay mineral comprises the external and internal surface area and, finally, the surface area which is exposed to the solution (Chap. 6.1). The aim of this study was to correlate adsorption data of common clays with these specific surface areas.

  5. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  6. Enhance decarboxylation reaction of carboxylic acids in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals are important constituents of the Earth's crust. These minerals catalyze reactions in several ways: by energy transfer processes, redox reactions, stabilization of intermediates and by Broensted or Lewis acidity behavior. Important set of organic reactions can be improved in the precedence of clay minerals. Besides the properties of clays to catalyze chemical reactions, it is possible to enhance some of its reactions by using ionizing radiation. The phenomenon of radiation-induced catalysis may be connected with ionizing process in the solid and with the trapped non-equilibrium charge carriers. In this paper we are reporting the decarboxylation reaction of carboxylic acids catalyzed by clay and by irradiation of the system acid-clay. We studied the behaviour of several carboxylic acids and analyzed them by gas chromatography, X-ray and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that decarboxylation of the target compound is the dominating pathway. The reaction is enhanced by gamma radiation in several orders of magnitude. (author)

  7. Adapting water accounting for integrated water resource management. The Júcar Water Resource System (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momblanch, Andrea; Andreu, Joaquín; Paredes-Arquiola, Javier; Solera, Abel; Pedro-Monzonís, María

    2014-11-01

    An increase in water demands, exacerbated by climate change and the tightening of environmental requirements, leads to a reduction in available water resources for economic uses. This situation poses challenges for water resource planning and management. Water accounting has emerged as an appropriate tool to improve transparency and control in water management. There are multiple water accounting approaches, but they generally involve a very exhaustive list of accounted concepts. According to our findings in this research, one of the best water accounting methodologies is the Australian Water Accounting Standard. However, its implementation for integrated water resource planning and management purposes calls into questioning the amount of information and level of detail necessary for the users of water accounts. In this paper, we present a different method of applying the Australian Water Accounting Standard in relation to water resource management, which improves its utility. In order to compare the original approach and that proposed here, we present and discuss an application to the Júcar Water Resource System, in eastern Spain.

  8. Chemistry management of generator stator water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry management of water cooled turbine generators with hollow copper conductors is very essential to avoid possible re-deposition of released copper oxides on stator windings, which otherwise may cause flow restrictions by partial plugging of copper hollow conductors and impair cooling. The phenomenon which is of more concern is not strictly of corrosion failure, but the consequences caused by the re-deposition of copper oxides that were formed by reaction of copper with oxygen. There were also some Operating experiences (OE) related to Copper oxide fouling in the system resulting shut down/off-line of plants. In Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), the turbine generator stator windings are of Copper material and cooled by demineralized water passing through the hollow conductors. The heated water from the stator is cooled by process water. A part of the stator water is continuously passed through a mixed bed polisher to remove any soluble ionic contaminants to maintain the purity of system water and also maintain copper content as low as possible to avoid possible re-deposition of released copper oxides on stator windings. The chemistry regime employed is neutral water with dissolved oxygen content between 1000-2000 ppb. Chemistry management of Stator water system was reviewed to know its effectiveness. Detailed chemical analyses of the spent resins from the polishing unit were carried out in various campaigns which indicated only part exhaustion of the polishing unit resins and reasonably low levels of copper entrapment in the resins, thus highlighting the effectiveness of the in-practice chemistry regime. (author)

  9. Investigating the behaviour of Mg isotopes during the formation of clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimpenny, Joshua; Colla, Christopher A.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2014-03-01

    We present elemental and isotopic data detailing how the Mg isotope system behaves in natural and experimentally synthesized clay minerals. We show that the bulk Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) of a set of natural illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite spans a 2‰ range, and that their isotopic composition depends strongly on a balance between the relative proportions of structural and exchangeable Mg. After acid leaching, these natural clays become relatively enriched in isotopically heavy Mg by between 0.2‰ and 1.6‰. Results of exchange experiments indicate that the Mg that has adsorbed to interlayer spaces and surface charged sites is relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg compared to the residual clay. The isotopic composition of this exchangeable Mg (-1.49‰ to -2.03‰) is characteristic of the isotopic composition of Mg found in many natural waters. Further experiments with an isotopically characterized MgCl2 solution shows that the clay minerals adsorb this exchangeable Mg with little or no isotopic fractionation, although we cannot discount the possibility that the uptake of exchangeable Mg does so with a slight preference for 24Mg. To characterize the behaviour of Mg isotopes during clay mineral formation we synthesized brucite (Mg(OH)2), which we consider to be a good analogue for the incorporation of Mg into the octahedral sheet of Mg-rich clay minerals or into the brucitic layer of clays such as chlorite. In our experiment the brucite mineral becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of Mg while the corresponding solution is always relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg. The system reaches a steady state after 10 days with a final fractionation factor (αsolid-solution) of 1.0005 at near-neutral pH. This result is consistent with the general consensus that secondary clay minerals preferentially take up isotopically heavy Mg during their formation. However our results also show that exchangeable Mg is an important component within bulk

  10. Experimental study of thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of Callovo-Oxfordian Clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    compression tests at elevated temperature (80 C): the effects of temperature on the behaviour of Clay-stone and thermal pressurization. A drained heating test under in-situ stress conditions evidenced, probably for first time, a plastic contractant response of the Clay-stone (like normally consolidated clays), a feature not considered in the presently conducted numerical modelling of deep disposal systems. Another new important observed feature is the increase in drained compressibility of the COx Clay-stone with temperature, not observed in clays. The investigation of thermal pressurization (caused by the low Clay-stone permeability and by the significant difference in thermal expansion between water and the solid phase) has been carried out by means of undrained heating tests, after a detailed analysis of the major effects of the measurement system (which should perhaps be also analyzed when performing in-situ measurements). The thermal pressurization coefficient appeared to be quite sensitive to changes in temperature and stress, it decreased between 0.14 and 0.1 MPa/C between 25 and 80 C. It is believed that the different thermo-hydro-mechanical volumetric responses obtained here allow a better interpretation and modelling of the behaviour of the Clay-stone formation around the galleries in areas that are mostly saturated, except close to the galleries (a few decimetres). (author)

  11. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus;

    2011-01-01

    contents. However, the TO model still overestimated water film thickness at potentials approaching ovendry condition (about −800 MPa). The semi–log linear Campbell-Shiozawa-Rossi-Nimmo (CSRN) model showed better fits for all investigated soils from −10 to −800 MPa and yielded high correlations with CL and......Accurate description of the soil water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics and biochemical vadose zone processes in arid environments. Soil water retention data corresponding to matric potentials of less than −10 MPa, where adsorptive forces...... classified into four groups on the basis of the Dexter number (n = CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing water film thickness at a given matric potential (<−10 MPa) was evaluated. The SA estimated from the dry end of the SWRC (SA_SWRC) was in good agreement with the SA measured with...

  12. Gas and water flow in an excavation-induced fracture network around an underground drift: A case study for a radioactive waste repository in clay rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Vaissière, Rémi; Armand, Gilles; Talandier, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) surrounding a drift, and in particular its evolution, is being studied for the performance assessment of a radioactive waste underground repository. A specific experiment (called CDZ) was designed and implemented in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in France to investigate the EDZ. This experiment is dedicated to study the evolution of the EDZ hydrogeological properties (conductivity and specific storage) of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone under mechanical compression and artificial hydration. Firstly, a loading cycle applied on a drift wall was performed to simulate the compression effect from bentonite swelling in a repository drift (bentonite is a clay material to be used to seal drifts and shafts for repository closure purpose). Gas tests (permeability tests with nitrogen and tracer tests with helium) were conducted during the first phase of the experiment. The results showed that the fracture network within the EDZ was initially interconnected and opened for gas flow (particularly along the drift) and then progressively closed with the increasing mechanical stress applied on the drift wall. Moreover, the evolution of the EDZ after unloading indicated a self-sealing process. Secondly, the remaining fracture network was resaturated to demonstrate the ability to self-seal of the COx claystone without mechanical loading by conducting from 11 to 15 repetitive hydraulic tests with monitoring of the hydraulic parameters. During this hydration process, the EDZ effective transmissivity dropped due to the swelling of the clay materials near the fracture network. The hydraulic conductivity evolution was relatively fast during the first few days. Low conductivities ranging at 10-10 m/s were observed after four months. Conversely, the specific storage showed an erratic evolution during the first phase of hydration (up to 60 days). Some uncertainty remains on this parameter due to volumetric strain during the

  13. Radiolysis of carboxylic acids adsorbed in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research is aimed at studying the effect of ionizing radiation in an heterogeneous system formed by a carboxylic acid adsorbed in a clay mineral. The study is focussed to discriminate if the presence of a solid surface alters the formation and distribution of radiolytic products in relation to the radiolysis of the carboxylic acid without the surface (clay). The results showed that the radiolysis of the system clay-acid goes along a defined path rather than showing various pathways of decomposition as in the case of simple aqueous solutions. The main pathway was the decarboxylation of the target compound rather than condensation/dimerization reactions

  14. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabrication of bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrence informat

  15. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabricationof bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrenceinformatio

  16. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution pH and...

  17. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    In the northern part of Vendsyssel, Denmark, the deposits made in the late glacial time are formed by the sea. The deposits are named after two mussels: Yoldia clay and Saxicava sand. However, in the southern part of Vendsyssel and in the area of Aalborg the clay and sand deposits from the late g...

  18. Wash water waste pretreatment system study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The use of real wash water had no adverse effect on soap removal when an Olive Leaf soap based system was used; 96 percent of the soap was removed using ferric chloride. Numerous chemical agents were evaluated as antifoams for synthetic wash water. Wash water surfactants used included Olive Leaf Soap, Ivory Soap, Neutrogena and Neutrogena Rain Bath Gel, Alipal CO-436, Aerosol 18, Miranol JEM, Palmeto, and Aerosol MA-80. For each type of soapy wash water evaluated, at least one antifoam capable of causing nonpersistent foam was identified. In general, the silicones and the heavy metal ions (i.e., ferric, aluminum, etc.) were the most effective antifoams. Required dosage was in the range of 50 to 200 ppm.

  19. Regeneration of Spent Lubricant Refining Clays by Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-zhen Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Step-by-step solvent extraction was used to regenerate spent clay by recovering the adsorbed oil in lubricating oil refining clay. Several polar and nonpolar solvents were tested, and petroleum ether (90–120°C and ethanol (95 v% were selected as the nonpolar and polar solvents, respectively. The spent clay was first extracted using petroleum ether (90–120°C to obtain ideal oil and then extracted with a mixed solvent of petroleum ether (90–120°C and ethanol (95 v% two or three times to obtain nonideal oil before being extracted with ethanol and water. Finally, the clay was dried at 130°C to obtain regenerated clay. The total oil recovery can be more than 99 wt% of the adsorbed oil. The recovered ideal oil can be used as lubricating base oil. Shorter storage times for spent clay produce better regeneration results. The regenerated clay can be reused to refine the lubricating base oils.

  20. Development and Characterisation of Nanoclays from Indian Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manocha

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Indian clays are known for their smecticity. One such clay sample collected from Bhuj (Gujaratwas characterised and modified by successive sedimentation processes for different time intervals.The non-plastic components of clay, viz., quartz, illite, iron oxide, CaO, MgO, and organic matterwere removed in different steps, as the heavy impurities in the clay-water suspensions, settledown during sedimentation. The free iron oxide present in clay suspension was reduced bygiving sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite treatment and iron content was further reducedfrom 12Œ15 per cent to 5Œ7 per cent respectively. The organic matter was removed by sodiumacetate-H2O2 treatment. The modified clay so obtained was characterised by thermal analysis,FTIR, and XRD,  SEM and TEM. The cation exchange capacities of original and modified clayswere determined both by methylene blue method and ammonium acetate method. The cationex change capacity is found to enhance from 120Œ130 meq/100 g to 135Œ145 meq/100 g. Usingthe above procedure, 92 per cent smecticity was obtained. Organo philisation of purified clay(smectite was carried out by intercalation with alkyl ammonium salt. The  XRD  analysis show edenhancement of interlamellar spacing from 1.294 nm to 2.855 nm.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.517-524, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1672

  1. Preparation and properties of biodegradable starch–clay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Yi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Well-dispersed starch-clay nanocomposites were prepared by adding a dilute clay dispersion to a solution of starch followed by coprecipitation in ethanol. The clay didn\\'t significantly influence the type of crystalline structure of starch molecules although the amount of crystallinity appears to be somewhat lower in the nanocomposites. The nanocomposites show improved modulus and strength without a decrease in elongation at break. The increase in modulus and strength is 65% and 30%, respectively for the nanocomposite containing 5 wt.% clay compared to the unfilled starch materials. Further increases in clay result in deterioration in properties most likely due to poorer clay dispersion and lower polymer crystallinity. As the amount of water increases, the modulus of both pure starch and starch nanocomposites decreases, although the change is less pronounced in the nanocomposites suggesting that the addition of clay to form nanocomposites can improve the stability of starch-based products during transportation and storage. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  3. Nanostructured multifunctional electromagnetic materials from the guest-host inorganic-organic hybrid ternary system of a polyaniline-clay-polyhydroxy iron composite: preparation and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reena, Viswan L; Pavithran, Chorappan; Verma, Vivek; Sudha, Janardhanan D

    2010-03-01

    A nanostructured electromagnetic polyaniline-polyhydroxy iron-clay composite (PPIC) was prepared by oxidative radical emulsion polymerization of aniline in the presence of polyhydroxy iron cation (PIC) intercalated clays. Morphological observation through SEM, TEM, and AFM suggested the formation of self-assembled nanospheres of PIC with self-assembled PANI engulfed over PIC, and the presence of iron in PPIC was confirmed by the EDS analysis. XRD studies revealed that PPIC are comprised of exfoliated clay layers with PIC in the distorted spinel structure. Magnetic property measurements showed that saturation magnetization increased from 7.3 x 10(-3) to 2.5 emu/g upon varying the amount of PHIC content from 0 to 10%. Electrical conductivity measurements with the same composition were observed to be in the range of 3.0 x 10(-2) to 1.1 S/cm. Thermal stability studies using TGA in combination with DTG suggested that PPICs were thermally stable up to 350 degrees C. The interaction among clay layers, PIC, and PANI chains in PPIC were manifested from the studies made by FTIR and DSC analysis. The prospects for the direct application of this material are developing low-cost chemical sensors and also processable electromagnetic interference shielding materials for high technological applications. PMID:20136090

  4. Simulation Of Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination For Remediation Of Tce In A Fractured Clay System: A New Model Approach And Application To Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Christiansen, Camilla Maymann;

    2010-01-01

    interspersed sand lenses and stringers. The transport model couples diffusion dominated transport in the clay matrix, with advective‐dispersive transport in the fractures and higher permeability sand lenses. The reactive model calculates sequential reductive dechlorination of TCE (trichloroethylene) to its...

  5. Modelling water uptake efficiency of root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Tron, Stefania; Schröder, Natalie; Bodner, Gernot; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake is crucial for plant productivity. Trait based breeding for more water efficient crops will enable a sustainable agricultural management under specific pedoclimatic conditions, and can increase drought resistance of plants. Mathematical modelling can be used to find suitable root system traits for better water uptake efficiency defined as amount of water taken up per unit of root biomass. This approach requires large simulation times and large number of simulation runs, since we test different root systems under different pedoclimatic conditions. In this work, we model water movement by the 1-dimensional Richards equation with the soil hydraulic properties described according to the van Genuchten model. Climatic conditions serve as the upper boundary condition. The root system grows during the simulation period and water uptake is calculated via a sink term (after Tron et al. 2015). The goal of this work is to compare different free software tools based on different numerical schemes to solve the model. We compare implementations using DUMUX (based on finite volumes), Hydrus 1D (based on finite elements), and a Matlab implementation of Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes 2000 (based on finite differences). We analyse the methods for accuracy, speed and flexibility. Using this model case study, we can clearly show the impact of various root system traits on water uptake efficiency. Furthermore, we can quantify frequent simplifications that are introduced in the modelling step like considering a static root system instead of a growing one, or considering a sink term based on root density instead of considering the full root hydraulic model (Javaux et al. 2008). References Tron, S., Bodner, G., Laio, F., Ridolfi, L., & Leitner, D. (2015). Can diversity in root architecture explain plant water use efficiency? A modeling study. Ecological modelling, 312, 200-210. Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes, R. A. (2000). Numerical simulation of infiltration, evaporation and shallow

  6. AOIPS water resources data management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwie, P.

    1977-01-01

    The text and computer-generated displays used to demonstrate the AOIPS (Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System) water resources data management system are investigated. The system was developed to assist hydrologists in analyzing the physical processes occurring in watersheds. It was designed to alleviate some of the problems encountered while investigating the complex interrelationships of variables such as land-cover type, topography, precipitation, snow melt, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and streamflow rates. The system has an interactive image processing capability and a color video display to display results as they are obtained.

  7. Water Treatment Systems for Long Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLynn, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Space exploration will require new life support systems to support the crew on journeys lasting from a few days to several weeks, or longer. These systems should also be designed to reduce the mass required to keep humans alive in space. Water accounts for about 80 percent of the daily mass intake required to keep a person alive. As a result, recycling water offers a high return on investment for space life support. Water recycling can also increase mission safety by providing an emergency supply of drinking water, where another supply is exhausted or contaminated. These technologies also increase safety by providing a lightweight backup to stored supplies, and they allow astronauts to meet daily drinking water requirements by recycling the water contained in their own urine. They also convert urine into concentrated brine that is biologically stable and nonthreatening, and can be safely stored onboard. This approach eliminates the need to have a dedicated vent to dump urine overboard. These needs are met by a system that provides a contaminant treatment pouch, referred to as a urine cell or contaminant cell, that converts urine or another liquid containing contaminants into a fortified drink, engineered to meet human hydration, electrolyte, and caloric requirements, using a variant of forward osmosis (FO) to draw water from a urine container into the concentrated fortified drink as part of a recycling stage. An activated carbon pretreatment removes most organic molecules. Salinity of the initial liquid mix (urine plus other) is synergistically used to enhance the precipitation of organic molecules so that activated carbon can remove most of the organics. A functional osmotic bag is then used to remove inorganic contaminants. If a contaminant is processed for which the saline content is different than optimal for precipitating organic molecules, the saline content of the liquid should be adjusted toward the optimal value for that contaminant. A first urine

  8. Transmission X-ray Microscopy—A New Tool in Clay Mineral Floccules Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray L. Frost

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective flocculation and dewatering of mineral processing streams containing clays are microstructure dependent in clay-water systems. Initial clay flocculation is crucial in the design and for the development of a new methodology of gas exploitation. Microstructural engineering of clay aggregates using covalent cations and Keggin macromolecules have been monitored using the new state of the art Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM with 60 nm tomography resolution installed in a Taiwanese synchrotron. The 3-D reconstructions from TXM images show complex aggregation structures in montmorillonite aqueous suspensions after treatment with Na+, Ca2+ and Al13 Keggin macromolecules. Na-montmorillonite displays elongated, parallel, well-orientated and closed-void cellular networks, 0.5–3 µm in diameter. After treatment by covalent cations, the coagulated structure displays much smaller, randomly orientated and openly connected cells, 300–600 nm in diameter. The average distances measured between montmorillonite sheets was around 450 nm, which is less than half of the cell dimension measured in Na-montmorillonite. The most dramatic structural changes were observed after treatment by Al13 Keggin; aggregates then became arranged in compacted domains of a 300 nm average diameter composed of thick face-to-face oriented sheets, which forms porous aggregates with larger intra-aggregate open and connected voids.

  9. Agricultural residues and expanded clay in Oncidium baueri Lindl. orchid cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Marchezi Mora

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For orchid cultivation in containers is essential to select the right substrate, since this will influence the quality of the final product, it serve as a support for the root system of the plants. This study aimed to evaluate different agricultural residues and expanded clay in Oncidium baueri Lindl. orchid cultivation. The plants were subjected to treatments: pinus husk + carbonized rice husk, pinus husk + coffee husk, pinus husk + fibered coconut, pecan nut husk, expanded clay, fibered coconut, coffee husk, carbonized rice husk, pinus husk. After eleven months of the experiment, the following variables were evaluated: plant height; largest pseudo-bulb diameter; number of buds; shoot fresh dry matter; the longest root length; number of roots; root fresh matter; root dry matter; and electric conductivity; pH and water retention capacity of the substrates. Except the expanded clay, the other substrates showed satisfactory results in one or more traits. Standing out among these substrates pinus husk + coffee husk and pine bark + fibered coconut, which favored the most vegetative and root characteristic of the orchid. The mixture of pinus husk + coffee husk and pinus husk + fibered coconut, provided the best results in vegetative and root growth of the orchid Oncidium baueri and the expanded clay did not show favorable results in the cultivation of this species.

  10. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SITE WATER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) site water system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  11. Vulnerability of Water Supply Systems to Droughts

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, David S.; Hughes, Trevor C.; James, W. Robert; Jensen, Donald T.; Haws, Frank W.

    1980-01-01

    This summary completion report describes the project work completed in three areas: 1) the development and preliminary testing of drought severity and vulnerability indices, 2) the impacts of Utah's 1977 drought, and 3) an operation comparison of stochastic streamflow models. The drought indices were evaluated for three municipal and three irrigation water supply systems in Utah. It was concluded that a continuous...

  12. LIGHTWEIGHT GREEN ROOF WATER RETENTION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    During Phase I, we have forged numerous necessary partnerships, which will allow us to begin our implementation tests. Working with the Philadelphia Water Department (PWD) and Drexel Smart House (DSH) we have 3 to 4 prime test sites for our system. We plan to execute our insta...

  13. Statistical mechanics of the shallow water system

    OpenAIRE

    Chavanis, P. H.; Sommeria, J.

    2000-01-01

    We extend the formalism of the statistical theory developed for the 2D Euler equation to the case of shallow water system. Relaxation equations towards the maximum entropy state are proposed, which provide a parametrization of sub-grid scale eddies in 2D compressible turbulence.

  14. A Water Recovery System Evolved for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORourke, Mary Jane E.; Perry, Jay L.; Carter, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    A new water recovery system designed towards fulfillment of NASA's Vision for Space Exploration is presented. This water recovery system is an evolution of the current state-of-the-art system. Through novel integration of proven technologies for air and water purification, this system promises to elevate existing technology to higher levels of optimization. The novel aspect of the system is twofold: Volatile organic contaminants will be removed from the cabin air via catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase, prior to their absorption into the aqueous phase, and vapor compression distillation technology will be used to process the condensate and hygiene waste streams in addition to the urine waste stream. Oxidation kinetics dictate that removal of volatile organic contaminants from the vapor phase is more efficient. Treatment of the various waste streams by VCD will reduce the load on the expendable ion exchange and adsorption media which follow, and on the aqueous-phase volatile removal assembly further downstream. Incorporating these advantages will reduce the weight, volume, and power requirements of the system, as well as resupply.

  15. Evaluation of some ceramic clays from Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1993-01-01

    This reports details the technical evaluation of ceramic clays collected during visits to Zambia in 1990 and 1991 by the author (Clive Mitchell). The clay samples included: Choma kaolin (Southern Province), Twapia kaolin (Copperbelt Province), Kapiri Mposhi kaolin (Central Province), Masenche clay (Northern Province), Leula clay, Misenga clay and Chikankata clay (Southern Province). The Choma kaolin was asessed to be an excellent source of ceramic-grade kaolin. The Twapia and Kapiri Mposhi ka...

  16. The effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to investigate the detrimental effects of freeze-thaw on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that molding water content has on the hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay soil that is subjected to freeze-thaw cycles, and to determine the relationship between the number of freeze-thaw cycles and the hydraulic conductivity of the compacted clay soil. Clay soils compacted and frozen wet of optimum experienced an increase in hydraulic conductivity of approximately 140 fold. The hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increased ten fold. These results are consistent with recent research which suggests that clay compacted wet of optimum experiences large increases in hydraulic conductivity while the hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increases to a lesser extent. 12 refs., 9 figs

  17. Prions, Radionuclides and Clays: Impact of clay interlayer "acidity" on toxic compound speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, L.; Hureau, C.; Sobolev, O.; Cuello, G.; Chapron, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The physical and chemical processes that are the basis of contaminant retardation in clay rich medium, such as soil or nuclear waste repository, have been studied at the molecular level by a combination of molecular dynamics (MD), electron paramagnetic spectroscopy (EPR) and neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS). The speciation of contaminants such as Sm, a radionuclide analogue, and Cu, bound to Prion protein (PrP), has been studied upon adsorption in clay interlayers. We used as molecular probe the P5-Cu(II) complex, where the P5 pentapeptide(92-96 PrP residues) represents one of the five Cu(II) binding site present in PrP, the key protein involved in diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In both cases, the pH of the interlayer has been inferred from the metal ion coordination, here used as a molecular reporter. In circum neutral pH waters, samarium is present as Sm(OH)3° species and should not be adsorbed in clay interlayer by "cation exchange" unless its hydrolysis is altered. Samarium NDIS results indicate that whether the number of oxygen nearest neighbours varies only from 8.5 to 7, as Sm penetrates the interlayer, the number of hydrogen nearest neighbours drops from 12 to 6. The high affinity of clay for Sm shows that a change in Sm hydrolysis occurs in the clay interlayer, but is directly followed by the formation of a surface complex with montmorillonite siloxane plane functional groups which prevents the determination of a "local pH". Conversely, has been found to be a much more sensitive interlayer water pH probe. and this peptide domain is involved in the misfolding of the protein,a transconformation which may lead to the pathogenic PrPSc form. We have therefore studied by EPR spectroscopy the adsorption of Cu(II)-P5 complexes on montmorillonite, and found the clay to have a large and selective adsorption capacity for the various [Cu(P5)H-n](2-n)+ complexes where n is the number of deprotonated amido function

  18. Time and frequency GPR waveforms analysis for clay content evaluation in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, F.; Patriarca, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical behaviour of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which exerts some considerable effects in many applications in the fields of civil engineering, geology and environmental engineering. This study focuses on pavement engineering, but the approach can be extended to other purposes. The presence of clay in the bearing structural layers of pavements frequently causes damages and defects, such as transversal and longitudinal cracks, deformations and rutting. Consequently, the road safety and operability decrease, while the expected number of accidents increases. In this work Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) laboratory inspections are carried out in order to predict the presence of clay in pavement structural layers. Data are post-processed in the frequency domain, according to the Rayleigh scattering method based on the Fresnel theory. This new technique can be supported by other survey methods, improving the quality of the results. Analysis are carried out using two different GPR systems. A Radar is used with ground-coupled antennae in a bistatic configuration and common offset; the transmitter and receiver are linked by optic fiber electronic modules and operate at 500 MHz central frequency. The received signal is sampled in the time domain at time steps of 7.8125 x 10-2 ns. A Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) acquires ultra-wide band data in a bandwidth from 500 MHz to 3000 MHz. The signal is sampled in the frequency domain with approximately 1.56 MHz frequency steps. A double-ridged broadband horn antenna is connected via a high-quality coaxial cable to the VNA pulse generator and illuminates the analyzed target in a monostatic off-ground configuration. The experimental setting required the use of road material, typically employed for sub-grade and sub-base layers. Three kind of soils, classified as A1, A2, A3 by AASHTO are used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated boxes. Bentonite clay is gradually added from 2% to

  19. Water delivery in the Early Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Süli, Áron; Sándor, Zsolt; Galiazzo, Mattia; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2015-01-01

    As part of the national scientific network 'Pathways to Habitable Worlds' the delivery of water onto terrestrial planets is a key question since water is essential for the development of life as we know it. After summarizing the state of the art we show some first results of the transport of water in the early Solar System for scattered main belt objects. Hereby we investigate the questions whether planetesimals and planetesimal fragments which have gained considerable inclination due to the strong dynamical interactions in the main belt region around 2 AU can be efficient water transporting vessels. The Hungaria asteroid group is the best example that such scenarios are realistic. Assuming that the gas giants and the terrestrial planets are already formed, we monitor the collisions of scattered small bodies containing water (in the order of a few percent) with the terrestrial planets. Thus we are able to give a first estimate concerning the respective contribution of such bodies to the actual water content i...

  20. In situ and laboratory heating experiments in clay rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome, where large clay deposits outcrop. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The experiment has been carried out by feeding an electric heater embedded in the clay at 6.4 meters in depth and by measuring temperature increases in boreholes drilled at different distances from the thermal source between 50 and 200 centimeters. After 1,200 hours the heater thermal power was varied from 250 to 500 watt. The theoretical temperature increases in the clay, calculated by means of Belgian MPGST code, have been compared with the experimental results by means of a ''curve fitting'' method which allows the deduction of clay thermal conductivity. The temperature increases measured in the clay fit quite well the theoretical values and show that the clay is a homogeneous and isotropic medium. The main conclusions of the experiment are as follows: the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm-1.deg.C-1; the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is nearly negligible

  1. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  2. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1994-01-01

    A system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

  3. Experimental study on inclined double solar water distillation system

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Foad

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this project is to design and test the double inclined solar water distillation system and compare it with a single inclined solar water distillation system under the climate conditions of North Cyprus. In an inclined solar water distillation system, the feeding water falls down on the bare plate through the distribution pipe. The double inclined solar water distillation system has two sections. In the lower section the feeding water falls down on the bare plate, through ...

  4. Frugivorous bats drink nutrient- and clay-enriched water in the Amazon rain forest: support for a dual function of mineral-lick visits

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanem, Simon J.; Ruppert, Hans; Kunz, Thomas H.; Voigt, Christian C.

    2013-01-01

    In Central Amazonia, large mammals create water-filled puddles when consuming soil. These mineral licks are visited by pregnant and lactating frugivorous bats; possibly for two reasons. Frugivorous bats could supplement their mineral-depleted fruit diet by drinking salty water, or they could buffer dietary plant secondary compounds by consuming soil. We analysed bat fruits from Ecuador and showed that they are depleted in elemental concentrations (Na, K, P) compared with similar f...

  5. Biotreatment of red water with fungal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, TenLin S.; Turner, R.J.; Sanville, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Red water generated during the manufacture of trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an environmental concern because it contaminates ground surfaces and groundwaters. Past methods for the management of this hazardous waste stream did not meet pollution compliance or were not cost effective. Biodegradation of TNT by bacteria has been reported, but no conclusive evidence supports its biotransformation to harmless products or its complete mineralization. The lignin peroxidase (ligninase) secreted by the white rot fungus (Phanerochaete chrysosporium) has been shown to degrade a broad spectrum of organic pollutants. In this study, the efficacy of treating red water with the P. chrysosporium system was investigated.

  6. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  7. Influence of Different Additives at Various Contents on the Properties of Pottery Clay Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongdej LIMPAIBOON

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of clay body is a highly important step during the production of local decorative pottery, especially the local unglazed low-fired terracotta. In this study, sand (size < 178 mm and Bulrush pulp were employed as an additive blended with clay (size < 125 mm in the preparation of clay body. Various sand contents (2 - 18 wt% and pulp contents (1 - 14 wt% were tested. The properties of each clay body were evaluated in terms of shrinkage, water absorption and modulus of rupture. The results obtained showed that higher sand or pulp content gave higher water absorption and lower shrinkage of clay body. The dried MOR value of pulp-clay body was much higher than that of sand-clay body at the same content. The maximum fired MOR value of sand-clay body (84.51 kgf/cm2 at sand content of 2 wt% was a little higher than that of pulp-clay body (80.44 kgf/cm2 at pulp content of 4 wt%. However, at a sand content ranging between 2 and 14 % or a pulp content ranging between 1 and 5 %, the fired MOR values of clay bodies were enhanced above that of local pottery clay body (60.14 kgf/cm2. From these results the pulp could adequately be used as an additive as well. Finally, a suitable sand or pulp content for producing smooth clay bodies was between 2 and 14 wt% or between 1 and 4 wt%, respectively, due to clay bodies obtained having more smooth texture and higher strength than local pottery clay body.

  8. A Benchmarking System for Domestic Water Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexter V. L. Hunt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The national demand for water in the UK is predicted to increase, exacerbated by a growing UK population, and home-grown demands for energy and food. When set against the context of overstretched existing supply sources vulnerable to droughts, particularly in increasingly dense city centres, the delicate balance of matching minimal demands with resource secure supplies becomes critical. When making changes to "internal" demands the role of technological efficiency and user behaviour cannot be ignored, yet existing benchmarking systems traditionally do not consider the latter. This paper investigates the practicalities of adopting a domestic benchmarking system (using a band rating that allows individual users to assess their current water use performance against what is possible. The benchmarking system allows users to achieve higher benchmarks through any approach that reduces water consumption. The sensitivity of water use benchmarks are investigated by making changes to user behaviour and technology. The impact of adopting localised supplies (i.e., Rainwater harvesting—RWH and Grey water—GW and including "external" gardening demands are investigated. This includes the impacts (in isolation and combination of the following: occupancy rates (1 to 4; roof size (12.5 m2 to 100 m2; garden size (25 m2 to 100 m2 and geographical location (North West, Midlands and South East, UK with yearly temporal effects (i.e., rainfall and temperature. Lessons learnt from analysis of the proposed benchmarking system are made throughout this paper, in particular its compatibility with the existing Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH accreditation system. Conclusions are subsequently drawn for the robustness of the proposed system.

  9. Fixing of heavy metals by some inflated Tunisian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the time of discharge of the water polluted in a natural environment and thanks to the properties of retention, adsorption and exchange of ions, clays constitute a natural barrier which will be able to limit the toxicity and the propagation of the pollutants. To contribute to the development of clays layers of Tunisia in the field of water treatments, we undertook with a mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of some inflating clays. The characteristics of these clays will be exploited for the study of the retention by adsorption of some heavy metals. The isotherms of adsorption, of heavy metals in aqueous solution by these natural clays before and after acid activation, are studied. The influence of several parameters on the fixing of heavy metals on clay such as the factors relating to the medium of adsorption (agitation, pH, time of contact, temperature. etc) and those relating to the adsorbent (mass, granulometry, impurities. etc) was studied in order to optimize the operating conditions of adsorptions.

  10. Soil Clay Minerals in Namibia and their Significance for the Terrestrial and Marine Past Global Change Research

    OpenAIRE

    HEINE, Klaus; Völkel, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    We delineated seven soil clay mineral provinces in Namibia. Many individual clay mineral assemblages occur in fluvial, pan, cave and other environments. Previous researchers have used clay mineral compositions as evidence for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, often without analyzing the formation, the transport and the deposition of these clay minerals. In Namibia, rates of erosion and denudation by water and wind have been very small since early Quaternary times. During the Quaternary, th...

  11. Diagnosing Causes of Water Scarcity in Complex Water Resources Systems and Identifying Risk Management Actions

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Garrote de Marcos, Luis; Ana IGLESIAS; Mediero Orduña, Luis

    2013-01-01

    From the water management perspective, water scarcity is an unacceptable risk of facing water shortages to serve water demands in the near future. Water scarcity may be temporary and related to drought conditions or other accidental situation, or may be permanent and due to deeper causes such as excessive demand growth, lack of infrastructure for water storage or transport, or constraints in water management. Diagnosing the causes of water scarcity in complex water resources systems is a prec...

  12. Preparation and characterization of biodegradable PLA/organosilylated clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, R.; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L.

    2016-05-01

    In this work a new organosilylated clay was successfully synthesized by functionalization of a natural sodium montmorillonite (MMT) by (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GOPTMS). This organosilylated clay was used as nanofiller for preparation, by solvent casting, of poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite systems. Similar systems, containing as nanofiller the commercial Cloisite 30B (i.e. a natural sodium montmorillonite organically modified with alkylammonium salt), were also prepared for comparison. All the obtained nanocomposite films were characterized using several techniques (XRD, permeability and mechanical tensile tests). Obtained results pointed out that nanocomposite system containing the organosilylated clay showed a better intercalation of the polymer chains into the clay layers and a higher improvement of the oxygen barrier properties, when compared to both the neat PLA film and the PLA film loaded with Cloisite 30B.

  13. Clay energetics in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Clays have been implicated in the origin of terrestrial life since the 1950's. Originally they were considered agents which aid in selecting, concentrating and promoting oligomerization of the organic monomeric substituents of cellular life forms. However, more recently, it has been suggested that minerals, with particular emphasis on clays, may have played a yet more fundamental role. It has been suggested that clays are prototypic life forms in themselves and that they served as a template which directed the self-assembly of cellular life. If the clay-life theory is to have other than conceptual credibility, clays must be shown by experiment to execute the operations of cellular life, not only individually, but also in a sufficiently concerted manner as to produce some semblance of the functional attributes of living cells. Current studies are focussed on the ability of clays to absorb, store and transfer energy under plausible prebiotic conditions and to use this energy to drive chemistry of prebiotic relevance. Conclusions of the work are applicable to the role of clays either as substrates for organic chemistry, or in fueling their own life-mimetic processes.

  14. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  15. Gas injection laboratory experiments on Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Understanding gas transport processes is one of the key issues in the assessment of radioactive waste repository performance and is the focus of this research. If the gas production rate (generated by the anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner) exceeds the rate of diffusion of gas in the host rock pore water, gas would continue to accumulate and pressure increase until it becomes sufficiently large to create pathways. Despite its importance, information at laboratory scale on gas pressure-induced pathways and breakthrough pressures in geological barriers under controlled gas volume rate and stress conditions is rather scarce. To this aim, the present study was started with the following specific objectives. 1) To develop and calibrate an experimental set-up to perform controlled volume-rate gas injection experiments using a high-pressure triaxial cell to apply isotropic/anisotropic stress states. 2) To carry out a series of tests on Opalinus clay OPA samples to study the conditions under which gas breakthrough processes occur, to analyse the influence of the gas injection rate, the stress state, the orientation of rock discontinuities and other relevant hydro-mechanical variables (porosity and degree of saturation); as well as the observation of the induced desaturation (pore water displacement by gas), in-going and outgoing gas fluxes, and aperture and preferential paths created. For example, local desaturation is a critical issue, since previous tests performed on compacted clay barriers evidenced that no significant water displacement occurred inside the specimen, despite the fact that the observed breakthrough pressure appeared to be higher than the air entry pressure of the material. An instrumented high-pressure triaxial cell was used, which was specifically designed to apply isotropic/ anisotropic stress states (up to a maximum of 20 MPa) while injecting gas at controlled volume rate. Each cap of the

  16. An Experimental Study on the Secondary Deformation of Boom Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yongfeng; CUI, Yu-Jun; Tang, Anh Minh; Li, Xiang-Ling; Sillen, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Boom clay formation, a deposit of slightly over-consolidated marine clay that belongs to the Oligocene series in the north east of Belgium, has been selected as a possible host material of nuclear waste disposal. In this context, the long-term deformation behaviour of Boom clay is of crucial importance in the performance assessment of the whole storage system. In this study, low and high pressure oedometer tests are carried out; the e-log σ'v (void ratio - logarithm of vertical effective stre...

  17. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  18. Operational water management of Rijnland water system and pilot of ensemble forecasting system for flood control

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Rene

    2013-04-01

    The Rijnland water system is situated in the western part of the Netherlands, and is a low-lying area of which 90% is below sea-level. The area covers 1,100 square kilometres, where 1.3 million people live, work, travel and enjoy leisure. The District Water Control Board of Rijnland is responsible for flood defence, water quantity and quality management. This includes design and maintenance of flood defence structures, control of regulating structures for an adequate water level management, and waste water treatment. For water quantity management Rijnland uses, besides an online monitoring network for collecting water level and precipitation data, a real time control decision support system. This decision support system consists of deterministic hydro-meteorological forecasts with a 24-hr forecast horizon, coupled with a control module that provides optimal operation schedules for the storage basin pumping stations. The uncertainty of the rainfall forecast is not forwarded in the hydrological prediction. At this moment 65% of the pumping capacity of the storage basin pumping stations can be automatically controlled by the decision control system. Within 5 years, after renovation of two other pumping stations, the total capacity of 200 m3/s will be automatically controlled. In critical conditions there is a need of both a longer forecast horizon and a probabilistic forecast. Therefore ensemble precipitation forecasts of the ECMWF are already consulted off-line during dry-spells, and Rijnland is running a pilot operational system providing 10-day water level ensemble forecasts. The use of EPS during dry-spells and the findings of the pilot will be presented. Challenges and next steps towards on-line implementation of ensemble forecasts for risk-based operational management of the Rijnland water system will be discussed. An important element in that discussion is the question: will policy and decision makers, operator and citizens adapt this Anticipatory Water

  19. Experimental design applied optimization of a state in epoxy clay dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents some analysis showed that the exfoliation / intercalation of a montmorillonite clay in epoxy resin such as viscosity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Increasing the viscosity of epoxy resin diglycidyl ether bisphenol A with the addition of clay associated with the sonification system at the time of dispersion is a good indication of exfoliation. The X-ray diffraction already cured composite shows a decrease of crystallinity of clay and EDS microanalysis of SEM, non-uniform dispersion of clay in epoxy resin. Thermal analysis TG composite clay / epoxy shows an increase in thermal stability relative to pure epoxy. (author)

  20. Hydraulic characterization of the boom clay formation from the HADES underground laboratory in Mol: evolution and assessment of the piezometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The network of piezometers installed in the Boom clay formation from the HADES Underground laboratory (-223 m) at Mol is an invaluable tool for the measurement and physical understanding of the groundwater flow towards a non closes deep repository system in an argillaceous formation. The hydraulic testing, test interpretation and groundwater sampling methodologies in a plastic clay (19 - 26 % H2O) at medium depth are presented. The results obtained from in situ tests (metric to local scale, 1 to 30 m) and from laboratory experiments on vertical and horizontal clay plugs (centimetric scale, 3 - 7 cm) have put into evidence the anisotropy of the Boom clay. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity is approximately 2.4 times higher than the vertical one. Laboratory and in situ results are discussed. Their comparison gives coherent hydraulic and transport parameters supporting the model used to describe quantitatively the migration of radionuclides through the clay. Meanwhile, concerning the hydraulic conductivity, a large discrepancy still subsists with the regional model (kilometric scale, 40 km x 80 km) which is presently being revisited (i.a. boundary conditions and refinement of the mesh, from 5 to 0.5 km) and with the regional observations often too scarce (water level measurements in the sandy aquifers surrounding the Boom clay formation). (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab