WorldWideScience

Sample records for clay soils

  1. Gardening in Clay Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Katie; Kuhns, Michael; Cardon, Grant

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet covers the basics of clay, silt and sand soils with an emphasis on gardening in soils with a high clay content. It includes information on the composition of clay soils, gardening tips for managing clay soils, and the types of plants that grow best in clay soils.

  2. Clay dispersibility and soil friability – testing the soil clay-to-carbon saturation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L. W.; Munkholm, L.J.; P. Moldrup; B. T. Christensen; Olesen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled three years in a field varying in clay content (~100 to ~220 g kg-1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay ...

  3. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Khaldoun; P. Moller; A. Fall; G. Wegdam; B. de Leeuw; Y. Méheust; J.O. Fossum; D. Bonn

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay s

  4. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with ...... of 10 and a Fines20/OC ratio of 20 may serve as corresponding thresholds for clay dispersibility, the latter probably best reflecting organo-mineral interactions of importance to the soil physical properties.......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...... dispersibility and no detectable effects on soil friability. Dispersed clay correlated to soil content of clay, but the correlation increased if subtracting a fraction assumed protected by OC. This trend was less convincing for soil tensile strength and friability. Increased clay dispersibility and reduced soil...

  6. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  7. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  8. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific.

  9. Estimation of soil clay content from hygroscopic water content measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wuddivira, Mark N.; Robinson, David A.; Lebron, Inma; Brechet, Laëtitia; Atwell, Melissa; De Caires, Sunshine; Oatham, Michael; Jones, Scott B.; Abdu, Hiruy; Verma, Aditya K.; Tuller, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Soil texture and the soil water characteristic are key properties used to estimate flow and transport parameters. Determination of clay content is therefore critical for understanding of plot-scale soil heterogeneity. With increasing interest in proximal soil sensing, there is the need to relate obtained signals to soil properties of interest. Inference of soil texture, especially clay mineral content, from instrument response from electromagnetic induction and radiometric methods is of subst...

  10. Clay Mineralogy of Various Marginal Soils in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Quang Hai; Egashira, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Various marginal soils derived from different parent materials were collected from different landforms and agro-ecological regions in Vietnam and were subjected to clay mineral analysis in addition to particle-size analysis. The result showed that the particle-size distribution of the soils had a close relationship with the landform. The clay content was highest for the soils from the meander floodplain and inland valley, followed by the soil from the hill and lowest for the soils from the ...

  11. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  12. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction is increa...

  13. Differences in physical properties of two clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Alakukku, Laura; Ristolainen, Antti; nuutinen, Visa

    2008-01-01

    We studied the physical properties of two clay soils (J1 and J2) having relatively similar texture but differing cultivation properties J2 being more sensitive to dry and wet conditions. The general assumption that the productivity of heavy clay soils is mainly threatened by excessive wetness holds in both fields.

  14. Clay mineralogy of weathering rinds and possible implications concerning the sources of clay minerals in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    Weathering rinds on volcanic clasts in Quaternary deposits in the western US contain only very fine-grained and poorly crystalline clay minerals. Rinds were sampled from soils containing well-developed argillic B horizons in deposits approx 105 yr old or more. The clay-size fraction of the rinds is dominated by allophane and iron hydroxy-oxides, whereas the B horizons contain abundant well-crystallized clay minerals. The contrast between the clay mineralogy of the weathering rinds, in which weathering is isolated from other soil processes, and that of the associated soil matrices suggests a need to reassess assumptions concerning the rates at which clay minerals form and the sources of clay minerals in argillic B horizons. It seems that crystalline clay minerals form more slowly in weathering rinds than is generally assumed for soil environments and that the weathering of primary minerals may not be the dominant source of crystalline clay minerals in Middle to Late Pleistocene soil.-A.P.

  15. Clay-illuvial soils in the Polish and international soil classifications

    OpenAIRE

    Kabała Cezary; Musztyfaga Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Soil with a clay-illuvial subsurface horizon are the most widespread soil type in Poland and significantly differ in morphology and properties developed under variable environmental conditions. Despite the long history of investigations, the rules of classification and cartography of clay-illuvial soils have been permanently discussed and modified. The distinction of clay-illuvial soils into three soil types, introduced to the Polish soil classification in 2011, has been criticized as excessi...

  16. Main Clay Minerals in Soils of Fujian Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; ZHANGWEIMING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The clay minerals of more than 200 soil samples collected from various sites of Fujian Province were studied by the X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy to study their distribution and evolution.Montmorillonite was found in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit,and some lateritic red soil,red soil and yellow soil with a low weathering degree.Chlorite existed mainly in coastal solonchak and paddy soil developed from marine deposit.1.4nm intergradient mineral appeared frequently in yellow soil,red soil and lateritic red soil.The content of 1.4nm intergradient mineral increased with the decrease of weathering degree from lateritic red soil to red soil to yellow soil.Hydrous micas were more in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit.and puple soil from purple shale than in other soils.Kaolinte was the most important clay mineral in the soils iun this province.The higher the soil weathering degree,the more the kaolinite existed.From yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil,kaolinite increased gradually,Kaolinite was the predominant clay mineral accompanied by few other minerals in typical lateritic red soil. Tubular halloysite was a widespread clay mineral in soils of Fujian Province with varying quantities.The soil derived from the paent rocks rich in feldspar contained more tubular halloysite.Spheroidal halloysite was found in a red soil and a paddy soil developed from olivine basalt gibbsite in the soils in this district was largely“primary gibbsite” which formed in the early weathering stage.Gibbsite decreased with the increase of weathering degree from yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil.Goethite also decreased in the same sequence while hematite increased.

  17. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Libo Hao; Qiaoqiao Wei; Yuyan Zhao; Zilong Lu; Xinyun Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative determination of clay minerals in soil based on bulk chemical composition data. The fundamental principles and processes of the calculation are elucidated. Some samples were used for reliability verification of the method and the results prove the simplicity and efficacy of the approach.

  18. Charge Properties and Clay Mineral Composition of Tianbao Mountains Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEJI-ZHENG; LIXUE-YUAN; 等

    1992-01-01

    The clay mineral association,oxides of clay fraction and surface charge properties of 7 soils,which are developed from granite,located at different altitudesof the Tianbao Mountains were studied.Results indicate that with the increase in altitude,1) the weathering process and desilicification of soil clay minerals became weaker,whereas the leaching depotassication and the formation process of hydroxy-aluminum interlayer got stronger;2)the contents of amorphous and complex aluminum and iron,and the activity of aluminum and iron oxides for soil clay fraction increased;and 3) the amount of variable negarive charge,anion exchange capacity and the values of PZC and PZNC also increased.The activity of aluminum and iron oxides,the accumulation of aluminum,and surface charge characteristics and their relation to clay oxides of the vertical zone soils were observed and recorded.

  19. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover is influenced by interactions between organic matter and the mineral soil fraction. However, the influence of clay content and type on SOC turnover rates remains unclear, particularly in tropical soils under natural vegetation. We examined the lability....... Basal soil respiration rates were determined from bulk soils and soil fractions. Substrate induced respiration rates were determined from soil fractions. SOC lability was significantly influenced by clay mineralogy, but not by clay content when compared across contrasting clay minerals. The lability...... of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving...

  20. Mechanical dispersion of clay from soil into water: readily-dispersed and spontaneously-dispersed clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the experimental determination of the amount of clay dispersed from soil into water is described. The method was evaluated using soil samples from agricultural fields in 18 locations in Poland. Soil particle size distributions, contents of organic matter and exchangeable cations were measured by standard methods. Sub-samples were placed in distilled water and were subjected to four different energy inputs obtained by different numbers of inversions (end-over-end movements). The amounts of clay that dispersed into suspension were measured by light scattering (turbidimetry). An empirical equation was developed that provided an approximate fit to the experimental data for turbidity as a function of number of inversions. It is suggested that extrapolation of the fitted equation to zero inversions enables the amount of spontaneously-dispersed clay to be estimated. This method introduces the possibility of replacing the existing subjective, qualitative method of determining spontaneously-dispersed clay with a quantitative, objective method. Even though the dispersed clay is measured under saturated conditions, soil samples retain a `memory' of the water contents at which they have been stored.

  1. Picloram and Aminopyralid Sorption to Soil and Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminopyralid sorption data are lacking, and these data are needed to predict off-target transport and plant available herbicide in soil solution. The objective of this research was to determine the sorption of picloram and aminopyralid to five soils and three clay minerals and determine if the pote...

  2. Clay-illuvial soils in the Polish and international soil classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabała Cezary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil with a clay-illuvial subsurface horizon are the most widespread soil type in Poland and significantly differ in morphology and properties developed under variable environmental conditions. Despite the long history of investigations, the rules of classification and cartography of clay-illuvial soils have been permanently discussed and modified. The distinction of clay-illuvial soils into three soil types, introduced to the Polish soil classification in 2011, has been criticized as excessively extended, non-coherent with the other parts and rules of the classification, hard to introduce in soil cartography and poorly correlated with the international soil classifications. One type of clay-illuvial soils (“gleby płowe” was justified and recommended to reintroduce in soil classification in Poland, as well as 10 soil subtypes listed in a hierarchical order. The subtypes may be combined if the soil has diagnostic features of more than one soil subtypes. Clear rules of soil name generalization (reduction of subtype number for one soil were suggested for soil cartography on various scales. One of the most important among the distinguished soil sub-types are the “eroded” or “truncated” clay-illuvial soils.

  3. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  4. Pesticide leaching in macroporous clay soils: field experiment and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords : pesticide leaching, macropores, preferential flow, preferential transport, cracked clay soil, pesticide leaching models, groundwater contamination, inverse modeling, bentazone and imidacloprid. The presence of macropores (i.e. shrinkage c

  5. Effect of Ionic Soil Stabilizers on Soil-Water Characteristic of Special Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The engineering properties of special clay are conventionally improved through the use of chemical additive such as ionic soil stabilizer (ISS). Such special clays are often referred to as stabilized or treated clays. The soil-water characteristic curves (SWCC) of special clays from Henan province and Hubei province were measured both in natural and stabilized conditions using the pressure plate apparatus in the suction range of 0-500 kPa. The SWCC results are used to interpret the special clays behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationships were developed between the basic clay and stabilized properties such as specific surface area and pore size distribution. The analysis showed that specific surface area decreases, cumulative pore volume and average pore size diameter decrease, dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. The research data and interpretation analysis presented here can be extended to understand the water film change behaviors influencing the mechanical and physical properties of stabilized special clay soils. KEY WORDS: ionic soil stabilizer, special clay, pore size diameter, specific surface area, soil water characteristic curve, water film

  6. Clay minerals in a denudation-accumulative soil catena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhikova, N. P.; Sorokina, N. P.; Khitrov, N. B.; Samsonova, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Chernozems and agrochernozems of the Kamennaya Steppe agroforest landscape have a silty clay or clay texture and similar associations of clay minerals. The plow horizons of the agrochernozems on a slope of 2°-3° to the Talovaya Balka have an increased content of the smectite phase (50-70%) compared to the upper horizons of the chernozems on flat watersheds (30-50%) due to the lithological discontinuity of the soil-forming material and the possible total removal of material on the slope by denudation. On slightly eroded areas, the clay minerals display a more intense disturbance of their crystal lattice structures by pedogenetic processes, which increase the degree of disorder in their layers and the accumulation of fine quartz in the clay fraction. In the areas with more significant erosion of the humus horizon, the clay minerals are characterized by their perfect structure and clean reflections, which are indicative of the outcropping of less weathered material from the middle part of the chernozem profile less transformed by pedogenesis.

  7. Clay content evaluation in soils through GPR signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Patriarca, Claudio; Slob, Evert; Benedetto, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which arises some important issues in many fields of employment, such as civil and environmental engineering, geology, and agriculture. This work focuses on pavement engineering, although the method applies to other fields of interest. Clay content in bearing courses of road pavement frequently causes damages and defects (e.g., cracks, deformations, and ruts). Therefore, the road safety and operability decreases, directly affecting the increase of expected accidents. In this study, different ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods and techniques were used to non-destructively investigate the clay content in sub-asphalt compacted soils. Experimental layout provided the use of typical road materials, employed for road bearing courses construction. Three types of soils classified by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as A1, A2, and A3 were used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated test boxes. Percentages of bentonite clay were gradually added, ranging from 2% to 25% by weight. Analyses were carried out for each clay content using two different GPR instruments. A pulse radar with ground-coupled antennae at 500 MHz centre frequency and a vector network analyzer spanning the 1-3 GHz frequency range were used. Signals were processed in both time and frequency domains, and the consistency of results was validated by the Rayleigh scattering method, the full-waveform inversion, and the signal picking techniques. Promising results were obtained for the detection of clay content affecting the bearing capacity of sub-asphalt layers.

  8. Remediation of copper polluted red soils with clay materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gangya Zhang; Yunqing Lin; Mingkuang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Attapulgite and montmorillonite were utilized to remediate heavy metal polluted red soils in Guixi City, Jiangxi Province, China.The effects of clay minerals on availability, chemical distribution, and biotoxicity of Cu and Zn were evaluated.The results provided a reference for the rational application of clay materials to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils.From the sorption experiment,the maximum adsorbed Cu2+ by attapulgite and montmorillonite was 1501 and 3741 mg/kg, respectively.After polluted red soil was amended with attapulgite or montmorillonite and cultured at 30 and 60 days, soil pH increased significantly compared to the control.An 8% increase in the amount of montmorillonite in soil and 30 days incubation decreased acid exchangeable Cu by 24.7% compared to the control red soil.Acid exchangeable Cu decreased with increasing amounts of attapulgite and montmorillonite, with best remediation effect reached at a dose of 8%.Results also showed that the Cu poisoning effect on earthworms was reduced with the addition of attapulgite and montmorillonite.Montmoriilonite showed the best effect, with the addition of a 2% dose the mortality of earthworms decreased from 60% to zero compared to the control.Our results indicated that the bioavailability of Cu in soils was reduced more effectively with the application of montmorillonite than attapulgite.

  9. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  10. Influence of cracking in the desiccation process of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Levatti, Hector Ulises; Prat Catalán, Pere; Ledesma Villalba, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that clayey soils undergoing desiccation tend to shrink and eventually crack. Analysis of the behaviour and influence of cracks in these types of soils is very important in several engineering fields such as mine tailing dams, long-term radioactive waste storage, impervious core of earth dams, and in any situation where clay is used as a barrier to fluid flow. Loss of humidity and cracking changes the permeability of such barriers that may no longer work properly and pose pot...

  11. Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity along a Clay Gradient Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2013-01-01

    clay content, respectively) at a field site in Lerbjerg, Denmark. The water-holding capacity of soils markedly increased with increasing soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the L1 to L3 soils than for the L4 to L6 soils. Higher air permeability values...

  12. Field methods for studying soil moisture regimes and irrigation practices in clay soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of water flow through swelling clay soils with macropores (''cracks'') requires special techniques because these soils are not isotropic and homogeneous as required by standard flow theory. The techniques should preferably be rapid and inexpensive to allow applications in the field. Three experimental techniques, which were recently developed at the Netherlands Soil Survey Institute, are discussed. The measure: (i) vertical and horizontal Ksub(sat) in a gypsum-covered cube of soil which is carved out in situ (the cube method); (ii) the Ksub(unsat) near saturation down to pressure heads of about -15cm by determining fluxes through a series of crusts and the associated negative pressure heads below the crusts (the crusts test); and (iii) short-circuiting, which is the preferential movement of free water along vertical macropores in unsaturated soil, by applying sprinkling irrigation to large, undisturbed cores. In addition, three examples are discussed whereby soil morphological field data are used for simulation models which characterize soil moisture regimes of clay soils. These examples cover: (i) the effect of horizontal cracks on upward unsaturated flow; (ii) infiltration of sprinkling irrigation in a cracked clay soil; and (iii) ponded infiltration of water in a clay soil with worm channels. (author)

  13. Soil-Water Characteristic Curves of Red Clay treated by Ionic Soil Stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship of red clay particle with water is an important factor to produce geological disaster and environmental damage. In order to reduce the role of adsorbed water of red clay in WuHan, Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) was used to treat the red clay. Soil Moisture Equipment made in U.S.A was used to measure soil-water characteristic curve of red clay both in natural and stabilized conditions in the suction range of 0-500kPa. The SWCC results were used to interpret the red clay behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationship were compared between the basic soil and stabilizer properties such as water content, dry density, liquid limit, plastic limit, moisture absorption rate and stabilizer dosages. The analysis showed that the particle density and specific surface area increase, the dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. After treatment with the ISS, the geological disasters caused by the adsorbed water of red clay can be effectively inhibited.

  14. A Preliminary Study on Identification of Clay Minerals in Soils with Reference to Reflectance Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUBIN-BIN; LIDE-CHENG; 等

    1995-01-01

    The characteristics of the reflectance spectra of clay minerals and their influences on the reflectance spectra of soils are dealt with in the paper.The results showed that dominant clay minerals in soils could be distinguished in light of the spectral -form parameters of the reflectance spectra of soils,thus making it possible to develop a quick method to determine clay minerals by means of reflectance spectra of soils in the lab.and providing a theoretic basis for remote sensing of clay minerals in soils with a high resolution imaging spectrometer.

  15. Identification of iron oxide and hydroxide in soil clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, S. P.; Raj, D.

    1993-04-01

    Clay fractions of soils collected at different depths from the foothills of Karbi Anglong, Assam (India), have been analysed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mössbauer data, recorded at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, show the presence of iron oxide (α-Fe 2O 3, hematite) and iron oxyhydroxide (α-FeOOH, goethite) in the form of fine particles/Al-substituted. All samples exhibited strong superparamagnetism, characteristic of the fine size of the oxide particles and the effect of aluminum substitution. Both hematite and goethite are present in the lower horizon while only goethite occurs in the upper horizon. In addition, silicate clay minerals e.g. kaolinite and illite are also identified.

  16. Preferential flow paths in a water repellent clay soil with grass cover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Grass-covered heavy basin clay soils in the Netherlands appeared to be water-repellent. Water-repellency in the top layers of these soils occurred mainly as a coating on the aggregates. Differences between minimum and maximum soil moisture contents were high in all the layers sampled. When the clay

  17. Microbial Decomposition of Extracellular DNA in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, E. M.; McHugh, T. A.; Schwartz, E.; Preteska, L.; Hayer, M.; Hungate, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Genomic analysis of soil communities can only be useful in predicting ecosystem processes if the genetic data gathered is representative of the microbial community. Consequently, extracellular DNA (eDNA) represents a pool of unexpressed genetic information that may skew genomic analyses. To date, our understanding of the representation of eDNA in metagenomic data and its decomposition in soil is very limited. To address this deficit, we performed a laboratory experiment wherein soils were amended with eDNA and/or clay minerals in a full factorial design. Specifically, the decomposition of 13C labeled E. coli DNA was monitored over a 30-day period in control, Kaolinite-amended, and Montmorillonite-amended soils. The amount of added eDNA carbon (C) remaining in the soil declined exponentially over time, with the majority of decomposition occurring in the first two weeks. Kaolinite significantly decreased eDNA decomposition rates and retained a higher fraction of eDNA-C (~70% remaining) than unamended and Montmorillonite-soils (~40% remaining) after 30 days. Phylogenetic (16S rRNA) sequencing of DNA extracted over the course of the incubation period enabled detection of the added eDNA. The relative abundance of added E. coli DNA decreased ~10-100 fold over 30 days. These results indicate that while a significant fraction of eDNA-C remained in the soil, this carbon was likely no longer in the form of intact strands of DNA amenable to sequencing. In addition, the eDNA affected the composition of the bacterial community. Specifically, the relative abundance of Planctomycetes and TM7 were elevated in soils that received eDNA regardless of clay addition, suggesting these phyla may be particularly effective at degrading eDNA and using it for growth. In conclusion these results indicate that the representation of eDNA in metagenomic sequence data declines rapidly, likely due to fragmentation. However, a fraction of eDNA material was resistant to decomposition, suggesting a

  18. Fabric and clay activity in soil water retention behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jommi Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling the water retention behaviour requires proper understanding of all the processes which affect the amount of water stored in the pore network, depending on the soil state and the soil history. Traditionally, in many applications a single water content – suction curve is used. This approach limits the applicability of the retention data to practical cases, especially when fine grain soils are dealt with, when the deformability and activity of the clay fraction significantly affect the interaction with water. On the other side, water retention is being recognised more and more as a fundamental information in the description of the mechanical response of the soil, as it provides the key connection to the partial volumetric strains in a deformation process. With reference to the work performed at the Politecnico di Milano in the last years, a contribution on the understanding and modelling the coupled water retention- mechanical response in deformable soils is presented. The contribution aims to: (i summarise the mechanisms which contribute to water retention; (ii point out the role played by an evolving fabric and the fluid properties on water retention; and (iii provide an overview on some of the consequences of evolving water retention properties on the mechanical behaviour.

  19. Theoretical Analysis of the Influence of the Thermal Diffusivity of Clay Soil on the Thermal Energy Distribution in Clay Soil of Abakaliki, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ugwu, E. I.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the thermal diffusivity of clay soil on thermal energy distribution in clay soil was studied using one and two dimensioned heat equation, which was solved, by using separation of variables method. In the analysis, heat was assumed to be propagated along rectangular moldedclaywithlength(L)with the width being considered negligible in the case of one dimension with different temperature ranging from 350 to 1290ºC within zero to one minute chosen where some parameters such as th...

  20. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.R. [Reclamation Technology, Inc., Athens, GA (United States); Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Johnson, D.O. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -1} cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems.

  1. Study of moisture migration in clay soils considering rate of freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA Kudriavtcev; AV Kazharskii; ED Goncharova; IB Berestianyi

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents some methods of numerical modeling and a study of moisture changing in frozen clay soils considering rates of freezing in the base of construction. An impact assessment of moisture changes in clay soils affecting strength characteristics during thawing was carried out in stability tests.

  2. Magnitude, modeling and significance of swelling and shrinkage processes in clay soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic process of swelling and shrinkage in clay soils has significant practical consequences, such as the rapid transport of water and solutes via shrinkage cracks to the subsoil, and the destruction of buildings and roads on clay soils. In order to develop measuring methods and computer simul

  3. Effects of organic matter and clay content in soil on pesticide adsorption processes

    OpenAIRE

    Rada Đurović; Jelena Gajić-Umiljendić; Tijana Đorđević

    2009-01-01

    The effect of organic matter and clay content on the adsorption of atrazine, acetochlor, clomazone, pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen in soil samples was studied. In order to determine whether and to what degree different soil properties affect the process of determination of selected pesticides, three soils with different clay and organic matter contents were used. An optimized liquid-solid extraction procedure followed by SPME measurement was applied to analyze the selected pesticides in soil s...

  4. To what extent clay mineralogy affects soil aggregation? Consequences for soil organic matter stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ugalde, O.; Barré, P.; Hubert, F.; Virto, I.; Chenu, C.; Ferrage, E.; Caner, L.

    2012-12-01

    Aggregation is a key process for soil functioning as it influences C storage, vulnerability to erosion and water holding capacity. While the influence of soil organic C on aggregation has been documented, much less is known about the role of soil mineralogy. Soils usually contain a mixture of clay minerals with contrasted surface properties, which should result on different abilities of clay minerals to aggregation. We took advantage of the intrinsic mineral heterogeneity of a temperate Luvisol to compare the role of clay minerals (illite, smectite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite) in aggregation. In a first step, grassland and tilled soil samples were fractionated in water in aggregate-size classes according to the hierarchical model of aggregation (Tisdall and Oades, 1982). Clay mineralogy and organic C in the aggregate-size classes were analyzed. The results showed that interstratified minerals containing swelling phases accumulated in aggregated fractions (>2 μm) compared to free clay fractions (500 μm) to micro-aggregates (50-250 μm). C concentration and C/N ratio followed the opposite trend. These results constitute a clay mineral-based evidence for the hierarchical model of aggregation, which postulates an increasing importance of the reactivity of clay minerals in the formation of micro-aggregates compared to larger aggregates. In the latter aggregates, formation relies on the physical enmeshment of particles by fungal hyphae, and root and microbial exudates. In a second step, micro-aggregates from the tilled soil samples were submitted to increasingly disaggregating treatments by sonication to evaluate the link between their water stability and clay mineralogy. Micro-aggregates with increasing stability showed an increase of interstratified minerals containing swelling phases and C concentration for low intensities of disaggregation (from 0 to 5 J mL-1). This suggests that swelling phases promote their stability. Swelling phases and organic C

  5. Effect of Clay Minerals on the Chemical Characteristics of Soil Humus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YEWEI; WENQIXIAO

    1996-01-01

    Chemical characteristics of humic substances in soils with different mineralogical characteristics and under different utilization paterns in Zhangpu,Fujian Province,together with two pairs of cultivated soils in North China Plain were studied by chemical analysis,visible and IR spectroscopy and 13C NMR spectrometry.For soils in Zhanpu the HA/FA ratio and both the aromaticity and the degree of humification of HA were higher in soils with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral than in those with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral,provided these soils were under the same utilization pattern.While for each pair of soils with similar mineralogical characteristics the HA/FA ratio was higher and the C/H ratio and the contnet of carboxyl group of HA were lower in paddy soil than in upland soil.Among the upland soils(or paddy soils)studied the Ha/FA ratio of soil in Zhangpu with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral was the lowest,and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest .the lowest.and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest It was concluded that the presence of montmorillonite favored the fromation and maturation of humic acid.

  6. Radiocesium sorption in relation to clay mineralogy of paddy soils in Fukushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Sho; Sano, Oki; Ito, Toyoaki; Yanai, Junta

    2014-01-15

    Relationships between Radiocesium Interception Potential (RIP) and mineralogical characteristics of the clay fraction isolated from 97 paddy soils (Hama-dori, n = 25; Naka-dori, n = 36; Aizu, n = 36) in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan were investigated to clarify the mineralogical factors controlling the (137)Cs retention ability of soils (half-life 30.1 y). Of all the fission products released by the Fukushima accident, (137)Cs is the most important long-term contributor to the environmental contamination. The RIP, a quantitative index of the (137)Cs retention ability, was determined for the soil clays. The composition of clay minerals in the soil clays was estimated from peak areas obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The predominant clay mineral was smectite in soils from Hama-dori and Aizu, while this was variable for those from Naka-dori. Native K content of the soil clays was found to be an indicator of the amount of micaceous minerals. The average RIP for the 97 soil clays was 7.8 mol kg(-1), and ranged from 2.4 mol kg(-1) to 19.4 mol kg(-1). The RIP was significantly and positively correlated with native K content for each of the geographical regions, Hama-dori (r = 0.76, p < 0.001), Naka-dori (r = 0.43, p < 0.05), and Aizu (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), while it was not related to the relative abundance of smectite. The linear relationship between RIP and native K content not only indicate a large contribution of micaceous minerals to the (137)Cs retention ability of the soil clays, but also could be used to predict the (137)Cs retention ability of soil clays for other paddy fields in Fukushima and other areas.

  7. Clay mineral formation and transformation in rocks and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three mechanisms for clay mineral formation (inheritance, neoformation, and transformation) operating in three geological environments (weathering, sedimentary, and diagenetic-hydrothermal) yield nine possibilities for the origin of clay minerals in nature. Several of these possibilities are discussed in terms of the rock cycle. The mineralogy of clays neoformed in the weathering environment is a function of solution chemistry, with the most dilute solutions favoring formation of the least soluble clays. After erosion and transportation, these clays may be deposited on the ocean floor in a lateral sequence that depends on floccule size. Clays undergo little reaction in the ocean, except for ion exchange and the neoformation of smectite; therefore, most clays found on the ocean floor are inherited from adjacent continents. Upon burial and heating, however, dioctahedral smectite reacts in the diagenetic environment to yield mixed-layer illite-smectite, and finally illite. With uplift and weathering, the cycle begins again. Refs.

  8. Soil Compaction and Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Yield in a Clay Textured Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidah Yahya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The impacts of soil compaction on crop yields have been studied extensively by soil scientists due to declining soil productivity associated with mechanisation. However, a relationship between machine-induced soil compaction and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis yield is unclear. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of mechanization on soil physical properties and the influence on oil palm yield. Approach: The palms were planted in Bernam series soil which is clay textured. Compaction treatments were imposed for 6 consecutive years. Comparisons were made between the effects of soil compaction caused by different trailer weights and monthly transportation frequency. Results: The results showed a beneficial effect of soil compaction on the oil palm yield. It significantly increased the yield with increased mean soil bulk density. The transportation frequency played a greater role than the trailer weight. After six years of soil compaction, there was a positive relationship between mean soil bulk density, porosity and oil palm yield. Conclusion: Thus compaction may not often be a problem.

  9. Estimation of the density of the clay-organic complex in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2016-01-01

    Soil bulk density was investigated as a function of soil contents of clay and organic matter in arable agricultural soils at a range of locations. The contents of clay and organic matter were used in an algorithmic procedure to calculate the amounts of clay-organic complex in the soils. Values of soil bulk density as a function of soil organic matter content were used to estimate the amount of pore space occupied by unit amount of complex. These estimations show that the effective density of the clay-organic matter complex is very low with a mean value of 0.17 ± 0.04 g ml-1 in arable soils. This value is much smaller than the soil bulk density and smaller than any of the other components of the soil considered separately (with the exception of the gas content). This low value suggests that the clay-soil complex has an extremely porous and open structure. When the complex is considered as a separate phase in soil, it can account for the observed reduction of bulk density with increasing content of organic matter.

  10. Phosphorus leaching from clay soils can be counteracted by structure liming

    OpenAIRE

    Ulen, Barbro; Etana, Ararso

    2014-01-01

    Two field experiments with drained plots on clay soils (60 and 25 % clay) demonstrated a significant reduction in leaching of total phosphorus after application of structure lime. Aggregate stability, was significantly improved. Phosphorus leaching in particulate form was significantly reduced following structure liming at the site with a very high clay content. Sites representing low (50 mg kg-1) and high (140 mg kg-1) levels of phosphorus extractable with acid ammonium lactate in topsoil di...

  11. Carbon saturation in the silt and clay particles in soils with contrasting mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Matus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The silt and clay particles play a key role as stabilizing agents of soil organic carbon (SOC. Several lines of evidence indicate a theoretical maximum or C saturation in individual particles. In the present study, we hypothesized that a C fraction displaying linear accumulation relative to the SOC is not influenced by C saturation, while a fraction displaying an asymptotic relationship is regarded as saturated (Stewart et al., 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare the amount of C in the silt and clay sized fractions in temperate and subtropical cropping soils across a range of textures with different mineralogy. Twenty-one and 18 soil samples containing 1:1 and 2:1 clay of temperate soil from Chile under monoculture of maize (Zea maiz L. for at least 30 years and 9 subtropical soils from Mexico under maize and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cropping for 9 years having mixed clay were collected at 0-0.1 m. The SOC of 2:1 soils was significantly higher (14±0.5 g kg-1 dry soil than 1:1 soils (10±0.7 g kg-1. However, subtropical soils showed the highest values (59±0.5 g kg-1. A positive (P < 0.01 relationship was observed between the SOC and the C in the silt fraction (R2 0.80-0.97, P < 0.01. In contrast, the clay fraction remained constant or showed asymptotic behavior. We conclude that the silt fraction, unlike clay, showed no evidence of C saturation, while clay accumulates C to a maximum. On average, the 2:1 clay was saturated at 1-2 g C kg-1 and 1:1 at 1 g C kg-1, and subtropical soils at 14 g C kg-1.

  12. Searching the critical soil organic carbon threshold for satisfactory tilth conditions – test of the Dexter clay:carbon hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L. W.; P. Moldrup; B. T. Christensen; Olesen, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    The concern for deteriorating soil structure at low soil organic matter (SOM) contents calls for better knowledge of SOM interaction with soil minerals as well as guidelines for soil conservation. We measured clay dispersibility in a field with a textural gradient. Our results support the concept of differentiating soil content of clay in a complexed and non-complexed part although our data did not point out an exact clay/OC ratio threshold. Our results also indicated that labile fractions of...

  13. Clays Can Decrease Gaseous Nutrient Losses from Soil-Applied Livestock Manures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Chris; Redding, Matthew; Hill, Jaye; Brown, Grant; Westermann, Maren

    2016-03-01

    Clays could underpin a viable agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement technology given their affinity for nitrogen and carbon compounds. We provide the first investigation into the efficacy of clays to decrease agricultural nitrogen GHG emissions (i.e., NO and NH). Via laboratory experiments using an automated closed-vessel analysis system, we tested the capacity of two clays (vermiculite and bentonite) to decrease NO and NH emissions and organic carbon losses from livestock manures (beef, pig, poultry, and egg layer) incorporated into an agricultural soil. Clay addition levels varied, with a maximum of 1:1 to manure (dry weight). Cumulative gas emissions were modeled using the biological logistic function, with 15 of 16 treatments successfully fitted ( oxide emissions were significantly lower (×3; < 0.05) at the highest clay addition level compared with no clay addition. When assessing manures individually, we observed generally decreasing trends in NH and NO emissions with increasing clay addition, albeit with widely varying statistical significance between manure types. Most of the treatments also showed strong evidence of increased C retention with increasing clay additions, with up to 10 times more carbon retained in treatments containing clay compared with treatments containing no clay. This preliminary assessment of the efficacy of clays to mitigate agricultural GHG emissions indicates strong promise. PMID:27065411

  14. Electrical properties of water in clay and silty soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarenketo, Timo

    1998-10-01

    In order to better understand ground penetrating radar (GPR) results obtained in road surveys and site investigations, the dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of four silt and clay soils were measured at different densities and moisture contents ranging from oven dry material to the plastic state. The real parts K' and imaginary parts K″ of the relative dielectric permittivity values of the soils were measured with an HP Surface Network Analyzer over a frequency range from 30 MHz to 3.0 GHz. A dielectric and electrical conductivity meter produced by Adek was also used. The results suggest that water in soils can be classified according to its electrical properties as: (1) an adsorption water layer, also known as the hygroscopic water layer; (2) a viscous or capillary water layer; and (3) free water. The measurements also showed that the adsorption water layer can be divided into inner and outer layers in accordance with the electrical double layer theory. The imaginary part of the dielectric value of the material is formed mainly in the outer layer and partly in the viscous (capillary) water layer, which also has two layers with differing electrical properties. The measurements also clearly showed that if the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) of a material is low, the water molecules are orderly arranged around the soil particles and the dielectric values of the bound water layers remain almost independent of frequency. If the CEC increases, the molecular structure of the bound water layers is disturbed and the water molecules more easily follow the changing AC field so that the dielectric value is higher. These materials are also highly dielectrically dispersive, especially at GPR frequencies below 400 MHz. Increasing CEC correlates well with increasing imaginary part of the adsorption water layer. Measured ohmic electrical conductivities were low at low moisture content and increased as the outer viscous water layer developed with higher moisture

  15. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis of the soil water characteristic (SWC) has been extensively studied for matric potentials between zero and −1.5 MPa. However, little information is available on how to quantify, evaluate, and identify the causes of hysteresis at potentials below −10 MPa where vapor sorption plays...... an important role. It is clear that modeling physical and biological soil processes is more accurate when SWC hysteresis is considered, particularly at low potentials where small differences in water content are associated with large changes in potential energy. The objectives of the presented study were to......: (i) evaluate and compare recently developed methods (MBET-n, Dh and SPN) for quantifying hysteresis in soils and pure clays, and (ii) investigate the role of organic matter (OM) and clay content and type on hysteresis. Five pure clays and two sets of soils with gradients in organic matter and clay...

  16. Effect of Polypropylene Fibers, Lime and Ceramic Additives on the Compressibility of Silty-Clay Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Hiba D. Saleem; Asad H. Humaish

    2016-01-01

    Soil stabilization is widely used by geotechnical engineers in the world to increase soil strength, soil compressibility and reduce the permeability. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different materials to the silty clayey soil (i.e. polypropylene fibers, lime and ceramic) and to figure out how the compressibility behave under mixture soil and these stabilized material at different percent (investigation their effect on the value of settlement). Silty clay ...

  17. Electron Microscopic Observation of Clays of Calcareous and Noncalcareous Soils in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    ALAM, Md. Lutfe; KAKOI, Teruzane; MIYAUCHI, Nobufumi; SHINAGAWA, Akio; カコイ, テルザネ; ミヤウチ, ノブフミ; シナガワ, アキオ

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopic observation of calcareous and noncalcareous floodplain soils of Bangladesh were carried out by TEM and SEM. Morphological changes in relation to clay formation and weathering process were investigated. Unweathered, partially weathered and weathered micaceous mineralsaccompanying with poorly crystallized kaolinite and halloysite and other primary minerals were observed in silt and coarse clay of both calcareous and noncalcareous soil. Smectite and vermiculite which aredomi...

  18. Electron Microscopic Observation of Clays of Calcareous and Noncalcareous Soils in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    ALAM, Md. Lutfe; KAKOI, Teruzane; MIYAUCHI, Nobufumi; SHINAGAWA, Akio; カコイ, テルザネ; ミヤウチ, ノブフミ; シナガワ, アキオ

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopic observation of calcareous and noncalcareous floodplain soils of Bangladesh were carried out by TEM and SEM. Morphological changes in relation to clay formation and weathering process were investigated. Unweathered, partially weathered and weathered micaceous minerals accompanying with poorly crystallized kaolinite and halloysite and other primary minerals were observed in silt and coarse clay of both calcareous and noncalcareous soil. Smectite and vermiculite which are...

  19. Potential use of lateritic and marine clay soils as landfill liners to retain heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermyanont, Tanit; Arrykul, Surapon; Charoenthaisong, Nanthanit

    2009-01-01

    The potential of a lateritic soil and a marine clay, typical of those found in hot and humid climatic regions, was assessed for use as a landfill liner material. A series of tests were conducted - physical and chemical, batch adsorption, column, hydraulic conductivity, etc., - to evaluate the heavy metal sorption capacity, chemical compatibility of hydraulic conductivity, and transport parameters of the soils. Experimental results showed that the marine clay had better adsorption capacity than that of the lateritic soil and that its hydraulic conductivity was an order of magnitude lower. In addition, the hydraulic conductivities of both soils when permeated with low concentration heavy metal solutions were below 1x10(-7)cm/s. When permeated with Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Ni solutions, the retardation factors of the lateritic soil and the marine clay ranged from 10 to 98 and 37 to 165, respectively, while the diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.0x10(-5) to 7.5x10(-6) and 3.0 to 9.14x10(-7)cm2/s, respectively. For both soils, Cr and Pb were retained relatively well, while Cd, Zn, and Ni were more mobile. The marine clay had higher retardation factors and lower diffusion coefficients, and its hydraulic conductivity was more compatible with Cr solution, than that of the lateritic soil. In general, the properties of the marine clay indicate that it has significant advantages over the lateritic soil as landfill liner material. PMID:18550353

  20. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity on clay content in soil determined from resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevnin, Vladimir; Delgado-Rodriguez, Omar; Mousatov, Aleksandr [Mexican Petroleum Institute, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ryjov, Albert [Moscow State Geological Prospecting Academy, Geophysical Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The influence of clay content in sandy and clayey soils on hydraulic conductivity (filtration coefficient) is considered. A review of published experimental data on the relationship of hydraulic conductivity with soil lithology and grain size, as dependent on clay content is presented. Theoretical calculations include clay content. Experimental and calculated data agree, and several approximation formulas for filtration coefficient vs clay content are presented. Clay content in soil is estimated from electric resistivity data obtained from 2D VES interpretation. A two-step method is proposed, the first step including clay content calculating from soil resistivity and groundwater salinity, and the second step including filtration coefficient estimating from clay content. Two applications are presented. [Spanish] El contenido de arcilla en suelos areno-arcillosos influye sobre la permeabilidad hidraulica (coeficiente de filtracion). Se presenta una revision de datos experimentales publicados que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el tipo litologico del suelo y el tamano de las particulas. A partir de calculos teoricos, se modifican las conocidas formulas que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el contenido de arcilla. Se estima el contenido de arcilla a partir de los datos interpretados por el metodo SEV, y se propone un procedimiento para la estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion: (a) calculo del contenido de arcilla a partir de la resistividad del suelo y de la salinidad del agua subterranea, (b) estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion a partir del contenido de arcilla. Se presentan algunos ejemplos de la aplicacion de esta metodologia.

  1. Radiocesium sorption in relation to clay mineralogy of paddy soils in Fukushima, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Atsushi, E-mail: na_4_ka_triplochiton@kpu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Ogasawara, Sho [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Sano, Oki; Ito, Toyoaki [Field Science Center, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Naruko-Onsen 232-3, Osaki, Miyagi 989-6711 (Japan); Yanai, Junta [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between Radiocesium Interception Potential (RIP) and mineralogical characteristics of the clay fraction isolated from 97 paddy soils (Hama-dori, n = 25; Naka-dori, n = 36; Aizu, n = 36) in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan were investigated to clarify the mineralogical factors controlling the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of soils (half-life 30.1 y). Of all the fission products released by the Fukushima accident, {sup 137}Cs is the most important long-term contributor to the environmental contamination. The RIP, a quantitative index of the {sup 137}Cs retention ability, was determined for the soil clays. The composition of clay minerals in the soil clays was estimated from peak areas obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The predominant clay mineral was smectite in soils from Hama-dori and Aizu, while this was variable for those from Naka-dori. Native K content of the soil clays was found to be an indicator of the amount of micaceous minerals. The average RIP for the 97 soil clays was 7.8 mol kg{sup −1}, and ranged from 2.4 mol kg{sup −1} to 19.4 mol kg{sup −1}. The RIP was significantly and positively correlated with native K content for each of the geographical regions, Hama-dori (r = 0.76, p < 0.001), Naka-dori (r = 0.43, p < 0.05), and Aizu (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), while it was not related to the relative abundance of smectite. The linear relationship between RIP and native K content not only indicate a large contribution of micaceous minerals to the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of the soil clays, but also could be used to predict the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of soil clays for other paddy fields in Fukushima and other areas. - Highlights: • RIP was measured for 97 paddy soils from Fukushima to assess {sup 137}Cs retention ability. • The dominant clay mineral was smectite, but this did not control RIP. • RIP was positively correlated with native K content. • Micaceous minerals were found to control the {sup 137}Cs retention

  2. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Brake, B.; M. J. van der Ploeg; Rooij, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil) by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geo...

  3. Effect of Soil Clay Content on RNA Isolation and on Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Gene Transcripts in Soil by Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR ▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Novinscak, A.; Filion, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil clay content on RNA isolation and on quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) quantification of microbial gene transcripts. The amount of clay significantly altered RNA isolation yields and qRT-PCR analyses. Recommendations are made for quantifying microbial gene transcripts in soil samples varying in clay content.

  4. Cations extraction of sandy-clay soils from cavado valley, portugal, using sodium salts solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva João Eudes da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of contamination by metals in the water wells of the Cavado Valley in north-west Portugal can be attributed to the heavy leaching of clay soils due to an excess of nitrogen resulting from the intensive use of fertilisers in agricultural areas. This work focuses on the natural weathering characteristics of soils, particularly the clay material, through the study of samples collected near the River Cavado. Samples taken from various sites, after physico-chemical characterisation, were subjected to clay dissolution tests, using sodium salts of different ionic forces, to detect the relationship between certain physico-chemical parameters of water, such as pH, nitrate, chloride and sulphate content, in the dissolution of clay and the subsequent extraction of such cations as Al, Fe and K. In acidic sandy clay soils, the mineralogical composition of which was characterised by a predominance of quartz, micas, kaolinite and K-feldspars, decreases of the clay material/water pH ratio increases dissolution of the micaceous and K-feldspars phases. The presence of nitrates in the aqueous solution apparently advanced the extraction of all three cations Al, Fe and K. The specific surface area of the clay material showed a significant correlation with the main kinetic parameters of cation extraction.

  5. Efficient resource management in dairy farming on peat and heavy clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de P.H.B.; Keulen, van H.; Lantinga, E.A.; Udo, H.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peat and heavy clay soils in the Netherlands are mainly used for permanent grassland to support dairy farming. As a result of intensification in dairy farming during the last decades, environmental quality is threatened by high emissions of N and P. Increased drainage of the wet soils has induced hi

  6. Chemical dispersants and pre-treatments to determine clay in soils with different mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rodrigues

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the soil physical properties, including the clay content, is of utmost importance for agriculture. The behavior of apparently similar soils can differ in intrinsic characteristics determined by different formation processes and nature of the parent material. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of separate or combined pre-treatments, dispersion methods and chemical dispersant agents to determine clay in some soil classes, selected according to their mineralogy. Two Brazilian Oxisols, two Alfisols and one Mollisol with contrasting mineralogy were selected. Different treatments were applied: chemical substances as dispersants (lithium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, and hexametaphosphate; pre-treatment with dithionite, ammonium oxalate, and hydrogen peroxide to eliminate organic matter; and coarse sand as abrasive and ultrasound, to test their mechanical action. The conclusion was drawn that different treatments must be applied to determine clay, in view of the soil mineralogy. Lithium hydroxide was not efficient to disperse low-CEC electropositive soils and very efficient in dispersing high-CEC electronegative soils. The use of coarse sand as an abrasive increased the clay content of all soils and in all treatments in which dispersion occurred, with or without the use of chemical dispersants. The efficiency of coarse sand is not the same for all soil classes.

  7. Effects of acid atmospheric deposition on the chemical composition of loess, clay and peat soils under forest in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klap, J.M.; Vries, de W.; Leeters, E.E.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In addition to a survey of the soils under 150 forest stands on non-calcareous sandy soils, the chemical composition of the soils under 40 stands on non-calcareous loess soil, 30 stands on non-calcareous clay soils and 30 stands on oligotrophous peat soils have been examined, to assess the current s

  8. Effects of Organic Matter and Clay Content in Soil on Pesticide Adsorption Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Đurović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic matter and clay content on the adsorption of atrazine, acetochlor, clomazone, pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen in soil samples was studied. In order to determine whether and to what degree different soil properties affect the process of determinationof selected pesticides, three soils with different clay and organic matter contents were used. An optimized liquid-solid extraction procedure followed by SPME measurement was applied to analyse the selected pesticides in soil samples. Detection and quantificationwere done by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Relative standard deviation (RSD values for multiple analyses of soil samples fortified at 30 μg/kg of each pesticide were below 19%. Limits of detection (LODs for all compounds studied were less than 2 μg/kg. The results indicate that soils with different physico-chemical properties have different effects on the adsorption of most pesticides, especially at higher concentration levels.

  9. Effect of potassium on fixation of ammonium by clay minerals in different soil layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agelda Ajazi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In intensive agriculture systems, efficient nutrient use is necessary for high crop yields as well as for sustainable environment management. Fixation of NH4+ and K+ by soil clays affect N and K availability to plants. Latest studies indicates that non-exchangeable NH4+, may affect crop productivity and soil N dynamics more than previously thought. An incubation study with K2SO4 and NH4NO3 was conducted to evaluate NH4+ and K+ fixation in two southern Albanian soils. Soils contained significant amount of native-fixed NH4+ and showed relatively high NH4+ fixing capacity. Native fixed ammonium content varied for horizons Ap and BCg, from 97 to 133 mg/kg and accounted for between 5 to 19, 8 % of the total nitrogen, respectively . Ammonium fixation was increased with N rates and was reduced with increased K rates. When K was added to the soil prior to the NH4, the amount of ammonium fixed was reduced. By contrast, when K+ and NH4+ were added to the soils simultaneously (equivalent amount; 2mEq/100g, the ammonium fixation was increased somewhat in the BCg horizon , whereas no such preference for ammonium fixation was found in the Ap horizon. In case when NH4+ and K+ were added to the soil samples in form of solutions, containing equal amounts of NH4+ (corresponding to 2 mEq NH4+/100 g soil but varying amounts of K+, the capacity of the soil to fix ammonium was reduced in proportion to the amount of K+ added. The soil samples incubated anaerobically, were with high differences in clay minerals content. The dominate clay minerals for profile (I-Ap horizon are smectite > vermiculite > Ilite, while vermiculite plus ilite (as the most important clay fixed minerals, comprised 21% of clay fraction and 13 % of the soil. In the profile (II-BCg horizon, the dominant clay minerals ranged; vermiculite > Ilite > smectite, while (vermiculite + ilite, comprised 52% of the clay fraction and 23, 4 % of the soil. Studies on Ap and BCg horizons comparing the amount of

  10. Soil Clay Minerals in Namibia and their Significance for the Terrestrial and Marine Past Global Change Research

    OpenAIRE

    HEINE, Klaus; Völkel, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    We delineated seven soil clay mineral provinces in Namibia. Many individual clay mineral assemblages occur in fluvial, pan, cave and other environments. Previous researchers have used clay mineral compositions as evidence for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, often without analyzing the formation, the transport and the deposition of these clay minerals. In Namibia, rates of erosion and denudation by water and wind have been very small since early Quaternary times. During the Quaternary, th...

  11. A semi-analytical solution for frost heave prediction of clay soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Bing; Ying Zhang; GuoYu Li

    2014-01-01

    Frost heave is one of the main freezing problems for construction in permafrost regions. The Konrad-Morgenstern seg-regation potential (SP) model is being used in practice for frost heave using numerical techniques. However, the heat re-lease from in-situ and migrated water in the freezing zone could result in some numerical instability, so the simulation of frost fringe is not ideal. In this study, a semi-analytical solution is developed for frost heave prediction of clay soil. The prediction results to the two tests with different freezing mode with clay soil agree well with the tested behavior, which indicates the feasibility of the solution.

  12. Clay Mineralogical Composition of Tea Garden Soils in Shandong Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jing-Long; Yang, Qi-Xia; Ming ZHAO; Liu, Ying-Xia; Egashira, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    For assistance of the appropriate plant-nutrient management practice to keep the sustainable tea production in Shandong Province, particle-size and clay mineral analyses were carried out to the surface layer of soils collected in tea gardens of Laoshan region of Qingdao City and Dahainanchun region of Jimo City, Shandong Province, People's Republic of China. Variation of the particle-size distribution with sites was small in each region. The clay content ranged from 17.6 to 22.7% for soils ...

  13. Comparing Kriging and Regression Approaches for Mapping Soil Clay Content in a diverse Danish Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev;

    2013-01-01

    Information on the spatial variability of soil texture including soil clay content in a landscape is very important for agricultural and environmental use. Different prediction techniques are available to assess and map spatial variability of soil properties, but selecting the most suitable...... technique at a given site has always been a major issue in all soil mapping applications. We studied the prediction performance of ordinary kriging (OK), stratified OK (OKst), regression trees (RT), and rule-based regression kriging (RKrr) for digital mapping of soil clay content at 30.4-m grid size using 6......,919 topsoil (0-20 cm) samples in an approximately 7,100 km2 representative area in Denmark. Eighty percent of the data were used for model calibration and the rest for validation. Twelve derivatives extracted from the digital elevation model, together with the information derived from the maps of landscape...

  14. Clay-associated organic matter in kaolinitic and smectitic soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattel-Koekkoek, E.J.W.

    2002-01-01

    The primary source of soil organic matter is plant debris of all kinds, such as dead roots, leaves and branches that enter into the soil and are then biologically decomposed at variable rates. Organic matter has many different important functions on a local and global scale. Soil organic matter is a

  15. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components Ⅲ. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca2 + -, Mg2 + -. Al3 + -and Fe3 + -saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ ≤ Fe3+ which coincided with the iucreasing aciditv of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  16. Si isotopes record cyclical dissolution and re-precipitation of pedogenic clay minerals in a podzolic soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Weis, Dominique; Lavkulich, Les; Vermeire, Marie-Liesse; Delvaux, Bruno; Barling*, Jane

    2014-05-01

    Soils are a major resource on the planet, acting as a key component for ecosystem function. The secondary minerals in the clay fraction are important players in soil biogeochemical processes as they provide a large reactive surface area. However, the origin and evolution of secondary minerals in soils are not yet fully understood. We determined the Si isotope compositions in the clay fraction of a podzolic soil chronosequence and document light 28Si enrichment during pedogenesis that increases with soil age. Relative to the original 'unweathered' clay-size minerals in deepsoil (δ30Si = -0.52±0.16 permil), the clay fraction of the topsoil eluvial horizon show less negative δ30Si values (δ30Sifrom -0.33 to -0.10 permil), while the clay fraction of the subsoil illuvial horizons is isotopically lighter (δ30Si from -0.60 to -0.84 permil). Geochemical and X-ray diffraction analyses show that the on-going enrichment in light 28Si in pedogenic minerals of illuvial subsoil horizons can only be related to the dissolution in the topsoil horizon of clay minerals previously enriched in 28Si. The 28Si enrichment in the clay fraction with pedogenesis and soil age provides consistent evidence for the cyclical dissolution and re-precipitation of pedogenic minerals. Our study shows that the successive generations of clay minerals occur over very short time scales (ca. 300 years). This is instrumental in the evolution of the clay mineral genesis in soils. This soil-forming process has implications for the modeling of soil evolution. Given the importance of clay minerals in the chemical cycles of elements, deciphering the origin of pedogenic Si in clay mineral genesis is central to a better understanding of soil development and associated terrestrial biogeochemical processes.

  17. Effects of acid atmospheric deposition on the chemical composition of loess, clay and peat soils under forest in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Klap, J.M.; Vries, de, H.J.C.; Leeters, E.E.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In addition to a survey of the soils under 150 forest stands on non-calcareous sandy soils, the chemical composition of the soils under 40 stands on non-calcareous loess soil, 30 stands on non-calcareous clay soils and 30 stands on oligotrophous peat soils have been examined, to assess the current status with repect to acidification and eutrophication, and the provide data for further studies. Only the clay soils are not yet seriously affected by the atmospheric inputs. The loess soils are ge...

  18. THE EFFECT OF REINFORCEMENT ON THE GBFS AND LIME TREATED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koteswara Rao,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available India being peninsular country has large area coming under coastal region and also it has been the habitat for considerable percentage of population. The marine clays are generally found in the coastal region of West Bengal, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Maharashtra and some parts of Gujarat. Marine or soft clays exists in these region are weak and deformative in nature. The present study deals with the strength characteristics of the marine clay collected from Kakinada Sea Port Ltd, Kakinada, A.P, India. The effect of lime on the strength characteristics of marine clay are studied in this investigation along with the reinforcement effect using geotextile as reinforcement and separator for the foundation soil bed.

  19. Zinc and copper sorption and fixation by an acid soil clay: effect of selective dissolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, N.; McBride, M.B.

    Copper and zinc sorption-desorption studies were carried out over a range of pH values using clay fractions separated from two horizons of an acid soil from New York. In the pH range of high sorption, as much as 95% of the sorbed metal could not be desorbed and thus was considered fixed. Sorption and fixation of Cu and Zn increased rapidly above pH 4 and 5, respectively, for the whole soil clays. Following removal of the oxide fraction by oxalate and citrate-dethionite extractions, sorption and fixation were reduced considerably at pH values below the onset of hydrolysis of the metals in bulk solution. Citrate-dithionite extraction was more effective than oxalate in reducing Zn sorption and fixation. These extraction procedures had less effect on the ability of the clays to sorb and fix Cu. It is concluded that microcrystalline and noncrystalline oxides in the clay fraction of this soil, representing < 20% off the clay by weight, provide reactive surfaces for the chemisorption of Cu and Zn. At low pH, adsorption at these surfaces may be the dominant mechanism of heavy metal immobilization, especially in the subsoil horizons.

  20. Modified clay sorbents for wastewater treatment and immobilization of heavy metals in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris; Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Stapkevica, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution with heavy metals is the result of both, anthropogenic and natural processes in the environment. Anthropogenic influence in great extent appears from industry, mining, treatment of metal ores and waste incineration. Contamination of soil and water can be induced by diffuse sources such as applications of agrochemicals and fertilizers in agriculture, air pollution from industry and transport, and by point sources, e.g., wastewater streams, runoff from dump sites and factories. Treatment processes used for metal removal from polluted soil and water include methodologies based on chemical precipitation, ion exchange, carbon adsorption, membrane filtration, adsorption and co-precipitation. Optimal removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous medium can be achieved by adsorption process which is considered as one of the most effective methods due to its cost-effectiveness and high efficiency. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soil also can be done with different adsorbents as the in situ technology. Use of natural and modified clay can be developed as one of the solutions in immobilization of lead, zinc, copper and other elements in polluted sites. Within the present study clay samples of different geological genesis were modified with sodium and calcium chlorides, iron oxyhydroxides and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in variable proportions of Ca/P equimolar ratio to test and compare immobilization efficiency of metals by sorption and batch leaching tests. Sorption capacity for raw clay samples was considered as relatively lower referring to the modified species of the same clay type. In addition, clay samples were tested for powder X-ray difractometry, cation exchange, surface area properties, elemental composition, as well as scanning electron microscopy pictures of clay sample surface structures were obtained. Modified clay sorbents were tested for sorption of lead as monocontaminant and for complex contamination of heavy metals. The

  1. Sand and clay mineralogy of sal forest soils of the Doon Siwalik Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh; R K Manhas; A K Tripathi; A K Raina; M K Gupta; S K Kamboj

    2011-02-01

    The peteromineralogical characterization of the soil was carried out for the 12 soil profiles exposed in the Shorea robusta dominated forests of the Siwalik forest division, Dehradun. The quartz was observed as the dominating light mineral fraction (64–80%) in all the profiles studied. Biotite, hornblende, zircon, tourmaline, rutile and opaques comprising of iron minerals constituted the heavy mineral fraction (20%). The mineralogy of both the sand and clay fractions revealed a mixed mineralogy. The clay minerals in the order of their dominance were vermiculite, illite, kaolinite and mixed layer minerals. The presence of vermiculite and illite in appreciable quantities indicates that these were synthesized from the K-rich soil solution, as orthoclase and micas were present in significant quantities in the sand minerals. The mineral suites identified in the study shows that the geological, climatological and topographical factors of the region collectively played a dominant role in their formation and transformation. After critical appraisal of the results, it may be deduced that the mineralogical composition, physicochemical properties and total elemental analysis of the soils do not show any deficiency of the bases and other plant nutrients in general. The inherent fertility of the soil is good as indicated by the sand and clay mineralogy of the soil and the biotite and feldspar together with the mica is an important source of nutrients for the vegetation in the soils of the Doon valley.

  2. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2011-01-01

    The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study was to...... and the so-called degree of P saturation (oxalate-extractable P on iron and aluminum minerals). Because higher colloidal P concentration was countered by a lower colloidal leaching, the total amount of leached P stayed remarkably constant along the natural clay gradient.......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...

  3. Modeling Air Permeability in Variably Saturated Soil from Two Natural Clay Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per;

    2013-01-01

    Understanding soil–gas phase properties and processes is important for finding solutions to critical environmental problems such as greenhouse gas emissions and transport of gaseous-phase contaminants in soils. Soil–air permeability, ka (μm2), is the key parameter governing advective gas movement...... measurements from two Danish arable fields, each located on natural clay gradients, this study presents a pore tortuosity–disconnectivity analysis to characterize the soil–gas phase. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of soil–moisture condition, clay content, and other potential...... drivers of soil texture and structure on soil-gas phase characteristics based on a ka–based pore tortuosity parameter, Xa [= log(ka/ka,1000)/log(ɛ/ɛ,1000)]. Results showed that Xa did not vary significantly with soil matric potential (in the range of –10 to –1000 cm H2O), but the average Xa across...

  4. Effect of potassium on fixation of ammonium by clay minerals in different soil layers

    OpenAIRE

    , Agelda Ajazi; Liri Miho; Aida Bani; , Ardian Maçi

    2013-01-01

    In intensive agriculture systems, efficient nutrient use is necessary for high crop yields as well as for sustainable environment management. Fixation of NH4+ and K+ by soil clays affect N and K availability to plants. Latest studies indicates that non-exchangeable NH4+, may affect crop productivity and soil N dynamics more than previously thought. An incubation study with K2SO4 and NH4NO3 was conducted to evaluate NH4+ and K+ fixation in two southern Albanian soils. Soils contained significa...

  5. Effect of clay minerals on the stabilization of black cotton and lateritic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem associated with black cotton and lateritic soils because of the swelling-shrinkage property of their constituent clay minerals were investigated. Samples of black cotton lateritic soils were collected from different parts of Kenya. The samples were analysed for their mineral compositions and later treated with hydrated lime in order to eliminate the swelling shrinkage behaviour. The samples were subsequently tested for their engineering properties in a soil mechanics laboratory using shear box and Casagrande apparatus. It was found that the chemical treatment of the soils with hydrated lime removes their plastic property and improves their shear strength. (author)

  6. Effects of clay amendment on adsorption and desorption of copper in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, X.; Stagnitti, F.; Allinson, G.; Turoczy, N.; Li, P.; LeBlanc, M.; Cann, M.A.; Doerr, S.H.; Steenhuis, M.M.; Parlange, J.Y.; Rooij, de G.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an important micronutrient and trace amounts are essential for crop growth. However, high concentrations of copper will produce toxic effects. Australia is increasingly developing production of crops in water repellent soils. Clay amendment, a common amelioration techniques used in Austral

  7. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  8. Modeling selenite adsorption envelopes on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenite adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum and iron oxides, clay minerals: kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite, and 45 surface and subsurface soil samples from the Southwestern and Midwestern regions of the USA as a function of solution pH. Selenite adsorption decreased ...

  9. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy clay soil were investigated by measuring nitrogen input, and nitrate concentrations in groundwater and drain discharge for two years. A bromide tracer was applied to study solute transport mechanisms. Nitrate transport in the

  10. Simulation of pesticide leaching in a cracking clay soil with the PEARL model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza, R.P.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2005-01-01

    Testing of pesticide leaching models is important to increase confidence in their use in pesticide registration procedures world-wide. The chromatographic PEARL model was tested against the results of a field leaching study on a cracking clay soil with a tracer (bromide), a mobile pesticide (bentazo

  11. Peculiarities of strength and deformability properties of clay soils in districts of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimenko, Sergey; Efimenko, Vladimir; Sukhorukov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The article demonstrates the methodology of the substantiation of the calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability characteristics of clay subgrade soils for the design of pavements by strength conditions in II, III, and IV road-climatic zones in West Siberia. The main purpose of the work is to ensure the quality of the design of roads in newly developed regions of Russia. To achieve this goal the following problems have been solved: the dislocation of boundary lines of road-climatic zones has been specified, zoning of the investigated territory for the design of roads has been detailed; regularities of changes in strength and deformability characteristics of clay subgrade soils of their moisture have been established; the territorial normalization of the calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability of clay subgrade soils in relation to the allocated road districts has been carried out. Specification of boundary lines of road-climatic zones has been implemented on the basis of the taxonomic system "zone-subzone-road district". The calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability characteristics of clay soils, established and differentiated according to road-climatic zones, will ensure the required level of the reliability of transport infrastructure facilities during the life cycle of roads.

  12. COMPARISON OF GLYPHOSATE PERSISTENCE IN CLAY SOIL ON NO-TILLED AND AUTUMN PLOUGHED PLOTS

    OpenAIRE

    Petruneva, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    The present work was based on the analysis of glyphosate concentrations in six soil layers after continuous multiple applications of herbicide products and various sampling times during the study period of 2010−2012, and aimed to contribute to a better recognition of the glyphosate persistence in clay soil. Two tillage methods (conventional tillage and no-till) were carried out in two replicates on the experimental field located in Jokioinen, South-Western Finland. This experiment was impo...

  13. Influence of cracking clays on satellite observed and model simulated soil moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Liu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertisols are clay soils that are common in the monsoonal and dry warm regions of the world. A defining feature of these soils is the development of shrinking cracks during dry periods, the effects of which are not described in land surface models nor considered in the surface soil moisture estimation from passive microwave satellite observations. To investigate the influence of this process we compared the soil moisture (θ in m3 m−3 from AMSR-E observations and the Community Land Model (CLM simulations over vertisols across mainland Australia. Both products agree reasonably well during wet seasons. However, during dry periods, AMSR-E θ falls below values for surrounding non-clays, while CLM simulations are higher. The impacts of soil property used in the AMSR-E algorithm, vegetation density and rainfall patterns were investigated, but do not explain the observed θ patterns. Analysis of the retrieval model suggests that the most likely reason for the low AMSR-E θ is the increase in soil porosity and surface roughness through cracking. CLM does not consider the behavior of cracking clay, including the further loss of moisture from soil and extremely high infiltration rates that would occur when cracks develop. Analyses show that the corresponding water fluxes can be different when cracks occur and therefore modeled evaporation, surface temperature, surface runoff and groundwater recharge should be interpreted with caution. Introducing temporally dynamic roughness and soil porosity into retrieval algorithms and adding a "cracking clay" module into models, respectively, may improve the representation of vertisol hydrology.

  14. [Occurrence relationship between iron minerals and clay minerals in net-like red soils: evidence from X-ray diffraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Han, Weni; Ma, Yu-Bo; Li, Rong-Biao

    2013-04-01

    The high purity of clay minerals is a key factor to reconstruct the palaeoclimate in clay mineralogy, however, the existence of iron minerals (such as goethite and hematite) and organics lead to the intergrowth of clay minerals and other minerals, producing other mineral impurities in enriched clay minerals. Although the removal of organics in soil sediments has been fully investigated, the occurrence state of iron minerals remains controversial, hindering the preparation of high-purity clay minerals. Therefore, the occurrence relationship of iron minerals and clay minerals in Jiujiang net-like red soils of the middle to lower reaches of the Yangtze River was investigated using the sequential separation method, which provided some implications for the removal of iron minerals in soil sediments. The results indicated that goethite and hematite were mostly absorbed on the surface of hydroxy-interlayered smectite and illite in the form of films, and the rest were absorbed by kaolinite.

  15. Multisensor on-the-go mapping of readily dispersible clay, particle size and soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaene, Guillaume; Niedźwiecki, Jacek; Papierowska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Particle size fractions affect strongly the physical and chemical properties of soil. Readily dispersible clay (RDC) is the part of the clay fraction in soils that is easily or potentially dispersible in water when small amounts of mechanical energy are applied to soil. The amount of RDC in the soil is of significant importance for agriculture and environment because clay dispersion is a cause of poor soil stability in water which in turn contributes to soil erodibility, mud flows, and cementation. To obtain a detailed map of soil texture, many samples are needed. Moreover, RDC determination is time consuming. The use of a mobile visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) platform is proposed here to map those soil properties and obtain the first detailed map of RDC at field level. Soil properties prediction was based on calibration model developed with 10 representative samples selected by a fuzzy logic algorithm. Calibration samples were analysed for soil texture (clay, silt and sand), RDC and soil organic carbon (SOC) using conventional wet chemistry analysis. Moreover, the Veris mobile sensor platform is also collecting electrical conductivity (EC) data (deep and shallow), and soil temperature. These auxiliary data were combined with VIS-NIR measurement (data fusion) to improve prediction results. EC maps were also produced to help understanding RDC data. The resulting maps were visually compared with an orthophotography of the field taken at the beginning of the plant growing season. Models were developed with partial least square regression (PLSR) and support vector machine regression (SVMR). There were no significant differences between calibration using PLSR or SVMR. Nevertheless, the best models were obtained with PLSR and standard normal variate (SNV) pretreatment and the fusion with deep EC data (e.g. for RDC and clay content: RMSECV = 0,35% and R2 = 0,71; RMSECV = 0,32% and R2 = 0,73 respectively). The best models were used to predict soil properties from the

  16. Reactive Clay Minerals in a land use sequence of disturbed soils of the Belgian Loam Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Lucia; Vandevenne, Floor; Ronchi, Benedicta; Meire, Patrick; Govers, Gerard; Struyf, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Clay minerals play a key role in soil biogeochemistry. They can stabilize organic matter, improve water storage, increase cation exchange capacity of the soil (CEC) and lower nutrient leaching. Phytoliths - the biogenic silica bodies (BSi) deposited in cell walls of plants - are important Si pools in soil horizons due to their higher solubility compared to minerals. They provide the source of Si for plant uptake in short time scales, as litter dissolves within soils. In a recent study, we analyzed the BSi pool differences across a set of different land uses (forests, pastures, croplands) in 6 long-term disturbed (multiple centuries) soil sites in the Belgium Loam Belt. Results from a simultaneous chemical extraction in 0.5M NaOH of Si and Al, showed that soils were depleted in the BSi pool while showing high levels of reactive secondary clay minerals, mainly in the deeper horizons and especially in the forests and the croplands. During the extraction, clays were similar in reactivity to the biogenic pool of phytoliths. In order to study the kinetics in a more natural environment, batch dissolution experiments were conducted. Samples from different soil depths for each land use site (0.5 g) were mixed with 0.5 L of demineralised water modified to pH 4, 7 and 10. Subsamples of 2 ml were taken during 3 months. In the end of the period, results for pH 7 showed that in the pastures, where reactive clays were almost absent, the ratio Si/RSi (defined as the Si concentration in the end of the batch experiment divided by the reactive silica extracted from the soil with the alkaline extraction) was lower than 0.005%. The same ratio was higher in the mineral horizons of forests (Si/RSi>0.01%) and croplands (0.005% < Si/RSi <0.01%) where clay minerals were the dominant fraction. These preliminary results highlight the clay minerals' strong potential for Si mobilization. More attention should be paid to this important fraction as it can contribute strongly to Si availability

  17. Distinguishing black carbon from biogenic humic substances in soil clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, D.A.; Chappell, M.A.; Martens, D.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thompson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most models of soil humic substances include a substantial component of aromatic C either as the backbone of humic heteropolymers or as a significant component of supramolecular aggregates of degraded biopolymers. We physically separated coarse (0.2-2.0????m e.s.d.), medium (0.02-0.2????m e.s.d.), and fine (> 0.02????m e.s.d.) clay subfractions from three Midwestern soils and characterized the organic material associated with these subfractions using 13C-CPMAS-NMR, DTG, SEM-EDX, incubations, and radiocarbon age. Most of the C in the coarse clay subfraction was present as discrete particles (0.2-5????m as seen in SEM images) of black carbon (BC) and consisted of approximately 60% aromatic C, with the remainder being a mixture of aliphatic, anomeric and carboxylic C. We hypothesize that BC particles were originally charcoal formed during prairie fires. As the BC particles aged in soil their surfaces were oxidized to form carboxylic groups and anomeric and aliphatic C accumulated in the BC particles either by adsorption of dissolved biogenic compounds from the soil solution or by direct deposition of biogenic materials from microbes living within the BC particles. The biogenic soil organic matter was physically separated with the medium and fine clay subfractions and was dominated by aliphatic, anomeric, and carboxylic C. The results indicate that the biogenic humic materials in our soils have little aromatic C, which is inconsistent with the traditional heteropolymer model of humic substances.

  18. Assessment of fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in present study the fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil was investigated through its adsorption and leaching using hplc. Experimental results revealed that thiodicarb follows first order kinetic with rate constant value of 0.711 h-1 and equilibrium study showed that freundlich model was best fitted with multilayer adsorption capacity 3.749 mol/g and adsorption intensity 1.009. Therefore, adsorption of thiodicarb was multilayer, reversible and non-ideal. Leaching study has indicated intermediate mobility of thiodicarb with water due to its solubility, while field study showed the non-leacher nature. However both adsorption and leaching were heavily affected by soil characteristics. As the soil taken was sandy clay loam hence due to clay texture adsorption was higher because of vacant sites existing and greater surface area. For this the pesticide has remained adsorbed in above 20 cm soil layer as clearly seen from field study, minor amount was recorded in third layer of soil having 21-30 cm depth. The leached amount of thiodicarb in first and last part of water was 1.075 and 0.003 ng/ mu l. The general trend observed for adsorption in column and field soil was decreased downwards from 2.027 to 0.618 and 5.079 to 0.009 ng/mu l. (author)

  19. Assessment of Fate of Thiodicarb Pesticide in Sandy Clay Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bajeer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study the fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil was investigated through its adsorption and leaching using HPLC. Experimental results revealed that thiodicarb follows first order kinetic with rate constant value of 0.711 h-1 and equilibrium study showed that Freundlich model was best fitted with multilayer adsorption capacity 3.749 mol/g and adsorption intensity 1.009. Therefore, adsorption of thiodicarb was multilayer, reversible and non-ideal. Leaching study has indicated intermediate mobility of thiodicarb with water due to its solubility, while field study showed the non-leacher nature. However both adsorption and leaching were heavily affected by soil characteristics. As the soil taken was sandy clay loam hence due to clay texture adsorption was higher because of vacant sites existing and greater surface area. For this the pesticide has remained adsorbed in above 20 cm soil layer as clearly seen from field study, minor amount was recorded in third layer of soil having 21-30 cm depth. The leached amount of thiodicarb in first and last part of water was 1.075 and 0.003 ng/µl. The general trend observed for adsorption in column and field soil was decreased downwards from 2.027 to 0.618 and 5.079 to 0.009 ng/µl.

  20. THE EFFECT OF MIXING WITH ORGANIC SOIL ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A COMPACTED CLAY LOAM SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah BARAN; BENDER, Damla; ÖZKAN, İlhami

    1996-01-01

    In this research, the effect of organic soil on changes in total pore space, aeration porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam were investigated. By adding organic soil at rates of 0 %, 1 %, 2 % and 4 % to soil, mixtures were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2, 0.21 kg/cm2, 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.95 kg/cm2 Some physical properties of compacted soil were determined. Compaction decreased total pore space, areation porosity, available water content...

  1. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk.

  2. Effects of iron and aluminum oxides and clay content on penetration resistance of five Greek soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Stefanou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of amorphous and crystalline iron (Fe and aluminum (Al oxides and oxy-hydroxides as well as clay on soil penetration resistance of five Greek soils, as a function of soil water suction was studied for the whole range of soil moisture. The soils tested were of loamy texture and were collected from cultivated and non-cultivated areas of north and central Greece (Macedonia and Thessaly. The study aimed at understanding the role of the above mentioned soil components on penetration resistance. The findings showed that the increase of iron and aluminum oxides and oxy-hydroxides content resulted in an increase of soil penetration resistance and the relationships between them were significant. Crystalline iron forms found to have a more profound effect on penetration resistance as compared to amorphous iron forms. Finally, positive and significant relationships were also found between penetration resistance and clay content. However, it is not entirely clear which of the two soil components plays the most important role in penetration resistance changes in soils.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM CHLORIDE ON THE REINFORCED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    OpenAIRE

    Koteswara Rao; D J. Purna Chandra Rao

    2011-01-01

    Weak marine soil deposits have been found both on the coast and in several offshore areas spread over many parts of the world. When clay particles precipitate in salt water, there is a tendency for the clayparticles to flocculate and stick together giving rise to some sort of edge-to-face arrangement. As a result, clay, silt, and fine sand particles settle almost at the same rate and the final sediment formed consists of particles with a very loose card house-like structure. Hence the marine ...

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM CHLORIDE ON THE REINFORCED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koteswara Rao,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Weak marine soil deposits have been found both on the coast and in several offshore areas spread over many parts of the world. When clay particles precipitate in salt water, there is a tendency for the clayparticles to flocculate and stick together giving rise to some sort of edge-to-face arrangement. As a result, clay, silt, and fine sand particles settle almost at the same rate and the final sediment formed consists of particles with a very loose card house-like structure. Hence the marine sediments can be considered loose sediments, usually formed with high void ratios. Problems are associated with these fine-grained soils deposited at a soft consistency. Fine-grained soils are very sensitive to changes in the stress system, moisture content and system chemistry of the pore fluid. In addition to these, the problems arising out ofhigh compressibility and low shear strength of these weak marine deposits expose geotechnical engineers to considerable changes in the construction of various coastal and offshore structures. In this present investigation, the performance of the potassium chloride on the strength characteristics of the marine clay has been studied and also the reinforcement effect on the improvement of load bearing capacity of the KCl treated marine clay has been studied.

  5. Competitive sorption between glyphosphate and inorganic phosphate on clay minerals and low organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic phosphate may influence the adsorption of glyphosate to soil surface sites. It has been postulated that glyphosphate sorption is dominated by the phosphoric acid moiety, therefore, inorganic phosphate could compete with glyphosate for surface sorption sites. Sorption of glyphosate is examined in low organic carbon systems where clay minerals dominate the available adsorption sites using 32P-labeled phosphate and 14C-labeled glyphosate to track sorption. Glyphosate sorption was found to be strongly dependent on phosphate additions. Isotherms were generally of the L type, which is consistent with a limited number of surface sites. Most sorption on whole soils could be accounted for by sorption observed on model clays of the same mineral type as found in the soils. (author)

  6. Water retention of rigid soils from a two-factor model for clay

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    Water retention is one of the key soil characteristics. Available models of soil water retention relate to the curve-fitting type. The objective of this work is to suggest a physical model of water retention (drying branch) for soils with a rigid matrix. "Physical" means the prediction based on the a priori measured or estimated soil parameters with a clear physical meaning. We rely on the two-factor model of clay that takes into account the factors of capillarity and shrinkage. The key points of the model to be proposed are some weak pseudo shrinkage that the rigid soils demonstrate according to their experimental water retention curves, and some specific properties of the rigid grain matrix. The three input parameters for prediction of soil water retention with the rigid grain matrix include inter-grain porosity, as well as maximum and minimum grain sizes. The comparison between measured and predicted sand water retention curves for four different sands is promising.

  7. Removal of MTBE from a clay soil using electrokinetic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabragh, A R; Bordbar, A T; Ghaziani, F; Javadi, A A

    2016-01-01

    Remediation of a soil contaminated with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was studied by using the electrokinetic technique. A series of experimental tests were carried out on contaminated soil in an electro-osmotic apparatus at different applied gradients of voltage and time. The tests were conducted with distilled water and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) solution as electrolyte. During each test the values of pH at anode and cathode reservoirs and also the discharge from cathode were measured. At the end of each test a number of soil samples were extracted from the middle of the soil at different distances from the anode and the removal of contaminant was measured by a gas chromatography apparatus. The results indicate that with EDTA as electrolyte the highest efficiency for removal of MTBE is achieved with 2.0 V/cm gradient and in the duration of 14 days. In addition, EDTA causes the values of pH to increase and decrease in the cathode and anode reservoirs, respectively. It also decreases the effluent and electro-osmotic permeability in comparison with distilled water. Experimental data were analysed by ANOVA and t-test methods. These statistical analyses showed significant difference (at 5% level) between the reference and other tests. PMID:26787321

  8. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdi, Noureddine, E-mail: nouryhamdi@gmail.com [Centre National des Recherches en Science des Materiaux, Borj Cedria Techno-Park, B.P. 95-2050, Hammam Lif, Tunis (Tunisia); Srasra, Ezzeddine [Centre National des Recherches en Science des Materiaux, Borj Cedria Techno-Park, B.P. 95-2050, Hammam Lif, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  9. Time and frequency GPR waveforms analysis for clay content evaluation in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, F.; Patriarca, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical behaviour of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which exerts some considerable effects in many applications in the fields of civil engineering, geology and environmental engineering. This study focuses on pavement engineering, but the approach can be extended to other purposes. The presence of clay in the bearing structural layers of pavements frequently causes damages and defects, such as transversal and longitudinal cracks, deformations and rutting. Consequently, the road safety and operability decrease, while the expected number of accidents increases. In this work Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) laboratory inspections are carried out in order to predict the presence of clay in pavement structural layers. Data are post-processed in the frequency domain, according to the Rayleigh scattering method based on the Fresnel theory. This new technique can be supported by other survey methods, improving the quality of the results. Analysis are carried out using two different GPR systems. A Radar is used with ground-coupled antennae in a bistatic configuration and common offset; the transmitter and receiver are linked by optic fiber electronic modules and operate at 500 MHz central frequency. The received signal is sampled in the time domain at time steps of 7.8125 x 10-2 ns. A Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) acquires ultra-wide band data in a bandwidth from 500 MHz to 3000 MHz. The signal is sampled in the frequency domain with approximately 1.56 MHz frequency steps. A double-ridged broadband horn antenna is connected via a high-quality coaxial cable to the VNA pulse generator and illuminates the analyzed target in a monostatic off-ground configuration. The experimental setting required the use of road material, typically employed for sub-grade and sub-base layers. Three kind of soils, classified as A1, A2, A3 by AASHTO are used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated boxes. Bentonite clay is gradually added from 2% to

  10. Influence of Amang (Tin Tailing) on Geotechnical Properties of Clay Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amang or tin tailing is commonly found in the vicinity of disused mining area and responsible in downgrading the water quality, landscape and mechanical behaviour of soils. It was generated from extraction process of separating valuable metal from particular ore. This paper presents the geotechnical characteristics of amang-contaminated clay soil. The geotechnical properties of uncontaminated soils were studied in order to compare to that of amang contaminated soils. The base soil used in this study represents completely weathered horizon of meta sedimentary rock. Meanwhile, tin tailing sample was taken from the disused mine at Sungai Lembing, Pahang. The geotechnical characterisations of base soil and contaminated soils were determined based on consistency index, compaction behaviour, hydraulic conductivity and undrained shear strength (UU tests). Contaminated soil samples were prepared by adding 5, 10 and 20 % of tailing, based on dry weigh of the studied base soil. The results from the particle size distribution analysis showed that residual soil from meta sedimentary rock comprised 42.6 % clay, 32.2 % silt and 25.2 % sand whilst tailing was dominated by 98 % of sand fraction. XRD analysis indicated the presence of quartz, kaolinite and muscovite minerals in the studied soil. The specific gravity of soil used is 2.67 and the pH is 3.88. Tailing found to have higher specific gravity of 3.37. The consistency index of contaminated soils showed that liquid limit, wL and plastic limit, wP decreased with the increase in the percentage of tailing added to the soil samples. The value of maximum dry density, ρ dry max increased while optimum moisture content decreased due to the increase in tailing content in soil sample. The permeability of contaminated soil also increased with the increase in tailing contents ranged from 19.8 cm/ hr to 23.8 cm/ hr. The undrained shear strength, Cu, of contaminated soil decreased from 646 kPa (5 % of tailing) to 312 kPa (20 % of

  11. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  12. Enrichment of trace elements in the clay size fraction of mining soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Patrícia; Valente, Teresa; Braga, M Amália Sequeira; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L

    2016-04-01

    Reactive waste dumps with sulfide minerals promote acid mine drainage (AMD), which results in water and soil contamination by metals and metalloids. In these systems, contamination is regulated by many factors, such as mineralogical composition of soil and the presence of sorption sites on specific mineral phases. So, the present study dedicates itself to understanding the distribution of trace elements in different size fractions (clay size fraction. Hence, the higher degree of contamination by toxic elements, especially arsenic in Penedono as well as the role of clay minerals, jarosite, and goethite in retaining trace elements has management implications. Such information must be carefully thought in the rehabilitation projects to be planned for both waste dumps. PMID:25712883

  13. Traditional Underground Grain Storage in Clay Soils in Sudan Improved by Recent Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla, AT.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the central clay plain of the Sudan, traditional subsistence farmers and small farmers that also produce for local markets want to keep the region near food self-sufficiency. They combine annual production of sorghum with underground pit storage of part of the harvest. With increasing climate variability this food security is coming more and more under pressure. Farmers recently experimented with pit innovations that would allow storage for more than one season. These innovations were quantified and further improvements were suggested. It was found that in the most abundantly occurring cracking clay soils, wide shallow pits, using thick chaff linings, with wider above ground soil caps, are most suitable for longer term storage.

  14. Enrichment of trace elements in the clay size fraction of mining soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Patrícia; Valente, Teresa; Braga, M Amália Sequeira; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L

    2016-04-01

    Reactive waste dumps with sulfide minerals promote acid mine drainage (AMD), which results in water and soil contamination by metals and metalloids. In these systems, contamination is regulated by many factors, such as mineralogical composition of soil and the presence of sorption sites on specific mineral phases. So, the present study dedicates itself to understanding the distribution of trace elements in different size fractions (clay size fraction. Hence, the higher degree of contamination by toxic elements, especially arsenic in Penedono as well as the role of clay minerals, jarosite, and goethite in retaining trace elements has management implications. Such information must be carefully thought in the rehabilitation projects to be planned for both waste dumps.

  15. Carbon-Nitrogen Relationships during the Humification of Cellulose in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1981-01-01

    the 2 soils with the high content of clay had a relatively high content of available unlabeled soil-N which was used for synthesis of metabolic material. The proportionate retention of labeled C for a given soil was largely independent of the size of the amendments, whereas the proportionate amount...... of labeled N incorporated into organic forms increased in the clay-rich soils with increasing size of amendments. Of the total labeled C remaining in the soils after the 1st mo. of incubation 50-70% was acid hydrolyzable, compared to 80-100% of the total remaining labeled organic N. This relationship held...... throughout the incubation and was independent of the size of the amendment and of the temperature of incubation. During the 2nd, 3rd and 4th yr of incubation the half-life of labeled amino acid-N in the soils was longer than the half-life of labeled amino acid-C, presumably due to immobilization reactions...

  16. Treatability of TCE-contaminated clay soils at the Rinsewater Impoundment, Michoud Assembly Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, A.J.; Gilbert, V.P.; Hewitt, J.D.; Koran, L.J. Jr.; Jennings, H.L.; Donaldson, T.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Marshall, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted treatability studies on clay soils taken from the Rinsewater Impoundment at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Michoud Assembly Facility. The soils are contaminated with up to 3000 mg/kg of trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, less than 10 mg/kg of trans-1,2-DCE, and less than 10 mg/kg of vinyl chloride. The goal of the study described in this report was to identify and test in situ technologies and/or develop a modified treatment regime to remove or destroy volatile organic compounds from the contaminated clay soils. Much of the work was based upon previous experience with mixed-region vapor stepping and mixed-region peroxidation. Laboratory treatments were performed on intact soil cores that were taken from contaminated areas at the Rinsewater Impoundment at MAF. Treatability studies were conducted on soil that was close to in situ conditions in terms of soil structure and contaminant concentrations.

  17. Soil moisture distribution over time in a clay loam soil in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Nishori; Besnik Gjongecaj; Deme Abazi

    2013-01-01

    Studying the soil moisture distribution over time in a given soil profile is the object of the present study. The way the soil moisture gets distributed over soil profile depends particularly on the soil texture and on the soil suction gradients developed. However, it changes continuously over time for a given soil depth. The method of determining the soil moisture distribution over time is based on the measuring of soil moisture suctions developed and the soil moisture contents in various ti...

  18. Bulk and clay mineral composition indicate origin of terra rossa soils in Western Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Durn, Goran; Ćorić, Radica; Tadej, Neven; Barudžija, Uroš; Rubinić, Vedran; Husnjak, Stjepan

    2014-01-01

    The B horizons of terra rossa soils developed on three different carbonate lithologies having variable insoluble residue contents were studied in Western Herzegovina. Comparison of  their composition and properties illustrates to what extent mineral (especially clay mineral assemblage) and particle size composition of those horizons and the insoluble residue of the underlying carbonate rocks can be used as indicators of the polygenetic nature of terra rossa in this region. Terra rossa B horiz...

  19. The role of clay minerals on the hardsetting properties of soils in the Carnarvon horticultural district of Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigated the role of clay minerals on the hardsetting properties of soils used for intensive irrigated horticulture in the Carnarvon horticultural district of Western Australia. Hardsetting soils break down when wetted due to a combination of slaking and dispersion processes, resulting in a structureless mass of soil when dry. Soil samples were studied from several horizons from six profiles with hardsetting problems. On bulk samples, we measured the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and following treatment with sodium (Na), measured the tensile strength of (Na saturated) remoulded cores. On clay separates we measured the clay mineralogy using X-ray . diffraction (XRD) analysis and CEC by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis after barium (Ba) saturation. Samples were also investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile strength of the Na saturated remoulded cores was highly correlated (p ≤ 0.001) to both clay % and CEC of the soil. Lugo (1975) working with dried briquettes of soil materials produced similar results, and demonstrated that the increase in tensile strength adversely affected the stand of plants. When the tensile strength of the remoulded cores was compared to the CEC of the clay fractions, the soil clays with higher CEC had greater tensile strength than soils lower in CEC (p=0.09). Initial qualitative XRD results using the SIROQUANT method indicated that the soil clays mainly consisted of kaolinite with some illite, but very little smectite content. However the measured CEC's (by Ba saturation) were higher than expected and could not be explained on the basis of the illite and kaolinite contents. It was therefore inferred that interstratified smectite was also present. Using the proprietary software 'Traces', and a Pseudo-Voigt peak-shape algorithm, each XRD pattern was fitted with calculated peaks for the clay minerals present. Comparison with calculated patterns for interstratified illite/smectite (I/S) using

  20. Evaluation of clay content in soils for pavement engineering applications using GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Patriarca, Claudio; Benedetto, Andrea; Slob, Evert C.; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-04-01

    Clay content significantly influences the mechanical behavior of soils, thereby playing an important role in many fields of applications such as civil engineering, geology and agriculture. In the area of pavement engineering, clay content in structural bearing courses of pavement frequently causes damages and defects, such as transversal and longitudinal cracks, or other faults. The main consequence is a lowering of both the road safety and operability, with the number of expected accidents increasing. In this study, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) laboratory tests were carried out to predict the clay amount in pavement structural layers under different clay and moisture conditions. GPR data processing is performed using two different methods. The first method is based on the Fresnel theory and focuses on the Rayleigh scattering of the radar waves. The approach is based on a different scattering of the various components of the frequency spectrum, mostly depending on both the soil texture and variation in soil moisture content. For the application of this method, we used a pulse radar with ground-coupled, 500 MHz centre-frequency antennas in a common offset, bistatic configuration. The transmitter and receiver were linked by optic fiber electronic modules. The second method is based on full-waveform inversion of the ultra wideband radar data. In particular, a specific radar-antenna electromagnetic model is used to filter out antenna effects and antenna-medium interactions from the raw radar data and retrieve the response of the soil only, expressed in terms of a layered medium Green's function. To estimate the medium geometrical and electrical values, an optimization inverse problem is formulated. For the application of that second method, we used a vector network analyzer (VNA) as continuous-wave stepped-frequency radar system to acquire data in the 500-3000 MHz frequency range. A doubled-ridged broadband horn antenna operating in far-field conditions was used as

  1. IMPACT OF POLLUTION ON THE CLAY MINERALOGICAL COMPOSITION OF SOME SOILS FROM ZLATNA AREA (ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Craciun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Zlatna area is a high polluted zone with heavy metals due to industrial activity (extraction and processing of non-ferrous area. In spite of the fact that industrial activity was stoped for 2-3 years, the effect of pollution are still obvious. The aim of this paper is to make evident some aspects concerning the impact of pollution on the mineralogical composition of the clay fraction (below 2μ from some soils belonging to dystric cambisol and luvisol type. From the chemical point of view, the effect of pollution is the acidifiation and depletion of bases, reflected by the decrease of values of indices which express soil reaction (pH and soil exchange properties, especially in the surface horizon. From mineralogical point of view, the acidifiation determines a strong alteration of primary minerals (micas and feldspars and just of secondary minerals (illite, evolution beeing towards hydroxy interlayered minerals (intergrade and kaolinite. As result of this alteration the content of kaolinite increases, achiving a double content in the surface horizon of some polluted soils. Sometimes kaolinite becomes the dominant mineral in the clay fraction of some strong polluted soil.

  2. Impact of clay mineral on air oxidation of PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Kouadio, Olivier; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Faure, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    This work investigated the impact of a clay mineral (bentonite) on the air oxidation of the solvent extractable organic matters (EOMs) and the PAHs from contaminated soils. EOMs were isolated from two coking plant soils and mixed with silica sand or bentonite. These samples, as well as raw soils and bentonite/soil mixtures, were oxidized in air at 60 and 100 °C for 160 days. Mineralization was followed by measuring the CO2 produced over the experiments. EOM, polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC), including PAH, contents were also determined. Oxidation led to a decrease in EOM contents and PAH concentrations, these diminutions were enhanced by the presence of bentonite. Transfer of carbon from EOM to insoluble organic matter pointed out a condensation phenomenon leading to a stabilization of the contamination. Higher mineralization rates, observed during the oxidation of the soil/bentonite mixtures, seem to indicate that this clay mineral had a positive influence on the transformation of PAC into CO2.

  3. Determination of essential and toxic elements in clay soil commonly consumed by pregnant women in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwalongo, D.; Mohammed, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    A habit of eating clay soil especially among pregnant women is a common practice in Tanzania. This practice known as geophagy might introduce toxic elements in the consumer's body to endanger the health of the mother and her child. Therefore it is very important to have information on the elemental composition of the eaten soil so as to assess the safety nature of the habit. In this study 100 samples of clay soil, which were reported to be originating from five regions in Tanzania and are consumed by pregnant women were analyzed to determine their levels of essential and toxic elements. The analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescent technique (EDXRF) of Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, Arusha. Essential elements Fe, Zn, Cu, Se and Mn and toxic elements As, Pb, Co, Ni, U and Th were detected in concentrations above WHO permissible limits in some of the samples. The results from this study show that the habit of eating soil is exposing the pregnant mothers and their children to metal toxicity which is detrimental to their health. Hence, further actions should be taken to discourage the habit of eating soil at all levels.

  4. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy study of mineral-organic matter associations in pasture soil clay fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Karunakaran, Chithra; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-06-17

    There is a growing acceptance that associations with soil minerals may be the most important overarching stabilization mechanism for soil organic matter. However, direct investigation of organo-mineral associations has been hampered by a lack of methods that can simultaneously characterize organic matter (OM) and soil minerals. In this study, STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at the C 1s, Ca 2p, Fe 2p, Al 1s, and Si 1s edges was used to investigate C associations with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si species in soil clay fractions from an upland pasture hillslope. Bulk techniques including C and N NEXAFS, Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, and XRD were applied to provide additional information. Results demonstrated that C was associated with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si with no separate phase in soil clay particles. In soil clay particles, the pervasive C forms were aromatic C, carboxyl C, and polysaccharides with the relative abundance of carboxyl C and polysaccharides varying spatially at the submicrometer scale. Only limited regions in the soil clay particles had aliphatic C. Good C-Ca spatial correlations were found for soil clay particles with no CaCO3, suggesting a strong role of Ca in organo-mineral assemblage formation. Fe EXAFS showed that about 50% of the total Fe in soils was contained in Fe oxides, whereas Fe-bearing aluminosilicates (vermiculite and Illite) accounted for another 50%. Fe oxides in the soil were mainly crystalline goethite and hematite, with lesser amounts of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite. XRD revealed that soil clay aluminosilicates were hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, Illite, and kaolinite. C showed similar correlation with Fe to Al and Si, implying a similar association of Fe oxides and aluminosilicates with organic matter in organo-mineral associations. These direct microscopic determinations can help improve understanding of organo-mineral interactions in soils.

  5. Clay content prediction using on-the-go proximal soil sensor fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabai, Salman; Knadel, Maria; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    There is a growing demand for high quality and reliable data on different soil constituents and properties in different scales. Research in the past decade has shown that traditional soil sampling cannot supply for this demand. Modern methods such as visible-near infrared (VNIR) and mid......-infrared (MIR) in the lab have already shown to be rapid, reliable, robust and low cost substitutes for traditional methods. Previous researchers have tried to use methods such as VNIR spectroscopy for on-the-go modeling of several soil constituents. However, in spite of being a highly influential parameter...... on soil usability, very few studies so far have provided robust and accurate predictions for fields with high clay content variability. An on-the-go multi-sensor platform was used to measure topsoil (25cm) VNIR spectra and temperature as well as electrical conductivity of top 30cm and top 90cm in 5 fields...

  6. The origin and early genesis of clay bands in youthful sandy soils along lake Michigan, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A beach ridge and dune complex with good radiocarbon control sampling the last 3500 radiocarbon years B.P. provides new insights on the early genesis of clay bands in sandy soils. Soil profiles were sampled by age groups, described in the field, and then subjected to laboratory analyses for particle-size distribution, pH, organic carbon, carbonate minerals, and extractable iron and manganese. This study suggests that small increases in pH, brought about by small increases in carbonate content within the soil profile, are responsible for flocculating small amounts of illuviated clay. This process, along with a transition to a greater hydraulic conductivity with soil depth due to coarser textures in any given profile, partly explains the existence and possible reason for the initiation of illuvial zones and eventually for clay-band horizons. A pronounced increase in the thickness of incipient clay-band horizons in soils older than 2300 years appears due to finer textures in the parent materials than are present in younger soils. Because of slightly reduced porosity and lower permeability, carbonates and a high pH are retained in both illuvial and eluvial horizons of some of these older soils. In addition, only in those profiles older than 2300 years do clay and iron oxide concentrations coincide and is there some suggestion of greater amounts of extractable manganese in horizons of minimum iron and clay. A pronounced segregation of clay-iron bands is not apparent at the study area but should occur in future years as additional amounts of iron and clay are deposited. ?? 1984.

  7. Effect of Polypropylene Fibers, Lime and Ceramic Additives on the Compressibility of Silty-Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiba D. Saleem

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil stabilization is widely used by geotechnical engineers in the world to increase soil strength, soil compressibility and reduce the permeability. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different materials to the silty clayey soil (i.e. polypropylene fibers, lime and ceramic and to figure out how the compressibility behave under mixture soil and these stabilized material at different percent (investigation their effect on the value of settlement. Silty clay soil it is used in this research in the geotechnical laboratories of the University of Wasit and the samples of soil are subjected to two main stress level using one-dimensional compression apparatus (i.e. 40KP and 80 KPa for both untreated and treated (stabilized soil with additives. A total of 48 hours of loading time is used and conventional reading rate for one-dimensional compression test is followed. Two main percentages (i.e. 1.5% and 3.5% from the total weight of soil specimens and they had been mixed with soil for 30 min using electrical mixer to attain a uniform soil-material mixture prior to consolidation cell preparation and loading procedure. The results of the experimental tests show that the compressibility of the treated soil specimens were decrease when the soil stabilized with these material and minimum compressibility was obtained when the polypropylene fibers at 1.5 % percentages is used at the higher stress level and 3.5% of lime-stabilized at low stress level.

  8. THE EFFECT OF MIXING WITH ORGANIC SOIL ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A COMPACTED CLAY LOAM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah BARAN

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of organic soil on changes in total pore space, aeration porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam were investigated. By adding organic soil at rates of 0 %, 1 %, 2 % and 4 % to soil, mixtures were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2, 0.21 kg/cm2, 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.95 kg/cm2 Some physical properties of compacted soil were determined. Compaction decreased total pore space, areation porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity, but in samples with the mixing rate of 4 %, all properties inspected were affected positively in all compaction levels, except available water content

  9. Ammonia transformations and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in a clay soil underlying a manure pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Baram, Shahar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Unlined manure ponds are constructed on clay soil worldwide to manage farm waste. Seepage of ammonia-rich liquor into underlying soil layers contributes to groundwater contamination by nitrate. To identify the possible processes that lead to the production of nitrate from ammonia in this oxygen-limited environment, we studied the diversity and abundance of ammonia-transforming microorganisms under an unlined manure pond. The numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria were most abundant in the top of the soil profile and decreased significantly with depth (0.5 m), correlating with soil pore-water ammonia concentrations and soil ammonia concentrations, respectively. On the other hand, the numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea were relatively constant throughout the soil profile (10(7) amoA copies per g(soil)). Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were detected mainly in the top 0.2 m. The results suggest that nitrate accumulation in the vadose zone under the manure pond could be the result of complete aerobic nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and could exist as a byproduct of anammox activity. While the majority of the nitrogen was removed within the 0.5-m soil section, possibly by combined anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, a fraction of the produced nitrate leached into the groundwater.

  10. Determination of the composition of the organic matter chemically stabilized by agricultural soil clay minerals: Spectroscopy and Density Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufqir, Sofia; Bloom, Paul; Toner, Brandy; Hatcher, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The interactions between soil organic matter and clay minerals are considered important processes because of their ability to sequester C in soil for long periods of time, and hence control C in the global C cycle when present. However, differing results have been reported regarding the composition of the soil organic matter - aromatic fractions versus aliphatic fractions - associated with clay minerals. To clarify this critical issue and better understand the C sequestration process in soils, we aimed to determine the nature of the chemically bound natural organic matter on clay surfaces, and to probe the speciation and spatial distribution of C in the soil clay nanoparticles using direct spectroscopic measurements namely solid-state CP-MAS and DP-MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). We tested the hypotheses that peptides and polysaccharides are stabilized by the smectite-illite clay while the lipids and black carbon are a separate phase; and that they are evenly distributed on clay surfaces. A soil clay fraction (5.5% organic C) was isolated from the surface of a prairie soil (Mollisol) in southwestern Minnesota, characterized by a pH 6.0, 32.5% clay content, and 3.7% organic carbon, using a sonication-sedimentation-siphoning process in distilled water. Then was subjected to density separation combined with low energy ultrasonic dispersion to separate the free organic and black C (light fraction) from the chemically bound C (heavy fraction). The XRD results indicated a dominance of interstratified smectite-illite clays in soil. The 13C-NMR spectra of the soil clay fraction suggested that polysaccharides and polypeptides are the prevailing components of the organic matter associated with the mineral clay, with only a minor component of aromatic C. The light fraction has strong alkyl C-H bands characteristic of fatty acids plus strong C-O bands characteristic of polysaccharides, including

  11. Effects of Humic Acid and Solution pH on Dispersion of Na—and Ca—Soil Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANYEQING; HUQIONGYING; 等

    1996-01-01

    Dispersed soil clays have a negative impact on soil structure and contribute to soil erosion and contaminant movement.In this study,two typical soils from the south of China were chosen for investigating roles of pH and humic acid(HA) on dispersion of soil clays.Critical flocculation concentration (CFC) of the soil clay suspension was determined by using light transmission at a wavelength of 600 nm.The results indicated that effects of pH and HA on dispersion of the soil clays were closely related to the type of the major minerals makin up the soil and to the valence of the exchangeable cations as well.At four rates of pH(4,6,8and 10),the CFC for the Na-yellow-brown soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.32 to 0.56,6.0 to 14.0,10.0 to 24.6 and 26.0 to 52.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively when Na-HA was added at the rate of from 0 to 40mgL-1,With the same Na-HA addition and three pH(6,8and 10)treatments,the CFC for the Na-red soil was incresed from 0.5 to 20.0,1.0 to 40.0 and 6.0 to 141.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively.Obviously,pH and HA has greater effects on clay dispersion of the red soil(dominated by 1:1 minerals and oxides) than on that of the yellow-brown soil(dominated by 2:1minerals).However,at three rates of pH(6,8and 10) and with the addition of Ca-HA from 0 to 40mg L-1,the CFC of the Ca-yellow-brown soil and Ca-red soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.55 to 0.81,0.75 to 1.28,0.55 to 1.45and 0.038 to 0.266.0.25 to 0.62,0.7to 1.6mmol CaCl2 L-1,respectively.So,Na-soil claye are more sensitive to pH and HA than Ca-soil clays.

  12. Study of Various Techniques for Improving Weak and Compressible Clay Soil under a High Earth Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein A.K. M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the suitability of three soil improvement techniques for the construction of a high earth embankment on thick weak and highly compressible clay soil. The eastern approach embankment of Alhalfaya Bridge on the River Nile linking Khartoum North and Omdurman cities was chosen as a case study and a comprehensive site investigation program was carried out to determine the properties the subsurface soils. The study results showed that unless the subsurface soils have been improved they may fail or undergo excessively large settlements due to the embankment construction. Three ground improvement techniques based on the principles of the “staged construction method, SCM”, “vertical sand drain, VSD” and “sand compaction piles, SCP” of embankment foundation soil treatment are discussed and evaluated. Embankment design options based on applications of the above methods have been proposed for foundation treatment to adequately support embankment loads. A method performance evaluation based on the improvement of soil properties achieved; the time required for construction and compared estimated costs criteria was made to assess the effectiveness and expected overall performance. Adoption of any of the soil improvement techniques considered depends mainly on the most critical and decisive factor governing the embankment design. Based on the overall performance for the embankment case studied, the sand drains is considered as the most appropriate improvement method followed by the sand compaction piles technique whereas the staged construction method showed the poorest overall performance.

  13. Development and evaluation of a new sorption model for organic cations in soil: contributions from organic matter and clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droge, Steven T J; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2013-12-17

    This study evaluates a newly proposed cation-exchange model that defines the sorption of organic cations to soil as a summed contribution of sorption to organic matter (OM) and sorption to phyllosilicate clay minerals. Sorption to OM is normalized to the fraction organic carbon (fOC), and sorption to clay is normalized to the estimated cation-exchange capacity attributed to clay minerals (CECCLAY). Sorption affinity is specified to a fixed medium composition, with correction factors for other electrolyte concentrations. The model applies measured sorption coefficients to one reference OM material and one clay mineral. If measured values are absent, then empirical relationships are available on the basis of molecular volume and amine type in combination with corrective increments for specific polar moieties. The model is tested using new sorption data generated at pH 6 for two Eurosoils, one enriched in clay and the other, OM, using 29 strong bases (pKa > 8). Using experimental data on reference materials for all tested compounds, model predictions for the two soils differed on average by only -0.1 ± 0.4 log units from measured sorption affinities. Within the chemical applicability domain, the model can also be applied successfully to various reported soil sorption data for organic cations. Particularly for clayish soils, the model shows that sorption of organic cations to clay minerals accounts for more than 90% of the overall affinity.

  14. Acceptable levels of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) in soils, depending on their clay and humus content and cation-exchange capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de S.; Rethfeld, H.; Driel, van W.

    1985-01-01

    Three sandy soils differing in humus content and three clay soils differing in clay content were supplied with heavy metals to determine which loading rate of each single metal should be regarded as critical from the viewpoint of crop yield and metal content dependent on soil cation exchange capacit

  15. Simulation of water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a heavy clay soil using the MACRO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Besien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dual-porosity MACRO model has been used to investigate methods of reducing leaching of isoproturon from a structured heavy clay soil. The MACRO model was applied to a pesticide leaching data-set generated from a plot scale experiment on a heavy clay soil at the Oxford University Farm, Wytham, England. The field drain was found to be the most important outflow from the plot in terms of pesticide removal. Therefore, this modelling exercise concentrated on simulating field drain flow. With calibration of field-saturated and micropore saturated hydraulic conductivity, the drain flow hydrographs were simulated during extended periods of above average rainfall, with both the hydrograph shape and peak flows agreeing well. Over the whole field season, the observed drain flow water budget was well simulated. However, the first and second drain flow events after pesticide application were not simulated satisfactorily. This is believed to be due to a poor simulation of evapotranspiration during a period of low rainfall around the pesticide application day. Apart from an initial rapid drop in the observed isoproturon soil residue, the model simulated isoproturon residues during the 100 days after pesticide application reasonably well. Finally, the calibrated model was used to show that changes in agricultural practice (deep ploughing, creating fine consolidated seed beds and organic matter applications could potentially reduce pesticide leaching to surface waters by up to 60%.

  16. Soil moisture distribution over time in a clay loam soil in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Nishori

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Studying the soil moisture distribution over time in a given soil profile is the object of the present study. The way the soil moisture gets distributed over soil profile depends particularly on the soil texture and on the soil suction gradients developed. However, it changes continuously over time for a given soil depth. The method of determining the soil moisture distribution over time is based on the measuring of soil moisture suctions developed and the soil moisture contents in various times, but in a given soil depth (internal drainage method [7]. The soil depths under investigation are four, starting from 0cm to 60cm, which means that the most important depth of soil profile is considered. Such measurements are supposed to be done over soil profile when the soil water flow is already ceased, in the conditions of preventing the evaporation [1, 7, and 9]. Therefore, to determine the soil moisture distribution over time, a plot of 8m x 6m or 48 m2 with no plants was set. The tensiometers and the electronic devices for soil moisture content measurements were installed in four soil depths. The plot was previously wetted and covered by a plastic to prevent the evaporation. In this way, it was made sure that the only possibility for water is to move internally, which gave us the opportunity to measure the changes in soil water content and in soil water suction over time. The final result showed that the dependency of soil water suction and soil moisture content over time is a power function (expressed as a semi logarithmic function, basically.

  17. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karup, Dan; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Greve, Mogens H.; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-09-01

    Solute transport through the soil matrix is non-uniform and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. Attempts have been made in previous studies to use infiltration experiments to identify the degree of preferential flow, but these attempts have often been based on small datasets or data collected from literature with differing initial and boundary conditions. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. From six agricultural fields in Denmark, 193 intact surface soil columns 20 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter were collected. The soils exhibited a wide range in texture, with clay and organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.03 to 0.41 and 0.01 to 0.08 kg kg- 1, respectively. All experiments were carried out under the same initial and boundary conditions using tritium as a conservative tracer. The breakthrough characteristics ranged from being near normally distributed to gradually skewed to the right along with an increase in the content of the mineral fines (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5% and up to 50% of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. Predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points as a function of time up to 50% of applied tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical advection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer

  18. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, E.; Tuller, M.; Møldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    vapour sorption, which can be measured within a shorter period of time, have recently been developed. Such models are often based on single-point measurements of water adsorption and do not account for sorption hysteresis or organic matter content. The present study introduces regression relationships...... for estimating clay content from hygroscopic water at different relative humidity (RH) levels while considering hysteresis and organic matter content. Continuous adsorption/desorption vapour sorption isotherm loops were measured for 150 differently textured soils with a state-of-the-art vapour sorption analyser...

  19. IMPACT OF POLLUTION ON THE CLAY MINERALOGICAL COMPOSITION OF SOME SOILS FROM ZLATNA AREA (ROMANIA)

    OpenAIRE

    C. Craciun; Alexandrina Manea; Laura Paulette; Marius Eftene; Victoria Mocanu

    2008-01-01

    Zlatna area is a high polluted zone with heavy metals due to industrial activity (extraction and processing of non-ferrous area). In spite of the fact that industrial activity was stoped for 2-3 years, the effect of pollution are still obvious. The aim of this paper is to make evident some aspects concerning the impact of pollution on the mineralogical composition of the clay fraction (below 2μ) from some soils belonging to dystric cambisol and luvisol type. From the chemical point of view, ...

  20. Dynamic compaction treatment technology research of red clay soil embankment in southern mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建华; 袁剑波; 熊虎; 陈伟

    2008-01-01

    High liquid limit soil generally adopted in expressway embankment construction of southern mountains, which often expresses some characteristics including high moisture content, high porosity ratio, low permeability, high compressibility, certain disintegration, and so on. Spring soil phenomenon and inhomogeneous compaction have effects on the quality of embankment construction, just because the water in soil is difficult to evaporate. Based on the study of reinforcement mechanism for high liquid limit soil, in situ tests for dynamic compaction treatment in Yizhang-Fengtouling expressway embankment were developed. The reliable and economical dynamic compaction treatment methods and the construction technology for large range high liquid limit soil embankment in southern mountains expressway were discussed. In the process, convenient measurement methods were adopted to evaluate the treatment effects. The test results show that the dynamic compaction method has good treatment effects on the local red clay embankment. The embankment compaction degree is improved with compactness coming to 90% around tamping pits and compactness over 95% in tamping pits interior after tamping. The bearing capacity, the physical mechanic-property and the shear strength for soil are obviously improved, which are enhanced with cohesive strength increasing over 10 kPa and compression modulus increasing over 3 MPa.

  1. Risk assessment of gas oil and kerosene contamination on some properties of silty clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, M; Shabanpor, M; Zakerinia, M; Ebrahimi, S

    2015-07-01

    Soil and ground water resource pollution by petroleum compounds and chemical solvents has multiple negative environmental impacts. The aim of this research was to investigate the impacts of kerosene and gas oil pollutants on some physical and chemical properties, breakthrough curve (BTC), and water retention curve (SWRC) of silty clay soil during a 3-month period. Therefore, some water-saturated soils were artificially contaminated in the pulse condition inside some glassy cylinders by applying half and one pore volume of these pollutants, and then parametric investigations of the SWRC were performed using RETC software for Van Genukhten and Brooks-Corey equations in the various suctions and the soil properties were determined before and after pollution during 3 months. The results showed that gas oil and kerosene had a slight effect on soil pH and caused the cumulative enhancement in the soil respiration, increase in the bulk density and organic matter, and reduction in the soil porosity and electrical and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, gas oil retention was significantly more than kerosene (almost 40%) in the soil. The survey of SWRC indicated that the contaminated soil samples had a little higher amount of moisture retention (just under 15% in most cases) compared to the unpolluted ones during this 3-month period. The parametric analysis of SWRC demonstrated an increase in the saturated water content, Θ s, from nearly 49% in the control sample to just under 53% in the polluted ones. Contaminants not only decreased the residual water content, Θ r, but also reduced the SWRC gradient, n, and amount of α parameter. The evaluation of both equations revealed more accurate prediction of SWRC's parameters by Van Genukhten compared to those of Brooks and Corey. PMID:26085279

  2. Irrigation with saline-sodic water: effects on two clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of a 4-year experiment aimed at evaluating the effect of irrigation with saline-sodic water on the soil are reported. The research was carried out at the Campus of the Agricultural Faculty of Bari University (Italy on 2 clay soils (Bologna – T1 and Locorotondo – T2. The soils were cropped to borlotto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., capsicum (Capsicum annuum L., sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., wheat (Triticum durum Desf grown in succession; the crops were irrigated with 9 saline-sodic types of water and subjected to two different leaching fractions (10% and 20% of the watering volume. The 9 solutions were obtained dissolving in de-ionised water weighted amounts of sodium chloride (NaCl and calcium chloride (CaCl2, deriving from the combination of 3 saline concentrations and 3 sodicity levels. The crops were irrigated whenever the water lost by evapotranspiration from the soil contained in the pots was equal to 30% of the soil maximum available water. The results showed that, though the soils were leached during the watering period, they showed a high salt accumulation. Consequently, the saturated soil extract electrical conductivity increased from initial values of 0.65 and 0.68 dS m-1 to 11.24 and 13.61 dS m-1 at the end of the experiment, for the soils T1 and T2, respectively. The saline concentration increase in irrigation water caused in both soils a progressive increase in exchangeable sodium, and a decrease in exchangeable calcium and non-significant variations in exchangeable potassium (K and magnesium (Mg.

  3. Measurements of the streaming potential of clay soils from tropical and subtropical regions using self-made apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Yi; Li, Jiu-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2014-09-01

    The streaming potential has been wildly used in charged parallel plates, capillaries, and porous media. However, there have been few studies involving the ζ potential of clay soils based on streaming potential measurements. A laboratory apparatus was developed in this study to measure the streaming potential (ΔE) of bulk clay soils' coupling coefficient (C) and cell resistance (R) of saturated granular soil samples. Excellent linearity of ΔE versus liquid pressure (ΔP) ensured the validity of measurements. The obtained parameters of C and R can be used to calculate the ζ potential of bulk soils. The results indicated that the ζ potentials measured by streaming potential method were significantly correlated with the ζ potentials of soil colloids determined by electrophoresis (r (2) = 0.960**). Therefore, the streaming potential method can be used to study the ζ potentials of bulk clay soils. The absolute values of the ζ potentials of four soils followed the order: Ultisol from Jiangxi > Ultisol from Anhui > Oxisol from Guangdong > Oxisol from Hainan, and this was consistent with the cation exchange capacities of these soils. The type and concentration of electrolytes affected soil ζ potentials. The ζ potential became less negative with increased electrolyte concentration. The ζ potentials were more negative in monovalent than in divalent cationic electrolyte solutions because more divalent cations were distributed in the shear plane of the diffuse layer as counter-cations on the soil surfaces than monovalent cations at the same electrolyte concentration.

  4. Interactions of Cations with Electrodialyzed Clay Fraction of Soils as Inferred from Wien Effect in Soil Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The electrical conductivities (ECs) of suspensions containing 25 and 30 g kg-1 solids prepared from theelectrodialyzed clay fraction (< 2 μm in diameter) of latosol, yellow-brown soil, and black soil, dispersed invarious nitrate solutions having concentrations of 1 × 10-4/z mol L-1, where z is the valence, and in distilledwater, were measured at field strengths ranging from 14 kV cm-1 to 210 kV cm-1. On the basis of analysesof the charge density and exchangeable ion composition on the surfaces of soil particles in the suspensions,and of the characters of the EC-field strength curves of the various suspensions, it was inferred that theincrement of EC (△EC) and/or relative electrical conductivity (REC) can indicate the bonding strengthbetween cations and soil particles. The bonding strengths of various cations with the soils diminished in theorder: K+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ = Ca2+ > Na+ for latosol, Ca2+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ = K+ > Na+ for yellow-brownsoil, and Zn2+ >Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Na+ for black soil.

  5. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos;

    2016-01-01

    (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curve (BTC), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability...... of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5 % and up to 50 % of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. The hereby predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points up to 50% of applied...... tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical convection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were hereby reasonable well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer mass...

  6. Microorganism-induced weathering of clay minerals in a hydromorphic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hanlie; Fang, Qian; Cheng, Liuling; Wang, Chaowen; Churchman, Gordon Jock

    2016-07-01

    In order to improve the understanding of factors influencing weathering in hydromorphic soils, the clay mineral and chemical compositions, iron (hydr)oxides, organic compounds, and Sr and Nd isotopic compositions, of hydromorphic soils on the banks of the Liangzi Lake, Hubei province, south China, were investigated. The B horizon in the lower profile exhibits a distinct net-like pattern, with abundant short white veins within the red-brown matrix. Their various 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic compositions showed only small variations of 0.7270-0.7235 and 0.51200-0.51204, respectively, consistent with the composition of Yangtze River sediments, indicating that the soils were all derived from alluvium from the catchment. The white veins contained notably more SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, and mobile elements relative to the red-brown matrix, while they both showed similar values for the chemical index of alteration of 86.7 and 87.1, respectively, and displayed similar degrees of weathering. The clay minerals in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were illite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite. These same three clay minerals comprised the white net-like veins in the soil B horizon, whereas only illite and kaolinite were observed in the red-brown matrix. Iron (hydr)oxides in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were hematite and goethite, whereas in the red-brown matrix of the B horizon they were hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite. Different organic compounds were observed for the white vein and the red-brown matrix in the soil B horizon: an 18:2 fatty acid biomarker for fungi in the net-like vein, but not in the red-brown matrix. Compared with the red-brown matrix, the white net-like vein also clearly contained more mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are sometimes associated with bacteria that have the capacity to reduce Fe(III). Thus, migration of iron and the formation of the net-like veins involved the participation of biota during the hydromorphic

  7. Clay and Soil Photolysis of the Pesticides Mesotrione and Metsulfuron Methyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Siampiringue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photolysis may represent an important degradation process of pollutants at the surface of soil. In the present work, we report a detailed study on the degradation of two pesticides: mesotrione and metsulfuron methyl using a sunlight simulator. In a first step, we studied the photochemical behaviour at the surface of clays from the kinetic as well as from the analytical point of view. In both cases, the quantum yields were found to be higher when compared to those obtained in aqueous solutions. The effect of iron(III, water, and humic substances contents was studied. In the former cases, an increase of the degradation rate was observed while an inhibition was observed with the latter owing to a filter effect phenomenon. In a second step, we studied the photodegradation at the surface of natural soil and identified the generated byproducts. They appear to mainly arise from photohydrolysis process.

  8. Performance Evaluation of Different Tillage Systems in a Clay Loam Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments were conducted to assess the performance of different tillage systems in a clay loam soil. A completely randomized block design with four treatments i.e., conventional tillage (CT), minimum tillage (MT), zero tillage (ZT) and controlled traffic farming (CTF) was carried out to evaluate the performance of tillage systems. Results indicated that the soil pulverization was higher (P<0.05) under MT and lower under CT treatments while, it was non-significant between MT and CTF treatments. Similarly, soil volume disturbed and effective ploughing depth was maximum (P<0.05) under CT followed by MT, CTF and minimum under ZT. Similarly the operating speed was significantly higher (P<0.05) under CTF and lower under CT whereas, wheel slippage/travel reduction was significantly minimum (P<0.05) under CTF and maximum under CT. Significantly, higher field capacity was recorded under CTF and lower (P<0.05) under CT. The maximum fuel consumption (P<0.05) was recorded under CT while it was minimum under ZT. Almost similar trends were observed for all parameters in 2012 and 2013. The results suggested that the control traffic system was more efficient tillage system in terms of soil pulverization, operating speed, travel reduction and over all field capacity. While, zero tillage had minimum fuel consumption and conventional tillage had higher working depth hence, more soil volume was disturbed under this treatment. (author)

  9. Modelling desiccation cracking in a homogenous soil clay layer: comparison between different hypotheses on constitutive behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jommi Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Desiccation cracks are usually thought to start from the surface of an evaporating soil layer, and the available simplified models for crack initiation and propagation are based on this hypothesis. On the contrary, experimental results on a Dutch river clay showed that cracks in an evaporating soil layer may start and propagate below the surface, confirming earlier findings by other researchers. A simple one-dimensional model was set up to analyse the consequences of different hypotheses about the material behaviour on the crack onset in a homogenous soil layer undergoing surface drying. The results of the model show that dependence of the material behaviour on the rate of water content change is a necessary requirement for cracks to initiate below the surface. The conclusion suggests that, to properly understand cracking in an evaporating soil layer, an intrinsic time scale for the mechanical response must be accounted for, among all the other factors which were previously highlighted by other researchers. The key factor to predict crack onset below the surface is the dependence of the drying branch of the water retention curve of the compressible soil on the rate of drying, which would be justified by a rate dependent fabric evolution.

  10. Water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a drained heavy clay soil: 1. Preferential flow processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haria, A. H.; Johnson, A. C.; Bell, J. P.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1994-12-01

    The processes and mechanisms that control pesticide transport from drained heavy clay catchments are being studied at Wytham Farm (Oxford University) in southern England. In the first field season field-drain water contained high concentrations of pesticide. Soil studies demonstrated that the main mechanism for pesticide translocation was by preferential flow processes, both over the soil surface and through the soil profile via a macropore system that effectively by-passed the soil matrix. This macropore system included worm holes, shrinkage cracks and cracks resulting from ploughing. Rainfall events in early winter rapidly created a layer of saturation in the A horizon perched above a B horizon of very low hydraulic conductivity. Drain flow was initiated when the saturated layer in the A horizon extended into the upper 0.06m of the soil profile; thereafter water moved down slope via horizontal macropores possibly through a band of incorporated straw residues. These horizontal pathways for water movement connected with the fracture system of the mole drains, thus feeding the drains. Overland flow occurred infrequently during the season.

  11. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. te Brake

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geometry factor was applied. The relative overestimation made by assuming constant isotropic shrinkage in the linear (basic shrinkage phase was 26.4% (17.5 mm for the actively shrinking layer between 0 and 60 cm. Aggregate-scale water storage and volume change revealed a linear relation for layers ≥ 30 cm depth. The range of basic shrinkage in the bulk soil was limited by delayed drying of deep soil layers, and maximum water loss in the structural shrinkage phase was 40% of total water loss in the 0–60 cm layer, and over 60% in deeper layers. In the dry period, fitted slopes of the ΔV–ΔW relationship ranged from 0.41 to 0.56 (EC-5 and 0.42 to 0.55 (CS616. Under a dynamic drying and wetting regime, slopes ranged from 0.21 to 0.38 (EC-5 and 0.22 to 0.36 (CS616. Alternating shrinkage and incomplete swelling resulted in limited volume change relative to water storage change. The slope of the ΔV–ΔW relationship depended on the drying regime, measurement scale and combined effect of different soil layers. Therefore, solely relying on surface level elevation changes to infer soil water storage changes will lead to large underestimations. Recent and future developments might provide a basis for application of shrinkage relations to field situations, but in situ observations will be required to do so.

  12. Degradation of the pesticide carbofuran on clay and soil surfaces upon sunlight exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountacer, H; Atifi, A; Wong-Wah-Chung, P; Sarakha, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the photolysis of carbofuran has been undertaken under sunlight conditions and at the surface of model supports such as clay films and different soils collected from two different sites in Morocco (Tirs and Dahs). In all conditions, an efficient degradation occurred owing to direct light absorption and also to photoinduced processes involving either clays or natural organic matter moities. On kaolin films, the photodegradation kinetics appears to follow a first-order process that clearly depends on the film thickness. The diffusion of carbofuran from the lower part to the illuminated surface was found to be negligible when compared to the photolysis process within the range of 20-70 μm. Thus, the photolysis rate constant at the surface of the solid support, k (0), was evaluated to be 7.0 × 10(-3) min(-1). Under these experimental conditions, the quantum yield was found equal to 2.1 × 10(-4). On soil surfaces, the disappearance rate constant was mainly attributed to photoinduced processes arising from natural organic matter. From the analytical point of view, the products were formed through (1) hydroxylation on the aromatic ring, (2) homolytic scission of the carbamate C-O bond leading to radical species formation, and (3) photohydrolysis of the carbamate C-O bond.

  13. Hydrological properties of a clay loam soil after long-term cattle manure application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J J; Sweetland, N J; Chang, C

    2002-01-01

    Limited information exists on the effect of long-term application of beef cattle (Bos taurus) manure on soil hydrological properties in the Great Plains region of North America. A site on a clay loam soil (Typic Haploboroll) was used to examine the effect of manure addition on selected soil hydrological properties in 1997 and 1998. The manure was annually applied in the fall for 24 yr at one, two, and three times the recommended rates (in 1973) under dryland (0, 30, 60, and 90 Mg ha(-1) wet basis) and irrigation (0, 60, 120, and 180 Mg ha(-1)). Manure significantly (P soil water retention (0-5 and 10-15 cm) by 5 to 48% compared with the control at most potentials between 0 and -1500 kPa. Field soil water content (0-5 and 10-15 cm) was increased by 10 to 22% in the summers of 1997 and 1998. Manure increased ponded infiltration by more than 200% at 90 Mg ha(-1) under dryland (1998) and at rates > or = 120 Mg ha(-1) under irrigation (1997). Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) of surface soil (1-cm depth) was significantly increased by 76 to 128% under dryland (1998) and irrigation (1997), as were number of pores > 1120 microm in diameter (37-128% increase). In contrast, manure rate had little or no effect on unsaturated hydraulic conductivity [K(psi)] values (-0.3, -0.5, -0.7, and -1.0 kPa) in 1997 and 1998. Overall, soil hydrological parameters generally had a neutral or positive response to 24 yr of annual manure addition. PMID:12026104

  14. Investigations of soil cracking and preferential flow in a weighing lysimeter filled with cracking clay soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, A.; Andersen, M. S.; Acworth, R. I.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryAn improved understanding of deep drainage processes in irrigated cracking soils is needed for sustainable irrigation management. To investigate the effect of crack dynamics and macropore flow on drainage in cracking soils, a series of irrigation experiments was carried out in a weighing lysimeter. Subsurface soil cracks of the initially very dry soil were investigated with a videoscope and changes in the surface expression of cracks in response to irrigation events were monitored by time-lapse photography. A bromide tracer was applied to one irrigation event. Variations in the combined soil and moisture mass and the volume of drainage out of the soil column was logged and the drainage EC and bromide content were determined. No drainage occurred out of the soil column during the first 3 out of 6 irrigation events, even though substantial surface runoff into the cracks occurred and, at least initially, soil cracks provided an uninterrupted flow path through the profile. The breakthrough of the bromide tracer, as well as an initially low EC of the drainage water indicate that preferential flow accounted for a substantial part of the first of the two drainage events, even though the soil cracks were sealed on the surface at the onset of the irrigation causing the drainage. The results show that lateral infiltration of macropore flow into the soil matrix can be substantial and should not be neglected while simulating macropore flow and deep drainage in cracking soils. The results also indicate that soil cracks can remain pathways for preferential flow even after they are closed at the soil surface. The type of water application appears to have an impact on the location of crack formation, with flood irrigation favouring reappearance of cracks at previous crack locations and simulated rainfall resulting in shifting crack locations.

  15. Water and nutrient transport on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Salm, Caroline; van den Toorn, Antonie; Chardon, Wim J; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2012-01-01

    In flat areas, transport of dissolved nutrients by water through the soil matrix to groundwater and drains is assumed to be the dominant pathway for nutrient losses to ground- and surface waters. However, long-term data on the losses of nutrients to surface water and the contribution of various pathways is limited. We studied nutrient losses and pathways on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in The Netherlands during a 5-yr period. Average annual nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses to surface water were 15.1 and 3.0 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively. Losses were dominated by particulate N (50%) and P (70%) forms. Rapid discharge through trenches was the dominant pathway (60-90%) for water and nutrient transport. The contribution of pipe drains to the total discharge of water and nutrients was strongly related to the length of the dry period in the preceding summer. This relationship can be explained by the very low conductivity of the soil matrix and the formation of shrinkage cracks during summer. Losses of dissolved reactive P through pipe drains appear to be dominated by preferential flow based on the low dissolved reactive P concentration in the soil matrix at this depth. Rainfall occurring after manure application played an important role with respect to the annual losses of N and P in spring when heavy rainfall occurred within 2 wk after manure application. PMID:22218191

  16. Comparing predictive abilities of three visible-near infrared spectrophotometers for soil organic carbon and clay determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Stenberg, Bo; Deng, Fan;

    2013-01-01

    of spectral preprocessing methods was applied in search for model improvement. Validation for SOC content using an independent data set derived from all three spectrophotometers provided values of RMSEP between 0.45 and 0.52 %, R2=0.44-0.58 and RPD=1.3-1.5. Clay content was predicted with a higher precision...... for SOC and clay predictions. The application of different spectral preprocessing procedures did not generate important improvements of the calibration models either. The results from this study showed that as long as strict laboratory scanning protocols were followed no significant differences...... carbon (SOC) and clay calibrations for 194 Danish top soils. Scanning procedures for the three spectrophotometers where done according to uniform laboratory protocols. SOC and clay calibrations were performed using PLS regression. One third of the data was used as an independent test set. A range...

  17. Reducing the Influence of Soil Moisture on the Estimation of Clay from Hyperspectral Data: A Case Study Using Simulated PRISMA Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Castaldi; Angelo Palombo; Simone Pascucci; Stefano Pignatti; Federico Santini; Raffaele Casa

    2015-01-01

    Soil moisture hampers the estimation of soil variables such as clay content from remote and proximal sensing data, reducing the strength of the relevant spectral absorption features. In the present study, two different strategies have been evaluated for their ability to minimize the influence of soil moisture on clay estimation by using soil spectra acquired in a laboratory and by simulating satellite hyperspectral data. Simulated satellite data were obtained according to the spectral charact...

  18. Determination of dependence between physical clay content in sod-podzolic soils and specific activity of 40K natural isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conditions of the Republic of Belarus there was analyzed the dependence between physical clay content in sod-podzolic soil and specific activity of 40K natural isotope. There was described a new method of determination of soil belonging to a particular soil type in the conditions of identification of the natural isotope K40. Experiments were realized on sod-podzolic automorphous and half-hydromorphic soils of natural and cultural agrocoenosis polluted with 137Cs and 90Sr after the Chernobyl disaster. The pollution density of 137Cs was from 313 to 2480 kBq/m2 and 90Sr – from 2 to 63 kBq/m2. Research results showed that soil texture content influenced on radionuclide fixation. Radionuclide entering into plants from sod-podzolic loamy soils was in 1,5-2,0 times and more lower in comparison with radionuclide entering from sod-podzolic sandy soils. The highest base exchange capacity of 137Cs, 90Sr and 40K was typical for the fraction of physical clay with the minimal particle size of 0,01mm. There was marked a close correlation connection between natural isotope 40K and a content of physical clay

  19. Laboratory investigations of Mars - Chemical and spectroscopic characteristics of a suite of clays as Mars soil analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn C.; Chang, Sherwood; Coyne, Lelia M.; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    A model system of Mars soil analog materials (MSAMs) was prepared, and the properties of these clays, such as chemical composition, surface-ion composition, water adsorption isotherms, and reflectance spectra, were examined. The results of these studies, performed along with simulations of the Viking Labeled Release Experiement using MSAMs, indicate that surface iron and adsorbed water are important determinants of clay behavior, as evidenced by changes in reflectance, water absorption, and clay surface reactions. The paper discusses the relevance of these results to the two major questions raised by prior explorations of Mars: has there ever been abundant water on Mars, and why is the iron found in the Martian soil not readily seen in the reflectance spectra of the surface?

  20. Impact of Long-Term Alfalfa Cropping on Soil Potassium Content and Clay Minerals in a Semi-Arid Loess Soil in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-Cheng; B. VELDE; LI Feng-Min; ZHANG Gan-Lin; ZHAO Ming-Song; HUANG Lai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa cropping has been considered an efficient method of increasing soil fertility.Usually nitrogen increase in root nodules is considered to be the major beneficial effect.A 21-year time series (five sampling periods) of alfalfa cultivation plots on a loess soil,initially containing illite and chlorite,in Lanzhou of northwestern China was selected to investigate the relationships among alfalfa cropping,soil potassium (K) content and soil clay minerals.The results indicated that soil K significantly accumulated after cropping,with a peak value at about 15 years,and decreased afterwards.The accumulated K was associated with the K increase in the well-crystallized illite,which was not extracted by the traditional laboratory K extraction methods in assessing bioavailability.The steep decline in soil K content after 15-year cropping was in accord with the observed fertility loss in the alfalfa soil.Plant biomass productivity peaked at near 9 years of culture,whereas soil K and clay minerals continued to increase until cropping for 15 years.This suggested that K increased in the topsoil came from the deep root zone.Thus alfalfa continued to store K in clays even after peak production occurred.Nitrogen did not follow these trends,showing a general decline compared with the native prairie soils that had not been cropped.Therefore,the traditional alfalfa cropping can increase K content in the topsoil.

  1. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT COMPACTION DURATIONS ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A CLAY LOAM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damla BENDER

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different compaction durations on changes of total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam soil were investigated. Soil samples were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2 , 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.00 kg/cm2 for 1, 2 and 4 minutes, then, above mentioned physical properties of soil samples were determined. Total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity of soil samples were not significantly affected from the compaction durations, but significantly decreased with increasing compaction levels.

  2. Using digital elevation models as an environmental predictor for soil clay contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev;

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) as an environmental predictor for soil clay content (SCC). It was based on the applicability of different DEMs, i.e., SRTM with 90-m resolution and airborne Light Detection...... and Ranging (LIDAR) (in 24- and 90-m resolution), using regression-tree analysis. Ten terrain parameters were generated from these DEMs. These terrain parameters were used along other environmental variables to statistically explain SCC content in Denmark. Results indicated that the SRTM tree model (T1: 90-m...... resolution) explained the variability of SCC measurements quasi-similarly (variance V = 60%) to the LIDAR tree models with 24-m (T2) or 90-m (T3) resolution (V = 60% for T2 and 61.5% for T3). The prediction performances (in terms of RMSE) of the produced maps (using these trees) compared with independent...

  3. Survival of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium in slurry applied to clay soil on a Danish swine farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boes, J.; Alban, L.; Bagger, J.;

    2005-01-01

    the survival times of E. coli and Salmonella in the soil surface following deposition of naturally contaminated pig slurry; and (3) simulate survival of Salmonella in different infection levels using E. coli data as input estimates. Slurry was deposited by four different methods: (1) hose applicator on black...... amended with contaminated pig slurry was an effective means to reduce environmental exposure to E. coli and Salmonella on this clay-soil farm....

  4. Effect of Alumina Colloid on the Sorption of Cs+ onto Sand and Clay Soils under Different Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution coefficient of cesium on soil (yellow sand and clay) with and without alumina as a colloidal material was measured by batch technique. The adsorption of Cs+ ions from aqueous sodium chloride solution onto yellow sand and clay in absences and presence of Al2O3, was investigated under different physicochemical conditions including contact time between liquid and solid phases, ph, ionic strength, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. Pseudo first order and pseudo second-order kinetic models were used to analyze the sorption rate data and the results showed that the pseudo second-order model is best correlation the kinetics data in all studied sorption processes. Both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were applicable to describe the adsorption of Cs+ ions by yellow sand with and without alumina but in case of clay with and without alumina Langmuir model not applicable. The maximum sorption capacities of clay in absences and presence of Al2O3 were found to be greater than that of yellow sand with and without Al2O3. The maximum sorption capacities for two sorbents were increased in presence of colloid alumina thane in absences. The sorption capacity is reduced at high temperature was related to the partial enhancement of desorption from yellow sand and clay surfaces. The adsorption of Cs+ ions by yellow sand and clay with and without alumina was exothermic reaction.

  5. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongzhen; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Huang, Panming; Jilani, Ghulam

    2008-03-01

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe2O3 content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that Koc would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface.

  6. [Mineralogy and genesis of mixed-layer clay minerals in the Jiujiang net-like red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Li, Rong-Biao; Han, Wen; Wu, Yu; Gao, Wen-Peng; Jia, Jin-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Mineralogy and genesis were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to understand the mineralogy and its genesis significance of mixed-layer clay minerals in Jiujiang red soil section. XRD and FTIR results show that the net-like red soil sediments are composed of illite, kaolinite, minor smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite and minor mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite. HRTEM observation indicates that some smectite layers have transformed into kaolinite layers in net-like red soil. Mixed-layer illite-smectite is a transition phase of illite transforming into smectite, and mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite is a transitional product relative to kaolinite and smectite. The occurrence of two mixed-layer clay species suggests that the weathering sequence of clay minerals in net-like red soil traversed from illite to mixed-layer illite-smectite to smectite to mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite to kaolinite, which indicates that net-like red soil formed under a warm and humid climate with strengthening of weathering.

  7. An Improved Description of the Seismic Response of Sites with High Plasticity Soils, Organic Clays, and Deep Soft Soil Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Brian

    Near surface soils can greatly influence the amplitude, duration, and frequency content of ground motions. The amount of their influence depends on many factors, such as the geometry and engineering properties of the soils and underlying bedrock, as well as the earthquake source mechanism and travel path. Building codes such as the 2012 International Building Code (IBC) define six site categories for seismic design of structures, which are based on the sites defined by the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). Site categories A, B, C, D, and E are defined by the time averaged shear wave velocity over the top 30 meters of the soil deposit. Site category F is defined as sites that include liquefiable or sensitive soils, as well as sites with more than 3 meters (10 ft) of peat or highly organic clays, more than 7.5 meters (25 ft) of soil with PI > 75, and more than 37 meters (120 ft) of soft to medium stiff clays. The IBC specifies simplified procedures to calculate design spectra for NEHRP sites A through E, and requires a site specific investigation for NEHRP F sites. However, established procedures for performing the required site specific investigations for NEHRP F sites are limited. The objective of this research is to develop a simplified procedure to estimate design spectra for non-liquefiable NEHRP F sites, specifically sites with organic soils, highly plastic soils, and deep soft soil deposits. The results from this research will directly affect US practice by developing much needed guidelines in this area. There is little empirical data on the seismic response of non-liquefiable NEHRP F sites. As a result, this study focused on generating data from site response analyses. To capture the variability of ground motions, this study selected five base case scenarios according to tectonic environments and representative cases encountered in common US practice. Suites of ground motions for each scenario were created by collecting ground motions

  8. Production of CO2 in crude oil bioremediation in clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro José Baptista

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to evaluate the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in clay soil a 45-days experiment. The experiment was conducted using an aerobic fixed bed reactor, containing 300g of contaminated soil at room temperature with an air rate of 6 L/h. The growth medium was supplemented with 2.5% (w/w (NH42SO4 and 0.035% (w/w KH2PO4. Biodegradation of the crude oil in the contaminated clay soil was monitored by measuring CO2 production and removal of organic matter (OM, oil and grease (OandG, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH, measured before and after the 45-days experiment, together with total heterotrophic and hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial count. The best removals of OM (50%, OandG (37% and TPH (45% were obtained in the bioreactors in which the highest CO2 production was achieved.O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a biodegradação de petróleo em solo argiloso durante 45 dias de ensaios. Os ensaios de biodegradação foram conduzidos em biorreatores aeróbios de leito fixo, com 300 g de solo contaminado, à temperatura ambiente e com uma vazão de ar de 6 L/h. As deficiências nutricionais foram corrigidas com 2,5% (p/p (NH42SO4 e com 0,035% (p/p KH2PO4. O monitoramento foi realizado em função da produção de CO2, da remoção de matéria orgânica (OM, de óleos e graxas (OandG e de hidrocarbonetos totais de petróleo (TPH, além bactérias heterotróficas totais (BHT e hidrocarbonoclásticas (BHc, no início e após 45 dias. Nos biorreatores onde houve maior crescimento de bactérias hidrocarbonoclásticas e maior produção de CO2, obteve-se os melhores percentuais de remoções de MO (50%, OandG (37% e TPH (45%.

  9. Carbon sequestration in clay and silt fractions of Brazilian soils under conventional and no-tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Estima Sacramento dos Reis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of soils to sequestrate carbon (C is mainly related to the formation of organo-mineral complexes. In this study, we investigated the influence of soil management systems on the C retention capacity of soil with an emphasis on the silt and clay fractions of two subtropical soils with different mineralogy and climate. Samples from a Humic Hapludox and a Rhodic Hapludox, clayey soils cultivated for approximately 30 years under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT were collected from six layers distributed within 100-cm soil depth from each site and from an adjacent native forest. After the removal of particulate organic matter (POM, the suspension (<53 µm was sonicated, the silt and clay fractions were separated in accordance with Stokes' law and the carbon content of whole soil and physical fractions was determined. In the Humic Hapludox, the clay and silt fractions under NT showed a higher maximum C retention (72 and 52 g kg-1, respectively in comparison to those under CT (54 and 38 g kg-1, respectively. Moreover, the C concentration increase in both fractions under NT occurred mainly in the topsoil (up to 5 cm. The C retention in physical fractions of Rhodic Hapludox varied from 25 to 32 g kg-1, and no difference was observed whether under an NT or a CT management system. The predominance of goethite and gibbsite in the Humic Hapludox, as well as its exposure to a colder climate, may have contributed to its greater C retention capacity. In addition to the organo-mineral interaction, a mechanism of organic matter self-assemblage, enhanced by longer periods of soil non-disturbance, seems to have contributed to the carbon stabilization in both soils.

  10. Enhanced degradation of 14C-HCB in two tropical clay soils using multiple anaerobic–aerobic cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to induce and enhance the degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a highly-chlorinated persistent organic pollutant, in two ecologically different tropical soils: a paddy soil (PS) and a non-paddy soil (FS). The degradation of HCB was enhanced using two anaerobic–aerobic cycles in model laboratory experiments. There was greater degradation of HCB in the PS (half-life of 224 days) relative to the FS (half-life of 286 days). It was further shown that soils amended with compost had higher metabolite concentrations relative to the non-amended soils. In the first cycle, there was little degradation of HCB in both soils. However, in the second cycle, there was enhanced mineralization in the PS under aerobic conditions, with the compost-treated samples showing higher mineralization. There was also extensive volatilization in both soils. The metabolite pattern revealed that the increased mineralization and volatilization was due to the formation of lower chlorinated benzenes. - Highlights: ► Two anaerobic–aerobic cycles enhanced the dissipation of HCB in two tropical soils – a paddy and non-paddy soil. ► The paddy soil was more effective in degrading HCB. ► The non-paddy soil adapted and degraded HCB in the second anaerobic–aerobic cycle. ► An additional carbon source enhanced degradation and mineralisation of HCB in both soils. - Two anaerobic–aerobic cycles enhance the degradation of HCB in two ecologically different tropical clay soils.

  11. Field corrosion characterization of soil corrosion of X70 pipeline steel in a red clay soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengrong Wang; Cuiwei Dun; Xiaogang Li; Zhiyong Liunn; Min Zhu; Dawei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of X70 pipeline steel buried in red soil environment has been studied. The surface morphology and elemental distribution were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion kinetics was evaluated by weight loss measurement. The results show that in red soil, the corrosion rate of X70 steel decreases with time, and follows the exponential decay law. General corrosion with non-uniform and localized pitting occurred on the steel surface.α-FeOOH was the dominate products during corrosion in whole buried periods, and the corrosion products exhibited well protective properties. The potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that icorr decreased with time, indicating the improvement of corrosion resistance. The results of Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS) are consistent with potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  12. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT COMPACTION DURATIONS ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A CLAY LOAM SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    BENDER, Damla; Abdullah BARAN; ÖZKAN, İlhami

    1997-01-01

    In this research, the effect of different compaction durations on changes of total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam soil were investigated. Soil samples were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2 , 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.00 kg/cm2 for 1, 2 and 4 minutes, then, above mentioned physical properties of soil samples were determined. Total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity ...

  13. Source zone remediation by ZVI-clay soil-mixing: Reduction of tetrachloroethene mass and mass discharge at a Danish DNAPL site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Binning, Philip John;

    2012-01-01

    ) technologies have proven effective for remediation of chlorinated compounds. ZVI-Clay soil-mixing is a new remediation technology, which combines abiotic degradation (via ZVI addition) and immobilization (via soil-mixing and clay addition), whereby a great potential for reduction of both contaminant mass...... and mass discharge is obtained. The technology was tested at a Danish DNAPL site, where the secondary aquifer was heavily contaminated by tetrachloroethene (PCE). ZVI-Clay soil-mixing was tested at a small source zone (~200 m3) with soil concentrations ranging up to 12,000 mg/kg. The objective of the field...... test was to document in situ destruction of the contaminant mass and the down-gradient response in contaminant mass discharge. The field sampling consisted of baseline measurements and a 19-month monitoring program (7 sampling campaigns) subsequent to the implementation of ZVI-Clay soil mixing...

  14. Estimation model of Cs-137 activity in soil samples derives from percentage of organic carbon and silt-clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of Cs-137 activity in soil samples was conducted at Nganjuk area through its soil organic carbon and silt-clay percentage. Twenty-six soil samples taken from Nganjuk area have been used to establish the relationship of Cs-137 activity and its soil samples quality parameters by using SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions) software. Chemical parameters of samples have higher variation compared to the physical. Estimated of Cs-137 activity in soil samples can be established by two parameters, those are percent of total organic carbon and percent of silt-clay contents. However, these two parameters could only explained 69.3 % of Cs-137 activity, the remaining 30.7 % potentially could be due to 10 % of error measurement, run-on redistribution of soil, farming as well as tillage system. By using the soil quality parameters, the Cs-137 activity under the limit detection could be estimated, hence, its usefulness to estimate the erosion rate through applying the Cs-model. (author)

  15. Influence of the insecticides acetamiprid and carbofuran on arylamidase and myrosinase activities in the tropical black and red clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiddin, G Jaffer; Srinivasulu, M; Maddela, N R; Manjunatha, B; Rangaswamy, V; Koch Kaiser, Alma Rosel; Maisincho Asqui, Jessica Cristina; Darwin Rueda, O

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of two insecticides, namely, acetamiprid and carbofuran on the enzymatic activities of arylamidase (as glucose formed from sinigrin) and myrosinase (as β-naphthylamine formed from L-leucine β-naphthylamide) in the black and red clay soils collected from a fallow groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) fields in the Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India. The study was realized within the framework of the laboratory experiments in which the acetamiprid and carbofuran were applied to the soils at different doses (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 kg ha(-1)). Initially, the physicochechemical properties of the soil samples were analyzed. After 10 days of pesticide application, the soil samples were analyzed for the enzyme activities. Acetamiprid and carbofuran stimulated the arylamidase and myrosinase activities at lower concentrations after 10 days incubation. Striking stimulation in soil enzyme activities was noticed at 2.5 kg ha(-1), persists for 20 days in both the soils. Overall, higher concentrations (5.0-10.0 kg ha(-1)) of acetamiprid and carbofuran were toxic or innocuous to the arylamidase and myrosinase activities. Nevertheless, the outcomes of the present study clearly indicate that the use of these insecticides (at field application rates) in the groundnut fields (black and red clay soils) stimulated the enzyme (arylamidase and myrosinase) activities.

  16. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe2O3 content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that Koc would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface. - The relative importance of organic matter and clay in butachlor adsorption in soil will depend on the ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content

  17. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhongzhen; He Yan [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Xu Jianming [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)], E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn; Huang Panming [Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Jilani Ghulam [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that K{sub oc} would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface. - The relative importance of organic matter and clay in butachlor adsorption in soil will depend on the ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content.

  18. Microbial assimilation of 14C of ground and unground plant materials decomposing in a loamy sand and a clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Ladd, J.N.; Amato, M.

    1996-01-01

    . More C-14 and N were mineralized and less microbial biomass C-14 accumulated in soils amended with unground than with ground subclover leaves. Differences in the amounts of (CO2)-C-14 and biomass C-14 were established during the initial 7 days of decomposition. At this time, biomass C-14 in the two...... of particle sizes >50 mu m accounted fro 5-6% input C-14 in the loamy sand; the proportions were little affected by grinding of the clover leaf amendment. In contrast, the amounts of biomass C-14 in the fraction of particle sizes soils. Thus......, the increased amounts of biomass C-14 in soils amended with ground leaves were mainly associated with clay plus silt size particles and microaggregates. After 7 d of decomposition, non-biomass C-14 in the two soil fractions accounted for about 40% of input C-14, irrespective of soil type and particle size...

  19. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  20. THE EFFECT OF REINFORCEMENT ON THE GBFS AND LIME TREATED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    OpenAIRE

    D. Koteswara Rao,; G.V.R. Prasada Raju,; N. L. Manikanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    India being peninsular country has large area coming under coastal region and also it has been the habitat for considerable percentage of population. The marine clays are generally found in the coastal region of West Bengal, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Maharashtra and some parts of Gujarat. Marine or soft clays exists in these region are weak and deformative in nature. The present study deals with the strength characteristics of the marine clay collected from Kakinad...

  1. Leaching of Nutrient Elements in a Red Soil Derived from Quaternary Red Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENRENFANG; ZHAOQIGUO

    1998-01-01

    A red soil derived from Quaternary red clay was employed to study nutrient leaching with woil columns repacked in laboratory,The objective was to identify the effects of fertilization practices on leaching patterns and magnitudes of Ca2+,Mg2+,K+,NH4+,and NO3-,The treatments were CK (as a control),CaCO3, CaSO4,MgCO3,Ca(H2PO4)2,urea,KCl,and multiple (a mixture of the above-mentioned fertilizers),The fertilizers were added to the bare surface of the soil columns,and then the columns were leached with 120 mL deionized water daily through peristaltic pumps over a period of 92 days.Leaching processes of NH4+,and NO3- wer e only measured in CK,ured,and multiple treatments which were directly related to N leaching, Results showed that sole application of CaSO4,and Ca(H2PO4)2 scarcely hd any effect on the leching losses of Ca2+,Mg2+,and K+; the application of MgCO3 sthimulated the leaching of Mg2+;the application of CaCO3 promoted the leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+ and K+; urea treatment also promoted the leaching of K+ and NH4+,and NO3- leaching mainly occurred at late stage of leaching process in particular;under KCl treatment,leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+,and K+ was promoted to a large extent;under multiple treatment, leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+,K+,NH4+,and NO3- was all increased and NO3- was mainly leached at the end of leaching process and still had a trend of increase.

  2. Tropical dryland agroforestry on clay soils: : Analysis of systems based on Acacia senegal in the Blue Nile region, Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Raddad, Elamin Yousif Abdalla

    2006-01-01

    Acacia senegal, the gum arabic producing tree, is the most important component in traditional dryland agroforestry systems in the Blue Nile region, Sudan. The aim of the present study was to provide new knowledge on the potential use of A. senegal in dryland agroforestry systems on clay soils, as well as information on tree/crop interaction, and on silvicultural and management tools, with consideration on system productivity, nutrient cycling and sustainability. Moreover, the aim was also to ...

  3. Influence of foliar application of algae extract and amino acids mixture on fenugreek plants in sandy and clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    SHAHIRA A. TARRAF; Talaat, Iman M.; ABO EL-KHAIR B. EL-SAYED; LAILA K. BALBAA

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Tarraf SA, Talaat IM, El-Sayed AEB, Balbaa LK. 2015. Influence of foliar application of algae extract and amino acids mixture on fenugreek plants in sandy and clay soils. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 33-37. Two pot experiments were conducted to study the effect of foliar application of algae extract and amino acids mixture on the growth and chemical constituents of fenugreek plants (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.). Plants were sprayed with different concentrations of algae extract (0.0, 2....

  4. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    OpenAIRE

    EL-Hefnawy, Mohamed E.; Selim, Elmetwaly M.; Assaad, Faiz F.; Ismail, Ali I.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0....

  5. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, Paul H.; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil Corg content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e., Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91 % of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78 % of the variability). The results obtained could enable robust scaling up exercises at a low cost as part of blue carbon stock assessments.

  6. Investigating the Effect of Three Nitrate Fertilizers on Nitrate Leaching under the Root Zone in Clay Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamer A. Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Nitrogen fertilizer is recognized as an important factor in crop’s yield level, however more application of N fertilizers in the soil have some adverse effects on environment and especially on ground water contamination. Perception and recognition the factors influencing nitrate transport through soil profile is helpful for fertilizer management to minimize adverse impacts on environment and nitrate leaching below the root zone. Approach: In this study, 9 large cylindrical lysimeters with 1 m height and 0.5 m diameter were filled with clay loam soil and planted with maize to investigate nitrate leaching under different types of N-fertilizer, chemical fertilizer, activated sludge and organic manure. Nitrate concentration in the soil and drainage water samples were analyzed by spectrophotometer method and the mass of nitrate was calculated in soil and drainage water. Crop productions for different treatments were compared too. Results: Results showed that cumulative mass of nitrate leaching from organic fertilizer was greater than the other treatments (229 kg ha-1. Organic manure had the greatest nitrate accumulation in soil (15.17 mg kg-1, which was significantly greater than chemical fertilizer. Conclusions/Recommendations: experimental results showed that manure application could result in NO3--N accumulation increase in the deeper soil profiles compared with activated sludge. Results showed that maize production was significantly higher under activated sludge fertilizer. Observations made in the current study suggested activated sludge fertilizer due to a higher crop production with same level of ground water contamination, especially in clay loam soils.

  7. The development of a multi-surface soil speciation model for Cd (II) and Pb (II): Comparison of two approaches for metal adsorption to clay fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A two-site surface complexation model was used to predict metal binding onto clays. • Five different surfaces are included in the multi-surface speciation model. • The improved model well predicted metal adsorption under various I and pH. • Adsorption on clays should be considered especially at low I and high pH condition. - Abstract: The mobility of toxic metals in soils or sediments is of great concern to scientists and environmentalists since it directly affects the bioavailability of metals and their movement to surface and ground waters. In this study, a multi-surface soil speciation model for Cd (II) and Pb (II) was developed to predict the partition of metals on various soil solid components (e.g. soil organic matter (SOM), oxide mineral, and clay mineral). In previous study, the sorption of metal cations on SOM and oxide minerals has been evaluated by thermodynamically based surface complexation model. However, metal binding to soil clay fractions was normally treated in a simplistic manner: only cation exchange reactions were considered and exchange coefficient was assumed unity. In this study, the binding of metals onto clays was described by a two-site surface sorption model (a basal surface site and an edge site). The model was checked by predicting the adsorption behavior of Cd (II) and Pb (II) onto three selected Chinese soils as a function of pH and ionic strengths. Results showed that the proposed model more accurately predicted the metal adsorption on soils under studied condition, especially in low ionic strength condition, suggesting that adsorption of metals to soil clay fractions need to be considered more carefully when modeling the partition of trace elements in soils. The developed soil speciation model will be useful when evaluating the movement and bioavailability of toxic metals in soil environment

  8. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, O.

    2016-01-18

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e. silt and clay), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between Corg and mud (i.e. silt and clay, particle sizes <63 μm) contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relative high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (i.e. mud-Corg saturation) together with significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter could overall disrupt the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud (i.e. silt and clay content) is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass

  9. Short-term Effects of Tillage Practices on Organic Carbon in Clay Loam Soil of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A tillage experiment, consisting of moldboard plow (MP), ridge tillage (RT), and no-tillage (NT), was performed in a randomized complete block design with four replicates to study the effect of 3-year tillage management on SOC content and its distribution in surface layer (30 cm) of a clay loam soil in northeast China. NT did not lead to significant increase of SOC in topsoil (0-5 cm) compared with MP and RT; however, the SOC content in NT soil was remarkably reduced at a depth of 5-20 cm. Accordingly, short-term (3-year) NT management tended to stratify SOC concentration, but not necessarily increase its storage in the plow layer for the soil.

  10. Some Fertility Characteristics and Fertilizer Requirements of a Newly Reclaimed Upland Red Soil Derived from Quaternary Red Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of field experiments from 1990 to 1994 in Yingtan, Jiangxi Province, were conducted on an upland red soil derived from Quaternary red clay which had been reclaimed three years before the experiments, in order to study the fertility characteristics and fertilizer requirements of the newly reclaimed soil. The field experiments included that on nutrient characteristics and fertilizer effect, that on K-supplying potential and K-Mg relationship, that on fertilization rates of K and N, etc. The newly reclaimed upland soil was low in both N and P, and its responses to nitrogen and phosphate application were very significant. The K-supplying potential was also low, so the soil was highly responsive to K fertilizer. The effect of Ca and Mg fertilizers was not so great for the reason that certain amounts of Ca and Mg were incorporated into the soil through application of calcium magnesium phosphate during land leveling before the experiments. Among the four micronutrients, B, Mo, Zn and Cu, B had the greatest effect on the soil. The fertilizer requirements of the soil were in an order of P and N > K > lime and B > Mg > Mo, Zn and Cu. Eight crops tested had different fertilizer-requiring characteristics. Rapeseed was very sensitive to P and B fertilizers. Barely was especially sensitive to P and lime and it also responded to B, Mo, Zn and Cu. And sweet potato was especially sensitive to K.

  11. Selectivity sequences and sorption capacities of phosphatic clay and humus rich soil towards the heavy metals present in zinc mine tailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Pranav Kumar; Seth, Chandra Shekhar; Misra, Virendra

    2007-08-25

    Sorption efficacy of phosphatic clay and humus rich soil alone and on combination were tested towards heavy metals present in zinc mine tailing (Zawar Zinc Mine), Udaipur (India). Characterization of the zinc mine tailing sample indicated the presence of Pb, Cu, Zn and Mn in the concentration of 637, 186, 720 and 577microg(-1), respectively. For sorption efficacy, the zinc mine tailing soil were properly amended with phosphatic clay and humus rich soil separately and in combination and leachability study was performed by batch experiment at different pH range from 3 to 9. The data showed that the percent leachability of heavy metal in non-amended soil was 75-90%. After amendment with phosphatic clay percent leachability of heavy metals became 35-45%. Further, the addition of humus soil to phosphatic clay decreased the percent leachability up to 5-15% at all tested pH. Column leachability experiment was performed to evaluate the rate of leachability. The shape of cumulative curves of Pb, Cu, Zn and Mn showed an increase in its concavity in following order: PbCu>Zn>Mn. Further, Langmuir isotherms applied for the sorption studies indicated that phosphatic clay in the presence of humus soil had high affinity for Pb followed by Cu, Zn and Mn, with sorption capacities (b) 139.94, 97.02, 83.32 and 67.58microgg(-1), respectively.

  12. Effects of different fertilizers on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in a yellow clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huaiying; Huang, Sha; Qiu, Qiongfen; Li, Yaying; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Dai, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Yellow clay paddy soil (Oxisols) is a typical soil with low productivity in southern China. Nitrification inhibitors and slow release fertilizers have been used to improve nitrogen fertilizer utilization and reduce environmental impaction of the paddy soil. However, their effects on ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in paddy soil have rarely been investigated. In the present work, we compared the influences of several slow release fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors on the community structure and activities of the ammonia oxidizers in yellow clay soil. The abundances and community compositions of AOA and AOB were determined with qPCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and clone library approaches. Our results indicated that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) of the soil was significantly related to the abundances of both AOA and AOB. Nitrogen fertilizer application stimulated the growth of AOA and AOB, and the combinations of nitrapyrin with urea (NPU) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) inhibited the growth of AOA and AOB, respectively. Compared with other treatments, the applications of NPU and UF also led to significant shifts in the community compositions of AOA and AOB, respectively. NPU showed an inhibitory effect on AOA T-RF 166 bp that belonged to Nitrosotalea. UF had a negative effect on AOB T-RF 62 bp that was assigned to Nitrosospira. These results suggested that NPU inhibited PNR and increased nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by inhibiting the growth of AOA and altering AOA community. UF showed no effect on NUE but decreased AOB abundance and shifted AOB community. PMID:27063014

  13. The influence of clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Getahun, Gizachew Tarekegn; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Schjønning, Per

    2016-01-01

    Tillage and residue management influence soil organic carbon (SOC) and lead to changes in soil physical behav-iour and functioning. We examined the effect of the clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management. Soil...... and DD and MP soil at 10–20 cm, while MP was higher than DD at 10–20 cm depth (p b 0.05). However, there was no difference in the effect of the contrasting tillage manage-ments on carbon sequestration when an equivalent soil mass and the entire topsoil layer were considered. In the top 10 cm soil, DD...... was sampled at the 0–10, 10–20 and 25–30 cm depths of a sandy loam soil at Flakkebjerg, Denmark in 2013. We used the experimental plots of a long-term field experiment with mouldboard ploughing (MP) and direct drilling (DD) treatments. The residue management included straw removal (−S) and straw retention (+S...

  14. Properties of a clay soil from 1.5 to 3.5 years after biochar application and the impact on rice yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, M.T.M.; Madari, B.E.; Bastiaans, L.; Oort, van P.A.J.; Leal, W.G.O.; Heinemann, A.B.; Silva, da M.A.S.; Maia, A.H.N.; Parsons, D.; Meinke, H.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the impact of a single application of wood biochar on soil chemical and physical properties and aerobic rice grain yield on an irrigated kaolinitic clay Ferralsol in a tropical Savannah. We used linear mixed models to analyse the response of soil and plant variables to application rat

  15. Source Zone Remediation by ZVI-Clay Soil-Mixing: Reduction of Tetrachloroethene Mass and Mass Discharge at a Danish DNAPL Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Binning, Philip John;

    2012-01-01

    -mixing. The concentrations of chlorinated ethenes were monitored via soil sampling at the source zone and groundwater sampling at a downgradient control plane. The results showed that within one year ZVI-Clay soil-mixing resulted in significant mass depletion of PCE (2-3 orders in magnitude) with ethene as the main...

  16. Innovative Uses of Organo-philic Clays for Remediation of Soils, Sediments and Groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCBs and similar low-solubility organic compounds continue to offer significant challenges in terrestrial and sediment remediation applications. While selective media such as granular activated carbon (GAC) have proven to be successful at absorbing soluble organics, these media may have reduced performance due to blinding in the presence of high molecular weight organic matter. An alternative technology addresses this problem with a clay-based adsorption media, which effectively and efficiently stabilizes low-solubility organic matter. OrganoclayTM reactive media utilizes granular sodium bentonite, which has been chemically modified to attract organic matter without absorbing water. The unique platelet structure of bentonite clays provides tremendous surface area and the capacity of the media to absorb over 60 percent of its own weight in organic matter. Because of these properties, organo-clays allow for several cost-effective in-situ remediation techniques, such as: - Flow-through filtration for removal of organic matter from aqueous solutions. Organo-clay can be utilized as a fixed-bed media in a column operation. This specialty media offers a high efficient alternative to Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) when applied as a flow through media to remove oil, PCB and other low soluble organic contaminates from water. - Placement in a Reactive Core MatTM. Organo-clay may be encapsulated into carrier textiles which are adhered together to create a thin reactive layer with high strength and even distribution of the reactive media. This type of delivery mechanism can be successfully applied in a sub aqueous or terrestrial environment for sediment capping applications - Permeable reactive barriers. Organo-clay can deliver high sorption capacity, high efficiency, and excellent hydraulic conductivity as a passive reactive media in these applications. (authors)

  17. Mapping of Total Carbon and Clay Contents in Glacial Till Soil Using On-the-Go Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy and Partial Least Squares Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhang-Quan; SHAN Ying-Jie; PENG Li; JIANG Yu-Gen

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing spatial variability of soil attributes,using traditional soil sampling and laboratory analysis,is cost prohibitive.The potential benefit of managing soils on a site-specific basis is well established.High variations in glacial till soil render detailed soil mapping difficult with limited number of soil samples.To overcome this problem,this paper demonstrates the feasibility of soil carbon and clay mapping using the newly developed on-the-go near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS).Compared with the geostatistics method,the partial least squares regression (PLSR),with NIRS measurements,could yield a more detailed map for both soil carbon and clay.Further,by using independent validation dataset,the accuracy of predicting could be improved significantly for soil clay content and only slightly for soil carbon content.Owing to the complexity of field conditions,more work on data processing and calibration modeling might be necessary for using on-the-go NIRS measurements.

  18. Size and Persistence of the Microbial Biomass Formed during the Humification of Glucose Hemicellulose Cellulose, and Straw in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1983-01-01

    straw. The half-life of labelled C in biomass during the second year of incubation ranged from 2 to 3 years.Native C in biomass ranged from 0.5 to 1.4% of the total C in native soil organic matter, the highest values occurring in the clay-rich soils. The half-life of native soil C, estimated from CO2...

  19. CONSTRUCTION OF A NEW HIGHWAY EMBANKMENT ON THE SOFT CLAY SOIL TREATMENT BY STONE COLUMNS IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QASIM A. ALJANABI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To continue of the second phase of the East Coast Expressway between Kuantan and Kula Terengganu in Malaysia system innovative solution are required. In this new phase there are embankment region has been subjected to extensive soft clay soil. These comprise typically of clayey silts of very high water content and undrained shear strengths in the range of 8 to 11 kPa to depths of up to 8m. To support an embankment height of up to 12 m, were filled and thereafter Vibro Replacement treatment was carried out to treat the very soft soil. Extensive instrumentation using rod settlement gauges, inclinometers and piezometers were installed to monitor the performance of the Vibro Replacement treatment. This paper reports on aspects of design, installation and the measured results from the instrumentation scheme.

  20. Effects of Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Interaction on the Stability of a Clay Slope: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedone Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep and slow landslide processes are frequently observed in clay slopes located along the Southern Apennines (Italy. A case study representative of these processes, named Pisciolo case study, is discussed in the paper. The geo-hydro-mechanical characteristics of the materials involved in the instability phenomena are initially discussed. Pluviometric, piezometric, inclinometric and GPS monitoring data are subsequently presented, suggesting that rainfall infiltration constitutes the main factor inducing slope movements. The connection between formation of landslide bodies and slope-atmosphere interaction has been demonstrated through a hydro-mechanical finite element analysis, whose results are finally reported in the work. This analysis has been conducted employing a constitutive model that is capable of simulating both saturated and unsaturated soil behaviour, as well as a boundary condition able to simulate the effects of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interaction.

  1. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossadeghi-Björklund, M; Arvidsson, J.; Keller, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Soil compaction by vehicular traffic modifies the pore structure and soil hydraulic properties. These changes potentially influence the occurrence of preferential flow, which so far has been little studied. Our aim was to study the effect of compaction on soil hydraulic and transport properties...... in subsoil. A randomized block design trial at two sites on a well-structured clay soil in central Sweden was established. Plots with two levels of compaction were created at both sites, in the following referred to as trafficked and control. The trafficked treatment was created by 4 passes track......-by-track with a three-axle dumper with a maximum wheel load of 5.8 Mg. After one year, undisturbed soil columns (20 cm height 20 cm diameter) from both trafficked and control plots at a depth of 30–50 cm were sampled. The columns were analyzed using X-ray CT imaging, together with measures of the degree of preferential...

  2. Identification of hydraulic parameters with slug test in clay soils%粘性土层井孔抽水试验的参数识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨利超; 王旭升; 焦赳赳; 王亚; 匡星星

    2011-01-01

    Clay soils belong to aquitards in hydrogeology. Groundwater flow, solute transport and geochemical process within clay soils play important roles in hydrological conditions and environmental changes. It is necessary to obtain the in-situ hydraulic parameters in clay soils with pumping tests when the hydrogeological problems in clay soils are investigated. However, due to weak permeability of clay soils, the analysis method of the pumping test in clay is different from those applied for pumping tests in aquifers. It is indicated that single-well pumping test in clay soils is similar to slug test in aquifers. This similarity suggests that the parameter estimation method of a slug test can be applied in pumping test in clay soils. In this study, the equation using the radius of influence and the exact analytical solution ofpumping test are applied in identifying hydraulic parameters of the clayed silt in Pearl river delta withpumping test data in boreholes. Hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of this silt are estimated andthe efficiency of the method is discussed.%粘性土层属于弱透水层,其水流、溶质运移和地球化学过程对于水文地质条件和环境变化具有重要意义.通过抽水试验来获取粘性土原位水力学参数是对粘性土水文地质问题进行研究的必要手段,但由于其渗透性很小,不能采用和常规含水层一样的方法求参.粘性土中的单孔抽水试验与一般含水层中的微水试验具有较大的相似性,因此可以借用微水试验的计算公式求参.本文以珠江三角洲淤泥质粘土井孔抽水试验为例,采用微水试验分析中的影响半径法和精确解法两种方法进行参数识别,获得了粘性土渗透系数和贮水率的参考值.

  3. Liquefaction Susceptibility of Soils With Clay Particles from Earthquake-induced Landslides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-sheng; JIANG Xin; ZHANG Xu

    2007-01-01

    The main reason for earthquake-induced landslides is liquefaction of soil, a process considered to occur mostly in sandy soils. Liquefaction can occur in clayey soils has also been reported and proven in the recent literature, but liquefaction in clayey soils still remains unclear and there are many questions that need to be addressed. In order to address these questions, an depth study on the liquefaction potential of clayey soils was conducted on the basis of field investigation and a series of laboratory tests on the samples collected from the sliding surface of the landslides. The liquefaction potential of the soils was studied by means of undrained cyclic ring-shear tests. Research results show that the liquefaction potential of sandy soils is higher than that of clayey soils given the same void ratio;the soil resistance to liquefaction rises with an increase in plasticity for clayey soils; relation between plasticity index and the liquefaction potential of soil can be used in practical application to estimate the liquefaction potential of soil.

  4. Coastal soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy%反射光谱估算滨海土壤黏粒含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦彩霞; 郑光辉; 赏刚; 孙东敏

    2016-01-01

    Clay content is an important soil property that affects the structure, nutrient supply and other characteristics of soils. Variations in clay content can indicate the degree of soil development or soil age. In traditional chemical analyses of soil properties, the extractant interacts in the solution and at the solution-particle interface, thus altering the equilibrium between the soil solid and solution phases. Soil reflectance spectroscopy has been developed as an effective alternative method of measuring soil properties primarily because it requires minimal sample preparation and it is fast, cost-effective, non-destructive and non-hazardous to the soil. In recent decades, research on the use of reflectance spectroscopy in soil science has achieved rapid advances. Reflectance spectroscopy can be successfully applied to estimate the soil clay content. However, the mechanisms of soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy are not very clear. The goals of this study were to identify the bands within the range of 360-2490 nm that can be used to estimate the clay content and explore the mechanisms of the clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy. A total of 150 coastal soil samples were collected. The soil reflectance spectra were measured in a dark room using a FieldSpec 3 portable spectrometer. Raw spectral data were pre-processed by smoothing (R) and then by first derivative (FD), continuum removal (CR) or reciprocal transformation (DS). Calibration (75 soil samples) and validation datasets (75 soil samples) were obtained from 1,000 random selections of the data. Stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were performed to estimate the soil clay content and to further identify the bands useful for modeling this parameter. The results indicated that the SMLR analysis of CR and R spectra and the PLSR analysis of R and FD spectra were characterized by good calibration and validation accuracies

  5. Evaluation of biostimulation in clay soil contaminated by petroleum; Avaliacao da bioestimulacao em solos argilosos contaminados com petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Sandro J.; Cammarota, Magali C.; Freire, Denize D.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Bioquimica. Lab. de Tecnologia Ambiental]. E-mail: baptista@eq.ufrj.br; denize@eq.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    Biostimulation has been used as a technic in order to increase the microbial activity adding inorganic nutrients and/or terminal electron acceptor in the contaminated place. The main goal of this work was evaluate how each inorganic nutrient could help the biodegradation at a given petroleum contaminated clay soil. At first, the work was designed to investigate the optimal relation between C:N:P that could influence the best organic matter removal (OMR) in aerobic bioreactors with 50 ml during 30 days. It was noticed that when one worked with 35 mg KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}/100 g soil, without adding nitrogen source, the OMR was 35%. Furthermore, it was noticed that the highest concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus was a limiting factor for microbial degradation and this resulted in the lowest OMR. At second, it was designed in aerobic bioreactor with 500 ml for 45 days and worked with the optimal concentrations of added phosphorus from the last stage. Although the assays have focused that nitrogen was not necessary to add to the soil, it was worked with 2,5 g (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}/100 g soil. The OMR was 46%, Oil and Grease removal was around 38% and TPH removal was around 45%. (author)

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of the Hybrid Clay- Based Material Montmorillonite-Melanoidin: A Potential Soil Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V Vilas; B Matthiasch; J Huth; J Kratz; S Rubert de la Rosa; P Michel; T Schäfer

    2011-12-31

    The study of the interactions among metals, minerals, and humic substances is essential in understanding the migration of inorganic pollutants in the geosphere. A considerable amount of organic matter in the environment is associated with clay minerals. To understand the role of organic matter in the environment and its association with clay minerals, a hybrid clay-based material (HCM), montmorillonite (STx-1)-melanoidin, was prepared from L-tyrosine and L-glutamic acid by the Maillard reaction. The HCM was characterized by elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), and thermal analysis. The presence of organic materials on the surface was confirmed by XPS and STXM. The STXM results showed the presence of organic spots on the surface of the STx-1 and the characterization of the functional groups present in those spots. Thermal analysis confirmed the existence of organic materials in the montmorillonite interlayer, indicating the formation of a composite of melanoidin and montmorillonite. The melanoidin appeared to be located partially between the layers of montmorillonite and partially at the surface, forming a structure that resembles the way a cork sits on the top of a champagne bottle.

  7. THE SIDE-EFFECT OF ORGANIC INSECTICIDE SPINOSAD ON BIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Telesiński

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of spinosad on soil biochemical and microbiological properties. The experiment was carried out on sandy loam with Corg content 10.91 g·kg-l. Spinosad, as Spintor 240 SC was added into soil in dosages: a recommended field dosage, and fivefold, tenfold, and twenty-fivefold higher dosages. The amount of spinosad introduced into soil was between 12.55 and 313.75 g·kg-l. Moreover, soil samples without spinosad supplement were prepared as a reference. Respective Spintor 240 SC doses were converted into 1 kg soil, taking into account 10 cm depth. After application of insecticide water emulsions, soil moisture was brought to 60% maximum holding water capacity. The soil was thoroughly mixed and stored in tightly-closed polyethylene bags at 20 °C for a period 4 weeks. During the experiment dissipation of spinosad, soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, urease and number of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes were assayed. Obtained results showed, that dissipation of spinosad in soil was relatively fast – the DT50 of this insecticide was ranged between 1.11 and 2.21 days. Spinosad residues had different effects on soil microbiological and biochemical properties. However, over time the impact of this insecticide definitely decreased. This indicated that the use of spinosad in organic farming, particularly in the field dosage, does not pose a long-term threat to the soil environment.

  8. Tensile behaviour of unsaturated compacted clay soils — A direct assessment method.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, R.A.; Hughes, P N; Davie, C. T.; Glendinning, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for testing the behaviour of soils placed under tensile load and demonstrates its suitability for testing a number of soil types under various conditions including saturation, compaction and stabilisation. Validation of the results obtained for the soils at relatively low saturation has been conducted using the established Brazilian (indirect) test for measuring the tensile strength of brittle materials. A fair comparison has been found and the results highlig...

  9. THE SIDE-EFFECT OF ORGANIC INSECTICIDE SPINOSAD ON BIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    Arkadiusz Telesiński; Wiera Michalcewicz; Maciej Płatkowski; Michał Stręk; Mirosław Onyszko; Jolanta Wiśniewska

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of spinosad on soil biochemical and microbiological properties. The experiment was carried out on sandy loam with Corg content 10.91 g·kg-l. Spinosad, as Spintor 240 SC was added into soil in dosages: a recommended field dosage, and fivefold, tenfold, and twenty-fivefold higher dosages. The amount of spinosad introduced into soil was between 12.55 and 313.75 g·kg-l. Moreover, soil samples without spinosad supplement were prepared as a reference...

  10. Nutrient leaching potential following application of papermill lime-sludge to an acidic clay soil

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Vettorazzo; F. C. S. Amaral; J. C. Chitolina

    2001-01-01

    This experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions with soil pots during 210 days, to evaluate the effect of calcitic papermill lime-sludge application (at the rates 0, 773, 1.547, and 2.320 mg kg-1 or respective equivalents to control, 2, 4, and 6 t ha-1), on chemical composition of soil leachate and its effects on eucalypt growth and yield. Highest soil leachate pH, SO4, and Na concentrations occurred in the 4 and 6 t ha-1 treatments. Soil leachate nitrate concentrations decreased ...

  11. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, Paul H.; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-Corg saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil Corg content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e., Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91 % of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78 % of

  12. Innovative uses of organo-philic clays for remediation of soils, sediments and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCBs and similar low-solubility organic compounds continue to offer significant challenges in terrestrial and sediment remediation applications. While selective media such as granular activated carbon (GAC) have proven to be successful at absorbing soluble organics, these media may have reduced performance due to blinding in the presence of high molecular weight organic matter. An alternative technology addresses this problem with a clay-based adsorption media, which effectively and efficiently stabilizes low-solubility organic matter. OrganoclayTM reactive media utilizes granular sodium bentonite, which has been chemically modified to attract organic matter without absorbing water. The unique platelet structure of bentonite clays provides tremendous surface area and the capacity of the media to absorb over 60 percent of its own weight in organic matter. Because of these properties, organo-clays allow for several cost-effective in-situ remediation techniques, such as: - Flow-through filtration for removal of organic matter from aqueous solutions: Organoclay can be utilized as a fixed-bed media in a column operation. This specialty media offers a high efficient alternative to Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) when applied as a flow through media to remove oil, PCB and other low soluble organic contaminates from water. - Placement in a Reactive Core MatTM: Organoclay may be encapsulated into carrier textiles which are adhered together to create a thin reactive layer with high strength and even distribution of the reactive media. This type of delivery mechanism can be successfully applied in a sub aqueous or terrestrial environment for sediment capping applications - Permeable reactive barriers: Organoclay can deliver high sorption capacity, high efficiency, and excellent hydraulic conductivity as a passive reactive media in these applications. (authors)

  13. Removal of Pah from clay soil contaminated with diesel oil by bioremediation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesel oil is one of the most common soil organic pollutants, as a consequence of spilling of storage tank spills and accidental leaks. In Pernambuco State, Northeast part of Brazil, there are several evidences of soil contamination by petroleum derivates due to gas station leaking. (Author)

  14. CLAY MINERALS AND THE ACCUMULATION OF SOIL ORGANIC MATTER IN NORTHWESTERN U.S. FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globally soils are an important terrestrial reservoir of carbon, storing approximately 3 times the carbon held in vegetation and 2 times the amount contained in the atmosphere. With the potential for global climate change it is imperative that world soils continue to be a sink f...

  15. Assessment of the regional variation in weathering rates of loess and clay soils in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.

    2001-01-01

    To calculate critical acid loads or to predict element concentrations in the soil solution, information on weathering rates is essential. Several studies have taken place in the Netherlands to obtain weathering rates for non-calcareous sandy soils. Recently information on weathering rates in less vu

  16. Removal of Pah from clay soil contaminated with diesel oil by bioremediation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changas-spinelli, A. C. O.; Kato, M. T.; Lima, E. S.; Gavazza, S.

    2009-07-01

    Diesel oil is one of the most common soil organic pollutants, as a consequence of spilling of storage tank spills and accidental leaks. In Pernambuco State, Northeast part of Brazil, there are several evidences of soil contamination by petroleum derivates due to gas station leaking. (Author)

  17. The effect of kauri (Agathis australis) on grain size distribution and clay mineralogy of andesitic soils in the Waitakere Ranges, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongkind, A.G.; Buurman, P.

    2006-01-01

    Kauri (Agathis australis) is generally associated with intense podzolisation, but little research has been carried out to substantiate this. We studied soil profiles, grain size distribution patterns and clay mineralogy under kauri and broadleaf/tree fern vegetation in the Waitakere Ranges, North Is

  18. New Technique Assessment of Plastic Limit of Soft Clay Particularly Peat Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Adon, Rashidah; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Ishikura, Ryohei; Wijeyesekera, Devapriya

    2013-01-01

    Plastic Limit (PL) is considered as the moisture content at which soil becomes too dry to remain plastic. Both the British Standards Institute (BS 1377 (1990)) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM D4318 (2001)) are consistent with their proposition of determining PL as the moisture content when the soil crumbles upon rolling it to thread of 3 mm diameter. However for challenging soils such as peat which is naturally organic substance derived from the remains of plants, the “ro...

  19. Root-Zone Redox Dynamics - In Search for the Cause of Damage to Treated-Wastewater Irrigated Orchards in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, David; Shenker, Moshe; Schwartz, Amnon; Assouline, Shmuel; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Treated wastewater (TW) has become a common source of water for agriculture. However recent findings raise concern regarding its use: a marked decrease (up to 40%) in yield appeared in orchards irrigated with TW compared with fresh water (FW) irrigated orchards. These detrimental effects appeared predominantly in orchards cultivated in clay soils. The association of the damage with clay soils rather than sandy soils led us to hypothesize that the damage is linked to soil aeration problems. We suspected that in clay soils, high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and high levels of organic material, both typical of TW, may jointly lead to an extreme decrease in soil oxygen levels, so as to shift soil reduction-oxidation (redox) state down to levels that are known to damage plants. Two-year continuous measurement of redox potential, pH, water tension, and oxygen were conducted in the root-zone (20-35 cm depth) of avocado trees planted in clay soil and irrigated with either TW or FW. Soil solution composition was sampled periodically in-situ and mineral composition was sampled in tree leaves and woody organs biannually. In dry periods the pe+pH values indicated oxic conditions (pe+pH>14), and the fluctuations in redox values were small in both TW and FW plots. Decreases in soil water tension following irrigation or rain were followed by drops in soil oxygen and pe+pH values. TW irrigated plots had significantly lower minimum pe+pH values compared with FW-irrigated plots, the most significant differences occurred during the irrigation season rather than the rain season. A linear correlation appeared between irrigation volume and reduction severity in TW-irrigated plots, but not in the FW plots, indicating a direct link to the irrigation regime in TW-irrigated plots. The minimum pe+pH values measured in the TW plots are indicative of suboxic conditions (9soil solution and in

  20. Nutrient leaching potential following application of papermill lime-sludge to an acidic clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Vettorazzo

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions with soil pots during 210 days, to evaluate the effect of calcitic papermill lime-sludge application (at the rates 0, 773, 1.547, and 2.320 mg kg-1 or respective equivalents to control, 2, 4, and 6 t ha-1, on chemical composition of soil leachate and its effects on eucalypt growth and yield. Highest soil leachate pH, SO4, and Na concentrations occurred in the 4 and 6 t ha-1 treatments. Soil leachate nitrate concentrations decreased with increasing lime-sludge rate. Soil leachate phosphate remained low (below the detection limit in all treatments until 120 days, while the concentration increased in the lime-sludge treatments at 210 days (last sampling in about 600 mg L-1. Lime-sludge decreased leachate Mg concentration, but had no significant effect among rates. Soil leachate Ca, K, B, Cu, Fe, and Zn did not change significantly for any lime-sludge application rates. The maximum NO3, Ca, Mg, K, and Na concentrations in the soil leachate occurred at 60 days after lime-sludge application (leaching equivalent to 1 pore volume, but for pH and SO4, the maximum occurred at 210 days (leaching equivalent to 4 pore volumes. Lime-sludge application decreased the concentration of exchangeable Al in the soil. Plant diameter growth and dry matter yield were increased with increasing lime-sludge rate. Beneficial effects on mineral nutrition (P, K, Ca, B, and Zn of eucalypts were also obtained by the application of 4 and 6 t ha-1 of lime-sludge.

  1. A mechanistic study of arsenate removal from artificially contaminated clay soils by electrokinetic remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tasuma; Moribe, Mai; Okabe, Yohhei; Niinae, Masakazu

    2013-06-15

    Batch desorption experiments and bench-scale electrokinetic experiments were performed to elucidate the electrokinetic remediation mechanisms of arsenate from artificially contaminated kaolinite. The electrokinetic experiments in which a constant voltage was applied demonstrated that high soil pH favored arsenate remediation with respect to both the remediation time and electricity consumption. It was also demonstrated that applying a pulse voltage (1 h ON, 1 h OFF) significantly improved the electricity consumption efficiency when the soil pH was maintained at the initial value during the experiments; this trend was not observed when the soil pH was gradually increased from the cathode side. These electrokinetic experimental results, with the support of arsenate desorption data obtained from batch experiments, indicate that the remediation rate-limiting step varied with soil pH. When the soil pH was maintained at the initial value of 7.2 during the experiments, arsenate desorption was the remediation rate-limiting step rather than the migration of dissolved arsenate toward the anode. Conversely, when the cathode pH was not controlled and the soil pH was correspondingly increased gradually from the cathode side, the migration of hydroxyl and desorbed arsenate ions toward the anode played a more important role in the control of the overall remediation efficiency. PMID:23643955

  2. Clay:organic-carbon and organic carbon as determinants of the soil physical properties: reassessment of the Complexed Organic Carbon concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Adrien; Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is well known to largely determine the soil physical properties and fertility. Total porosity, structural porosity, aeration, structural stability among others are reported to increase linearly with increasing SOC in most studies. Is there an optimal SOC content as target in soil management, or is there no limit in physical fertility improvement with SOC? Dexter et al. (2008) investigated the relation between clay:SOC ratio and the physical properties of soils from different databases. They observed that the R2 of the relation between SOC and the physical properties were maximized when considering the SOC fraction limited to a clay:SOC ratio of 10. They concluded that this fraction of the SOC was complexed, and that the additional SOC was not influencing the physical properties as strongly as the complexed one. In this study, we reassessed this approach, on a database of 180 undisturbed soil samples collected from cambiluvisols of the Swiss Plateau, on an area of 2400 km2, and from different soil uses. The physical properties were obtained with Shrinkage Analysis, which involved the parameters used in Dexter et al., 2008. We used the same method, but detected biases in the statistical approach, which was, therefore, adapted. We showed that the relation between the bulk density and SOC was changing with the score of visual evaluation of the structure (VESS) (Ball et al., 2007). Therefore, we also worked only on the "good" structures according to VESS. All shrinkage parameters were linearly correlated to SOC regardless of the clay:SOC ratio, with R2 ranging from 0.45 to 0.8. Contrarily to Dexter et al. (2008), we did not observed an optimum in the R2 of the relation when considering a SOC fraction based on the clay:SOC ratio. R2 was increasing until a Clay:SOC of about 7, where it reached, and kept, its maximum value. The land use factor was not significant. The major difference with the former study is that we worked on the same soil group

  3. Rainfall kinetic energy controlling erosion processes and sediment sorting on steep hillslopes: A case study of clay loam soil from the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Shi, Z. H.; Wang, J.; Fang, N. F.; Wu, G. L.; Zhang, H. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy (KE) can break down aggregates in the soil surface. A better understanding of sediment sorting associated with various KEs is essential for the development and verification of soil erosion models. A clay loam soil was used in the experiments. Six KEs were obtained (76, 90, 105, 160, 270, and 518 J m-2 h-1) by covering wire screens located above the soil surface with different apertures to change the size of raindrops falling on the soil surface, while maintaining the same rainfall intensity (90 ± 3.5 mm h-1). For each rainfall simulation, runoff and sediment were collected at 3-min intervals to investigate the temporal variation of the sediment particle size distribution (PSD). Comparison of the sediment effective PSD (undispersed) and ultimate PSD (dispersed) was used to investigate the detachment and transport mechanisms involved in sediment mobilization. The effective-ultimate ratios of clay-sized particles were less than 1, whereas that of sand-sized particles were greater than 1, suggesting that these particles were transported as aggregates. Under higher KE, the effective-ultimate ratios were much closer to 1, indicating that sediments were more likely transported as primary particles at higher KE owing to an increased severity of aggregate disaggregation for the clay loam soil. The percentage of clay-sized particles and the relative importance of suspension-saltation increased with increasing KE when KE was greater than 105 J m-2 h-1, while decreased with increasing KE when KE was less than 105 J m-2 h-1. A KE of 105 J m-2 h-1 appeared to be a threshold level beyond which the disintegration of aggregates was severe and the influence of KE on erosion processes and sediment sorting may change. Results of this study demonstrate the need for considering KE-influenced sediment transport when predicting erosion.

  4. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus;

    2011-01-01

    dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were...... with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water...... and SA. It is therefore recommended to apply the empirical CSRN model for predicting the dry part of the water retention curve (−10 to −800 MPa) from measured soil texture or surface area. Further research should aim to modify the more physically based TO model to obtain better descriptions of the SWRC...

  5. Preferential flow of bromide, bentazon, and imidacloprid in a Dutch clay soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.; Smelt, J.H.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Leaching to ground water and tile drains are important parts of the environmental assessment of pesticides. The aims of the present study were to (i) assess the significance of preferential flow for pesticide leaching under realistic worst-case conditions for Dutch agriculture (soil profile with thi

  6. The role of dissolved organic matter in adsorbing heavy metals in clay-rich soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Refaey; B. Jansen; A.H. El-Shater; A.A. El-Haddad; K. Kalbitz

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of tested heavy metals on Egyptian soils was large in all situations tested and follows the order: Cu >> Ni ≈ Zn. Copper was influenced by the timing of dissolved organic matter addition more than Ni and Zn. Specific binding mechanisms (inner-sphere complexes) dominated the affinity of Cu

  7. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolan, N.S., E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Kunhikrishnan, A. [Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro-Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Naidu, R. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts > biosolids > biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2–2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha{sup −1} yr{sup −1} Mg{sup −1} biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C

  8. Improvement of Soil Moisture Retrieval from Hyperspectral VNIR-SWIR Data Using Clay Content Information: From Laboratory to Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Oltra-Carrió

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the constraints and performance of SMC retrieval methodologies in the VNIR (Visible-Near InfraRed and SWIR (ShortWave InfraRed regions (from 0.4 to 2.5 µm when passing from controlled laboratory conditions to field conditions. Five different approaches of signal processing found in literature were considered. Four local criteria are spectral indices (WISOIL, NSMI, NINSOL and NINSON. These indices are the ratios between the spectral reflectances acquired at two specific wavelengths to characterize moisture content in soil. The last criterion is based in the convex hull concept and it is a global method, which is based on the analysis of the full spectral signature of the soil. The database was composed of 464 and 9 spectra, respectively, measured over bare soils in laboratory and in-situ. For each measurement, SMC and texture were well-known and the database was divided in two parts dedicated to calibration and validation steps. The calibration part was used to define the empirical relation between SMC and SMC retrieval approaches, with coefficients of determination (R2 between 0.72 and 0.92. A clay content (CC dependence was detected for the NINSOL and NINSON indices. Consequently, two new criteria were proposed taking into account the CC contribution (NINSOLCC and NINSONCC. The well-marked regression between SMC and global/local indices, and the interest of using the CC, were confirmed during the validation step using laboratory data (R² superior to 0.76 and Root mean square errors inferior to 8.3% m3∙m−3 in all cases and using in-situ data, where WISOIL, NINSOLCC and NINSONCC criteria stand out among the NSMI and CH.

  9. Effect of blade vibration on mulch tillage performance under silt clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Goudarzi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mulch tillage system is an intermediate system which covers some of disadvantages of no tillage and conventional tillage systems. In farms in which tillage is done with a chisel plow, runoff and soil erosion have a less important relation to moldboard and disk plow and naturally absorption of rainfall will be developed. Thus, the mulch tillage system is an appropriate alternative to conventional tillage and no tillage (Backingham and Pauli, 1993. The unwanted vibration in machinery and industry mainly processes most harmful factors, for example: bearing wear, cracking and loosening joints. And noise is produced in electrical systems by creating a short circuit (Wok, 2011. Self-induced and induced vibration are used in tillage systems. Induced vibration is created by energy consumption and self-induced vibration is created by collision among the blades and soil at the shank (Soeharsono and Setiawan, 2010. A study by Mohammadi-gol et al. (2005 was conducted. It was found that on the disk plow, plant residues maintained on the soil are more than that of moldboard plow. 99% frequency and amplitude, speed and rack angle of blade directly affect soil inversion and indirectly affect preservation of crop residue on the soil. The effect of vibration frequency and rack angle of blade to reduce the tensile strength is also clear. Moreover, in contrast to previous studies when speed progressing is less than (λ, not only the relative speed (λ, but also frequency can reduce the tensile strength (Beiranvand and Shahgoli, 2010; Awad-Allah et al., 2009. Therefore, aim of this study was to determine the effect of vibration and the speed of tillage on soil parameters and drawbar power in using electric power. Materials and Methods: To perform this test, three different modes of vibration (fixed, variable and induced vibration and two levels of speed in real terms at a depth of 20 cm were used for farming. The test was performed with a split plot

  10. Effect of organic matter on the parameters of the selective sorption of cobalt and zinc by soils and their clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. S.; Kochetkov, I. V.; Kruglov, S. V.; Aleksakhin, R. M.

    2011-06-01

    The sorption and ion-exchange behavior of Co(II) and Zn in the soil-equilibrium solution system was studied for different types and varieties of native soils and their clay fractions before and after mild oxidation with H2O2 to remove the organic carbon. The parameters of the ion-exchange adsorption and the selectivity coefficients of the (Co(II), Zn)/Ca ion exchange were determined using different models for describing the relationship between the dissolved and sorbed forms of the metals. These were the empirical Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and the model of the ion-exchange adsorption based on the acting mass law. It was found that the soil organic matter played an important role in the selectivity of the ion-exchange adsorption of Co(II) and Zn by the soils and their clay fractions. This was confirmed by an abrupt decrease (to almost 1) of the selectivity coefficients of the Co2+/Ca2+ and Zn2+/Ca2+ exchange after the treatment of the clay fraction with hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Transport, sorption and degradation of atrazine in two clay soils from Mexico : Andosol and Vertisol

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, B.; Duwig, Céline; Hidalgo, C; Muller, K.; de Mora, L.; Raymundo, E.; Etchevers, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Although atrazine has been banned in the European Union, it is still one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. It is has been detected in surface and groundwater and has been shown to be associated with major human health problems. Atrazine fate in the environment, e.g. sorption, leaching and degradation depends, inter alia, on soil characteristics. Independent static and dynamic experiments were conducted to identify and uncouple the processes governing the fate of atrazine. Two a...

  12. Natural clay based soil as an effective barrier against radionuclide migration in a uranium tailings structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olympic Dam Operations mines and processes copper, uranium, silver and gold from a vast underground ore body located in the far north of South Australia. The tailings from the milling operation are pumped at the current rate of 2.3 million tonnes annually into an above ground Tailings Retention System (TRS) covering an area of 180 hectares. Initial studies conducted at a small scale pilot plant TRS in 1985 indicated that contaminants in the acid based tailings were reduced to background levels within a short distance after the tailings/soil interface. This study was commenced to confirm the effectiveness of the natural soils at the base of the current TRS in preventing downward migration of radionuclides. Core samples have been taken at a number of locations, and radionuclide concentrations plotted against depth. Results from the core samples taken to date have confirmed that downward radionuclide movement is effectively stopped within the first 40 centimeters after the tailings/soil interface. 5 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  13. Use of a flashiness index to predict phosphorus losses from subsurface drains on a Swedish farm with clay soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro; Stenberg, Maria; Wesström, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    Risk assessment for elevated leaching losses of phosphorus (P) from agricultural land is commonly based on indices, since such losses are highly episodic and difficult to predict. Here a flashiness index (FI) representing changes in daily water flow from drainage systems was estimated from measured discharge (agrohydrological years 2004-2013) after reconstruction of subsurface drainage systems in 16 fields on a former swine farm. The fields were analysed for ammonium lactate-extractable soil P (P-AL), clay, carbon and other soil parameters in 2004. Transport of total P (TP), dissolved reactive P (DRP) and unreactive P (UP) was estimated from concentrations in composite water samples taken flow-proportionally up to 20 times per year. On average, 2.20 kg TP ha-1 yr-1 was leached, with 27% in DRP form, from the entire farm. FI was significantly negatively correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient p < 0.05) to mean yearly discharge from each field. Stepwise regression demonstrated that FI index was the most important single explanatory parameter for flow-proportional yearly mean concentration of unreactive P losses (UP) from each field, with a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.67. The corresponding concentration of dissolved reactive P (DRP) was significantly positively correlated (p = 0.015) to soil P-AL and FI. A regression model for TP leaching losses based on FI, P-AL and yearly discharge (Q) from 11 of the fields over nine years (r2 = 0.67, p = 0.002) was validated against TP leaching from the remaining five fields (32% of farm area). Root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.43, which represented 20% of measured leaching (mean 2.14 kg TP ha-1 yr-1). For individual years, RMSE for different fields was 37-80% of measured TP leaching (0.8-3.7 kg TP ha-1 yr-1). The FI index could be used together with soil P test to predict P leaching from individual fields of a drained farm.

  14. Effects of Organic Anions on Phosphate Adsorption and Desorption from Variable—Charge Clay Minerals and Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEZHEN-LI; YUANKE-NENG; 等

    1992-01-01

    Effects of citrate and tartrate on phosphate adsorption and desorption from kaolinite,goethite,amorphous Al-oxide and Ultisol were studied.P adsorption was significantly decreased as the concentration of the organic anions increased from 10-5 to 10-1 M.At 0.1 M and pH 7.0,tartrate decreased P adsorption by 27.6%-50.6% and citrate by 37.9-80.4%,depending on the kinds of adsorbent.Little Al and/or Fe were detected in the equilibrium solutions,even at the highest concentration of the organic anions.Effects of the organic anions on phosphate adsorption follow essentially the competitive adsorption mechanism.The selectivity coefficients for competitive adsorption can be used to compare the effectiveness of different organic anions in reducing P adsorption under given gonditions. Phosphate desorption was increased by 3 to 100 times in the presence of 0.001 M citrate or tartrate compared to that in 0.02 M KCl solution alone.However,for all the soil and clay minerals studied the amount of P desorbed by citrate or tartrate was generally lower than or close to that of isotopically exchangeable P.The effect of organic anions on phosphate desorption arises primarily from ligand exchange.

  15. In-situ studies on the performance of landfill caps (compacted soil liners, geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners, capillary barriers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, S. [IGB - Ingenieurbuero fuer Grundbau, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Since 1986 different types of landfill covers have been studied in-situ on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg, Germany. Water balance data are available for eight years. The performance of different carriers has been measured by collecting the leakage on areas ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to 500 m{sup 2}. Composite liners with geomembranes performed best, showing no leakage. An extended capillary barrier also performed well. The performance of compacted soil liners, however, decreased severely within five years due to desiccation, shrinkage and plant root penetration (liner leakage now ranging from 150 mm/a to 200 mm/a). About 50 % of the water that reaches the surface of the liner is leaking through it. The maximum leakage rates have increased from 2 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} to 4 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Two types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) have been tested for two years now with disappointing results. The GCL desiccated during the first dry summer of the study. High percolation rates through the GCL were measured during the following winter (45 mm resp. 63 mm in four months). Wetting of the GCL did not significantly reduce the percolation rates.

  16. Sedimentos arcillosos en un suelo del valle inferior del río Colorado (Argentina Clay sediments in a soil of the lower Colorado river valley (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Peinemann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la presencia de capas sedimentarias ricas en minerales de arcilla en un subsuelo del valle inferior del río Colorado por su importancia para el régimen hídrico de suelos bajo riego. Difractogramas de rayos X efectuados sobre la fracción arcilla fina de estos sedimentos revelaron que está compuesta por smectitas con muy buena cristalización. La caracterización fisicoquímica del perfil de suelo mostró que el fuerte incremento de minerales de arcilla en el subsuelo estuvo vinculado con un aumento de pH y PSI y en consecuencia una marcada disminución en la conductividad hidráulica, motivo por el cual la eventual presencia de estas capas sedimentarias debe ser muy tenida en cuenta en la programación de las prácticas de riego para evitar el posible deterioro de los suelos.The presence of sedimentary clay layers in subsoils of the lower Colorado river valley are described due to their impact on the water balance of soils under irrigation. X-ray difractograms of the fine clay fraction of these sediments show that they are composed of smectites with a very good crystallization. The physicochemical characterization of the soil profile indicates that the abrupt increase of clay minerals was associated with high pH and ESP values as well as a sharp decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, the presence of sedimentary clay layers in soils has to be considered when planning irrigation practices to avoid soil degradation.

  17. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil

  18. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  19. Clay minerals and sedimentary basin history

    OpenAIRE

    Merriman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Clay minerals in the mud and soil that coat the Earth's surface are part of a clay cycle that breaks down and creates rock in the crust. Clays generated by surface weathering and shallow diagenetic processes are transformed into mature clay mineral assemblages in the mudrocks found in sedimentary basins. During metamorphism, the release of alkali elements and boron from clay minerals generates magmas that are subsequently weathered and recycled, representing the magma-to-mud pathway of the cl...

  20. Potential for Recycling Nutrients from Biosolids Amended with Clay and Lime in Coarse-Textured Water Repellence, Acidic Soils of Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjutha Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biosolids in soils is an efficient method of recycling nutrients from biosolids and it is considered even safer when it is modified after mixing and diluting with other suitable soil organic amendments. A variety of soil organic amendments, such as green manures and composts, are used for modifying and co-composting with biosolids. However, these may not be considered as appropriate biosolids disposal and remedial measures for soils with unique problems such as low soil pH, water repellence nature, and poor water and nutrient retention capacities due to soil textural issues. Historically, soil amendments such as lime, clay, and recently biochar are being applied for such problematic soils at Western Australia and these researches focused mostly on improvement in soil physical and chemical properties. However, studies with potential for applying modified biosolids with these amendments are not complete yet. This review focused on identifying such gaps in these studies from over 170 peer-reviewed key research and review articles published over decades to latest in these areas.

  1. Metal oxides, clay minerals and charcoal determine the composition of microbial communities in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Doreen; Ding, Guo-Chun; Pronk, Geertje Johanna; Heister, Katja; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Smalla, Kornelia

    2013-10-01

    Microbial communities in soil reside in a highly heterogeneous habitat where diverse mineral surfaces, complex organic matter and microorganisms interact with each other. This study aimed to elucidate the long-term effect of the soil mineral composition and charcoal on the microbial community composition established in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene. One year after adding sterile manure to different artificial soils and inoculating microorganisms from a Cambisol, the matured soils were spiked with phenanthrene or not and incubated for another 70 days. 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer fragments amplified from total community DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Metal oxides and clay minerals and to a lesser extent charcoal influenced the microbial community composition. Changes in the bacterial community composition in response to phenanthrene differed depending on the mineral composition and presence of charcoal, while no shifts in the fungal community composition were observed. The abundance of ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes was increased in phenanthrene-spiked soils except for charcoal-containing soils. Here we show that the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil is an ongoing process and that different properties present in artificial soils influenced the bacterial response to the phenanthrene spike.

  2. Point of zero salt effect: Relationships with clay mineralogy of representative soils of the S(a)o Paulo State, Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. E. ALVES; A. LAVORENTI

    2005-01-01

    The point of zero salt effect (PZSE) is the soil pH value at which the magnitude of the variable surface charges is not changed due to variations in the ionic concentration of the soil solution. This property influences not only electrochemical phenomena occurring at the solid-solution interface but also the flocculation degree of the soil particles. In this study we investigated the relationships between the clay mineralogy and the PZSE values of representative soils of the Sao Paulo State, Brazil. The results confirmed the usefulness of the difference between the soil pH values measured in 1 mol L-1 KCl (pHKC1) and in water (pHH2O) (2 pHKC1 - pHH2O) for estimating the PZSE of tropical soils, except for the ones rich in exchangeable Al; furthermore, the △pH index (pHKCI - pHH2O) was highly correlated with the difference between the PZSE and pHH2O values, reiterating the △pH utility for estimating both the signal and the magnitude of the net surface charge of tropical soils. Finally, correlation and multiple regression analyses showed that the PZSE value of weathered non-allophanic tropical soils tends to increase and to equal the soil pH due to the weathering-induced kaolinite destabilization and concomitant Fe- and Al-oxide accumulation.

  3. Hydraulic Anisotropy Characterization Using Azimuthal Self Potential Gradient [ASPG]: Results from Pneumatic Fracturing of Tight Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, L.; Wishart, D.; Schnell, D.; Hermann, G.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that bulk hydraulic anisotropy associated with fractures in fractured rock aquifers can be inferred from Azimuthal Self Potential Gradient (ASPG) measurements. This extremely simple technique involves measuring the self potential gradient as a function of azimuth with a pair of non polarizing electrodes connected to a voltmeter. The electrokinetic effect associated with the flow of fluids within fractures is the source of the ASPG signal. Fracture strike mapping at multiple sites has repeatedly demonstrated the effectiveness of the method at the field scale and indicated that the direction of flow can be determined from the polarity of relatively large ASPG signals. A laboratory study was conducted to determine whether ASPG could also be used to characterize the hydraulic anisotropy associated with the enhancement of permeability and porosity of tight unconsolidated soils (e.g. clays) as a result of pneumatic fracturing, a technique to improve the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Compressed kaolinite sediments were pneumatically fractured following industry procedures. The resulting fracture geometry was quantified from strike analysis of visible fractures combined with strike data from optical borehole televiewer (BHTV) imaging. ASPG measurements were then made during injection of a simulated remedial treatment (electrolyte/dye) under an applied gas pressure. Consistent with previous findings in fractured rock aquifers, ASPG lobes are well correlated with azimuths of high fracture strike density suggesting that the ASPG anisotropy is a proxy measure of hydraulic anisotropy created by the pneumatic fracturing. The magnitude of the ASPG signal scales linearly (linear correlation coefficients > 0.74) with the applied gas pressure gradient for any particular hydraulically-active fracture set and the positive lobe of the ASP anomaly denotes the flow direction within that fracture set. These findings demonstrate that applications of the

  4. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    Science.gov (United States)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  5. Micromorphology and stable-isotope geochemistry of historical pedogenic siderite formed in PAH-contaminated alluvial clay soils, Tennessee, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, J.A.; Fowle, D.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, J.J.; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400-450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (FeCO3) was present and whether siderite occurrence was related to organic contaminant distribution. Samples from shallow depths were generally more heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than those at greater depth. The upper 1 m in most boreholes consisted of mixtures of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth) consisted of highly structured clays exhibiting fine subangular blocky ped structures, as well as redox-related features. Pedogenic siderite was abundant in the upper 2 m of most cores and in demonstrably historical (< 100 years old) soil matrices. Two morphologies were identified: (1) sphaerosiderite crystal spherulites ranging from 10 to 200 um in diameter, and (2) coccoid siderite comprising grape-like "clusters" of crystals 5-20 ??n in diameter. The siderite, formed in both macropores and within fine-grained clay matrices, indicates development of localized anaerobic, low-Eh conditions, possibly due to microbial degradation of organic contaminants. Stable-isotope compositions of the siderite have ??13C values spanning over 25%o (+7 to - 18%o VPDB) indicating fractionation of DIC by multiple microbial metabolic pathways, but with relatively constant ??18O values from (-4.8 ?? 0.66%o VPDB) defining a meteoric sphaerosiderite line (MSL). Calculated isotope equilibrium water ??18O values from pedogenic siderites at the CCP site are from 1 to 5 per mil lighter than the groundwater ??18O values that we estimate for the site. If confirmed by field studies in progress, this observation might call for a reevaluation of

  6. Organic Control of Dioctahedral and Trioctahedral Clay Formation in an Alkaline Soil System in the Pantanal Wetland of Nhecolândia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Jean-François; Martins-Silva, Elisângela R.; Furian, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on the formation of authigenic clays in an alkaline soil system surrounding lakes of the Nhecolândia region, Pantanal wetland. The presence of trioctahedral Mg-smectites (stevensite and saponite types), which requires low Al and Fe contents in the soil solution for its formation, contrasts with the neoformation of dioctahedral Fe-mica (glauconite, and Fe-illite), which instead requires solutions relatively enriched in Al and Fe. This study aims to understand the conditions of co-existence of both, Mg-smectite and Fe-mica a common clay association in former or modern alkaline soil systems and sediments. The study was carried out along an alkaline soil catena representative of the region. The soil organization revealed that Mg-smectite occur in top soil close to the lake, whereas Fe-mica dominate in the clay fraction of deeper greenish horizons a few meters apart. We propose here that this spatial distribution is controlled by the lateral transfer of Fe and Al with organic ligands. Alkaline organic rich solutions (DOC up to 738 mg L-1) collected in the watertable were centrifuged and filtered through membranes of decreasing pore size (0.45 μm, 0.2 μm, 30 KDa, 10 KDa, 3 KDa) to separate colloidal and dissolved fractions. Fe, Al, Si, Mg and K were analysed for each fraction. Although the filtration had no influence on Si and K contents, almost 90% of Fe (up to 2.3 mg L-1) and Al (up to 7 mg L-1) are retained at the first cutoff threshold of 0.45μm. The treatment of the same solutions by oxygen peroxide before filtration shows that a large proportion of Fe and Al were bonded to organic colloids in alkaline soil solution at the immediate lake border, allowing Mg-smectite precipitation. The fast mineralization of the organic matter a few meters apart from the lake favors the release of Fe and Al necessary for Fe-mica neoformation. In comparison with chemical and mineralogical characteristics of alkaline environments described in the

  7. Evaluation of Turf-Grass and Prairie-Vegetated Rain Gardens in a Clay and Sand Soil, Madison, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Balster, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with a consortium of 19 cities, towns, and villages in Dane County, Wis., undertook a study to compare the capability of rain gardens with different vegetative species and soil types to infiltrate stormwater runoff from the roof of an adjacent structure. Two rain gardens, one planted with turf grass and the other with native prairie species, were constructed side-by-side in 2003 at two locations with different dominant soil types, either sand or clay. Each rain garden was sized to a ratio of approximately 5:1 contributing area to receiving area and to a depth of 0.5 foot. Each rain garden, regardless of vegetation or soil type, was capable of storing and infiltrating most of the runoff over the 5-year study period. Both rain gardens in sand, as well as the prairie rain garden in clay, retained and infiltrated 100 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during water years 2004-07. The turf rain garden in clay occasionally had runoff exceed its confining boundaries, but was still able to retain 96 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during the same time period. Precipitation intensity and number of antecedent dry days were important variables that influenced when the storage capacity of underlying soils would become saturated, which resulted in pooled water in the rain gardens. Because the rooftop area that drained runoff to each rain garden was approximately five times larger than the area of the rain garden itself, evapotranspiration was a small percentage of the annual water budget. For example, during water year 2005, the maximum evapotranspiration of total influent volume ranged from 21 percent for the turf rain garden in clay to 25 percent for the turf rain garden in sand, and the minimum ranged from 12 percent for the prairie rain garden in clay to 19 percent for the prairie rain garden in sand. Little to no runoff left each rain garden as effluent and a small percentage of runoff returned to the

  8. Radionuclides in milk of dairy heifers raised on forages harvested from phosphatic clay soils on reclaimed mined land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, C.R.; Umana, R.; Hayen, M.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    Alfalfa (AR; Medicago sativa L.) and corn (CSR; Zea mays L.) were grown in phosphatic clay soils on phosphate-mined reclaimed land in central Florida. Corn (CSC) also was grown on unmined land and served as a control forage. Upon harvesting, plants were chopped and ensiled. Concentrations of {sup 226}Ra averaged 2.44, 0.26 and 0.15; {sup 210}Pb averaged 1.04, 0.63, and 0.52; and {sup 210}Po averaged 1.59, 0.59, and 1.26 Bq kg{sup -1} DM for AR, CSR, and CSC, respectively. These forages were fed separately to Holstein dairy replacement heifers (Bos taurus) (n=15 per forage) from approximately 9 to 25 mo of age. Heifers gave birth to calves at approximately 24 mo of age. Samples of milk were collected on d 1, 15, and 30 of lactation and analyzed for radionuclides. Averaged across sampling days, heifers fed AR had greater milk concentrations of {sup 226}Ra compared with those fed CSR (0.27 vs. 0.22 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.10), which, in turn, had greater milk concentrations compared with heifers fed CSC (0.22 vs. 0.13 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.05). Heifers fed AR also had greater milk concentrations of {sup 210}Po compared with heifers fed CSR (0.58 vs. 0.30 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.10), but values of CSR-fed heifers were not different from CSC-fed heifers (0.45 Bq kg{sup -1} DM). Lead-210 was greater in milk from heifers fed CSR compared with those fed AR or CSC (1.38 vs. 0.94 and 0.92 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.13), respectively. Plasma S and Cu concentrations suggested subclinical molybdenosis in heifers fed AR. However, all heifers grew at an acceptable rate, conceived normally, had normal gestation periods, gave high quality colostrum at calving, and produced similar amounts of milk. 17 refs., 9 tabs.

  9. The key role of micromorphology in studies of the genesis of clay minerals and their associations in soils and its relevance to advances in the philosophy of soil science

    OpenAIRE

    CHURCHMAN, Gordon Jock

    2013-01-01

    Micromorphological observations from 3 different published works have been studied to aid understanding of aggregation and of colloids, both unique to soils. Saprolites in Hong Kong included ‘veins’ of different thicknesses and colours. Optical mineralogy identified them as infill from the neogenesis of clays in rock fractures. The common thicker infills resulted from weathering. Dark infill contained comminuted primary minerals whereas thin pale infill originated hydrothe...

  10. Clay properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report an overview will be given of the basic properties of (suspended) clay particles. In section 2 the structure of clay minerals will be described. The forces between suspended particles (section 3) and the possible consequences of them, flocculation or deflocculation (sections 4 and 5) w

  11. Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Bongoua-Devisme, Jeanne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Parisot, Nicolas; Peyret, Pierre; Leyval, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the

  12. Disturbance of water-extractable phosphorus determination by colloidal particles in a heavy clay soil from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.F.; Chardon, W.J.; Salm, van der C.

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication January 25, 2005. Water extraction methods are widely used to extract phosphorus (P) from soils for both agronomic and environmental purposes. Both the presence of soil colloids in soil water filtrates, and the contribution of colloidal P to the molybdate-reactive phosphorus

  13. Salinity control in a clay soil beneath an orchard irrigated with treated waste water in the presence of a high water table: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, David; Laufer, Asher; Bardhan, Gopali; Levy, Guy J.

    2015-12-01

    A citrus orchard planted on a structured, clay soil associated with a high water table, irrigated by drip irrigation system using treated waste water (TWW) and local well water (LWW) was considered here. The scope of the present study was to analyze transport of mixed-ion, interacting salts in a combined vadose zone-groundwater flow system focusing on the following issues: (i) long-term effects of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system, identifying the main factors (e.g., soil salinity, soil sodicity) that control these effects, and (ii) salinity control aiming at improving both crop productivity and groundwater quality. To pursue this two-fold goal, 3-D numerical simulations of field-scale flow and transport were performed for an extended period of time, considering realistic features of the soil, water table, crop, weather and irrigation, and the coupling between the flow and the transport through the dependence of the soil hydraulic functions, K(ψ) and θ(ψ), on soil solution concentration C, and sodium adsorption ratio, SAR. Results of the analyses suggest that in the case studied, the long-term effect of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system is attributed to the enhanced salinity of the TWW, and not to the increase in soil sodicity. The latter findings are attributed to: (i) the negative effect of soil salinity on water uptake, and the tradeoff between water uptake and drainage flux, and, concurrently, solute discharge below the root zone; and, (ii) the tradeoff between the effects of C and SAR on K(ψ) and θ(ψ). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that a data-driven protocol for soil salinity control, based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water, guided by the soil solution salinity at the centroid of the soil volume active in water uptake, may lead to a substantial increase in crop yield, and to a substantial decrease in the salinity load in the groundwater.

  14. Effects of discharging acid-mine drainage into evaporation ponds lined with clay on chemical quality of the surrounding soil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapanda, F.; Nyamadzawo, G.; Nyamangara, J.; Wuta, M.

    Compacted clay layers are commonly used as liners to limit acid-mine drainage (AMD) percolation into the surrounding environment from containment areas or ponds. In the long term, this practical and sometimes economical means of AMD disposal has often presented other considerable environmental challenges. The chemical quality of soil, river water and groundwater surrounding evaporation ponds lined with clay was determined at Iron-Duke Mine in Glendale, Zimbabwe. At this mine over 150 m 3/d of wastewater containing AMD were discharged daily for over a decade. The soils located downslope in relation to the ponds and closer to the ponds were acidified (pH 2.8-4.4) and enriched with salts. The level of contamination was highest within 15 m from the ponds and at 2-6 m depths from the surface. The variability in soil pH and electrical conductivity with position, distance from the ponds and depth from surface was attributed to the vertical and lateral flow of contaminated groundwater containing leachates from the ponds. The groundwater and river water surrounding the ponds were contaminated with arsenic (As), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), sulphate, salts and acidity, and the level of contamination increased with proximity to the ponds. Potential public health hazards from consumption of the groundwater and river water were high. It was concluded that discharging of AMD into the ponds has not been an environmentally effective means of AMD containment and disposal. There was need for better AMD disposal means, particularly those that would improve the containment of AMD to reduce its seepage.

  15. Numerical investigation of soil plugging effect inside sleeve of cast-in-place piles driven by vibratory hammers in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong Jie; Chen, Fu Quan; Dong, Yi Zhi

    2016-01-01

    During driving sleeve of cast-in-place piles by vibratory hammers, soils were squeezed into sleeve and then soil plugging was formed. The physic-mechanical properties of the soil plug have direct influence on the load transmission between the sleeve wall and soil plug. Nevertheless, the researches on this issue are insufficient. In this study, finite element and infinite element coupling model was introduced, through the commercial code ABAQUS, to simulate the full penetration process of the sleeve driven from the ground surface to the desired depth by applying vibratory hammers. The research results indicated that the cyclic shearing action decreases both in soil shear strength and in granular cementation force when the sleeve is driven by vibratory hammers, which leads to a partially plugged mode of the soil plug inside the sleeve. Accordingly, the penetration resistance of sleeve driven by vibratory hammers is the smallest compared to those by other installation methods. When driving the sleeve, the annular soil arches forming in the soil plug at sleeve end induce a significant rise in the internal shaft resistance. Moreover, the influence of vibration frequencies, sleeve diameters, and soil layer properties on the soil plug was investigated in detail, and at the same time improved formulas were brought forward to describe the soil plug resistance inside vibratory driven sleeve. PMID:27386238

  16. Dispersão de argila em microagregados de solo incubado com calcário Clay dispersion in microaggregates of soil incubated with limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tulio Spera

    2008-12-01

    incubated with 0, 1.9, 3.8, 5.7, 7.6 and 15.2 Mg ha-1. After the incubation period, the micro and macro porosity, soil density, clay dispersion, hydraulic conductivity and concentration of exchangeable Al, Ca and Mg and soil organic matter were evaluated. Soil density, clay dispersion, pH and Ca and Mg concentration increased with lime application, while macro porosity, hydraulic conductivity, soil organic matter, and Al decreased. The increase of pH and hydraulic conductivity were higher in the sterilized soil. Liming effects were more evident at a rate of 3.8 Mg ha-1. Soil sterilization increased the pH value and decreased the organic matter content and Ca, besides the hydraulic conductivity. Micro- aggregate dispersion in limed soils can, at least partially, contribute to soil compaction.

  17. Clay minerals in pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateo, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Argille, Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Clay minerals are fundamental constituents of life, not only as possible actors in the development of life on the Earth (Cairns-Smith and Hartman, 1986), but mainly because they are essential constituents of soils, the interface between the solid planet and the continental biosphere. Many, many authors have devoted themselves to the study of clays and clay minerals since the publication of the early modern studies by Grim (1953, 1962) and Millot (1964). In those years two very important associations were established in Europe (Association Internationale pour l'Etude des Argiles, AIPEA) and in the USA (Clay Mineral Society, CMS). The importance of these societies is to put together people that work in very different fields (agronomy, geology, geochemistry, industry, etc.), but with a common language (clays), very useful in scientific work. Currently excellent texts are being published, but introductory notes are also available on the web (Schroeder, 1998).

  18. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  19. Fracture mapping in clays: the design and application of a mobile gas geochemistry laboratory for the analysis of soil gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated soil gas analyses for helium, radon, carbon dioxide, oxygen and organic gases allow the accurate interpretation of soil gas signatures as indicators of underlying structure. The most important features observed in the patterns of soil gas behaviour are large variations over faults and fractures. Structures such as these provide channelways for fluid movement in the upper crust. The construction of a mobile gas geochemistry laboratory for the analysis of soil gases at field investigation sites, and the subsequent trials carried out to evaluate the laboratory, clearly show that the soil gas investigation technique is accurate and viable as an independent site investigation method for the study of fracturing and groundwater movement around potential waste repository sites. (author)

  20. Amplification of plasmid DNA bound on soil colloidal particles and clay minerals by the polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify a 600-base pair (bp) sequence of plasmid pGEX-2T DNA bound on soil colloidal particles from Brown soil (Alfisol) and Red soil (Ultisol), and three different minerals (goethite, kaolinite, montmorillonite). DNA bound on soil colloids, kaolinite, and montmorillonite was not amplified when the complexes were used directly but amplification occurred when the soil colloid or kaolinite-DNA complex was diluted, 10- and 20-fold. The montmorillonite-DNA complex required at least 100-fold dilution before amplification could be detected. DNA bound on goethite was amplified irrespective of whether the complex was used directly, or diluted 10- and 20-fold. The amplification of mineral-bound plasmid DNA by PCR is, therefore, markedly influenced by the type and concentration of minerals used. This information is of fundamental importance to soil molecular microbial ecology with particular reference to monitoring the fate of genetically engineered microorganisms and their recombinant DNA in soil environments.

  1. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  2. The role of dissolved organic matter and its adsorption for the fate of heavy metals in clay-rich soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaey, Yasser B.; Jansen, Boris; El-Shater, Abdel-Hamid; El-Haddad, Abdel-Aziz; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Heavy metals (HMs), due to their toxic and hazardous nature, are possibly the most widespread contaminants imposing a serious threat to human health. To find out the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and soil constituents on the uptake of Cu, Ni, and Zn, batch adsorption experiments were conducted using five soils sampled from Egypt. Sorption data were interpreted in terms of the initial mass (IM) isotherm model. In all soils, for all metals and in all experiments, the majority of the HMs were immobilized on the solid phase. The addition of DOM and timing thereof was found to play a pivotal role in determining the affinity of the HMs for the solid phase. When DOM and HMs were added simultaneously, Cu affinity decreased in Fe-(hydr)oxide rich soils (by 7%) and increased in soils poor in Fe-(hydr)oxide (by 6-10%). When DOM was added first, followed by HMs in a later stage affinity of Cu strongly increased in most soils. In contrast, for both Ni and Zn the affinity to the solid phase was enhanced (3-18%) in presence of DOM regardless of whether the DOM was added simultaneously with or prior to HMs addition. The difference is explained by Cu binding to the solid phase and to DOM through strong inner-sphere complexes, whereas Ni and Zn interacted predominantly through weaker electrostatic interactions. As a result Cu was able to bind more strongly to previously adsorbed DOM on the solid phase in case of smectite, while this effect was counteracted by the coating of available specific binding sites on Fe-(hydr)oxides.

  3. Soil Water Repellency of Sands and Clay as Affected by Particle Size%砂土和黏土的颗粒差异对土壤斥水性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨松; 吴珺华; 董红艳; 张燕明

    2016-01-01

    斥水性土壤广泛存在于自然界中,并且对土壤环境和作物生长等有重要影响。建立理想化的土壤颗粒模型对砂土和黏土的斥水特性进行计算分析。结果表明:当接触角很小时,砂土中不存在斥水现象。随着接触角的增大,砂土斥水性与含水率密切相关,砂土的密实度对其斥水性也有重要影响,当砂土比较密实时,土壤的“亲水”与“斥水”特性对含水率特别敏感,随着含水率的变化,砂土可能由亲水性较好的土壤转变为斥水性土壤;当砂土比较松散时,土壤颗粒的斥水性对含水率并不敏感。当黏土接触角略小于90°且湿润半径b也较小时,黏土也存在斥水现象。如果黏土颗粒的接触角较小或接触角小于90°且湿润半径b较大,黏土总是亲水的。黏土含水率较大时,斥水特性由土壤颗粒的接触角决定。%Water-repellent soils,existing widely in nature,have some important effects on soil environment and crop growth. In order to analyze water repellency of sand and clay,models of sand and clay different in particle size were built. Results showed that no phenomenon of water repellency was found in sand soil when the contact angle of water with sand was small. Water repellency of sand soil was closely related to soil water content when the sand-water contact angle was big. Compactness of the soil was another important factor affecting soil water repellency. When the sand soil was highly compacted,whether the soil was hydrophilic or hydrophobic was very sensitive to water content,and it might switch from one state to another with changing soil water content. When the sand soil was quite loose,it was no longer sensitive to soil water content. In clay soil with soil-water contact angle being slightly less than 90°and wetting radius b being small,the phenomenon of water repellency was observed. But when the clay soil was much smaller than 90°in soil-water and

  4. Constitutive model for overconsolidated clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the relationships between the Hvorslev envelope,the current yield sur-face and the reference yield surface,a new constitutive model for overconsolidated clays is proposed. It adopts the unified hardening parameter,to which the potential failure stress ratio and the characteristic state stress ratio are introduced. The model can describe many characteristics of overconsolidated clays,including stress-strain relationships,strain hardening and softening,stress dilatancy,and stress path dependency. Compared with the Cam-clay model,the model only re-quires one additional soil parameter which is the slope of the Hvorslev envelope. Comparisons with data from triaxial drained compression tests for Fujinomori clay show that the proposed model can rationally describe overconsolidated properties. In addition,the model is also used to predict the stress-strain relationship in the isotropic consolidation condition and the stress paths in the undrained triaxial compression tests.

  5. Constitutive model for overconsolidated clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO YangPing; HOU Wei; ZHOU AnNan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the relationships between the Hvorslev envelope, the current yield surface and the reference yield surface, a new constitutive model for overconsolidated clays is proposed. It adopts the unified hardening parameter, to which the potential failure stress ratio and the characteristic state stress ratio are introduced. The model can describe many characteristics of overconsolidated clays, including stress-strain relationships, strain hardening and softening, stress dilatancy, and stress path dependency. Compared with the Cam-clay model, the model only requires one additional soil parameter which is the slope of the Hvorslev envelope. Comparisons with data from triaxial drained compression tests for Fujinomori clay show that the proposed model can rationally describe overconsolidated properties. In addition, the model is also used to predict the stress-strain relationship in the isotropic consolidation condition and the stress paths in the undrained triaxial compression tests.

  6. Interaction Effects of Insecticides on Enzyme Activities in Black Clay Soil from Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nasreen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In practice pesticides are extensively used in agriculture as a part of pest control strategies. Two insecticides, endosulfan (organochlorine and profenophos (organophosphate, were assessed for their effects on the activities of protease (in terms of tyrosine formed from casein and urease (as ammonia released from urea in soil, collected from a fallow groundnut field by applications of insecticides at normal field rates and at higher concentrations (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 kg ha-1, in a laboratory study. The results showed a strong positive influence on protease and urease enzyme activities in soil treated with 2.5 and 5.0 kg ha-1 dry soil and they were significantly (P ≤ 0.05 higher than the control over the course of incubation. In soil treatment, there was a significant increase in protease and decrease in urease activities after 24h of incubation which continued up to 20 days. However, a significant decrease in both protease and urease enzyme activities was observed in 30 and 40 days of incubation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.60.2.671

  7. Satellite based radar interferometry to estimate large-scale soil water depletion from clay shrinkage: possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, te B.; Hanssen, R.F.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based radar interferometry is a technique capable of measuring small surface elevation changes at large scales and with a high resolution. In vadose zone hydrology, it has been recognized for a long time that surface elevation changes due to swell and shrinkage of clayey soils can serve as

  8. Effects of Different Factors on Water Flow and Solute Transport Investigated by Time Domain Reflectometry in Sandy Clay Loam Field Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-09-01

    Factors affecting preferential flow and transport in the vadose zone need to be investigated by experiments and simulations to protect groundwater against surface applied chemicals. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of several factors (soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate) and their interactions on the extent of preferential flow and transport in a sandy clay loam field soil using the time domain reflectometry (TDR) for measuring SWC and electrical conductivity (EC) in 12 treatments, modeling (by HYDRUS-1D and VS2DTI) the measured SWC and EC, and conducting statistical tests for comparing the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) obtained by inversely fitting in the CXTFIT program. The study results showed that the applied solution moved faster in the undisturbed, wet initial SWC, and higher application rate experimental conditions than in the disturbed, dry initial SWC, and lower application rate, respectively, based on the analysis of the changes in TDR measured SWC and EC with depth at 1, 2, 5, and 15 h of the experiments. However, the effects of interactive factors or treatments on water flow and solute transport were not clear enough. The modeling results showed that HYDRUS-1D was better than VS2DTI in the estimation of EC and especially SWC, but overall the models had relatively low performances in the simulations. Statistical test results also showed that the treatments had different flow and transport characteristics because they were divided into different groups in terms of the means of SWC and EC and solute transport parameters. These results suggest that similar experiments with more distinct interactions and modeling studies with different approaches need to be considered for better understanding the complex flow and transport processes in the vadose zone. PMID:23002311

  9. Adsorção de fósforo em solos de argila de atividade baixa Phosphate sorption in low activity clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Souza Valladares

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo foram avaliadas possíveis correlações entre atributos físicos e químicos do solo e a capacidade máxima de adsorção de fósforo (CMAP em solos com argila de atividade baixa de diferentes regiões do Brasil, sendo utilizadas amostras de horizontes superficiais (A e subsuperficiais (B de 16 perfis de solos. As doses para a determinação da CMAP foram calculadas com base no teor de fósforo remanescente e variaram de 0 a 135 mg.L-1. A partir dos dados obtidos foram então construídas isotermas de adsorção de Langmuir. Foram feitas correlações entre CMAP e os teores de argila, de carbono orgânico, ki, kr, superfície específica, teor de alumínio determinado por ataque sulfúrico e teores das diferentes formas de ferro extraível. Foi observada grande variação nos valores de CMAP para o horizonte superficial (48 a 1429 mg.kg-1 e para o horizonte subsuperficial (455 e 1.667 mg.kg-1. Os coeficientes de correlação demonstraram haver uma associação significativa entre a CMAP e o teor de argila dos solos, ferro e alumínio, determinados pelo ataque sulfúrico e ferro extraído com ditionito-citrato-bicarbonato (DCB. A análise de regressão múltipla mostrou bom ajuste aos valores da CMAP com base em atributos dos solos estudados.In this study possible correlations between physical and chemical properties and the maximum phosphorus adsorption capacity (MAPC were evaluated in soils with low activity clay from different regions of Brazil, using samples from the surface (A and subsurface (B horizons of 16 soil profiles. The dosages for the determination of MAPC were calculated from the level of remaining phosphorus and they ranged from 0 to 135 mg L-1. From this data isotherms of P adsorption were built. Correlations were tested between MAPC and the clay content, organic carbon, ki, kr, specific surface, Al content determined by sulfuric acid attack, and content of different forms of extracted iron. A high variation in the

  10. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  11. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  12. Organic waste treatment with organically modified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of organically modified clays in hazardous waste management applications offers a significant new and untapped potential. These clays may be used in the stabilization of organic wastes and organically contaminated soils, for waste water treatment, for oil spill control, for liner systems beneath fuel oil storage tanks, and as a component within liner systems of hazardous waste storage treatment and disposal facilities. Organically modified clays (organophilic clays) may be employed in each of these systems to adsorb organic waste constituents, enhancing the performance of the applications

  13. Long term corrosion of iron and non alloy or low alloy steels in clay soils. Physico-chemical characterisation and electrochemical study of archaeological analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archaeological objects of Gallo-Roman and Merovingian time, and from a battlefield of World War 1, were studied to better understand long term corrosion phenomena of iron in clay soils. This study is part of the French national program about nuclear waste deep repository, conducted by the ANDRA (French national Agency for Radioactive Waste Management). Iron archaeological analogues make a valuable contribution to the specifying of containers for long lived and high level wastes (HLWs), because they provide access to the considered time scale. The experimental issue is divided into two major parts: - a physico-chemical characterisation of corrosion products, by Raman spectroscopy; - an electrochemical study of the behaviour of the different corrosion layers. Although the metallic material is different between ancient artefacts (ferrite) and 1914-1918 remains (hypo-eutectoid steels), the same stable phases are identified in their corrosion products: mainly iron oxides and oxi-hydroxides. From a macroscopic point of view, these products are staggered into two layers: an internal one, and an external one, which contains soil markers. Under the microscope, a complex composite structure appears. Goethite a-FeOOH, which was identified on each object, is frequently in contact with the metal core. The average corrosion rate in the burial environment, deduced from the layers thickness, highlights a significant slowdown of corrosion after the first burial time, about one century. The electrochemical study showed the predominant role of transport phenomena in the pores of corrosion layers. The behaviour of the metal - internal layer system is well explained by a model of porous electrode (De Levie theory). Despite its porosity, the internal layer is protective, as it leads to a significant decrease of the corrosion rate (about ten time). (author)

  14. Evaluation of Long-Term Application of Organic Residues on Accumulation of Organic Matter and Improvement of Soil Chemical Properties in a Clay Terrace Soil of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Egashira, Kazuhiko; Han, Jing-Long; Karim, A.J.M. Sirajul; Abu Zofar Md. Moslehuddin; Yamada, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The field experiment on the long-term application of organic residues was started in 1988 at the farm of Bangabandhu Shekh Mujibur Rahamn Agricultural University (BSMRAU; named as Institute of Postgraduate Studies in Agriculture (ISPA)until 1998) and is continued until now. Five kinds of organic residues (no-application, rice straw green manure, compost and cowdung) were applied every June to cover soil surface uniformly as a thin layer and incorporated into soil to the depth of 10cm. Rice(Ju...

  15. 几种土壤及黏土矿物对多氯联苯吸附特性的研究%Adsorption Charcteristics of PCBs in Soils and Clay Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司雄元; 王寅; 陈倩倩; 司友斌

    2012-01-01

    采用批量平衡试验,研究了不同土壤及长黏土矿物对多氯联苯吸附特性。结果表明:多氯联苯浓度范围为0.25~5.0mg L-1时,不同土壤及黏土矿物对多氯联苯的吸附均能用Freundlich方程很好地拟合,随着溶液中多氯联苯浓度的增加,土壤及黏土矿物对多氯联苯的吸附量增加;几种土壤对多氯联苯吸附量大小顺序为:红壤〉黄褐土〉砂姜黑土,土壤有机质、粘粒等对多氯联苯吸附起主要作用,土壤更易吸附高氯代PCB77;黏土矿物对多氯联苯吸附量大小顺序为:纳米蒙脱石〉纳米SiO2〉凹凸棒石,黏土矿物吸附多氯联苯能力的大小与黏土矿物的比表面积、粒径、层状结构等有关;多氯联苯本身分子的大小影响其在黏土矿物上的吸附;土壤中添加黏土矿物可以提高对多氯联苯的吸附。%Adsorption characteristics of PCBs in soils and clay minerals were studied using the batch equilibration technique.Results showed that the adsorption of PCBs conformed to the Freundlich equation when the concentrations of PCBs were from 0.25 mg L-1 to 5.0 mg L-1,and the adsorption of PCBs in soils and clay minerals increased with the increase of initial concentration.The adsorption capacity of soils for PCBs followed the order red soil yellow brown soil shajiang black soil.The contents of organic matter and clay in soil governed adsorption of PCBs,and the high chlorine of PCBs were easier to be absorbed by soils.The adsorption capacity of clay minerals for PCBs followed the order nanometer-sized montmorillonite nanometer-sized SiO2 attapulgite.The adsorption ability of clay minerals for PCBs related to the surface area,diameter and layered structure of clay minerals.The molecular size of PCBs also affected the adsorption.Adding clay minerals to soil could improve the adsorption ability.

  16. Study on Engineering Geological Property of Q2 Overlapping Clay Soil in Ningxiang along Changsha- Yiyang Railway%长益城际宁乡Q2网纹黏土工程地质特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪莹鹤; 郭建湖; 赵新益; 高威

    2011-01-01

    研究目的:长沙至益阳城际铁路宁乡境内广泛分布Q2网纹状红黏土,这种土体性质有很强的区域性,城际铁路对路基的沉降变形控制十分严格,所以针对此类路基如何采用合理的处理方法是一个关键问题.为了全面了解宁乡Q2网纹状红黏土的工程性质,结合现场地质调绘、钻探、原位测试及室内试验,对土体的形态成因、物理性质、强度特性、变形固结特性以及膨胀特性进行系统的探讨,为路基设计提供可靠的依据.研究结论:网纹状土是在湿热的气候条件及多水的环境下,红黏土经多次淋溶沉淀作用而形成;网纹土的孔隙比比一般黏土要大,饱和度一般低于90%,为非饱和土;液限及液性指数较高,为高液限土;天然状态下网纹土的强度较高,一般处于硬塑~坚硬状态,承载力可达200 kPa;网纹土属于中压缩性土,下层网纹土压缩性比上层土要高;网纹土是典型的超固结土,表层的超固结比达到15.4;网纹土一般为弱膨胀土.%Research purposes; The Q2 overlapping clay soil is widely distributed in Ningxiang along the ChangshaYiyang Railway and it is hardly found in other regions. To choose the proper method to treat this type of soil is the key problem because the subgrade settlement of intercity railway must be controlled strictly. Through the in - situ investigation, drilling exploration, in -situ test and indoor experiment, etc, the study is done on the soils morphology and genesis, physical property, strength characteristics, deformation consolidation and expansive property to know the engineering characteristics of the overlapping clay soil for providing the reliable basis for the subgrade design. Research conclusions;The overlapping soil is formed from the red clay caused by the effect of leaching and depositing under the warm and wet environment, and it is a typical unsaturated soil with void ratio being bigger than red clay and saturation degree

  17. Adjustment of the expedite method for clay content determination in Rondônia soils Ajuste de método expedito para determinação de teor de argila em solos de Rondônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo André Schlindwein

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil clay content is an important soil attribute and has been used to classification of phosphorus status in the soil in order to determinate the needing of phosphorus amounts to be applied to crops production. The aim of this research was to adjust the method for soil clay content determination, adopted by the laboratories of Southern Brazil (ROLAS-RS/SC, for soil clay content evaluation in Rondônia soils. The study was conducted using 50 soil samples from Rondônia State with wide range clay content. It was tested shaking periods (1.5, 2.0 and 2.5h associated with periods for soil particles decantation (1.5 and 2.0h to correlate with the standard method for soil texture testing, known as the pipette method. Clay content determined through this method was significantly correlated with pipette method. The better treatment was the combination of 2.0h of shaking and 1.5h of decantation, resulted in total period of 3.5h, which reduced the period to determine the soil clay content without loss of accuracy.O teor de argila é um importante atributo de solo e é utilizado na determinação de faixas de teores de fósforo para fins de recomendação de adubação. O objetivo deste trabalho foi ajustar o método de determinação de argila utilizado pelos laboratórios da ROLAS-RS/SC para avaliar os teores de argila dos solos de Rondônia. O estudo foi conduzido com 50 amostras de solos do Estado de Rondônia, com diferentes teores de argila. O teor de argila foi determinado utilizando-se o método da ROLAS-RS/SC, com diferentes períodos de agitação (1,5; 2,0 e 2,5h e de decantação das partículas do solo (1,5 e 2,0h e o método da pipeta, considerado padrão para essa determinação. Os teores de argila determinados nas combinações de períodos de agitação e de decantação se correlacionaram significativamente com os teores determinados pelo método da pipeta. O melhor tratamento foi a combinação de 2,0h de agitação e 1,5h de decanta

  18. Comparative short-term effects of sewage sludge and its biochar on soil properties, maize growth and uptake of nutrients on a tropical clay soil in Zimbabwe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Willis Gwenzi; Moreblessing Muzava; Farai Mapanda; Tonny P Tauro

    2016-01-01

    Soil application of biochar from sewage could potentialy enhance carbon sequestration and close urban nutrient balances. In sub-Saharan Africa, comparative studies investigating plant growth effect and nutrients uptake on tropical soils amended with sewage sludge and its biochar are very limited. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of sewage sludge and its biochar on soil chemical properties, maize nutrient and heavy metal uptake, growth and biomass partitioning on a tropical clayey soil. The study compared three organic amendments; sewage sludge (SS), sludge biochar (SB) and their combination (SS+SB) to the unamended control and inorganic fertilizers. Organic amendments were applied at a rate of 15 t ha–1 for SS and SB, and 7.5 t ha–1 each for SS and SB. Maize growth, biomass production and nutrient uptake were signiifcantly improved in biochar and sewage sludge amendments compared to the unamended control. Comparable results were observed with F, SS and SS+SB on maize growth at 49 d of sowing. Maize growth for SB, SS, SS+SB and F increased by 42, 53, 47, and 49%, respectively compared to the unamended control. Total biomass for SB, SS, SS+SB, and F increased by 270, 428, 329, and 429%, respectively compared with the unamended control. Biochar amendments reduced Pb, Cu and Zn uptakes by about 22% compared with sludge alone treatment in maize plants. However, there is need for future research based on the current pot experiment to determine whether the same results can be produced under ifeld conditions.

  19. The plastic limit of clays

    OpenAIRE

    Haigh, Stuart K.; Vardanega, Paul J.; Bolton, Malcolm D.

    2013-01-01

    The plastic limit of soils was first described by Atterberg in 1911. The thread-rolling test was standardised at the US Public Roads Bureau in the 1920s and 1930s, and has subsequently become one of the standard tests of soil mechanics. This paper reviews the original definitions of plastic limit as proposed by Atterberg, and proposes that the brittle failure observed in the plastic limit test is caused by either air entry or cavitation in the clay. Critical state soil mechanics is used to sh...

  20. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of soils from the moray cusco archaeological site: a study by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceron Loayza, Maria L., E-mail: malucelo@hotmail.com; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge A.; Mejia Santillan, Mirian E. [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Laboratorio de Analisis de Suelos, Laboratorio de Espectroscopia Moessbauer, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Peru)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this work is to report the advances in the elemental and structural characterization of the clay fraction of soils from the terraces of the Moray Archaeological site, located 38 km north of the city of Cusco, Cusco Region. One sample was collected from each of the twelve terraces of this site and its clay fraction was separated by sedimentation. Previously the pH of the raw samples was measured resulting that all of the samples were from alkaline to strongly alkaline. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used for the elemental characterization, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy (TMS), using the {gamma} 14.4 keV nuclear resonance transition in {sup 57}Fe, were used for the structural characterization of the clays and clay minerals present in each sample. The EDXRF analyses of all the samples show the presence of relatively high concentrations of sulfur in some of the samples and relatively high concentrations of calcium in all of the samples, which may be related to the high alkalinity of the samples. By XRD it is observed the presence of quartz, calcite, gypsum, cronstedtite, 2:1 phyllosilicates, and iron oxides. The mineralogical analysis of Fe by TMS shows that it is present in the form of hematite and occupying Fe{sup 2 + } and Fe{sup 3 + } sites in phyllosilicates, cronstedtite, and other minerals not yet identified.

  1. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of soils from the moray cusco archaeological site: a study by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón Loayza, María L.; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge A.; Mejía Santillán, Mirian E.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the advances in the elemental and structural characterization of the clay fraction of soils from the terraces of the Moray Archaeological site, located 38 km north of the city of Cusco, Cusco Region. One sample was collected from each of the twelve terraces of this site and its clay fraction was separated by sedimentation. Previously the pH of the raw samples was measured resulting that all of the samples were from alkaline to strongly alkaline. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used for the elemental characterization, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), using the γ 14.4 keV nuclear resonance transition in 57Fe, were used for the structural characterization of the clays and clay minerals present in each sample. The EDXRF analyses of all the samples show the presence of relatively high concentrations of sulfur in some of the samples and relatively high concentrations of calcium in all of the samples, which may be related to the high alkalinity of the samples. By XRD it is observed the presence of quartz, calcite, gypsum, cronstedtite, 2:1 phyllosilicates, and iron oxides. The mineralogical analysis of Fe by TMS shows that it is present in the form of hematite and occupying Fe2 + and Fe3 + sites in phyllosilicates, cronstedtite, and other minerals not yet identified.

  2. 粘土矿物固定化微生物对土壤中阿特拉津的降解研究%Biodegradation of Atrazine in Soils by Clay Minerals Immobilized a Degradation Bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪玉; 王磊; 司友斌; 孟雪梅

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradation of atrazine in soils by clay minerals immobilized a degradation bacterium were studied. The bacterium which was isolated from activated sludge by enrichment using atrazine as sole source of carbon and nitrogen was preliminarily identified as Ochrobac-trum sp., according to its physiological-biochemical characteristics, photos of ESEM and the similarity analysis of its 16S rDNA gene sequence. The strains growed well on clay minerals, and reached logarithmic phase at 48 h. The degradation rate of atrazine was larger signifi-cally when adding degradation bacteria into soils. The biodegradation capacity by immobilized microorganism on clay minerals was improved compared with free microorganism. The smaller the particle size of clay minerals, the more the biodegradation of atrazine. The effect of immobilized nano-clay minerals was better than corresponding clays. The degradation of atrazine were 42.47%, 46.19%, 56.31 % respectively, after adding free microorganism into vertisol, alfisol and red soil on 28 d. When adding immobilized microorganism by montmorillonite, nano-mont-morillonite, the degradation of atrazine were 52.16%, 63.97% in vertisol, 59.28%, 63.91% in alfisol, and 68.03%, 76.59% in red soil. The degradation of atrazine in the soil without microorganism was 29.16% in vertisol, 30.63% in alfisol, 41.47% in red soil. Atrazine degradation in soils could be described by first-order kinetic equation. The effect of degradation varied from different soils. The(t_(1/2) of atrazine was 36.9 d in red soil, 49.1 d in vertisol, and 55.0 d in alfisol without microorganism. When adding immobilized microorganism by nano-montmorillonite, half-life was 16.3 d, 25.3 d, 21.7 d respectively.%以粘土矿物为载体,采用吸附挂膜法对已筛选的阿特拉津降解菌株进行固定化,并应用固定化微生物降解土壤中的阿特拉津.结果表明,该菌株在粘土矿物上生长良好,根据菌种生理生化特性、

  3. Response of Soybean [Glycine Max (L. Merrill] to Lime Based Integrated Nutrient Management and Mulching on Nodulation, Nutrient Contents and Yield in Clay Loam Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Jain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was laid out in a randomized block design consisted of 6 treatments viz. (T1-Absolute control,(T2 -Farmer practice (50kg DAP/ha,(T3 RDF+ ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ Ammonium Molybdate 1.0g/kg seed+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha,(T4-RDF+ ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha +Rhizobium+PSB (@Each 5g/kg seed +Ammonium Molybdate 1.0g/kg seed,(T5-50%RDF+ ZnSO4@25 kg/ha +FYM 2.5 t/ha+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha + Rhizobium+PSB (@Each 5g/kg seed + Ammonium Molybdate 1.0g/kg seed + Mulching and(T6-50% RDF + ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ slacked lime@25 Kg Ca(OH 2 + Vermicompost 1.5t/ha + Rhizobium + *PSB (@Each 5g/kg seed + Ammonium Molybdate1.0g/kg seed + Mulching. Variety JS 95-60 was used under experimentation which was conducted in clay loam soil during kharif seasons of 2010, 2011 and 2012 at ZARS Khargone (M.P The effect of lime based integrated nutrient management and mulching on nodulation, its dry weight, nutrient contents in straw & seed at maturity and grain yield(kg/ha were found to increase significantly and beneficial due to the application of 50% RDF + ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha + V.C. 1.5t/ha + B.F.+ A.M. + Mulching(T6 followed by treatment T4 and T5 ( Table 1 over other treatments.

  4. 易盐渍区粘土夹层对土壤水盐运动的影响特征%Effect of clay interlayers on soil water-salt movement in easily-salinized regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余世鹏; 杨劲松; 刘广明

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale soil column experiments for simulation water-salt movement in clay interlayers under normal growing conditions were carried out in an easily-salinized region for different textures of soils and groundwater conditions in the Huang-Huai-Hai alluvial plain of China. In this study, the 20-year measurement was analyzed to examine the effect of clay interlayers on soil water-salt movement in easily-salinized regions. Results show that the clay inter-layer has a significant positive effect on the water-holding capacity in the soil and acts as a filter obstructing the salinity infiltration. This is especially true for restraining the penetration of surface accumulated salts. The thicker the clay interlayer is, the greater the effect will be. The range of depth to groundwater is likely to be smaller in the area with surface accumulated salts and clay interlayers around 1.0 m than that with silt loam soils around 1.5 m. And in the latter case, the salinization of soils is easily induced when the groundwater level is lower than a threshold value of 2.5 m. The amount of accumulated salts is found to be higher in clay interlayers than that in silt loam soils. Thus, proper monitoring and measures are necessary to prevent the secondary salinization of soils in the practice of water resources management.%针对黄淮海冲积平原土壤剖面中粘土夹层普遍存在的现象,在典型易盐渍区开展模拟易盐农田常规种植条件下水盐运移的大型土柱实验,基于长达20年的长系列监测数据分析,系统研究易盐渍区不同土体构型和地下水位等代表性条件下的土壤水盐运移规律和粘土夹层的影响特征.研究结果表明:粘土层有良好的保水和隔盐能力,尤其对表土积盐的抑制效果显著,且抑盐效果随粘土层厚度增加而提升;含粘土夹层土体表土积盐的地下水埋深范围更小,表土积盐高峰出现在l m左右地下水埋深,全剖面粉砂壤土土体

  5. Dredging Processes I: The Cutting of Sand, Clay & Rock - Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of cutting theories. It starts with a generic model, which is valid for all types of soil (sand, clay and rock) after which the specifics of dry sand, water saturated sand, clay, rock and hyperbaric rock are covered. For each soil type small blade angles and large blade a

  6. 膨胀土与红黏土石灰改性对比试验研究%Comparative laboratory study of lime-treated expansive soil and red clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志亮; 郭爱国; 太俊

    2013-01-01

    为探讨石灰改性膨胀土与红黏土的强度发展规律,以生石灰与消石灰改性的南阳膨胀土与郴州红黏土为研究对象,进行了无侧限抗压、固结快速直剪和固结压缩试验的对比研究。研究发现:在1a养生龄期内,石灰改性的南阳膨胀土与郴州红黏土无侧限抗压强度与养生龄期的对数基本呈线性关系;按大于最佳含水率3%制样的强度在养生28 d以后高于按最佳含水率制样;生石灰改性效果比消石灰改性效果好,由于矿物成分不同,石灰改性南阳膨胀土的效果比石灰改性郴州红黏土好。%To explore the development law of the strength of lime-treated expansive soil and red clay, the unconfined compression, consolidated quick direct shear tests and consolidation test are carried out to compare the Nanyang expansive soil and Chenzhou red clay modified by quicklime and hydrated lime respectively. The study found that during the one-year curing period of lime-treated Nanyang expansive soil and Chenzhou red clay, the unconfined compression strength is linear with the logarithm of curing age. The strength of the samples with moisture content larger than optimum moisture content for 3%after 28 days curing is higher than that of the optimum moisture content samples. In addition, the modification effect of quicklime is better than the effect of hydrated lime. Due to the different mineral composition, the modification effect of lime-treated Nanyang expansive soil is better than that of Chenzhou red clay.

  7. Comparison of soil nematode communities in three forest types on sand and clay coal-mining dumps in Germany and Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanel, L. [Academy of Science Czech Republic, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Inst. Soil Biology

    2003-12-01

    Nematode communities were studied in alder, oak and pine plantations, about 30-year-old, on sand coal-mining spoils at Cottbus in Germany and on clay coal-mining spoils at Sokolov, Czech Republic. Mean abundance of nematodes varied from 326 to 772 x 10{sup 3} ind.m{sup -2} and biomass from 286 to 795 mg.m{sup -2}. The genera Plectus, Acrobeloides, Filenchus and Aphelenchoides were common in all localities. The genera Rhabditis, Wilsonema, Tylencholaimus, Cephalenchus, Coslenchus, Rotylenchus, Aporcelaimellus, Eudorylaimus. and Prionchulus showed particular preferences for individual sites. Nematode faunas in alder and oak plantations were more affected by region than nematode faunas in pine plantations. Maturity Index and trophic diversity of nematode communities were greater in tree plantations on clay spoils than on sand spoils. Taxonomic diversity of nematode communities was greater in deciduous forest plantations on sand spoils than on clay spoils.

  8. Soil-water characteristics and pore-size distribution of lateritic clay%红黏土的土水特性及其孔隙分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙德安; 高游; 刘文捷; 韦昌富; 张升

    2015-01-01

    The pressure plate method, filter paper method and vapor equilibrium technique with saturated salt solution and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests on Guilin lateritic clay are used to investigate the soil-water characteristics and pore-size distribution of undisturbed and compacted specimens in full suction range. The test results show that the undisturbed specimen has lower water content and saturation degree than the compacted one in the suction ranging from 0 kPa to 10 MPa because of the development of internal crack of undisturbed specimen with the increasing suction. When the suction is higher than 10 MPa, the soil-water characteristic curves (SWCC) coincide with each other. In the transition zone, the SWCCs of the undisturbed and compacted specimens are different from the typical ones. The undisturbed natural specimens exhibit a unimodal pore-size distribution, and the compacted ones usually have a double-porosity microstructure. The stability of shrinkage of the undisturbed natural specimen is larger than that of the compacted one. The compacted specimens with different dry densities also have the same pore-size distribution between particles, while the inter-aggregate pore distribution differ between the compacted specimens with different dry densities. It explains that when it is expressed by the relation between suction and water content, the SWCC is independent of dry density in the high suction range. When it is expressed by the relation between suction and saturation degree, the SWCC with high dry density is higher than that with the small one.%以桂林红黏土为研究对象,采用压力板法、滤纸法和饱和盐溶液蒸气平衡法3种方法研究在全吸力范围内原状样和压实样的土水特性,并结合压汞试验研究其孔隙分布。试验结果表明:当吸力约小于10 MPa时原状样的土水特征曲线略低于压实样,主要原因是原状样内部裂隙随吸力的增加而不断发展;当吸力约大于10

  9. 农业利用对东北黑土黏粒矿物组成及养分的影响%Effect of Agricultural Use on Clay Minerals and Nutrient of Black Soil in Northeast of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑庆福; 赵兰坡

    2011-01-01

    为了明确农业利用对土壤的黏粒矿物组成差异及养分的影响;通过在东北黑土定点和历时8年的现代农业开垦利用,以研究东北黑土的黏粒矿物组成差异及养分的影响;经过8年的农业开垦利用后,东北黑土的风化进程加强,0.002~0.02 mm粉粒含量显著降低(F=5.84>P001=0.026),而黏粒含量因水土流失,增加未达到显著;土壤交换性离子活性较强,酸化程度加重,有机质含量降低,对养分保蓄能力明显下降.土壤中的伊利石含量极显著降低(F=11.25>P001=0.003),而高岭石和蒙脱石含量极显著增加(F=11.67>P001=0.003;F=13.89>P001=0.001),S/I混层矿物含量也较8年前的高;土壤黏粒矿物是极为敏感的胶体类型,它的改变会影响土壤肥力特征.%In order to identify the effect of agricultural use on clay minerals and nutrient of soil, th study of modern agriculture use of black soil in Northeast China has lasted for 8 years. Clay mineral com position and nutrient of black soil were investigated. The results showed that the weathering process of th black soil was strengthened. The content of silt fraction between 0.002 and 0.02mm was significantly de creased, while the content of clay fraction increase was not significant for soil erosion. Soil exchangeabl ion activity was strong, degree of acidification was increased, organic matter content decreased, and th nutrient holding capability decreased. The content of illite in soil was significantly lower, while the con tent of kaolinite and montmorillonite were significantly increased. The content of S / I mixed-layer miner al is higher than before 8 years. Soil clay minerals were a very sensitive type colloid, and its changes af fected soil fertility characteristics.

  10. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  11. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  12. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić; Dubravko Domitrović; Želimir Veinović

    2007-01-01

    Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs) composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the lo...

  13. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  14. Centrifuge modelling of rigid piles in soft clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, R.T.; Poder, M.; Truong, P.;

    2016-01-01

    of this study is to employ centrifuge modelling in order to derive experimental p-y curves for rigid piles embedded in over-consolidated soft clay. A kaolin clay sample was prepared and pre-consolidated by applying a constant pressure at the soil surface, while different over-consolidation ratios were achieved...

  15. Simulation and model comparison of unsaturated movement of pesticides from a large clay lysimeter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.P.M.; Gottesbüren, B.; Diekkrüger, B.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    A long-term (>10 months) leaching experiment was conducted with a large clay soil column and a rain simulator to study unsaturated transport of the nematicide aldicarb and the herbicide simazine in a cracked clay soil. Water retention and soil conductivity were derived from experimental outflow data

  16. RESEARCH OF SWELLING OF SUZAKH CLAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubetskiy Valeriy Leonidovich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the course of construction of Sangtudinsky hydropower plant-1 on the River Vakhsh, it was deemed necessary to identify clay swelling properties in the event of alterations of the humidity mode of fructured half-rock soils, or the Suzakh clay, that accommodated tunnel-shaped water outlets within a section that was 75 meters long. The depth of tunnels was about 100 m. Any interaction with swelling soils could lead to destruction of the tunnel lining. Suzakh clays demonstrated the following physical and mechanical properties: density of particles of soil ρ= 2,69 g/cm; soil density ρ = 2.40-2.47 g/cm; porosity of 8.2-10.8 %; ultimate resistance to uniaxial compression = 13.1-31.0 MPa. Water saturated clay samples disintegrated into cloddy fragments; the rate of a longitudinal ultrasonic wave in the area of unaltered soils was equal to = 2500 m/c; repulse coefficient k was equal to 15 MPa/m; solidity coefficient (according to Protodyakonov was equal to 1,5; modulus of deformation in the massif was equal to 0.23 х10 MPa. The author proposed a methodology and designed a pilot set of equipment units designated for the identification of the swelling properties of fractured half-rock soils. Results of the pilot unit operation are presented in the article. Swelling properties are based on the monolith testing results. The programme contemplated a set of experiments held in various limit states on the surface of monoliths. Dependence between the swelling pressure and the swelling deformation in the course of water saturation was identified. The experiment demonstrates that alterations of the humidity mode of free surface Suzakh clays cause the relative deformation of swelling up to 1.1 %, and if the lining is rigid, the swelling pressure can exceed 4 MPa.

  17. Calculation of the debris flow concentration based on clay content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Ningsheng; CUI; Peng; LIU; Zhonggang; WEI; Fangqiang

    2003-01-01

    The debris flow clay content has very tremendous influence on its concentration (γC). It is reported that the concentration can be calculated by applying the relative polynomial based on the clay content. Here one polynomial model and one logarithm model to calculate the concentration based on the clay content for both the ordinary debris flow and viscous debris flow are obtained. The result derives from the statistics and analysis of the relationship between the debris flow concentrations and clay content in 45 debris flow sites located in the southwest of China. The models can be applied for the concentration calculation to those debris flows that are impossible to observe. The models are available to calculate the debris flow concentration, the principles of which are in the clay content affecting on the debris flow formation, movement and suspending particle diameter. The mechanism of the relationship of the clay content and concentration is clear and reliable. The debris flow is usually of micro-viscous when the clay content is low (<3%), by analyzing the developing tendency on the basics of the relationship between the clay content and debris flow concentration. Indeed, the less the clay content, the less the concentration for most debris flows. The debris flow tends to become the water rock flow or the hyperconcentrated flow with the clay content decrease. Through statistics it is apt to transform the soil into the viscous debris flow when the clay content of ranges is in 3%-18%. Its concentration increases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 5% and 10%. But the value decreases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 10% and 18%. It is apt to transform the soil into the mudflow, when the clay content exceeds 18%. The concentration of the mudflow usually decreases with the increase of the clay content, and this developing tendency reverses to that of the micro-viscous debris flow. There is

  18. Geotechnical studies of Jaitapur marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.

    characterisEd. by high water content and high Atterberg limits. Undrained shear strength varied from 1.8 to 6 KPa. These were moderately sensitive clays. Carbonate content which varied from 3 to 27%, was found to influence engineering properties of the soil...

  19. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  20. Visualizing and Quantifying Bioaccessible Pores in Field-Aged Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Clay Soils Using Synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Kim, J.; Zhu, N.; McBeth, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial hydrocarbon degradation is environmentally significant and applicable to contaminated site remediation practices only when hydrocarbons (substrates) are physically bioaccessible to bacteria in soil matrices. Powerful X-rays are produced by synchrotron radiation, allowing for bioaccessible pores in soil (larger than 4 microns), where bacteria can be accommodated, colonize and remain active, can be visualized at a much higher resolution. This study visualized and quantified such bioaccessible pores in intact field-aged, oil-contaminated unsaturated soil fractions, and examined the relationship between the abundance of bioaccessible pores and hydrocarbon biodegradation. Using synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) at the Canadian Light Source, a large dataset of soil particle characteristics, such as pore volumes, surface areas, number of pores and pore size distribution, was generated. Duplicate samples of five different soil fractions with different soil aggregate sizes and water contents (13, 18 and 25%) were examined. The method for calculating the number and distribution of bioaccessible pores using CT images was validated using the known porosity of Ottawa sand. This study indicated that the distribution of bioaccessible pore sizes in soil fractions are very closely related to microbial enhancement. A follow-up aerobic biodegradation experiment for the soils at 17 °C (average site temperature) over 90 days confirmed that a notable decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations occurred in soils fractions with abundant bioaccessible pores and with a larger number of pores between 10 and 100 μm. The hydrocarbon degradation in bioactive soil fractions was extended to relatively high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C16-C34). This study provides quantitative information about how internal soil pore characteristics can influence bioremediation performance.

  1. Nanoporous clay with carbon sink and pesticide trapping properties

    OpenAIRE

    Woignier, Thierry; Duffours, L.; Colombel, P.; Dieudonné, P.

    2015-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the mechanisms and factors involved in the dynamics of organic carbon in soils is required to identify and enhance natural sinks for greenhouse gases. Some tropical soils, such as Andosols, have 3-6 fold higher concentrations of organic carbon than other kinds of soils containing classical clays. In the tropics, toxic pesticides permanently pollute soils and contaminate crops, water resources, and ecosystems. However, not all soils are equal in terms of pesticide c...

  2. Actual cation exchange capacity of agricultural soils and its relationship with pH and content of organic carbon and clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van P.J.; Houba, V.J.G.; Beusichem, van M.L.

    2001-01-01

    For the set up of a multinutrient 0.01 M calcium chloride (CaCl2) soil testing program a conversion from conventional soil testing programs to a CaCl2 program has been proposed in literature. Such conversion should be based on the relationship between test values of the conventional method and the C

  3. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  4. Determinación de parámetros para los modelos elastoplásticos mohr-coulomb y hardening soil en suelos arcillosos Parameter determination for the elasto-plastic models Mohr-coulomb and Hardening soil in clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Nieto Leal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta un programa de investigación desarrollado para la evaluación y determinación de los parámetros para los modelos constitutivos Mohr-Coulomb y Hardening Soil en suelos arcillosos. La metodología incluye el análisis de algunas correlaciones, ensayos básicos de caracterización y pruebas de compresión triaxial no drenada sobre muestras de suelo reconstituidas en laboratorio. A partir de los parámetros obtenidos se simuló el comportamiento esfuerzo-deformación en el programa de elementos finitos PLAXIS, evaluando a partir de un análisis comparativo, el desempeño de los modelos en relación con el comportamiento experimental del suelo. Del análisis realizado se aprecia que para el conjunto de parámetros considerados, los resultados computacionales muestran una correspondencia razonable y satisfactoria con los resultados experimentales, donde se observa una mejor aproximación al comportamiento descrito por las pruebas, en las simulaciones realizadas con el modelo Hardening Soil, cuyos resultados evidencian un mayor ajuste a la relación hiperbólica creciente, típica del tipo de suelo ensayado. De igual forma, los resultados obtenidos constituyen una validación importante de la metodología desarrollada.This article presents a research program developed for the evaluation and determination of the Morh-Coulomb model parameters and the Hardening Soil model parameters in clay soils. The metodology includes the analysis of some correlations, basic characterization soil tests and undrained compression triaxial tests carried out on reconstituted soil samples in laboratory (kaolin. From the obtained parameters the behavior stress-strain was simulated in the element finite software PLAXIS, examiningthe performance of the models by comparing the numeric calculation results with the experimental soil behavior. For the sets of considered model parameters, the analysis shows that the computational results have a reasonable

  5. Engineering property test of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志彬; 刘松玉; 蔡奕

    2015-01-01

    Engineering property of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil was studied through a series of laboratory experiments. Oil contents (mass fraction) of 4%, 8%, 12%, 16% and 20% were selected to represent different contamination degrees, and the soil specimens were manually prepared through mixing and static compaction method. Initial water content and dry density of the test kaolin clay were controlled at 10% and 1.58 g/cm3, respectively. Test results indicate that since part of the diesel oil will be released from soil by evaporation, the real water content should be derived through calibration of the quasi water content obtained by traditional test method. As contamination degree of the kaolin clay increases, both liquid limit and plastic limit decrease, but there’s only a slight increase for plasticity index. Swelling pressure of contaminated kaolin clay under confined condition will be lowered when oil-content gets higher. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of the oil-contaminated kaolin clay is influenced by not only oil content but also curing period. Increase of contamination degree will continually lower UCS of the kaolin clay specimen. In addition, electrical resistivity of the contaminated kaolin clay with given water content decreases with the increase of oil content. However, soil resistivity is in good relationship with oil content and UCS. Finally, oil content of 8% is found to be a critical value for engineering property of kaolin clay to transit from water-dominated towards oil-dominated characteristics.

  6. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    55Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the Bt-development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of 55Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for 55Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  7. Numerical Modelling of Embankment on Soft Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nujid, M. M.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to predict deformation of embankment on soft clay of Muar. The prediction performance focusing on displacement at critical fill height of 5.5 m. The study was based on reported result in 1992. With the aid of computer intelligence, the advanced constitutive soil models could be adopted to analyze the soft clay behavior. The COMSOL Multiphysics (v4.4) has been used to simulate the problem with coupled physics available in the software. The vertical displacements are in good agreement close to published result.

  8. Reconstruction of late Quaternary monsoon oscillations based on clay mineral proxies using sediment cores from the western margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.; Schneider, R.R.

    sites were from the hinterland rocks and soils. Careful evaluations of several factors that could complicate the clay distribution in marine environment indicate that the clay mineral parameters can be used as proxies for the intensity of summer monsoon...

  9. The Influence of Stress Treatments on the Microbial Biomass and the Rate of Decomposition of Humified Matter in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1983-01-01

    with CHCl3. Air-drying, C addition (unlabeled glucose), heating (80.degree. C), and grinding of the soils accelerated the evolution of labeled CO2. Grinding and heating had the largest effect, increasing CO2 evolution during the first 10 days by a factor of 15 to 22 relative to untreated soil. Air-drying...... had the least effect; it increased the CO2 evolution 7-9 times. The accelerating effect was still measurable during the 3rd month of incubation when the CO2 evolution was 1.2 to 1.9 times that from untreated soil. The treatments also affected the labeled biomass; air-drying had the least effect...... originating from straw. The addition of unlabeled glucose accelerated the evolution of labeled CO2-C in all 4 soils. The size of the effect on CO2 evolution and on the biomass was similar to that of air-drying. Grinding killed a larger percentage of the biomass in the sandy soil than in the soils with a high...

  10. Contracción de agregados de Argiudoles de la Pampa Ondulada diferenciados en su mineralogía de arcillas Shrinkage of soil aggregates from rolling Pampa Argiudolls differentiated by their clay mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Guillermo Castiglioni

    2005-07-01

    propiedades que mejor se relacionaron con la tasa de contracción residual, mientras que la presencia de carbono orgánico disminuyó sensiblemente su valor.Swelling and shrinking affect soil physical and chemical behavior. Mc Garry & Malafant improved a model with three shrinkage areas, through which it is possible to estimate parameters with physical significance to compare different soils. The objective of the present work was to determine which soil properties and characteristics of Rolling Pampa Argiudolls with different clay mineralogy, affect the model parameters of Mc Garry & Malafant. Clods of distinct horizons of three non-disturbed soils were used to set the specific volume change / gravimetric water content relationship. Estimated parameters of the three straight lines model, were correlated with soils properties and characteristics. Whereas the distinct behavior in the volume change of argilic horizons with contrasting mineralogy was mainly at low soil water contents, the influence of clay percentage was best appreciated with normal shrinkage slope and at high soil water contents. Independently of clay mineralogy, the air entry point in the argilic horizons was registered at soil moisture seldom registered in the field. In the BC and C horizons, the joined consideration of clay and CEC gave a better correlation with the residual shrinkage slope, than the values obtained pondering those parameters individually. In the A and BA horizons the CEC was the better predictive parameter of the residual shrinkage slope. Analyzing the A, BA, BC and C horizons together, equivalent moisture and particle density were the best soil properties for predicting the residual contraction rate, whereas organic carbon decreased this value significantly.

  11. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium...

  12. Experimental study on soil moisture content of geogrid-reinforced clay under freezing-thawing cycle%冻融循环下格栅加筋粘土土体含水率试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵荣飞; 宓永宁; 姜广田; 金丹; 高微

    2012-01-01

    通过一系列室内含水率测试试验,研究了格栅加筋粘土在多次冻融循环条件下土体含水率的变动情况,探讨了填料压实度,加筋层数和初始含水率对冻融后土体含水率变动的影响规律.结果表明,压实度对土体ωi影响最大,低压实度时,△ω1为正值,高压实度时,△ω1为负值;加筋层数次之,ω1值随加筋层数增加而减小,在压实度高的土体中尤为显著;初始含水率影响最弱,仅在土体压实度较低时,较大的初始含水率会引起较大的△ω1值.%Through a series of lab-tests on moisture content of soil, the change of the moisture content of the grid-reinforced clay under freezing-thawing cycle is studied herein, and then the law of the impact from the compaction degree, the reinforcement layers and the initial moisture content of the soil on the moisture content of the soil under freezing-thawing cycles are discussed. The result shows that the compaction degree has the greatest impact on the soil body ωi, i. e. △ω1 is positive when the compaction degree is low and △ω1, is negative when the compaction degree is high; meanwhile, the number of the reinforcement layers only has a secondary impact on the soli body, i. e. the value of ω1, is decreased along with the increase of the number of the reinforcement layers, while it is significant in the highly compacted soil; moreover, the impact from the initial moisture content is much less and the greater value of △ω1 is to be only arisen from a greater initial moisture content when the compaction degree of soil is low.

  13. Mineralogia e cristalografia da fração argila de horizontes coesos de solos nos tabuleiros costeiros Crystallography and mineralogy of the clay fraction of hardsetting horizons in soils of coastal tablelands in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neyde Fabíola Balarezo Giarola

    2009-02-01

    -related physical and chemical factors, but an influence of mineralogical and crystallographic properties of clay minerals was also suggested by some researchers. In this study we tested the possibility that clay fraction of hardsetting horizons of soils from the Barreiras sediments of Coastal Tablelands are predominantly kaolinitic and highly crystalline and organized, which can favor a face-to-face arrangement of the crystals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the crystallographic and mineralogical characteristics of clay minerals in hardsetting soil horizons from the sediment group Barreiras and their contribution to the hardsetting character. One non-hardsetting and five hardsetting horizons were studied along the coastal tableland. A kaolinite sample with high crystallinity degree was also included as reference. All profiles were analyzed for taxonomic classification and location of the horizons of interest. Organic matter and oxides were removed from the samples of the selected horizons. After soil dispersion, the clay fraction was individualized, treated and examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD to determine the minerals and structure degree of order/disorder, according to the method described by Plançon & Zacarie (1990. The degree of structural organization of the kaolinites of the hardsetting and non-hardsetting horizons was similar to and lower than the kaolinite used as reference. Results indicated that the hardsetting behavior of the studied soils could not be explained by clay packaging.

  14. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features

  15. Solos sob vegetação de restinga na Ilha do Cardoso (SP: II - Mineralogia das frações silte e argila Soils under restinga vegetation on the Cardoso Island (SP: II - Mineralogy of silt and clay fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Haenel Gomes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A vegetação de restinga é uma formação típica que ocorre na costa brasileira em materiais de origem quartzosa e pobres em nutrientes. Os solos que ocorrem nesses ambientes são principalmente Espodossolos e Neossolos Quartzarênicos, com incipiente processo de podzolização. A podzolização é freqüentemente estudada em regiões de clima frio, sendo escassos os estudos mineralógicos de Espodossolos em clima tropical e material de origem quartzoso. Neste trabalho foram estudados solos sob vegetação de restinga na Ilha do Cardoso-SP, com o objetivo de identificar a assembléia mineralógica da fração silte e argila deles, no intuito de dar subsídios para melhor entendimento de sua gênese. Os principais minerais encontrados na fração argila foram quartzo e caulinita e, na fração silte, feldspato e quartzo. Isso indica que nesses solos a assembléia mineralógica é relativamente mais intemperizada do que os Espodossolos encontrados sob clima mais frio, e mesmo em relação a outros solos estudados no litoral brasileiro, devido ao próprio material de origem, pobre em minerais primários intemperizáveis, e à migração de complexos organometálicos insaturados, o que aumenta seu poder de dissolução. Em alguns horizontes (2Cgj foram identificadas esmectitas, as quais podem ser herdadas ou neoformadas, e sua gênese é dissociada da podzolização.Restinga is a typical vegetation on quartzitic, sandy, nutrient-poor parent materials along the Brazilian coast.. Podzolization is the main pedogenic process in restinga soils and Spodosols and Quartzipsamments with incipient podzolization are the most common soils. Podzolization is frequently studied in cold climate regions, while mineralogical studies of Spodosols in tropical climate on quartzitic parent material are scant. In this work, soils under restinga vegetation on the Ilha do Cardoso-SP, Brazil were studied to identify the mineralogical assembly of silt and clay fractions

  16. Measurement and conceptual modelling of herbicide transport to field drains in a heavy clay soil with implications for catchment-scale water quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tediosi, A; Whelan, M J; Rushton, K R; Thompson, T R E; Gandolfi, C; Pullan, S P

    2012-11-01

    Propyzamide and carbetamide are essential for blackgrass control in oilseed rape production. However, both of these compounds can contaminate surface waters and pose compliance problems for water utilities. The transport of propyzamide and carbetamide to an instrumented field drain in a small clay headwater tributary of the Upper Cherwell catchment was monitored over a winter season. Despite having very different sorption and dissipation properties, both herbicides were transported rapidly to the drain outlet in the first storm event after application, although carbetamide was leached more readily than propyzamide. A simple conceptual model was constructed to represent solute displacement from mobile pore water and preferential flow to drains. The model was able to reproduce the timing and magnitude of herbicide losses well, lending support to its conceptual basis. Measured losses in drainflow in the month following application were 1.1 and 8.1%, respectively, for propyzamide and carbetamide. Differences were due to a combination of differences in herbicide mobility and due to the fact that the monitoring period for carbetamide was hydrologically more active. For both compounds, losses were greater than those typically reported elsewhere for other herbicides. The data suggest that drainflow is the dominant pathway for the transfer of these herbicides to the catchment outlet, where water is abstracted for municipal supply. This imposes considerable constraints on the management options available to reduce surface water concentrations of herbicides in this catchment. PMID:22982449

  17. Germination of nine species of a pioneer plant community of pliocene clay soils of central western italy under different photo- and thermo-periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldemaro Boscagli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Germination response under different photo- and thermo-periods was investigated in nine species of the association Parapholido-Artemisietum cretaceae, a typical plant community of clay badland vegetation in central western Italy. The species showed: (i more rapid germination under the photo- and thermo-period emulating autumn conditions than under the one emulating early spring conditions; (ii different germination rates under condition emulating periods with high diurnal insolation followed by high or low nocturnal heat dispersion: Aegilops geniculata, Parapholis strigosa and Artemisia cretacea were indifferent, Hordeum maritimum, Trifolium scabrum, Brachypodium distachyum and Parapholis incurva responded positively to higher thermal dispersion, whereas Medicago minima and Scorpiurus muricatus responded negatively; (iii different responses to a constant low temperature of 2oC: Artemisia cretacea, Parapholis incurva, Parapholis strigosa and Scorpiurus muricatus showed complete or very high dormancy; the other species showed a germination capacity between 55 and 87% in the following decreasing order: Medicago minima > Hordeum maritimum > Trifolium scabrum > Aegilops geniculata > Brachypodium distachyum. All species had delayed and reduced germination responses at 2oC. Grasses showed prompt, quick and high germination as environmental conditions became more favourable; legumes showed a similar response when their coat-imposed dormancy was removed, while the asteracea A. cretacea showed only a moderate germination capacity and one of the lowest germination rates. Nomenclaure: Pignatti (1982.

  18. Clay particle retention in small constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braskerud, B C

    2003-09-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) can be used to mitigate non-point source pollution from arable fields. Previous investigations have shown that the relative soil particle retention in small CWs increases when hydraulic load increases. This paper investigates why this phenomenon occurs, even though common retention models predict the opposite, by studying clay and silt particle retention in two Norwegian CWs. Retention was measured with water flow proportional sampling systems in the inlet and outlet of the wetlands, and the texture of the suspended solids was analyzed. The surface area of the CWs was small compared to the watershed area (approximately 0.07%), giving high average hydraulic loads (1.1 and 2.0 md(-1)). One of the watersheds included only old arable land, whereas the other included areas with disturbed topsoil after artificial land leveling. Clay particle retention was 57% for the CW in the first watershed, and 22% for the CW in the disturbed watershed. The different behavior of the wetlands could be due to differences in aggregate size and stability of the particles entering the wetlands. Results showed that increased hydraulic loads did affect CW retention negatively. However, as runoff increased, soil particles/aggregates with higher sedimentation velocities entered the CWs (e.g., the clay particles behaved as silt particles). Hence, clay particle settling velocity is not constant as assumed in many prediction models. The net result was increased retention.

  19. On the thermal behaviour of Boom clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delage, P.; Cui Yu Jun [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, Paris (France); Sultan, N. [IFREMER, Brest (France)

    2004-07-01

    When temperature is increased, the various phenomena that occur in a saturated natural potential host clay for nuclear waste disposal (Boom clay from SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium) were experimentally investigated in a temperature controlled high stress triaxial cell. Firstly, the pore pressure build-up due to the difference in thermal dilation of both water and minerals was investigated through thermal consolidation tests. Interesting information was obtained about the dissipation of thermally induced pore pressure in Boom clay, based on the standard Terzaghi consolidation theory. Secondly, the volume change behaviour in drained conditions (i.e. under a very slow temperature increase) confirmed that the clay overconsolidation ratio (OCR) controlled the nature of the volume changes. Whereas overconsolidated soils use to dilate as any material when temperature is elevated, normally consolidated soils present a decrease in volume, which is less common. The principles of a coupled thermo-elasto-plastic model that was specifically developed to model this particular behaviour are finally presented. Obviously, it appears necessary to account in detail for these thermal phenomena in order to properly understand the response of the geological barrier in the near field once nuclear waste has been stored. (orig.)

  20. On the thermal behaviour of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When temperature is increased, the various phenomena that occur in a saturated natural potential host clay for nuclear waste disposal (Boom clay from SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium) were experimentally investigated in a temperature controlled high stress triaxial cell. Firstly, the pore pressure build-up due to the difference in thermal dilation of both water and minerals was investigated through thermal consolidation tests. Interesting information was obtained about the dissipation of thermally induced pore pressure in Boom clay, based on the standard Terzaghi consolidation theory. Secondly, the volume change behaviour in drained conditions (i.e. under a very slow temperature increase) confirmed that the clay overconsolidation ratio (OCR) controlled the nature of the volume changes. Whereas overconsolidated soils use to dilate as any material when temperature is elevated, normally consolidated soils present a decrease in volume, which is less common. The principles of a coupled thermo-elasto-plastic model that was specifically developed to model this particular behaviour are finally presented. Obviously, it appears necessary to account in detail for these thermal phenomena in order to properly understand the response of the geological barrier in the near field once nuclear waste has been stored. (orig.)

  1. Improvement of Bearing Capacity of Shallow Foundation on Geogrid Reinforced Silty Clay and Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Kolay, P. K.; Kumar, S; Tiwari, D.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the improvement in the bearing capacity of silty clay soil with thin sand layer on top and placing geogrids at different depths. Model tests were performed for a rectangular footing resting on top of the soil to establish the load versus settlement curves of unreinforced and reinforced soil system. The test results focus on the improvement in bearing capacity of silty clay and sand on unreinforced and reinforced soil system in non-dimensional form, that is, BCR....

  2. Late Precambrian oxygenation; inception of the clay mineral factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Martin; Droser, Mary; Mayer, Lawrence M; Pevear, David; Mrofka, David

    2006-03-10

    An enigmatic stepwise increase in oxygen in the late Precambrian is widely considered a prerequisite for the expansion of animal life. Accumulation of oxygen requires organic matter burial in sediments, which is largely controlled by the sheltering or preservational effects of detrital clay minerals in modern marine continental margin depocenters. Here, we show mineralogical and geochemical evidence for an increase in clay mineral deposition in the Neoproterozoic that immediately predated the first metazoans. Today most clay minerals originate in biologically active soils, so initial expansion of a primitive land biota would greatly enhance production of pedogenic clay minerals (the "clay mineral factory"), leading to increased marine burial of organic carbon via mineral surface preservation.

  3. Clay mineralogy in agrochernozems of western Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papish, I. Ya.; Chizhikova, N. P.; Poznyak, S. P.; Varlamov, E. B.

    2016-10-01

    The mineralogy of clay fractions separated from deep low-humus deep-gleyic loamy typical agrochernozems on loess-like loams of the Upper Bug and Dniester uplands in the Central Russian loess province of Ukraine consists of complex disordered interstratifications with the segregation of mica- and smectite-type layers (hereafter, smectite phase), tri- and dioctahedral hydromicas, kaolinite, and chlorite. The distribution of the clay fraction is uniform. The proportions of the layered silicates vary significantly within the profile: a decrease in the content of the smectite phase and a relative increase in the content of hydromicas up the soil profile are recorded. In the upper horizons, the contents of kaolinite and chlorite increase, and some amounts of fine quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases are observed. This tendency is observed in agrochernozems developed on the both Upper Bug and Dniester uplands. The differences include the larger amounts of quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases in the clay material of the Upper Bug Upland, while the contents of the smectite phase in the soil profiles of the areas considered are similar. An analogous mineral association is noted in podzolized agrochernozems on loess-like deposits in the Cis-Carpathian region of the Southern Russian loess province developed on the Prut-Dniester and Syan-Dniester uplands. The distribution of particle-size fractions and the mineralogy of the clay fraction indicate the lithogenic heterogeneity of the soil-forming substrate. When the drifts change, the mineral association of the soils developed within the loess-like deposits gives place to minerals dominated by individual smectite with some mica-smectite inter stratifications, hydromicas, and chlorite.

  4. Gardening in Sandy Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Katie; Kuhns, Michael; Cardon, Grant

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet covers the basics of clay, silt and sand soils with an emphasis on gardening in soils with a high sand content. It includes information on the composition of sandy soils, gardening tips for managing sandy soils, and the types of plants that grow best in sandy soils.

  5. The infiltration process of clay soil under different initial soil water contents%不同初始含水率下粘质土壤的入渗过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘目兴; 聂艳; 于婧

    2012-01-01

    Soil infiltration is the basic hydrologicsl process for water penetrating into the soil, and the amount of water infiltrating the soil surface directly affects the quantity of surface runoff and soil erosion, even the recharge of both soil and underground water. The initial soil water content is an important factor to soil infiltration, and its role in runoff controlling and soil erosion prevention has been taken into account by many researches. In this study, the double-ring infiltration method was used to quantitatively measure the infiltrability of surface soil (0-5 cm depth) covered with forestland and grassland, which were under two antecedent soil water contents of 12% and 40% , respectively. In addition, the changes of soil infiltration process over time were estimated with different infiltration models.The results indicated that the initial soil infiltration rate of forestland and grassland tended to decrease with increasing initial soil water content. And an increase in initial soil water content results in an increase in steady infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration rate. Whether forestland or grassland, soil infiltration process with higher initial soil water content reaches the steady infiltration stage earlier than that with lower initial soil water content. For forestland with initial soil gravimetric water content rate of 12% , the initial soil infiltration rate was 8.95 mm/min, which was four times to the initial infiltration rate for forestland soil with gravimetric water content rate of 40%. However, its steady infiltration rate 0. 24 mm/min was only one eighth of the forestland with initial soil gravimetric water content rate of 40% , and the cumulative infiltration in an hour was only two thirds of that. This phenomena may attribute to the faster wetting rate of drier soil in infiltration process, which cause stronger slaking forces of the soil and severe aggregates breakdown, enhance surface sealing or promote the destruction of soil

  6. Macro-and Micro- Properties of Two Natural Marine Clays in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming-jing; PENG Li-cai; ZHU He-hua; LIN Yi-xi; HUANG Liang-ji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,macro- and micro- properties of natural marine clay in two different and representative regions of China are investigated in detail.In addition to in-situ tests,soil samples are collected by use of Shelby tubes for laboratory examination in Shanghai and Zhuhai respectively,two coastal cities in China.In the laboratory tests,macro-properties such as consolidation characteristics and undrained shear strength are measured.Moreover,X-ray diffraction test,scanning electron microscope test,and mercury intrusion test are carried out for the investigation of their micro-properties including clay minerals and microstructure.The study shows that:(1) both clays are Holocene series formations,classified as either normal or underconsolidated soils.The initial gradient of the stress-strain curves shows their increase with increasing consolidation pressure;however,the Shanghai and the Zhuhai clays are both structural soils with the latter shown to be more structured than the former.As a result,the Zhuhai clay shows strain softening behavior at low confining pressures,but strain hardening at high pressures.In contrast,the Shanghai clay mainly manifests strain-hardening.(2) An activity ranges from 0.75 to 1.30 for the Shanghai marine clay and from 0.5 to 0.85 for the Zhuhai marine clay.The main clay mineral is illite in the Shanghai clay and kaolinite in the Zhuhai clay.The Zhuhai clay is mainly characterized by a flocculated structure,while the typical Shanghai clay shows a dispersed structure.The porous structure of the Shanghai clay is characterized mainly by large and medium-sized pores,while the Zhuhai clay porous structure is mainly featreed by small and medium-sized pores.The differences in their macro- and micro- properties can he attributed to different sedimentation environments.

  7. Monitoring of radioactive nuclides in incinerator fly ash and adsorption of Cs in simulated and actual eluate of the fly ash onto clay and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive nuclides in the incinerator fly ash of municipal solid waste was determined and monitored. For leaching radioactive Cs from incinerating fly ash in reclaimed land, a modified No. 13 elution test and adsorption with stable Cs onto andosol were performed. The activity concentration of radioactive nuclides in incinerator fly ash was constant within the range of the activity concentration before the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The 134Cs/137Cs activity concentration ratio was almost equal to 1, corresponding to 137Cs existing in environment before the accident. 40% of 137Cs in incinerator fly ash eluted with the modified No. 13 elution test, and adsorption ratio of Cs+ onto the andosol showed 90% as being the primary concentration was equal to or more than 5000 μg L−1. In addition, the desorption results used for 5 types of solvent showed that desorption ratio of adsorbed Cs+ from the soil was 3.6% at the maximum. Hence, it is anticipated that using a soil that is similar in composition to the andosol suppresses the leaching out of radioactive Cs from reclaimed land. (author)

  8. Mineral Composition of Clay Fraction of the Chernozems Spread out in Ovče Pole in Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mile Markoski; Tatjana Mitkova; Vedran Rubinić

    2011-01-01

    The results of mineral composition of the clay fraction of the chernozems spread out in Ovče Pole are presented. The mechanical composition of the soil samples show high domination of the physical clay and clay fractions in the soil separates, what is one of the reasons for strong influence on the physical and physical-mechanical properties of the soil. The clay content is dominant in the soil separates fraction and varies from 23.60% to 56.90%, or 36.23% average. The average content of physi...

  9. Soil dynamics of the origination of soil tare during sugar beet lifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, G.D.; Koolen, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    High soil tare of sugar beet on wet clay soil after uprooting with share lifters is usually attributed to the fact that the soil becomes sticky due to mechanical impact during uprooting. Results of field experiments have shown good potential for obtaining low soil tare of sugar beet on wet clay soil

  10. Sustainable agriculture and nitrogen reduction: an open field experiment using natural zeolitites in silty-clay reclaimed soil at Codigoro (Po River Delta, Ferrara, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccini, Barbara; Di Giuseppe, Dario; Mastrocicco, Micòl; Coltorti, Massimo; Colombani, Nicolò; Ferretti, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    Following the guidelines of Nitrate and Water Framework Directives (91/676/CEE, 200/60/CE) an innovative integrated zeolitite cycle is being tested on a reclaimed clayey-silt soil in the Po Delta area (Ferrara Province, Italy), in the framework of the EU-funded ZeoLIFE project (LIFE+10 ENV/IT/000321). Natural zeolitites are pyroclastic rocks containing more than 50% of zeolites, a kind of hydrous minerals with peculiar physical and chemical properties, like high and selective cation exchange capacity (CEC), molecular adsorption and reversible dehydration. Zeolitites can trap NH4+ from solutions and release it gradually to the plant roots once they have been mixed in agricultural soils, allowing both fertilization and irrigation reduction and improvement of the yield. The fertilization reduction can result in a decrease of the nitrate content in groundwater and surface waters, ultimately leading to a mitigation of nutrient excess in the environment. Similarly, reduction of irrigation water means a minor exploitation of the water resource. The selected material used in the project is a chabazite zeolitite coming from a quarry near Sorano in Central Italy (Bolsena volcanic district). The open-field experimentation foresees two year of cultivation. A surface of about 6 ha has been divided into six parcels: three control parcels are cultivated and irrigated in traditional way; two parcels have been added with coarse-grained (ø = 3- 6 mm) natural zeolitite at different zeolitite/soil ratios (5 kg/m2 and 15 kg/m2) and one has been mixed with fine-grained (ø natural zeolitite and in that bearing NH4+-charged zeolitite, the fertilization has been reduced by 30% and 50% with respect to the controls. Notwithstanding these reductions, the yield increased by 5% and 15% in the parcel added with natural zeolitite and in that treated with NH4+-charged zeolitite, respectively. As confirmed by previously performed laboratory leaching tests, NH4+ in porewater and surface water was

  11. [Mechanism of tritium persistence in porous media like clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Jie; Wang, Jin-Sheng; Teng, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Ni

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of tritium persistence in clay minerals, three types of clay soils (montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite) and tritiated water were used in this study to conduct the tritium sorption tests and the other related tests. Firstly, the ingredients, metal elements and heat properties of clay minerals were studied with some instrumental analysis methods, such as ICP and TG. Secondly, with a specially designed fractionation and condensation experiment, the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in the clay minerals separated from the tritium sorption tests were fractionated for investigating the tritium distributions in the different types of adsorptive waters. Thirdly, the location and configuration of tritium adsorbed into the structure of clay minerals were studied with infrared spectrometry (IR) tests. And finally, the forces and mechanisms for driving tritium into the clay minerals were analyzed on the basis of the isotope effect of tritium and the above tests. Following conclusions have been reached: (1) The main reason for tritium persistence in clay minerals is the entrance of tritium into the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in clay minerals. The percentage of tritium distributed in these three types of adsorptive water are in the range of 13.65% - 38.71%, 0.32% - 5.96%, 1.28% - 4.37% of the total tritium used in the corresponding test, respectively. The percentages are different for different types of clay minerals. (2) Tritium adsorbed onto clay minerals are existed in the forms of the tritiated hydroxyl radical (OT) and the tritiated water molecule (HTO). Tritium mainly exists in tritiated water molecule for adsorbed water and interlayer water, and in tritiated hydroxyl radical for structural water. (3) The forces and effects driving tritium into the clay minerals may include molecular dispersion, electric charge sorption, isotope exchange and tritium isotope effect.

  12. Matéria orgânica e aumento da capacidade de troca de cátions em solo com argila de atividade baixa sob plantio direto Soil organic matter and cation exchange capacity increase in a low activity clay soil under no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise Nara Ciotta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O sistema de manejo afeta a matéria orgânica do solo, o que pode ter expressivo efeito na CTC de solos com argila de atividade baixa. Neste estudo, avaliou-se o efeito da utilização durante 21 anos do sistema plantio direto (SPD sobre os estoques de carbono orgânico (CO, bem como a sua relação com o aumento da CTC de um Latossolo bruno (629 g kg-1 de argila, em Guarapuava, PR. O SPD promoveu acúmulo de CO na camada superficial do solo (0-6cm, o que refletiu-se num aumento de 2,63t ha-1 no estoque de CO, na camada de 0-20cm, em comparação ao preparo convencional. A baixa taxa de acúmulo de CO (0,12t ha-1 ano-1 foi relacionada à alta estabilidade física da matéria orgânica neste solo argiloso e oxídico. Apesar do pequeno acúmulo de CO no solo sob SPD, este teve reflexo positivo na CTC do solo, com um aumento médio, na camada de 0-8cm, de 15,2mmol c kg-1 na CTC efetiva, e de 20,7mmol c kg-1 na CTC a pH 7,0, em comparação ao solo em preparo convencional. Os resultados obtidos reforçam a importância do SPD quanto ao seu efeito nos estoques de matéria orgânica e, em consequência, na CTC de solos tropicais e subtropicais com predominância de argila de atividade baixa.Soil management affects the organic matter stocks, and thus the CEC especially in low activity clay soils. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term (21 years effect of the no-tillage on soil organic carbon (SOC stocks and its relationship with CEC increase in a clayey Oxisol (Hapludox, in Guarapuava (PR, Southern Brazil. No-tillage soil had only 2.63t ha-1 more SOC than conventionally tilled soil at 0-20cm, and the highest net accumulation occurred in soil surface layers (0-6cm. The low accumulation rate of SOC in the no-tilled soil (0,12t ha-1 yr-1 was related to the high physical stability of soil organic matter in this clayey Oxisol. Despite the small effect on SOC contents, the no-tilllage had an expressive influence on the CEC of 0-8cm soil

  13. Adsorption of diethyl phthalate ester to clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanhua; Si, Youbin; Zhou, Dongmei; Gao, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Phthalate esters are a group of plasticizers, which have been widely detected in China's agricultural and industrial soils. In this study, batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate the environmental effects on the adsorption of diethyl phthalate ester (DEP) to clay minerals. The results showed that DEP adsorption isotherms were well fitted with the Freundlich model; the interlayer spacing of K(+) saturated montmorillonite (K-mont) was the most important adsorption area for DEP, and di-n-butyl ester (DnBP) was limited to intercalate into the interlayer of K-mont due to the bigger molecular size; there was no significant effect of pH and ionic strength on DEP adsorption to K-mont/Ca-mont, but to Na-mont clay. The adsorption to kaolinite was very limited. Data of X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectra further proved that DEP molecules could intercalate into K-/Ca-mont interlayer, and might interact with clay through H-bonding between carbonyl groups and clay adsorbed water. Coated humic acid on clay surface would enhance DEP adsorption at low concentration, but not at high concentration (eg. Ce>0.26 mM). The calculated adsorption enthalpy (ΔHobs) and adsorption isotherms at varied temperatures showed that DEP could be adsorbed easier as more adsorbed. This study implied that clay type, compound structure, exchangeable cation, soil organic matter and temperature played important roles in phthalate ester's transport in soil.

  14. MAX--An Interactive Computer Program for Teaching Identification of Clay Minerals by X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohut, Connie K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses MAX, an interactive computer program for teaching identification of clay minerals based on standard x-ray diffraction characteristics. The program provides tutorial-type exercises for identification of 16 clay standards, self-evaluation exercises, diffractograms of 28 soil clay minerals, and identification of nonclay minerals. (MDH)

  15. Modeling in Ceramic Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Louis J.

    1976-01-01

    Modeling is an additive process of building up a sculpture with some plastic material like clay. It affords the student an opportunity to work in three dimensions, a creative relief from the general two-dimensional drawing and design activities that occupy a large segment of time in the art curriculum. (Author/RK)

  16. Magnificent Clay Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2007-01-01

    Each August, third grade artists at Apple Glen Elementary in Bentonville, Arkansas, start the school year planning, creating, and exhibiting a clay relief mural. These mural projects have helped students to acquire not only art knowledge and techniques, but an even more important kind of knowledge: what it means to plan and successfully complete a…

  17. Breakdown of Clays by Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Through Changes in Oxidation State of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocena, J. M.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Organisms are known to play a significant role in the transformation of clay minerals in soils. In our earlier work on canola, barley and alfalfa, we reported that Glomus, an arbuscular mycorrhizae, selectively transformed biotite into 2:1 expanding clays through the oxidation of Fe (II) in biotite to Fe(III). In this presentation, we will share similar results on clay transformations mediated by ectomycorrhizal fungi colonizing the roots of coniferous trees. Clay samples were isolated from rhizosphere soils of sub-alpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) in northern British Columbia (Canada). Chemical and mineralogical properties of these soils had been reported in our earlier paper. In this study, we subjected the clay samples to iron X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (Fe-XANES) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron facility in Saskatoon (Canada). Our initial results showed relatively higher amounts of Fe (III) than Fe(II) in clays collected from rhizosphere of Piloderma (an ectomycorrhizal fungus) compared to soils influenced by non-Piloderma species and Control (non-rhizosphere soil). Coupled with the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, there seems to be a positive relationship between the relative amounts of Fe(III) and the 2:1 expanding clays. This relationship is consistent with our results on agricultural plants in laboratory experiments on biotites where we suggested that oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) results in the formation of 2:1 expanding clays. In a related data set on chlorite alteration we observed that after dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) treatment, the d-spacing of a slight portion of chloritic expanding clays shifted to higher angles indicating decreased d-spacing towards micaceous clays. The reductive process initiated through the action of the DCB treatment seems to indicate the collapsed of expandable clays upon the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). Initial results from the Fe-XANES and XRD analysis of DCB

  18. Assessment of the mechanical properties of sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay using triaxial shear tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment. PMID:24982951

  19. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  20. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms through effective flocculation and sedimentation with combined use of flocculants and phosphorus adsorbing natural soil and modified clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyma, Natalia Pessoa; de Magalhães, Leonardo; Furtado, Luciana Lima; Mucci, Maíra; van Oosterhout, Frank; Huszar, Vera L M; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi; Lürling, Miquel

    2016-06-15

    Eutrophication often results in blooms of toxic cyanobacteria that hamper the use of lakes and reservoirs. In this paper, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of a metal salt (poly-aluminium chloride, PAC) and chitosan, alone and combined with different doses of the lanthanum modified bentonite Phoslock(®) (LMB) or local red soil (LRS) to sediment positively buoyant cyanobacteria from Funil Reservoir, Brazil, (22°30'S, 44°45'W). We also tested the effect of calcium peroxide (CaO2) on suspended and settled cyanobacterial photosystem efficiency, and evaluated the soluble reactive P (SRP) adsorbing capacity of both LMB and LRS under oxic and anoxic conditions. Our data showed that buoyant cyanobacteria could be flocked and effectively precipitated using a combination of PAC or chitosan with LMB or LRS. The SRP sorption capacity of LMB was higher than that of LRS. The maximum P adsorption was lowered under anoxic conditions especially for LRS ballast. CaO2 addition impaired photosystem efficiency at 1 mg L(-1) or higher and killed precipitated cyanobacteria at 4 mg L(-1) or higher. A drawback was that oxygen production from the peroxide gave positive buoyancy again to the settled flocs. Therefore, further experimentations with slow release pellets are recommended. PMID:26706124

  1. Nanoporous clay with carbon sink and pesticide trapping properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woignier, T.; Duffours, L.; Colombel, P.; Dieudonné, P.

    2015-07-01

    A thorough understanding of the mechanisms and factors involved in the dynamics of organic carbon in soils is required to identify and enhance natural sinks for greenhouse gases. Some tropical soils, such as Andosols, have 3-6 fold higher concentrations of organic carbon than other kinds of soils containing classical clays. In the tropics, toxic pesticides permanently pollute soils and contaminate crops, water resources, and ecosystems. However, not all soils are equal in terms of pesticide contamination or in their ability to transfer pollution to the ecosystem. Andosols are generally more polluted than the other kinds of soils but, surprisingly, they retain and trap more pesticides, thereby reducing the transfer of pesticides to ecosystems, water resources, and crops. Andosols thus have interesting environmental properties in terms of soil carbon sequestration and pesticide retention. Andosols contain a nano porous clay (allophane) with unique structures and physical properties compared to more common clays; these are large pore volume, specific surface area, and a tortuous and fractal porous arrangement. The purpose of this mini review is to discuss the importance of the allophane fractal microstructure for carbon sequestration and pesticide trapping in the soil. We suggest that the tortuous microstructure (which resembles a labyrinths) of allophane aggregates and the associated low accessibility partly explain the poor availability of soil organic matter and of any pesticides trapped in andosols.

  2. Clay fraction mineralogy of a Cambisol in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastacio, A. S.; Fabris, J. D., E-mail: jdfabris@ufmg.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Stucki, J. W. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences (United States); Coelho, F. S.; Pinto, I. V. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Viana, J. H. M. [Embrapa Milho e Sorgo (Brazil)

    2005-11-15

    Clay minerals having a 2:1 (tetrahedral:octahedral sheet) structure may be found in strongly weathering soils only if the local pedo-climatic environment prevents them from further weathering to other minerals such as iron oxides. The clay minerals impart important chemical properties to soils, in part by virtue of changes in the redox state of iron in their crystal structures. Knowing the chemical nature of soil clays is a first step in evaluating their potential reactivity with other soil constituents and processes, such as the chemical decomposition of organic substrates to be potentially used in environmental remediation. The purpose of this work was to characterize the iron oxides and iron-bearing clay minerals from a B horizon of a Cambisol developed on tuffite in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The iron oxides of this NaOH-treated clay-fraction were found to contain mainly maghemite ({gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and superparamagnetic goethite ({alpha}FeOOH). Kaolinite (Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}), smectite, and minor portions of anatase (TiO{sub 2}) were identified in the CBD-treated sample.

  3. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  4. 饱和软黏土中足尺静压桩挤土效应试验研究%Test research on soil compacting effect of full scale jacked-in pile in saturated soft clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周火垚; 施建勇

    2009-01-01

    Soil compacting effect of jacked-in pile in the saturated soft clay is a topic of concern in the geotechnical engineering. Monitoring laws of lateral displacement of soil, pore pressure and land upheaval during pile-sinking is a project that a lot of researchers hope to implement. In this research, three full scale jacked-in piles are penetrated into the saturated soft clay and mostly studied by monitoring the law of lateral displacement with depth and radial distance to pile-sinking, the law of land upheaval with depth of penetration and radial distance to pile-sinking, and the law of pore pressure with penetration depth and time. Characteristics of maximum excess pore water pressure with radial distance and depth are also analyzed. From this test results, it is obtained that the maximum lateral displacement occurs at a depth of about 0.75L; land upheaval build up rapidly and reach the maximum when the pile tip arrive at depth of about 6 m; and the increment of excess pore water pressure reaches the maximum when the pile tip arrive at the piezometer level; while the maximum excess pore pressure presents a hysteresis quality with radial distance.%饱和软黏土地基中静压桩挤土效应是岩土工程中常见的问题.监测土体侧向位移、孔隙压力、地面隆起随压桩过程变化的规律是很多研究者希望实施的计划.在饱和软黏土地基中进行了3根足尺静压桩的压入试验,重点监测了沉桩时的侧向位移随深度和距桩轴不同距离、地面隆起量随桩的贯入深度和距桩轴不同距离、孔隙压力随桩的贯入深度和时间的变化规律,并分析了超静孔隙水压力最大值沿径向和深度的变化特性.由测试结果可知,最大的侧向位移发生在距地表0.75L附近,地面隆起从桩贯入开始迅速发展,并在桩压入到6 m左右时达到最大值,测点处超静孔压增量的最大值发生在桩端到达该点所在水平面时,而超孔压的最大值沿径向有滞后性.

  5. Escoamento superficial e desagregação do solo em entressulcos em solo franco-argilo-arenoso com resíduos vegetais Interrill surface runoff and soil detachment on a sandy clay loam soil with residue cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elemar Antonino Cassol

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A presença de resíduos vegetais sobre a superfície do solo altera as características do escoamento superficial gerado pela chuva e a desagregação e transporte de sedimento resultantes do processo erosivo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as condições hidráulicas e as relações de desagregação do solo e de resistência ao escoamento com a presença de resíduos vegetais na erosão em entressulcos. O experimento foi realizado no laboratório, com um Argissolo Vermelho distrófico típico, em parcelas com 0,10 m m-1 de declive sob chuva simulada. O solo foi coberto por resíduos vegetais de palha de soja, nas doses de 0, 0,05, 0,1, 0,2, 0,4 e 0,8 kg m-2. O aumento na cobertura do solo (CS com resíduos vegetais elevou a altura da lâmina de escoamento e a rugosidade hidráulica e reduziu a velocidade média do escoamento, provocada pelo aumento das forças viscosas promovida pela interposição física dos resíduos ao escoamento. O resultado é a redução na taxa de desagregação do solo (Di. A Di foi de 5,35x10-4 kg m-2 s-1 para solo descoberto e 1,50x10-5 kg m-2 s-1 em solo com 100% de cobertura na maior dose de palha. Os modelos de Laflen e potencial foram adequados para estimar o coeficiente de cobertura para resíduo em contato direto com a superfície do solo em função da cobertura do solo.Soil surface cover with crop residue modifies surface flow characteristics, generated by excess rainfall, and soil detachment and sediment transport resulting from the erosion process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hydraulic conditions, detachment and flow resistance on interrill erosion on soil covered with residue. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory, on a Hapludult soil at a slope of 0.10 m m-1, under simulated rainfall and soil surface covered with soybean residue at the rates of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 kg m-2. The increase in soil surface cover (SC with residue, caused an increase in water flow

  6. Study of Adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay minerals also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represents ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs

  7. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Jelínek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC, the cis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC are expected in the trans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water – bentonite interaction and the swelling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as well as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  8. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petr Jelnek; Stanisaw M.Dobosz; Jaroslav Beo; Katarzyna Major-Gabry

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC), thecis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC) are expected in thetrans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water - bentonite interaction and the sweling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as wel as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  9. Faults in clays their detection and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Faults in clays project', a cooperative research effort between Ismes and Enea of Italy and BGS and Exeter University of the UK, has been aimed at assessing and improving the resolution capability of some high resolution geophysical techniques for the detection of discontinuities in clay formations. All Ismes activities have been carried out in Italy: they consisted in the search of one or more sites - faulted clay formations - suitable for the execution of geophysical and geotechnical investigations, in the execution of such tests and in additional geological surveys and laboratory (geotechnical and geochemical) testing. The selected sites were two quarries in plio-pleistocenic clay formations in central Italy where faults had been observed. The greatest part of the research work has been carried out in the Orte site where also two 90 m boreholes have been drilled and cored. Geophysical work at Orte consisted of vertical electrical soundings (VESs) and horizontal electrical lines (HELs), four high resolution seismic reflection lines, and in-hole and cross-hole logs. Laboratory activities were geotechnical characterization and permeability tests, and measurements of disequilibrium in the uranium decay series. At Narni, where Exeter University sampled soil gases for geochemical analyses, the geophysical work consisted in a geo-electrical survey (five VESs and two HELs), and in two high resolution reflection seismic lines. Additional investigations included a structural geology survey. The main conclusion of the research is that current geophysical techniques do not have a resolution capacity sufficient to detect the existence and determine the characteristics of faults in deep homogeneous clay formations

  10. Fixation of Selenium by Clay Minerals and Iron Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdy, A. A.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1977-01-01

    In studying Se fixation, soil components capable of retaining Se were investigated. The importance of Fe hydrous oxides in the fixation of Se was established. The clay minerals common to soils, such as kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite, all exhibited Se fixation, but greater fixation...... occurred with the 1:1 than the 2:1 clay type. Experiments with finely ground minerals showed that the pH of the systems greatly influenced the rate of fixation, reaching a maximum between pH 3 and 5 and decreasing rapidly as the pH increased. With the Fe2O3 system fixed Se was slightly reduced as the p......H was increased to over 8. The extractability of Se from the clay minerals indicated that 1:1 clay type minerals fix selenite more indissolubly than 2:1 clays and that selenite was adsorbed on the clays mainly by a surface exchange reaction. The major part of the selenite added to the Fe2O3 system was found...

  11. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.

  12. Program and Abstracts for Clay Minerals Society 28th Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that were accepted for presentation at the annual meeting. Some of the main topics covered include: (1) fundamental properties of minerals and methods of mineral analysis; (2) surface chemistry; (3) extraterrestrial clay minerals; (4) geothermometers and geochronometers; (5) smectite, vermiculite, illite, and related reactions; (6) soils and clays in environmental research; (7) kaolinite, halloysite, iron oxides, and mineral transformations; and (8) clays in lakes, basins, and reservoirs.

  13. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  14. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the location and the obeying function, GCLs have to fulfill certain conditions. A legislated compatibility criterion has to be proven by various laboratory tests. In the paper are presented the results of direct shear and chemical compatibility tests of GCLs as well as the results of permeability measurement of kaolin clay (the paper is published in Croatian .

  15. Effect of heavy metal cations on the fate of extracellular DNA adsorbed and bound on clay minerals.

    OpenAIRE

    Ascher J.; Ceccherini M.T.; Arfaioli P.; Borgogni F.; Pietramellara G.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of high-valent metal cations on clay mineral surfaces is hypothesised to induce conformational changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the DNA molecule adsorbed and bound onto clays, defined as M-conformation, and its condensation. The hypothesis that these reversible phenomena could enhance the resistance of DNA to enzymatic degradation strongly encourages the studies on the effects of heavy metal contamination in clay rich soils on the fate of extracellular soil DNA ...

  16. Developments in modelling of thermohydro-geomechanical behaviour of Boom clay and clay-based buffer materials (Volume 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of two years of research on thermomechanics of clays performed within CEC contract Fl1W/0150 are described herein. Previous studies (research contracts with CEC/WAS/380.83.7 l) performed by ISMES have evidenced the need for an improved modelling of the volumetric response of natural clays. In a coupled approach, this leads to an improved prediction of pore-pressure development and dissipation. This is crucial for assessing conditions of a possible local thermal failure as verified in laboratory tests done at ISMES. The first part of the study lays the foundations of a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the interaction between water and soil skeleton. It consists in: (a) developing a framework for inclusion of water/soil particle thermally induced interaction into a thermodynamically consistent mixture theory approach (Section 2); (b) studying possible modelling approaches of considering the effective thermal expansion coefficient of pore water dependency on pore water status (Section 2); (c) testing artificial clays to assess pore water thermal expansion dependence on temperature in the presence of different amounts of active clay minerals and also Boom clay (Section 3); (d) performing a laboratory test campaign on Boom clay with special attention to the response in the overconsolidated domain (Section 4). 89 figs., 18 tabs., 102 refs

  17. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... successfully. At natural watercontent w = 40 to 45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k

  18. Shales and swelling soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, J. A.; Dimillio, A. F.; Strohm, W. E., Jr.; Vandre, B. C.; Anderson, L. R.

    The thirteen (13) papers in this report deal with the following areas: a shale rating system and tentative applications to shale performance; technical guidelines for the design and construction of shale embankments; stability of waste shale embankments; dynamic response of raw and stabilized Oklahoma shales; laboratory studies of the stabilization of nondurable shales; swelling shale and collapsing soil; development of a laboratory compaction degradation test for shales; soil section approach for evaluation of swelling potential soil moisture properties of subgrade soils; volume changes in compacted clays and shales on saturation; characterization of expansive soils; pavement roughness on expansive clays; and deep vertical fabric moisture barriers in swelling soils.

  19. Clays, clay minerals and cordierite ceramics - a review

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Valaskova

    2015-01-01

    The conventional methods for the synthesis of cordierite ceramics include the solid-state sintering of individual oxides of magnesium, aluminium and silicon of the corresponding chemical composition of cordierite, or sintering of the natural raw materials. Clays are used in the ceramics industries largely because of their contribution to the molding and drying properties. The most effective use of clays meets with the problems of the improvement of the working properties of clays and...

  20. Chlordecone retention in the fractal structure of volcanic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Allophanic soils are highly polluted but less contaminant for cultivated vegetables. ► SAXS and TEM show the fractal structure of allophane aggregates at the nanoscale. ► Allophane aggregates play the role of a labyrinth which fixes and traps chlordecone. ► Allophane physical properties contribute to chlordecone retention in andosols. - Abstract: Chlordecone (CHLD), a soil and foodstuff pollutant, as well as an environmentally persistent organochlorine insecticide, was used intensively in banana fields. The chlordecone uptake of three crops was measured for two types of polluted soils: allophanic and non-allophanic. The uptake is lower for allophanic soils even if their chlordecone content is higher than with non-allophanic soils. The fractal structure of the allophane aggregates was characterized at the nanoscale by small angle X-rays scattering, pore size distribution and transmission electron microscopy. We showed that clay microstructures should be an important physico-chemical factor governing the fate of chlordecone in the environment. Allophanic clays result in two counterintuitive findings: higher contaminant trappings yet lower contaminant availability. We propose that this specific, tortuous structure, along with its associated low accessibility, partly explains the low availability of chlordecone confined in allophanic soils. Capsule The fractal and tortuous microstructure of allophane clay favours the chlordecone retention in soils and disfavours the crop uptake.

  1. Chlordecone retention in the fractal structure of volcanic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woignier, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.woignier@imbe.fr [IRD, UMR 237, IMBE, PRAM B.P. 214 Petit Morne, 97232, Le Lamentin, Martinique (France); CNRS, UMR 7263, IMBE, PRAM B.P. 214 Petit Morne, 97232, Le Lamentin, Martinique (France); Aix Marseille Universite, IMBE, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de Saint Jerome, avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, F-13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Clostre, Florence [Cirad/PRAM, UPR fonctionnement agroecologique et performances des systemes de culture horticoles, B.P. 214 Petit Morne, 97232, Le Lamentin, Martinique (France); Macarie, Herve [IRD, UMR 237, IMBE, PRAM B.P. 214 Petit Morne, 97232, Le Lamentin, Martinique (France); Cirad UR HortSys, TA B-103/PS4, Boulevard de la Lironde, 34398, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Jannoyer, Magalie [Cirad/PRAM, UPR fonctionnement agroecologique et performances des systemes de culture horticoles, B.P. 214 Petit Morne, 97232, Le Lamentin, Martinique (France); Cirad UR HortSys, TA B-103/PS4, Boulevard de la Lironde, 34398, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Allophanic soils are highly polluted but less contaminant for cultivated vegetables. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAXS and TEM show the fractal structure of allophane aggregates at the nanoscale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Allophane aggregates play the role of a labyrinth which fixes and traps chlordecone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Allophane physical properties contribute to chlordecone retention in andosols. - Abstract: Chlordecone (CHLD), a soil and foodstuff pollutant, as well as an environmentally persistent organochlorine insecticide, was used intensively in banana fields. The chlordecone uptake of three crops was measured for two types of polluted soils: allophanic and non-allophanic. The uptake is lower for allophanic soils even if their chlordecone content is higher than with non-allophanic soils. The fractal structure of the allophane aggregates was characterized at the nanoscale by small angle X-rays scattering, pore size distribution and transmission electron microscopy. We showed that clay microstructures should be an important physico-chemical factor governing the fate of chlordecone in the environment. Allophanic clays result in two counterintuitive findings: higher contaminant trappings yet lower contaminant availability. We propose that this specific, tortuous structure, along with its associated low accessibility, partly explains the low availability of chlordecone confined in allophanic soils. Capsule The fractal and tortuous microstructure of allophane clay favours the chlordecone retention in soils and disfavours the crop uptake.

  2. Potential bioavailability of mercury in humus-coated clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Daiwen; Zhong, Huan

    2015-10-01

    It is well-known that both clay and organic matter in soils play a key role in mercury biogeochemistry, while their combined effect is less studied. In this study, kaolinite, vermiculite, and montmorillonite were coated or not with humus, and spiked with inorganic mercury (IHg) or methylmercury (MeHg). The potential bioavailability of mercury to plants or deposit-feeders was assessed by CaCl2 or bovine serum albumin (BSA) extraction. For uncoated clay, IHg or MeHg extraction was generally lower in montmorillonite, due to its greater number of functional groups. Humus coating increased partitioning of IHg (0.5%-13.7%) and MeHg (0.8%-52.9%) in clay, because clay-sorbed humus provided more strong binding sites for mercury. Furthermore, humus coating led to a decrease in IHg (3.0%-59.8% for CaCl2 and 2.1%-5.0% for BSA) and MeHg (8.9%-74.6% for CaCl2 and 0.5%-8.2% for BSA) extraction, due to strong binding between mercury and clay-sorbed humus. Among various humus-coated clay particles, mercury extraction by CaCl2 (mainly through cation exchange) was lowest in humus-coated vermiculite, explained by the strong binding between humus and vermiculite. The inhibitory effect of humus on mercury bioavailability was also evidenced by the negative relationship between mercury extraction by CaCl2 and mercury in the organo-complexed fraction. In contrast, extraction of mercury by BSA (principally through complexation) was lowest in humus-coated montmorillonite. This was because BSA itself could be extensively sorbed onto montmorillonite. Results suggested that humus-coated clay could substantially decrease the potential bioavailability of mercury in soils, which should be considered when assessing risk in mercury-contaminated soils.

  3. Probabilistic Description of a Clay Site using CPTU tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sarah; Lauridsen, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl;

    2012-01-01

    A clay site at the harbour of Aarhus, where numerous cone penetration tests have been conducted, is assessed. The upper part of the soil deposit is disregarded, and only the clay sections are investigated. The thickness of the clay deposit varies from 5 to 6 meters, and is sliced into sections of...... a geotechnical assessment of a site, using both the method for classifying soil behaviour types and applying statistics, yield a new level of information, and certainty about the estimates of the strength parameters which are the important outcome of such a site description....... meter in thickness. For each slice, a map of the variation of the undrained shear strength is created through Kriging and the probability of finding weak zones in the deposit is calculated. This results in a description of the spatial variation of the undrained shear strength at the site. Making...

  4. Novel clay carriers for the controlled release of organic agrochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled-release (CR) formulations of alachlor and atrazine herbicides were prepared using sodium alginate and pectine as natural, biodegradable matrices and clay minerals as inert fillers. The release of the two herbicides from different type of CR formulations was studied in static water. The release of alachlor from alginate based formulations and a commercial formulation in sandy loam soil and its movement in a soil column was also studied. The rate of release was affected by the type of clay and the size of the formulation beads. The addition of Fisher bentonite to the alginate reduced the rate of release of herbicides. The release was slower from the larger beads and from those prepared using high viscosity alginate. The release of alachlor in the soil and its movement through the soil column was faster from the commercial formulation than the CR formulation. (author). 6 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Multi-dimensional electro-omosis consolidation of clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, J.; Hicks, M.A.; Dijkstra, J.

    2012-01-01

    Electro-osmosis consolidation is an innovative and effective ground improvement method for soft clays. But electro-osmosis is also a very complicated process, as the mechanical behaviour, and hydraulic and electrical properties of the soil are changing rapidly during the treatment process; this make

  6. Potentials for the Modified Cam-Clay model

    OpenAIRE

    Zouain, Nestor; Pontes, Ivaldo; Vaunat, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Energy and dissipation pseudo-potentials are employed to derive constitutive relationships, in the context of thermodynamic concepts, for the widely used Modified Cam-Clay (MCC) model for soil mechanics. A variational formulation of the MCC evolution equations is proposed in this paper. Since plastic collapse of MCC soils cannot be embedded in the classical limit analysis theory, finding the critical amplification of the load that produces plastic collapse is formulated in...

  7. Cyclic Shearing Deformation Behavior of Saturated Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The apparatus for static and dynamic universal triaxial and torsional shear soil testing is employed to perform stress-controlled cyclic single-direction torsional shear tests and two-direction coupled shear tests under unconsolidated-undrained conditions. Through a series of tests on saturated clay, the effects of initial shear stress and stress reversal on the clay's strain-stress behavior are examined, and the behavior of pore water pressure is studied. The experimental results indicate that the patterns of stress-strain relations are distinctly influenced by the initial shear stress in the cyclic single-direction shear tests. When the initial shear stress is large and no stress reversal occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by an accumulative effect. When the initial shear stress is zero and symmetrical cyclic stress occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by a cyclic effect. The pore water pressure fluctuates around the confining pressure with the increase of cycle number. It seems that the fluctuating amplitude increases with the increase of the cyclic stress. But a buildup of pore water pressure does not occur. The deformations of clay samples under the complex initial and the cyclic coupled stress conditions include the normal deviatoric deformation and horizontal shear deformation, the average deformation and cyclic deformation. A general strain failure criterion taking into account these deformations is recommended and is proved more stable and suitable compared to the strain failure criteria currently used.

  8. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundl, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  9. Cation exchange and adsorption on clays and clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Ammann, Lars

    2003-01-01

    The specific surface area of a clay mineral comprises the external and internal surface area and, finally, the surface area which is exposed to the solution (Chap. 6.1). The aim of this study was to correlate adsorption data of common clays with these specific surface areas.

  10. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  11. Clay Mineral Image Collection for Education in Geotechnical Engineering and the Earth Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Gordon; Dove, Joseph E.; Han, Nizhou; Dove, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This file contains a collection of scanning electron microscope images of Kaolinite and Bentonite pure clay minerals, and the fine portion of a natural soil. National Science Foundation Grant No. 1301124

  12. Selected Properties and Systematic Position of Soils Developed from Red Sandstones and Clays of the Lower Triassic Buntsandstein in the Nw Part of the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland / Niektóre właściwości i pozycja systematyczna gleb wytworzonych z czerwonych piaskowców i iłów dolnego triasu w NW obrzeżeniu Gór Świętokrzyskich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagórski Zbigniew

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the properties of soils developed from the Lower Triassic Buntsandstein sediments in the north-western part of the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland. These are deposits of continental genesis and unique features such as red beds. Two representative soil pedons - the Bartków profile (pBK developed from clay and the Góra Czerwona profile (pGC developed from sandstone were selected for detailed analyzes. The morphology of profiles, their micromorphological features, mineralogical composition, and physico-chemical properties were examined. Most of the properties of the soils are a consequence of the original parent rock lithology. A specific feature of the morphology of the soils are the presence of red color (about 10R by the Munsell color scale related to the presence of hematite. As shown by the XRD data, hematite is not the product of the current soil-forming processes, but it is a lithogenic component, which was inherited from the parent rock. Under the influence of climatic factors primary rock structure has been transformed into a new pedogenic one. Soils developed from clays have a characteristic angular blocky structure. Micromorphological analysis showed that an important role in the formation of soil structure involves geogenic susceptibility of Triassic clays to specific cuboid disintegration. This is indicated by the pore system of planes as an orthogonal nets visible in thin section. The soils developed from sandstone have a weak (unstable subangular blocky structure. The main reason is the insufficient dispersion of the clay-ferruginous fraction from the sandstone matrix. Microscopic observations indicate that fine factions occurs as loose microaggregates, which results in a feature that smaller rock fragments and individual quartz grains are not bonded into soil aggregates. The studied soils are characterized by specific physical-chemical properties. Some of them strongly depend on the mineralogical

  13. Prediction of Settlements of Soft Clay Subjected to Long-Term Dynamic Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    -Presented is the numerical analysis of settlements of soft soil by a 2-D dynamic effective stress FEM method. The model based on the results of cyclic triaxial tests on the reconstituted soft Ariake clay is used to predict the wave induced excess pore water pressure and residual strain of soft clay. The settlements of two types of breakwaters on the soft clay under ocean wave load, a low embankment subjected to traffic load and the tunnel surrounded by soft clay in Shanghai subjected to locomotive load are calculated as examples.

  14. Submicron structures provide preferential spots for carbon and nitrogen sequestration in soils

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Cordula; Mueller, Carsten W.; Höschen, Carmen; Buegger, Franz; Heister, Katja; Schulz, Stefanie; Schloter, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The sequestration of carbon and nitrogen by clay-sized particles in soils is well established, and clay content or mineral surface area has been used to estimate the sequestration potential of soils. Here, via incubation of a sieved (

  15. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Xuhui; Wang, James; Ciblak, Ali; Cox, Evan E.; Riis, Charlotte; Terkelsen, Mads; Gent, David B.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-01-01

    Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK–enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solven...

  16. Viscous property of dried clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-sheng; LI Jian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    One dimensional and triaxial compression tests of air-dried and oven-dried Fujinomori clay and Pisa clay were carried out. Water content is less than 4.5 % and 1.0% for air-dried and oven-dried clay specimens, respectively. In all tests, axial strain rate was changed stepwise many times and drained creep tests were performed several times during monotonic loading at a constant strain rate. Global unloading (and also reloading in some tests) was applied during which creep loading tests were performed several times. Cyclic loading with small stress amplitude and several cycles was also performed to calculate the modulus of elasticity of the clay in tests. Local displacement transducer was used in triaxial compression test to increase measuring accuracy of axial strain. The results show that air-dried and oven-dried clay have noticeable viscous properties; during global unloading, creep deformation changes from positive to negative, i.e. there exist neutral points (zero creep deformation or no creep deformation point) in global unloading part of strain-stress curve; viscous property of Fujinomori clay decreases when water content decreases, i.e. viscous property of air-dried Fujinomori clay is more significant than that of oven-dried Fujinomori clay.

  17. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabrication of bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrence informat

  18. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabricationof bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrenceinformatio

  19. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    In the northern part of Vendsyssel, Denmark, the deposits made in the late glacial time are formed by the sea. The deposits are named after two mussels: Yoldia clay and Saxicava sand. However, in the southern part of Vendsyssel and in the area of Aalborg the clay and sand deposits from the late g...

  20. Water Absorbing Plantation Clay for Vertical Greenery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lih-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the arises of environmental conscious, the usage of vertical garden system has become more popular in urban cities. Citizens can enjoys the benefits of energy and cost saving besides ornamental effect. More investigations have been conducted on green facades led to the cities ecological enhancement.However, limited plants species can be planted for green facades systems as this system does not provide sufficient soil and nutrients for common plants. Alternative plantation methods such as planted box and felt system required additional maintenance attention. The idea of using clay composite which consists of nutritious soil, water absorbing polymer and flexible cement clay potentially become alternative vertical greenery systems that offers economic and sustainable plantation platform for more variety of plants.The fabricating of clay composite involved three processes, they are: mixing, moulding and drying. Physical properties characterisation (density, pH, compression test, aging test and water immersion test were tested on the dried fabricated clay composite to ensure their sustainability in tropical climate. The results showed that clay composite with 1.5 wt% of cement and 0.3 wt% superabsorbent polymer shows optimum water absorbing properties. This system are expected to enable more agriculture activities in urban living.

  1. Distribución de la porosidad de un suelo franco arcilloso (alfisol en condiciones semiáridas después de 15 años bajo siembra directa Soil porosity distribution of a clay loam soil (alfisol in semi-arid conditions after 15 years under direct drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Isabel Cerisola

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un estudio más amplio sobre evolución de las propiedades físicas de un suelo sometido a tres sistemas de labranza, se realizó, en dos campañas consecutivas, un seguimiento de la distribución de la porosidad del suelo según su origen, en parcelas cultivadas bajo siembra directa continua durante 15 años. En el ensayo se consideró un trayecto de 2 metros de longitud, perpendicular a la dirección de las labores, donde se realizaron mediciones de densidad aparente seca y contenido de humedad. El cultivo extensivo de secano (cereal, en cada una de las dos campañas, fue cebada de ciclo corto y de ciclo largo. El calendario de la toma de datos de las variables medidas se fijó en 5 fechas por campaña. La porosidad estructural del suelo, debida principalmente a la alternancia de ciclos de humectación - desecación, fue calculada cada 5 cm y hasta 35 cm de profundidad. Este proceso de fisuración natural resulta suficiente para asegurar un buen drenaje y facilitar el desarrollo radicular de las plantas, siempre y cuando el contenido de humedad se mantenga dentro de la capacidad de retención de agua.On a long-term essay under direct drilling, the evolution of the physical properties of a clay loam soil, such as distribution by origin of soil porosity, has been assessed during two growing seasons. The cereal crops in each growing seasons were spring barley and winter barley, respectively. Soil physical properties were measured on a 2 m length transect located in a perpendicular line to the direction of vehicular traffic for field operations. Five sampling opportunities, within crop cycle, were used to measure the variables. Structural soil porosity, due principally to shrinkage and swelling cycles, was assessed in the 0 to 35 cm depth soil profile. This natural process seemed to be sufficient to guarantee good drainage and normal crop development, unless in the moisture content range included in field capacity.

  2. Woody plant roots fail to penetrate a clay-lined landfill: Managment implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, George R.; Handel, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    In many locations, regulatory agencies do not permit tree planting above landfills that are sealed with a capping clay, because roots might penetrate the clay barrier and expose landfill contents to leaching. We find, however, no empirical or theoretical basis for this restriction, and instead hypothesize that plant roots of any kind are incapable of penetrating the dense clays used to seal landfills. As a test, we excavated 30 trees and shrubs, of 12 species, growing over a clay-lined municipal sanitary landfill on Staten Island, New York. The landfill had been closed for seven years, and featured a very shallow (10 to 30-cm) soil layer over a 45-cm layer of compacted grey marl (Woodbury series) clay. The test plants had invaded naturally from nearby forests. All plants examined—including trees as tall as 6 m—had extremely shallow root plates, with deformed tap roots that grew entirely above and parallel to the clay layer. Only occasional stubby feeder roots were found in the top 1 cm of clay, and in clay cracks at depths to 6 cm, indicating that the primary impediment to root growth was physical, although both clay and the overlying soil were highly acidic. These results, if confirmed by experimental research should lead to increased options for the end use of many closed sanitary landfills.

  3. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  4. Developments in modelling of thermohydro-geomechanical behaviour of Boom clay and clay-based buffer materials (volume 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is composed of two parts: The first part (Volume 1) lays the foundations of a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the interaction between water and soil skeleton during thermal dilatation. The second part (volume 2) is devoted to the development and the application of advance constitutive modelling of mechanical behaviour of clays taking into account the extensive tests of Boom clay reported in the first volume. The development concentrated on the improvement of prediction of the volumetric response of clay skeleton: (a) improving the dilatancy prediction at low to high overconsolidation ratios (Section 2). An elasto-plastic constitutive model has been developed to account for this effect (Section 3.2.); (b) modelling of swelling effects (Section 2.5). A preliminary interpretative model for swelling prediction has been developed (Section 2.5). The application part consisted in interpreting the experimental results obtained for Boom clay to calibrate a set of constants (Section 3) for performing numerical analyses (Section 4) for the thermomechanical model already calibrated for Boom clay (Appendix). Interpretation of the tests required an assessment of influence of the strong anisotropy effects revealed by Boom clay on the basis of an interpretative model characterized by a kinematic hardening plasticity and coupled elasticity (section 3)

  5. Evaluation of some ceramic clays from Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1993-01-01

    This reports details the technical evaluation of ceramic clays collected during visits to Zambia in 1990 and 1991 by the author (Clive Mitchell). The clay samples included: Choma kaolin (Southern Province), Twapia kaolin (Copperbelt Province), Kapiri Mposhi kaolin (Central Province), Masenche clay (Northern Province), Leula clay, Misenga clay and Chikankata clay (Southern Province). The Choma kaolin was asessed to be an excellent source of ceramic-grade kaolin. The Twapia and Kapiri Mposhi ka...

  6. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    -del Hoyo, C. (2007). Applied Clay Science. 36, 103-121.Layered Double Hydroxides and human health: An overview. -Valderrábano, M., Rodríguez-Cruz, S., del Hoyo, C., Sánchez-Martín, M.J. (2006). 4th International Workshop "Bioavalailability of pollutants and soil remediation". 1, 5-6. Physicochemical study of the adsorption of pesticides by lignins. -Volzone, C. (2007). Applied Clay Science. 36, 191-196. Retention of pollutant gases: Comparison between clay minerals and their modified products.

  7. Characterization of clays found in soils of the indian territories in Rio Grande do Sul State by using the {sup 57} Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy; Caracterizacao de argilas encontradas em solos de terras indigenas do RS com o auxilio da espectroscopia Moessbauer de {sup 57} Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.A.S.; Gobbi, D.; Marcos, J.L.N. [Universidade de Passo Fundo, RS (Brazil), Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e Geociencias; Paduani, C. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Ardisson, J.D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2004-06-01

    Clay samples collected from soils of indian territories of the middle plateau in Rio Grande do Sul were analyzed with the aim to obtain characterization data and technical parameters for their potential use as raw material for ceramic products. The mineralogical study in samples by using the X-ray diffraction technique demonstrated that the predominant clay mineral is kaolinite. Others minerals as quartz and rutile also are present in small amounts. Chemical analysis shows low percentages for oxides of Mg, Mn, K, Na, Ca, Cu and Zn (overall percentages smaller than 0.97%). The samples also were analyzed with the {sup 57} Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The Moessbauer spectra at room temperature confirm the presence of the mineral kaolinite. At 77 K they reveal the existence of the minerals goethite and hematite as ultrafine magnetic particles in a superparamagnetic state. The physical tests performed in the samples show that these soils are very fine material and present appropriate granulometric characteristics and plasticity, which can be taken in advantage for the production of materials for construction or production of ornamental artifacts. (author)

  8. Boom clay pore water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, geological disposal in clay is the primary option for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel from the biosphere. The Boom Clay is studied as the potential host rock for methodological studies on the geological disposal of radioactive waste. It is present under the facilities of the SCK-CEN at Mol, at a depth of 190 to 293 m. The current R and D programme focuses on the feasibility and safety of radioactive waste disposal in the Boom Clay. In this framework, a detailed characterisation of the clay is performed (mechanical, physico-chemical and hydrogeological properties, variability, role of organic matter,...). In addition, high priority is given to the understanding of the basic phenomena which control the retention o f radionuclides in the clay. Therefore, it is very important to characterise and understand the pore water composition in the host rock. All the available information from previous studies on the Boom Clay pore water chemistry was synthesise d in a 'state of the art' report, status 2004. This report describes the pore water sampling and analytical techniques, the results, and interpretation of a series of studies carried out in-situ in the HADES URF and in the laboratories. The objective of this study was to evaluate the most reliable technique(s) to obtain representative pore water samples, to determine the variation of the pore water composition in the Boom Clay, to present a coherent geochemical model for explaining the mechanisms controlling the Boom Clay pore water composition, and to propose a reference pore water composition to be used in the laboratory experiments, for speciation calculations, and for assessments of perturbation that might influence the Boom Clay pore water. The main conclusions will be presented here. (authors)

  9. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.W.W.; Chen, Z.K.; Coo, J.L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Chen, R., E-mail: chenrui1005@hotmail.com [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Urban and Civil Engineering for Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explore feasibility of unsaturated clay as a gas barrier in landfill cover. • Gas breakthrough pressure increases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • Gas emission rate decreases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • A 0.6 m-thick clay layer may be sufficient to meet gas emission rate limit. - Abstract: Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas–water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different

  10. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg‑1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation.

  11. Hidráulica do escoamento e transporte de sedimentos em sulcos em solo franco-argilo-arenoso Flow hydraulics and sediment transport in rills of a sandy clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramon Barros Cantalice

    2005-07-01

    capacity to deform the rill and alter flow hydraulics, responsible for rill formation dynamics. The objective of this study was to evaluate flow hydraulic conditions that can provide important information on erosion relationships, soil erodibility and sediment transport in furrows of a recently-tilled Palleudult. Rills were pre-formed in a sandy clay loam soil with an average slope of 0.067 m m-1. Simulated rainfall with an intensity of 74 mm h-1 was applied during 80 min, while rainfall and extra inflows of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 L min-1 were jointly applied for the last 20 min of each run in the rill. Results indicated that the rill flow regime varied from transitional subcritical to turbulent subcritical. The rill erosion detachment rates were linear to shear stress. Rill erodibility (Kr was 0.0024 kg-1 s-1 N and critical shear stress (tauc was 2.75 Pa. Two functions to predict sediment transport based on stream power explained 53% of data variability, which indicates the inherent difficulty of predicting solid transport through shallow flows on eroding agricultural lands, and the physical and mineralogical diversity of particles and aggregates of the studied soil.

  12. Importância das espécies minerais no potássio total da fração argila de solos do Triângulo Mineiro Importance of mineral species in total potassium content of clay fraction in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Melo

    2003-10-01

    arenito da Formação Uberaba, migmatito/micaxisto do Grupo Araxá e basalto da Formação Serra Geral.Few studies relate the K reserve in soils developed in a humid tropic climate with the minerals found in the clay fraction. Nineteen soils were collected for this purpose in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, developed from different parent materials and different weathering degrees. Due to the greater occurrence, a larger number of samples of the Bauru Group was collected, comprising all the geological formations found in the region. The total K content in soil and the sand, silt, and clay fractions were determined after the digestion of the soil samples by HF, HNO3 and H2SO4. To quantify the contribution of each mineral species to the total K content, Na-saturated clay samples were submitted by a sequential and selective mineral extraction procedure, following the order: amorphous Al and Fe oxides; crystalline Fe oxides; kaolinite and gibbsite; mica and other 2:1 minerals and; feldspar and resistant minerals. The clay mineralogy composition reflects the high weathering and leaching degree in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, with low contents of amorphous minerals, a predominant proportion of kaolinite and the presence of other secondary resistant minerals. In spite of this mineral composition, the clay fraction presented the highest total K content, mainly in the most weathered soils. Due to the high proportion of kaolinite in the clay fraction, this mineral was an important source of non-exchangeable K forms. On the other hand, the contribution of amorphous Fe and Al oxides and crystalline Fe oxides to the total K content of the clay fraction was negligible. In general, easily weathered primary minerals (mica and feldspar contributed largely to the total K of the clay fraction, principally to the youngest soils developed from the Uberaba (sandstone and Serra Geral (basalt Formations, and the Araxá Group (migmatite/micaschist.

  13. Prions, Radionuclides and Clays: Impact of clay interlayer "acidity" on toxic compound speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, L.; Hureau, C.; Sobolev, O.; Cuello, G.; Chapron, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The physical and chemical processes that are the basis of contaminant retardation in clay rich medium, such as soil or nuclear waste repository, have been studied at the molecular level by a combination of molecular dynamics (MD), electron paramagnetic spectroscopy (EPR) and neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS). The speciation of contaminants such as Sm, a radionuclide analogue, and Cu, bound to Prion protein (PrP), has been studied upon adsorption in clay interlayers. We used as molecular probe the P5-Cu(II) complex, where the P5 pentapeptide(92-96 PrP residues) represents one of the five Cu(II) binding site present in PrP, the key protein involved in diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In both cases, the pH of the interlayer has been inferred from the metal ion coordination, here used as a molecular reporter. In circum neutral pH waters, samarium is present as Sm(OH)3° species and should not be adsorbed in clay interlayer by "cation exchange" unless its hydrolysis is altered. Samarium NDIS results indicate that whether the number of oxygen nearest neighbours varies only from 8.5 to 7, as Sm penetrates the interlayer, the number of hydrogen nearest neighbours drops from 12 to 6. The high affinity of clay for Sm shows that a change in Sm hydrolysis occurs in the clay interlayer, but is directly followed by the formation of a surface complex with montmorillonite siloxane plane functional groups which prevents the determination of a "local pH". Conversely, has been found to be a much more sensitive interlayer water pH probe. and this peptide domain is involved in the misfolding of the protein,a transconformation which may lead to the pathogenic PrPSc form. We have therefore studied by EPR spectroscopy the adsorption of Cu(II)-P5 complexes on montmorillonite, and found the clay to have a large and selective adsorption capacity for the various [Cu(P5)H-n](2-n)+ complexes where n is the number of deprotonated amido function

  14. Shear Strength of Remoulding Clay Samples Using Different Methods of Moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaliza, W.; Ismail, B.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Nurul, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    Shear strength for clay soil was required to determine the soil stability. Clay was known as a soil with complex natural formations and very difficult to obtain undisturbed samples at the site. The aim of this paper was to determine the unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay on different methods in moulding samples which were proctor compaction, hand operated soil compacter and miniature mould methods. All the samples were remoulded with the same optimum moisture content (OMC) and density that were 18% and 1880 kg/m3 respectively. The unconfined shear strength results of remoulding clay soils for proctor compaction method was 289.56kPa with the strain 4.8%, hand operated method was 261.66kPa with the strain 4.4% and miniature mould method was 247.52kPa with the strain 3.9%. Based on the proctor compaction method, the reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay soil of hand operated method was 9.66%, and for miniature mould method was 14.52%. Thus, because there was no significant difference of reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength between three different methods, so it can be concluded that remoulding clay by hand operated method and miniature mould method were accepted and suggested to perform remoulding clay samples by other future researcher. However for comparison, the hand operated method was more suitable to form remoulded clay sample in term of easiness, saving time and less energy for unconfined shear strength determination purposes.

  15. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    OpenAIRE

    James D Stephenson; Lydia J Hallis; Kazuhide Nagashima; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest minera...

  16. Influence of soil texture on carbon dynamics and storage potential in tropical forest soils of Amazonia

    OpenAIRE

    Telles, Everaldo de Carvalho Conceicao; Camargo, Plinio Barbosa; Luiz A Martinelli; Trumbore, Susan E.; da Costa, Enir Salazar; Santos, Joaquim; Higuchi, Niro; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme

    2003-01-01

    Stable and radiocarbon isotopes were used to investigate the role of soil clay content in the storage and dynamics of soil carbon in tropical forest soils. Organic matter in clay-rich Oxisols and Ultisols contains at least two distinct components: (1) material with light δ13C signatures and turnover times of decades or less; and (2) clay-associated, 13C-enriched, carbon with turnover times of decades at the surface to millennia at depths >20 cm. Soil texture, in this case clay content, exerts...

  17. Influence of soil texture on carbon dynamics and storage potential in tropical forest soils of Amazonia

    OpenAIRE

    Telles, E.; de Camargo, P.; Martinelli, L.; Trumbore, S.; Da Costa, E; Santos, J.; N. Higuchi; de Oliveira, R.

    2003-01-01

    [1] Stable and radiocarbon isotopes were used to investigate the role of soil clay content in the storage and dynamics of soil carbon in tropical forest soils. Organic matter in clay-rich Oxisols and Ultisols contains at least two distinct components: ( 1) material with light delta(13)C signatures and turnover times of decades or less; and ( 2) clay-associated, C-13-enriched, carbon with turnover times of decades at the surface to millennia at depths > 20 cm. Soil texture, in this case clay c...

  18. Development of a Large Scale Infiltration Tank for Determination of the Hydraulic Properties of Expansive Clays

    OpenAIRE

    TANG, Anh Minh; Ta, An-Ninh; Cui, Yu-Jun; THIRIAT, Jérémy

    2009-01-01

    International audience A large-scale infiltration tank was developed to study the water transfer in compacted expansive clay. Volumetric water content sensors were buried in a soil column for water content monitoring during infiltration. In addition to water content, soil suction and temperature at various locations and the heave at the soil surface were also monitored. Emphasis was put in minimizing the effect of sensors installation on water transfer and soil deformation. The results obt...

  19. Phosphorus speciation of clay fractions from long-term fertility experiments in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Ann Kristin; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Hesterberg, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural soils constitute a main driver for eutrophication of the Baltic Sea. There is limited knowledge about sorption and release processes of P in these soils, especially concerning the effects of fertilization. In this study, P speciation of the clay fractions from six different soils in long-term fertility experiments in Sweden was investigated by P K-edge XANES spectroscopy. As expected, unfertilized soils had lower concentrations of acid-digestible P comp...

  20. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  1. Reduction of soil tare by improved uprooting of sugar beet : a soil dynamic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, G.D.

    2001-01-01

    The relative amount of soil in sugar beet lots, called soil tare, should be reduced to curtail the cost and negative aspects of soil tare. Highest soil tare occurs in beet lots harvested out of wet clay soil. The main problem is that commonly-used share lifters press the soil against the beet. There

  2. Surfactant-modified bentonite clays: preparation, characterization, and atrazine removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Singh, Neera

    2015-03-01

    Bentonite clay was modified using quaternary ammonium cations, viz. phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), trioctylmethylammonium (TOMA) [100 % of cation exchange capacity of clay], and stearylkonium (SK) [100 % (SK-I) and 250 % (SK-II) of cation exchange capacity of clay]. The organoclays were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Atrazine adsorption on modified clays was studied using a batch method. Bentonite clay was a poor adsorbent of atrazine as 9.4 % adsorption was observed at 1 μg mL(-1) atrazine concentration. Modification of clay by PTMA cation did not improve atrazine adsorption capacity. However, atrazine adsorption in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-bentonites varied between 49 and 72.4 % and data fitted well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R > 0.96). Adsorption of atrazine in organoclays was nonlinear and slope (1/n) values were adsorption constants, K f(1/n) in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-I-bentonites was 239.2, 302.4, and 256.6, respectively, while increasing the SK cation loading in the clay (SK-II) decreased atrazine adsorption [K f(1/n) - 196.4]. Desorption of atrazine from organoclays showed hysteresis and TOMA- and SK-I-bentonites were the best organoclays to retain the adsorbed atrazine. Organoclays showed better atrazine removal from wastewater than an aqueous solution. The synthesized organoclays may find application in soil and water decontamination and as a carrier for atrazine-controlled released formulations. PMID:25273519

  3. Clay Minerals Deposit of Halakabad (Sabzevar- Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mohammad Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Clay minerals are expanded in south of Sabzevar. They are identified with light color in the filed. The XRD and XRF chemical and mineralogical studies on the Clay minerals indicated that their main clay minerals are Kaolinite, Illite and Dickite. Pyrophyllite is minor clay mineral. Quartz and Sanidine non clay minerals are present with clay minerals .Ratio of Al2O3 is about 40 per cent, it is very good for industrial minerals .Volcanic rocks are origin clay minerals .Their composition are bas...

  4. Characterization of edible clay (multani mitti) using INAA (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multani Mitti is basically clay commonly used in cosmetics, medicines. It is also used for cleansing of body and hair and eating specially women (pregnant and lactating) and children. 16 Essential major, minor and trace elements (Ba, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Se Sr, Ti, V and Zn) have been determined in Multani Mitti (MM) clay using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique were studied in collected clay samples from Rakhi Gaj located 40 Km from D. G. Khan, Pakistan. These samples were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to detect the elemental hazard assessment. Radioassay schemes for three sets of elements after neutron irradiation and cooling were evolved to avoid matrix effects. The composition of MM clay shows major elements in descending order as Fe > K > Mg > Na > Mn > Zn > V > Rb > Cr >Ba followed by minor elements as Sr >Co > Cs with trace levels of Se. Data have been compared with clays available in literature globally. Intakes of essential elements were calculated for pregnant, lactating women and children. Intakes were found comparable to WHO levels except Fe and Cr. Risk assessment was measured using mathematical model. The quality assurance of data was performed using Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) of a similar matrix (IAEA Lake sediment SL-1 and IAEA Soil S-7). (author)

  5. Permeability response of oil-contaminated compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation on the behavior of motor oil-contaminated, partially saturated compacted clays. For the study, both a natural clay and an artificially purified kaolinite, contaminated with 0 to 8% of motor oil, were firstly compacted following the ASTM standard procedure. Secondly, permeability tests were carried out in a triaxial cell on 10 cm-diameter compacted clay specimens. The results of the investigation indicate that increasing percentages of motor oil decrease both the optimum water content and the optimum dry density of the two clays. However, whereas the optimum water content on the average decreases by about 6% when the percentage contamination increases from 0 to 8%, the corresponding decrease in the optimum dry density is less than 3%. Even though the optimum dry density decreases as the percentage of oil increases from 0 to 8%, there is, however, a range in oil content varying between 2 and 4% for which the optimum dry density is slightly greater than that of the untreated soils. As far as the permeability tests are concerned, the results indicate that as the percentage of oil increases, the coefficient of permeability decreases substantially, especially for clay specimens which were initially compacted on the dry side of optimum

  6. Inhibiting water evaporation of sand soil with clay modified by linear alklybezene sulfonates%十二烷基苯磺酸钠改性黏土抑制沙土水分蒸发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张增志; 渠永平; 王宏娟; 杜红梅

    2014-01-01

    针对荒漠化地区生态恢复中沙土有效水分涵养难的问题,采用十二烷基苯磺酸钠(linear alklybezene sulfonates,LAS)与黏土复合制备土基改性材料。研究了材料在模拟沙漠气候条件下的保水性能,并测试材料老化后抗压强度损失率和质量损失率以及其保水性能的变化。采用扫描电子显微镜、傅里叶红外光谱分析、X 射线衍射分析、热重分析对材料保水机理进行研究。结果表明,土基改性材料保水性能良好,改性后黏土的片层结构和化学成分没有明显变化,通过LAS亲水端与黏土中结合水的相互作用,将松散的黏土胶结起来,LAS中憎水端相互连接形成憎水网络,从而在地表形成透气保水的固结层来有效降低水分蒸发。模拟沙漠气候条件下的植草试验表明当 LAS 和黏土的质量比为2∶1时,土基改性材料保水透气性能较佳,草籽发芽率从对照组的8%提高到43%。研究结果为制备新型土基固沙植草材料提供参考。%Desertification is one of the most serious environment problems in the world. Three methods commonly used in desertification control are engineering, chemical and biological sand fixation. Aiming at available water conservation in desertification ecological restoration, the clay-based modified materials were prepared by clay and sodium dodecyl benzene sulphonate (LAS) composite. LAS (2, 4, 6 and 8 g) was individually dissolved into 15 g distilled water while strong stirring for 10 minutes. Then, 3 g bentonite was slowly added into the solutions under strong stirring. The slurry was sprinkled onto sand with a relative humidity of 40%. The samples were regarded as L1, L2, L3 and L4, respectively according to the different contents of LAS (2, 4, 6 and 8 g), and the original clay L was as control group. The water retention property was studied in simulated desertification climate and the materials were analyzed and characterized

  7. Emprego de calcário e de superfosfato simples na cultura do algodoeiro em solo argiloso ácido Use of lime and of ordinary superphosphate for cotton cultivated on acid clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson M. da Silva

    1980-01-01

    liming experiment with cotton are discussed. This experiment was conducted on Latosolic B Terra Roxa soil, acid, with a pH index of 5.0, originally under "cerradão" vegetation, with 66% of clay, 4.3% of organic mater, 0.9, 0.8 and 0.5 (meq/100 ml of Al3+, Ca2+and Mg2+, respectively. The experimental design was a split-plot, with four replications. Dolomitic limestone was applied in the first year, on main plots at the levels of 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 6.0 t/ha. P and K were annually applied on split-plots, as a factorial 3 x 2, at the levels of 0, 60 and 120 kg/ha of P2O5, and 40 and 80 kg/ha of K2O, respectively, with ordinary superphosphate and potassium chloride. Four months after lime application, the neutralization of the exchangeable aluminum found by soil analysis was observed, at the highest level, the pH value increased up to 5.5 and values of calcium plus magnesium reached 3.0 meq. The linear effect upon cotton yield, due to liming, was significant during all the period of this study, increasing from the first to the third year. The effect of phosphorus was smaller, but positive and significant. Cotton plants did not react to potassium fertilization and interactions were not observed. Lime increased the concentrations of P, Ca and Mg in leaf blades, and decreased those of K, Fe, Mn and Al in the year when it was applied. There were no symptoms of K or micronutrient deficiencies due to the use of lime at high level.

  8. First Direct Detection of Clay Minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, R. B.; Owensby, P. D.; Clark, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    Magnesian clays or clay-type minerals were conclusively detected in the martian regolith. Near-IR spectral observations of Mars using the Mauna Kea 2.2-m telescope show weak but definite absorption bands near microns. The absorption band positions and widths match those produced by combined OH stretch and Mg-OH lattice modes and are diagnostic of minerals with structural OH such as clays and amphiboles. Likely candidate minerals include serpentine, talc, hectorite, and sponite. There is no spectral evidence for aluminous hydroxylated minerals. No distinct band occurs at 2.55 microns, as would be expected if carbonates were responsible for the 2.35 micron absorption. High-albedo regions such as Elysium and Utopia have the strongest bands near 2.35 microns, as would be expected for heavily weathered soils. Low-albedo regions such as Iapygia show weaker but distinct bands, consistent with moderate coatings, streaks, and splotches of bright weathered material. In all areas observed, the 2.35-micron absorption is at least three times weaker than would be expected if well-crystallized clay minerals made up the bulk of bright soils on Mars.

  9. Formation of stable nanocomposite clays from small peptides reacted with montmorillonite and illite-smectite mixed layer clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; LeBlanc, J.; Peña, S.; Gottlieb, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how organic compounds interact with clay minerals and which functional groups result in the strongest bonds is pivotal to achieving a better understanding of how mineral composition affects the residence time of carbon and nitrogen in soils. In this work, we describe how small peptides derived from tryptone casein digest are dissolved and suspended with clay minerals to examine the nature of OM adsorption to mineral surfaces and the resulting effect on clay mineral structure. XRD analyses indicate that peptides intercalation results in expansion of the d001 spacing of montmorillonite (Mt) and the smectite component of a 70-30 illite-smectite mixed layer clay (I-S) and poorer crystallinity overall as a result of exfoliation of tactoids. Peptide adsorption is concentration-dependent, however, surface adsorption appears to mediate interlayer adsorption in Mt reaching a maximum of 16% of the mass of the organoclay complex, indicating that at a critical concentration, peptide intercalation will supersede surface adsorption resulting in a more stable attachment. In I-S the degree of surface adsorption and intercalation is proportional to concentration, however, surface adsorption is not a priming mechanism for interlayer adsorption. Thermogravimetric analysis of the organoclay complexes determined by TGA coupled to GC-MS indicate that the most prominent product species measured was 1-(1-Trimethylsiloxyethenyl)-3-trimethylsiloxy-benzene, likely from tryptophan monomer decomposition. The compound was detected over a broad temperature range, greater than 300 oC, during pyrolysis and suggests a carbon-silicon covalent bond formed between the peptide and tetrahedral layers in the clay. An additional silicon-bearing VOC detected at lower pyrolysis temperature by GC was N,N-Diethyl-1-(trimethylsilyl)-9,10-didehydroergoline-8-carboxamide, likely derived from a lysine-bearing peptide derivative. We hypothesize that hydrophobic (non-ionic) peptides react with silanol

  10. Hydrogeology in Clay Tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, Knud Erik; Nilsson, Bertel;

    2012-01-01

    Low-permeability soils such as clayey tills constitute geological boundaries to underlying chalk aquifers that are commonly used as a drinking water resource. Fractures and sand lenses within till sequences represent hydraulic avenues with high hydraulic conductivites limiting the protective...... have on the hydraulic regime within a clayey till aquitard. De fleste steder i Danmark danner moræneler en geologisk grænse til underliggende grundvandsmagasiner, der udgør vigtige drikkevandskilder i den danske vandforsyning. Sprækker og sandlinser i moræneleret resulterer i en øget strømning gennem...

  11. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project

  12. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Koerner, R.M. [Geosynthetic Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bonaparte, R. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  13. Spatial and temporal variability of soil electrical conductivity related to soil moisture

    OpenAIRE

    José Paulo Molin; Gustavo Di Chiacchio Faulin

    2013-01-01

    Soil electrical conductivity (ECa) is a soil quality indicator associated to attributes interesting to site-specific soil management such as soil moisture and texture. Soil ECa provides information that helps guide soil management decisions, so we performed spatial evaluation of soil moisture in two experimental fields in two consecutive years and modeled its influence on soil ECa. Soil ECa, moisture and clay content were evaluated by statistical, geostatistical and regression analyses. Semiv...

  14. Modeling soil electrical conductivity-depth relationships with data from proximal and penetrating ECa sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa), a widely used proximal soil sensing technology, is related to several important soil properties, including salinity, clay content, and bulk density. Particularly in layered soils, interpretation of ECa variations would be enhanced with better calibrations...

  15. Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans) in traditional clay products used during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, N.M.; Talidda, A.; Malisch, R.; Kotz, A.; Tritsher, A.; Fiedler, H.; Zeilmaker, M.J.; Kooijman, M.; Wienk, K.J.H.; Traag, W.A.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Geophagy, the practice of consuming clay or soil, is encountered among pregnant women in Africa, Eastern Asia and Latin America, but also in Western societies. However, certain types of clay are known to contain high concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Th

  16. Finite Element Investigations on the Interaction between a Pile and Swelling Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    This paper aims to investigate the interaction between a pile and a swelling soil modelled as a cohesive soil subjected to unloading. The investigations include analyses of the heave of the excavation level, shear stresses at the soil–pile interface and internal pile forces based on a case study...... of Little Belt Clay. The case study involves a circular concrete pile installed in clay immediately after an excavation. The influence of the swelling soil on the soil–pile interaction and the internal pile forces are analysed by solely observing the upper pile part positioned in the swelling zone...

  17. Finite Element Investigations on the Interaction between a Pile and Swelling Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the interaction between a pile and a swelling soil modelled as a cohesive soil subjected to unloading. The investigations include analyses of the heave of the excavation level, shear stresses at the soil–pile interface and internal pile forces based on a case study of Little Belt Clay. The case study involves a circular concrete pile installed in clay immediately after an excavation. The influence of the swelling soil on the soil–pile interaction and the interna...

  18. Determining the clay/organic carbon ratio by visible near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Peng, Yi; Hermansen, Cecilie;

    /OC ratio directly would be valuable. Visible near infrared spectroscopy (vis-NIRS) is a cost-effective method for soil analysis and was tested here for the prediction of clay/OC ratio. Soil samples from two agricultural fields in Denmark (N=115) were analyzed. Partial Least Squares regression (full cross...

  19. Influence of salinity on bioremediation of oil in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spills from oil production and processing result in soils being contaminated with oil and salt. The effect of NaCl on degradation of oil in a sandy-clay loam and a clay loam soil was determined. Soils were treated with 50 g kg-1 non-detergent motor oil (30 SAE). Salt treatments included NaCl amendments to adjust the soil solution electrical conductivities to 40, 120, and 200 dS m-1. Soils were amended with nutrients and incubated at 25oC. Oil degradation was estimated from the quantities of CO2 evolved and from gravimetric determinations of remaining oil. Salt concentrations of 200 dS m-1 in oil amended soils resulted in a decrease in oil mineralized by 44% for a clay loam and 20% for a sandy-clay loam soil. A salt concentration of 40 dS m-1 reduced oil mineralization by about 10% in both soils. Oil mineralized in the oil amended clay-loam soil was 2-3 times greater than for comparable treatments of the sandy-clay loam soil. Amending the sandy-clay loam soil with 5% by weight of the clay-loam soil enhanced oil mineralization by 40%. Removal of salts from oil and salt contaminated soils before undertaking bioremediation may reduce the time required for bioremediation. (author)

  20. Charm of Purple Clay A private museum in Wuxi is devoted to purple-clay art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Purple-clay art pieces will be on display in a museum opening soon in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province. The museum, named Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Museum, is part of the Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Art Exhibition Center

  1. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Chen; Yue Niu; Boya Wang; Kamal Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental conce...

  2. Performance of asphalt and clay liners as a uranium mill tailings leachate barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is evaluating the long-term effectiveness of various asphalt and clay liner materials as a radionuclide and process chemical barrier from uranium mill tailings. A field test is being conducted by monitoring asphalt and clay liners installed at the Grand Junction, Colorado tailings site. In addition eight prospective liners have undergone three months exposure to accelerated conditions to predict their behavior over a 1000 year period. High calcium leachates have been forced through thin layers of clay to determine the ability of the clay to resist ion exchange, which reduces its swelling capabilities. Asphalt liners have been exposed to elevated temperatures and increased strengths of oxidizing agents to accelerate their aging process. The permeability coefficients measured during this exposure were then used to predict each liners stability with time. The analyses thus far show that clay soils with bentonite amendments and most asphalt compositions have good long-term performance characteristics. 3 figures, 1 table

  3. Performance of asphalt and clay liners as a uranium mill tailings leachate barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is evaluating the long-term effectiveness of various asphalt clay liner materials as a radionuclide and process chemical barrier from uranium mill tailings. A field test is being conducted by monitoring asphalt and clay liners installed at the Grand Junction, Colorado tailings site. In addition, eight prospective liners have undergone three months exposure to accelerated conditions to predict their behavior over a 1000-year period. High-calcium leachates have been forced through thin layers of clay to determine the ability of the clay to resist ion exchange, which reduces its swelling capabilities. Asphalt liners have been exposed to elevated temperatures and increased strengths of oxidizing agents to accelerate their aging process. The permeability coefficients measured during this exposure were then used to predict each liners stability with time. The analyses thus far show that clay soils with bentonite amendments and most asphalt compositions have good long-term performance characteristics

  4. On the decay of strength in Guilin red clay with cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effect of cracks in red clay on shear strength through dry-wet cycle test, the experimenters used imaging software and a mathematical model to determine fractal dimension and crack ratio of surface cracks in red clay in Guilin, China. After each dry-wet cycle, direct shear tests were carried out on the sample, and such variables as matrix suction on the crack propagation process of red clay were analyzed. The mechanics model was established and obtained the critical condition of soil cracks. The results show that with the increase in the number of dry-wet cycles the shear strength of the samples would decrease. But the rule of shear strength of sample 3 is slightly different from samples 1 and 2. The shear strength of red clay has a good correlation with fractal dimension and crack ratio, which could be an identification index of the strength of red clay

  5. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  6. The Determination Of Scaling Factor of Clay Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Sulaeman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The observations and tests under small scale in 1-gravity condition is intended to obtain a comparative behavior of model and prototype of geotechnical case by imposing the scaling relations. Simulation to represent related structure, sub-soil and failure mechanism need to be prepared prior to do observations in this modelling. To obtain the new parameter for sub-soil simulation and inter-dependency with scaling relationship, the  ten samples with different water content of prototype clay soil were consolidated in the triaxial CU test.  After consolidation, each sample were given the arbitrarily initial mean stress po =1/3 (σ1+σ2+σ3 at the same time each corresponding void ratio were recorded. The data was plotted and numbered in the e Ln p’ axises to adopt critical state line concept. Further shear stage in triaxial CU test were done to record the stress and strain of each ten samples. Among those of ten stress strain curves there were 3 similar curves (1, 6 and 8 observed when the deviatoric stress was normalized with its po, this showed similar behavior among them. The further observation revealed that void ratio in the clay soil no. 8 (ep corresponded with void ratio of the sample no. 1 (em, stress ratio N and critical state line parameter l in the form of  em= ep+ l Ln N. To support the expression of  em= ep+ l Ln N,  The “pile loading test” case was prepared in small scale and full scale modeling, em   represented void ratio of clay in small scale and ep represented void ratio of clay at original project location. Load settlement curves were obtained from both “pile loading test” in small and full scale simulation and the result showed closely good agreement.

  7. Assessment of Time Functions for Piles Driven in Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustesen, Anders; Andersen, Lars; Sørensen, Carsten Steen

    The vertical bearing capacity of piles situated in clay is studied with regard to the long-term set-up. A statistical analysis is carried out on the basis of data from numerous static loading tests. The database covers a wide range of both soil and pile properties, which ensures a general....... Hence, it is suggested that a constant set-up factor should be applied for the prediction of pile capacities at a given time after initial driving....

  8. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in shallow, recently recharged ground water -- Input data set for clay sediment (gwava-s_clay)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the amount of clay sediment in the soil, in percent times 1000, in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data...

  9. Determination of spatial variability of aluminum according to the clay distribution in soils of Querência do Norte/Paraná State, BrazilDeterminação da variabilidade espacial de alumínio em função da distribuição de argila em solos de Querência do Norte/Paraná, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luiz Chicati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The major part of Brazilian soils shows elevated aluminum contents and in several cases this element occurs in phytotoxic levels. Aluminum is a constituent of the soil´s clay minerals. Its release can occur to the exchangeable fraction or to the soil solution. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the relationship between the spatial variability of aluminum and the distribution of soil clay. In order to achieve that, a grid of soil samples was collected in field, defined by means of photointerpretation and observation of images. The results obtained in laboratory were submitted to statistical analyses to verify spatial dependence, which was proven later. The space continuity was studied by means of the semivariogram’s elaboration using different models. The best semivariograms were chosen by cross validation performed through "ordinary kriging". Thus, it could be observed that these variables showed structure of spatial dependence, with a positive correlation between them, besides it was possible to make maps in order to allow a better agricultural exploitation.A maior parte dos solos brasileiros possui altos teores de alumínio e, em muitos casos, este elemento ocorre em níveis fitotóxicos. Constituinte dos minerais de argila, pode ter sua liberação diretamente na forma trocável ou para a solução do solo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi demonstrar a relação entre a variabilidade espacial do alumínio e a distribuição de argila do solo. Para isto, foi coletada uma malha de amostras de solo em campo, definida por meio de fotointerpretação e observação de imagens. Os resultados obtidos em laboratório foram submetidos a análises estatísticas visando a verificação da dependência espacial, que foi comprovada posteriormente. A continuidade espacial foi estudada mediante a elaboração de semivariogramas utilizando-se diferentes modelos. Os melhores semivariogramas foram escolhidos mediante a validação cruzada executada

  10. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  11. Gas migration through bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas produced by irradiation of pore water in the highly compacted bentonite that surrounds the copper canisters according to the KBS 2 and 3 concepts, may escape from the clay/copper interface if the gas pressure is higher than the groundwater pressure. A reasonable physical model predicts that gas may penetrate wider capillary passages that actually exist in the very dense clay, although these passages are still of microscopic size. In the large majority of the clay voids, the capillary action is sufficient, however, to resist gas penetration, and this suggests that a possible mechanism of gas migration is that of a finger-like pattern of tortuous gas passages extending from the canisters if radiolysis takes place at all. Two series of experiments have been run at gas pressures up to about 10 MPa. Nitrogen as well as hydrogen were used in these tests which seem to confirm, in principle, the validity of the physical model. (authors)

  12. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  13. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  14. Dynamics of clay mineralogy with profile depth in relation to long term potassium fertilizer application to sugar cane crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment consisted of treatment of sugar cane crop with N, NP, NPK and farmyard manure and determination of its effect on soil mica, vermiculite and montmorillonite over a period of 18 years. The NPK treatment had greater mica in coarse clay, but less in fine clay than NP and control treatments. Vermiculite in coarse clay fraction, in NPK treatment, increased with the depth as compared to other treatments. The fertilizer treatment effect on smectite content was obvious only in AP horizon in fine clay fraction. (author)

  15. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xuhui, E-mail: x.mao@neu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Wang, James [Geosyntec Consultants, Columbia, MA (United States); Ciblak, Ali [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Cox, Evan E. [Geosyntec Consultants, Columbia, MA (United States); Riis, Charlotte [NIRAS A/S, Alleroed (Denmark); Terkelsen, Mads [Capital Region of Denmark, Hilleroed (Denmark); Gent, David B. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), US Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Alshawabkeh, Akram N., E-mail: aalsha@neu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous delivery of electron donors and bacteria into low permeability clays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacteria injection, growth and consequent transformation of contaminants are viable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EK injection is more effective than advection-based injection for clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electroosmosis appears to be the driving mechanism for bacteria injection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both EK transport and biodegradation contribute the removal of VOCs in clay. - Abstract: Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solvents is evaluated. Dehalococcoides (Dhc) bacterial strain and lactate ions are uniformly injected in contaminated clay and complete dechlorination of chlorinated ethene is observed in laboratory experiments. The injected bacteria can survive, grow, and promote effective dechlorination under EK conditions and after EK application. The distribution of Dhc within the clay suggests that electrokinetic transport of Dhc is primarily driven by electroosmosis. In addition to biodegradation due to bioaugmentation of Dhc, an EK-driven transport of chlorinated ethenes is observed in the clay, which accelerates cleanup of chlorinated ethenes from the anode side. Compared with conventional advection-based delivery, EK injection is significantly more effective for establishing microbial reductive dechlorination capacity in low-permeability soils.

  16. Survival of microorganisms in smectite clays - Implications for Martian exobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Deborah M.; Vestal, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The survival of Baccillus subtilis, Azotobacter chroococcum, and the enteric bacteriophage MS2 has been examined in clays representing terrestrial (Wyoming type montmorillonite) and Martian (Fe3+ montmorillonite) soils exposed to terrestrial and Martian environmental conditions of temperature and atmospheric composition and pressure. An important finding is that MS2 survived simulated Mars conditions better than the terrestrial environment, probably owing to stabilization of the virus caused by the cold and dry conditions of the simulated Mars environment. This finding, the first published indication that viruses may be able to survive in Mars-type soils, may have important implications for future missions to Mars.

  17. Magnetic properties of the Tertiary red clay from Gansu Province, China and its paleoclimatic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The study on magnetic properties of the red clay indicates that the red clay and loess- paleosol sequence have a common magnetic mineralogy, with magnetite, maghemite, hematite (and possibly goethite) contributing to the magnetic behavior. The red clay magnetic susceptibility is also found to have a positive relation with extrafine superparamagnetic grains. This suggests that, like the Quaternary loess-paleosols, an ultrafine ferrimagnetic component produced during pe-dogenesis in the red clay under humid conditions also plays an important role in susceptibility enhancement in the soil units. This is supported by the correlation between Rb/Sr ratio and magnetic susceptibility. This signifies that, like the above loess-paleosol sequence, the magnetic susceptibility of the red clay can be used as a general proxy paleoclimatic indicator, although whether its susceptibility in the red clay is comparable to pedogenesis intensity and requires further investigation. Magnetic susceptibility variation in the red clay thus also provides an eo-lian/pedogenic record of paleoclimatic evolution. Study of the background susceptibility indicates that, on average, the absolute scale of the paleoclimatic shift from red clay development to Quaternary loess deposition is similar to the climatic shift from stage 5 (S1) to stage 2-4 (L1). This may suggest that during the Quaternary there is an evident strengthening of the absolute wind intensity to bring more (about double) coarser and less weathered (non-SP fraction) eolian magnetic input from the source regions to the Loess Plateau than during the Pliocene. The presence of eolian red clay since 7.5 Ma BP in central-northern China implies an important envi-ronmental change from the underlying Cretaceous red sandstone. The red clay development was closely related to global drying and climate cooling since the Cretaceous and closely associated with the abrupt uplift of the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau at about that time. This uplift of the

  18. Numerical verification of similar Cam-clay model based on generalized potential theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟志辉; 杨光华; 傅旭东; 温勇; 张玉成

    2014-01-01

    From the mathematical principles, the generalized potential theory can be employed to create constitutive model of geomaterial directly. The similar Cam-clay model, which is created based on the generalized potential theory, has less assumptions, clearer mathematical basis, and better computational accuracy. Theoretically, it is more scientific than the traditional Cam-clay models. The particle flow code PFC3D was used to make numerical tests to verify the rationality and practicality of the similar Cam-clay model. The verification process was as follows: 1) creating the soil sample for numerical test in PFC3D, and then simulating the conventional triaxial compression test, isotropic compression test, and isotropic unloading test by PFC3D; 2) determining the parameters of the similar Cam-clay model from the results of above tests; 3) predicting the sample’s behavior in triaxial tests under different stress paths by the similar Cam-clay model, and comparing the predicting results with predictions by the Cam-clay model and the modified Cam-clay model. The analysis results show that the similar Cam-clay model has relatively high prediction accuracy, as well as good practical value.

  19. Thermo-mechanical constitutive modeling of unsaturated clays based on the critical state concepts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeed Tourchi; Amir Hamidi

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-mechanical constitutive model for unsaturated clays is constructed based on the existing model for saturated clays originally proposed by the authors. The saturated clays model was formulated in the framework of critical state soil mechanics and modified Cam-clay model. The existing model has been generalized to simulate the experimentally observed behavior of unsaturated clays by introducing Bishop’s stress and suction as independent stress parameters and modifying the hardening rule and yield criterion to take into account the role of suction. Also, according to previous studies, an increase in temperature causes a reduction in specific volume. A reduction in suction (wetting) for a given confining stress may induce an irreversible volumetric compression (collapse). Thus an increase in suction (drying) raises a specific volume i.e. the movement of normal consolidation line (NCL) to higher values of void ratio. However, some experimental data confirm the assumption that this reduction is dependent on the stress level of soil element. A generalized approach considering the effect of stress level on the magnitude of clays thermal dependency in compression plane is proposed in this study. The number of modeling parameters is kept to a minimum, and they all have clear physical interpretations, to facilitate the usefulness of model for practical applications. A step-by-step procedure used for parameter cali-bration is also described. The model is finally evaluated using a comprehensive set of experimental data for the thermo-mechanical behavior of unsaturated soils.

  20. Thermo-mechanical constitutive modeling of unsaturated clays based on the critical state concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Tourchi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A thermo-mechanical constitutive model for unsaturated clays is constructed based on the existing model for saturated clays originally proposed by the authors. The saturated clays model was formulated in the framework of critical state soil mechanics and modified Cam-clay model. The existing model has been generalized to simulate the experimentally observed behavior of unsaturated clays by introducing Bishop's stress and suction as independent stress parameters and modifying the hardening rule and yield criterion to take into account the role of suction. Also, according to previous studies, an increase in temperature causes a reduction in specific volume. A reduction in suction (wetting for a given confining stress may induce an irreversible volumetric compression (collapse. Thus an increase in suction (drying raises a specific volume i.e. the movement of normal consolidation line (NCL to higher values of void ratio. However, some experimental data confirm the assumption that this reduction is dependent on the stress level of soil element. A generalized approach considering the effect of stress level on the magnitude of clays thermal dependency in compression plane is proposed in this study. The number of modeling parameters is kept to a minimum, and they all have clear physical interpretations, to facilitate the usefulness of model for practical applications. A step-by-step procedure used for parameter calibration is also described. The model is finally evaluated using a comprehensive set of experimental data for the thermo-mechanical behavior of unsaturated soils.

  1. The soil reference shrinkage curve

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    A recently proposed model showed how a clay shrinkage curve is transformed to the soil shrinkage curve at the soil clay content higher than a critical one. The objective of the present work was to generalize this model to the soil clay content lower a critical one. I investigated (i) the reference shrinkage curve, that is, one without cracks; (ii) the superficial layer of aggregates, with changed pore structure compared with the intraaggregate matrix; and (iii) soils with sufficiently low clay content where there are large pores inside the intraaggregate clay (so-called lacunar pores). The methodology is based on detail accounting for different contributions to the soil volume and water content during shrinkage. The key point is the calculation of the lacunar pore volume variance at shrinkage. The reference shrinkage curve is determined by eight physical soil parameters: (1) oven-dried specific volume; (2) maximum swelling water content; (3) mean solid density; (4) soil clay content; (5) oven-dried structural...

  2. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  3. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  5. Mathematical modelling of undrained clay behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, J. H.; Noeg, K.

    1976-01-01

    The proposed general analytical model describes the anisotropic, elastoplastic, path-dependent, stress-strain properties of inviscid saturated clays under undrained conditions. Model parameters are determined by using results from strain-controlled simple shear tests on a saturated clay. The model's accuracy is evaluated by applying it to predict the results of other tests on the same clay, including monotonic and cyclic loading. The model explains the very anisotropic shear strength behavior observed for weak marine clays.

  6. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  7. Sorption of Cesium on Latvia clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium is like potassium - good solubility and mobile in a ground, easy assimilates in organism expressly brawn woof. It is a problem if pollutant is radioactive 137Cs. We made experiments to sorption a 2M CsF solution on some Latvian clays which mainly contain hydro micas. We establish that clay treated with 25% sulfuric acid absorb cesium two times more that waste clay. Hereto unstuck elute Cs from clays

  8. Three Soil Quality Demonstrations for Educating Extension Clientele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in educating youth, Master Gardeners, and agricultural producers about soil quality. Three soil demonstrations show how soil organic matter increases water holding capacity, improves soil structure, and increases nutrient retention. Exercise one uses clay bricks and sponges to represent mineral soils and soil organic…

  9. Prediction of Soil Moisture Content and Soil Salt Concentration from Hyperspectral Laboratory and Field Data

    OpenAIRE

    Chi Xu; Wenzhi Zeng; Jiesheng Huang; Jingwei Wu; Willem J. D. van Leeuwen

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the simultaneous retrieval of surface soil moisture and salt concentrations using hyperspectral reflectance data in an arid environment. We conducted laboratory and outdoor field experiments in which we examined three key soil variables: soil moisture, salt and texture (silty loam, clay and silty clay). The soil moisture content models for multiple textures (M_SMC models) were based on selected hyperspectral reflectance data located around 1460, 1900 and 2010 nm and res...

  10. Mineral Composition of Clay Fraction of the Chernozems Spread out in Ovče Pole in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mile Markoski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of mineral composition of the clay fraction of the chernozems spread out in Ovče Pole are presented. The mechanical composition of the soil samples show high domination of the physical clay and clay fractions in the soil separates, what is one of the reasons for strong influence on the physical and physical-mechanical properties of the soil. The clay content is dominant in the soil separates fraction and varies from 23.60% to 56.90%, or 36.23% average. The average content of physical sand and physical clay fractions is 42.20% and 57.80% respectively. Analysis of the mineral composition of clay in its entirety showed that no one of the minerals in the analyzed chernozem samples is not in absolute domination, but there is evident higher presence of clay minerals with 2:1 lattice type (vermiculite, illite and smectites in comparison with 1:1 lattice type (kaolinite. This shows that our variety of vertical chernozems has little deteriorated physical and physical-mechanical properties compared with typical chernozems.

  11. Hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.; Visser, P.J.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay due to the turbulent flow, based on theoretical analysis and experimental results. The undisturbed clay has the unique and complicated characteristics of cohesive force among clay particles, which are highly different from dis

  12. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  13. A STUDY ON THE INFLUENCE OF LIME ON FLYASH TREATED MARINE CLAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koteswara Rao

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Different types of soils are available in our country, but some of them are not suitable for pavement design. Since India is a peninsular country, a vast area coming under coastal region. The soil which exists in these coastal regions is marine clay and is generally weak and highly compressible in nature. Since there is a great need for improving the transportation facilities in coastal regions, it is essential to improve the marine clay for the construction of pavements, because the successful performance of the pavement depends on the nature of subgrade soil. In the present study the geotechnical properties of marine clay i.e. OMC & MDD, CBR, Atterberg limits , DFS and strength characteristics were determined before and after treatment by using flyash and lime.

  14. Improving the Hydraulic Performance of Stormwater Infiltration Systems in Clay Tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockhorn, Britta

    investigations on two typical Danish clay till sites, and one modeling study with the integrated surface water and groundwater model HydroGeoSphere. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is the most critical soil physical parameter when it comes to sizing stormwater infiltration systems. In the first study...... in clay tills has potential for improving the hydraulic performance of stormwater infiltration systems. The third study was an assessment of the influence of small-scale soil physical features in clay tills on the hydraulic performance of stormwater infiltration systems based on a HydroGeoSphere model......% if biopores like earthworm burrows were also added. A comparison of HydroGeoSphere infiltration hydrographs with a simple soakaway model (Roldin et al. 2012b) showed that the exclusion of small-scale soil physical features may result in significant underestimation of the hydraulic performance of stormwater...

  15. Sorption of organic cations to phyllosilicate clay minerals: CEC-normalization, salt dependency, and the role of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droge, Steven T J; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2013-12-17

    Sorption to the phyllosilicate clay minerals Illite, kaolinite, and bentonite has been studied for a wide variety of organic cations using a flow-through method with fully aqueous medium as the eluent. Linear isotherms were observed at concentrations below 10% of the cation-exchange capacity (CEC) for Illite and kaolinite and below 1 mmol/kg (clays was strongly influenced by the electrolyte composition of the eluent but with a consistent trend for a diverse set of compounds on all clays, thus allowing for empirical correction factors. When sorption affinities for a given compound to a given clay are normalized to the CEC of the clay, the differences in sorption affinities between clays are reduced to less than 0.5 log units for most compounds. Although CEC-normalized sorption of quaternary ammonium compounds to clay was up to 10-fold higher than CEC-normalized sorption to soil organic matter, CEC-normalized sorption for most compounds was comparable between clays and soil organic matter. The clay fraction is thus a potentially relevant sorption phase for organic cations in many soils. The sorption data for organic cations to clay showed several regular trends with molecular structure but also showed quite a few systematic effects that we cannot explain. A model on the basis of the molecular size and charge density at the ionized nitrogen is used here as a tool to obtain benchmark values that elucidate the effect of specific polar moieties on the sorption affinity.

  16. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied.

  17. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  18. Effect of clay organic modifier on the final performance of PCL/clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luduena, L.N., E-mail: luduena@fi.mdp.edu.ar [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology (INTEMA), Engineering Faculty, National University of Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302 B7608FDQ, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Kenny, J.M. [Institute of Polymers Science and Technology, ICTP, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vazquez, A., E-mail: avazquez@fi.uba.ar [INTECIN (UBA-CONICET), Polymer and Composite Group, Engineering Faculty, University of Buenos Aires, Las Heras 2214 C1063ACV, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, V.A., E-mail: alvarezvera@fi.mdp.edu.ar [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology (INTEMA), Engineering Faculty, National University of Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302 B7608FDQ, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} The degradation of clay organo-modifiers during processing affect clay dispersion degree and clay content inside the matrix. {yields} Isothermal thermogravimetrical analysis was used to simulate the thermal degradation of clay organo-modifiers in extrusion. {yields} Improving polymer-clay compatibility may not be the main factor to achieve the best mechanical performance. {yields} The best combination between PCL/clay compatibility and thermal resistance of the clay, was obtained for C20A. - Abstract: The effect of un-modified and several organo-modified montmorillonites on the morphology, mechanical properties and thermal behavior of polycaprolactone (PCL) based nanocomposites prepared by melt intercalation was studied. The study was centered on the analysis of the clay characteristics that have influence on the final properties of PCL/clay nanocomposites. Polymer/clay compatibility was analyzed studying both bulk and surface polarity degree of the clays by means of water absorption tests (bulk) and contact angle measurements (surface). The thermal stability of the clays was analyzed by dynamic thermogravimetrical tests (TGA). The degradation of the clay organo-modifiers during processing was simulated by isothermal TGA. The clay dispersion degree inside the nanocomposites was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The melt rheology was used as a method to compare the dispersion degree of the clay by means of the shear thinning exponent, n{sub Rh}. The tensile mechanical properties were measured and theoretically analyzed by means of several micro-mechanical models. It was found that the thermal stability of the clay organo-modifiers is a critical factor that can modify the final clay content and the clay dispersion degree inside the nanocomposite, demonstrating that the enhancement of the polymer-clay compatibility may not be the main factor to achieve the best mechanical performance when shear forces during processing, i.e. extrusion

  19. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  20. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material

  1. Transformation of anthracene on various cation-modified clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Xiyou; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, anthracene was employed as a probe to explore the potential catalytic effect of clay minerals in soil environment. Clay minerals saturated with various exchangeable cations were tested. The rate of anthracene transformation follows the order: Fe-smectite > Cu-smectite > Al-smectite ≈ Ca-smectite ≈ Mg-smectite ≈ Na-smectite. This suggests that transition-metal ions such as Fe(III) play an important role in anthracene transformation. Among Fe(III)-saturated clays, Fe(III)-smectite exhibits the highest catalytic activity followed by Fe(III)-illite, Fe(III)-pyrophyllite, and Fe(III)-kaolinite, which is in agreement with the interlayer Fe(III) content. Moreover, effects by two common environmental factors, pH and relative humidity (RH), were evaluated. With an increase in pH or RH, the rate of anthracene transformation decreases rapidly at first and then is leveled off. GC-MS analysis identifies that the final product of anthracene transformation is 9,10-anthraquinone, a more bioavailable molecule compared to anthracene. The transformation process mainly involves cation-π bonding, electron transfer leading to cation radical, and further oxidation by chemisorbed O2. The present work provides valuable insights into the abiotic transformation and the fate of PAHs in the soil environment and the development of contaminated land remediation technologies.

  2. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material.

  3. Resposta à aplicação e recuperação de enxofre em cultivos de casa de vegetação em solos com diferentes teores de argila e matéria orgânica Responses to sulfur application and recuperation in greenhouse crops in soils with different clay and organic matter content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo dos Santos Rheinheimer

    2007-04-01

    after each crop and analyzed for S-SO4-2. It was evaluate the dry matter production and S-SO4-2 absorbed by plants. Only canola responded to sulphur application. Soybean, black bean, sesame, clover and wheat did not response to sulfur application. There was not observed correlation between soil S-SO4-2 available in 10cm topsoil and crop yields. Soils with different clay and organic matter content showed similar behavior of crop response to sulfur application. The increase of S-SO4-2 availability with fertilization was greater in soils with more clay content.

  4. Correlation Between Soil Water Retention Capability and Soil Salt Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The soil moisture retention capability of Chao soil and coastal saline Chao soil in Shandong and Zhejiang provinces were measured by pressure membrane method. The main factors influencing soil moisture retention capability were studied by the methods of correlation and path analyses. The results indicated that < 0.02mm physical clay and soil salt content were the main factors influencing soil moisture retention capability. At soil suction of 30~50 kPa, the soil salt content would be the dominant factor.

  5. Factors affecting the hydraulic performance of infiltration based SUDS in clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockhorn, B.; Klint, K.E.S.; Locatelli, Luca;

    2015-01-01

    The influence of small scale soil heterogeneity on the hydraulic performance of infiltration based SUDS was studied using field data from a clayey glacial till and groundwater simulations with the integrated surface water and groundwater model HydroGeoSphere. Simulations of homogeneous soil blocks...... that exclusion of small scale soil physical features may greatly underestimate hydraulic performance of infiltration based SUDS....... with hydraulic properties ranging from sand to clay showed that infiltration capacities vary greatly for the different soil types observed in glacial till. The inclusion of heterogeneities dramatically increased infiltration volume by a factor of 22 for a soil with structural changes above and below the CaC03...

  6. Sorption of cesium on Latvian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium is like potassium - good solubility and mobile in a ground, easily assimilate in organism expressly brawn woof. It is a problem if pollutant is a radioactive 137Cs. We made experiments to sorption a 2M CsF solution on some Latvian clays which mainly contain hydro micas (cesium content after good elute of clays are in table). We establish, that clay treated with 25 % sulfuric acid adsorb cesium two times more that waste clay. Hereto unstuck elute Cs from clays. (author)

  7. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  8. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consum

  9. Organophilic clays as a tracer to determine Erosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentler, A.; Strauss, P.; Schomakers, J.; Hann, S.; Köllensberger, G.; Ottner, F.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years the use of new tracing techniques to measure soil erosion has gained attention. Beside long time existing isotopic methods the use of rare earth elements has been reported. We wanted to contribute to the efforts of obtaining better methods for determination surface soil movement and tested a novel method using organophilic clays as a tracer for erosion related studies. At present tests to extract organophilic clays from soil have been performed successfully using an Industrial produced organophilic bentonite (Tixogel TVZ, Süd-Chemie) treated with quaternary ammonium surfactants. A liquid extraction method with barium ions (Ba2+) and methanol was used to extract the n-alkyl ammonium compounds from the inter crystal layers of the modified Bentonite. To increase extraction efficiency, an ultrasound device was used (UW 2200 Bandelin, 10.000 cycles per second, vibration amplitude 54 µm, sonification time of one minute). This procedure lead to a recovery rate of about 85% for the organophilic bentonite. This was clearly superior to alternative extraction methods such as acetonitrile in different mixing ratios. Quantification of the extracted surfactants was performed via high performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS, Agilent 1200 SL HPLC and 6220 time-of-flight MS). The mass spectra of this industrial produced organophilic clay mineral showed four different molecular masses (M+H+ of 304.30, 332.33, 360.36 and 388.39. The four substances could be separated by HPLC (20 x 2 mm Zorbax C18 reversed phase column, 0.5 mL/min isocratic flow with 90% acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid in water, run time of 7 minutes). The linear working range of the method was 5 to 1000 µg/L, with a limit of quantification of 1 µg/L n-alkyl ammonium compound. All four compounds of the Tixogel were extracted with identical extraction efficiencies and are hence suitable for accurate quantification procedures. Next steps of the methodology to develop are the

  10. Effect of Grain Size on Selected Physico-Chemical Properties of Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osumanu H. Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Mixture of the right proportion of expanding and non-expanding clays to improve plasticity (moldability of clays used in the pot industry of Malaysia is yet to be well investigated. In addition, little is known about the choice of the right clay size to eliminate or reduce the content of undesirable compounds such as Fe2O3, Al2O3 to improve the strength of pots and roofing tiles in the country. The objective of this study was to investigate how selected physico-chemical properties of pottery clay relate to grain size of Nyalau series ((Typic Paleudults. Approach: Soil samples were refined into 25, 20 and 63 µm using size grading method. The mineralogical composition of the samples was determined using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. The chemical composition of the samples was also determined using standard procedures. Firing was done at 800°C in a muffle furnace and the cracks of the samples recorded. Results: The clay particles with sizes 20 and 25 µm were higher in LOI and total C than that those of 63 µm regardless of grain size, the clay investigated had quartz (SiO2, illite-montmorillonite, Anatase ((TiO2 and kaolinite. Grading affected the concentrations of Fe, Al and Si as clays with particle sizes 20 and 25 µm had higher contents of the aforementioned elements compared with those of 63 µm. The clay with particles 63 µm had the best strength and this was so because the clay particles had the lowest amount of Fe, Al and Si. Conclusion: The strength of Malaysian pots could be improved upon proper grading of the clay particles.

  11. Study of adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals; Estudio de Adsorcion de Fenentreno en Diferentes Tipos de Arcillas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, M. L.; Escolano, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Diaz, F. J.; Perez, R.; Garcia, S.; Garcia Frutos, F. J.

    2003-07-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay mineral also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represent ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of soil electrical conductivity related to soil moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Paulo Molin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil electrical conductivity (ECa is a soil quality indicator associated to attributes interesting to site-specific soil management such as soil moisture and texture. Soil ECa provides information that helps guide soil management decisions, so we performed spatial evaluation of soil moisture in two experimental fields in two consecutive years and modeled its influence on soil ECa. Soil ECa, moisture and clay content were evaluated by statistical, geostatistical and regression analyses. Semivariogram models, adjusted for soil moisture, had strong spatial dependence, but the relationship between soil moisture and soil ECa was obtained only in one of the experimental fields, where soil moisture and clay content range was higher. In this same field, coefficients of determinations between soil moisture and clay content were above 0.70. In the second field, the low soil moisture and clay content range explain the absence of a relationship between soil ECa and soil moisture. Data repetition over the years, suggested that ECa is a qualitative indicator in areas with high spatial variability in soil texture.

  13. Effects of Paper-Mill Sludge as a Mulch versus Topsoil Incorporation on Potassium Uptake and the Grain Yield of Rain-Fed Wheat in a High Specific Surface Loess Soil with Illite Dominance in Clay Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    S Amini; Movahedi Naeini, S. A. R.; Mashayekhi, K.

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment with rain-fed winter wheat investigated the nutritional aspects of paper-mill sludge as a mulch and incorporated into the topsoil. Treatments with chemical fertilizers were also used as controls. Paper-mill sludge used as mulch with high rate (100 MG ha−1) and also the combined N and K mineral fertilizer treatments increased yield when a low potassium otherwise caused potassium deficiency in wheat with high specific surface soil. High soil Ca : K molar ratio by incorporatio...

  14. Porosity Investigation of Kosova's Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makfire Sadiku

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Acid activated clay minerals are used as catalysts in the desulphurization of crude oil or as catalyst carrier, as drilling mud, as bleaching earth. Approach: The efficiency of the acid activation can be described in two ways. As increase of the surface and as increase of the cumulative pore volume after the activation. Results: In different samples of the clay mineral the activation was done with different sulfuric acid concentrations for two and 3h. Afterwards the specific surface was measured by means of nitrogen adsorption. All the measured isotherms belong to the pseudo-two kind. After the activation the surface enhanced from around 100-180 m2 g-1. The mesopore distribution is calculated out of the hysteresis between adsorption-desorption isotherms of the nitrogen. Conclusion: It is shown that the activation increases significantly the amount of mesopores which is reflected in the cumulative volume. The macrospore volume of the clay samples were measured by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry for pore sizes up to 320 nm. The volume of the macrospores results to an increase up to two times after the activation. The cumulative volume of all the pores is shown like a good parameter of the efficiency of the acid activation. The measurements were fulfilled in the newly equipped laboratory of the surface characterizations of the Tirana University. These analyses are of big interest for the industry in Albania and Kosove.

  15. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  16. Improvement of Bearing Capacity of Shallow Foundation on Geogrid Reinforced Silty Clay and Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Kolay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the improvement in the bearing capacity of silty clay soil with thin sand layer on top and placing geogrids at different depths. Model tests were performed for a rectangular footing resting on top of the soil to establish the load versus settlement curves of unreinforced and reinforced soil system. The test results focus on the improvement in bearing capacity of silty clay and sand on unreinforced and reinforced soil system in non-dimensional form, that is, BCR. The results show that bearing capacity increases significantly with the increased number of geogrid layers. The bearing capacity for the soil increases with an average of 16.67% using one geogrid layer at interface of soils with equal to 0.667 and the bearing capacity increases with an average of 33.33% while using one geogrid in middle of sand layer with equal to 0.33. The improvement in bearing capacity for sand underlain silty clay maintaining and equal to 0.33; for two, three and four number geogrid layer were 44.44%, 61.11%, 72.22%, respectively. The finding of this research work may be useful to improve the bearing capacity of soil for shallow foundation and pavement design for similar type of soil available elsewhere.

  17. Nonlinear elastic model for compacted clay concrete interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. R. SHAKIR; Jungao ZHU

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear elastic model was developed to simulate the behavior of compacted clay concrete interface (CCCI) based on the principle of transition mechanism failure (TMF). A number of simple shear tests were conducted on CCCI to demonstrate different failure mechanisms; i.e., sliding failure and deformation failure. The clay soil used in the test was collected from the "Shuang Jang Kou" earth rockfill dam project. It was found that the behavior of the interface depends on the critical water contents by which two failure mechanisms can be recognized. Mathematical relations were proposed between the shear at failure and water content in addition to the transition mechanism indicator.The mathematical relations were then incorporated into the interface model. The performance of the model is verified with the experimental results. The verification shows that the proposed model is capable of predicting the interface shear stress versus the total shear displacement very well.

  18. Reactivity of clay minerals with acids and alkalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1971-01-01

    One-g samples of a montmorillonite, a metabentonite, an illite, two kaolinites, and three halloysites were treated with 50 ml of hydrochloric acid (6??45 N, 1:1), acetic acid (4??5 N, 1:3), sodium hydroxide (2??8 N), sodium chloride solution (pH 6??10; Na = 35???; Cl = 21??5???), and natural sea water (pH 7??85; Na = 35??5???; Cl = 21??5???) for a 10-day period in stoppered plastic vials. The supernatant solutions were removed from the clay minerals and analyzed for SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and K2O. All the solutions removed some SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 from the samples, but the quantities were small. Sodium hydroxide attacked the kaolin group minerals more strongly than it did montmorillonite, metabentonite, or illite. Halloysite was more strongly attacked by hydrochloric acid than was any of the other experimental minerals. Hydrochloric acid removed iron oxide coatings from soil clay minerals, but acetic acid did not remove them completely. The samples most strongly attacked by HCl and NaOH were examined by X-ray diffraction. Acid treatment did not destroy the structure of the clays, but the halloysite structure was partially destroyed. Sodium hydroxide attacked the halloysite structure, as shown by chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. These experiments show that treatment in dilute acids has no harmful effect in the preparation of clays for X-ray diffraction. Acetic acid is preferred to hydrochloric acid for this purpose. Hydrochloric acid cleans clay minerals by removing free iron oxide from the surface; acetic acid is less effective. ?? 1971.

  19. The Adsorption Capacity, Pore Structure, and Thermal Behavior of the Modified Clay Containing SSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge ash (SSA was created by burning municipal sludge. The potential of clay containing 1 or 3 or 5% SSA was assessed for use as a landfill liner-soil material. Batch adsorption, low temperature N2 adsorption, and TG-DTA tests were performed to evaluate the adsorption capacity, micropore structure, thermostability, and components of soils under Cr(VI and Pb(II chemical solutions. With the increasing amount of SSA in modified clay, the adsorption capacity of Cr(VI and Pb(II to the modified clay increases gradually. After absorption, the pore size of modified clay ranges from 2 nm to 8 nm. With the increasing amount of absorption, the pore volume decreases and the specific surface area increases. With the increasing of adsorption concentration of Cr(VI and Pb(II, the mass loss percentage of modified clay increases to 23.4% and 12.6%, respectively. The modified clay containing SSA may be used as a good barrier material to attenuate contamination of Cr(VI and Pb(II in landfills.

  20. Estimating Particle-Size Distribution from Sand, Silt, and Clay Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaee, Maryam; Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Liaghat, Abdolmajid

    2010-05-01

    Particle-size distribution (PSD) is one of the soil properties which not only is used in estimation of soil water retention curve as well as unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, but also is applied in the most hydrological studies. Since the measurement of particle-size distribution, soil water retention curve and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is time consuming and expensive especially in large scale hydrological investigations, in this study, a method was developed based upon the least squares optimization approach to estimate cumulative particle-size distribution from sand, silt and clay content. A revised form of van Genuchten retention model which has been previously applied to represent cumulative particle-size distribution was fitted to the measured three points of PSD, and its two unknown parameters such as N and Dg were determined. For this purpose, we used curve fitting toolbox of MATLAB software. Then estimated N and Dg values were applied to estimate cumulative particle mass for other particle radii in order to determine the whole shape of PSD. A total of 80 soil samples from the UNSODA database including 10 soil textures were selected to verify the presented method. We divided our database into three groups, (1) is coarse soil texture including sand, sandy loam and loamy sand (32 soil samples), (2) medium soil texture such as sandy clay loam, loam, silt loam (31 soil samples), and (3) fine soil texture including clay, sandy clay, silty clay and clay loam (17 soil samples). The RMSE value was calculated to evaluate the presented method. For groups 1, 2 and 3, the RMSE values were 0.071, 0.064, and 0.046, respectively. The linear regression between the estimated and measured cumulative particle mass showed that this method is capable for estimating PSD from three measured points. The line slope for groups 1, 2 and 3 were 0.93, 0.94 and 0.95, respectively, and correlation coefficient (R2) values were obtained greater than 0.96. For all 80 soil samples

  1. Modernity and putty-clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  2. Characteristics of deformation of saturated soft clay under the load of Shanghai subway line No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Qun; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Shu-Kai; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Jian-Xiu

    2008-05-01

    Shanghai subway Line No. 2 passes through the center of Shanghai from Songhong Road station in the west to Zhangjianggaoke station in the east. The total length of Shanghai subway Line No. 2 is 25 km. The tunnel mostly lies in the saturated soft clay and the environment issue can not be ignored. The response frequency and response stress of soil around the tunnel are monitored when the subway train passes through. The cyclic triaxial test of the saturated soft clay around the subway tunnel is conducted using the data monitored. The characteristics of deformation of the saturated soft clay of Shanghai under the subway load are analyzed. The results show that when the subway train Line No. 2 begins to run, a small and vertical rebound first occurs in the saturated soft clay at the side wall of the tunnel. Although a large deformation does not occur in the saturated soft clay at the side wall of the tunnel when the subway train has run for a period of time, yet with the lapse of time, a perceptive and non-uniform deformation will still occur. The vertical rebound is transitory and a plastic deformation occurs immediately in the saturated soft clay at the bottom of the tunnel, the large deformation at the bottom of the tunnel is 30 times that of the saturated soft clay at the side wall of the tunnel.

  3. Immobilization of fungal laccase onto a nonionic surfactant-modified clay material: application to PAH degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Liu, Keng-Hua; Liao, Yi-Fen; Yang, Vivian

    2016-03-01

    Nonionic surfactant-modified clay is a useful absorbent material that effectively removes hydrophobic organic compounds from soil/groundwater. We developed a novel material by applying an immobilized fungal laccase onto nonionic surfactant-modified clay. Low-water-solubility polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (naphthalene/phenanthrene) were degraded in the presence of this bioactive material. PAH degradation by free laccase was higher than degradation by immobilized laccase when the surfactant concentration was allowed to form micelles. PAH degradation by immobilized laccase on TX-100-modified clay was higher than on Brij35-modified clay. Strong laccase degradation of PAH can be maintained by adding surfactant monomers or micelles. The physical adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto clay plays an important role in PAH degradation by laccase, which can be explained by the structure and molecular interactions of the surfactant with the clay and enzyme. A system where laccase is immobilized onto TX-100-monomer-modified clay is a good candidate bioactive material for in situ PAHs bioremediation.

  4. Searching for reciclability of modified clays for an environmental application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Antequera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    prevention of the health. We have used the FT-IR spectroscopy and DTA/TG studies to confirm the reciclability of these materials and the possible application in the industry to prevent the contamination. References -del Hoyo, C. (2007). Applied Clay Science. 36, 103-121.Layered Double Hydroxides and human health: An overview. -Valderrábano, M., Rodríguez-Cruz, S., del Hoyo, C., Sánchez-Martín, M.J. (2006). 4th International Workshop "Bioavalailability of pollutants and soil remediation". 1, 5-6. Physicochemical study of the adsorption of pesticides by lignins. -Volzone, C. (2007). Applied Clay Science. 36, 191-196. Retention of pollutant gases: Comparison between clay minerals and their modified products.

  5. A Study on Sorption of (226)Ra on Different Clay Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajji, E; Al-Masri, M S; Khalily, H; Naoum, B E; Khalil, H S; Nashawati, A

    2016-08-01

    The sorption of radium 226 ((226)Ra) on different clay materials (bentonite, illite and a mixture of bentonite-illite) was studied. Clay materials are used in the construction of disposal pits for technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) wastes (i.e., contaminated soil and sludge) generated by the oil and gas industry operations. Experimental conditions (pH, clay materials quantity, and activity concentrations of (226)Ra) were changed in order to determine the optimal state for adsorption of (226)Ra. The results showed that the concentration of adsorbed (226)Ra on clay materials increased with time to reach an equilibrium state after approximately 5 h. More than 95 % of the radium was adsorbed. The mixture of bentonite-illite (1/9) exhibited the greatest adsorption of radium under all experimental conditions. PMID:27329110

  6. CLAY MINERAL ASSEMBLAGES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN SHIHEZI FORMATION FROM THE HUAIBEI COAL-BEARING STRATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文辉; 许光泉; 刑军

    1998-01-01

    Clay mineral assemblages in Shihezi Formation of Huaibei coal-bearing strata are determined by X-ray diffraction and Differential Thermal Analyzer, that is restated to the sedimentfaces and climatic changes in the source area, and to a lesser extent, alterations during burial diagenesis. In the Upper Shihezi Formation, the clay fraction is dominated by kaolinite in norther npart of the coal field, which was formed in alluvial sediment environment. But in the South ofHuaibei coal field, the clay mineral assemblage consists of mainly illite that reflects the influenceof sea water. The predominately kaolinite and sederite composition of the clay fraction in the lower Shihezi Formation sediments documents less relief and gentle erosion of kaolinite rich soils developing under warm source area. In the lower part of Shihezi Formation, some chlorite is detected, which suggests transformation of illite or kaolinite to chlorite under conditions of burial diagenesis.

  7. Modeling of Cation Binding in Hydrated 2:1 Clay Minerals - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David E.

    2000-09-14

    Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals are high surface area, layered silicates that play a unique role in determining the fate of radionuclides in the environment. This project consisted of developing and implementing computer simulation methods for molecular characterization of the swelling and ion exchange properties of Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals, and the subsequent analysis and theoretical modeling with a view toward improving contaminant transport modeling as well as soil remediation and radionuclide containment strategies. Project results included the (a) development of simulation methods to treat clays under environmentally relevant conditions of variable water vapor pressure; (b) calculation of clay swelling thermodynamics as a function of interlayer ion size and charge (calculated quantities include immersion energies, free energies, and entropies of swelling); and (c) calculation of ion exchange free energies, including contributions from changing interlayer water contents and layer spacing.

  8. Bearing Capacity and Critical Punch-Through Depth of Spudcan on Sand Overlying Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘君; 于龙; 周慧; 孔宪京

    2014-01-01

    Spudcan may experience punch-through failure on strong over weak layered soils, such as sand overlying clay. A large deformation finite element method (LDFE) is used to simulate the penetration process of spudcan into sand overlying clay. The sand is simulated by smoothed hyperbolic Mohr-Coulomb model, and the clay is simulated by a simple elasto-plastic model which obeys Tresca yield criterion. According to the LDFE results of a large amount of cases, the effects of the strength, unit weight and thickness of the top sand layer, as well as the effect of the strength of the underlying clay on the spudcan punch-through behavior, are investigated. The critical depth occurring punch-through and the critical bearing capacity are presented in charts. Fitting equations to calculate the critical punch-through depth and the critical bearing capacity are proposed for the convenience of engineering practice.

  9. Modelling unfrozen water content in a silty clay permafrost deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of a calibration equation for determining the unfrozen water content of a Greenlandic silty clay permafrost deposit. Calibration experiments have been conducted for water contents in the interval 0 – 10 % at both 5 °C and 22 °C. Calibration equations are verified against permittivity data from a permafrost core......The mechanical properties of both unfrozen soils and permafrost soils are influenced by the amount of unfrozen water in the pore space. When dealing with foundation engineering in permafrost areas it is essential to estimate the unfrozen water content (wu). This paper deals with the establishing...... of material properties similar to the test soil. The calibration for 5°C is seen to make a good fit to the permafrost core data. Further experiments should be performed in order to extend the range of water contents tested and hence the range of validity of the calibration equation....

  10. The effect of soil type on the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghollahi, Ali; Fazaelipoor, Mohammad Hassan; Schaffie, Mahin

    2016-09-15

    In this research the bioremediation of four different types of contaminated soils was monitored as a function of time and moisture content. The soils were categorized as sandy soil containing 100% sand (type I), clay soil containing more than 95% clay (type II), coarse grained soil containing 68% gravel and 32% sand (type III), and coarse grained with high clay content containing 40% gravel, 20% sand, and 40% clay (type IV). The initially clean soils were contaminated with gasoil to the concentration of 100 g/kg, and left on the floor for the evaporation of light hydrocarbons. A full factorial experimental design with soil type (four levels), and moisture content (10 and 20%) as the factors was employed. The soils were inoculated with petroleum degrading microorganisms. Soil samples were taken on days 90, 180, and 270, and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was extracted using soxhlet apparatus. The moisture content of the soils was kept almost constant during the process by intermittent addition of water. The results showed that the efficiency of bioremediation was affected significantly by the soil type (Pvalue soil with the initial TPH content of 69.62 g/kg, and the lowest for the clay soil (23.5%) with the initial TPH content of 69.70 g/kg. The effect of moisture content on bioremediation was not statistically significant for the investigated levels. The removal percentage in the clay soil was improved to 57% (within a month) in a separate experiment by more frequent mixing of the soil, indicating low availability of oxygen as a reason for low degradation of hydrocarbons in the clay soil.

  11. The effect of soil type on the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghollahi, Ali; Fazaelipoor, Mohammad Hassan; Schaffie, Mahin

    2016-09-15

    In this research the bioremediation of four different types of contaminated soils was monitored as a function of time and moisture content. The soils were categorized as sandy soil containing 100% sand (type I), clay soil containing more than 95% clay (type II), coarse grained soil containing 68% gravel and 32% sand (type III), and coarse grained with high clay content containing 40% gravel, 20% sand, and 40% clay (type IV). The initially clean soils were contaminated with gasoil to the concentration of 100 g/kg, and left on the floor for the evaporation of light hydrocarbons. A full factorial experimental design with soil type (four levels), and moisture content (10 and 20%) as the factors was employed. The soils were inoculated with petroleum degrading microorganisms. Soil samples were taken on days 90, 180, and 270, and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was extracted using soxhlet apparatus. The moisture content of the soils was kept almost constant during the process by intermittent addition of water. The results showed that the efficiency of bioremediation was affected significantly by the soil type (Pvalue soil with the initial TPH content of 69.62 g/kg, and the lowest for the clay soil (23.5%) with the initial TPH content of 69.70 g/kg. The effect of moisture content on bioremediation was not statistically significant for the investigated levels. The removal percentage in the clay soil was improved to 57% (within a month) in a separate experiment by more frequent mixing of the soil, indicating low availability of oxygen as a reason for low degradation of hydrocarbons in the clay soil. PMID:27233045

  12. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuhui; Wang, James; Ciblak, Ali; Cox, Evan E; Riis, Charlotte; Terkelsen, Mads; Gent, David B; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-04-30

    Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solvents is evaluated. Dehalococcoides (Dhc) bacterial strain and lactate ions are uniformly injected in contaminated clay and complete dechlorination of chlorinated ethene is observed in laboratory experiments. The injected bacteria can survive, grow, and promote effective dechlorination under EK conditions and after EK application. The distribution of Dhc within the clay suggests that electrokinetic transport of Dhc is primarily driven by electroosmosis. In addition to biodegradation due to bioaugmentation of Dhc, an EK-driven transport of chlorinated ethenes is observed in the clay, which accelerates cleanup of chlorinated ethenes from the anode side. Compared with conventional advection-based delivery, EK injection is significantly more effective for establishing microbial reductive dechlorination capacity in low-permeability soils. PMID:22365139

  13. Shrinkage limit of soil mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrinkage limit, one of the Atterberg limits, is widely linked with many plasticity-based soil behaviors. However, in a great majority of these cases, such correlations have been found to exhibit poor performance. Recently, it has been brought out that the shrinkage limit of a natural soil does not depend upon plasticity characteristics, and it is primarily governed by the relative grain size distribution of the soil. The present study confirms this mechanism with the results obtained using clay-clay, clay-non-cohesive soil, and non-cohesive soil mix systems. The present study gains importance from the point of view of criteria with respect to the design of back fill materials to be used in various applications, such as nuclear waste disposal projects

  14. Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans) in traditional clay products used during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, Noortje M; Talidda, Antonia; Malisch, Rainer; Kotz, Alexander; Tritscher, Angelika; Fiedler, Heidelore; Zeilmaker, Marco J; Kooijman, Martin; Wienk, Koen J H; Traag, Wim A; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P

    2013-02-01

    Geophagy, the practice of consuming clay or soil, is encountered among pregnant women in Africa, Eastern Asia and Latin America, but also in Western societies. However, certain types of clay are known to contain high concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). The aim of this study was to determine the PCDD/F contents of orally consumed clays purchased from Dutch and African markets. Congener patterns were compared with those of pooled human milk samples collected in eight African countries, to investigate a possible relationship with clay consumption. From the Dutch market thirteen clay products were examined, seven of African and six of Suriname origin. From seven African countries, twenty clay products were collected. All 33 clay products were screened with a cell-based bioassay and those showing a high response were analyzed by GC/HRMS. High PCDD/F concentrations were measured in three clay products from the Dutch market, ranging from 66 to 103 pg TEQ g(-1), whereas clay products from African countries were from 24 to 75 pg TEQ g(-1). Patterns and relatively high concentrations of PCDD/Fs in human milk samples from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Côte d'Ivoire suggest a relationship with the consumption of contaminated clay. Frequent use of PCDD/F contaminated clay products during pregnancy may result in increased exposure of the mother and subsequently the developing fetus and new-born child. The use of these contaminated clays during pregnancy should be carefully considered or even discouraged. PMID:23159200

  15. Thermal stability of PMMA–clay hybrids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2010-04-01

    Materials with small particle size are being extensively used in composites and hybrid materials. Exfoliated clay–polymer hybrids show enhanced properties. Exfoliation of clay platelets can be affected by selecting dispersing agents. In the present work, clay dispersed by natural dispersant (soap stone powder), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) dispersed clay and acid clay (amorphous clay) are taken. They are then polymerized with poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) by solution intercalation method. The thermal stability of these different clay–PMMA hybrids have been studied and compared with that of pure PMMA by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The bonding of clay with PMMA has been studied by IR. Morphology of clay–PMMA hybrids has been shown by SEM and XRD which indicate partially exfoliated structure in T606-4 and intercalated structures in T606-6 and T606-2.

  16. Radiological assessment of pharmaceutical clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability for pharmaceutical and cosmetic application of fourteen clay samples, eight raw and six commercialized samples, from Minas Gerais and Sao Paulo states, Brazil, were evaluated and their mineralogy, chemical and radiological composition were determined. Results indicated that the samples are composed mainly of quartz, kaolinite and feldspar, enriched in Al2O3 and TiO2, Cd, Cs, Sb, Se, Th, and U and depleted in SiO2, MgO, P2O5, and Ca. Concentrations found are unlikely to present any harm in topical applications, and all the radiological parameters were below the global average or the established limits. (author)

  17. Retention processes in clay-rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Tournassat, Christophe; Grangeon, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    International audience Within the context of the clay barrier concept for underground nuclear waste storage, montmorillonite and bentonite have been widely used as reference materials for radionuclides (RN) retention studies. Associated modeling work aims at understanding and predicting the retention of RN in clay-rocks where clay minerals are assumed to be representative of the most reactive phases. This " bottom-up " approach relies on a good confidence in the mechanistic understanding o...

  18. Considering Organic Carbon for Improved Predictions of Clay Content from Water Vapor Sorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2014-01-01

    Accurate determination of the soil clay fraction (CF) is of crucial importance for characterization of numerous environmental, agricultural, and engineering processes. Because traditional methods for measurement of the CF are laborious and susceptible to errors, regression models relating the CF...... carbon (OC) content and propose a modification to improve prediction accuracy. Evaluation of the CF prediction accuracy for 29 soils with clay contents ranging from 6 to 25% and with OC contents from 2.0 to 8.4% showed that the models worked reasonably well for all soils when the OC content was below 2...... to water vapor sorption isotherms that can be rapidly measured with a fully automated vapor sorption analyzer are a viable alternative. In this presentation we evaluate the performance of recently developed regression models based on comparison with standard CF measurements for soils with high organic...

  19. Ceramic clays from the western part of the Tamnava Tertiary Basin, Serbia: Deposits and clay types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on geological, mineralogical, physical, chemical and technological investigations in the Tamnava Tertiary Basin near Šabac town (western Serbia, deposits of ceramic clays were studied. These ceramic clays are composed of kaolin-illite with a variable content of quartz, feldspars, mica, iron oxides and hydroxides, and organic matter. Four main types of commercial clays were identified: i red-yellow sandy-gravely (brick clays; ii grey-white poor sandy (ceramic clays; iii dark-carbonaceous (ceramic clays; and iv lamellar (“interspersed” fatty, poor sandy (highly aluminous and ferrous clays. Ceramic clays are defined as medium to high plastic with different ranges of sintering temperatures, which makes them suitable for the production of various kinds of materials in the ceramic industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI-176016

  20. The Boom Clay geochemistry: Natural evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, the Boom Clay is studied as the reference formation for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. As the Boom Clay is considered as the main barrier for radionuclide migration/retention, a thorough characterisation of the clay and its pore water was done. This facilitates better understanding of the long-term geological processes and the distribution of the trace elements and radionuclides. From a mineralogical/geochemical point of view, the Boom Clay is considered as a rather homogeneous sediment, vertically as well as laterally. It is composed of detrital minerals, organic matter and fossils. Minerals are mainly clay minerals, quartz and feldspars. Minor amounts of pyrite and carbonates are also present. Small variations in mineralogical/geochemical composition are related to granulometrical variations. The radiochemical study indicates that the Boom Clay is in a state of secular radioactive equilibrium, meaning that the Boom Clay has not been disturbed for a very long time. Pore water sampling is done in situ from various piezometers, or by the squeezing or leaching of clay cores in the laboratory. These three pore water sampling techniques have been compared and evaluated. Boom Clay pore water is a NaHCO3 solution of 15 mM, containing 115 mg·l-1 of dissolved natural organic carbon. Some slight variations in pore water composition have been observed and can be explained by principles of chemical equilibrium. (author)