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Sample records for clay mineral assemblage

  1. Clay minerals assemblage in the Neogene fluvial succession of the Pishin Belt, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal Khan; Kassi, Akhtar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    indicate derivation of material from the Pre-Miocene sedimentary and meta-sedimentary terrains of the Pishin Belt. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that clay minerals in various mudstones and sandstone samples are identical and detrital in nature and include smectite, chlorite, illite, serpentine...... and metasedimentary successions. The source of kaolinite seems to be pedogenic or lateritic. The clay minerals assemblage in mudstones and sandstones of the Dasht Murgha group, Malthanai formation and Bostan formation appears to have been derived from the nearby-exposed Pre-Miocence mafic/ultramafic rocks...

  2. Clay minerals in the sediments around the Andaman Islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    Clay minerals in the eastern side of Andaman Islands consist of montmorillonite, kaolinite, illite and Fe-rich chlorites while on western side they consist of illite and Fe-poor chlorite with minor kaolinite and montmorillonite. These assemblages...

  3. Pb-Zn mineralization of Ali ou Daoud area (Central High Atlas, Morocco: characterisation of deposit and relationship with the clay assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoudi, L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Zn-Pb-Fe ores in the Ali ou Daoud deposit (Central High Atlas are found as stratiform levels and as karst fillings in carbonate platforms facies of Bajocian age. Tectonic structures (e.g., synsedimentary faults played a relevant role in the ore emplacement. The dolomitic ore-related host-rock levels are characterized by the presence of kaolinite enrichment in clay levels in amounts directly related to the proportion of the clay minerals. The latter is evidenced by correlation between kaolinite and sulphide contents, suggesting that the installation of kaolinite and mineralisations would result from the same hydrothermal fluid.[Français] Dans les séries sédimentaires carbonatées d’Ali ou Daoud (Haut Atlas Central, les minéralisations à Zn, Pb et Fe en amas stratiformes forment les faciès de remplissage des karsts d’une plateforme carbonatée bajocienne. Le contrôle structural joue un rôle capital dans la localisation du gîte en bordure de plateforme sur des failles synsédimentaires. Dans les niveaux dolomitiques encaissants des minéralisations, les assemblages argileux sont caractérisés par la présence de kaolinite dont la teneur varie parallèlement avec celle du minerai. Ceci suggère que la mise en place de la kaolinite et des minéralisations résulterait du même fluide hydrothermal. [Español] En las series sedimentarias carbonatadas de Ali ou Daoud (Alto Atlas Central, las mineralizaciones de Zn, Pb y Fe aparecen en niveles estratiformes como facies de reemplazamiento de los karsts de una plataforma carbonatada Bajociense. El control estructural desempeña un papel crucial en la localización del yacimiento a lo largo de la plataforma sobre fallas sinsedimentarias. En los niveles dolomíticos que incluyen las mineralizaciones, las asociaciones arcillosas se caracterizan por la presencia de caolinita, cuyo contenido varía paralelamente al de la mineralización. Esto sugiere que la creación de caolinita y de la

  4. Ichnofabrics and biologically mediated changes in clay mineral assemblages from a deep-water, fine-grained, calcareous sedimentary succession : an example from the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation, offshore Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.; McIlroy, D. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2010-09-15

    This paper documented the ichnology and ichnofabrics of the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation, a 400-metre thick succession of fine-grained calcareous mudstone located offshore Nova Scotia, and examined changes in the ichnofabric that may be the result of paleoenvironmental perturbations. The formation has two lithofacies, one pure chalk and the other an interbedded, kaolinite-bearing, argillaceous and calcareous claystone, both of which have components derived from primary production in the photic zone, which is rich in foraminifera and coccoliths. The formation is bioturbated in which low pelagic sediment accumulations rates resulted in tiering and continual overprinting of trace fossils. The ichnological analysis unveiled the trends in environmental deterioration and amelioration. Fluctuations in the input of organic matter resulted in a rise of the redox front and low porewater/sediment oxygenation, which excluded many endobenthic organisms and resulted in changes in the trace fossil assemblages. Bioturbation alters the authigenic clay mineral assemblages and thereby affects sediment texture, as shown in the mineralogical differences between burrow fill and host sediment. The clay mineral assemblage was more diverse within the burrows than in the surrounding sediment. This is likely due to the authigenesis in the digestive system of deposit-feeding endobenthos. The effects of bioturbation are reflected in the chalk and interlayed marlstone of the formation. Biologically induced textural heterogeneities have a significant effect on reservoir quality. It was concluded that large-scale biodeposition may notably alter the texture of fine-grained sediments. 66 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  5. Clays, Nanoclays, and Montmorillonite Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Faheem

    2008-12-01

    The recent introduction of nanoclays as fillers or additives in polymers for various desired effects is a subject of an increased interest for research and development to establish various applications. An increased consumption is indicated by the wider applications of clay nanocomposites approaching to almost one-quarter (24 pct) in 2005 of the total nanocomposites used. However, an interesting concern, along with the studies addressing how nanoclays change the behavior of polymeric materials, is to discover what are clays, nanoclays and montmorillonite minerals. The various structures of montmorillonite available in nature and their modification for application are discussed. An attempt is made to review the origin of using clays when nanotechnology did not exist, coupled with the effects of montmorillonite-based nanoclays on commercially known polymers.

  6. Surface Geochemistry of the Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Garrison; Skipper, Neal T.; Sutton, Rebecca; Park, Sung-Ho; Soper, Alan K.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    1999-03-01

    Clay minerals are layer type aluminosilicates that figure in terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, in the buffering capacity of the oceans, and in the containment of toxic waste materials. They are also used as lubricants in petroleum extraction and as industrial catalysts for the synthesis of many organic compounds. These applications derive fundamentally from the colloidal size and permanent structural charge of clay mineral particles, which endow them with significant surface reactivity. Unraveling the surface geochemistry of hydrated clay minerals is an abiding, if difficult, topic in earth sciences research. Recent experimental and computational studies that take advantage of new methodologies and basic insights derived from the study of concentrated ionic solutions have begun to clarify the structure of electrical double layers formed on hydrated clay mineral surfaces, particularly those in the interlayer region of swelling 2:1 layer type clay minerals. One emerging trend is that the coordination of interlayer cations with water molecules and clay mineral surface oxygens is governed largely by cation size and charge, similarly to a concentrated ionic solution, but the location of structural charge within a clay layer and the existence of hydrophobic patches on its surface provide important modulations. The larger the interlayer cation, the greater the influence of clay mineral structure and hydrophobicity on the configurations of adsorbed water molecules. This picture extends readily to hydrophobic molecules adsorbed within an interlayer region, with important implications for clay-hydrocarbon interactions and the design of catalysts for organic synthesis.

  7. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  8. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  9. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413333450; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay

  10. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Fachgebiet Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    This first systematic survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, is currently being extended to neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals, like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we examine if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally to support the interpretation of pertinent experiments. A further facet of these studies is to account also for the dynamic nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamic simulations.

  11. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study ...

  12. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  13. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  14. Alteration of swelling clay minerals by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of six dioctahedral and two trioctahedral swellable clay minerals was leached in H2SO4 and HCl at concentrations of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 M at 80 °C for several hours. Alteration of the clay mineral structures was dependent on the individual character of each mineral (chemical

  15. Heavy sediment influx during early Holocene: Inference from clay mineral studies in a core from the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    depositional origin on the eastern Nile cone 3 . Chlorite and kaolinite also have been used as valuable indicators of continental sources and differe n- tial depositional si tes in the eastern Atlantic sediments off North America 4 . The Bay of Bengal covers..., Montmorillonite. Figure 2. X - ray diffractograms of selected subsamples. the basis of clay mineral distribution and M/I ratio the core is divided into two units, each with distinct clay mineral assemblages and source. The demarcation...

  16. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications.

  17. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Mechanism of tritium persistence in porous media like clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Jie; Wang, Jin-Sheng; Teng, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Ni

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of tritium persistence in clay minerals, three types of clay soils (montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite) and tritiated water were used in this study to conduct the tritium sorption tests and the other related tests. Firstly, the ingredients, metal elements and heat properties of clay minerals were studied with some instrumental analysis methods, such as ICP and TG. Secondly, with a specially designed fractionation and condensation experiment, the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in the clay minerals separated from the tritium sorption tests were fractionated for investigating the tritium distributions in the different types of adsorptive waters. Thirdly, the location and configuration of tritium adsorbed into the structure of clay minerals were studied with infrared spectrometry (IR) tests. And finally, the forces and mechanisms for driving tritium into the clay minerals were analyzed on the basis of the isotope effect of tritium and the above tests. Following conclusions have been reached: (1) The main reason for tritium persistence in clay minerals is the entrance of tritium into the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in clay minerals. The percentage of tritium distributed in these three types of adsorptive water are in the range of 13.65% - 38.71%, 0.32% - 5.96%, 1.28% - 4.37% of the total tritium used in the corresponding test, respectively. The percentages are different for different types of clay minerals. (2) Tritium adsorbed onto clay minerals are existed in the forms of the tritiated hydroxyl radical (OT) and the tritiated water molecule (HTO). Tritium mainly exists in tritiated water molecule for adsorbed water and interlayer water, and in tritiated hydroxyl radical for structural water. (3) The forces and effects driving tritium into the clay minerals may include molecular dispersion, electric charge sorption, isotope exchange and tritium isotope effect.

  19. Low temperature CO2 mineralization into basalt: solution chemistry and secondary mineral assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysi, A.; Stefánsson, A.

    2009-12-01

    solution pH and their oxidation state. Secondary mineral assemblages were identified using SEM, and WDS elemental maps combined with quantitative analysis on EMPA. In all experiments, secondary minerals precipitating from solution were (Ca)-(Mg)-Fe-rich carbonates, amorphous Fe-hydroxides and (Na)-Ca-Mg-Fe clays. Our model compare qualitatively well with the experiments, the key factors controlling CO2 mineralization into carbonates beeing competing reactions between clays and carbonates for Ca+2, Mg+2 and Fe+2 ions.

  20. Identification of Clay Minerals of the Eastern Southern Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of Clay Minerals of the Eastern Southern Region of Lake Victoria by Ethylene Glycol and Heat: Xray Diffraction and Infrared Spectroscopy ... Tanzania Journal of Science ... IR spectroscopy study was also carried out and the results were presented for comparison to clay minerals identified by XRD analysis.

  1. Impact-Induced Clay Mineral Formation and Distribution on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Craig, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals have been identified in the central peaks and ejecta blankets of impact craters on Mars. Several studies have suggested these clay minerals formed as a result of impact induced hydrothermalism either during Mars' Noachian era or more recently by the melting of subsurface ice. Examples of post-impact clay formation is found in several locations on Earth such as the Mjolnir and Woodleigh Impact Structures. Additionally, a recent study has suggested the clay minerals observed on Ceres are the result of impact-induced hydrothermal processes. Such processes may have occurred on Mars, possibly during the Noachian. Distinguishing between clay minerals formed preor post-impact can be accomplished by studying their IR spectra. In fact, showed that the IR spectra of clay minerals is greatly affected at longer wavelengths (i.e. mid-IR, 5-25 micron) by impact-induced shock deformation while the near-IR spectra (1.0-2.5 micron) remains relatively unchanged. This explains the discrepancy between NIR and MIR observations of clay minerals in martian impact craters noted. Thus, it allows us to determine whether a clay mineral formed from impact-induced hydrothermalism or were pre-existing and were altered by the impact. Here we study the role of impacts on the formation and distribution of clay minerals on Mars via a fully 3-D Monte Carlo cratering model, including impact- melt production using results from modern hydrocode simulations. We identify regions that are conducive to clay formation and the location of clay minerals post-bombardment.

  2. Relationship between sediment clay minerals and total mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongchum, Manoch; Hudnall, Wayne H; DeLaune, R D

    2011-01-01

    A group of 262 sediment samples were collected from various lakes, rivers, reservoirs, and bayous of Louisiana. All samples were analyzed for total mercury. Twenty nine of the samples with total mercury content ranging from 11 to 401 ppb (μg/kg) were analyzed for clay minerals and other sediment physical and chemical properties. Clay content in sediments varied from 3 to 72%. Clay minerals were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Identification of clay minerals was determined by MacDiff software and quantification of clay minerals was obtained by Peak Height Percentage (PHP) calculation. The dominant clay mineral was Hydrated Interlayer Vermiculite (HIV), which represented 51-83% of the total clay mineral. Significant linear correlations were observed between Hg and total clay content (r=0.538**). However Smectite was the only individual clay type correlated (r=0.465**) with mercury in sediment. Cation exchange capacity (r=0.404*), organic matter (r=0.577**), and sulfur (r=0.676**) were also correlated significantly with mercury level in sediment.

  3. Clay mineralogy of weathering rinds and possible implications concerning the sources of clay minerals in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    Weathering rinds on volcanic clasts in Quaternary deposits in the western US contain only very fine-grained and poorly crystalline clay minerals. Rinds were sampled from soils containing well-developed argillic B horizons in deposits approx 105 yr old or more. The clay-size fraction of the rinds is dominated by allophane and iron hydroxy-oxides, whereas the B horizons contain abundant well-crystallized clay minerals. The contrast between the clay mineralogy of the weathering rinds, in which weathering is isolated from other soil processes, and that of the associated soil matrices suggests a need to reassess assumptions concerning the rates at which clay minerals form and the sources of clay minerals in argillic B horizons. It seems that crystalline clay minerals form more slowly in weathering rinds than is generally assumed for soil environments and that the weathering of primary minerals may not be the dominant source of crystalline clay minerals in Middle to Late Pleistocene soil.-A.P.

  4. Characterization of clay minerals; Caracterizacion de minerales arcillosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A. [Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  5. Clay minerals as proxies of the late Quaternary East Asian monsoon evolution in the South China Sea revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Li, X.; He, Z.; Colin, C.; Zhao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Clay minerals have a significant role in sedimentation and paleoenvironment studies of the South China Sea. Many previous studies showed that the time series variation in late Quaternary clay mineral assemblages presents mostly glacial-interglacial cyclicity, and they were interpreted chemical weathering closely related to contemporaneous climatic changes of source areas. It is quite debatable whether clay minerals can directly indicate the East Asian monsoon evolution. To answer this question, we investigated sediment cores collected in various locations in the South China Sea during the MARCO POLO cruise in 2005, MD05-2904 (2066 m water depth, abbreviated w.d.) and MD05-2905 (1198 m w.d.) in the north, MD05-2901 (1254 m w.d.) and MD05-2899 (2393 m w.d.) in the west, and MD05-2895 (1982 m w.d.) in the south. Our results show that provenance supply and current transport directly control the clay mineralogical compositions in core and surface sediments, with various expression forms in different locations. In the north, the clay mineral assemblage indicates a relationship between surface current transport (for smectite) under the significant influence of the Kuroshio intrusion and deep water transport (for illite and chlorite). In the west, the East Asian monsoons forced surface currents and different clay-composition provenances affect the glacial-interglacial cyclicity of clay mineral variations. In the south, land-sea distribution variations controlled by the sea level change determine the sources of clay minerals. Our new studies suggest that the late Quaternary clay minerals in the South China Sea do not bear contemporaneous paleoclimatic features, and their implication for proxies of the East Asian monsoon evolution is realized through both the provenance supply and current transport processes.

  6. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  7. Climatic control on clay mineral formation: Evidence from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type,climate,topography and exposure age affect weathering environments.In the present study,an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering pro ...

  8. Climatic control on clay mineral formation: Evidence from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type, climate, topography and exposure age affect weath- ering environments. In the present study, an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering ...

  9. Clay mineral distribution on the Kerala continental shelf and slope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of @iRV gaveshani@@ were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral cntent. The distribution of total clay (< 4~k fraction...

  10. Control of clay minerals effect in flotation. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Hasan Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased exposure to low grade ores highlights the importance of understanding phyllosilicate gangue mineralogy which consists of common gangue minerals. To improve the flotation performance and ore quality the negative effect of the clay minerals on flotation should be identified. The presence of clay minerals leads to problems, such as changing the froth stability, which are related to swelling behaviour, increase in pulp viscosity, overconsumption of reagents, slime coating and mechanical entrainment. The clay content in the ore is changing from time to time and it is necessary to provide quick solutions to the issues caused by the new ore composition. The objective of this paper is to give an overview how to control the colloidal properties of clay minerals on flotation.

  11. Fixation of Selenium by Clay Minerals and Iron Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdy, A. A.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1977-01-01

    In studying Se fixation, soil components capable of retaining Se were investigated. The importance of Fe hydrous oxides in the fixation of Se was established. The clay minerals common to soils, such as kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite, all exhibited Se fixation, but greater fixation...... occurred with the 1:1 than the 2:1 clay type. Experiments with finely ground minerals showed that the pH of the systems greatly influenced the rate of fixation, reaching a maximum between pH 3 and 5 and decreasing rapidly as the pH increased. With the Fe2O3 system fixed Se was slightly reduced as the p......H was increased to over 8. The extractability of Se from the clay minerals indicated that 1:1 clay type minerals fix selenite more indissolubly than 2:1 clays and that selenite was adsorbed on the clays mainly by a surface exchange reaction. The major part of the selenite added to the Fe2O3 system was found...

  12. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  13. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookins, D.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Geology

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

  14. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  15. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  16. Pyrene mineralization in clay soil with and without organic Carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pyrene mineralization in clay soil with and without organic Carbon: the rol of adsorption and desorption kinetics equilibria. C N Owabor, J O Osarkunmwense. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Physics Vol. 14 (1) 2008 pp. 109-114. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  17. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative determination of clay minerals in soil based on bulk chemical composition data. The fundamental principles and processes of the calculation are elucidated. Some samples were used for reliability verification of the method and the ...

  18. A study on the differential thermal analysis of clays and clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, P.L.

    1951-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) as a method of analysing properties of chemical compounds, more especially of clay minerals, developed rapidly, but lack of quantitative interpretations left many problems to be studied. A historical review was presented, showing the purpose of the study.

  19. Reactivity of clay minerals with acids and alkalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dorothy; Starkey, Harry C.

    1971-01-01

    One-g samples of a montmorillonite, a metabentonite, an illite, two kaolinites, and three halloysites were treated with 50 ml of hydrochloric acid (6⋅45 N, 1:1), acetic acid (4⋅5 N, 1:3), sodium hydroxide (2⋅8 N), sodium chloride solution (pH 6⋅10; Na = 35‰; Cl = 21⋅5‰), and natural sea water (pH 7⋅85; Na = 35⋅5‰; Cl = 21⋅ 5‰) for a 10-day period in stoppered plastic vials. The supernatant solutions were removed from the clay minerals and analyzed for SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and K2O. All the solutions removed some SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 from the samples, but the quantities were small. Sodium hydroxide attacked the kaolin group minerals more strongly than it did montmorillonite, metabentonite, or illite. Halloysite was more strongly attacked by hydrochloric acid than was any of the other experimental minerals. Hydrochloric acid removed iron oxide coatings from soil clay minerals, but acetic acid did not remove them completely. The samples most strongly attacked by HCl and NaOH were examined by X-ray diffraction. Acid treatment did not destroy the structure of the clays, but the halloysite structure was partially destroyed. Sodium hydroxide attacked the halloysite structure, as shown by chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. These experiments show that treatment in dilute acids has no harmful effect in the preparation of clays for X-ray diffraction. Acetic acid is preferred to hydrochloric acid for this purpose. Hydrochloric acid cleans clay minerals by removing free iron oxide from the surface; acetic acid is less effective.

  20. Pb-Zn mineralization of the Ali ou Daoud area (Central High Atlas, Morocco): characterisation of the deposit and relationships with the clay assemblages; Mineralisation Pb-Zn du type MVT de la region d'Ali ou Daoud (Haut Atlas Central, Maroc): caracterisations du gite et relations avec les corteges de mineraux argileux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouguina, E. M.; Daoudi, L.

    2008-07-01

    Zn-Pb-Fe ores in the Ali ou Daoud deposit (Central High Atlas) are found as stratiform levels and as karst fillings in carbonate platforms facies of Bajocian age. Tectonic structures (e.g., syn sedimentary faults) played a relevant role in the ore emplacement. The dolomitic ore-related host-rock levels are characterized by the presence of kaolinite enrichment in clay levels in amounts directly related to the proportion of the clay minerals. The latter is evidenced by correlation between kaolinite and sulphide contents, suggesting that the installation of kaolinite and mineralizations would result from the same hydrothermal fluid. (Author) 55 refs.

  1. Can corn plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi affect soil clay assemblage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, P.; Cozzolino, V.; Di Meo, V.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Plants can extract K from exchangeable and non-exchangeable sites in the soil clay mineral structures. The latter, known as fixed K, is usually seen as an illite layer, i.e. an anhydrous K layer that forms a 1.0 nm structural layer unit as seen by X-ray diffraction. Nutrient availability can be enhanced in the root zone by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi. In this study, the effects of non-inoculated and Glomus intraradices inoculated corn plant growth under different experimental conditions on soil K-bearing clay minerals were identified. The soil, a Vertic Xerofluvent, was planted in corn in a 2008-2010 randomized field experiment. Bulk and rhizosphere soil sampling was carried out from May to September 2010 from fertilized plots (N200P90K160 and N200P0K160) with and without plants. According to XRD analysis, three major K-bearing minerals were present in soil: smectite-rich mixed layer mineral, illite-rich mixed layer mineral and illite. Results at 40DAS indicate extraction of K from clay minerals by plant uptake, whereas at 130DAS much of the nutrient seems to be returned to the soil. There is an apparent difference between bulk and rhizophere clays. The XRD patterns are not unequivocally affected by Glomus inoculation. There are observable changes in clay mineralogy in fallow unfertilized compared with fertilized soil. In the studied soil, the illite rich mixed-layer minerals seem to be the source of K absorbed by plants, while illite acts as sink of K released from the plant-microorganisms system at the end of the growing season and as source for the following crop.

  2. Geochemical Investigation of Clay Minerals in Marte, Borno State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Adams

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay deposit collected from various locations in Marte (Northern Borno, were studied to determine their physical and chemical characteristics in order to evaluate their suitability for industrial uses. Major and trace element analyses were carried out on clay samples using Inductively Couple Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES and X- Ray Fluorescence (XRF. The result of the chemical analysis of the ten (10 samples collected showed significant amounts of SiO2 and Al2O3. Silica content ranges from 51.48 to 62.44 % while alumina varies from 12.49 to 19.00 %. The calcium oxide ranges from 1.17 to 3.39 %, Na2O ranges from 1.1 to 8.61 %, K2O from 1.54 to 3.66 %, MgO varies from 0.04 to0.14 %, Fe2O3 varies from 0.3 to 2.7 % and MnO ranges from 0.01 to 1.03 %. The result showed that the clays are mainly smectite with quartz and felspar as the main non-clay minerals. Generally, the geochemical results of the samples do not meet the standard for industrial utilization when compared to the Industrial specifications. However, for industrial utilization, some of the clay samples may be used after necessary beneficiations.

  3. Characterization and classification of clay minerals for potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clay samples composed of albite (5-16.7%), kaolinite (11.4-36.2%), microcline (15.2-35.3%), quartz (24.3-68.1%), hornblende (7.6% in samples from Ngamwa only), and other mineral impurities in small amounts. Ngamwa clayey materials consist of high impurities of chemical oxides such as TiO2, MnO, MgO and ...

  4. Paleoenvironmental significance of clay mineral assemblages in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    change controls continental weathering rates and runoff, which in turn influences soil formation and. Keywords. Arabian ..... Sm/Il (smectite/illite) ratios, which may be used as humidity indices, show relatively lower values ..... reported from the laminated sediments of Pakistan margin (von Rad et al. 1999) and western mar-.

  5. Paleoenvironmental significance of clay mineral assemblages in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The low values of biogenic carbonate and organic carbon also indicate low productivity associated with weak summer monsoons during Heinrich Events. Abrupt increased humidity was recorded at 15–12.7 ka (Bølling/Allerød Event) sandwiched between two lows of Heinrich Events. Cycles of millennial timescale variations ...

  6. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases, Ribose, and Phosphate by Some Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Hashizume

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate how clays might catalyze the formation of nucleosides, nucleotides and polynucleotides in the “RNA world”. The adsorption of purines, pyrimidines and nucleosides from aqueous solution to clay minerals is affected by suspension pH. With montmorillonite, adsorption is also influenced by the nature of the exchangeable cations. Here, we review the interactions of some clay minerals with RNA components.

  7. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  8. Harnessing Water and Resources from Clay Minerals on Mars and Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    Clay minerals provide a source of water, metals, and cations that can be harvested to provide resources for human exploration on Mars, asteroids, etc. Planning how to access these resources from clays could be a vital component of human exploration.

  9. Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes.

  10. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-543, Deleg. Coyoacan, C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  11. Effect of swelling mineral on geotechnical characteristics of clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Cherif Mechri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The shrinking and swelling is a very common phenomenon in the world, mainly in arid and semiarid areas. The construction on these soils often requires a study of the risk of swelling, in advance. The emergence of this phenomenon in soils is caused primarily by the presence of swelling clays and water. The risk is most significant when the rate of the expansive minerals, such as bentonite, is important. Several researchers have studied the relationship between the percentages of swelling minerals and soil swelling potential. The researchers have shown the difficulty of characterization, because of the complexity of the phenomenon under natural conditions, where several other phenomena occur, and which are not considered in laboratory experimentation. This article addresses the characterization of several soils, with different swelling rates from the physical, chemical and mechanical tests. It shows the relationship between the quantity of swelling minerals and some site conditions, such as water content and consolidation stress, on the ability of soil to swell. This work aims to establish empirical relationships between the percentage of swelling minerals and soil swelling potential.

  12. Crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal via clay-microbe-oil interactions: Effect of acid activated clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Fialips, Claire I

    2017-07-01

    Acid treatment of clay minerals is known to modify their properties such as increase their surface area and surface acidity, making them suitable as catalysts in many chemical processes. However, the role of these surface properties during biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is only known for mild acid (0.5 M Hydrochloric acid) treated clays. Four different clay minerals were used for this study: a montmorillonite, a saponite, a palygorskite and a kaolinite. They were treated with 3 M hydrochloric acid to produce acid activated clay minerals. The role of the acid activated montmorillonite, saponite, palygorskite and kaolinite in comparison with the unmodified clay minerals in the removal of PAHs during biodegradation was investigated in microcosm experiments. The microcosm experiments contained micro-organisms, oil, and clays in aqueous medium with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community predominantly composed of Alcanivorax spp. Obtained results indicated that acid activated clays and unmodified kaolinite did not enhance the biodegradation of the PAHs whereas unmodified montmorillonite, palygorskite and saponite enhanced their biodegradation. In addition, unmodified palygorskite adsorbed the PAHs significantly due to its unique channel structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reply to Comment by Xu et al. on "Sr-Nd isotope composition and clay mineral assemblages in eolian dust from the central Philippine Sea over the last 600 kyr: Implications for the transport mechanism of Asian dust" by Seo et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Inah; Lee, Yong Il; Yoo, Chan Min; Kim, Hyung Jeek; Hyeong, Kiseong

    2016-12-01

    Against Xu et al. (2016), who argued that East Asian Desert (EAD) dust that traveled on East Asian Winter Monsoon winds dominates over Central Asian Desert (CAD) dust in the Philippine Sea with presentation of additional data, we reconfirm Seo et al.'s (2014) conclusion that CAD dust carried on the Prevailing Westerlies and Trade Winds dominates over EAD dust in overall dust budget of the central Philippine Sea. The relative contribution of dust from EADs and CADs using clay mineral composition should be evaluated with elimination of mineralogical contribution from the volcanic end-member which is enriched in kaolinite and overestimate the contribution of EAD dust.

  14. Clay mineral distribution from Bhimunipatnam to Pudimadaka along cental eastern continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    Forty eight sediment samples, collected from 50-100m depth, have been analysed for their clay mineral composition and distribution. Kaolinite with chlorite (K + C) is the predominant mineral followed by illite and montmorillonite. K + C and illite...

  15. Clay mineral distribution in the shelf sediments off the northern part of the east coast of india

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, Ch.M.

    and kaolinite concentrations are higher in the clay fraction of the more sandy sediments and montmorillonite proportions are higher in the clays. The clay minerals present in the shelf sediments closely reflect their sources but their relative abundance depends...

  16. Reconstruction of a digital core containing clay minerals based on a clustering algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanlong; Pu, Chunsheng; Jing, Cheng; Gu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Qingdong; Liu, Hongzhi; Khan, Nasir; Dong, Qiaoling

    2017-10-01

    It is difficult to obtain a core sample and information for digital core reconstruction of mature sandstone reservoirs around the world, especially for an unconsolidated sandstone reservoir. Meanwhile, reconstruction and division of clay minerals play a vital role in the reconstruction of the digital cores, although the two-dimensional data-based reconstruction methods are specifically applicable as the microstructure reservoir simulation methods for the sandstone reservoir. However, reconstruction of clay minerals is still challenging from a research viewpoint for the better reconstruction of various clay minerals in the digital cores. In the present work, the content of clay minerals was considered on the basis of two-dimensional information about the reservoir. After application of the hybrid method, and compared with the model reconstructed by the process-based method, the digital core containing clay clusters without the labels of the clusters' number, size, and texture were the output. The statistics and geometry of the reconstruction model were similar to the reference model. In addition, the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm was used to label various connected unclassified clay clusters in the initial model and then the number and size of clay clusters were recorded. At the same time, the K-means clustering algorithm was applied to divide the labeled, large connecting clusters into smaller clusters on the basis of difference in the clusters' characteristics. According to the clay minerals' characteristics, such as types, textures, and distributions, the digital core containing clay minerals was reconstructed by means of the clustering algorithm and the clay clusters' structure judgment. The distributions and textures of the clay minerals of the digital core were reasonable. The clustering algorithm improved the digital core reconstruction and provided an alternative method for the simulation of different clay minerals in the digital cores.

  17. Reconstruction of a digital core containing clay minerals based on a clustering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanlong; Pu, Chunsheng; Jing, Cheng; Gu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Qingdong; Liu, Hongzhi; Khan, Nasir; Dong, Qiaoling

    2017-10-01

    It is difficult to obtain a core sample and information for digital core reconstruction of mature sandstone reservoirs around the world, especially for an unconsolidated sandstone reservoir. Meanwhile, reconstruction and division of clay minerals play a vital role in the reconstruction of the digital cores, although the two-dimensional data-based reconstruction methods are specifically applicable as the microstructure reservoir simulation methods for the sandstone reservoir. However, reconstruction of clay minerals is still challenging from a research viewpoint for the better reconstruction of various clay minerals in the digital cores. In the present work, the content of clay minerals was considered on the basis of two-dimensional information about the reservoir. After application of the hybrid method, and compared with the model reconstructed by the process-based method, the digital core containing clay clusters without the labels of the clusters' number, size, and texture were the output. The statistics and geometry of the reconstruction model were similar to the reference model. In addition, the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm was used to label various connected unclassified clay clusters in the initial model and then the number and size of clay clusters were recorded. At the same time, the K -means clustering algorithm was applied to divide the labeled, large connecting clusters into smaller clusters on the basis of difference in the clusters' characteristics. According to the clay minerals' characteristics, such as types, textures, and distributions, the digital core containing clay minerals was reconstructed by means of the clustering algorithm and the clay clusters' structure judgment. The distributions and textures of the clay minerals of the digital core were reasonable. The clustering algorithm improved the digital core reconstruction and provided an alternative method for the simulation of different clay minerals in the digital cores.

  18. Effects of clay minerals on diethyl phthalate degradation in Fenton reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Fang, Guodong; Zhou, Dongmei; Gao, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Phthalate esters are a group of plasticizers, which are commonly detected in China's soils and surface water. Fenton reactions are naturally occurring and widely applied in the degradation of contaminants. However, limited research was considered the effects of clay minerals on contaminants degradation with OH oxidation. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the degradation of diethyl phthalate (DEP) in Fenton reactions in the presence of clay minerals, and the effects of clay type, Fe content in clay structure. The results showed the clay adsorption inhibited total degradation of DEP, and Fe content in clay structure played an important role in DEP degradation, including in solution and adsorbed in clay minerals. Clay minerals with less Fe content (clay-adsorbed DEP was much slower than DEP in solution. Six main products of DEP degradation were identified, including monoethyl phthalate, phthalate acid, hydroxyl diethyl phthalate, etc. This study implied that phthalate ester's degradation would be much slower in natural water than expected in the presence of clay minerals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clay Minerals in Mawrth Vallis Region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This map showing the location of some clay minerals in of a portion of the Mawrth Vallis region of Mars covers an area about 10 kilometers (6.2 mile) wide. The map is draped over a topographical model that exaggerates the vertical dimension tenfold. The mineral mapping information comes from an image taken on Sept. 21, 2007, by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). Iron-magnesium phyllosilicate is shown in red. Aluminum phyllosyllicate is shown in blue. Hydrated silica and a ferrous iron phase are shown in yellow/green. The topographical information comes from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter. Mawrth Vallis is an outflow channel centered near 24.7 degrees north latitude, 339.5 degrees east longitude, in northern highlands of Mars. CRISM is one of six science instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter.

  20. Surficial clay mineral distribution on the southwestern continental margin of India: Evidence of input from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Gujar, A.R.

    of the continental source area. A number of studies have shown that clay mineral distributions are particularly sensitive indicators of spatial and temporal changes of the geology and the weathering characteristics on the adjacent continental landmass (Biscaye..., and hydrography on the dispersal and Surficial clay mineral distribution in SW India 323 distribution of clay minerals, and to identify the sources of the sediments in this region, particularly the potential clay mineral contribution from the BBW. 2. STUDY...

  1. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Light Coal Fractions and the Thermal Reaction Products of These Clay Minerals during Combustion in a Drop Tube Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the contribution of clay minerals in light coal fractions to ash deposition in furnaces, we investigated their distribution and thermal reaction products. The light fractions of two Chinese coals were prepared using a 1.5 g·cm−3 ZnCl2 solution as a density separation medium and were burned in a drop-tube furnace (DTF. The mineral matter in each of the light coal fractions was compared to that of the relevant raw coal. The DTF ash from light coal fractions was analysed using hydrochloric acid separation. The acid-soluble aluminium fractions of DTF ash samples were used to determine changes in the amorphous aluminosilicate products with increasing combustion temperature. The results show that the clay mineral contents in the mineral matter of both light coal fractions were higher than those in the respective raw coals. For the coal with a high ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction thermally transformed more dehydroxylation products compared with those in the raw coal, possibly contributing to solid-state reactions of ash particles. For the coal with a low ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction produced more easily-slagging material compared with those in the raw coal, playing an important role in the occurrence of slagging. Additionally, ferrous oxide often produces low-melting substances in coal ash. Due to the similarities of zinc oxide and ferrous oxide in silicate reactions, we also investigated the interactions of clay minerals in light coal fractions with zinc oxide introduced by a zinc chloride solution. The extraneous zinc oxide could react, to a small extent, with clay minerals in the coal during DTF combustion.

  2. Dynamic mechanical properties and anisotropy of synthetic shales with different clay minerals under confining pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fei; Di, Bangrang; Wei, Jianxin; Ding, Pinbo; Shuai, Da

    2018-03-01

    The presence of clay minerals can alter the elastic behaviour of reservoir rocks significantly as the type of clay minerals, their volume and distribution, and their orientation control the shale's intrinsic anisotropic behaviours. Clay minerals are the most abundant materials in shale, and it has been proven extremely difficult to measure the elastic properties of natural shale by means of a single variable (in this case, the type of clay minerals), due to the influences of multiple factors, including water, TOC content and complex mineral compositions. We used quartz, clay (kaolinite, illite and smectite), carbonate and kerogen extract as the primary materials to construct synthetic shale with different clay minerals. Ultrasonic experiments were conducted to investigate the anisotropy of velocity and mechanical properties in dry synthetic and natural shale as a function of confining pressure. Velocities in synthetic shale are sensitive to the type of clay minerals, possibly due to the different structures of the clay minerals. The velocities increase with confining pressure and show higher rate of velocity increase at low pressures, and P-wave velocity is usually more sensitive than S-wave velocity to confining pressure according to our results. Similarly, the dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increase with applied pressure, and the results also reveal that E11 is always larger than E33 and ν31 is smaller than ν12. Velocity and mechanical anisotropy decrease with increasing stress, and are sensitive to stress and the type of clay minerals. However, the changes of mechanical anisotropy with applied stress are larger compared with the velocity anisotropy, indicating that mechanical properties are more sensitive to the change of rock properties.

  3. Clay-mineral suites, sources, and inferred dispersal routes: Southern California continental shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R; Dowling, Jennifer S; Schuetze, Anthony; Lee, Homa J

    2003-01-01

    Clay mineralogy is useful in determining the distribution, sources, and dispersal routes of fine-grained sediments. In addition, clay minerals, especially smectite, may control the degree to which contaminants are adsorbed by the sediment. We analyzed 250 shelf sediment samples, 24 river-suspended-sediment samples, and 12 river-bed samples for clay-mineral contents in the Southern California Borderland from Point Conception to the Mexico border. In addition, six samples were analyzed from the Palos Verdes Headland in order to characterize the clay minerals contributed to the offshore from that point source. The areas and standard weighting factors. Most fine-grained sediment is supplied to the shelf by rivers during major winter storms, especially during El Niño years. The largest sediment fluxes to the region are from the Santa Ynez and Santa Clara Rivers, which drain the Transverse Ranges. The mean clay-mineral suite for the entire shelf sediment data set (26% smectite, 50% illite, 24% kaolinite+chlorite) is closely comparable to that for the mean of all the rivers (31% smectite, 49% illite, 20% kaolinite+chlorite), indicating that the main source of shelf fine-grained sediments is the adjacent rivers. However, regional variations do exist and the shelf is divided into four provinces with characteristic clay-mineral suites. The means of the clay-mineral suites of the two southernmost provinces are within analytical error of the mineral suites of adjacent rivers. The next province to the north includes Santa Monica Bay and has a suite of clay minerals derived from mixing of fine-grained sediments from several sources, both from the north and south. The northernmost province clay-mineral suite matches moderately well that of the adjacent rivers, but does indicate some mixing from sources in adjacent provinces.

  4. [Species Determination and Spectral Characteristics of Swelling Clay Minerals in the Pliocene Sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-wen; Chen, Jiang-jun; Fang, Qian; Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-lie

    2015-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to deepen our research on specific species and spectral characteristics of swelling clay minerals in the Pliocene sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai province. XRD results show that swelling clay minerals are dominant clay minerals in the sandstones, which can be up to 97% in percentage. XRD patterns show 060 reflections of the samples occur both remarkably at 1.534 Å and 1.498 Å, indicating the samples contain physical mixtures of trioctahedral and dioctahedral swelling clay minerals, respectively. Further treatment of Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation shows the swelling clay minerals collapse to 9.3-9.9 Å with a partial expansion to -18 Å. This indicates the swelling clay minerals dominate montmorillonite and contain minor saponite. The montmorillonite shows no swelling after Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation because of Li+ inserting into the octahedral layers, which balances the layer charge caused by the substitution of Mg to Al. FTIR results show the samples are composed of a kind of phyllosilicate with absorbed and structural water, which is in agreement with the results of XRD. Absorbed peaks at 913, 842, 880 cm(-1), corresponding to OH associated with Al-Al, Al-Mg, and Al-Fe pairs, further indicates the minerals are dominant dioctahedron in structure. Meanwhile, absorbed peaks at 625 and 519 cm(-1), corresponding to coupled Si-O and Al-O-Si deformation, indicates parts of Si is replaced by Al in tetrahedron. The spectral characteristics of the samples are against the presence of beidellite and nontronite based on the results of XRD and FTIR, while demonstrating an,existence of montmorillonite. This study, to distinguish the specific species of swelling clay species in clay minerals, would be of great importance when using clay mineralogy to interpret provenance and climatic information.

  5. Clays as mineral dust aerosol: An integrated approach to studying climate, atmospheric chemistry, and biogeochemical effects of atmospheric clay minerals in an undergraduate research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. D.; Crane, C. C.; Harris, K. J.; Thompson, C. E.; Miles, M. K.; Weingold, R. M.; Bucuti, T.

    2011-12-01

    Entrained mineral dust aerosol accounts for 45% of the global annual atmospheric aerosol load and can have a significant influence on important environmental issues, including climate, atmospheric chemistry, cloud formation, biogeochemical processes, visibility, and human health. 70% of all mineral aerosol mass originating from Africa consists of layered aluminosilicates, including illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite clays. Clay minerals are a largely neglected component of mineral aerosol, yet they have unique physiochemical properties, including a high reactive surface area, large cation exchange capacities, small particle sizes, and a relatively large capacity to take up adsorbed water, resulting in expansion of clay layers (and a larger reactive surface area for heterogeneous interactions) in some cases. An integrated laboratory research approach has been implemented at Hendrix College, a Primarily Undergraduate Institution, in which undergraduate students are involved in independent and interdisciplinary research projects that relate the chemical aging processes (heterogeneous chemistry) of clay minerals as a major component of mineral aerosol to their effects on climate (water adsorption), atmospheric chemistry (trace gas uptake), and biogeochemistry (iron dissolution and phytoplankton biomarker studies). Preliminary results and future directions will be reported.

  6. Clay mineral distribution on tropical shelf: an example from the western shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of RV Gaveshani were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral content. The distribution of total clay ( 4 mu fraction...

  7. Spatial distribution and longitudinal variation of clay minerals in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.

    of the 76.5 degrees E fracture zone (FZ), which strongly suggests the possibility of clay supply due to circulation of Antarctic Bottom Water from the south through the FZ. The distribution of four clay minerals along 73 degrees and 76.5 degrees E FZ...

  8. Characterization of sands and mineral clays in channel and floodplain deposits of Portuguesa river, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando José González Clemente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the main channel and floodplain of Portuguesa River were studied the mineralogical characteristics of sand and clay minerals respectively. The methodology consisted of X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, for both mineral fractions. The results indicated the presence of mainly of quartz sands with minor amounts of chlorite, muscovite, calcite and feldspar which are considered quartz sand mature. Its origin is related to the source area and rework of soils and sediments of the floodplain. The clay fraction is characterized by the presence of 13 mineral crystalline phases consisting mainly of quartz, muscovite and chlorite, and clay minerals such as kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite and nontronita. Its detrital origin may be due to mineral neoformation and inheritance. Therefore both mineral fractions consist mainly of quartz and kaolinite, which are essential components of the source area as well as the Quaternary alluvial deposits and the soils that make up the region.

  9. Clay mineral distribution in the continental shelf and slope off Saurashtra, West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    with relatively low values on the outer shelf. Illite and chlorite contents are high on the outer shelf. These variations are attributed to the influence of depositional environment and individual property of the clay minerals. Distinct differences in the nature...

  10. Competitive sorption between imidacloprid and imidacloprid-urea on soil clay minerals and humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Zheng, Wei; Gan, Jianying

    2002-11-06

    Soil organic matter and clay minerals are responsible for the adsorption of many pesticides. Adsorption and competitive sorption of imidacloprid on clay minerals and humic acids (HA) were determined using the batch equilibration method. The sorption coefficient of imidacloprid on humic acids was significantly higher than that on Ca-clay minerals, indicating that soil organic matter content was a more important property in influencing the adsorption of imidacloprid. Competitive sorption was investigated between imidacloprid and its main metabolite imidacloprid-urea on HA and Ca-clay minerals. The results showed that the sorption capacity of imidacloprid on clay minerals and HA was reduced in the presence of the metabolite, implying that imidacloprid-urea could occupy or block adsorption sites of imidacloprid on soil, potentially affecting the fate, transport, and bioavailability of imidacloprid in the environment. The interactions between a Ca-clay or HA-clay mixture and adsorption of imidacloprid and imidacloprid-urea were studied using IR differential spectra on thin films made of the adsorbent. The possible mechanisms were discussed from the shift of characteristic IR absorption bands of imidacloprid and imidacloprid-urea after sorption.

  11. Lithologic Control on Secondary Clay Mineral Formation in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, E.; Rasmussen, C.; Dhakal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transformation of rock to soil is central to landscape evolution and ecosystem function. The objective of this study was to examine controls on secondary mineral formation in a forested catchment in the Catalina-Jemez CZO. We hypothesized landscape position controls the type of secondary minerals formed in that well-drained hillslopes favor Si-poor secondary phases such as kaolinite, whereas poorly drained portions of the landscape that collect solutes from surrounding areas favor formation of Si-rich secondary phases such as smectite. The study focused on a catchment in Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico where soils are derived from a mix of rhyolitic volcanic material, vegetation includes a mixed conifer forest, and climate is characterized by a mean annual precipitation of ~800 mm yr-1 and mean annual temperature of 4.5°C. Soils were collected at the soil-saprolite boundary from three landscape positions, classified as well drained hillslope, poorly drained convergent area, and poorly drained hill slope. Clay fractions were isolated and analyzed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and thermal analysis. Quantitative XRD of random powder mounts indicated the presence of both primary phases such as quartz, and alkali and plagioclase feldspars, and secondary phases that include illite, Fe-oxyhydroxides including both goethite and hematite, kaolinite, and smectite. The clay fractions were dominated by smectite ranging from 36-42%, illite ranging from 21-35%, and kaolinite ranging from 1-8%. Qualitative XRD of oriented mounts confirmed the presence of smectite in all samples, with varying degrees of interlayering and interstratification. In contrast to our hypothesis, results indicated that secondary mineral assemblage was not strongly controlled by landscape position, but rather varied with underlying variation in lithology. The catchment is underlain by a combination of porphorytic rhyolite and

  12. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    . Basal soil respiration rates were determined from bulk soils and soil fractions. Substrate induced respiration rates were determined from soil fractions. SOC lability was significantly influenced by clay mineralogy, but not by clay content when compared across contrasting clay minerals. The lability......Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover is influenced by interactions between organic matter and the mineral soil fraction. However, the influence of clay content and type on SOC turnover rates remains unclear, particularly in tropical soils under natural vegetation. We examined the lability...... of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving...

  13. Enhanced cellular preservation by clay minerals in 1 billion-year-old lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacey, David; Saunders, Martin; Roberts, Malcolm; Menon, Sarath; Green, Leonard; Kong, Charlie; Culwick, Timothy; Strother, Paul; Brasier, Martin D.

    2014-07-01

    Organic-walled microfossils provide the best insights into the composition and evolution of the biosphere through the first 80 percent of Earth history. The mechanism of microfossil preservation affects the quality of biological information retained and informs understanding of early Earth palaeo-environments. We here show that 1 billion-year-old microfossils from the non-marine Torridon Group are remarkably preserved by a combination of clay minerals and phosphate, with clay minerals providing the highest fidelity of preservation. Fe-rich clay mostly occurs in narrow zones in contact with cellular material and is interpreted as an early microbially-mediated phase enclosing and replacing the most labile biological material. K-rich clay occurs within and exterior to cell envelopes, forming where the supply of Fe had been exhausted. Clay minerals inter-finger with calcium phosphate that co-precipitated with the clays in the sub-oxic zone of the lake sediments. This type of preservation was favoured in sulfate-poor environments where Fe-silicate precipitation could outcompete Fe-sulfide formation. This work shows that clay minerals can provide an exceptionally high fidelity of microfossil preservation and extends the known geological range of this fossilization style by almost 500 Ma. It also suggests that the best-preserved microfossils of this time may be found in low-sulfate environments.

  14. Kinetics and Products of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Iron(II/III)-Bearing Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe-Wong, Claresta; Brown, Gordon E; Maher, Kate

    2017-09-05

    Hexavalent chromium is a water-soluble pollutant, the mobility of which can be controlled by reduction of Cr(VI) to less soluble, environmentally benign Cr(III). Iron(II/III)-bearing clay minerals are widespread potential reductants of Cr(VI), but the kinetics and pathways of Cr(VI) reduction by such clay minerals are poorly understood. We reacted aqueous Cr(VI) with two abiotically reduced clay minerals: an Fe-poor montmorillonite and an Fe-rich nontronite. The effects of ionic strength, pH, total Fe content, and the fraction of reduced structural Fe(II) [Fe(II)/Fe(total)] were examined. The last variable had the largest effect on Cr(VI) reduction kinetics: for both clay minerals, the rate constant of Cr(VI) reduction varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude with Fe(II)/Fe(total) and is described by a linear free energy relationship. Under all conditions examined, Cr and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra show that the main Cr-bearing product is a Cr(III)-hydroxide and that Fe remains in the clay structure after reacting with Cr(VI). This study helps to quantify our understanding of the kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by Fe(II/III)-bearing clay minerals and may improve predictions of Cr(VI) behavior in subsurface environments.

  15. Adsorption of zinc and lead on clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Jablonovská

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Clays (especially bentonite, zeolite and quartz sand are widely used as landfill barriers to prevent contamination of subsoil and groundwater by leachates containing heavy metals. The sorption of zinc and lead on these clays was studied as a function of time and it was found that the initial 1 h our was sufficient to exchange most of the metal ions. The retention efficiency of clay samples of Zn2+ and Pb2+ follows the order of bentonite > zeolite> quartz sand. Whatever the clay sample, lead is retained more than zinc. The concentration of elements in the solution was followed by atomic adsorption spectrofotometry. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus, previously isolated from the kaoline deposit Horna Prievrana was added into the clay samples to comparise the accumulation of Zn2+ and Pb2+ from the model solution. The study of heavy metal adsorption capacity of bacteria- enriched clay adsorbent showed a high retention efficiency for lead ions as comparised with zinc ions. Biosorption is considered a potential instrument for the removal of metals from waste solutions and for the precious metals recovery as an alternative to the conventional processes.

  16. Ground Truthing Orbital Clay Mineral Observations with the APXS Onboard Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C.; Gellert, R.; VanBommel, S.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. S.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring approximately 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since 2011. Its rim segments predate the Hesperian-age Burns formation and expose Noachian-age material, which is associated with orbital Fe3+-Mg-rich clay mineral observations [1,2]. Moving to an orders of magnitude smaller instrumental field of view on the ground, the clay minerals were challenging to pinpoint on the basis of geochemical data because they appear to be the result of near-isochemical weathering of the local bedrock [3,4]. However, the APXS revealed a more complex mineral story as fracture fills and so-called red zones appear to contain more Al-rich clay minerals [5,6], which had not been observed from orbit. These observations are important to constrain clay mineral formation processes. More detail will be added as Opportunity is heading into her 10th extended mission, during which she will investigate Noachian bedrock that predates Endeavour crater, study sedimentary rocks inside Endeavour crater, and explore a fluid-carved gully. ESA's ExoMars rover will land on Noachian-age Oxia Planum where abundant Fe3+-Mg-rich clay minerals have been observed from orbit, but the story will undoubtedly become more complex once seen from the ground.

  17. Alteration of non-swelling clay minerals and magadiite by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of three kaolins, a sepiolite, an illite and one magadiite were treated with 1, 5 and 10 M H2SO4 at 80 °C for several hours. The alteration of the non-swelling clay mineral structures was controlled by the individual character of each mineral (chemical composition and initial

  18. Distribution of Hydrothermal Mineral Assemblages in the Sevenmile Hole Area, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A.; Larson, P.; John, D.; Cosca, M.; Pauley, B.; Manion, J.; Pritchard, C.; Andersen, A.

    2007-12-01

    alteration is predominantly an advanced argillic, acid sulfate assemblage. Distribution of clay minerals may indicate a vertical temperature gradient related to depth below the paleosurface. Kaolinite and opal tend to occur along and just below the canyon rim. Montmorillonite (smectite) is the dominant clay mineral at intermediate depths or in areas suspected to be near zones of higher heat flow. Illite is the most common clay in the deepest exposures, and also at intermediate depths along a strongly silicified ridge that locally contains vuggy quartz alteration and hydrothermal breccias. The ridge is believed to be a local center of higher temperature fluid upwelling. This hydrothermal environment was most likely produced by deeper seated vapors that rose and mixed with shallow surface meteoric waters. A single sample of alunite yielded an 40Ar/39Ar age of 150 ka for the Sevenmile Hole altered area. It is unknown if the hydrothermal system in this area has been continuously or intermittently active since caldera collapse. The distribution of clay and other hydrothermal minerals preserved in the Grand Canyon walls suggest patterns in temperature and zonation that can be applied to the interpretation of the temporal evolution of the active hot spring systems in Yellowstone National Park.

  19. Global distribution of clay-size minerals on land surface for biogeochemical and climatological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akihiko; Wagai, Rota

    2017-08-01

    Clay-size minerals play important roles in terrestrial biogeochemistry and atmospheric physics, but their data have been only partially compiled at global scale. We present a global dataset of clay-size minerals in the topsoil and subsoil at different spatial resolutions. The data of soil clay and its mineralogical composition were gathered through a literature survey and aggregated by soil orders of the Soil Taxonomy for each of the ten groups: gibbsite, kaolinite, illite/mica, smectite, vermiculite, chlorite, iron oxide, quartz, non-crystalline, and others. Using a global soil map, a global dataset of soil clay-size mineral distribution was developed at resolutions of 2' to 2° grid cells. The data uncertainty associated with data variability and assumption was evaluated using a Monte Carlo method, and validity of the clay-size mineral distribution obtained in this study was examined by comparing with other datasets. The global soil clay data offer spatially explicit studies on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, dust emission to the atmosphere, and other interdisciplinary earth sciences.

  20. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program

  1. Clay mineral formation under oxidized conditions and implications for paleoenvironments and organic preservation on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainey, Seth R.; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Adcock, Christopher T.; Tschauner, Oliver; Hurowitz, Joel A.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Xiao, Yuming; Bartlett, Courtney L. (CIW); (UNLV); (CIT); (SBU)

    2017-11-01

    Clay mineral-bearing locations have been targeted for martian exploration as potentially habitable environments and as possible repositories for the preservation of organic matter. Although organic matter has been detected at Gale Crater, Mars, its concentrations are lower than expected from meteoritic and indigenous igneous and hydrothermal reduced carbon. We conducted synthesis experiments motivated by the hypothesis that some clay mineral formation may have occurred under oxidized conditions conducive to the destruction of organics. Previous work has suggested that anoxic and/or reducing conditions are needed to synthesize the Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite at low temperatures. In contrast, our experiments demonstrated the rapid formation of Fe-rich clay minerals of variable crystallinity from aqueous Fe3+ with small amounts of aqueous Mg2+. Our results suggest that Fe-rich clay minerals such as nontronite can form rapidly under oxidized conditions, which could help explain low concentrations of organics within some smectite-containing rocks or sediments on Mars.

  2. Modeling of Cation Binding in Hydrated 2:1 Clay Minerals - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David E.

    2000-09-14

    Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals are high surface area, layered silicates that play a unique role in determining the fate of radionuclides in the environment. This project consisted of developing and implementing computer simulation methods for molecular characterization of the swelling and ion exchange properties of Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals, and the subsequent analysis and theoretical modeling with a view toward improving contaminant transport modeling as well as soil remediation and radionuclide containment strategies. Project results included the (a) development of simulation methods to treat clays under environmentally relevant conditions of variable water vapor pressure; (b) calculation of clay swelling thermodynamics as a function of interlayer ion size and charge (calculated quantities include immersion energies, free energies, and entropies of swelling); and (c) calculation of ion exchange free energies, including contributions from changing interlayer water contents and layer spacing.

  3. Characterization of Clay Minerals and Kerogen in Alberta Oil Sands Geological End Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Limin

    The high degree of variability of oil sands ores can be attributed to a mixture of different geological end members, i.e., estuarine sand, estuarine clay, marine sand and marine clay. This study focused on the mineralogy, especially of clay minerals, and toluene insoluble organic matter, referred to as kerogen, in different oil sands end members. Clays and kerogens will likely have a significant impact on solvent recovery from the gangue following non-aqueous bitumen extraction. The bitumen-free solids were subjected to mineralogical and geochemical analysis. Kerogens were isolated and analyzed by various characterization methods. The types of clays were identified in oriented samples by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nitrogen to carbon ratio in the isolated kerogens is found to be higher than in bitumen. There are more type III kerogens in estuarine samples and more type II kerogens in marine samples.

  4. Reconstruction of late Quaternary monsoon oscillations based on clay mineral proxies using sediment cores from the western margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.; Schneider, R.R.

    during re- working (Biscaye, 1965) and methods followed for sample preparation and clay mineral quanti¢- cation (Pierce and Siegel, 1969). As a consequence of these, either selective transportation/deposition of clay minerals or mixing of clay minerals.... 130, 203^229. Pierce, J.W., Siegel, F.R., 1969. Quanti¢cation in clay mineral studies of sediments and sedimentary rocks. J. Sediment. Petrol. 39, 187^193. Prell, W.L., 1984. Variation of monsoonal upwelling: A re- sponse to changing solar radiation...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of water, solution, and clay mineral-water systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Clays and clay minerals together with zeolites are major mineral components in the earth's surface environment. These minerals interact with the atmosphere, natural water, inorganic and organic components in soils, etc. Physicochemical processes in the surface region are generally complex and difficult to understand because of the complicated "molecular" structures and the ambient conditions under wet circumstances. We have investigated the structure and physical/dynamical properties of the mineral-gas/liquid systems by means of molecular simulation methods; molecular dynamics and Metropolis Monte Carlo methods. Swelling of smectite and adsorption of inorganic molecules in clay minerals and zeolites, etc. were simulated and analyzed on the basis of the atomic and molecular processes. We have developed atomic and molecular interaction models of inorganic systems. The models compose of electrostatic, short range repulsive, van der Waals and covalent (radial and angular) terms with respect to all the elements appeared in the mineral-water systems. All of our molecular dynamics simulations (MD) were performed with full degree of freedom of atom motions. Using the model for H2O molecule, the structure and physical properties such as density, diffusion coefficients, etc. of ice polymorphs and water are well reproduced. Alkaliharide aqueous solutions and gas hydrates and their (hydrophobic) solutions are also reasonably simulated. Clay mineral-water interactions are particularly important to understand the mechanical and chemical processes in the environments, in order to develop nano-composite materials, and to use clays in engineering applications. Absorption and swelling are the most remarkable properties of clay minerals, specially smectite. We have investigate these properties by means of molecular simulation methods using various clay minerals-water/solution systems. The swelling curves, the relation between humidity and the basal spacings, were reproduced

  6. Characterization of Heat-treated Clay Minerals in the Context of Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, E. N.; Wang, Y.; Kruichak, J. N.; Mills, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes, if any, that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of repository-relevant clay minerals (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, and montmorillonite), were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-1000 °C. These samples were characterized to determine surface area, mineralogical alteration, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Our results show that for conditions up to 500 °C, no significant change occurs, so long as the clay mineral remains mineralogically intact. At temperatures above 500 °C, transformation of the layered silicates into silica phases leads to alteration that impacts important clay characteristics. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's Nation Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: SAND2015-6524 A

  7. Palynology and clay mineralogy of the Deccan volcanic associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The clay mineral investigation of the Ninama sediments which are carbonate dominated shows dominance of low charge smectite (LCS) along with the presence of mica and vermiculite. Based on the clay mineral assemblage it is interpreted that arid climatic conditions prevailed during the sedimentation. The smectite ...

  8. Atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Rosso, Kevin M; Frierdich, Andrew J; Scherer, Michelle M

    2015-03-03

    Due to their stability toward reductive dissolution, Fe-bearing clay minerals are viewed as a renewable source of Fe redox activity in diverse environments. Recent findings of interfacial electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals and electron conduction in octahedral sheets of nontronite, however, raise the question whether Fe interaction with clay minerals is more dynamic than previously thought. Here, we use an enriched isotope tracer approach to simultaneously trace Fe atom movement from the aqueous phase to the solid ((57)Fe) and from the solid into the aqueous phase ((56)Fe). Over 6 months, we observed a significant decrease in aqueous (57)Fe isotope fraction, with a fast initial decrease which slowed after 3 days and stabilized after about 50 days. For the aqueous (56)Fe isotope fraction, we observed a similar but opposite trend, indicating that Fe atom movement had occurred in both directions: from the aqueous phase into the solid and from the solid into aqueous phase. We calculated that 5-20% of structural Fe in clay minerals NAu-1, NAu-2, and SWa-1 exchanged with aqueous Fe(II), which significantly exceeds the Fe atom layer exposed directly to solution. Calculations based on electron-hopping rates in nontronite suggest that the bulk conduction mechanism previously demonstrated for hematite1 and suggested as an explanation for the significant Fe atom exchange observed in goethite2 may be a plausible mechanism for Fe atom exchange in Fe-bearing clay minerals. Our finding of 5-20% Fe atom exchange in clay minerals indicates that we need to rethink how Fe mobility affects the macroscopic properties of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and its role in Fe biogeochemical cycling, as well as its use in a variety of engineered applications, such as landfill liners and nuclear repositories.

  9. Interaction of surface-modified silica nanoparticles with clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Omurlu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, the adsorption of 5-nm silica nanoparticles onto montmorillonite and illite is investigated. The effect of surface functionalization was evaluated for four different surfaces: unmodified, surface-modified with anionic (sulfonate, cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat, and nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG surfactant. We employed ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy to determine the concentration of adsorbed nanoparticles in conditions that are likely to be found in subsurface reservoir environments. PEG-coated and quat/PEG-coated silica nanoparticles were found to significantly adsorb onto the clay surfaces, and the effects of electrolyte type (NaCl, KCl and concentration, nanoparticle concentration, pH, temperature, and clay type on PEG-coated nanoparticle adsorption were studied. The type and concentration of electrolytes were found to influence the degree of adsorption, suggesting a relationship between the interlayer spacing of the clay and the adsorption ability of the nanoparticles. Under the experimental conditions reported in this paper, the isotherms for nanoparticle adsorption onto montmorillonite at 25 °C indicate that adsorption occurs less readily as the nanoparticle concentration increases.

  10. Influence of clay minerals on curcumin properties: Stability and singlet oxygen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Joyce L. S.; Valandro, Silvano R.; Poli, Alessandra L.; Schmitt, Carla C.

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has showed promising photophysical properties regarding to biological and chemical sciences. However, the main barrier for those applications are their low solubility and stability in aqueous solution. The effects of two different clay minerals, the montmorillonite (SWy-2) and the Laponite RD (Lap) nanoclay, on the stabilization of Curcumin were investigated. Their effects were compared with two well-established environments (acidic and neutral aqueous media). CUR/clay hybrids were prepared using a simple and fast method, where CUR solution was added into clay suspensions, to obtain well dispersed hybrids in water. The degradation process of CUR and CUR/clays hybrids was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopic. For both studied hybrids, the CUR degradation process was suppressed by the presence of the clay particles. Furthermore, the Lap showed a great stabilization effect than SWy-2. This behavior was due to the smaller particle size and higher exfoliation ability of Lap, providing a large surface for CUR adsorption compared to SWy-2. The degradation process of CUR solutions and CUR/clay hybrids was also studied in the presence of light. CUR photodegradation process was faster not only in the aqueous solution but also in the clay suspension compared to those studied in the dark. The presence of clay particles accelerated the photodegradation of CUR due to the products formation in the reactions between CUR and oxygen radicals. Our results showed that the singlet oxygen quantum yield (ΦΔ) of CUR were about 59% higher in the clay suspensions than CUR in aqueous solution. Therefore, the formation of CUR/clay hybrids, in particularly with Lap, suppressed the degradation in absence light of CUR and increased the singlet oxygen generation, which makes this hybrids of CUR/clay a promising material to enlarge the application of CUR in the biological sciences.

  11. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  12. Reduced Iron-Containing Clay Minerals as Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Dong, Hailiang; Zeng, Qiang; Xia, Qingyin; Zhang, Limin; Zhou, Ziqi

    2017-07-05

    Previous work documented the general antibacterial mechanism of iron containing clays that involved hydroxyl radical (•OH) production from soluble Fe2+, and attack of cell membrane and intracellular proteins. Here we explore the role of clay structural Fe(II) in •OH production at near neutral pH and identify a lipid involved in the antibacterial process. Structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2 was reduced (rNAu-2) and E. coli, a model bacterium, was exposed to rNAu-2 in oxic suspension. The antibacterial activity of rNAu-2 was dependent on pH and Fe(II) concentration, where E. coli were completely killed at pH 6, but survived at pH 7 and 8. In the presence of a •OH scavenger or in anaerobic atmosphere, E. coli survived better, suggesting that cell death may be caused by •OH generated from oxidation of structural Fe(II) in rNAu-2. In-situ imaging revealed damage of a membrane lipid, cardiolipin, in the polar region of E. coli cells, where reactive oxygen species and redox-active labile Fe were enriched. Our results advance the previous antibacterial model by demonstrating that the structural Fe(II) is the primary source of •OH, which damages cardiolipin, triggers the influx of soluble Fe2+ into the cell, and ultimately leads to cell death.

  13. Surveying Clay Mineral Diversity in the Murray Formation, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T.F.; Blake, D. F..; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W..; Morrison, S. M.; Yen, A. S.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The CheMin XRD instrument aboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has documented clay minerals in various drill samples during its traverse of Gale Crater's floor and ascent of Mt. Sharp. The most recent samples, named Marimba, Quela and Sebina were acquired from the Murray Formation in the Murray Buttes region of lower Mt. Sharp. Marimba and Quela come from a approx. 30 m package of finely laminated lacustrine mudstones. Sebina comes from an overlying package of heterolithic mudstone-sandstones. Clay minerals make up approx.15-25 wt.% of the bulk rock with similar contributions to XRD patterns in all three samples. Broad basal reflections at approx. 10deg 2(theta) CoK(alpha) indicate the presence of 2:1 group clay minerals. The 02(lambda) clay mineral band lies at approx. 22.9deg 2(theta), a region typically occupied by Fe-bearing dioctahedral 2:1 clay minerals like nontronite or Fe-illite. The low humidity within the CheMin instrument, which is open to the martian atmosphere, promotes loss of interlayer H2O and collapse of smectite interlayers making them difficult to distinguish from illites. However, based on the low K content of the bulk samples, it appears that smectitic clay minerals are dominant. Peak dehydroxylation of the Marimba sample measured by the SAM instrument on MSL occurred at 610C and 780C. Fe-bearing smectites are not consistent with these dehydroxylation temperatures. Thus, we suggest that a mixture of dioctahedral and trioctahedral smectite phases are present giving the appearance of intermediate octahedral occupancy in XRD. Dioctahedral smectites have not previously been reported in Gale Crater by MSL. Earlier in the mission, relatively clay mineral rich samples (approx. 20 wt.%) from lacustrine mudstones in Yellowknife Bay (YKB) were found to contain ferrian saponites. It is proposed that YKB saponites formed via isochemical aqueous alteration of detrital olivine close to the time of sediment deposition, under anoxic to poorly oxidizing

  14. Experimental Constraints on Microbial Liberation of Structural Iron from Common Clay Minerals in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, K. S.; Gaines, R. R.; Trang, J.; Scott, S. W.; Crane, E. J.; Lackey, J.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Berelson, W.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in many marine settings. The marine Fe-cycle is complex because Fe may be used as an electron donor or acceptor and cycled many times before ultimate burial in sediments. Thus, the availability of iron plays a large role in the marine carbon cycle, influencing not only the extent of primary productivity but also the oxidation of organic matter in sediments. The primary constituents of marine sediments are clay minerals, which commonly contain lattice-bound Fe in octahedral sites. In marine settings, the pool of Fe bound within silicate mineral lattices has long been considered reactive only over long timescales, and thus non-bioavailable. In vitro experimental evidence has shown that lab cultures of Fe-reducing bacteria are able to utilize structurally-bound Fe (III) from the crystal lattice of nontronite, an uncommon but particularly Fe-rich (> 12 wt.%) smectite. Importantly, this process is capable of liberating Fe (II) to solution, where it is available to biotic processes as an electron donor. In order to constrain the capacity of naturally-occurring marine bacteria to liberate structurally-coordinated Fe from the lattices of common clay minerals, we exposed a suite of 16 different clay minerals (0.8-13.9 wt.% Fe) to lab cultures of known Fe-reducer S. onenidensis MR-1 and to a natural consortium of Fe-reducing microbes from the San Pedro and Santa Monica Basins over timescales ranging from 7-120 days. Clay minerals were treated with Na-dithionite to extract surface-bound Fe prior to exposure. Crystallographic data and direct measurements of Fe in solution demonstrate the release of structural Fe from all clay minerals analyzed. Neoformation of illite and amorphous quartz were observed. The array of clay minerals and microbes used in this experiment complement past findings and suggest that common clay minerals may represent a large and previously unrecognized pool of bioavailable Fe in the world ocean that contributes significantly

  15. Chemistry and mineralogy of clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dusts and the implications for iron availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Mineral dust supplied to remote ocean regions stimulates phytoplankton growth through delivery of micronutrients, notably iron (Fe). Although attention is usually paid to Fe (hydr)oxides as major sources of available Fe, Fe-bearing clay minerals are typically the dominant phase in mineral dust. The mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in dust particles, however, are largely unknown. We conducted microscopic identification and chemical analysis of the clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dust particles. Cross-sectional slices of dust particles were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) techniques and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). TEM images of FIB slices revealed that clay minerals occurred as either nano-thin platelets or relatively thick plates. The nano-thin platelets included illite, smectite, illite-smectite mixed layers and their nanoscale mixtures (illite-smectite series clay minerals, ISCMs) which could not be resolved with an electron microbeam. EDXS chemical analysis of the clay mineral grains revealed that the average Fe content was 5.8% in nano-thin ISCM platelets assuming 14% H2O, while the Fe content of illite and chlorite was 2.8 and 14.8%, respectively. In addition, TEM and EDXS analyses were performed on clay mineral grains dispersed and loaded on microgrids. The average Fe content of clay mineral grains was 6.7 and 5.4% in Asian and Saharan dusts, respectively. A comparative X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk dusts showed that Saharan dust was more enriched in clay minerals than in Asian dust, while Asian dust was more enriched in chlorite. The average Fe / Si, Al / Si and Fe / Al molar ratios of the clay minerals, compared to previously reported chemistries of mineral dusts and leached solutions, indicated that dissolved Fe originated from clay minerals. Clay minerals, in particular nanocrystalline ISCMs and Fe-rich chlorite are important sources of available Fe in

  16. Investigating the behaviour of Mg isotopes during the formation of clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimpenny, Joshua; Colla, Christopher A.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2014-03-01

    We present elemental and isotopic data detailing how the Mg isotope system behaves in natural and experimentally synthesized clay minerals. We show that the bulk Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) of a set of natural illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite spans a 2‰ range, and that their isotopic composition depends strongly on a balance between the relative proportions of structural and exchangeable Mg. After acid leaching, these natural clays become relatively enriched in isotopically heavy Mg by between 0.2‰ and 1.6‰. Results of exchange experiments indicate that the Mg that has adsorbed to interlayer spaces and surface charged sites is relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg compared to the residual clay. The isotopic composition of this exchangeable Mg (-1.49‰ to -2.03‰) is characteristic of the isotopic composition of Mg found in many natural waters. Further experiments with an isotopically characterized MgCl2 solution shows that the clay minerals adsorb this exchangeable Mg with little or no isotopic fractionation, although we cannot discount the possibility that the uptake of exchangeable Mg does so with a slight preference for 24Mg. To characterize the behaviour of Mg isotopes during clay mineral formation we synthesized brucite (Mg(OH)2), which we consider to be a good analogue for the incorporation of Mg into the octahedral sheet of Mg-rich clay minerals or into the brucitic layer of clays such as chlorite. In our experiment the brucite mineral becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of Mg while the corresponding solution is always relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg. The system reaches a steady state after 10 days with a final fractionation factor (αsolid-solution) of 1.0005 at near-neutral pH. This result is consistent with the general consensus that secondary clay minerals preferentially take up isotopically heavy Mg during their formation. However our results also show that exchangeable Mg is an important component within bulk

  17. Measuring the specific caesium sorption capacity of soils, sediments and clay minerals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de A.; Konoplev, A.V.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2007-01-01

    Two methods to quantify the specific Cs sorption capacity of soils and sediments, which is generally believed to be associated with the Frayed Edge Sites (FES) of illitic clay minerals, are described in detail and are critically reviewed. The first method is a direct measurement of the FES capacity,

  18. Distribution and dispersal of clay minerals on the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.; Rao, V.P.

    -rock influence on clay-mineral composition appears to be more important than physical transport - the southwest monsoon drift in the present case. In the northwestern part of the study area, the high-velocity tidal streams of the macrotidal Gulf of Kutch act...

  19. Spectral characteristics of clay minerals in the 2.5 - 14 µm wavelength region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yitagesu, F.A.; Meer, F.D. van der; Werff, H.M.A. van der; Hecker, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Identification and quantification of clay minerals, particularly those that are responsible for susceptibility of soils to expansion and shrinkage, is a constant focus of research in geotechnical engineering. The visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelength regions are well explored.

  20. Selenium containing clays minerals as additive for the discoloration of glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, K.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    While selenium is applied as decolorizing agent for flint container glass or tableware glass, the retention of selenium in glass however is very low. Generally more than 75% of the total selenium input sublimes from the glass melt and leaves the clay minerals due to the high volatility of

  1. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  2. Modeling selenite adsorption envelopes on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenite adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum and iron oxides, clay minerals: kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite, and 45 surface and subsurface soil samples from the Southwestern and Midwestern regions of the USA as a function of solution pH. Selenite adsorption decreased ...

  3. Is the geological concept of clay minerals appropriate for soil science? A literature-based and philosophical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchman, G. Jock

    Data in the literature for soils that are dominated by each of the main types of clay minerals were examined and compared with those for reference clay minerals of the same types to determine the extent to which the nature and properties of clay-size minerals in soils could be explained by those of clay minerals with the same name from non-soil, ‘geological’ environments. Published information on soils from Australia, New Zealand and Iran was sourced for this study. The clay fractions of each of the soils are dominated by either one of the common phyllosilicates: kaolinite, halloysite, illite/mica, vermiculite, smectite, and palygorskite, or by the nanocrystalline mineral, allophane. Data for samples of kaolinite that had been extracted from soils from several countries (Australia, Thailand, Indonesia and Brazil) and purified before characterization have also been examined. In soils, each dominant clay mineral is generally associated with other materials, including iron oxides, other phyllosilicates and/or nanocrystalline minerals and organic matter. As the most studied example of an extracted phyllosilicate, kaolinite shows a wide range of properties in different soils, but a narrower range of properties within a particular locality. However, almost all of the soil kaolinites studied have larger specific surface areas and higher cation exchange capacities than reference kaolinites. The literature also reveals that, among phyllosilicates in soils, illites have a wide range of potassium contents, expandable minerals (vermiculites and smectites) may be interlayered by hydroxy-Al species particularly, and smectitic layers often occur interstratified with other layers, including those of illite, kaolinite and halloysite. The variability of soil phyllosilicates and their common association with other, often poorly crystallized but highly reactive minerals and compounds can be explained by their formation in the highly heterogeneous and dynamic soil environment

  4. A study of the trace sulfide mineral assemblages in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Hannah M.; Ferguson, Katherine M.; Lehrer, Malia L.; Boudreau, Alan E.

    2017-03-01

    The sulfide assemblages of the Stillwater Complex away from the well-studied ore zones are composed mainly of variable proportions of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and ±pyrite. Excluding vein assemblages and those affected by greenschist and lower temperature alteration, the majority can be classified into two broad assemblages, defined here as pristine (multiphase, often globular in shape) or volatile-bearing (multiphase, high-temperature, volatile-rich minerals such as biotite, hornblende, or an unmixed calcite-dolomite assemblage). The volatile-bearing assemblages are mainly found within and below the J-M reef, where native copper and sphalerite are also locally present. Pristine sulfides are found throughout the stratigraphy. Both groups can be affected by apparent S loss in the form of pyrite being converted to magnetite and chalcopyrite to a Cu-Fe-oxide (delafossite), with little to no silicate alteration. An upward trend from pentlandite-rich to pyrrhotite-rich to pyrite-rich assemblages is observed in the footwall rocks in upper GN-I, and the same trend repeats from just below the reef and continues into the overlying N-II and GN-II. Modeling suggests that the sulfide Ni in the Peridotite Zone is largely controlled by silicate Ni. When taken together, observations are most readily explained by the remobilization of selected elements by a high-temperature fluid with the apparent loss of S > Cu > Ni. This could concentrate ore metals by vapor refining, eventually producing a platinum group element-enriched sulfide ore zone, such as the J-M reef.

  5. Microwave processing of oil sands and contribution of clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, John; Binner, Eleanor; Saeid, Abdul; Al-Harahsheh, Mohammed; Kingman, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This study establishes the feasibility of microwave heating for extracting oil from Oil Sands in ex-situ processes. Previous studies in this area have shown some potential, but have not characterised the dielectric properties of the Oil Sands used, nor related them to the mineral composition, both of which are vital if successful scale up is to be achieved. In this work the fundamental interactions of microwave energy with Oil Sands are investigated and understood for the first time, and the ...

  6. Clay Mineralogy of Coal-Hosted Nb-Zr-REE-Ga Mineralized Beds from Late Permian Strata, Eastern Yunnan, SW China: Implications for Paleotemperature and Origin of the Micro-Quartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The clay mineralogy of pyroclastic Nb(Ta-Zr(Hf-REE-Ga mineralization in Late Permian coal-bearing strata from eastern Yunnan Province; southwest China was investigated in this study. Samples from XW and LK drill holes in this area were analyzed using XRD (X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electronic microscope. Results show that clay minerals in the Nb-Zr-REE-Ga mineralized samples are composed of mixed layer illite/smectite (I/S; kaolinite and berthierine. I/S is the major component among the clay assemblages. The source volcanic ashes controlled the modes of occurrence of the clay minerals. Volcanic ash-originated kaolinite and berthierine occur as vermicular and angular particles, respectively. I/S is confined to the matrix and is derived from illitization of smectite which was derived from the original volcanic ashes. Other types of clay minerals including I/S and berthierine precipitated from hydrothermal solutions were found within plant cells; and coexisting with angular berthierine and vermicular kaolinite. Inferred from the fact that most of the I/S is R1 ordered with one case of the R3 I/S; the paleo-diagenetic temperature could be up to 180 °C but mostly 100–160 °C. The micro-crystalline quartz grains (<10 µm closely associated with I/S were observed under SEM and were most likely the product of desiliconization during illitization of smectite.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations in the grand canonical ensemble: Application to clay mineral swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroll, Robert M.; Smith, David E.

    1999-11-01

    A grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics (GMD) simulation method has been adapted to examine the thermodynamics of clay-mineral hydration. In the GMD method, the number of water molecules in the system is treated as a continuous variable for which an equation of motion is established. Fluctuations in the water content at constant chemical potential are investigated using trajectories of this particle number variable. A bias potential may be used to modify the free energy contour along the particle number coordinate. This catalyzes particle fluctuations and greatly improves simulation convergence. Adaptation of the GMD method to treat hydrated clay minerals included the introduction of a local-control technique that fixes the water chemical potential in the clay interlayer region. In addition, a bias-potential feedback algorithm was implemented to improve particle fluctuation efficiency. Information pertaining to the free energy contour, generated during the course of the simulation, was used periodically to enhance the bias potential. This allowed for the utilization of a single input bias potential under a broad range of simulation conditions. The method was used to investigate swelling of a cesium-montmorillonite clay. Measured disjoining pressures showed oscillations that are indicative of crystalline-swelling phase transitions. Integration of the disjoining pressures yielded a swelling free energy profile with distinct free-energy minima for the one- and two-layer hydrates. The results may be compared qualitatively with both clay swelling and surface force apparatus experiments, and with previous simulation studies of simple fluids in slit pores.

  8. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10-11 ~ 10-9 molL-1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  9. Bioreduction of Fe-bearing clay minerals and their reactivity toward pertechnetate (Tc-99)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Liu, Chongxuan; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2011-09-01

    99Technetium ( 99Tc) is a fission product of uranium-235 and plutonium-239 and poses a high environmental hazard due to its long half-life ( t1/2 = 2.13 × 10 5 y), abundance in nuclear wastes, and environmental mobility under oxidizing conditions [i.e., Tc(VII)]. Under reducing conditions, Tc(VII) can be reduced to insoluble Tc(IV). Ferrous iron, either in aqueous form (Fe 2+) or in mineral form [Fe(II)], has been used to reduce Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). However, the reactivity of Fe(II) from clay minerals, other than nontronite, toward immobilization of Tc(VII) and its role in retention of reduced Tc(IV) has not been investigated. In this study the reactivity of a suite of clay minerals toward Tc(VII) reduction and immobilization was evaluated. The clay minerals chosen for this study included five members in the smectite-illite (S-I) series, (montmorillonite, nontronite, rectorite, mixed layered I-S, and illite), chlorite, and palygorskite. Surface Fe-oxides were removed from these minerals with a modified dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) procedure. The total structural Fe content of these clay minerals, after surface Fe-oxide removal, ranged from 0.7% to 30.4% by weight, and the structural Fe(III)/Fe(total) ratio ranged from 45% to 98%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed that after Fe oxide removal the clay minerals were free of Fe-oxides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that little dissolution occurred during the DCB treatment. Bioreduction experiments were performed in bicarbonate buffer (pH-7) with structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor, lactate as the sole electron donor, and Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 cells as a mediator. In select tubes, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) was added as electron shuttle to facilitate electron transfer. In the S-I series, smectite (montmorillonite) was the most reducible (18% and 41% without and with AQDS, respectively) and illite the least (1% for both

  10. Adsorption of Dissolved Gases (CH4, CO2, H2, Noble Gases) by Water-Saturated Smectite Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, I. C.; Gadikota, G.; Dazas, B.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of dissolved gases by water-saturated clay minerals plays important roles in a range of fields. For example, gas adsorption in on clay minerals may significantly impact the formation of CH4 hydrates in fine-grained sediments, the behavior of CH4 in shale, CO2 leakage across caprocks of geologic CO2 sequestration sites, H2 leakage across engineered clay barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories, and noble gas geochemistry reconstructions of hydrocarbon migration in the subsurface. Despite its importance, the adsorption of gases on clay minerals remains poorly understood. For example, some studies have suggested that clay surfaces promote the formation of CH4 hydrates, whereas others indicate that clay surfaces inhibit the formation of CH4 hydrates. Here, we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the adsorption of a range of gases (CH4, CO2, H2, noble gases) on clay mineral surfaces. Our results indicate that the affinity of dissolved gases for clay mineral surfaces has a non-monotone dependence on the hydrated radius of the gas molecules. This non-monotone dependence arises from a combination of two effects: the polar nature of certain gas molecules (in particular, CO2) and the templating of interfacial water structure by the clay basal surface, which results in the presence of interfacial water "cages" of optimal size for intermediate-size gas molecules (such as Ne or Ar).

  11. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence N. Warr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98% of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  12. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  13. Adsorption of herbicide paraquat by clay mineral regenerated from spent bleaching earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Lai, Chi-Wei

    2006-06-30

    The adsorption of herbicide paraquat (as model adsorbate) in aqueous solution onto regenerated clay mineral from bleaching earth waste has been studied in a batch reaction system. The adsorption rate has been investigated under the controlled process parameters including initial pH, salinity and temperature. Based on the high affinity between cationic paraquat and clay mineral, a pseudo-second order model has been developed using experimental data to predict the rate constant of adsorption, and equilibrium adsorption capacity. The results showed that the adsorption process could be satisfactorily described with the reaction model and were reasonably explained by assuming a competitive adsorption mechanism in the ion exchange process. Further, the fitted adsorption capacity at equilibrium decreased with increasing temperature. It implied that the strong interaction might play an important role in the paraquat-clay system. Overall, the results from this study demonstrated that the clay resource regenerated from bleaching earth waste could be used as a low-cost mineral adsorbent for the removal of environmental cationic organic pollutants from the aqueous solution.

  14. Microbial reduction of Fe(III)-bearing clay minerals in the presence of humic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Qiu, Shuang; Liu, Baiqing; Pu, Yiying; Gao, Zhanming; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-03-01

    Both Fe(III)-bearing clay minerals and humic acids (HAs) are abundant in the soils and sediments. Previous studies have shown that bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals could be accelerated by adding anthraquinone compound as a redox-active surrogate of HAs. However, a quinoid analogue could not reflect the adsorption and complexation properties of HA, and little is known about the effects of real HAs at environmental concentration on bioreduction of clay minerals. Here, it was shown that 10-200 mg l-1 of natural or artificially synthesized HAs could effectively stimulate the bioreduction rate and extent of Fe(III) in both iron-rich nontronite NAu-2 and iron-deficient montmorillonite SWy-2. After adsorption to NAu-2, electron-transfer activities of different HA fractions were compared. Additionally, Fe(II) complexation by HAs also contributed to improvement of clay-Fe(III) bioreduction. Spectrosopic and morphological analyses suggested that HA addition accelerated the transformation of NAu-2 to illite, silica and siderite after reductive dissolution.

  15. Leaching of clay minerals in a limestone environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1959-01-01

    Water saturated with CO2 at about 25??C was percolated through mixed beds of limestone or marble fragments and montmorillonite, "illite" and kaolinite in polyethylene tubes for six and fortyfive complete runs. The leachates were analysed for SiO2, A12O3 and Fe2O3, but only SiO2 was found. The minerals lost SiO2 in this order: montmorillonite > kaolinite > "illite". The differential removal of SiO2 during the short period of these experiments suggests a mechanism for the accumulation of bauxite deposits associated with limestones. ?? 1959.

  16. Clay minerals related to the circulation of geothermal fluids in boreholes at Rittershoffen (Alsace, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jeanne; Patrier, Patricia; Genter, Albert; Beaufort, Daniel; Dezayes, Chrystel; Glaas, Carole; Lerouge, Catherine; Sanjuan, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Two geothermal wells, GRT-1 and GRT-2, were drilled into the granite at Rittershoffen (Alsace, France) in the Upper Rhine Graben to exploit geothermal resources at the sediment-basement interface. Brine circulation occurs in a permeable fracture network and leads to hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The goal of the study was to characterize the petrography and mineralogy of the altered rocks with respect to the permeable fracture zones in the granitic basement. As clay minerals are highly reactive to hydrothermal alteration, they can be used as indicators of present-day and paleo-circulation systems. Special attention has been paid to the textural, structural and chemical properties of these minerals. The fine-grained clay fraction (< 5 μm) was analyzed around the originally permeable fracture zones to observe the crystal structure of clay minerals using X-ray diffraction. Chemical microanalysis of the clay minerals was performed using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The occurrences of mixed layers illite-smectite ( 10% smectite) provide a promising guide for identifying the fracture zones that control the present-day circulation of geothermal fluids in the Rittershoffen wells. However, multistage paleo-circulation systems could lead to an abundance of heterogeneous and fine-grained illitic minerals that could plug the fracture system. The permeability of fracture zones in the GRT-1 well was likely reduced because of an intense illitization, and the well was stimulated. The occurrence of chlorite in the permeable fracture zones of GRT-2 is indicative of less intense illitization, and the natural permeability is much higher in GRT-2 than in GRT-1.

  17. Evaluation of mineral kaolinite present in portuguese clays for use in porcelain stoneware; Avaliacao do mineral caulinita presente em argilas portuguesas para uso em gres porcelanato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna da Silveira, G.C. [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (IFRN), RN (Brazil); Acchar, W.; Gomes, U.U.; Luna da Silveira, R.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grnde do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil); Labrincha, A.; Miranda, C.M.P., E-mail: glebacoelli@hotmail.com [Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-07-01

    Kaolinite is a mineral from the kaolin, product resulting from transformation in depth of alumino silicate mineral type, such as feldspars, plagioclase and feldspars contained in the rocks. Clays are raw materials that have as main characteristic the plasticity property, which gives the product, after applying a certain pressure, a defined shape and an increase in the mechanical resistance when they become from green to dry and then to sintered. Given these characteristics, this paper analyzes the presence of the existing mineral kaolinite in two portuguese clays who are used in the preparation of formulations of porcelain stoneware tiles. The analyzes of the two clays were made by fluorescence x-ray diffraction of x-rays, thermal analysis, particle size and scanning electron microscopy, to better use of this mineral in the formulations. In both clays were found aluminum oxide, as well as mineral quartz, kaolinite and illite. (author)

  18. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  19. Chemistry and mineralogy of clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dusts and the implications for iron supply to the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-11-01

    Mineral dust supplied to remote ocean regions stimulates phytoplankton growth through delivery of micronutrients, notably iron (Fe). Although attention is usually paid to Fe (hydr)oxides as major sources of available Fe, Fe-bearing clay minerals are typically the dominant phase in mineral dust. The mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in dust particles, however, are largely unknown. We conducted microscopic identification and chemical analysis of the clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dust particles. Cross-sectional slices of dust particles were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) techniques and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). TEM images of FIB slices revealed that clay minerals occurred as either nano-thin platelets or relatively thick plates. Chemical compositions and lattice fringes of the nano-thin platelets suggested that they included illite, smectite, illite-smectite mixed layers, and their nanoscale mixtures (illite-smectite series clay minerals, ISCMs) which could not be resolved with an electron microbeam. EDXS chemical analysis of the clay mineral grains revealed that the average Fe content was 5.8% in nano-thin ISCM platelets assuming 14% H2O, while the Fe content of illite and chlorite was 2.8 and 14.8%, respectively. In addition, TEM and EDXS analyses were performed on clay mineral grains dispersed and loaded on micro-grids. The average Fe content of clay mineral grains was 6.7 and 5.4% in Asian and Saharan dusts, respectively. A comparative X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk dusts showed that Saharan dust was more enriched in clay minerals than Asian dust, while Asian dust was more enriched in chlorite. Clay minerals, in particular nanocrystalline ISCMs and Fe-rich chlorite, are probably important sources of Fe to remote marine ecosystems. Further detailed analyses of the mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in global mineral dusts are required to evaluate the

  20. Identifying provenance-specific features of detrital heavy mineral assemblages in sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Andrew C.; Hallsworth, Claire

    1994-05-01

    The composition of heavy mineral assemblages in sandstones may be heavily influenced by processes operating during transport, deposition and diagenesis. As a consequence, conventional heavy mineral data may not be a reliable guide to the nature of sediment source material. Certain features of heavy mineral suites, however, are inherited directly from the source area without significant modification, such as the varietal characteristics of individual mineral species. This paper describes an alternative approach to varietal studies that concentrates on relative abundances of minerals that are stable during diagenesis and have similar hydraulic behaviour. Ratios of apatite to tourmaline, TiO 2 minerals to zircon, monazite to zircon, and chrome spinel to zircon provide a good reflection of the source rock characteristics, because they are comparatively immune to alteration during the sedimentary cycle. These ratios are described as index values (ATi, RZi, MZi and CZi, respectively). This approach avoids some of the practical problems associated with varietal studies, such as the need to make subjective decisions about mineral properties or to use advanced analytical techniques that may not be accessible to the analyst. It also makes use of more components of the heavy mineral suite and thus provides a more balanced view of provenance characteristics. The use of these ratios is illustrated with examples from Upper Jurassic sandstones in the Outer Moray Firth area of the UK continental shelf and Triassic sandstones from onshore and offshore UK. Heavy mineral indices, notably ATi and MZi, show marked variations in Upper Jurassic Piper sandstones of the Outer Moray Firth. Main Piper sandstones have lower ATi and MZi values compared with Supra Piper sandstones, indicating significant stratigraphic evolution of provenance. The UK Triassic shows major regional variations in a number of index values, including ATi, MZi and CZi, demonstrating that sediment was supplied from

  1. Crystal structure control of aluminized clay minerals on the mobility of caesium in contaminated soil environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzene, Liva; Ferrage, Eric; Viennet, Jean-Christophe; Tertre, Emmanuel; Hubert, Fabien

    2017-02-01

    Radioactive caesium pollution resulting from Fukushima Dai-ichi and Chernobyl nuclear plant accidents involves strong interactions between Cs+ and clays, especially vermiculite-type minerals. In acidic soil environments, such as in Fukushima area, vermiculite is subjected to weathering processes, resulting in aluminization. The crystal structure of aluminized clays and its implications for Cs+ mobility in soils remain poorly understood due to the mixture of these minerals with other clays and organic matter. We performed acidic weathering of a vermiculite to mimic the aluminization process in soils. Combination of structure analysis and Cs+ extractability measurements show that the increase of aluminization is accompanied by an increase in Cs+ mobility. Crystal structure model for aluminized vermiculite is based on the interstratification of unaltered vermiculite layers and aluminized layers within the same particle. Cs+ in vermiculite layers is poorly mobile, while the extractability of Cs+ is greatly enhanced in aluminized layers. The overall reactivity of the weathered clay (cation exchange capacity, Cs+ mobility) is then governed by the relative abundance of the two types of layers. The proposed layer model for aluminized vermiculite with two coexisting populations of caesium is of prime importance for predicting the fate of caesium in contaminated soil environments.

  2. An update on synthetic dyes adsorption onto clay based minerals: A state-of-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngulube, Tholiso; Gumbo, Jabulani Ray; Masindi, Vhahangwele; Maity, Arjun

    2017-04-15

    Dyes are growing to be a problematic class of pollutants to the environment. The disposal of dyes in water resources has bad aesthetic and health effects, hence the need to remove them from the environment. The need for treatment methods that are effective and low in price is rising hence a lot of research interest is being diverted towards adsorbents that are cheap, preferable naturally occurring materials like clays. In most reported dye adsorption studies, limited information on the relationship between characterization results with adsorbent performance on dye removal has been given. This review article seeks to report on the link between the adsorption characteristics of the clays and their adsorption capacities and to gather information on the modifications done on clays to improve their adsorption capacities. A critical analysis of the different mechanisms involved during the decolouration process and their application for dye removal has been discussed in detail in this up-to-date review. From a wide range of consulted literature review, it is evident that some clays have appreciable adsorption capacities on top of being widely available. It was also noted that several parameters like contact time, dosage, concentration, temperature and pH affect the removal of dyes. Furthermore, the application of clay minerals for decolourising water represents economic viable and locally available materials that can be used substantially for pollution control and management. Conclusions were also drawn and suggestions for future research perspectives are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. METODOLOGY FOR LATERÍTICS CU-BEARING CLAY MINERALS CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Satiko Mano

    2015-12-01

    This study describes an optimized methodology to characterize a Cu-lateritic ore, mainly composed of Cu-bearing clay minerals. Cations saturations and particle sizes separation, combined with X-ray diffraction, mid infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy allow concluding that this Cu-lateritic ore is mainly composed of smectites, micas and kaolinite; furthermore, the copper is especially associated to mica and secondarily to smectite.

  4. DE-FG02-06ER15364: Final Technical Report Nanoscale Reactivity of Clays, Clay Analogues (Micas), and Clay Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Kathryn L.

    2008-07-03

    The project objectives were to determine the nanoscale to molecular scale structure of the interface between muscovite mica and aqueous solutions containing various sorbates and to explore systematics that control the incorporation of inorganic and organic chemical components during aging of nanoparticles of iron-oxides and aluminosilicate clays. The basal surface of phyllosilicates is a primary sorbent of environmental contaminants, natural organic matter, and nutrients. Micas are also superb atomically-flat substrates used in materials science and surface physics applications. We applied X-ray scattering techniques using high brilliance synchrotron radiation to investigate molecular-scale details of mica’s interface structure in solutions containing common and toxic cations, anions, and natural organic molecules. Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in the environment and have a high capacity for sorbing contaminants through the combined effects of their high surface areas and pH-dependent surface charge. Aging of nanoparticles from metastable to stable phases can be inhibited by sorption of nonstructural components, but exact mechanisms are unknown. We synthesized Fe-oxides and aluminosilicate clay minerals from aqueous solutions in the presence of selected anions, and organic molecules, and quantified the uptake of these additives during aging and some implications for nanoparticle formation.

  5. Mineral matter and clay-organic complexes in oil sands extraction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikula, R.J.; Axelson, D.E.; Sheeran, D. (CANMET, Devon, AB (Canada). Fuel Processing Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Differences in oil sands processibility and extraction yields can be dependent upon many factors including the composition of the mineral components and the organic complexes that are associated with certain minerals. These mineral-organic associations help provide the bridge which leads to carry over of bitumen with the tailings as well as carry over of water and mineral matter with the bitumen product. The nature of the organic component of clay-organic complexes extracted from various streams in an oil sands recovery process is discussed in relation to the stability of both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions formed. The samples were obtained from Suncor's oil sands extraction plant located in Fort McMurry, Alberta. Samples were obtained from throughout the extraction process from the primary froth through to the final diluted bitumen product. These samples have been studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as with other techniques such as interfacial tension measurements. The data indicate that high water content products originate, to a great extent, from the presence of a very hydrophilic organic matrix attached to the surface of the clay and heavy metal minerals. 15 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Effects of complexation between organic matter (OM) and clay mineral on OM pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Hongling; Yuan, Peng; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jinzhong; He, Hongping; Zhou, Junming; Song, Hongzhe; Li, Zhaohui

    2017-09-01

    The stability and persistence of organic matter (OM) in source rocks are of great significance for hydrocarbon generation and the global carbon cycle. Clay-OM associations commonly occur in sedimentation and diagenesis processes and can influence the pyrolytic behaviors of OM. In this study, clay-OM complexes, i.e., interlayer clay-OM complexes and clay-OM mixture, were prepared and exposed to high-pressure pyrolysis conditions in confined gold capsule reactors to assess variations in OM pyrolysis products in the presence of clay minerals. Three model organic compounds, octadecanoic acid (OA), octadecy trimethyl ammonium bromide (OTAB), and octadecylamine (ODA), were employed and montmorillonite (Mt) was selected as the representative clay mineral. The solid acidity of Mt plays a key role in affecting the amount and composition of the pyrolysis gases generated by the clay-OM complexes. The Brønsted acid sites significantly promote the cracking of hydrocarbons through a carbocation mechanism and the isomerization of normal hydrocarbons. The Lewis acid sites are primarily involved in the decarboxylation reaction during pyrolysis and are responsible for CO2 generation. Mt exhibits either a catalysis effect or pyrolysis-inhibiting during pyrolysis of a given OM depending on the nature of the model organic compound and the nature of the clay-OM complexation. The amounts of C1-5 hydrocarbons and CO2 that are released from the Mt-OA and Mt-ODA complexes were higher than those of the parent OA and ODA, respectively, indicating a catalysis effect of Mt. In contrast, the amount of C1-5 hydrocarbons produced from the pyrolysis of Mt-OTAB complexes was lower than that of OTAB, which we attribute to an inhibiting effect of Mt. This pyrolysis-inhibiting effect works through the Hoffmann elimination that is promoted by the catalysis of the Brønsted acid sites of Mt, therefore releasing smaller amounts of gas hydrocarbons than the nucleophilic reaction that is induced by the

  7. Clay minerals as palaeomonsoon proxies: Evaluation and relevance to the late Quaternary records from SE Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.

    Palaeoclimatic studies are largely dependent on the quality of records and a prudent use of environmental proxy indicators. In this study, the factors affecting the detrital clay minerals in marine environment and their utility and reliability...

  8. Gold-silver-tellurium mineral assemblages in different ore styles of the Southern Urals VHMS deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, V. V.; Zaykov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Tesalina, S. G.; Herrington, R. J.; Buschmann, B.; Becker, K.; Petersen, S.; Orgeval, J. J.; Leistel, M.

    2003-04-01

    VMS deposits of the South Urals generally show a continuum in degradation and reworking ranging from pristine steep-sided hydrothermal sulphide mounds to deposits dominated by layered strata of clastic sulphides. Four different deposits with varying degrees of degradation in order of increased reworking: (Yaman-Kasy longrightarrow Molodezhnoe longrightarrow Alexandrinskoe longrightarrow Balta-Tau) have been ranged. The influence of sulphide mound destruction and of sea-floor alteration on mineral assemblages was investigated In the pristine Yaman-Kasy sulphide mound gold and silver occur as altaite+tellurium+hessite-stuetzite+sylvanite and later galena+native gold+pyrite assemblages in chalcopyrite+isocubanite-rich linings of former chimney conduits. Chalcopyrite-dominated conduit fragments in clastic ore facies contain native tellurium+gold intergrowths. In the weakly reworked Molodezhnoe deposit gold-silver assemblages only occur in sea-floor altered clastic sulphides on the slope of massive sulphide mounds in bornite- and tennantite-rich ores in association with Cu-Ag sulfides such as jalpaite, mckinstryite, and stromeyerite and rare Au-Ag-tellurides (petzite). The Alexandrinskoe deposit is dominated by clastic ores and here native gold and rare hessite occur together with galena in tennantite-sphalerite-dominated veins of the footwall as well as in drusy sphalerite forming conduits of vent chimneys. An assemblage of electrum+galena+tennantite was observed in secondary chalcopyrite in the outer walls of chimneys. Native gold+stromeyerite are common in bornite-rich clastic sulphides while an assemblage of Ag-sulphosalts+electrum is common in barite-rich ores. In the reworked Balta-Tau deposit Ag-sulphosalts+electrum-kustelite occur often together with tennantite+galena+barite banded ores. Gold-silver-telluride mineralisation in these VMS deposits changes with degree of reworking from Au-tellurides, and native gold+galena+pyrite in pristine sulphide mounds to

  9. Mineral carbonation of gaseous carbon dioxide using a clay-hosted cation exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Il-Mo; Roh, Ki-Min

    2013-01-01

    The mineral carbonation method is still a challenge in practical application owing to: (1) slow reaction kinetics, (2) high reaction temperature, and (3) continuous mineral consumption. These constraints stem from the mode of supplying alkaline earth metals through mineral acidification and dissolution. Here, we attempt to mineralize gaseous carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate, using a cation exchange reaction of vermiculite (a species of expandable clay minerals). The mineralization is operated by draining NaCI solution through vermiculite powders and continuously dropping into the pool of NaOH solution with CO2 gas injected. The mineralization temperature is regulated here at 293 and 333 K for 15 min. As a result of characterization, using an X-ray powder diffractometer and a scanning electron microscopy, two types of pure CaCO3 polymorphs (vaterite and calcite) are identified as main reaction products. Their abundance and morphology are heavily dependent on the mineralization temperature. Noticeably, spindle-shaped vaterite, which is quite different from a typical vaterite morphology (polycrystalline spherulite), forms predominantly at 333 K (approximately 98 wt%).

  10. Paleoenvironmental Implications of Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Blake, David F.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx. 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx. 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx. 10A with a slight inflexion at approx. 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and

  11. Clay minerals: Properties and applications to dermocosmetic products and perspectives of natural raw materials for therapeutic purposes-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Jemima Daniela Dias; Bertolino, Silvana Raquel Alina; Cuffini, Silvia Lucia; Ducart, Diego Fernando; Bretzke, Pedro Eriberto; Leonardi, Gislaine Ricci

    2017-12-20

    Clay minerals are layered materials with a number of peculiar properties, which find many relevant applications in various industries. Since they are easily found everywhere, they are particularly attractive due to their economic viability. In the cosmetic industry, clay minerals are often used as excipients to stabilize emulsions or suspensions and to modify the rheological behavior of these systems. They also play an important role as adsorbents or absorbents, not only in cosmetics but also in other industries, such as pharmaceuticals. This reviewer believes that since this manuscript is presented as covering topical applications that include pharmaceuticals, some types of clay minerals should be considered as a potential material to be used as drug delivery systems. We review several applications of clay minerals to dermocosmetic products, relating them to the underlying properties of these materials and exemplifying with a number of clay minerals available in the market. We also discuss the use of clay minerals in topically-applied products for therapeutic purposes, specially for skin treatment and protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of clay minerals in the process streams produced by the extraction of bitumen from Athabasca oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminsky, H.A.W.; Etsell, T.H.; Ivey, D.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Omotoso, O. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CETC

    2009-02-15

    The clay minerals present in the oil sands were studied with particular reference to how they are partitioned in bitumen ore during the extraction process. Bitumen production from surface-mined oil sands accounts for nearly two-thirds of the total bitumen production in Alberta. Every cubic meter of mined ore results in 1.3 cubic meters of mature fine tailings (MFT). The characteristic differences between the clay minerals that report to the froth versus the tailings streams were also examined to determine which minerals could impact different unit operations in the bitumen extraction process. X-ray diffraction and random powder samples were used to quantify the clay minerals. Particle size distribution and clay activity balances were also conducted. The degree of partitioning during the conditioning and flotation stages in a batch extractor was determined by the surface properties of the clay minerals. The water-continuous tailings stream was separated into fine and coarse tailings fractions through sedimentation. The study showed that bitumen-clay interactions may be dominated by kaolinite or iron oxides. Clays are responsible for the poor settling behaviour of MFTs. The clay minerals present in the oil sands include illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite, kaolinite-smectite, and chlorite. The close proximity of the tailings ponds to the Athabasca River and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission require that the ponds be reclaimed to a natural landscape before mine closure. In addition to its impact on fine tailings reclamation, clay mineralogy plays a role in extraction froth flotation and emulsion stability during froth treatment. The mineralogy of the froth solids was found to be different from the mineralogy of the middlings and tailings solids. 39 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  13. Transmission X-ray Microscopy—A New Tool in Clay Mineral Floccules Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray L. Frost

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective flocculation and dewatering of mineral processing streams containing clays are microstructure dependent in clay-water systems. Initial clay flocculation is crucial in the design and for the development of a new methodology of gas exploitation. Microstructural engineering of clay aggregates using covalent cations and Keggin macromolecules have been monitored using the new state of the art Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM with 60 nm tomography resolution installed in a Taiwanese synchrotron. The 3-D reconstructions from TXM images show complex aggregation structures in montmorillonite aqueous suspensions after treatment with Na+, Ca2+ and Al13 Keggin macromolecules. Na-montmorillonite displays elongated, parallel, well-orientated and closed-void cellular networks, 0.5–3 µm in diameter. After treatment by covalent cations, the coagulated structure displays much smaller, randomly orientated and openly connected cells, 300–600 nm in diameter. The average distances measured between montmorillonite sheets was around 450 nm, which is less than half of the cell dimension measured in Na-montmorillonite. The most dramatic structural changes were observed after treatment by Al13 Keggin; aggregates then became arranged in compacted domains of a 300 nm average diameter composed of thick face-to-face oriented sheets, which forms porous aggregates with larger intra-aggregate open and connected voids.

  14. Characterizing the surface charge of clay minerals with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The engineering properties of clayey soils, including fluid permeability, erosion resistance and cohesive strength, are quite different from those of non-cohesive soils. This is mainly due to their small platy particle shape and the surrounding diffuse double layer structure. By using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, the surface topography and the interaction force between the silicon dioxide tip and the kaolinite/montmorillonite clay minerals have been measured in the 1.0 mM NaCl solution at neutral pH. From this, the surface potential of the clay minerals is determined by mathematical regression analyses using the DLVO model. The length/thickness ratio of kaolinite and montmorillonite particles measured ranges from 8.0 to 15.0. The surface potential and surface charge density vary with particles. The average surface potential of montmorillonite is −62.8 ± 10.6 mV, and the average surface potential of kaolinite is −40.9 ± 15.5 mV. The measured results help to understand the clay sediment interaction, and will be used to develop interparticle force model to simulate sediment transport during erosion process.

  15. Sediment transport mechanisms inferred from heavy mineral assemblages on the 2010 Chilean tsunami deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascalho, João; Costa, Pedro; Lario, Javier

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of heavy mineral (HM) assemblages in tsunami deposits has been applied to infer inundation and backwash phases and to establish sediment sources. In ideal conditions and due to their specific density (>2.9 g/cm3), heavy minerals are the most suitable component of a sediment assemblage that can provide information regarding flow competence. Having these features in consideration, sandy tsunamigenic samples from Arauco and Mataquito areas (central Chile) were retrieved after the 27th of February 2010 tsunami that affected the Chilean coastline. Twenty seven samples (a total of 54 thin sections) tsunamigenic and beach samples were prepared to observe HM under the petrographic microscope. After dividing the samples in 4 fractions (500 µm), HM were separated using bromoform and two fractions (63- 125 µm and 125-500µm) were individually mounted using Canada balsam resin on glass slides. About 300 heavy minerals per slide were identified and counted. Both assemblages were mainly composed of magnetite, pyrrhotite, amphiboles, pyroxenes, olivine, micas and zircon (this specie particularly abundant in the finer fraction analyzed). In Arauco (Ar), average HM percentages in the 125-500 µm fraction was 17.9% while in Mataquito (Ma) it was 25.7%. In the 63-125 µm fraction HM average percentages were 36.9% and 56.1%, for Ar and Ma respectively. In the 125-500 µm fraction the percentage of magnetic minerals (the densest of the denser HM) correspond to 13.2% in Ar and 2.7% in Ma. While in the finer fraction these percentages are of 0.24% and 0.1% In Ar it was possible to perceive that the highest concentration in HM and magnetic minerals was observed in the NE sector (Llico) of the embayment, where the highest run-up was observed. In this specific sector an inland decrease of HM and magnetic minerals was detected along a 300m profile, with HM percentages varying from 27% to 9% and magnetic minerals from 16% to 5%, thus suggesting a progressive energy decrease

  16. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions between clay minerals and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, J.R.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1976-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange between clay minerals and water has been measured in the temperature range 100-350?? for bomb runs of up to almost 2 years. Hydrogen isotope exchange between water and the clays was demonstrable at 100??. Exchange rates were 3-5 times greater for montmorillonite than for kaolinite or illite and this is attributed to the presence of interlayer water in the montmorillonite structure. Negligible oxygen isotope exchange occurred at these low temperatures. The great disparity in D and O18 exchange rates observed in every experiment demonstrates that hydrogen isotope exchange occurred by a mechanism of proton exchange independent of the slower process of O18 exchange. At 350?? kaolinite reacted to form pyrophyllite and diaspore. This was accompanied by essentially complete D exchange but minor O18 exchange and implies that intact structural units in the pyrophyllite were inherited from the kaolinite precursor. ?? 1976.

  17. Adsorption and Desorption of Cesium in Clay Minerals: Effects of Natural Organic Matter and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Ilgen, Anastasia; Mills, Melissa; Lee, Moo; Seol, Jeung Gun; Cho, Nam Chan; Kang, Hyungyu

    2017-04-01

    Cesium (Cs) released into the environment (e.g., Fukushima accident) poses significant environmental concerns and remediation challenges. A majority of Cs in the environment have remained within the surface soils due to the strong adsorption affinity of Cs towards clay minerals. Different clay minerals have different bonding sites, resulting in various adsorption mechanisms at nanometer scale. For example, the illite commonly has a basal spacing of 1.0 nm, but becomes wider to 1.4 nm once other cations exchange with K in the interlayer site. Cs adsorbs into these expanded wedged zone strongly, which can control its mobility in the environment. In addition, natural organic matter (NOM) in the surface soils can interact with clay minerals, which can modify the mechanisms of Cs adsorption on the clay minerals by blocking specific adsorption sites and/or providing Cs adsorption sites on NOM surface. In this work, three representative clay minerals (illite, vermiculite, montmorillonite) and humic acid (HA) are used to systematically investigate the adsorption and desorption behavior of Cs. We performed batch adsorption experiments over a range of Cs concentrations on three clay minerals with and without HA, followed by sequential desorption batch testing. We tested desorption efficiency as a function of initial adsorbed Cs concentration, HA content, sodium concentration, and pH. The sequential extraction results are compared to the structural changes in clay minerals, measured using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Hence, this work aims to identify the mechanisms of Cs fixation at the nanometer (or atomic-) scale as a function of the clay mineral properties (e.g. expandability, permanent surface charge) and varying organic matter content at different pH values and to enhance our atomic-scale mechanistic understanding of

  18. Laboratory experiments on ammoniated clay minerals with relevance for asteroid (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Simone; Stefani, Stefania; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Ammannito, Eleonora

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations with VIR spectrometer onboard Dawn spacecraft [1] have suggested the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates widespread on the surface of asteroid (1) Ceres [2,3]. The global surface composition of Ceres as suggested by VIR average infrared spectrum in the 1-4 micron range appears to be due to a mixture of NH4-bearing phyllosilicates, serpentine, carbonates and a dark absorbing phase (magnetite or amorphous carbon) [2]. An absorption feature occurring near 3.1 micron in the average spectrum is considered the main evidence for the presence of NH4-bearing phase; nevertheless in the past several authors tried to explain this feature, as observed with telescopic spectra, invoking the presence of brucite, cronstedtite, water ice or clays [4]. In this project we are carrying out laboratory experiments with the aim of studying ammoniated phyllosilicates in the visible-infrared range. A suite of 9 clay minerals has been used for this study, including illite, nontronite and montmorillonite. In order to produce the ammoniated species we followed a modified procedure based on the one described in Bishop et al. (2002) [5]. All minerals were reduced in fine grain size (treated with ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) and heated in oven at 200°C for 24 h at normal pressure conditions, before the measurements. Reflectance spectra were acquired with the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) in use at INAF-IAPS/P-LAB, in the range 1-14 μm, on both clay minerals and NH4-treated clays. Almost all spectra of NH4-treated species are characterized by the occurrence of several new absorption features, appearing at different wavelengths near 2, 3, 6 and 7 micron. In some cases the spectral shape of already existent absorption bands resulted deeply modified. A few species did not show the appearance of new features. These results suggest that NH4+ ions fix in various ways in different minerals. Nontronite and montmorillonite appear to be the best candidates, among the

  19. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas; Blake, David; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Farmer, Jack, D.; Treiman, Allan H; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 021 band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx 10A with a slight inflexion at approx 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating

  20. The association of soil organic matter with mineral surfaces depends on clay content in an arable Cambisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Steffen A.; Angelika, Koelbl; Hoeschen, Carmen; Mueller, Carsten W.; Koegel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    The amount and distribution of mineral-associated soil organic matter (MOM) depends on the availability of adsorptive mineral surface area. In soils with low content of fine-sized mineral particles, the available mineral surface is limited in comparison to soils with high content of fine-sized mineral particles. Accordingly, the spatial distribution of MOM from soils with various contents of fine-sized mineral particles should reflect different structural organization of organo-mineral associations. In this study, we analyzed MOM and further indicators of its binding in the topsoil (020 cm) of an arable Cambisol. The sampled site showed a gradient in the content of clay-sized particles (6-35 %) under similar soil management and biomass input. We obtained fine silt-sized (26.3 μm) and clay-sized (0.22 μm) mineral-associated (>1.6 g cm3) fractions from a combined density and size fractionation. We measured solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and analyzed the specific surface area of the fractions by N2-BET with and without NaOCl oxidation. The spatial distribution of MOM was determined by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) at a lateral resolution of approximately 100 nm. We found that the mineral-associated carbon concentration of the fine silt and clay-sized fractions decreased from 80 to 40 mg g-1 when the content of clay-sized particles increased from 6 to 15 %. In the clay-rich soils the mineral-associated carbon remained constant at approximately 40 mg g-1 for higher contents of clay-sized particles from 15 to 30 %. In addition, the 12C and 12C14N ion distributions obtained from NanoSIMS indicated a much higher coverage of mineral surface with MOM in the sandy soils than in the clay-rich soils. Our data shows that both the concentration and coverage of MOM is increased in soils with a lower content of fine-sized mineral particles, when the input of organic material to the soil is similar.

  1. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparation of clay mineral samples for high resolution x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbati, Gennaro; Seim, Christian; Legall, Herbert; Stiel, Holger; Thomas, Noel; Wilhein, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    In the development of optimum ceramic materials for plastic forming, it is of fundamental importance to gain insight into the compositions of the clay minerals. Whereas spectroscopic methods are adequate for determining the elemental composition of a given sample, a knowledge of the spatial composition, together with the shape and size of the particles leads to further, valuable insight. This requires an imaging technique such as high resolution X-ray microscopy. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy provides a viable element mapping technique. Since the fine particle fraction of the materials has a major effect on physical properties like plasticity, the analysis is focused mainly on the smallest particles. To separate these from the bigger agglomerates, the raw material has to pass through several procedures like centrifugation and filtering. After that, one has to deposit a layer of appropriate thickness on to a suitable substrate. These preparative techniques are described here, starting from the clay mineral raw materials and proceeding through to samples that are ready to analyze. First results using high resolution x-ray imaging are shown.

  3. Zeolite-clay mineral zonation of volcaniclastic sediments within the McDermitt caldera complex of Nevada and Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzman, Richard K.; Rytuba, James J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcaniclastic sediments deposited in the moat of the collapsed McDermitt caldera complex have been altered chiefly to zeolites and potassium feldspar. The original rhyolitic and peralkaline ash-flow tuffs are included in conglomerates at the caldera rims and grade into a lacustrine series near the center of the collapse. The tuffs show a lateral zeolitic alteration from almost fresh glass to clinoptilolite, clinoptilolite-mordenite, and erionite; to analcime-potassium feldspar; and finally to potassium feldspar. Vertical zonation is in approximately the same order. Clay minerals in associated mudstones, on the other hand, show little lateral variation but a distinct vertical zonation, having a basal dioctahedral smectite, a medial trioctahedral smectite, and an upper dioctahedral smectite. The medial trioctahedral smectite is enriched in lithium (as much as 6,800 ppm Li). Hydrothermal alteration of the volcaniclastic sediments, forming both mercury and uranium deposits, caused a distinct zeolite and clay-mineral zonation within the general lateral zonation. The center of alteration is generally potassium feldspar, commonly associated with alunite. Potassium feldspar grades laterally and vertically to either clinoptilolite or clinoptilolite-mordenite, generally associated with gypsum. This zone then grades vertically and laterally into fresh glass. The clay minerals are a dioctahedral smectite, a mixed-layer clay mineral, and a 7-A clay mineral. The mixed-layer and 7-A clay minerals are associated with the potassium feldspar-alunite zone of alteration, and the dioctahedral smectite is associated with clinoptilolite. This mineralogical zonation may be an exploration guide for mercury and uranium mineralization in the caldera complex environment.

  4. Study of the behaviour of azinphos-methyl in a clay mineral by batch and column leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, A; Chentouf, A

    2000-02-11

    Research efforts dealing with the processes affecting the transport of pesticides in soils are needed in order to prevent further damage of surface and groundwater reserves. Although organic matter has been recognised as the most important contributor to the adsorption of non-ionic organic pesticides in soils, in some cases clay minerals may have an important role in the retention of these compounds. The present study was designed to improve the knowledge of the behaviour of azinphos-methyl in soils. Coefficients from adsorption isotherms and HPLC analysis of soil column leachates were used in this work for predicting pesticide mobility in soils. The studied clay mineral was a Spanish bentonite with a predominant montmorillonite fraction. The results showed that azinphos-methyl was adsorbed on the clay mineral and demonstrated the catalytic effect of bentonite on the hydrolysis of the pesticide.

  5. Mineral assemblage transformation of a metakaolin-based waste form after geopolymer encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin D., E-mail: Benjamin.Williams@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Neeway, James J., E-mail: James.Neeway@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Snyder, Michelle M.V., E-mail: Michelle.ValentaSnyder@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Bowden, Mark E., E-mail: Mark.Bowden@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Amonette, James E., E-mail: Jim.Amonette@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Arey, Bruce W., E-mail: Bruce.Arey@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pierce, Eric M., E-mail: pierceem@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS-6035, Room 372, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Brown, Christopher F., E-mail: Christopher.Brown@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P., E-mail: Nik.Qafoku@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Mitigation of hazardous and radioactive waste can be improved through conversion of existing waste to a more chemically stable and physically robust waste form. One option for waste conversion is the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process. The resulting FBSR granular material was encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix referred to here as Geo-7. This provides mechanical strength for ease in transport and disposal. However, it is necessary to understand the phase assemblage evolution as a result of geopolymer encapsulation. In this study, we examine the mineral assemblages formed during the synthesis of the multiphase ceramic waste form. The FBSR granular samples were created from waste simulant that was chemically adjusted to resemble Hanford tank waste. Another set of samples was created using Savannah River Site Tank 50 waste simulant in order to mimic a blend of waste collected from 68 Hanford tank. Waste form performance tests were conducted using the product consistency test (PCT), the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the structure of a previously unreported NAS phase and indicate that monolith creation may lead to a reduction in crystallinity as compared to the primary FBSR granular product. - Highlights: • Simulated Hanford waste was treated by the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. • The FBSR granular product was encapsulated in a geopolymer monolith. • Leach tests were performed to examine waste form performance. • XRD revealed the structure of a previously unreported sodium aluminosilicate phase. • Monolithing of granular waste forms may lead to a reduction in crystallinity.

  6. Heteroagglomeration of zinc oxide nanoparticles with clay mineral modulates the bioavailability and toxicity of nanoparticle in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Senapati, Violet Aileen; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-06-01

    The extensive use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in cosmetics, sunscreens and healthcare products increases their release in the aquatic environment. The present study explored the possible interaction of ZnO NPs with montmorillonite clay minerals in aqueous conditions. An addition of ZnO NPs on clay suspension significantly (pclay particles from 1652±90nm to 2158±13nm due to heteroagglomeration. The electrokinetic measurements showed a significant (pclay association (-1.37±0.03μmcm/Vs) that results to the electrostatic interaction between ZnO NPs and clay particles. The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of ZnO NPs-clay association demonstrated the binding of ZnO NPs with the Si-O-Al region on the edges of clay particles. The increase in size of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates further leads to their sedimentation at 24h. Although, the stability of ZnO NPs in the clay suspension was decreased due to heteroagglomeration, but the bioavailability and toxicity of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates in Tetrahymena pyriformis was enhanced. These observations provide an evidence on possible mechanisms available in natural environment that can facilitate nanoparticles entry into the organisms present in lower trophic levels of the food web. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term variations of clay mineral composition in the Andaman Sea (IODP Exp. 353 Site U1447): preliminary result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Khim, B. K.; Cho, H. G.; Kim, S.; 353 Scientists, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Clay mineral studies in the Bengal Fan have allowed the reconstruction of the erosional history of the Himalayan-Tibetan complex since the Early Miocene. Several factors such as climate change and tectonic activity are important for the erosion rate of the Himalaya-Tibet complex. IODP Expedition 353 Site U1447 (10°47.4'N, 93°00'E; 1391 mbsl) was drilled on a ridge 45 km offshore Little Andaman Island in the Andaman Sea, penetrating to total depths of 738 m. Riverine sediments supplied mainly by the Irrawaddy and Salween (draining the Indo-Burman Ranges; smectite-rich) and the Ganga/Brahmaputra (draining the Himalaya; illite-rich) via the surface currents have been known to deposit in the Andaman Sea. We measured clay minerals of 38 sediment samples collected from 150 to 737 m CSF-A at Site U1447 in order to reveal long-term variation patterns of clay minerals and their controlling factors. Age reconstruction of Site U1447 aided by shipboard biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data defined the study interval spanning from the Late Miocene ( 10 Ma) to Early Pleistocene ( 1.25 Ma). At this interval, clay minerals consist mainly of smectite (28-61% with an average of 47%) followed by illite (20-41% with an average of 29%), kaolinite (9-19% with an average of 14%), and chlorite (5-15% with an average of 10%). Variation of clay mineral compositions is divided into three stages; almost consistent variations of all clay minerals (from 750 to 570 m CSF-A; 10.0 to 7.5 Ma), gradual decrease of smectite and increase of illite and chlorite (from 570 to 400 m CSF-A; 7.5 to 4.5 Ma), and great fluctuation of all clay minerals (from 400 to 150 m CSF-A; 4.5 to 1.1 Ma). Such long-term clay mineral changes may be related to provenance switches, tectonic evolution of the source regions, climatic variations, degree of volcanism with basin evolution, sedimentation history by sea level changes or some combination of these factors.

  8. Understanding the role of clay minerals in the chromium(VI) bioremoval by Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCTCC AB93066 under growth condition: microscopic, spectroscopic and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chunxi; Wu, Pingxiao; Li, Yuewu; Ruan, Bo; Li, Liping; Tran, Lytuong; Zhu, Nengwu; Dang, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to investigate the role of clay minerals, e.g., kaolinite and vermiculite, in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under growth condition in glucose-amended mediums as a method for treating Cr(VI)-contaminated subsurface environment such as soil. Our results indicated that glucose could acted as an essential electron donor, and clay minerals significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by improving the consumption rate of glucose and stimulating the growth and propagation of P. aeruginosa. Cr(VI) bioreduction by both free cells and clay minerals-amended cells followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, with the latter one fitting better. The mass balance analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis found that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) and the adsorption of total chromium on clay minerals-bacteria complex was small, implying that Cr(VI) bioremoval was not mainly due to the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto cells or clay minerals or clay minerals-cells complex but mainly due to the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of P. aeruginosa under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). Atomic force microscopy revealed that the addition of clay minerals (e.g. vermiculite) decreased the surface roughness of Cr(VI)-laden cells and changed the cell morphology and dimension. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that organic matters such as aliphatic species and/or proteins played an important role in the combination of cells and clay minerals. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the attachment of cells on the surface of clay minerals, indicating that clay minerals could provide a microenvironment to protect cells from Cr(VI) toxicity and serve as growth-supporting materials. These findings manifested the underlying influence of clay minerals on microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and gave an understanding of the interaction between pollutants, the environment and the biota.

  9. Terrestrial Analogs for Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H; Morris, Richard V.; Bristow, Thomas; Ming, Douglas W.; Achillies, Cherie; Bish, David L.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Chipera, Steve

    2013-01-01

    the last three varieties may be contemporaneous. One sample shows agate (alpha- quartz) that was precipitated between the episodes of deposition of the fine-grained and coarse-grained 'griffithite.' 'Griffithite' is not unique as a possible terrestrial analog - some clay minerals from the Doushantou formation, China, have similar 02L diffraction bands, and many basalts contain smectites in vesicles and as replacements after olivine. Similar trioctahedral smectites occur also in the nakhlite martian meteorites - as veinlets and replacements of olivine. By understanding the formation of these terrestrial clays, we hope to constrain the nature and mechanism of formation of the Sheepbed clay mineral.

  10. Measuring the specific caesium sorption capacity of soils, sediments and clay minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Koning, A. [aEnergy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Westerduinweg 3, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG, Petten (Netherlands); Konoplev, A.V. [Institute of Experimental Meteorology, 82 Lenin Avenue, Obninsk, Kaluga Region, 249020 (Russian Federation); Comans, R.N.J. [Wageningen University, Department of Soil Quality, P.O. Box 8005, 6700 EC Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2007-01-15

    Two methods to quantify the specific Cs sorption capacity of soils and sediments, which is generally believed to be associated with the Frayed Edge Sites (FES) of illitic clay minerals, are described in detail and are critically reviewed. The first method is a direct measurement of the FES capacity, while the second quantifies the combined parameter K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] (=K{sub C}(K-->Cs) x [FES]) i.e. the product of the FES capacity and the affinity of these sites for Cs. Both methods use the bulky AgTU-complex to mask non-specific sorption sites for Cs and are applied to a number of different soils and pure minerals. Measurement of the FES capacity of pure illite is straightforward. It is shown that the measured capacity is independent of the saturating ion, but does depend on particle size. This method could not be successfully applied to a peat bog soil with 90% organic matter, because the necessary correction for non-specific Cs sorption by the large pool of organic exchange sites overpasses the capacity of the small FES fraction. Measurement of the combined parameter K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] is shown to be more appropriate in such cases. Application of the FES capacity method to the hydrous aluminosilicate mineral allophane, an important soil constituent of Andisols, shows that the AgTU-complex is unable to block all non-specific sorption sites for Cs on this mineral. The K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] measurements show evidence of a very small number of specific Cs sorption sites on allophane, much smaller than inferred from the FES capacity measurement. The FES capacity of the clay mineral vermiculite is difficult to quantify because the high Cs concentrations that are needed to measure the FES capacity probably cause a collapse of the vermiculite interlayers, thereby creating more high-affinity sites for Cs. The K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] method, in which only trace concentrations of Cs are used, is shown to be more appropriate for soils

  11. Preferential adsorption of extracellular polymeric substances from bacteria on clay minerals and iron oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuanyuan; Wei, Xing; Cai, Peng; Huang, Qiaoyun; Rong, Xinming; Liang, Wei

    2011-03-01

    The adsorption of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Bacillus subtilis on montmorillonite, kaolinite and goethite was investigated as a function of pH and ionic strength using batch studies coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms of EPS on minerals conformed to the Langmuir equation. The amount of EPS-C and -N adsorbed followed the sequence of montmorillonite>goethite>kaolinite. However, EPS-P adsorption was in the order of goethite>montmorillonite>kaolinite. A marked decrease in the mass fraction of EPS adsorption on minerals was observed with the increase of final pH from 3.1 to 8.3. Calcium ion was more efficient than sodium ion in promoting EPS adsorption on minerals. At various pH values and ionic strength, the mass fraction of EPS-N was higher than those of EPS-C and -P on montmorillonite and kaolinite, while the mass fraction of EPS-P was the highest on goethite. These results suggest that proteinaceous constituents were adsorbed preferentially on montmorillonite and kaolinite, and phosphorylated macromolecules were absorbed preferentially on goethite. Adsorption of EPS on clay minerals resulted in obvious shifts of infrared absorption bands of adsorbed water molecules, showing the importance of hydrogen bonding in EPS adsorption. The highest K values in equilibrium adsorption and FTIR are consistent with ligand exchange of EPS phosphate groups for goethite surface. The information obtained is of fundamental significance for understanding interfacial reactions between microorganisms and minerals. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reducement of cadmium adsorption on clay minerals by the presence of dissolved organic matter from animal manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjun; Ren, Lingwei; Zhu, Lizhong

    2017-04-01

    Clay minerals are the most popular adsorbents/amendments for immobilizing heavy metals in contaminated soils, but the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil environment would potentially affect the adsorption/immobilization capacity of clay minerals for heavy metals. In this study, the effects of DOM derived from chicken manure (CM) on the adsorption of cadmium (Cd 2+ ) on two clay minerals, bentonite and zeolite, were investigated. The equilibrium data for Cd 2+ sorption in the absence or presence of CM-DOM could be well-fitted to the Langmuir equation (R 2  > 0.97). The presence of CM-DOM in the aqueous solution was found to greatly reduce the adsorption capacity of both minerals for Cd 2+ , in particular zeolite, and the percentage decreases for Cd 2+ sorption increased with increasing concentrations of Cd 2+ as well as CM-DOM in aqueous solutions. The adsorption of CM-DOM on zeolite was greater than that on bentonite in the absence of Cd 2+ , however, a sharp increase was observed for CM-DOM sorption on bentonite with increasing Cd 2+ concentrations but little change for that on zeolite, which can be attributed to the different ternary structures on mineral surface. The CM-DOM modified clay minerals were utilized to investigate the effect of mineral-adsorbed CM-DOM on Cd 2+ sorption. The adsorbed form was found to inhibit Cd 2+ sorption, and further calculation suggested it primarily responsible for the overall decrease in Cd 2+ sorption on clay minerals in the presence of CM-DOM in aqueous solutions. An investigation for the mineral surface morphology suggested that the mineral-adsorbed CM-DOM decreased Cd 2+ sorption on bentonite mainly through barrier effect, while in the case of zeolite, it was the combination of active sites occupation and barrier effect. These results can serve as a guide for evaluating the performance of clay minerals in immobilizing heavy metals when animal manure is present in contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. The Imprint of Atmospheric Evolution in the D/H of Hesperian Clay Minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, A. E.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Flesch, G. J.; Christensen, L. E.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio in strongly bound water or hydroxyl groups in ancient Martian clays retains the imprint of the water of formation of these minerals. Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment measured thermally evolved water and hydrogen gas released between 550 degrees Centigrade and 950 degrees Centigrade from samples of Hesperian-era Gale crater smectite to determine this isotope ratio. The D/H value is 3.0 (plus or minus 0.2) times the ratio in standard mean ocean water. The D/H ratio in this approximately 3-billion-year-old mudstone, which is half that of the present Martian atmosphere but substantially higher than that expected in very early Mars, indicates an extended history of hydrogen escape and desiccation of the planet.

  14. Removal of organic pollutants in model water and thermal wastewater using clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Emese; Vajda, Krisztina; Veréb, Gábor; Dombi, András; Mogyorósi, Károly; Ábrahám, Imre; Májer, Marcell

    2011-01-01

    Water treatment method was developed for the removal of different anionic dyes such as methyl orange and indigo carmine, and also for thymol applying sodium bentonite and cationic surfactant - hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) - or polyelectrolytes (polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride, poly-DADMAC and poly-amines). The removal efficiency of these model substrates was examined in model water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, HPLC and TOC analysis. The clay mineral and HTAB were added in one step to the polluted model water in Jar-test experiments. The influence of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the applied clay mineral and the presence of polyaluminium chloride coagulant (BOPAC) were also tested for the water treatment process. The structures of the in situ produced and pre-prepared organoclay composites were compared by XRD analysis. The rapid formation of organoclay adsorbents provided very efficient removal of the dyes (65-90 % in 3-10 mg/L TOC(0) range) with 200 mg/L sodium bentonite dose, however thymol was less efficiently separated. Adsorption efficiencies of the composites were compared at different levels of ion exchange such as at 40, 60 and 100 %. In the case of thymol, the elimination of inorganic carbon from the model water before the TOC analysis resulted in some loss of the analysed volatile compound therefore the HPLC analysis was found to be the most suitable tool for the evaluation of the process. This one-step adsorption method using in situ formed organoclay was better performing than the conventional process in which the montmorillonite-surfactant composite is pre-preapared and subsequently added to the polluted water. The purification performance of this method was also evaluated on raw and artificially polluted thermal wastewater samples containing added thymol.

  15. The role of clay minerals in the preservation of organic matter in sediments of qinghai lake, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Lv, G.; Eberl, D.; Li, S.; Kim, J.

    2009-01-01

    The role of saline lake sediments in preserving organic matter has long been recognized. In order to further understand the preservation mechanisms, the role of clay minerals was studied. Three sediment cores, 25, 57, and 500 cm long, were collected from Qinghai Lake, NW China, and dissected into multiple subsamples. Multiple techniques were employed, including density fractionation, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), total organic carbon (TOC) and carbon compound analyses, and surface area determination. The sediments were oxic near the water-sediment interface, but became anoxic at depth. The clay mineral content was as much as 36.8%, consisting mostly of illite, chlorite, and halloysite. The TEM observations revealed that organic matter occurred primarily as organic matter-clay mineral aggregates. The TOC and clay mineral abundances are greatest in the mid-density fraction, with a positive correlation between the TOC and mineral surface area. The TOC of the bulk sediments ranges from 1 to 3% with the non-hydrocarbon fraction being predominant, followed by bitumen, saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbons, and chloroform-soluble bitumen. The bimodal distribution of carbon compounds of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction suggests that organic matter in the sediments was derived from two sources: terrestrial plants and microorganisms/algae. Depthrelated systematic changes in the distribution patterns of the carbon compounds suggest that the oxidizing conditions and microbial abundance near the water-sediment interface promote degradation of labile organic matter, probably in adsorbed form. The reducing conditions and small microbial biomass deeper in the sediments favor preservation of organic matter, because of the less labile nature of organic matter, probably occurring within clay mineral-organic matter aggregates that are inaccessible to microorganisms. These results have important implications for our

  16. Surficial clay mineral distribution on the southwestern continental margin of India: evidence of input from the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Onkar S.; Gujar, A. R.

    1996-03-01

    Analyses of spatial distribution of clay minerals, sediment texture, and > 63 μm fractions of the grab samples from the S W continental margin of India exhibit: (i) higher contents of illite and chlorite on the lower slope and (ii) a well-defined no-clay zone on the entire shelf. Kaolinite and smectite are also present in significant quantities on the slope with traces of gibbsite and palygorskite in some samples. The high contents of illite and chlorite (clay minerals which are not abundant in the soils and estuarine sediments of this region) in the southern region of the study area are evidence for sediment contribution from the Bay of Bengal waters (BBW), which enter this region after the SW monsoon. Distribution trends of kaolinite, smectite, gibbsite, and laterite granules on the slope are suggestive of contribution from chemically weathered soils of Peninsular India.

  17. Clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and soil organic carbon distribution within soil aggregates in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Fernández-Ugalde, Oihane; Virto, Iñigo; Arias-González, Ander

    2017-04-01

    Soil mineralogy is of primary importance for key environmental services provided by soils like carbon sequestration. However, current knowledge on the effects of clay mineralogy on soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization is based on limited and conflicting data. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and SOC distribution within soil aggregates in mature Pinus radiata D.Don forest plantations. Nine forest stands located in the same geographical area of the Basque Country (North of Spain) were selected. These stands were planted on different parent material (3 on each of the following: sandstone, basalt and trachyte). There were no significant differences in climate and forest management among them. Moreover, soils under these plantations presented similar content of clay particles. We determined bulk SOC storage, clay mineralogy, the content of Fe-Si-Al-oxides and oxyhydroxides and the distribution of organic C in different soil aggregate sizes at different soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-20 cm). The relationship between SOC and abiotic factors was investigated using a factor analysis (PCA) followed by stepwise regression analysis. Soils developed on sandstone showed significantly lower concentration of SOC (29 g C kg-1) than soils developed on basalts (97 g C kg-1) and trachytes (119 g C kg-1). The soils on sandstone presented a mixed clay mineralogy dominated by illite, with lesser amounts of hydroxivermiculite, hydrobiotite and kaolinite, and a total absence of interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. In contrast, the major crystalline clay mineral identified in the soils developed on volcanic rocks was interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. Nevertheless, no major differences were observed between basaltic and trachytic soils in the clay mineralogy. The selective extraction of Fe showed that the oxalate extractable iron was significantly lower in soils on sandstone (3.7%) than on basalts (11.2%) and

  18. Study of adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals; Estudio de Adsorcion de Fenentreno en Diferentes Tipos de Arcillas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, M. L.; Escolano, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Diaz, F. J.; Perez, R.; Garcia, S.; Garcia Frutos, F. J.

    2003-07-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay mineral also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represent ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs.

  19. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  20. Characterization of clay deposits from Egypt and assessment of their potential application for waste water treatment: How dissolved organic matter determines the interaction of heavy metals and clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Refaey Mohammed, Y.B.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the potential of using clay minerals abundant in local soils in Egypt as low cost materials to reduce Cu, Ni and Zn pollution of soil and groundwater originating from polluted wastewater; specifically focusing on the influence of the interaction of clay

  1. Luminescent Oxygen Gas Sensors Based on Nanometer-Thick Hybrid Films of Iridium Complexes and Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Ir(III complexes in photo-responsive molecular devices for oxygen gas sensing is reviewed. Attention is focused on the immobilization of Ir(III complexes in organic or inorganic host materials such as polymers, silica and clays in order to enhance robustness and reliability. Our recent works on constructing nanometer-thick films comprised of cyclometalated cationic Ir(III complexes and clay minerals are described. The achievement of multi-emitting properties in response to oxygen pressure is demonstrated.

  2. Laboratory study on heterogeneous decomposition of methyl chloroform on various standard aluminosilica clay minerals as a potential tropospheric sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kutsuna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl chloroform (1,1,1-trichloroethane, CH3CCl3 was found to decompose heterogeneously on seven types of standard clay minerals (23 materials in dry air at 313 K in the laboratory. All reactions proceeded through the elimination of HCl; CH3CCl3 was converted quantitatively to CH2=CCl2. The activities of the clay minerals were compared via their pseudo-first-order reaction rate constants (k1. A positive correlation was observed between the k1 value and the specific surface area (S of clay minerals, where the S value was determined by means of the general Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET equation. The k1 value was anti-correlated with the value of n, which was a parameter of the general BET equation and related to the average pore size of the clay minerals, and correlated with the water content that can be removed easily from the clay minerals. The reaction required no special pretreatment of clay minerals, such as heating at high temperatures; hence, the reaction can be expected to occur in the environment. Photoillumination by wavelengths present in the troposphere did not accelerate the decomposition of CH3CCl3, but it induced heterogeneous photodecomposition of CH2=CCl2. The temperature dependence of k1, the adsorption equilibrium coefficient of CH3CCl3 and CH2=CCl2, and the surface reaction rate constant of CH3CCl3 were determined for an illite sample. The k1 value increased with increasing temperature. The amount of CH3CCl3 adsorbed on the illite during the reaction was proportional to the partial pressure of CH3CCl3. The reaction was sensitive to relative humidity and the k1 value decreased with increasing relative humidity. However, the reaction was found to proceed at a relative humidity of 22% at 313 K, although the k1 value was about one-twentieth of the value in non-humidified air. The conditions required for the reaction may be present in major desert regions of the world. A simple estimation indicates that the possible heterogeneous

  3. Curiosity's traverse through the upper Murray formation (Gale crater): ground truth for orbital detections of Martian clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehouck, Erwin; Carter, John; Gasnault, Olivier; Pinet, Patrick; Daydou, Yves; Gondet, Brigitte; Mangold, Nicolas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Arvidson, Raymond; Maurice, Sylvestre; Wiens, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Orbital observations from visible/near-infrared (VNIR) spectrometers have shown that hydrated clay minerals are widespread on the surface of Mars (e.g., Carter et al., JGR, 2013), but implications in terms of past environmental conditions are debated. In this context, in situ missions can play a crucial role by providing "ground truth" and detailed geological setting for orbital signatures. Since its landing in 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has found evidence for clay minerals in several sedimentary formations within Gale crater. The first clays were encountered at Yellowknife Bay, where results from the CheMin X-ray diffractometer (XRD) showed the presence of 20 wt% tri-octahedral, Fe/Mg-bearing smectites (Vaniman et al., Science, 2014). However, due to dust cover, this location lacks any signature of clay minerals in orbital VNIR observations. Smaller amounts of clay minerals were found later in the rover's traverse, but again at locations with no specific signature from orbit. More recently, Curiosity reached the upper Murray formation, a sedimentary layer consisting primarily of mudstones and belonging to the basal part of Aeolis Mons (or Mt Sharp), the central mound of Gale crater. There, for the first time, orbital signatures of clay minerals can be compared to laterally-equivalent samples that were analyzed by Curiosity's payload. Orbital VNIR spectra suggest the prevalence of di-octahedral, Al/Fe-bearing smectites, clearly distinct from the tri-octahedral, Fe/Mg-bearing species of Yellowknife Bay (Carter et al., LPSC, 2016). Preliminary results from XRD and EGA analyses performed by the CheMin and SAM instruments at Marimba, Quela and Sebina drill sites are broadly consistent with such interpretation. However, and perhaps unsurprisingly, in situ data show more complexity than orbital observations. In particular, in situ data suggest the possible presence of an illitic component as well as the possible co-existence of both di

  4. Sorption kinetics and chemical forms of Cd(II) sorbed by thiol-functionalized 2:1 clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, D; Brigatti, M F; Laurora, A; Pini, S; Medici, L

    2007-05-08

    The interaction between Cd(II) in aqueous solution and two 2:1 expandable clay minerals (i.e., montmorillonite and vermiculite), showing different layer charge, was addressed via batch sorption experiments on powdered clay minerals both untreated and amino acid (cysteine) treated. Reaction products were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRDP), chemical analysis (elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectrophotometry), thermal analysis combined with evolved gases mass spectrometry (TGA-MSEGA) and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy via extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) characterization. Sorption isotherms for Cd(II) in presence of different substrates, shows that Cd(II) uptake depends both on Cd(II) starting concentration and the nature of the substrate. Thermal decomposition of Cd-cysteine treated clay minerals evidences the evolution of H(2)O, H(2)S, NO(2), SO(2), and N(2)O(3). These results are well consistent with XRDP data collected both at room and at increasing temperature and further stress the influence of the substrate, in particular cysteine, on the interlayer. EXAFS studies suggest that Cd(II) coordinates with oxygen atoms, to give monomer complexes or CdO molecules, either on the mineral surface and/or in the interlayer. For Cd-cysteine complexes EXAFS data agree with the existence of Cd-S clusters, thus suggesting a predominant role of the thiol group in the bonding of Cd with the amino acid.

  5. Visible-near-infrared spectroscopy can predict the clay/organic carbon and mineral fines/organic carbon ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Cecilie; Knadel, Maria; Møldrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    The ratios of mineral fines (clay + fine silt) to organic carbon (OC), consisting of the n-ratio (i.e., the clay/OC ratio) and m-ratio (i.e., the fines/OC ratio) have recently been used to analyze and predict soil functional properties such as tilth conditions, clay dispersibility, degree...... from seven Danish and one Greenlandic fields, with a large textural range (clay: 0.027–0.355 kg kg−1; OC: 0.011–0.084 kg kg−1; n-ratio: 0.49–16.80; m-ratio: 1.46–32.14), were analyzed for texture and OC and subsequently scanned with a vis-NIR spectrometer from 400 to 2500 nm. The spectral data were...... correlated to reference values of the n-ratio, m-ratio, clay, fine silt, fines, and OC with partial least squares regression. The vis-NIR models were developed on a regional dataset comprising the 480 soil samples divided into calibration and validation subsets. Further, we tested vis-NIR models developed...

  6. Characterization of Mineral Assemblages in Ancient Roman Maritime Concrete with Synchrotron X-ray Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, C.; Jackson, M. D.; Monteiro, P. J.; Wenk, H.

    2012-12-01

    1 μm. Illumination with the polychromatic beam resulted in Laue single crystal diffraction patterns with reflection spots, which were indexed based on mineral phases previously tentatively identified through optical techniques. For example, large plate-like crystals within certain sub-spherical voids were identified as hydrocalumite, a double-layered hydroxide that commonly includes chloride ions. For nanocrystalline phases, and for phases with an average grain size smaller than the X-ray beam, the monochromatic beam proved more useful. Illumination with the monochromatic beam resulted in creation of Debye-Scherrer diffraction rings, which we integrated to obtain powder diffraction patterns at a very high spatial resolution. We identified 11Å Al-tobermorite, a layered hydrated calcium-silicate mineral, in the centers of partially-dissolved relict lime clasts. An assemblage of fine-grained Al-tobermorite, ettringite, and hydrocalumite occurred within certain sub-spherical voids. The cementitious matrix showed possible calcium-aIumino-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H), a poorly-crystalline phase modeled on tobermorite, with a weakly-defined peak at about 11.2 Å.

  7. Broad-spectrum in vitro antibacterial activities of clay minerals against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAYDEL, SHELLEY E.; REMENIH, CHRISTINE M.; WILLIAMS, LYNDA B.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objectives The capacity to properly address the worldwide incidence of infectious diseases lies in the ability to detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. Therefore, identifying and analyzing inhibitory agents are worthwhile endeavors in an era when few new classes of effective antimicrobials have been developed. The use of geological nanomaterials to heal skin infections has been evident since the earliest recorded history, and specific clay minerals may prove valuable in the treatment of bacterial diseases, including infections for which there are no effective antibiotics, such as Buruli ulcer and multi-drug resistant infections. Methods We have subjected two iron-rich clay minerals, which have previously been used to treat Buruli ulcer patients, to broth culture testing of antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant pathogenic bacteria to assess the feasibility of using clay minerals as therapeutic agents. Results One specific mineral, CsAg02, demonstrated bactericidal activity against pathogenic Escherichia coli, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) E. coli, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium marinum and a combined bacteriostatic/bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant S. aureus (PRSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Mycobacterium smegmatis, while another mineral with similar structure and bulk crystal chemistry, CsAr02, had no effect on or enhanced bacterial growth. The <0.2 μm fraction of CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 200°C or 550°C retained bactericidal activity, while cation-exchanged CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 900°C no longer killed E. coli. Conclusions Our results indicate that specific mineral products have intrinsic, heat-stable antibacterial properties, which could provide an inexpensive treatment against numerous human bacterial infections. PMID:18070832

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of clay mineral from anorthitic plagioclase from Korea; Kankokusan no Ca ni tomu shachoseki wo genryo to suru nendo kobutsu no suinetsu gosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. [Korea Mining Promotion Corp., (Korea, Republic of). Technology and Research Institute; Kimura, K.; Tateyama, H. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Saga (Japan); Lee, E.; Choi, C. [Han-Yang University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-05-25

    Hydrothermal synthesis of clay mineral was performed for industrial practice using anorthitic plagioclase with various degrees of weathering from Sanchung district, Gyeonsan Nam Do, Korea. It was clarified that plagioclase was decomposed by hydrothermal reaction with weak acid solution under low temperature and low pressure condition, to form clay mineral. Individual effects of various reaction conditions were examined. The reaction temperature, addition of aluminum chloride, and slurry concentration were effective in this order. Especially, at the reaction temperature, 180degC, intermediate product, allophane which is amorphous aluminum silicate with low crystallinity was formed. It was clarified for the synthesis of clay mineral that the anorthitic plagioclase was superior as a starting material to albite due to less addition of aluminum chloride, resulting in the industrial advantage. It was found that the obtained clay mineral was kaolin with low crystallinity having a mean particle size less than 1.1{mu}m. 16 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Geochemistry, factor analysis and clay mineral distribution of the sediments and relationship with the associated ferromanganese nodules from the SW Carlsberg ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Ambre, N.V.

    and sediments suggest diagenetic supply of Mn sup(+2) through pore waters during early diagenesis. Distribution of clay minerals show that illite and smectite are more abundant than kaolinite and chlorite, whereas palygorskite and montmorillonite occur as poorly...

  10. Geophagia clay soil as a source of mineral nutrients and toxicants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geophagia, which involves ingestion of non-food lithospheric substances, is the major form of pica in many African cultures. A common lithospheric pica substance ingested in the Cape Three Point region of West Africa, particularly Ghana and Togo, is a white loamy clay soil. This clay soil is usually ingested by women of ...

  11. Clay mineral evidence of nepheloids contribution to the Heinrich layers in the North West Atlantic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Cortijo, E.; Vidal, L.; Labeyrie, L.; Debrabant, P.

    1998-01-01

    The clay fraction of four cores drilled in the north Atlantic Ocean was studied at a very high resolution over the last 150 ka in order to record the mineralogical signature of Heinrich events. Factor analysis of clay mineralogy establishes that three independent factors represent the main

  12. Physicochemical Study of Photocatalytic Activity of TiO2 Supported Palygorskite Clay Mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahcen Bouna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the influence of physicochemical parameters, namely, the photocatalyst loading, dye concentration, and pH of polluted solutions, on the degradation efficiency of Orange G (OG solutions containing TiO2 nanoparticles supported on palygorskite clay mineral (TiO2-Pal. The TiO2 photocatalyst attached to natural palygorskite fibers was elaborated by colloidal sol-gel route. It exhibits the anatase structure that is the most photoactive crystallographic form. The highest performances of supported photocatalyst on OG degradation were found using an optimum amount of TiO2-Pal around 0.8 g·L−1, which corresponds properly to ca. 0.4 g·L−1 of TiO2. This amount is interestingly lower than the 2.5 g·L−1 generally reported when using pure unsupported TiO2 powder. The photodegradation rate increases by decreasing OG initial concentration, and it was found significantly higher when the OG solution is either acidic (pH<4 or basic (pH≈11. For OG concentrations in the range 5×10-6– 5×10-4 M, the kinetic law of the OG degradation in presence of TiO2-Pal is similar to that reported for unsupported TiO2 nanopowder. It follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood model with a first-order reaction and an apparent rate constant of about 2.9×10-2 min−1.

  13. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D.; Sears, S. Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-01-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  14. Carbonation of Clay Minerals Exposed to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees and 250 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Gill, S.; Butcher, T.(BNL); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of carbonation of clay minerals, such as bentonite, kaolinite, and soft clay, we exposed them to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2)/water at temperatures of 200 and 250 C and pressures of 1500 and 2000 psi for 72- and 107-hours. Bentonite, comprising three crystalline phases, montmorillonite (MMT), anorthoclase-type albite, and quartz was susceptible to reactions with ionic carbonic acid yielded by the interactions between scCO2 and water, particularly MMT and anorthoclase-type albite phases. For MMT, the cation-exchangeable ions, such as Na+ and Ca2+, present in its basal interplanar space, were replaced by proton, H+, from ionic carbonic acid; thereafter, the cations leaching from MMT directly reacted with CO32- as a counter ion of H+ to form carbonate compounds. Such in-situ carbonation process in basal space caused the shrinkage and breakage of the spacing structure within MMT. In contrast, the wet carbonation of anorthoclase-type albite, categorized as rock minerals, entailed the formation of three amorphous by-products, such as carbonates, kaolinite-like compounds, and silicon dioxide. Together, these two different carbonations caused the disintegration and corruption of bentonite. Kaolinite clay containing the amorphous carbonates and silicon dioxide was inert to wet carbonation. We noted only a gain in weight due to its water uptake, suggesting that kaolinite-like by-products generated by the wet carbonation of rock minerals might remain unchanged even during extended exposure. Soft clay consisting of two crystalline phases, dolomite and silicon dioxide, also was unaltered by wet carbonation, despite the uptake of water.

  15. Degradative crystal–chemical transformations of clay minerals under the influence of cyanobacterium-actinomycetal symbiotic associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Ivanova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and actinomycetes are essential components of soil microbial community and play an active role in ash elements leaching from minerals of the parent rock. Content and composition of clay minerals in soil determine the sorption properties of the soil horizons, water-holding capacity of the soil, stickiness, plasticity, etc. The transformative effect of cyanobacterial–actinomycetes associations on the structure of clay minerals – kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, biotite and muscovite – was observed, with the greatest structural lattice transformation revealed under the influence of association in comparison with monocultures of cyanobacterium and actinomycete. The range of the transformative effect depended both on the type of biota (component composition of association and on the crystal–chemical parameters of the mineral itself (trioctahedral mica – biotite, was more prone to microbial degradation than the dioctahedral – muscovite. The formation of the swelling phase – the product of biotite transformation into the mica–vermicullite mixed-layered formation was revealed as a result of association cultivation. Crystal chemical transformation of vermiculite was accompanied by the removal of potassium (К, magnesium (Mg and aluminum (Al from the crystal lattice. The study of such prokaryotic communities existed even in the early stages of the Earth's history helps to understand the causes and nature of the transformations undergone by the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere of the planet.contribution of treatments on structure induces and model parameters are discussed in the paper.

  16. Clay properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report an overview will be given of the basic properties of (suspended) clay particles. In section 2 the structure of clay minerals will be described. The forces between suspended particles (section 3) and the possible consequences of them, flocculation or deflocculation (sections 4 and 5)

  17. [Mineralogy and genesis of mixed-layer clay minerals in the Jiujiang net-like red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Li, Rong-Biao; Han, Wen; Wu, Yu; Gao, Wen-Peng; Jia, Jin-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Mineralogy and genesis were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to understand the mineralogy and its genesis significance of mixed-layer clay minerals in Jiujiang red soil section. XRD and FTIR results show that the net-like red soil sediments are composed of illite, kaolinite, minor smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite and minor mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite. HRTEM observation indicates that some smectite layers have transformed into kaolinite layers in net-like red soil. Mixed-layer illite-smectite is a transition phase of illite transforming into smectite, and mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite is a transitional product relative to kaolinite and smectite. The occurrence of two mixed-layer clay species suggests that the weathering sequence of clay minerals in net-like red soil traversed from illite to mixed-layer illite-smectite to smectite to mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite to kaolinite, which indicates that net-like red soil formed under a warm and humid climate with strengthening of weathering.

  18. The effects of the biogeochemical properties of clay minerals on the Pb sorption and desorption in various redox condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, T. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The fate and transportation of hazardous trace metal in soil environment can be controlled by various factors including temperature, geological location, properties of bed rock or sediment, human behavior, and biogeochemical reactions. The sorption and desorption process is one of the major process for control the transportation of trace metal in soil-water system. Nonetheless, few studies were focused on the biological controlling parameters, particularly redox reaction of structural metal of clay minerals. Thus, the objective of the present study is to investigate the correlation between the sorption and desorption reaction of Pb and biogeochemical properties of clay minerals. The effects of redox state of structural Fe and layer charge of the minerals on the migration/speciation of Pb at the various geochemical environment will be elucidated. The Fe-rich smectite, nontronite (NAu-1), and bulk soil samples which were collected from abandoned mine areas were reduced by microbial respiration by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 and/or Na-dithionite to various oxidation state of structural Fe. Then the Pb-stock solution made with common lead and nitric acid were spiked into the mineral/soil slurry with various Pb concentration to test the sorption and desorption reaction upto 7 days. The reaction was stopped at each time point by freezing the pellet and supernatant separately after centrifugation. Then the concentration and stable isotope ratio of Pb in the supernatant were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and Multicollector (MC)-ICP-MS. The structural as well as chemical modification on nontronite and bulk soil sample were measured using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wet chemistry analysis. The changes in Pb species in supernatant by sorption and desorption and its consequences on the clay structural/biogeochemical properties will be discussed.

  19. Removal of cyanobacterial blooms in Taihu Lake using local soils. I. Equilibrium and kinetic screening on the flocculation of Microcystis aeruginosa using commercially available clays and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Gang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)]. E-mail: gpan@mail.rcees.ac.cn; Zhang Mingming [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Chen Hao [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zou Hua [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Yan Hai [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2006-05-15

    Algal removal abilities of 26 clays/minerals were classified into three categories according to the 8-h equilibrium removal efficiency (Q {sub 8h}) and removal rate at a clay loading of 0.7 g/L. Type I clays (sepiolite, talc, ferric oxide, and kaolinite) had a Q {sub 8h} > 90%, a t {sub 5} (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) < 15 min, and a t {sub 8} < 2.5 h. Type II clays (6 clays) had a Q {sub 8h} 50-90%, a t {sub 5} < 2.5 h, and a t {sub 8} > 2.5 h. Type III clays (14 clays) with Q {sub 8h} < 50%, t {sub 5} > 8 h and t {sub 8} > 14 h had no practical value in removal of algal blooms. When the clay loading was reduced to 0.2 g/L, Q {sub 8h} for all the 25 materials decreased to below 60%, except for sepiolite whose Q {sub 8h} remained about 97%. The high efficiency for sepiolite to flocculate M. aeruginosa cells in freshwaters was due to the mechanism of netting and bridging effect. - Sepiolite was the most effective flocculant among 26 commercially available clays and minerals in removing harmful algal cells from freshwaters.

  20. The influence of shale depositional fabric on the kinetics of hydrocarbon generation through control of mineral surface contact area on clay catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Habibur M.; Kennedy, Martin; Löhr, Stefan; Dewhurst, David N.; Sherwood, Neil; Yang, Shengyu; Horsfield, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Accurately assessing the temperature and hence the depth and timing of hydrocarbon generation is a critical step in the characterization of a petroleum system. Clay catalysis is a potentially significant modifier of hydrocarbon generation temperature, but experimental studies of clay catalysis show inconsistent or contradictory results. This study tests the hypothesis that source rock fabric itself is an influence on clay mineral catalysis as it controls the extent to which organic matter and clay minerals are physically associated. Two endmember clay-organic fabrics distinguish the source rocks studied: (1) a particulate fabric where organic matter is present as discrete, >5 μm particles and (2) a nanocomposite fabric in which amorphous organic matter is associated with clay mineral surfaces at sub-micron scale. High-resolution electron imaging and bulk geochemical characterisation confirm that samples of the Miocene Monterey Formation (California) are representative of the nanocomposite source rock endmember, whereas samples from the Permian Stuart Range Formation (South Australia) represent the particulate source rock endmember. Kinetic experiments are performed on paired whole rock and kerogen isolate samples from these two formations using open system, non-isothermal pyrolysis at three different heating rates (0.7, 2 and 5 K/min) to determine the effects of the different shale fabrics on hydrocarbon generation kinetics. Extrapolation to a modelled geological heating rate shows a 20 °C reduction in the onset temperature of hydrocarbon generation in Monterey Formation whole rock samples relative to paired kerogen isolates. This result is consistent with the Monterey Formations's nanocomposite fabric where clay catalysis can proceed because reactive clay minerals are intimately associated with organic matter. By contrast, there is no significant difference in the modelled hydrocarbon generation temperature of paired whole rock and kerogen isolates from the

  1. Protection of Nitrosomonas europaea colonizing clay minerals from inhibition by nitrapyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S J; Prosser, J I

    1991-08-01

    Nitrate production by Nitrosomonas europaea in inorganic liquid medium containing ammonium was limited by reduction in pH. In the presence of montmorillonite and vermiculite, expanding clays with high cation-exchange-capacity (CEC), nitrite yield was increased, ammonia oxidation continued at pH values below those which inhibited growth in the absence of clays and growth was biphasic. The first phase was similar to that in the absence of clays, while the second was characterized by a lower rate of nitrite production. Illite, a non-expanding clay with low CEC, had no significant effect on ammonia oxidation, while oxidation of ammonia-treated vermiculite (ATV) occurred with no significant change in the pH of the medium. ATV, montmorillonite and vermiculite, but not illite, protected cells from inhibition by nitrapyrin at concentrations inhibitory to cells growing in suspended culture. This protection was maintained in ATV homo-ionic to Al3+, but montmorillonite made homo-ionic to Al3+ did not provide protection from inhibition. Attachment of cells to clays with high CEC is therefore advantageous in providing exchange at the clay surface of NH+4 and H+ produced by ammonia oxidation, in reducing pH toxicity, and in protecting cells from inhibition.

  2. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  3. Effects of clay minerals, hydroxides, and timing of dissolved organic matter addition on the competitive sorption of copper, nickel, and zinc : a column experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Refaey, Y.; Jansen, B.; Parsons, J.R.; de Voogt, P.; Bagnis, S.; Markus, A.; El-Shater, A.-H.; El-Haddad, A.-A.; Kalbitz, K.

    2017-01-01

    Infiltration of heavy metal (HM) polluted wastewater can seriously compromise soil and groundwater quality. Interactions between mineral soil components (e.g. clay minerals) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) play a crucial role in determining HM mobility in soils. In this study, the influence of

  4. Adsorption Properties of Hydrocarbons (n-Decane, Methyl Cyclohexane and Toluene on Clay Minerals: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of hydrocarbons may significantly affect hydrocarbon migration in unconventional reservoirs. Clay minerals form the primary adsorbent surfaces for hydrocarbons adsorbed in mudstone/shale. To study the adsorption properties of hydrocarbons (n-decane (C10H22, methyl cyclohexane (C7H14 and toluene (C7H8 on clay minerals (i.e., cookeite, ripidolite, kaolinite, illite, illite/smectite mixed-layer, Na-montmorillonite and Ca-montmorillonite, hydrocarbon vapor adsorption (HVA tests were conducted at 298.15 K. The results showed that (i the adsorption amounts of C10H22, C7H14 and C7H8 ranged from 0.45–1.03 mg/m2, 0.28–0.90 mg/m2 and 0.16–0.53 mg/m2, respectively; (ii for cookeite, ripidolite and kaolinite, the adsorption capacity of C10H22 was less than C7H14, which was less than C7H8; (iii for illite, Na-montmorillonite and Ca-montmorillonite, the adsorption capacity of C10H22 was greater than that of C7H8, and the adsorption capacity of C7H14 was the lowest; (iv for an illite/smectite mixed-layer, C7H14 had the highest adsorption capacity, followed by C10H22, and C7H8 had the lowest capacity. Adsorption properties were correlated with the microscopic parameters of pores in clay minerals and with experimental pressure. Finally, the weighted average method was applied to evaluate the adsorption properties of C10H22, C7H14 and C7H8 on clay minerals in oil-bearing shale from the Shahejie Formation of Dongying Sag in the Bohai Bay Basin, China. For these samples, the adsorbed amounts of C7H14 ranged from 18.03–28.02 mg/g (mean 23.33 mg/g, which is larger than that of C10H22, which ranges from 15.40–21.72 mg/g (mean 18.82 mg/g. The adsorption capacity of C7H8 was slightly low, ranging from 10.51–14.60 mg/g (mean 12.78 mg/g.

  5. Provenance and distribution of clay minerals in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Rao, B.R.

    and distribution of clay minerals 1761 are the predominant rock types cropping out in the Saurashtra and the drainage basins of the Narmada and Tapti Rivers, which annually discharge about 60 million tonnes of sediment through the Gulf of Cambay (Rao, 1975). A... depths of 50 m on the continental shelf (Fig. 2). South of 15”N intense coastal upwelling occurs during the SW Monsoon. During the NE monsoon (November-February), the southerly surface current is replaced by a northerly surface current (Fig. 2...

  6. The fate of iron on Mars: Mechanism of oxidation of basaltic minerals to ferric-bearing assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps the most conspicuous indication that chemical weathering has occurred on the surface of Mars is the overall color of the red planet and the spectroscopic features that identify ferric-bearing assemblages in the martian regolith. Apparently, Fe(2+) ions in primary minerals in parent igneous rocks on the martian surface have been oxidized to ferric iron, which occurs in degradation products that now constitute the regolith. The mineralogy of the unweathered igneous rocks prior to weathering on the martian surface is reasonably well constrained, mainly as a result of petrographic studies of the SNC meteorites. However, the alteration products resulting from oxidative weathering of these rocks are less well-constrained. The topics covered include the following: primary rocks subjected to chemical weathering; dissolution processes; oxidation of dissolved Fe(2+); mechanism of polymerization of hydrous ferric oxides; terrestrial occurrences of ferromagnesian smectites; and dehydroxylated Mg-Fe smectites on Mars.

  7. Fundamental Studies of Clay and Clay-rich Mineral Reactions with H2O-CO2 Fluids: Application to Geological Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizmeshya, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Geological sequestration is currently being actively developed as a near-term, large-scale carbon sequestration technology in which supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is injected below-ground into saline aquifers, depleted and existing oil and gas reservoir. Implementation strongly depends on the specific geological profile of each candidate injection site. Caprock formations that contain swellable clay minerals are of particular concern, since interaction with injected CO2 may produce complex local structural effects related to shrinkage, desiccation, and plastic response leading to CO2 escape. The current knowledge-base on rock-brine-CO2 interactions often relies on semi-empirical geochemical modeling and autoclave experiments, which necessitate quenching (de-gassing) to ambient conditions for characterization. To avoid these effects we used a moissanite-based microreaction system (Diefenbacher, J et al Rev. Mod. Inst., 76 15103 (2005)) which enables in situ synchrotron characterization of interactions under constant CO2 activity. Synchrotron studies were performed at the GSECARS sector of the Argonne National Lab APS to systematically determine the response of representative Ca- and Na-montmorillonites (STx-1, SWy-1) clays to dry/wet scCO2 (H2O-rich) fluids at T and P encountered in typical aquifers. Our main findings for hydrated STx-1 are that desiccation occurs spontaneously on the scale of minutes-hours over a wide range of conditions in dry scCO2 via release of H2O with volume changes as large as 19% in relation to the initial volume. Desiccation was not observed in wet scCO2, or in corresponding saline solutions containing 1-3 M NaCl, but quenching to ambient conditions from low-pressures leads to re-hydration in STx-1 suggesting a pressure-dependent diffusion barrier for H2O from the clay into bulk scCO2. Similar desiccation transitions with smaller volume changes of 5-9% were also observed in SWy-1 at P 140 atm and T 40 C. At high pressures ( 200 atm

  8. Sedimentological and clay mineral studies in Kakinada Bay, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    The sediments of Kakinada Bay are predominantly silty clays, with a phi mean range between 2.9 to 7.8 northern, central and southern parts of the bay consist of finer sediments (5.5 to 7.05 phi) while the eastern and western parts of the bay...

  9. An update on synthetic dyes adsorption onto clay based minerals: A state-of-art review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngulube, T

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available that are effective and low in price is rising hence a lot of research interest is being diverted towards adsorbents that are cheap, preferable naturally occurring materials like clays. In most reported dye adsorption studies, limited information on the relationship...

  10. Sorption of Pyrene by Clay Minerals Coated with Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM from Landfill Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingxiao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM from landfill leachate with clays could affect significantly the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs in soils. The complexes of montmorillonite (MT and kaolinite (KL with DOM extracted from landfill leachate were prepared under controlled conditions, termed CMT and CKL, respectively. The bare clays and their complexes were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, thermogravimetry (TG, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Batch experiments were designed to investigate the sorption behavior of pyrene onto the clays in the presence of DOM. The maximum sorption capacities of pyrene on MT, CMT, KL, and CKL were 22.18, 38.96, 42.00, and 44.99 μg·g−1, respectively, at the initial concentration of 1000 ± 150 μg·L−1. The sorption isotherms of pyrene by the bare clays followed the Henry model well, whereas the Freundlich sorption isotherm provided a better fit to the equilibrium data of the sorption by the complexes. The role of montmorillonite and kaolinite complexes with DOM in the retention of pyrene in soils was different. This may be due to the different crystal structures between montmorillonite and kaolinite.

  11. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  12. Transport of vanadium (V in saturated porous media: effects of pH, ionic-strength and clay mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium, a hazardous pollutant, has been frequently detected in soil and groundwater, however, its transport behavior in porous media were not clearly understood. In this study, the effects of solution pH, ionic strength (IS and the effect of clay mineral on the transport of vanadium in saturated porous media were investigated. Laboratory experiments using a series of columns packed with quartz sand were carried out to explore the retention and transport of vanadium with a range of ionic-strength (0.001–0.1 M and pH (4–8 and two different types of clay minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite. Results of the breakthrough experiments showed that vanadium was highly mobile in the saturated porous media. The increase in pH rendered a higher transport of vanadium in saturated porous media. The study also indicated an easier transfer of vanadium with an increase in IS. Montmorillonite enhanced the mobility of vanadium in the column when compared to kaolinite. A mathematical model based on advection-dispersion equation coupled with equilibrium and kinetic reactions was used to describe the retention and transport of vanadium in the columns very well.

  13. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Qingling; Deng Yali; Li Huishu; Liu Jie [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Hu Hongqing, E-mail: hqhu@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Chen Shouwen [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Sa Tongmin [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L{sup -1}. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ({Delta}{sub r}G{sub m}{sup {theta}}) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ({Delta}{sub r}H{sub m}{sup {theta}}) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  14. Inclusion reaction by swellable clay minerals. Part 4. ; Inclusion and solubilization of griseofulvin, a poorly water-soluble drug, by swellable clay minerals. Bojunsei nendo kobutsu no hosetsu sayo. Dai yonho. ; Bojunsei nendo kobutsu ni yoru nan prime yosei yakubutsuter dot griseofulvin no hosetsu to kayoka sayo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Takahashi, T. (Shiseido Basic Research Lab., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-05-20

    Griseofulvin (GF) is often kaken in too much because it is poorly water-soluble. The inclusion reaction of GF by clay minerals, which are expected to enhance its solubility and the duration effect of the medicine, is investigated in terms of crystallized conditions and water solubility of included GF. GF is dissolved in advance in solvents such as acetone, and clay minerals are dispersed in the solution. When the solvent and dissolved GF are impregnated in the layers and pores of the clay minerals, a powder complex including GF in the clay minerals is obtained. A simple mixture of GF and clay minerals is prepared as the reference specimen. The high solubility is, different from that of high molecular system, estimated to be caused by the formation of an associated body of finely dispersed clay mineral particles and the medicine. A few neutral medical substances other than GF have been subjected to study as poorly water-soluble medicines. As regards the effect of the medicines, it is confirmed by experiments that they show similar effects to that of free chemicals. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Mineral assemblage transformation of a metakaolin-based waste form after geopolymer encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin D.; Neeway, James J.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Bowden, Mark E.; Amonette, James E.; Arey, Bruce W.; Pierce, Eric M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.

    2016-05-01

    Current plans for nuclear waste vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) lack the capacity to treat all of the low activity waste (LAW) that is not encapsulated in the vitrified product. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplemental technologies under consideration to fill this gap. The FBSR process results in a granular product mainly composed of feldspathoid mineral phases that encapsulate the LAW and other contaminants of concern (COCs). In order to better understand the characteristics of the FBSR product, characterization testing has been performed on the granular product as well as the granular product encapsulated in a monolithic geopolymer binder. The non-radioactive simulated tank waste samples created for use in this study are the result of a 2008 Department of Energy sponsored Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) in 2008. These samples were created from waste simulant that was chemically shimmed to resemble actual tank waste, and rhenium has been used as a substitute for technetium. Another set of samples was created by the Savannah River Site Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) using a chemical shim of Savannah River Site Tank 50 waste in order to simulate a blend of 68 Hanford tank wastes. This paper presents results from coal and moisture removal tests along with XRD, SEM, and BET analyses showing that the major mineral components are predominantly sodium aluminosilicate minerals and that the mineral product is highly porous. Results also show that the materials pass the short-term leach tests: the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Product Consistency Test (PCT).

  16. Götzenite- and combeite-bearing mineral assemblages in peralkaline nephelinite at Nyiragongo, East African Rift: Recrystallization around a degassing alkaline magma chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T.; Elburg, M.; Erambert, M.

    2012-04-01

    In most igneous rocks, the high field strength elements (HFSE) titanium and zirconium reside in minerals such as ilmenite, titanite, zircon and baddelyite. In some highly peralkaline igneous rocks (agpaitic nepheline syenite, elpidite granite) these minerals are not stable, and the HFSE form complex, Na-, Ca- and volatile bearing silicate minerals. The central crater of Nyiragongo volcano in the East African Rift has a semi-permanent lava lake which may be regarded as a high-level magma chamber open to the atmosphere. The lavas and pyroclastic rocks of Nyiragongo range in composition from olivine melilitite to nephelinite and minor alkali olivine basalt. The nephelinites range from metaluminous to peralkaline compositions, including strongly peralkaline combeite nephelinite. In fresh peralkaline nephelinite, titanium is hosted in different minerals or mineral assemblages with titanomagnetite ± perovskite ± Ti-rich clinopyroxene, but in some holocrystalline, thermally metamorphosed nephelinites, götzenite (ideally Na2Ca5Ti(Si2O7)2F4) is the main Ti-bearing mineral. Götzenite is stable with combeite (Na2Ca2Si3O9), diopside and kirschsteinite, which replace primary magmatic minerals and glassy groundmass. The compositions of coexisting nepheline and kalsilite suggest recrystallization temperatures between 500 and 600 °C. A chemographic analysis of the sub-solidus mineral assemblages of götzenite-bearing and götzenite-free peralkaline nephelinite suggests that götzenite is stabilized by elevated fluorine activity combined with moderately high (for nephelinite) silica activity. At increasing peralkalinity, götzenite is likely to break down to perovskite-bearing mineral assemblages coexisting with combeite. The presence of götzenite- and combeite-bearing nephelinite at Nyiragongo is due to the influence of fluorine-rich fluids degassing from magma stored in the lava lake.

  17. Nanoscale spatial analysis of clay minerals containing cesium by synchrotron radiation photoemission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Toru; Shimoyama, Iwao; Matsumura, Daiju; Tsuji, Takuya; Nishihata, Yasuo; Kogure, Toshihiro; Ohkochi, Takuo; Yasui, Akira; Yaita, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation photoemission electron microscope (SR-PEEM) was applied to demonstrate the pinpoint analysis of micrometer-sized weathered biotite clay particles with artificially adsorbed cesium (Cs) atoms. Despite the insulating properties of the clay, we observed the spatial distributions of constituent elements (Si, Al, Cs, Mg, and Fe) without charging issues and clarified reciprocal site-correlations among these elements with nanometer resolution. We found that Cs atoms were likely to be adsorbed evenly over the entire particle; however, we identified an occupational conflict between Cs and Mg atoms, implying that Cs sorption involves ion exchange processes. Spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of the Cs4,5 M-edge region showed Cs to be present in a monocation state (Cs+) as typically observed for Cs compounds. Further pinpoint XAS measurements were also performed at the Fe L2,3-edge to determine the chemical valence of the Fe atoms. The shapes of the spectra were similar to those for Fe2O3, indicating that Fe in the clay was in a 3+ oxidation state. From these observations, we infer that charge compensation facilitates Cs adsorption in the vicinity of a substitution site where Si4+ ions are replaced by Fe3+ ions in SiO4 tetrahedral sheets. Our results demonstrate the utility of SR-PEEM as a tool for spatially resolved chemical analyses of various environmental substances, which is not limited by the poor conductivity of samples.

  18. Preparation of Al/Fe-Pillared Clays: Effect of the Starting Mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Helir-Joseph; Blanco, Carolina; Gil, Antonio; Vicente, Miguel-Ángel; Galeano, Luis-Alejandro

    2017-11-28

    Four natural clays were modified with mixed polyoxocations of Al/Fe for evaluating the effect of the physicochemical properties of the starting materials (chemical composition, abundance of expandable clay phases, cationic exchange capacity and textural properties) on final physicochemical and catalytic properties of Al/Fe-PILCs. The aluminosilicate denoted C2 exhibited the highest potential as starting material in the preparation of Al/Fe-PILC catalysts, mainly due to its starting cationic exchange capacity (192 meq/100 g) and the dioctahedral nature of the smectite phase. These characteristics favored the intercalation of the mixed (Al 13- x /Fe x ) 7+ Keggin-type polyoxocations, stabilizing a basal spacing of 17.4 Å and high increase of the BET surface (194 m²/g), mainly represented in microporous content. According to H₂-TPR analyses, catalytic performance of the incorporated Fe in the Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation (CWPO) reaction strongly depends on the level of location in mixed Al/Fe pillars. Altogether, such physicochemical characteristics promoted high performance in CWPO catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous medium at very mild reaction temperatures (25.0 ± 1.0 °C) and pressure (76 kPa), achieving TOC removal of 52% and 70% of azo-dye decolourization in only 75 min of reaction under very low concentration of clay catalyst (0.05 g/L).

  19. Effect of pH on the heavy metal-clay mineral interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altyn, O.; Oezbelge, H.O.; Dogu, T.; Oezbelge, T.A. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-31

    Adsorption and ion exchange of Pb and Cd on the surface of kaolinite and montmorillonite were studied with a strong emphasis on the pH values of solutions containing heavy metal ions. The pH range studied was 2.5 - 9. For kaolinite at a clay/solution ratio of 1/10 (w/w), Pb removal changes from 20 to 30% for an initial Pb concentration of 1640 ppm, and Cd removal changes from 10 to 20% for an initial Cd concentration of 1809 ppm. Due to its high exchange capacity, montmorillonite can remove more heavy metal than kaolinite. Removal rates for montmorillonite can reach up to 90% for both Pb and Cd. In the pH range of 3-6, there is a plateau for the removal rates. At pH values higher than 6, removal seems to increase artificially due to the precipitation of heavy metals. Under similar conditions for both clays, the rate of removal of Pb is always higher than that of Cd. As the pH value decreases for montmorillonite, there is a strong tendency for decreased surface area and swelling, as indicated by BET surface area measurements, adsorbed layer thickness and pore size distribution data. In the range of pH values studied, X-ray diffraction analysis showed the appearance of a characteristic (001) peak for montmorillonite, indicating that the crystalline structure of the clay was intact during the experiments.

  20. Preparation of Al/Fe-Pillared Clays: Effect of the Starting Mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helir-Joseph Muñoz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Four natural clays were modified with mixed polyoxocations of Al/Fe for evaluating the effect of the physicochemical properties of the starting materials (chemical composition, abundance of expandable clay phases, cationic exchange capacity and textural properties on final physicochemical and catalytic properties of Al/Fe-PILCs. The aluminosilicate denoted C2 exhibited the highest potential as starting material in the preparation of Al/Fe-PILC catalysts, mainly due to its starting cationic exchange capacity (192 meq/100 g and the dioctahedral nature of the smectite phase. These characteristics favored the intercalation of the mixed (Al13−x/Fex7+ Keggin-type polyoxocations, stabilizing a basal spacing of 17.4 Å and high increase of the BET surface (194 m2/g, mainly represented in microporous content. According to H2-TPR analyses, catalytic performance of the incorporated Fe in the Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation (CWPO reaction strongly depends on the level of location in mixed Al/Fe pillars. Altogether, such physicochemical characteristics promoted high performance in CWPO catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous medium at very mild reaction temperatures (25.0 ± 1.0 °C and pressure (76 kPa, achieving TOC removal of 52% and 70% of azo-dye decolourization in only 75 min of reaction under very low concentration of clay catalyst (0.05 g/L.

  1. Influence of organic matter and clay minerals in migration of derivative compounds of hydrocarbons; Influencia da materia organica e argilominerais na migracao de compostos derivados de hidrocarbonetos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Denize Gloria Barcellos; Mendonca Filho, Joao Graciano de; Polivanov, Helena [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: denize@geologia.ufrj.br; graciano@geologia.ufrj.br; helena@acd.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    Soil samples from the Guanabara Bay in Duque de Caxias city (RJ) were submitted to mineralogical and organic geochemistry analyses. This proceeding was used mainly to determine a possible interaction of hydrocarbons contaminants with the organic matter and the clay minerals presents in this mangrove. The sampling was carried out using Direct Push techniques. Thus, the mainly clay minerals characterizes were: gibbsite, illite, caulinite and smectite. The compositional analysis of organic constituents showed a predominance of amorphous material (degraded cuticles), followed of wood material and sporomorphs constituents, suggesting that the biological degradation occurred in situ. (author)

  2. Effects of clay minerals on transport of graphene oxide in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Taotao; Xia, Tianjiao; Qi, Yu; Zhang, Chengdong; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The presence of kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite in packed quartz sand inhibited the transport of graphene oxide to different degrees. Transport inhibition was exerted mainly by the presence of positively charged sites on clay edges (which served as favorable deposition sites), whereas the effects on the overall particle-collector interaction energy and flow path were small. Kaolinite exhibited the most significant transport-inhibition effects because of its high percentage of edge area. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:655-660. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. GEOCHEMICAL AND CLAY-MINERAL STUDY OF HEALING MUD FROM WUDALIANCHI, NE CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rasskazov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the centuries, people have used healing mud (peloids to draw toxins out of the body, boost the immune system, cure psoriasis, acne, depression, and hair loss. The beauty industry has used mud-clay masks, body wraps, soaps, and baths. The useful properties of mud were established empirically. The most popular healing-mud spars are known in the Dead Sea in Israel, Baden-Baden in Germany, Calistoga in California, Budapest in Hungary, Akhtala and Kumisi in Georgia, Paratunka in Kamchatka, Wudalianchi in China.

  4. Cesium and Strontium Uptake to Clay Minerals and Their Weathering Products in a Caustic Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sunkyung; Amistadi, Mary Kay; Seraphin, Supapan; Chorover, Jon

    2004-03-28

    Weathering behavior and contaminant (Sr and Cs) uptake by specimen clays (illite, vermiculite, montmorillonite and kaolinite) and their secondary solid phase products were studied in batch systems under geochemical conditions characteristic of leaking tank waste at the Hanford Site in WA (0.05 M AlT, 2 M Na+, 1 M NO3 -, pH {approx}14, Cs+ and Sr2+ present as co-contaminants). Time series experiments were conducted from 0 to 369 days, with initial Cs+ and Sr2+ concentrations ranging from 10-5 to 10-3 M. Cesium sorption after 369 d reaction was the greatest in the order of vermiculite, illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite at 10-3 M Cs/Sr. In the case of Sr, vermiculite showed highest Sr sorption and was followed by kaolinite, montmorillonite and illite at highest loading Cs/Sr after 369 d. Secondary phase products were feldspathoid sodium aluminum nitrate silicate, sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate, Na-Al chabazite and zeolite X in weathered clays. Discrete Sr single phases were found in kaolinite and illite systems after 369 d at 10-3 M Cs/Sr.

  5. The Study Of Mfensi Clay In The Ashanti Region Of Ghana | Nsiah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    composition, Mineral assemblage, Shrinkage, Water absorption, Colour, Refractoriness, Plastic index, Particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction pattern, Combustion, decomposition and evaporation, and Phase transition, crystallization. Mfensi clay was reasonably plastic and when fired at 1100 oC, turned yellowish-brown.

  6. Disseminated, veinlet and vein Pb-Zn, Cu and Sb polymetallic mineralization in the GaleChah-Shurab mining district, Iranian East Magmatic Assemblage (IEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Mehrabi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian East Magmatic Assemblage (IEMA in the Central Lut region, hosted porphyry and vein-type polymetallic mineralization. The GaleChah-Shurab mining district is located in NW of the IEMA. Volcanic and subvolcanic bodies in the area are composed of calc-alkaline porphyry quartz-latite, porphyry dacite and rhyodacite and hornblende-biotite andesite, equivalent to I-type granite. They emplaced in Tertiary and intruded the Jurassic shale, siltstone and limestone basement (Shemshak Fm. The faults, joints and fractures, are the main controls on the mineralization, in forms of disseminated, vein, veinlet and minor stockwork and brecciation type mineralization of Pb, Zn, Cu, Sb and trace elements. Vein and veinlet of Pb+Zn±Cu±Sb in the Gale-Chah abandoned mine accompanied by carbonate and silicic alterations in association with galena, sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, bournonite and tetrahedrite as the hypogene ore minerals and their supergene products including cerussite, covellite, digenite and second-generation colloidal pyrite. The Pb+Zn+Cu+Sb mineralization associated with sericitic and silicic alterations in the Shurab abandoned mine, is composed of two types of mineralization, veinlet and brecciation vein in the porphyry dacite boundaries with Jurassic shale and sandstones, and the disseminated and disseminated-veinlet mineralization which is hosted by the altered porphyry dacite and rhyodacite intrusive rocks. The mineral assemblages are galena, sphalerite, stibnite, As-bearing pyrite, chalcopyrite and tetrahedrite-tennantite complex hypogene-sulfide ore as a hypogene ore, and malachite, covellite, cerussite and melancoitic pyrite as a sulfide-oxide supergene ore. The Pb+Zn+Sb±As±Ag polymetallic occurrence is associated with sericitic, carbonate and chloritic alteration assemblage in the Chupan occurrence, in two forms, I vein, veinlet-stockwork (30m depth confined to fault structures and II disseminated-replacement (below 70m mainly

  7. Interactions between extracellular polymeric substances and clay minerals affect soil aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Cordula; Rehschuh, Stephanie; Kemi Olagoke, Folasade; Redmile Gordon, Marc; Kalbiltz, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    Soil aggregation is crucial for carbon (C) sequestration and microbial processes have been recognised as important control of aggregate turnover (formation, stability, and destruction). However, how microorganisms contribute to these processes is still a matter of debate. An enthralling mechanism determining aggregate turnover and therefore C sequestration may be the excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) as microbial glue, but effects of EPS on aggregation is largely unknown. Moreover, interdependencies between important aggregation factors like the amount of fine-sized particles (clay content), the decomposability of organic matter and the microbial community (size and composition, as well as the excretion of EPS) are still poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the complex interactions between these factors and their role in aggregate turnover. It was hypothesized that an increase in microbial activity, induced by the input of organic substrates, will stimulate EPS production and therefore the formation and stability of aggregates. To test this hypothesis, an incubation experiment has been conducted across a gradient of clay content (montmorillonite) and substrate decomposability (starch and glucose) as main drivers of the microbial activity. A combination of aggregate separation and stability tests were applied. This results will be examined with respect to the obtained microbial parameters (amount and composition of EPS, CO2 emission, microbial biomass, phospholipid fatty acid), to disentangle the mechanisms and factors controlling aggregate turnover affected by soil microorganisms. This study is expected to provide insights on the role of EPS in the stability of aggregates. Thus, the results of this study will provide an improved understanding of the underlying processes of aggregate turnover in soils, which is necessary to implement strategies for enhanced C sequestration in agricultural soils.

  8. identification of clay minerals of the eastern southern region of lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ray analysis are almost the same. The results for the identification of minerals by ethylene glycol and heat treatment from the XRD analysis are supported by Infrared analysis (Table 2). The absorption bands due to OH stretching vibration at 3694 ...

  9. Bioavailability of iron in geophagic earths and clay minerals, and their effect on dietary iron absorption using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Gretchen L.; Ahn, Cedric I.; Bodis, Mary S.; Luwedde, Flavia; Miller, Dennis D.; Hillier, Stephen; Tako, Elad; Glahn, Raymond P.; Young, Sera L.

    2014-01-01

    Geophagy, the deliberate consumption of earth, is strongly associated with iron (Fe) deficiency. It has been proposed that geophagy may be practiced as a means to improve Fe status by increasing Fe intakes and, conversely, that geophagy may cause Fe deficiency by inhibiting Fe absorption. We tested these hypotheses by measuring Fe concentration and relative bioavailable Fe content of 12 samples of geophagic earth and 4 samples of pure clay minerals. Further, we assessed the impact of these samples on the bioavailability of Fe from an Fe-rich test meal (cooked white beans, WB). Fe concentrations were measured with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Fe bioavailability was determined using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model in which ferritin formation was used as an index of Fe bioavailability. Geophagic earth and clay mineral samples were evaluated with this model, both alone and in combination with WB (1:16 ratio, sample:WB). Median Fe concentration of the geophagic earth was 3485 (IQR 2462, 14571) μg/g and mean Fe concentration in the clay minerals was 2791 (± 1782) μg/g. All specimens had Fe concentrations significantly higher (p ≤ 0.005) than the Fe concentration of WB (77 μg/g). Ferritin formation (i.e. Fe uptake) in cells exposed to geophagic earths and clay minerals was significantly lower than in cells exposed to WB (p ≤ 0.05) and Fe uptake responses of 11 of the 16 samples were not significantly different from the blank, indicating no bioavailable Fe. When samples were combined with WB, 5 of 16 had mean ferritin levels that were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05, one tail) than the WB alone, indicating that the samples inhibited Fe uptake from the WB. None of the ferritin responses of cells exposed to both WB and earth/clay were significantly higher than WB alone. Thus, although geophagic earths and mineral clays are high in total Fe, very little of this Fe is bioavailable. Further, some geophagic earth and clay mineral

  10. Mild acid and alkali treated clay minerals enhance bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soil: A14C-tracer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-04-01

    Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils requires a higher microbial viability and an increased PAH bioavailability. The clay/modified clay-modulated bacterial degradation could deliver a more efficient removal of PAHs in soils depending on the bioavailability of the compounds. In this study, we modified clay minerals (smectite and palygorskite) with mild acid (HCl) and alkali (NaOH) treatments (0.5-3 M), which increased the surface area and pore volume of the products, and removed the impurities without collapsing the crystalline structure of clay minerals. In soil incubation studies, supplements with the clay products increased bacterial growth in the order: 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl ≥ unmodified for palygorskite. A 14 C-tracing study showed that the mild acid/alkali-treated clay products increased the PAH biodegradation (5-8%) in the order of 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified > 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl > 0.5 M NaOH ≥ unmodified ≥ 3 M NaOH for palygorskite. The biodegradation was correlated (r = 0.81) with the bioavailable fraction of PAHs and microbial growth as affected particularly by the 0.5 M HCl and 0.5 M NaOH-treated clay minerals. These results could be pivotal in developing a clay-modulated bioremediation technology for cleaning up PAH-contaminated soils and sediments in the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon paste electrodes modified with a new phenothiazine derivative adsorbed on zeolite and on mineral clay for NADH oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gligor, Delia [Department of Physical Chemistry, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)], E-mail: ddicu@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Balaj, Florina [Department of Physical Chemistry, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Maicaneanu, Andrada [Department of Chemical Technology, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Gropeanu, R.; Grosu, I. [Department of Organic Chemistry, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Muresan, Liana; Popescu, I.C. [Department of Physical Chemistry, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-01-15

    Two new composite electrodes, based on carbon paste (CP) incorporating a synthetic zeolite (13X type; Z) or a natural mineral clay (bentonite; B), both impregnated with a new phenothiazine derivative [3,7-di(m-aminophenyl)-10-ethyl phenothiazine; EPh], were developed. The physical properties of the EPh-Z and EPh-B composite materials have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode measurements were used for electrochemical characterization of the EPh-Z-CPEs and EPh-B-CPEs electrodes. CV measurements revealed a reasonably fast electron transfer rate for both modified electrodes. No significant differences, concerning the pH effect on the formal standard potential, the magnitude of the rate constants for heterogeneous electron transfer and the electrode response stability, were observed between the investigated electrodes. Both electrodes showed a good electrocatalytic activity for {beta}-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation (for example, in the case of EPh-Z-CPEs the electrocatalytic rate constant was 1.1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, at pH 7)

  12. Origin of clay minerals in Early Eocene volcanic paleosols on King George Island, Maritime Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinola, Diogo Noses; Pi-Puig, Teresa; Solleiro-Rebolledo, Elizabeth; Egli, Markus; Sudo, Masafumi; Sedov, Sergey; Kühn, Peter

    2017-07-25

    The paleoclimate during the Early Eocene in Maritime Antarctica is characterized by cool conditions without a pronounced dry season. Soils formed on volcanic material under such climate conditions in modern analogue environments are usually Andosols rich in nanocrystalline minerals without pedogenic smectite. The paleosols formed on volcanic material on King Georges Island are covered by basalts, dated by 6 new (40)Ar/(39)Ar datings to 51-48 Ma, and are rich in smectite. A pedogenic origin of the smectites would suggest a semi-arid rather than a wet non-seasonal humid paleoclimate. To investigate the origin of the smectites in these paleosols we used X-ray diffraction and microscopic techniques. Minor mineralogical changes between the volcanic parent material and the paleosols and a homogenous distribution of smectites throughout the paleosol horizons indicate that these smectites were mainly inherited from the pyroclastic parent material, which was altered prior to surficial weathering. Nevertheless, the mineralogical properties, such as degree of crystallinity and octahedral site occupancy, of these smectites were modified during the ancient soil formation. Our findings highlight that trioctahedral smectites were a product of deuteric alteration of pyroclastic rocks and were progressively transformed to dioctahedral smectites during weathering in a soil environment on King George Island.

  13. Provenance and depositional environments of the late Neogene Red Clay deposits in Northern China based on detrital zircon and heavy mineral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yuan; Kaakinen, Anu; Beets, Christiaan J.; Prins, Maarten A.

    2014-05-01

    The late Miocene - Pliocene (about 11-2.5 Ma) time is the latest period of undisturbed global warmth before the onset of glacial times. Pliocene climate state is proposed as almost an analogue for future global climate by the end of 21st century and has been focus of much research. The Neogene red earth underlying the Pleistocene loess - paleosol deposits in northern China, has been demonstrated to have a relatively continuous depositional character at least over the past ~7-8 to ~2.6Ma. These Red Clay deposits are not only important continental archives of late Miocene-Pliocene environmental and climatic changes, but also preserve significant information on past atmospheric circulation patterns. Multiple competing hypotheses have been proposed for the provenance of Red Clay deposits of the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), yet none has been confirmed. Whether it is sediments derived from single or multiple source areas still remains ambiguous. U-Pb age dating of detrital zircons from clastic sediments has proved to be powerful tool to trace sediment sources. However, this method is seldom applied in constraining the provenance of Red Clay deposits. In this study, we selected three typical Red Clay sections across the northern China. They are Dongwan in the western part, Lantian in the southern part and Baode in the northeastern part of the CLP. Based on the systematic field geologic survey, stratigraphic investigation and magnetostratigraphy, 15 samples in different stratigraphic levels were chosen. By applying the zircon U-Pb dating and single grain zircon morphology, combined with heavy mineral analysis of the Red Clay samples, the research aims to investigate the source and spatio-temporal evolution of Neogene Red Clay deposits of northern China. This study has significant implications for understanding the Red Clay depositional environments and will give insight into the past wind systems responsible for transporting dust onto the Chinese Loess Plateau.

  14. Origin and diagenesis of clay minerals in relation to sandstone paragenesis: An example in eolian dune reservoirs and associated rocks, Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollastro, R.M.; Schenk, C.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Eolian dune sandstones are the principal reservoir rocks in the Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming. These sandstones formed as shorelines retreated and dunes migrated across siliciclastic sabkhas. Sandstones are mainly quartzarenites; on average, clay minerals constitute about 5 wt.% the whole rock. Although present in minor amounts, clay minerals play an important role in the diagenetic evolution of these sandstones. Allogenic clay minerals are present in shaly rock fragments and laminae. Early infiltration of clays into porous sabkha sands commonly form characteristic menisei or bridges between framework grains or, when more extensive, form coatings or rims on grain surfaces. Authigenic clays include nearly pure smectite, mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S), and late diagenetic illite and corrensite; these clay minerals are present as pore-lining cements. In addition to the deposition and neoformation of clay minerals throughout sandstone paragenesis, the conversion of smectite to illite occurred as temperatures increased with progressive burial. A temperature of 103C is calculated at a present depth of 3,200 m using a geothermal gradient of 30C/km and a mean annual surface temperature of 7C. After correction for uplift and erosion (250 m), the maximum calculated temperature for the conversion of all random I/S to ordered I/S is 100C. This calculated temperature is in excellent agreement with temperatures of 100-110C implied from I/S geothermometry.

  15. Clay minerals of Pliocene deposits and their potential use for the purification of polluted wastewater in the Sohag area, Egypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Refaey, Y.; Jansen, B.; El-Shater, A.H.; El-Haddad, A.A.; Kalbitz, K.

    2015-01-01

    In our study we investigated the clay fraction composition of Pliocene clay deposits in the Sohag area, Egypt. Our goal was to obtain insights into the origin of the deposits, and to assess their potential for use in inexpensive wastewater purification. The rationale for the latter was that in Egypt

  16. Evaluation of the endotoxin binding efficiency of clay minerals using the Limulus Amebocyte lysate test: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumberger, Simone; Ladinig, Andrea; Reisinger, Nicole; Ritzmann, Mathias; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-01-02

    Endotoxins are part of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria. They are potent immune stimulators and can lead to death if present in high concentrations. Feed additives, which bind endotoxins in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, could help to prevent their negative impact. The objective of our study was to determine the potential of a bentonite (Bentonite 1), a sodium bentonite (Bentonite 2), a chemically treated smectite (Organoclay 1) and a modified attapulgite (Organoclay 2) to bind endotoxins in vitro. Polymyxin B served as positive control. The kinetic chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte lysate test was adapted to measure endotoxin activity. Firstly, a single sorption experiment (10 endotoxin units/mL (EU/mL)) was performed. Polymyxin B and organoclays showed 100% binding efficiency. Secondly, the adsorption efficiency of sorbents in aqueous solution with increasing endotoxin concentrations (2,450 - 51,700 EU/mL) was investigated. Organoclay 1 (0.1%) showed a good binding efficiency in aqueous solution (average 81%), whereas Bentonite 1 (0.1%) obtained a lower binding efficiency (21-54%). The following absorbent capacities were calculated in highest endotoxin concentration: 5.59 mg/g (Organoclay 1) > 3.97 mg/g (Polymyxin B) > 2.58mg/g (Organoclay 2) > 1.55 mg/g (Bentonite 1) > 1.23 mg/g (Bentonite 2). Thirdly, a sorption experiment in artificial intestinal fluid was conducted. Especially for organoclays, which are known to be unspecific adsorbents, the endotoxin binding capacity was significantly reduced. In contrast, Bentonite 1 showed comparable results in artificial intestinal fluid and aqueous solution. Based on the results of this in vitro study, the effect of promising clay minerals will be investigated in in vivo trials.

  17. A study on the characteristics of granular clay minerals for the adsorption and recovery of metal ions 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Chul Hun; Park, Jin Tae; Choi, Byung In; Kim, Sang Yeon [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Granular clay mineral(GCM) as new adsorbent for the adsorption and recovery of metal ion in aqueous solution was prepared successfully from various powder-typed Na-bentonite, Ca-bentonite and Kaolinite with high-precision preparation device self-designed in this study. The adsorption behaviour of 8-hydroxyquinoline(8HQ) and dimethylglyoxime(DGM) on porous GCMs was studied to obtain the optimum conditions for the preparation of 8HQ-GCM adsorbent. The adsorption mechanism of 8HQ on GCM have been also investigated by interpreting the distribution coefficients, Freundlich constants(K and 1/n) and adsorption enthalpy({Delta}H) measured under various conditions. The adsorption capacities and quantitative adsorption pH range of 8HQ-GCM adsorbent for metal ions were found to be 2.03 x 10{sup -3} mmol, Cu{sup +2}/g at pH 2 - 9 for Cu{sup +2}, 2.01 x 10{sup -3} mmol Ni{sup +2}/g, at pH 4 - 9 for Ni{sup +2}, 0.83 x 10{sup -3} mmol Zn{sup +2}/g at pH 6 - 9 for Zn{sup +2}, 0.97 x 10{sup -3} mmol Cd{sup +2}/g at pH 6 - 9 for Cd{sup +2} and 1.00 x 10{sup -3} mmol Pb{sup +2}/g at pH 6 - 9 for Pb{sup +2}, respectively. The selective adsorption of Cu{sup +2} from Ni{sup +2}, Zn{sup +2}, Cd{sup +2} and Pb{sup +2} was possible at pH 4 by 8HQ-GCM. The metal ions adsorbed by 8HQ-GCM were quantitatively recovered with 0.5N HCl. (author). 35 refs., 12 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. The role of clay minerals and fulvic acid to the complexation of Na, Mg, and Ca in stream flows from adjacent forested head watersheds composed of different vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terajima, Tomomi; Moriizumi, Mihoko; Nakamura, Tomohiro

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the complexation and flow process in metal elements under a fresh water environment, discharges of Na, Mg, and Ca were measured in streams of adjacent forested head watersheds composed of coniferous evergreen- and deciduous broad leaf- trees. Total elements (T-Na, T-Mg, and T-Ca) and ions (Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) in stream flows which passed through 0.45 μm filters were measured with an ICP and Ion-chromatograph. The remainders of total elements and ions were equated with complex compounds. Then the discharges of Si and fulvic acid, which respectively are the representatives of ligands by clay minerals and humic substances, provided the relationship between the compound discharges and the complexation process of the above metal elements. Even if Na, Mg, and Ca are believed to be mostly free ions in fresh water environments, the rates of the compounds to the total elements ranged 10 to 40 % in the coniferous watershed and 20 to 60 % in the deciduous watersheds. The compounds sometimes occupied more than half of the total elements; this was predominant in the deciduous watershed. These mean that the discharge of compounds is not negligible in watershed hydrology. Possible complexation processes in metal elements are #1) Hydration, #2) Adsorption or substitution with clay minerals, #3) Mineral complex, #4) Adsorption with humic substances as represented by fulvic acid, and #5) Chelate with organic acids as oxalate, formic acid, and pyrrole. Under fresh water environments, #2 and #4 must be the most potential processes of the complexation in metal elements. The relationship between the compounds, Si, and fulvic acid, therefore, supplies useful information to presume the status of the compounds. The compounds-Si relations in both watersheds showed linear correlations (r=0.79 to 0.99) for a stream base flow and stream flow in a small rainstorm. The linear correlations, however, occurred only for the stream flow in the compounds-Si relations at a big

  19. CO2-Brine-Iron-bearing Clay Mineral Interactions: Surface Area Changes and Fracture-Filling Potentials in Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission from coal-fired power plants. The injected CO2 in GCS sites can induce dissolution of rocks and secondary mineral formation, potentially change the physical properties of the geological formations, and thus influence the transport and injectivity of CO2. However, most of the relevant studies are based on hydrological transport, using simulation models rather than studying actual interfacial chemical reactions. The mechanisms and kinetics of interfacial reactions among supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-saline water-rock surfaces at the molecular scale and their impacts on CO2 leakage have not been well understood. This research investigated the effects of various environmental factors (such as temperature, pressure, salinity, and different metal ion and organic-containing brine) on the dissolution and surface morphological changes of clay minerals. In this work, iron-bearing clay mineral, biotite [K(Mg,Fe)3AlSi3O10(OH,F)2], was used for model clay minerals in potential GCS sites. Both fluid/solid chemistry analysis and interfacial topographic studies were conducted to investigate the dissolution/precipitation on clay mineral surfaces under GCS conditions in high salinity systems. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the interfacial surface morphology changes were observed. Shortly after a CO2 pressure of 102 atm is applied at 95oC, in situ pH of solutions was 3.15 ± 0.10. The early intrinsic dissolution rates of biotite were 8.4 ± 2.8 × 10-13 and 11.2 ± 3.0 × 10-13 mol Si m-2s-1 in water and NaCl solution, respectively. At the early stage of reaction, fast growth of fibrous illite on biotite basal planes was observed. After 22-70 h reaction, the biotite basal surface cracked, resulting in illite detaching from the surfaced. Later, the cracked surface layer was released into solution, thus the inner layer was exposed as a renewed

  20. Synthesis and structural characterization of ferrous trioctahedral smectites: Implications for clay mineral genesis and detectability on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Nickerson, Ryan D.; Morris, Richard V.; Agresti, David G.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2015-06-01

    Widespread detections of phyllosilicates in Noachian terrains on Mars imply a history of near-surface fluid-rock interaction. Ferrous trioctahedral smectites are thermodynamically predicted products of basalt weathering on early Mars, but to date only Fe3+-bearing dioctahedral smectites have been identified from orbital observations. In general, the physicochemical properties of ferrous smectites are poorly studied because they are susceptible to air oxidation. In this study, eight Fe2+-bearing smectites were synthesized from Fe2+-Mg-Al silicate gels at 200°C under anoxic conditions. Samples were characterized by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and visible/near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy. The range of redox states was Fe3+/ΣFe = 0 to 0.06 ± 0.01 as determined by both XAS and, for short integration times, Mössbauer. The smectites have 060 distances (d(060)) between 1.53 and 1.56 Å, indicating a trioctahedral structure. d(060) and XAS-derived interatomic Fe-(Fe,Mg,Al) distance scaled with Fe content. Smectite VNIR spectra feature OH/H2O absorption bands at 1.4 and 1.9 µm, (Fe2+,Mg,Al)3-OH stretching bands near 1.4 µm, and Fe2+Fe2+Fe2+-OH, MgMgMg-OH, AlAl(Mg,Fe2+)-OH, and AlAl-OH combination bands at 2.36 µm, 2.32 µm 2.25 µm, and 2.20 µm, respectively. The spectra for ferrous saponites are distinct from those for dioctahedral ferric smectites, permitting their differentiation from orbital observations. X-ray diffraction patterns for synthetic high-Mg ferrosaponite and high-Mg ferrian saponite are both consistent with the Sheepbed saponite detected by the chemistry and mineralogy (CheMin) instrument at Gale Crater, Mars, suggesting that anoxic basalt alteration was a viable pathway for clay mineral formation on early Mars.

  1. Laboratory experiments on Mars-relevant clay and phosphate minerals yield insights into the aqueous history and potential for habitability on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausrath, E.; Adcock, C. T.; Gainey, S.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Tu, V.

    2012-12-01

    Data from Mars landers and orbiters increasingly indicate the occurrence of aqueous geochemical processes, suggesting the presence of environments that may be habitable. These environments, however, differ from terrestrial environments in significant ways. Laboratory experiments can therefore be vital in providing further insight into environmental conditions on Mars, and the implications for habitability. Here we report the results of experiments designed to interpret observations of Mars from landers, orbiters and martian meteorites. Dissolution rates of the Mars-relevant phosphate minerals whitlockite, merrillite, and chlorapatite, as well as amorphous Al- and Fe-phosphates, suggest rapid dissolution of these phases. Phosphate release on Mars may therefore have been greater than on Earth, with important implications for habitability. Measured dissolution rates of nontronite when compared to montmorillonite dissolution rates from the literature suggest that preferential dissolution of nontronite may be able to account for enrichments of montmorillonite and kaolinite in profiles at Mawrth Vallis. Synthesis experiments of clay minerals under oxidizing and reducing conditions may help interpret transitions in clay mineral chemistry as a possible paleoredox indicator.

  2. Clay mineralogy and source-to-sink transport processes of Changjiang River sediments in the estuarine and inner shelf areas of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifei; Zou, Xinqing; Gao, Jianhua; Wang, Chenglong; Li, Yali; Yao, Yulong; Zhao, Wancang; Xu, Min

    2018-02-01

    We examined the source-to-sink sediment transport processes from the Changjiang River to the estuarine coastal shelf area by analyzing the clay mineral assemblages in suspended sediment samples from the Changjiang River catchment and surface samples from the estuarine coastal shelf area following the impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) in 2003. The results indicate that the clay mineral compositions throughout the study area are dominated by illite, with less abundant kaolinite and chlorite and scarce smectite. The clay minerals display distinct differences in the tributaries and exhibit obvious changes in the trunk stream compared with the periods before 2003, and the source of sediment has largely shifted to the mid- to lower reaches of the river after 2003. Spatially, the clay mineral assemblages in the estuarine area define two compositionally distinct provinces. Province I covers the mud area of the Changjiang River estuary and the Zhe-Min coastal region, where sediment is primarily supplied by the Changjiang River. Province II includes part of the Changjiang River estuary and the southeastern portion of the study area, where the sediment is composed of terrestrial material from the Changjiang River and re-suspended material from the Huanghe River carried by the Jiangsu coastal current. Moreover, the other smaller rivers in China (including the Oujiang and Minjiang rivers of mainland China and the rivers of West Taiwan) also contribut sediments to the estuarine and inner shelf areas. In general, the clay mineral assemblages in the Changjiang River estuarine area are have mainly been controlled by sediment supplied from upstream of the Changjiang River tributaries. However, since the completion of the TGD in 2003, the mid- to downstream tributaries have become the main source of sediments from the Changjiang catchment into the East China Sea. These analyses further demonstrate that the coastal currents and the decrease in the sediment load of the river

  3. Cerium sequestration and accumulation in fractured crystalline bedrock: The role of Mn-Fe (hydr-)oxides and clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changxun; Drake, Henrik; Mathurin, Frédéric A.; Åström, Mats E.

    2017-02-01

    considerable amounts of Mn. These spectroscopic and microscopic features led us to suggest that the remarkable accumulation of Ce(IV) in this fracture is a result of repeated formation and dissolution of Mn oxides, that is, formation of Mn oxide followed by oxidative scavenging of Ce as Ce oxide nanoparticles, which largely remained during the subsequent reductive dissolution of the Mn oxides. In addition, the XANES data indicate that goethite has the capability to oxidize Ce at near-neutral pH under our experimental conditions (goethite reacted with 0.001 M Ce for 48 h in a glove box with O2 <1 ppm). This previously unrecognized Ce oxidation pathway also seems to contribute to a minor extent to the oxidative scavenging of Ce in the fracture network. Trivalent Ce in the fracture coatings, in particular below 2.5 m, is mainly sorbed as inner-sphere complexes on clay minerals. Taking into account the facts that Ce in the present groundwater is scarce and modeled to be largely complexed with humic substance, it is argued that the inner-sphere complexes were mainly formed from past (Paleozoic) hydrothermal fluids.

  4. The use of Clay minerals in stratigraphic correlations of carboniferous coal deposits. Les mineraux argileux au service des correlations stratigraphiques des formations houilleres du Carbonifere; Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzi, G.; Bossiroy, D.; Dreesen, R. (ISSeP, Liege (Belgium))

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of this research project has been achieved: the development of a new tool for the lithostratigraphical correlation of cored boreholes. The proposed technique is based on the processing and interpretation of the results of mineralogical analyses, carried out on the clay minerals from finegrained siliciclastic rocks, associated with coal seams. For this study, the stratigraphical interval below and above the Quaregnon Marine Band (limit between the Westphalian A and B), and more precisely the rock sequence between coal seams no KS 71 and 44 was selected: this interval has been recorded in several cored boreholes, north of the actual exploitation limits of the Beringen and Zolder-Houthalen collieries (Belgian Campine). Over 1000 samples (mainly from mudstones, some siltstones and sandstones) were taken out of the cores, at a regular spacing (about 2m), for further mineralogical analysis. Simultaneously, a sedimentological study was carried out on the the sampled sequences, as well as a petrographical analysis of the main rock types. This resulted in a reconstruction of the Westphalian depositional environments and in a better knowledge of the 'behaviour' (geological history) of the clay minerals. The mineralogical composition of the clay minerals was identified through X-ray diffraction and computer-aided graphical processing of the resulting data produced percentage or intensity ratio curves, which could then be used as a lithostratigraphical correlation tool. Correlations have been shown between relatively simple rock sequences (without split seams) in neighbouring boreholes (1 to 3 km apart) and positive correlations revealed between more complex sequences containing multiple coals seams. Some positive but less obvious correlations have also been discovered between sequences from widely spaced boreholes ({+-}10 km apart).

  5. Special clays: what they are, characterization and properties

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Antonio C. Vieira; Santos, Pérsio de Souza; Santos, Helena de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Special clays are a group of clays different from the large volume of clay mineral products named "Industrial Clays": kaolins, ball clays, refractory clays, bentonites, fuller's earths, common clays. Two groups of special clays exist: rare, as in the case of hectorite and sepiolite and restricted areas, as in the case of white bentonite, halloysite and palygorskite (attapulgite). A review is given of the most important producers of the special clays and their properties in the Western World, ...

  6. Tellurides, selenides and Bi-mineral assemblages from the Río Narcea Gold Belt, Asturias, Spain: genetic implications in Cu-Au and Au skarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepedal, A.; Fuertes-Fuente, M.; Martín-Izard, A.; González-Nistal, S.; Rodríguez-Pevida, L.

    2006-07-01

    Gold ores in skarns from the Río Narcea Gold Belt are associated with Bi-Te(-Se)-bearing minerals. These mineral assemblages have been used to compare two different skarns from this belt, a Cu-Au skarn (calcic and magnesian) from the El Valle deposit, and a Au-reduced calcic skarn from the Ortosa deposit. In the former, gold mineralization occurs associated with Cu-(Fe)-sulfides (chalcopyrite, bornite, chalcocite-digenite), commonly in the presence of magnetite. Gold occurs mainly as native gold and electrum. Au-tellurides (petzite, sylvanite, calaverite) are locally present; other tellurides are hessite, clausthalite and coloradoite. The Bi-bearing minerals related to gold are Bi-sulfosalts (wittichenite, emplectite, aikinite, bismuthinite), native bismuth, and Bi-tellurides and selenides (tetradymite, kawazulite, tsumoite). The speciation of Bi-tellurides with Bi/Te(Se + S) ≤ 1, the presence of magnetite and the abundance of precious metal tellurides and clausthalite indicate fO2 conditions within the magnetite stability field that locally overlap the magnetite-hematite buffer. In Ortosa deposit, gold essentially occurs as native gold and maldonite and is commonly related to pyrrhotite and to the replacement of löllingite by arsenopyrite, indicating lower fO2 conditions for gold mineralization than those for El Valle deposit. This fact is confirmed by the speciation of Bi-tellurides and selenides (hedleyite, joséite-B, joséite-A, ikunolite-laitakarite) with Bi/Te(+ Se + S) ≥ 1.

  7. Problem of the reciprocal transformations of clay minerals and scattered organic matter (ROV) in relation to the problem of the genesis and migration of oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, A.Ye.; Abilgaliyev, M.Zh.; Faddeyev, V.A.; Kozlovskiy, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Based on methods of experimental modeling we studied the system of montmorillonite water solution of KC1--scattered organic matter, which is found under the influence of increased temperature, hydrostatic pressure and electric current. The methods of infrared spectroscopic, X-ray graphic, Moessbauer, thermal and chemical analyses showed that the use of electrical current promotes the formation of montmorillonite. Its hydro-micatization occurs without change and with change in a pattern of the crystal lattice (di-and trioctahedral). Other mineral formations also appear, among which are kaolinite and feldspars. The scattered organic matter can be desorbed from the surface of clay minerals and moved toward the anode or cathode according to the laws of electrical kinetics. It is shown that natural electrical potentials of the earth play a significant role in the lithogenesis of precipitates and should be considered in solving the problem of genesis and migration of oil.

  8. Mineral catalysis of the formation of the phosphodiester bond in aqueous solution - The possible role of montmorillonite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.; Ertem, Gozen; KAMALUDDIN; Agarwal, Vipin; Hua, Lu Lin

    1989-01-01

    The possible role of montmorillonite clays in the spontaneous formation on the primitive earth of the phosphodiester bond in the presence of water was investigated in experiments measuring the binding of various nucleosides and nucleotides with Na(+)-montmorillonite 22A and the reactions of these compounds with a water-soluble carbodiimide. It was found that, at neutral pH, adenine derivatives bind stronger than the corresponding uracil derivatives, consistent with the protonation of the adenine by the acidic clay surface and a cationic binding of the protonated ring to the anionic clay surface. The reaction of the 5-prime-AMP with carbodiimide resulted in the formation of 2-prime,5-prime-pApA (18.9 percent), 3-prime,5-prime-pApA (11 percent), and AppA (4.8 percent). The yields of these oligomers obtained when poly(U) was used in place of the clay were 15.5 percent, 3.7 percent, and 14.9 percent AppA, respectively.

  9. Late-Quaternary variations in clay minerals along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence of climatic variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Sukhija, B.S.; Gujar, A; Nagabhushanam, P.; Paropkari, A

    Down-core variations in illite, chlorite, smectite and kaolinite (the major clays) in two sup(14)C-dated cores collected along the SW continental margin of India show that illite and chlorite have enhanced abundance during 20-17, 12.5, 11-9.5, and 5...

  10. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  11. A new microenvironment for the formation of clay minerals: the example of authigenic halloysite-7Å and gibbsite in a stalactite from Agios Georgios Cave, Kilkis, north Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ifandi, University of Patras

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An unusual authigenic origin for halloysite and gibbsite is reported in a stalactite from Agios Georgios Cave, Kilkis. This speleothem includes mostly pure calcite whereas minor areas of Mg-rich calcite and scarce dolomite are present in four growth phases. Abundant pores are created due to imperfect coalescence of the calcite crystals. Several of them contain detrital muscovite, which was presumably transferred from the dripping water, during the formation of speleothem and has been variably altered to halloysite. Several pores in the stalactite contain different mineral assemblages that we interpret as in situ: halloysite-7Å, halloysite + silica, gibbsite + silica and gibbsite. The breakdown of the muscovite and the formation of halloysite require acidic conditions, which we suggest to have been established by potassium solubilising microorganisms. The silica minerals include spheroidal assemblages or needle-like and blade-like quartz and can be explained by further dissolution of halloysite, under the same acidic conditions in the presence of microorganisms. In our model, the precipitation of gibbsite is the result of direct formation from muscovite, promoted from abundant and undisturbed water percolation, at moderately low pH, also induced by the presence of bacteria. Given that microbial activities promote: (1 breakdown of muscovite and formation of halloysite, silica, and gibbsite, and (2 formation of Mg-calcite and dolomite after calcite, then it is likely that two or more different microbial communities may exist in the same speleothem. The first creates mild acidic conditions, aiming at the decomposition of muscovite in the microenvironment of the pores antagonising the second that produces alkaline microregimes and the local precipitation of Mg-rich carbonate minerals.

  12. Stable mineral assemblages of igneous rocks . A. Rittmann, 1973. Springer, Berlin, 262 pp., D.M. 76.00

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobi, A.C.

    1974-01-01

    Rocks can be named, described and compared in terms of their chemical analysis, or in terms of their actual mineral content measured in volume per cent (the "mode"). Both are of course related, although similar chemical compositions may lead to widely varying modes depending on subtle

  13. Dioxin congener patterns in commercial catfish from the United States and the indication of mineral clays as the potential source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, J K; Archer, J C

    2013-01-01

    Since 1991 the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has conducted annual surveys of pesticide residues in foods under the Agricultural Marketing Service's Pesticide Data Program (PDP). To assess chemical residues in domestically marketed catfish products, 1479 catfish samples were collected during the 2008-2010 PDPs. A subset of 202 samples was analysed for 17 toxic polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs). The average pattern of the individual PCDD/F congener concentrations in the catfish was rather unique in that it had almost no measurable amounts of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), but all PCDDs were present. This pattern was more dominant in the domestically produced catfish products than in the imported products (China/Taiwan). Comparison of the pattern to known sources of PCDD/Fs showed strong similarities to the pattern of PCDD/Fs found in kaolin clays which have often been used as anti-caking agents in animal feeds. To investigate whether catfish feeds may be the source of the PCDD/Fs found in the catfish, archived catfish feed data from a US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) database were examined. In 61 out of 112 feed samples, the PCDD concentrations were 50 times higher than the PCDF concentrations and resembled the pattern found in the catfish products and in clays mined in the south-eastern United States. Although the source of PCDD/Fs in domestically marketed catfish products cannot be definitively established, mined clay products used in feeds should be considered a likely source and, given the wide concentration range of PCDD/Fs that has been found in clays, a critical control point for PCDD/Fs entrance to the food supply.

  14. A New Tool for Separating the Magnetic Mineralogy of Complex Mineral Assemblages from Low Temperature Magnetic Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Lagroix

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One timeless challenge in rock magnetic studies, inclusive of paleomagnetism and environmental magnetism, is decomposing a sample's bulk magnetic behavior into its individual magnetic mineral components. We present a method permitting to decompose the magnetic behavior of a bulk sample experimentally and at low temperature avoiding any ambiguities in data interpretation due to heating-induced alteration. A single instrument is used to measure the temperature dependence of remanent magnetizations and to apply an isothermal demagnetization step at any temperature between 2 and 400 K. The experimental method is validated on synthetic mixtures of magnetite, hematite, goethite as well as on natural loess samples where the contributions of magnetite, goethite, hematite and maghemite are successfully isolated. The experimental protocol can be adapted to target other iron bearing minerals relevant to the rock or sediment under study. One limitation rests on the fact that the method is based on remanent magnetizations. Consequently, a quantitative decomposition of absolute concentration of individual components remains unachievable without assumptions. Nonetheless, semi-quantitative magnetic mineral concentrations were determined on synthetic and natural loess/paleosol samples in order to validate and test the method as a semi-quantitative tool in environmental magnetism studies.

  15. Interaction of CO2-Rich Fluid with Wellbore Cement and Adjacent Formation Mineral Assemblages: Contrasting Potential Impacts to Porosity (LLNL-ABS-416485)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, W. W.; Carroll, S. A.; Morris, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 into existing oil or gas wells juxtaposes acidic, reactive fluids against formation mineral assemblages as well as wellbore cement. In response, a variety of mineral dissolution and subsequent precipitation reactions may occur, resulting in net volume changes which can either reduce or enhance porosity and permeability. Previous reactive transport modeling studies have shown that the expected volume changes associated with reservoir and cap rock materials comprised primarily of silicate minerals are relatively minor because of slow reaction rates and/or limited solubility effects on stable silicates. However, wellbore cement, which consists principally of hydrated calcium silicate and portlandite, is much more reactive and may be subject to appreciable volume changes that either allow fractures to self-seal or, conversely, to experience geochemical or geomechanical failure. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of various geochemical and hydrologic factors in influencing porosity changes in wellbore cement using a one-dimensional reactive transport modeling approach with a dual porosity component. Model assumptions and results are compared to laboratory and field data as a check on model fidelity. Specifically, we simulate (1) the formation of the representative unweathered cement mineralogy (hydrated calcium silicate + portlandite + hydrogarnet + monosulfate + brownmillerite) from the hydration of a calcium aluminosilicate-based Class G oil well cement, and (2) the development of reaction fronts involving diffusive transport of CO2-rich fluid components within the cement and the adjacent formation minerals. The model domain is based on a simulated annular well bore with a pre-existing damaged zone through which CO2-enriched fluids flow. Simulated fluid-cement geochemical reactions include precipitation of secondary mineral phases such as aragonite as well as alteration of the hydrated calcium silicate solid solution

  16. Mycotoxins modify the barrier function of Caco-2 cells through differential gene expression of specific claudin isoforms: Protective effect of illite mineral clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandro; Ares, Irma; Ramos, Eva; Castellano, Víctor; Martínez, Marta; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María-Aránzazu

    2016-04-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), fumonisin B1 (FB1), ochratoxin A (OTA) and T-2 toxin (T2) are mycotoxins that commonly contaminate the food chain and cause various toxicological effects. Their global occurrence is regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health. In this study, the results demonstrate that, in human Caco-2 cells, AFB1, FB1, OTA and T2 origin cytotoxic effects, determining cell viability through MTT assay and LDH leakage, and decrease trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The decrease in barrier properties is concomitant with a reduction in the expression levels of the tight junction constituents claudin-3, claudin-4 and occludin. The protective effect of mineral clays (diosmectite, montmorillonite and illite) on alterations in cell viability and epithelial barrier function induced by the mycotoxins was also evaluated. Illite was the best clay to prevent the mycotoxin effects. Illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment completely abolished AFB1 and FB1-induced cytotoxicity. Also, the decreases in the gene expression of claudins and the reduction of TEER induced by mycotoxins were reversed by the illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that mycotoxins AFB1, FB1, T2 and OTA disrupt the intestinal barrier permeability by a mechanism involving reduction of claudin isoform expressions, and illite counteracts this disruption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clay-based Nanocomposites Possibilities and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    In the last decades, clay mineral based nanocomposites and polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNC) have been proposed as very useful materials for many uses including photocatalysis, medicinal uses as tissue engineering or modified drug delivery systems. Clay minerals and especially montmorillonite, kaolinite, halloysite palygorskite and sepiolite are the most used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, colloidal dimensions of their particles and other properties. This lecture aims at reporting on very recent developments in the use of clay minerals and PCNC as materials with photocatalytic and medical interest.

  18. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  19. Modelling of the physico-chemical behaviour of clay minerals with a thermo-kinetic model taking into account particles morphology in compacted material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sali, D.; Fritz, B.; Clément, C.; Michau, N.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling of fluid-mineral interactions is largely used in Earth Sciences studies to better understand the involved physicochemical processes and their long-term effect on the materials behaviour. Numerical models simplify the processes but try to preserve their main characteristics. Therefore the modelling results strongly depend on the data quality describing initial physicochemical conditions for rock materials, fluids and gases, and on the realistic way of processes representations. The current geo-chemical models do not well take into account rock porosity and permeability and the particle morphology of clay minerals. In compacted materials like those considered as barriers in waste repositories, low permeability rocks like mudstones or compacted powders will be used : they contain mainly fine particles and the geochemical models used for predicting their interactions with fluids tend to misjudge their surface areas, which are fundamental parameters in kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to improve how to take into account the particles morphology in the thermo-kinetic code KINDIS and the reactive transport code KIRMAT. A new function was integrated in these codes, considering the reaction surface area as a volume depending parameter and the calculated evolution of the mass balance in the system was coupled with the evolution of reactive surface areas. We made application exercises for numerical validation of these new versions of the codes and the results were compared with those of the pre-existing thermo-kinetic code KINDIS. Several points are highlighted. Taking into account reactive surface area evolution during simulation modifies the predicted mass transfers related to fluid-minerals interactions. Different secondary mineral phases are also observed during modelling. The evolution of the reactive surface parameter helps to solve the competition effects between different phases present in the system which are all able to fix the chemical

  20. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  1. Mineralogy of subducted clay and clay restite in the lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, L.; Skora, S. E.; Walter, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Light Source in Didcot, England. Preliminary analysis of diffraction data collected at ambient pressure indicates the following phase assemblages. At transition zone conditions the clay produces an assemblage of St+K-Holl+Gt+Cpx+CAS-phase, consistent with multi-anvil results [6]. CAS-phase is absent by 30 GPa, and K-Holl disappears from the assemblage between 40 and 50 GPa. At >30 GPa the assemblage consists of St+NAL+CF-structured phase±K-Holl. In the restite composition the assemblage at 19-24 GPa is St+Cor+Gt, and at higher pressures is mainly St+Mg-perovskite with minor unknown peaks. Further analysis of diffraction patterns and FEG-EPMA analysis of ion-milled samples are in progress to elucidate phase relations to 80 GPa. [1] van der Hilst et al., Nature 1997. 386:578-584 . [2] Fukao et al., Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2009. 37:19-46. [3] Skora & Blundy, J. Petrol., 2010. 51:2211-2243. [4] Bulanova et al., Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 2010. DOI: 10.1007/s00410-010-0490-6. [5] Domanik & Holloway, GCA 1996. 60: 4133-1450. [6] Irifune et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 1994. 126:351-368.

  2. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  3. Microtektites and Associated Minerals in the Iridium-Rich Layer of Marine Clay From the Central North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    Our study is based on a sample derived from a deep sea core (GPC3) from the mid-Pacific Ocean floor north of the Hawaiian Islands, provided by Jim Broda, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The 65 Ma K/T boundary layer was identified by measurements of magnetic susceptibility (Doh, 1987) and Ir anomaly (Kyte et al., 1995) which peaked at a down-hole depth of 2055-2056 cm. Our sample of red clay was about 5 cubic cm in size. After wet-sieving for the size fraction greater than 38 microns, we hand-picked grains of interest under a binocular microscope. We found 40 microtektites (glass spherules, mostly devitrified), 12 olive-green aggregates composed of talc/magnetite, and 3 green and blue crystals of silicon carbide (SiC). There are many quartz grains having decorated deformation lamellae or mosaic structures. The olive-green talc/magnetite particles have textures and composition similar to materials found in chondritic meteorites, whereas, SiC crystals are known to occur in carbonaceous chondrites. These particles seem to implicate an affinity to meteorites. Ir-rich deposits world-wide are believed to have settled from dust produced by the Chicxulub Impact, but what object from space created the impact crater is rather uncertain. Our results reported here cannot rule out the possiblilty of impact by comets, because the nature of cometary dust particles are not very well known.

  4. Detection of soluble and fixed NH 4+ in clay minerals by DTA and IR reflectance spectroscopy: a potential tool for planetary surface exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.; Banin, A.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Klovstad, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life. It is the only element among the six major biogenic elements, C, N, S, O, P, H, whose presence in the Martian soil has not been positively and directly established. We describe here a study assessing the ability to detect NH 4+ in soils using two methods: differential thermal analysis (DTA) and infrared (IR) reflectance spectroscopy. Four standard clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite and attapulgite) and an altered tephra sample from Mauna Kea were treated with NH 4+ in this study, then leached in order to remove the non-chemically bound ammonium species. Aliquots of these NH 4+-treated and then leached samples were analyzed by DTA and IR reflectance spectroscopy to quantify the detectability of soluble and sorbed/fixed NH 4+. An exotherm at 270-280°C was clearly detected in the DTA curves of NH 4+-treated (non-leached) samples. This feature is assigned to the thermal decomposition reaction of NH 4+. Spectral bands observed at 1.56, 2.05, 2.12, 3.06, 3.25, 3.55, 4.2, 5.7 and 7.0 μm in the reflectance spectra of NH 4+-treated and leached samples are assigned to the sorbed/fixed ammonium in the clays. The montmorillonite spectra have shown the most intense absorption features due to fixed ammonium among the leached samples in this study, as a result of its high cation sorption capacity. It is concluded that the presence of fixed NH 4+ in clays may be detected by IR reflectance or emission spectroscopy. Distinction between soluble and fixed NH 4+ may be achieved through the presence or absence of several spectral features assigned to the fixed NH 4+ moiety and, specifically, by use of the 4.2 μm feature assigned to solution NH 4+. Thermal analyses furnish supporting evidence of ammonium in the clays/soil through detection of N released at temperatures of 270-330°C. Based on the results of this study, it is estimated that IR spectra measured from a rover should be able to detect ammonium if present above a few

  5. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  6. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of cadmium on fungi and on interactions between fungi and bacteria in soil: influence of clay minerals and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

    1977-05-01

    Fungi (Rhizopus stolonifer, Trichoderma viride, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans, Cunninghamella echinulata, and several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium) tolerated higher concentrations of cadmium (Cd) when grown in soil than when grown on laboratory media, indicating that soil mitigated the toxic effects of Cd. In soil amended with clay minerals, montmorillonite provided partial or total protection against fungistatic effects of Cd, whereas additions of kaolinite provided little or no protection. Growth rates of Aspergillus niger were inhibited to a greater extent by 100 or 250 ..mu..g of Cd per g in soil adjusted to pH 7.2 than in the same soil at its natural pH of 5.1. However, there were no differences in the growth rates of Aspergillus fischeri with 100 or 250 ..mu..g of Cd per g in the same soil, whether at pH 5.1 or adjusted to pH 7.2. Growth of A. niger and A. fischeri in a soil contaminated with a low concentration of Cd (i.e., 28 ..mu..g/g), obtained from a site near a Japanese smelter, did not differ significantly from growth in a soil collected some distance away and containing 4 ..mu..g of Cd per g. Growth of A. niger in sterile soil amended with 100 ..mu..g of Cd per g and inoculated with Bacillus cereus or Agrobacterium tumefaciens was reduced to a greater extent than in the same soil containing 100 ..mu..g of Cd per g but no bacteria. The inhibitory effects of Agrobacterium radiobacter to A. niger were slightly reduced in the presence of 100 ..mu..g of Cd per g, whereas the inhibitory effects of Serratia marcescens were enhanced.

  8. Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaquero, M. P.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible changes in the mineral composition of food during frying could be the consequence of losses by leaching, or changes in concentrations caused by exchanges between the food and culinary fat of other compounds. The net result depends on the type of food, the frying fat used and the frying process. Moreover, the modifications that frying produces in other nutrients could indirectly affect the availability of dietary minerals. The most outstanding ones are those that can take place in the fat or in the protein. With respect to the interactions between frying oils and minerals, we have recent knowledge concerning the effects of consuming vegetable oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without turnover, on the nutritive utilization of dietary minerals. The experiments have been carried out in pregnant and growing rats, which consumed diets containing, as a sole source of fat, the testing frying oils or unused oils. It seems that the consumption of various frying oils, with a polar compound content lower or close to the maximum limit of 25% accepted for human consumption, does not alter the absorption and metabolism of calcium, phosphorous, iron or copper. Magnesium absorption from diets containing frying oils tends to increase but the urinary excretion of this element increases, resulting imperceptible the variations in the magnesium balance. The urinary excretion of Zn also increased although its balance remained unchanged. Different studies referring to the effects of consuming fried fatty fish on mineral bioavailability will also be presented. On one hand, frying can cause structural changes in fish protein, which are associated with an increase in iron absorption and a decrease in body zinc retention. The nutritive utilization of other elements such as magnesium, calcium and copper seems to be unaffected. On the other hand; it has been described that an excess of fish fatty acids in the diet produces iron depletion, but when fatty

  9. Utilization of Nkpuma-Akpatakpa clay in ceramics: characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Nkpuma – Akpatakpa clay was analysed for its ceramics suitability. Chemical, mechanical and spectral characterization of the clay was carried out to obtain more information from this clay found in commercial quantity at Ebonyi. State Nigeria. The XRD analysis showed that the principal minerals in the clay are ...

  10. Utilization of Nkpuma-Akpatakpa clay in ceramics: characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nkpuma – Akpatakpa clay was analysed for its ceramics suitability. Chemical, mechanical and spectral characterization of the clay was carried out to obtain more information from this clay found in commercial quantity at Ebonyi State Nigeria. The XRD analysis showed that the principal minerals in the clay are quartz, ...

  11. clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    and X-ray diffraction and physico-mechanical properties. Due to polarity match, hydrophilic unmodified montmorillonite clay showed enhanced properties in resulting fluoroelastomer nanocomposites, while hydro- phobic organo-clay showed best results in SEBS nanocomposites. Keywords. Nanocomposites; nanoclays ...

  12. CONTRAST IN CLAY MINERALOGY AND THEIR EFFECT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    originating from percolation of mud-rich waters or illuviation of clay cutans, (ii) pedogenic mud aggregates ... pedogenic mud aggregates to authigenic clay, (iv) alteration of K-feldspar and ferromagnesian minerals to ..... mature source rocks and clay minerals transformation causing an activated acidic environment to leach ...

  13. Strange Assemblage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Robert Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper contends that the power of Deleuze & Guattari’s (1988 notion of assemblage as theorised in 1000 Plateaus can be normalised and reductive with reference to its application to any social-cultural context where an open system of dynamic and fluid elements are located. Rather than determining the assemblage in this way, this paper argues for an alternative conception of ‘strange assemblage’ that must be deliberately and consciously created through rigorous and focused intellectual, creative and philosophical work around what makes assemblages singular. The paper will proceed with examples of ‘strange assemblage’ taken from a film by Peter Greenaway (A Zed and 2 Noughts; the film ‘Performance’; educational research with Sudanese families in Australia; the book, Bomb Culture by Jeff Nuttall (1970; and the band Hawkwind. Fittingly, these elements are themselves chosen to demonstrate the concept of ‘strange assemblage’, and how it can be presented. How exactly the elements of a ‘strange assemblage’ come together and work in the world is unknown until they are specifically elaborated and created ‘in the moment’. Such spontaneous methodology reminds us of the 1960s ‘Happenings’, the Situationist International and Dada/Surrealism. The difference that will be opened up by this paper is that all elements of this ‘strange assemblage’ cohere in terms of a rendering of ‘the unacceptable.'

  14. Preparation and characterization of polymer nanocomposites based on chitosan and clay minerals; Preparacao e caracterizacao de nanocompositos polimerico baseados em quitosana e argilo minerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiori, Ana Paula Santos de Melo; Gabiraba, Victor Parizio; Praxedes, Ana Paula Perdigao [Instituto Federal de Alagoas (IFAL), Marechal Deodoro, AL (Brazil); Nunes, Marcelo Ramon da Silva; Balliano, Tatiane L.; Silva, Rosanny Christhinny da; Tonholo, Josealdo; Ribeiro, Adriana Santos, E-mail: aribeiro@qui.ufal.br [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    In this work nanocomposites based on chitosan and different clays were prepared using polyethyleneglycol (PEG) as plasticizer. The samples obtained were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG) and by mechanical characterization (tensile test) with the aim of investigating the interactions between chitosan and clay. The nanocomposite films prepared using sodium bentonite (Ben) showed an increase of 81.2% in the maximum tensile stress values and a decrease of 16.0% in the Young’s modulus when compared to the chitosan with PEG (QuiPEG) films, evidencing that the introduction of the clay into the polymer matrix provided a more flexible and resistant film, whose elongation at break was 93.6% higher than for the QuiPEG film. (author)

  15. Um método simples de caracterização de argilominerais por difração de raios X A simple method for the characterization of clay minerals by X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. F. Albers

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available A técnica de difração de raios X tem sido amplamente utilizada para a determinação de fases cristalinas em materiais cerâmicos. Em argilas, a grande quantidade de quartzo e seu elevado grau de orientação dificultam a identificação e caracterização das demais fases presentes. Baseando-se no princípio da sedimentação, é apresentado neste trabalho um método simples e confiável para a determinação de argilominerais em materiais argilosos.The X-ray diffraction technique has been widely used for the determination of crystalline phases in ceramic materials. The large content and high degree of orientation of quartz in clays pose a problem to the identification and characterization of the remaining phases. A simple and reliable method for the determination of clay minerals in clay materials, based on the sedimentation principle, is presented.

  16. Application of clay minerals from Cayo Guan, Cuba, as sorbents of heavy metals and ceramic raw materials; Aplicaciones de los minerales arcillosos de Cayo Guan, Cuba, como adsorbentes de metales pesados y materia prima ceramica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, D.; Barba, F.; Callejas, P.; Recio, P.

    2012-11-01

    It has been studied by Analysis Heating Microscope Optical the behaviour of some kaolinitic clays from a reservoir of Cayo Guan rich in iron oxides and low silica content proving to be a refractory materials whose softening appears after 1500 degree centigrade. It has obtained the workability diagram of the different clay minerals calculating the plasticity by the method of Casagrande spoon; only one of the samples is in the area suitable for extrusion. Vitrification diagrams report that the capacity of water absorption is <0.6 % when the temperature of 1400 degree centigrade is achieved. We have designed a program to calculate compositions of porcelain stoneware prepared from these modified clays adding low-cost raw materials that facilitate the formation of glassy phase ((potassium feldspar and glass cullet) and/or increase the silica (sand and diatomaceous earth used as filters in the brewing industry). With one of these compositions, prepared in the laboratory (60 % of clay, 30 % feldspar and 10 % of diatomaceous earth), calcined at 1250 degree centigrade with a heating rate of 15 degree centigrade/min, the results were: water absorption 0.8 %, and linear shrinkage 21 % without any deformation observed. These clays have been treated with acid to eliminate its high iron content and study its application as an sorbent of heavy metals as Cd{sup 2}+, Cr{sup 3}+. The results of the immobilization of these elements have been compared with those obtained with thermally activated vermiculite at 800 degree centigrade, showing that the treated samples show sorption of both cadmium and chromium below the vermiculite, but the non-treated ones are suitable to remove chromium; this is because these clays do not contain in its composition exchangeable ions (Ca{sup {sub 2}} +, Mg{sup 2} +, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}), and even if they are chemically activated only the presence of Fe ions is which produces form bindings (Cr{sub x}.Fe{sub 1}-x) (OH){sub 3} which favor Cr sorption

  17. Characterization of Clays from Poorly Processing Oil Sands using Synchrotron Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    OMOTOSO, OLADIPO; MIKULA, RANDY; URQUHART, STEPHEN; SULIMMA, HARDY; STEPHENS, PETER

    2006-01-01

    ... into reasons for poor processability. Often, however, a greater level of detail is required to quantify low levels of mixed layering in clay minerals and the multitude of non-clay minerals in the ores...

  18. Identity Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Line Helverskov

    The study aims at exploring how identity is enacted within the context of a two-year programme in Service, Hospitality, and Tourism Management (SHTM). This research thus investigates how students and educators go about their daily lives in different educational contexts both on and off campus......, the IDENTITY ASSEMBLAGES 8 analysis unfolds the relational understanding of identity by introducing the concept of ‘identity assemblages’, that is, complex actor-networks of the human/non-human and material/immaterial. Furthermore, the analysis describes how the enactment of identities is made possible...... or hindered by organisational patterns, that is, modes of ordering (Law 1994). This is, in essence, an argument for identities as organisational effects. The study’s main contributions may be structured in three categories. First, it explores the applicability of ANT to identity studies and thereby serves...

  19. Contrast in clay mineralogy and their effect on reservoir properties in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adigrat sandstone formation in the Blue Nile Basin is dominated by quartz arenite and subarkosic arenite, and cemented by carbonate, clay minerals and quartz overgrowths. Clay minerals in the Adigrat sandstone formation are dominated by kaolinite, illite and chlorite. Illite is the common grain-coating clay mineral.

  20. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  1. Geological explorations of clay deposit near Pragersko and clay quality tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duška Rokavec

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of illite clays located near Pragersko, at the southern boundary of the Maribor – Ptuj depression, was investigated. The results of mining geological investigations showed the extension and characteristics of clay occurrences in the area. Primary characteristics of single types of raw clay from the deposit (mineral composition, grain size distribution, plasticity, etc., and the quality of biscuit were determined with laboratory tests.In a 4-9 m thick bed of clay we identified four different types of clay, which are, as a mixture, suitable for use in brick industry.

  2. Tracing multiple resedimentation on an isolated karstified plateau: The bauxite-bearing Miocene red clay of the Southern Bakony Mountains, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Péter; Dunkl, István; Csillag, Gábor; Mindszenty, Andrea; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Józsa, Sándor

    2017-08-01

    The Vöröstó (= Red Lake) Formation, located in the Southern Bakony Mountains and the Balaton Highlands (Hungary), is a red, clayey continental assemblage containing hard, up to fist-sized bauxite pebbles, occurring in a large apparent stratigraphic gap between underlying karstified Triassic carbonates and mid' Miocene to Quaternary cover. The origin and the exact stratigraphic position of the assemblage have been controversial for a long time. In this study, petrographic observations on the bauxite pebbles revealed common features with Cretaceous bauxite deposits known in the region, whereas heavy mineral composition of the red clay matrix is similar to those known from the Eocene bauxite horizon of the region. Single grain zircon U-Pb ages obtained from the bauxite pebbles and their red clayey matrix show similar late Archean to Jurassic age components. Additionally, Cenozoic U-Pb ages are well represented in the mostly euhedral zircon crystals separated from the red clays, whereas this volcanogenic contribution completely missing from the bauxite pebbles. SEM morphology and related EDX chemical analysis of clay minerals indicate polygenetic, detrital origin for the red clays. The main source material of the bauxite bearing Vöröstó Formation is most probably local Cretaceous and Eocene bauxite deposits exposed during the middle-late Miocene. These tropical weathering products were partly decomposed and degraded, but dilution by siliciclastic contribution is negligible. We suggest a transport mechanism dominated by local redeposition of mostly pelitic and allitic material through seasonal muddy debris flows within a karstic landscape. B: Heavy mineral composition of red clays and the bauxite pebble population (pp) samples (in %).

  3. The Composition and Physical Properties of Some Clays of Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    manufacture of refractories, pottery/ceramic wares and structural units. They are also used as fillers or extenders in various products. The identification and quantification of the clay and non-clay minerals present in a clay material determines their uses and related industries. Each industrial process requires certain property ...

  4. Instrumental characterization of clay by XRF, XRD and FTIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Instrumental characterizations of the clay were performed by different techniques such as XRF, XRD and FTIR. XRF shows the chemical compositions of the clay where Al-oxide and silica oxide are present in major quantity whereas XRD confirms the presence of these minerals in clay. FTIR studies show the presence of ...

  5. Antimicrobial clay-based materials for wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Elsie E; Hamilton, Ashley R

    2014-04-01

    The historical use of clay minerals for the treatment of wounds and other skin ailments is well documented and continues within numerous human cultures the world over. However, a more scientific inquiry into the chemistry and properties of clay minerals emerged in the 19th century with work investigating their role within health gathering pace since the second half of the 20th century. This review gives an overview of clay minerals and how their properties can be manipulated to facilitate the treatment of infected wounds. Evidence of the antimicrobial and healing effects of some natural clay minerals is presented alongside a range of chemical modifications including metal-ion exchange, the formation of clay-drug composites and the development of various polymer-clay systems. While the evidence for applying these materials to infected wounds is limited, we contextualize and discuss the future of this research.

  6. Effects of clay minerals and organic matter in formulated sediments on the bioavailability of sediment-associated uranium to the freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Sarah E., E-mail: sarah.crawford@usask.ca [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Liber, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.liber@usask.ca [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); School of Environment and Sustainability, 117 Science Place, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8 (Canada); Institute of Loess Plateau, 92 Wucheng Road, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that bioavailability influences metal toxicity in aquatic ecosystems. However, the factors and mechanisms that influence uranium (U) bioavailability and toxicity in sediment have not been thoroughly evaluated, despite evidence that suggests different sediment components can influence the sorption and interaction of some metals. Given that dissolved U is generally accepted as being the primary bioavailable fraction of U, it is hypothesized that adsorption and interaction of U with different sediment components will influence the bioavailability of U in sediment. We investigated the effects of key sediment physicochemical properties on the bioavailability of U to a model freshwater benthic invertebrate, Chironomus dilutus. Several 10-day spiked sediment bioaccumulation experiments were performed, exposing C. dilutus larvae to a variety of formulated sediments spiked with different concentrations of U (5, 50 and/or 200 mg U/kg d.w.). Mean accumulation of U in C. dilutus larvae decreased significantly from 1195 to 10 mg U/kg d.w. as kaolin clay content increased from 0% to 60% in sediment spiked with 50 mg U/kg d.w. Similarly, higher organic matter content also resulted in a significant reduction of U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae, indicating a reduction in U bioavailability. Concentrations of U in both the overlying water and sediment pore water displayed a strong positive relationship to U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae (r{sup 2} = 0.77, p < 0.001 and r{sup 2} = 0.57, p < 0.001, respectively) for all experiments, while total U concentrations in the sediment had a poor relationship to U bioaccumulation (r{sup 2} = 0.10, p = 0.028). Results from this research confirm that sediment clay and organic matter content play a significant role in altering U bioavailability, which is important in informing risk assessments of U contaminated sites and in the development of site-specific sediment quality guidelines for U. - Highlights: • We

  7. Cryosalt Formation in Delaminated Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    -montmorillonite at hosting hydrohalite, the results of this study can be used to suggest that delaminated Na-montmorillonite sheets encapsulate the salt solutions and by preventing sublimation of water, promotes crystallization of hydrohalite. As delamination is not possible in Ca-montmorillonite, water more readily sublimated from the system, leaving behind a dry Ca-montmorillonite/NaCl assemblage. As such, this work identified processes through which clay minerals can affect the formation of cryosalts that are not only of importance to terrestrial environments of the cryosphere but also to atmospheric processes involving dust aerosols. [1] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), Scientific Reports. 6, 32136. [2] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 7, 2849-2855. [3] Wagner, R., Möhler O., Schnaiter, M. (2012), 33, 8557-8571.

  8. Clays of volcanic – detrititus strata of North the Bohemian coal basin as a raw material for the preparation of natural mineral pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Rucký

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Raw materials which are suitable for the preparation of mineral pigments are found in the area of the North Bohemian brown coal basin. Set Experiments on a hydrocyclone were realized as a part of the technological research of the suitability of “bolus” and ochres from the North Bohemian brown coal basin to be applicated as ecological pigments. It was found that this method of processing is suitable for the preparation of the product which can serve as a mineral pigment. Produced pigments were examined concerning their application in the area of paint pigments with a positive result.

  9. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  10. Nature, distribution and origin of clay minerals in grain size fractions of sediments from manganese nodule field, Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nath, B.N.

    DT, IR and X-ray diffraction analyses have been carried out on 3 grain size fractions (1, 1-2 and 2-4 mu m) of sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Results indicate that there are 2 smectite minerals (montmorillonite and Fe...

  11. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  12. Clay, Water, and Salt: Controls on the Permeability of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, Ian C; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2017-09-19

    The ability to predict the permeability of fine-grained soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks is a fundamental challenge in the geosciences with potentially transformative implications in subsurface hydrology. In particular, fine-grained sedimentary rocks (shale, mudstone) constitute about two-thirds of the sedimentary rock mass and play important roles in three energy technologies: petroleum geology, geologic carbon sequestration, and radioactive waste management. The problem is a challenging one that requires understanding the properties of complex natural porous media on several length scales. One inherent length scale, referred to hereafter as the mesoscale, is associated with the assemblages of large grains of quartz, feldspar, and carbonates over distances of tens of micrometers. Its importance is highlighted by the existence of a threshold in the core scale mechanical properties and regional scale energy uses of shale formations at a clay content X clay ≈ 1/3, as predicted by an ideal packing model where a fine-grained clay matrix fills the gaps between the larger grains. A second important length scale, referred to hereafter as the nanoscale, is associated with the aggregation and swelling of clay particles (in particular, smectite clay minerals) over distances of tens of nanometers. Mesoscale phenomena that influence permeability are primarily mechanical and include, for example, the ability of contacts between large grains to prevent the compaction of the clay matrix. Nanoscale phenomena that influence permeability tend to be chemomechanical in nature, because they involve strong impacts of aqueous chemistry on clay swelling. The second length scale remains much less well characterized than the first, because of the inherent challenges associated with the study of strongly coupled nanoscale phenomena. Advanced models of the nanoscale properties of fine-grained media rely predominantly on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, a mean field

  13. Intercalated layered clay composites and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phukan, Anjali

    Supported inorganic reagents are rapidly emerging as new and environmentally acceptable reagents and catalysts. The smectite group of layered clay minerals, such as, Montmorillonite, provides promising character for adsorption, catalytic activity, supports etc. for their large surface area, swelling behavior and ion exchange properties. Aromatic compounds intercalated in layered clays are useful in optical molecular devices. Clay is a unique material for adsorption of heavy metals and various toxic substances. Clay surfaces are known to be catalytically active due to their surface acidity. Acid activated clays possess much improved surface areas and acidities and have higher pore volumes so that can absorb large molecules in the pores. The exchangeable cations in clay minerals play a key role in controlling surface acidity and catalytic activity. Recently, optically active metal-complex-Montmorillonite composites are reported to be active in antiracemization purposes. In view of the above, a research work, relating to the preparation of different modified clay composites and their catalytic applications were carried out. The different aspects and results of the present work have been reported in four major chapters. Chapter I: This is an introductory chapter, which contains a review of the literature regarding clay-based materials. Clay minerals are phyllosilicates with layer structure. Montmorillonite, a member of smectite group of clay, is 2:1 phyllosilicate, where a layer is composed of an octahedral sheet sandwiched by two tetrahedral sheets. Such clay shows cation exchange capacity (CEC) and is expressed in milli-equivalents per 100 gm of dry clay. Clays can be modified by interaction with metal ion, metal complexes, metal cluster and organic cations for various applications. Clays are also modified by treating with acid followed by impregnation with metal salts or ions. Montmorillonite can intercalate suitable metal complexes in excess of CEC to form double

  14. Magnetic composites from minerals: study of the iron phases in clay and diatomite using Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements and XRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, M.; Maciel, J. C.; Quispe-Marcatoma, J.; Pandey, B.; Neri, D. F. M.; Soria, F.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; de Carvalho, L. B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic particles as matrix for enzyme immobilization have been used and due to the enzymatic derivative can be easily removed from the reaction mixture by a magnetic field. This work presents a study about the synthesis and characterization of iron phases into magnetic montmorillonite clay (mMMT) and magnetic diatomaceous earth (mDE) by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), magnetic measurements and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also these magnetic materials were assessed as matrices for the immobilization of invertase via covalent binding. Mössbauer spectra of the magnetic composites performed at 4.2 K showed a mixture of magnetite and maghemite about equal proportion in the mMMT, and a pure magnetite phase in the sample mDE. These results were verified using XRD. The residual specific activity of the immobilized invertase on mMMT and mDE were 83 % and 92.5 %, respectively. Thus, both magnetic composites showed to be promising matrices for covalent immobilization of invertase.

  15. Genotoxic potential of montmorillonite clay mineral and alteration in the expression of genes involved in toxicity mechanisms in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisanaba, Sara, E-mail: saramh@us.es [Area of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sevilla, Profesor García González no. 2, 41012 Seville (Spain); Hercog, Klara; Filipic, Metka [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jos, Ángeles [Area of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sevilla, Profesor García González no. 2, 41012 Seville (Spain); Zegura, Bojana [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} has a wide range of well-documented and novel applications. • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} induces micronucleus, but not nuclear bridges or nuclear buds in HepG2 cells. • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} induces changes in the gene expression. • Gene alteration is presented mainly after 24 h of exposure to Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +}. - Abstract: Montmorillonite, also known as Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} (CNa{sup +}), is a natural clay with a wide range of well-documented and novel applications, such as pharmaceutical products or food packaging. Although considered a low toxic product, the expected increased exposure to CNa{sup +} arises concern on the potential consequences on human and environmental health especially as its genotoxicity has scarcely been investigated so far. Thus, we investigated, for the first time, the influence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of CNa{sup +} (15.65, 31.25 and 62.5 μg/mL) on genomic instability of human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) by determining the formation of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) with the Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay. Further on we studied the influence of CNa{sup +} on the expression of several genes involved in toxicity mechanisms using the real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that CNa{sup +} increased the number of MNi, while the numbers of NBUDs and NPBs were not affected. In addition it deregulated genes in all the groups studied, mainly after longer time of exposure. These findings provide the evidence that CNa{sup +} is potentially genotoxic. Therefore further studies that will elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in toxic activity of CNa{sup +} are needed for hazard identification and human safety assessment.

  16. Hydrogen bonding and vibrational properties of hydroxy groups in the crystal lattice of dioctahedral clay minerals by means of first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, V.; Timon, V.; Escamilla-Roa, E.; Hernández-Languna, A.; Sainz-Díaz, C. I.

    2004-10-01

    The hydroxy groups of the crystal lattice of dioctahedral 2:1 phyllosilicates were investigated by means of quantum-mechanical calculation. The standard Kohn-Sham self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) method was applied using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with numerical atomic orbitals and double-zeta polarized functions as basis set. Isomorphous cation substitution of different cations in the octahedral and tetrahedral sheet was included along with several interlayer cations reproducing experimental crystal lattice parameters. The effect of these substitutions and the interlayer charge on the hydroxyl group properties was also studied. These structures represent different cation pairs among Al3+, Fe3+ and Mg2+ in the octahedral sheet of clays joined to OH groups. The geometrical disposition of the OH bond in the crystal lattice and the hydrogen bonds and other electrostatic interactions of this group were analyzed. The frequencies of different vibrational modes of the OH group [ν(OH), δ(OH) and γ(OH)] were calculated and compared with experimental data, finding a good agreement. These frequencies depend significantly on the nature of cations which are joined with, and the electrostatic interactions with, the interlayer cations. Besides, hydrogen-bonding interactions with tetrahedral oxygens are important for the vibrational properties of the OH groups; however, also the electrostatic interactions of these OH groups with the rest of tetrahedral oxygens within the tetrahedral cavity should be taken into account. The cation substitution effect on the vibration modes of the OH groups was analyzed reproducing the experimental behaviour.

  17. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  18. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  19. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    Clays, which have been loaded to a high stress level, will under certain conditions keep low porosity and permeability due to the high degree of compression. In some situations it seems that porosity and permeability will recover to a very high extent when the clay is unloaded. This seems...... to be the case for high plasticity clays that are uncemented, and with a high content of clay minerals, especially smectite. Oedometer tests on samples from the Paleogene period show that 80% or more of the compaction will recover when unloaded, and if unloaded to a stress lower than in situ stress level...... the clay will expand to an even higher porosity....

  20. Identification of Zn-Bearing Micas and Clays from the Cristal and Mina Grande Zinc Deposits (Bongará Province, Amazonas Region, Northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Arfè

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zn-bearing phyllosilicates are common minerals in nonsulfide Zn deposits, but they seldom represent the prevailing economic species. However, even though the presence of Zn-bearing clays is considered as a disadvantage in mineral processing, their characteristics can give crucial information on the genesis of the oxidized mineralization. This research has been carried out on the Mina Grande and Cristal Zn-sulfide/nonsulfide deposits, which occur in the Bongará district (Northern Peru. In both of the deposits, Zn-bearing micas and clays occur as an accessory to the ore minerals. The XRD analyses and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS investigations revealed that the Zn-bearing micas that are occurring in both deposits mostly consist of I/S mixed layers of detrital origin, which have been partly altered or overprinted by sauconite during the supergene alteration of sulfides. Sporadic hendricksite was also identified in the Cristal nonsulfide mineral assemblage, whereas at Mina Grande, the fraipontite-zaccagnaite (3R-polytype association was detected. The identified zaccagnaite polytype suggests that both fraipontite and zaccagnaite are genetically related to weathering processes. The hendricksite detected at Cristal is a product of hydrothermal alteration, which is formed during the emplacement of sulfides. The complex nature of the identified phyllosilicates may be considered as evidence of the multiple processes (hydrothermal and supergene that occurred in the Bongará district.

  1. Clays as dietary supplements for swine: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Mohana Devi; Kim, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clays are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate molecules composed of alkali and alkaline earth cations along with small amounts of various other elements. The best-known are montmorillonite, smectite, illite, kaolinite, biotite and clinoptilolite. The molecules in these clays are arranged in three-dimensional structures creating internal voids and channels capable of trapping a wide variety of molecules. As a result of this structure, clay minerals are regarded as a simple and effective tool...

  2. Linking mineral deposits to speleogenetic processes in Cova des Pas de Vallgornera (Mallorca, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan P. Onac

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cova des Pas de Vallgornera (CPV is the premier cave of the Balearic Archipelago. Over 74 km of passages develop within two carbonate lithofacies (reef front and back reef, which ultimately control the patterns of the cave and to some degree its mineral infilling. The diversity of speleothem-forming minerals is four times greater around or within hypogene-related features (vents, rims, cupolas, compared to any other vadose passages in the cave. The mineralogy of speleothems (crusts, nodules, crystals, earthy masses associated with hypogene features in the seaward upper maze of Sector F is characterized by the presence of aragonite, ankerite, huntite, clay minerals, and quartz. In the Tragus and Nord sectors, however, the dominant mineral is dolomite, along with aragonite, celestine, huntite, clay minerals, and quartz. Calcite is by far the most ubiquitous mineral throughout the cave. Detailed macroscopic and scanning electron microanalysis and imaging have permitted the investigation of textural relationships between the minerals associated with vents, rims, and vent’s roof and walls. These studies along with morphological and stable isotope analyses confirm that not all minerals are connected with a hypogene stage in the cave evolution, and furthermore, none of them appears to be sulfuric acid by-products. Instead, the mineral assemblages documented in speleothems from CPV clearly support at least three speleogenetic pathways, namely seacoast mixing, ascending of warm groundwaters, and meteoric recharge (vadose. Thus, cave minerals in Cova des Pas de Vallgornera hold the keys to reconstruction and understanding of processes and conditions under which they precipitated, allowing to establish their relationship with various speleogenetic pathways.

  3. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  4. Role of clay as catalyst in Friedel–Craft alkylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solid acids have become increasingly important for many liquid-phase industrial reactions these days. Montmorillonite clays (2:1 clay mineral) have been used as efficient solid acid catalysts for a number of organic and liquid phase reactions and offer several advantages over classic acids. Tailor made catalysts can be ...

  5. Geophagic clays: Their mineralogy, chemistry and possible human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geophagic clays: Their mineralogy, chemistry and possible human health effects. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... of the study were to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the mineral constituents and to determine selected elemental compositions in the clay samples in order to infer on possible human health effects.

  6. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  7. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  8. Comparison of authigenic minerals in sandstones and interbedded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanically infiltrated clays, grain-coating clay/hematite, quartz and feldspar overgrowths, carbonate cements and pore-filling and pore-lining clay minerals that precipitated in the sandy facies also precipitated in the fine-grained sediments. The abundance of authigenic minerals in decreasing order include: sandstone ...

  9. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Cox, Stephen J; Hu, Xiao L; Sorella, Sandro; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields...

  10. Ordered assemblies of clay nano-platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Chen, Biqiong; Evans, Julian R G

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate five methods of arranging smectite clay tactoids into layered arrangements as a part of the quest for the biomimetic simulation of nacre. Provided the clay is not fully exfoliated, the tactoids retain sufficient rigidity for alignment and we present micrographs which demonstrate these ordered structures. This paves the way for exploration of the high mineral filler end of polymer-clay nanocomposites which can approach the high aragonite volume fraction of nacre. The clay was dispersed in water without additives by ultrasonic agitation, cleaned by partial sedimentation and the resulting suspension was subjected to controlled phase separation by sedimentation, centrifugation, controlled rate slip casting, filtration and electrophoresis. Well-aligned parallel layers of platelets were obtained from all the five methods, the best stacking being associated with slip cast layers. Polyethylene oxide was incorporated into these well-aligned tactoids.

  11. Catalyzed Synthesis of Zinc Clays by Prebiotic Central Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruixin; Basu, Kaustuv; Hartman, Hyman; Matocha, Christopher J; Sears, S Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2017-04-03

    How primordial metabolic networks such as the reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and clay mineral catalysts coevolved remains a mystery in the puzzle to understand the origin of life. While prebiotic reactions from the rTCA cycle were accomplished via photochemistry on semiconductor minerals, the synthesis of clays was demonstrated at low temperature and ambient pressure catalyzed by oxalate. Herein, the crystallization of clay minerals is catalyzed by succinate, an example of a photoproduced intermediate from central metabolism. The experiments connect the synthesis of sauconite, a model for clay minerals, to prebiotic photochemistry. We report the temperature, pH, and concentration dependence on succinate for the synthesis of sauconite identifying new mechanisms of clay formation in surface environments of rocky planets. The work demonstrates that seeding induces nucleation at low temperatures accelerating the crystallization process. Cryogenic and conventional transmission electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and measurements of total surface area are used to build a three-dimensional representation of the clay. These results suggest the coevolution of clay minerals and early metabolites in our planet could have been facilitated by sunlight photochemistry, which played a significant role in the complex interplay between rocks and life over geological time.

  12. Métodos de concentração de minerais 2:1 secundários na fração argila visando sua identificação por difratometria de raios x Methods for concentrating secondary 2:1 minerals in the clay fraction for subsequent identification by x-ray difractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander de Freitas Melo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Além dos baixos teores normalmente encontrados na fração argila dos solos sob clima tropical e subtropical, o tamanho reduzido e a baixa cristalinidade dos minerais 2:1 secundários dificultam sua identificação por difratometria de raios X (DRX. Este estudo objetivou avaliar métodos químicos e físico de concentração de minerais 2:1 secundários na fração argila para facilitar a identificação por DRX, incluindo a natureza dos minerais quanto ao local de formação de cargas permanentes (lâmina tetraedral ou octaedral. Coletaram-se amostras de dois Cambissolos originados de argilito da Formação Guabirotuba na Bacia Sedimentar de Curitiba (PR: horizontes A, Bi, C1 (1,2 a 1,5 m, C2 (2,2 a 2,5 m, C3 (3,2 a 3,5 m e C4 (4,2 a 4,5 m. Após remoção da matéria orgânica e dispersão da terra fina seca ao ar, a fração argila foi submetida a tratamentos sequenciais com ditionito-citratobicarbonato (DCB (amostra desferrificada - remoção de óxidos de Fe pedogenéticos e com soluções de NaOH a quente, em diferentes concentrações (0,5; 1,0; 1,5; 2,5; 3,5; 4,0; 4,5 e 5,0 mol L-1, para extração de gibbsita e caulinita, em diferentes graus. A fração argila desferrificada também foi submetida à separação física (centrifugação em argila grossa (0,2 a 2 m e fina (Besides the typically low levels of secondary 2:1 minerals found in the clay fraction of soils in tropical and subtropical climates, the small mineral size and low crystallinity make their analyses by X-ray difractometry (XRD difficult. This study aimed to evaluate physical and chemical methods for concentrating secondary 2:1 minerals in the clay fraction to facilitate their identification by XRD. Also, it was sought to analyze the nature of the minerals regarding the sites of origin of permanent charges (tetrahedral or octahedral sheets. Samples were collected in two Cambisols originated from argillite of the Guabirotuba formation in the sedimentary basin of Curitiba

  13. Affects and assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Affects and assemblages are Deleuzian Guattarian notions related to aesthetics and spatial territories. In recent urban geography and urban studies these notions are increasingly gaining more impact (Amin & Thrift 2002, Pile 2008, Farías & Bender 2010, Andersen & Harrison 2010, Thrift 2008). What...... happens to aesthetics and how does it change the existing social and geographical understanding of urban space? The paper sets out to reintroduce aesthetical aspects of affects and assemblages in relation to urban space and urban planning. It presupposes urban space as a continuous state of becoming where...... affects and assemblages produce subjective feelings and emotions (Pile 2009) Recently, urban experience designs and events aim at evoking affects through affects and assemblages. A Danish example is the Carlsberg city in Copenhagen another is The High line in Chelsea, New York (Samson 2011). Thus...

  14. comparison of authigenic minerals in sandstones and interbedded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    authigenic clay minerals, feldspar overgrowths, quartz overgrowths, carbonates and hematite .... the primary porosity in the sandy, silty and muddy facies is highly reduced by infiltrated clay. ... aluminium, silicon, calcium, magnesium and iron.

  15. Importância das espécies minerais no potássio total da fração argila de solos do Triângulo Mineiro Importance of mineral species in total potassium content of clay fraction in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Melo

    2003-10-01

    arenito da Formação Uberaba, migmatito/micaxisto do Grupo Araxá e basalto da Formação Serra Geral.Few studies relate the K reserve in soils developed in a humid tropic climate with the minerals found in the clay fraction. Nineteen soils were collected for this purpose in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, developed from different parent materials and different weathering degrees. Due to the greater occurrence, a larger number of samples of the Bauru Group was collected, comprising all the geological formations found in the region. The total K content in soil and the sand, silt, and clay fractions were determined after the digestion of the soil samples by HF, HNO3 and H2SO4. To quantify the contribution of each mineral species to the total K content, Na-saturated clay samples were submitted by a sequential and selective mineral extraction procedure, following the order: amorphous Al and Fe oxides; crystalline Fe oxides; kaolinite and gibbsite; mica and other 2:1 minerals and; feldspar and resistant minerals. The clay mineralogy composition reflects the high weathering and leaching degree in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, with low contents of amorphous minerals, a predominant proportion of kaolinite and the presence of other secondary resistant minerals. In spite of this mineral composition, the clay fraction presented the highest total K content, mainly in the most weathered soils. Due to the high proportion of kaolinite in the clay fraction, this mineral was an important source of non-exchangeable K forms. On the other hand, the contribution of amorphous Fe and Al oxides and crystalline Fe oxides to the total K content of the clay fraction was negligible. In general, easily weathered primary minerals (mica and feldspar contributed largely to the total K of the clay fraction, principally to the youngest soils developed from the Uberaba (sandstone and Serra Geral (basalt Formations, and the Araxá Group (migmatite/micaschist.

  16. Contrasting origin of two clay-rich debris flows at Cayambe Volcanic Complex, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detienne, M.; Delmelle, P.; Guevara, A.; Samaniego, P.; Opfergelt, S.; Mothes, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the sedimentological and mineralogical properties of a debris flow deposit west of Cayambe Volcanic Complex, an ice-clad edifice in Ecuador. The deposit exhibits a matrix facies containing up to 16 wt% of clays. However, the stratigraphic relationship of the deposit with respect to the Canguahua Formation, a widespread indurated volcaniclastic material in the Ecuadorian inter-Andean Valley, and the deposit alteration mineralogy differ depending on location. Thus, two different deposits are identified. The Río Granobles debris flow deposit ( 1 km3) is characterised by the alteration mineral assemblage smectite + jarosite, and sulphur isotopic analyses point to a supergene hydrothermal alteration environment. This deposit probably derives from a debris avalanche initiated before 14-21 ka by collapse of a hydrothermally altered rock mass from the volcano summit. In contrast, the alteration mineralogy of the second debris flow deposit, which may itself comprise more than one unit, is dominated by halloysite + smectite and relates to a shallower and more recent (3200 m) volcanic soils. Our study reinforces the significance of hydrothermal alteration in weakening volcano flanks and in favouring rapid transformation of a volcanic debris avalanche into a clay-rich debris flow. It also demonstrates that mineralogical analysis provides crucial information for resolving the origin of a debris flow deposit in volcanic terrains. Finally, we posit that slope instability, promoted by ongoing subglacial hydrothermal alteration, remains a significant hazard at Cayambe Volcanic Complex.

  17. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  18. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Transformações mineralógicas e cristaloquímicas decorrentes dos ensaios termais em argilas cauliníticas ferruginosas Mineralogical and crystalochemical transformations originated from thermal essays on ferruginous kaolinitic clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Ferreira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Transformações mineralógicas e cristaloquímicas foram investigadas em amostras de argilas cauliníticas ferruginosas aquecidas a temperaturas de 800, 1000 e 1200 °C. As análises de difração de raios X e térmica diferencial e gravimétrica mostraram ser a caulinita o argilomineral predominante nas amostras naturais. Os resultados da espectroscopia Mössbauer mostraram que o alto conteúdo em Fe (22,5% em peso, determinado por fluorescência de raios X, é relacionado à presença de goethita (18% em peso e hematita (16% em peso. Entretanto um resíduo deste elemento (Fe3+ e Fe2+ foi constatado após a extração do ferro usando solução de ditionito-citrato-bicarbonato, e possivelmente se deve à presença de ferro na estrutura da caulinita. O processo de sinterização mostra uma desestruturação da caulinita, assim como a transformação da goethita em hematita, cujo tamanho dos cristais cresce com o incremento da temperatura. O tamanho do cristal de hematita a 1200 °C é 5 vezes maior do que na amostra natural. A mulita formada a 1000 °C é constituída da solução sólida de Fe2O3, com Al2O3, o que resulta em produto resistente e de maior estabilidade térmica.Mineralogical and crystallochemical transformations of representative ferruginous kaolinitic clay samples were investigated in specimens burned at 800, 1000 and 1200 °C. X-ray diffraction and differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses showed that kaolinite was the predominant mineral in the raw samples. The Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed that the high iron content (22.5 wt.%, as determined by X-ray fluorescence, is related to the presence of goethite (18 wt.% and hematite (16 wt.%. However, after Fe was extracted using a dithionite-citrate system buffered with sodium bicarbonate, a residue of this element (Fe3+ and Fe2+ was found in the structure of the kaolinite. The sintering process showed the destruction of kaolinite, as well as the transformation of

  20. Effect of the Acid Treatment of Montmorillonite Clay in the Oleic Acid Esterification Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento,Alexsandra Rodrigues do; Alves,José Antônio Barros Leal Reis; Melo,Marcus Antônio de Freitas; Melo, Dulce Maria de Araújo; Souza,Marcelo José Barros de; Pedrosa,Anne Michelle Garrido

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel is a fuel renewable, biodegradable and environmentally correct fuel, which can be obtained from the esterification reactions, transesterification and pyrolisis. Montmorillonite is a clay mineral of the smectite group and are of great interest for industrial processes such as catalysis and adsorption. Acid activation of clay minerals is one of the most effective methods proposed to produce active materials. In this work, montmorillonite clay was treated with H2SO4 in different concen...

  1. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Zartman, Richard E.; William F. Jaynes

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cati...

  2. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated or plastic clays (Tsang and Hudson, 2010). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. During the lifespan of a clay repository, the repository performance is affected by complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow, formation of damage zones, radionuclide transport, waste dissolution, and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) of the repository. These coupled processes may affect radionuclide transport by changing transport paths (e.g., formation and evolution of excavation damaged zone (EDZ)) and altering flow, mineral, and mechanical properties that are related to radionuclide transport. While radionuclide transport in clay formation has been studied using laboratory tests (e,g, Appelo et al. 2010, Garcia-Gutierrez et al., 2008, Maes et al., 2008), short-term field

  3. Soils, plants and clay minerals: mineral and biologic interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velde, B; Barre, Pierre, Dr

    2010-01-01

    ..., weather patterns, plants and so forth. Chemistry and Physics were defined after Mathematics in order to establish more precise and viable principles of the behavior of the materials that formed the world around mankind. It became quite clear that the observation of the natural world was too complicated to consider all of the possible variables which ...

  4. Vitrification and neomineralisation of bentonitic and kaolinitic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These processes are found to be similar to those of transformation of sedimentary rocks into metamorphic and/or igneous rocks. Resultant fired mineral phases depicted mineral compositions of ceramic bodies, and the study suggested that these clays could be gainfully utilized in the making of ceramic wares, subject to ...

  5. Vitrification and neomineralisation of bentonitic and kaolinitic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resultant fired mineral phases depicted mineral compositions of ceramic bodies, and the study suggested that these clays could be gainfully utilized in the making of ceramic wares, subject to selected beneficiation processes. Keywords: kaolin, bentonite, vitrification, neomineralization, ceramic, firing. Global Journal of ...

  6. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  7. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  8. Finicky clay divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  9. Translanguaging and Semiotic Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennycook, Alastair

    2017-01-01

    This paper asks what translanguaging could start to look like if it incorporated an expanded version of language and questioned not only to the borders between languages but also the borders between semiotic modes. Developing the idea of spatial repertoires and assemblages, and looking at data from a Bangladeshi-owned corner shop, this paper…

  10. Assemblages of Patient Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balatsas Lekkas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    This thesis identifies how design processes emerge during the use of devices in healthcare, by attending to assemblages where contingencies of risk and harm co-exist with the contribution of healthcare professionals to the safe care of patients. With support from the field of Science and Technology...

  11. Early-middle Eocene birds from the Lillebaelt Clay Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2009-01-01

    The marine Lillebaelt Clay Formation of central Denmark is of early-middle Eocene age (late Ypresian - middle Lutetian; microfossil zones NP 13-NP 15). Over 20 bird fossils collected by amateur palaeontologists have been acquired through the Danish national ‘Danekrae' fossil treasure trove...... legislation. The fossils are preserved in clay ironstone concretions and almost two-thirds are isolated skulls preserved three-dimensionally. Bird fossils of this age and degree of preservation are rare in an international context. The fossils indicate a very diverse assemblage consisting of both marine...... Clay Formation deposits derive from just after the Early Eocene Climate Optimum, a period of global elevated temperatures resulting from rapid greenhouse warming. Comparison between this bird assemblage and the recently revised assemblage from the older (earliest Ypresian) Fur Formation of Denmark...

  12. Clay mineralogy indicates the muddy sediment provenance in the estuarine-inner shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifei; Zou, Xinqing; Liu, Qing; Wang, Chenglong; Ge, Chendong; Xu, Min

    2018-02-01

    The estuarine-inner shelf mud regions of the East China Sea (ECS) are valuable for studying the source-to-sink processes of fluvial sediments deposited since the Holocene. In this study, we present evidence of the provenance and environmental evolution of two cores (S5-2 and JC07) from the estuarine-inner shelf regions of the ECS over the past 100 years based on 210Pb dating, high-resolution grain size measurements and clay mineral analyses. The results indicate that the clay mineral assemblages of cores S5-2 and JC07 are dominated by illite, followed by kaolinite and chlorite, and present scarce amounts of smectite. A comparison of these clay mineral assemblages with several major sources reveals that the fine sediments on the estuarine-inner shelf of the ECS represent a mixture of provenances associated with the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, as well as smaller rivers. However, the contribution of each provenance has varied greatly over the past hundred years, as indicated by the down-core variability due to strong sediment reworking and transport on the inner shelf and the reduction of the sediment load from the Yangtze River basin. In the mud region of the Yangtze River estuary, the sediment from 1930 to 1956 was primarily derived from the Yangtze River, although the Yellow River was also an important influence. From 1956 to 2013, the Yellow River contribution decreased, whereas the Yangtze River contribution correspondingly increased. In the Zhe-Min mud region, the Yangtze River contributed more sediment than did other rivers from 1910 to 1950; however, the Yangtze River contribution gradually decreased from 1950 to 2013. Moreover, the other small rivers accounted for minor contributions, and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) played an important role in the sediment transport process in the ECS. Our results indicate that the weakening/strengthening of the EAWM and a decrease in the sediment load of the Yangtze River influenced the transport and fate of sediment

  13. Carbon sequestration in clay and silt fractions of Brazilian soils under conventional and no-tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Estima Sacramento dos Reis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of soils to sequestrate carbon (C is mainly related to the formation of organo-mineral complexes. In this study, we investigated the influence of soil management systems on the C retention capacity of soil with an emphasis on the silt and clay fractions of two subtropical soils with different mineralogy and climate. Samples from a Humic Hapludox and a Rhodic Hapludox, clayey soils cultivated for approximately 30 years under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT were collected from six layers distributed within 100-cm soil depth from each site and from an adjacent native forest. After the removal of particulate organic matter (POM, the suspension (<53 µm was sonicated, the silt and clay fractions were separated in accordance with Stokes' law and the carbon content of whole soil and physical fractions was determined. In the Humic Hapludox, the clay and silt fractions under NT showed a higher maximum C retention (72 and 52 g kg-1, respectively in comparison to those under CT (54 and 38 g kg-1, respectively. Moreover, the C concentration increase in both fractions under NT occurred mainly in the topsoil (up to 5 cm. The C retention in physical fractions of Rhodic Hapludox varied from 25 to 32 g kg-1, and no difference was observed whether under an NT or a CT management system. The predominance of goethite and gibbsite in the Humic Hapludox, as well as its exposure to a colder climate, may have contributed to its greater C retention capacity. In addition to the organo-mineral interaction, a mechanism of organic matter self-assemblage, enhanced by longer periods of soil non-disturbance, seems to have contributed to the carbon stabilization in both soils.

  14. EFFECT OF CALCINATION TEMPERATURE OF TUNISIAN CLAYS ON THE PROPERTIES OF GEOPOLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essaidi N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are amorphous three dimensional aluminosilicate materials that may be synthesized at room or slightly higher temperature by alkaline activation of aluminosilicates obtained from industrial wastes, calcined clays and natural minerals. Among the different family of geopolymers, two Tunisian clays (a kaolinite clay from Tabarka and illito/kaolinitic clay from Medenine are tested for their feasibility of geopolymers at low temperature. The unfired and calcined clays were dissolved in strongly alkaline solution in order to produce consolidated materials whose pastes were characterized by their compressive strength. Hardened geopolymer samples were also submitted to X-Ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The geopolymer strength is related to the structure and reactivity of the clay generated by thermal treatment and to the role of associated minerals in clays. The amorphous character of obtained geopolymers and the displacement of the IR wavenumber are signature of geopolymerisation reaction.

  15. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assessment of organomodified clays potentially used in food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Prieto, Ana I; Pichardo, Silvia; Jordá-Beneyto, María; Aucejo, Susana; Jos, Ángeles

    2015-09-01

    Modern food packaging has made great advances as result of global trends and consumer preferences, which are oriented to obtain improved food quality and safety. In this regard, clay minerals, and mainly Montmorillonite (Mt) are attracting considerable interest in food packaging because of the improvements developed in mechanical and barrier properties. Hence, the present work aim to assess the toxicity of four Montmorillonite-based clay minerals, an unmodified clay, Cloisite®Na+ (CNa+), and three modified Mt clays: Cloisite®30B (C30B), a commercial clay, and Clay1 and Clay2, two novel modified organoclays developed by the Packaging, Transport, & Logistics Research Institute (ITENE). First, the cytotoxic effects were studied in the Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). In addition, the potential mutagenicity of the clays was evaluated by the Ames test. Clay1 did not induce any cytotoxic effects in HUVEC, although it exhibited potential mutagenicity in TA98 Salmonella typhimurium strain. In contrast, Clay2 produced cytotoxicity in endothelial cells but no mutagenicity was recorded. However, CNa+ was not cytotoxic neither mutagenic. And finally, C30B showed positive results in both assays. Therefore, results showed that clay minerals have a different toxicity profile and a case by case toxicity evaluation is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Holocene Provenance Identification and Climate Control of Indus Basin By Using Radiogenic Techniques and Clay Mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANWAR ALIZAI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Two commonly used isotopic methods (Zircon U-Pb dating and K-feldspar Pb dating were employed for the Holocene provenance identification within the Indus basin. Zircon grains from the upper Indus are generally younger than 200 Ma in contrast with the eastern tributaries, which show varying inputs from Greater and Lesser Himalayan sources. The Sutlej river is very rich in Lesser Himalayan-sourced sediments, while the Chenab is mostly eroded from the Greater Himalaya. Grains younger than 200 Ma in the sands of the Thar desert indicate preferential aeolian transport from the Indus lower reaches. K-feldspar Pb dating of silt and sand-sized grains from the modern Sutlej and Chenab rivers show a clear Himalayan provenance, contrasting with grains from the Indus Suture Zone, but are overlapping with Karakoram compositions. The desert dunes commonly show 207Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/204Pb values that are much higher than those seen in the rivers, most consistent with erosion from Nanga Parbat. This implies at least some origin from the trunk Indus, probably reworked by summer monsoon winds from the SW, a hypothesis supported by U-Pb zircon dating. Further, data collected from Holocene and Pleistocene buried sands on the western edge of the Thar desert were sourced from Himalayan rivers before and at 6–8 ka, but after that time the proportion of high isotopic ratio grains rose, indicating increased contribution from the Thar Desert dunes prior to ~4.5 ka when flow ceased entirely. Clay mineral assemblages are dominated by smectite and illite, with minor chlorite and kaolinite. Deltaic sediments integrate clay minerals across the basin with increased smectite input between 13 and 7.5 ka, indicating stronger chemical weathering when the summer monsoon intensified and correlating with similar trends in peninsular India.

  17. Octyl Phenol Synthesis Using Natural Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casuscelli

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of clay minerals, HB, NB and Al-PILC have been studied in the alkylation reactions of 2-octanol with phenol at 180°C, under conditions of alcohol/phenol = 1 (mole ratio and W/FAo °= 64,27 ghmol-1. The selectivity of Al-PILC was 77,12% for octyl phenol and 16,5% for dioctyl phenol.

  18. Ensilin Tests on Selected Clays and Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    are one of the most difficult formations to drill effectively. Shales are sedimentary rocks deposited in a marine environment that contain silt and...minerals are exposed to water in drilling fluids, they swell, disperse and eventually cause wellbore instabilities. This leads to many problems in...of the numerous works on shale classification and shale control. 2.1 Clays In order to understand shale instability, one must first look at the

  19. Strategic Shuffling of Clay Layers to Imbue Them with Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Raj Kumar; Raidongia, Kalyan

    2017-06-01

    Layers of naturally occurring clay minerals are rearranged to prepare highly sensitive multiresponsive clay-clay bilayer membrane (CCBM). The CCBM introduced here responds to the minuscule changes in the surrounding environments including temperature, humidity, and presence of solvent vapors by morphing in specific manners. Strips cut from CCBM exhibit up to 588 N kg -1 force output when exposed to temperature fluctuations. Inheriting the natural stability of clay minerals, CCBM demonstrates extreme robustness, heating up to 500 °C, cooling with liquid N 2 and exposure to corrosive chemical vapors did not deteriorate its bending performance. Mechanistic studies suggest that shape transformations of CCBM are driven by the unequal response of its components to external stimuli. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Source rock indication from the heavy mineral weight percentages, central Tamil Nadu, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajamanickam, G.V.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Manickaraj, D.S.; Gujar, A.R.; Loveson, V.J.; Chaturvedi, S.K.; Chandrasekar, N.; Mahesh, R.

    mineral distribution. Though much variation in the positive direction is noticed, significant shift in the heavy mineral assemblage could not be recognized. Heavy minerals have been evaluated for the weight percentage distribution in the low tide and high...

  1. Clays as dietary supplements for swine: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mohana Devi; Kim, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clays are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate molecules composed of alkali and alkaline earth cations along with small amounts of various other elements. The best-known are montmorillonite, smectite, illite, kaolinite, biotite and clinoptilolite. The molecules in these clays are arranged in three-dimensional structures creating internal voids and channels capable of trapping a wide variety of molecules. As a result of this structure, clay minerals are regarded as a simple and effective tool for the prevention of the negative effects of many toxic compounds. Dietary supplementation with clays has been shown to improve weight gain and feed conversion in pigs. Where improvements in performance have been noted, one of the most likely explanations for the improvement is the fact clays increase nutrient digestibility. Clays reduce the speed of passage of feed along the digestive tract which allows more time for digestion. Feeding clays also causes morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa such as an increase in villus height and an increase in the villus height to crypt depth ratio. These changes increase the surface area of the gastrointestinal tract thus increasing nutrient digestibility. Several studies have indicated that feeding clay reduces the incidence, severity and duration of diarrhea in pigs. The mechanism for the reduction in diarrhea is likely due to increases in the numbers of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus and decreases in Clostridia and E. coli in the small intestine of pigs fed clays. In addition, the numbers of pigs born alive and weaned, birth weight and weaning weight have been shown to be higher for sows fed clays. Several studies have indicated that clays can help mitigate the effects of mycotoxins. The aim of the present review is to focus on the various clays which have been given attention in recent research and to discuss their potential to improve pig performance.

  2. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Andra organised an International Symposium on the use of Natural and Engineered Clay-based Barriers for the Containment of Radioactive Waste hold at the Congress Centre of Tours, France, in March 2005. The symposium provided an opportunity to take stock of the potential properties of the clay-based materials present in engineered or natural barriers in order to meet the containment specifications of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. It was intended for specialists working in the various disciplines involved with clays and clay based minerals, as well as scientists from agencies and organisations dealing with investigations on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The themes of the Symposium included geology, geochemistry, transfers of materials, alteration processes, geomechanics, as well as the recent developments regarding the characterisation of clays, as well as experiments in surface and underground laboratories. The symposium consisted of plenary sessions, parallel specialized sessions and poster sessions. (author)

  3. Fashion, Mediations & Method Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille

    , 1997). "Mediation" is an activity rather than an actor; a co-constructive relation that creates what it mediates - the producer and the consumer. Hennion argues "that something effectively `happens´ in this process, which transforms the ways things were before" (Hennion & Grenier 2000, p. 346). Hennion...... to STS literature by expanding one of its central debates to a new empirical setting; fashion specifically, and the aesthetic-cultural field on a more general level. In trying to make a theoretical connection between aesthetics and sociality of fashion, the paper suggests the term of "mediator" (Hennion......, it is an important ambition of this paper to go into a methodological discussion of how "that which effectively happens" can be approached. To this end, the paper will combine Hennion's term of the "mediator" with John Laws methodological term of "method assemblages". Method assemblages is a suggested as a way...

  4. Biodegradation of crude oil saturated fraction supported on clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Jones, Martin D; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-02-01

    The role of clay minerals in crude oil saturated hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/saturated hydrocarbon microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clay minerals used for this study were montmorillonite, palygorskite, saponite and kaolinite. The clay mineral samples were treated with hydrochloric acid and didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce acid activated- and organoclays respectively which were used in this study. The production of organoclay was restricted to only montmorillonite and saponite because of their relative high CEC. The study indicated that acid activated clays, organoclays and unmodified kaolinite, were inhibitory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. Unmodified saponite was neutral to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. However, unmodified palygorskite and montmorillonite were stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturated fraction and appears to do so as a result of the clays' ability to provide high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients such that the nutrients were within the 'vicinity' of the microbes. Adsorption of the saturated hydrocarbons was not significant during biodegradation.

  5. Grain surface features and clay mineralogy of the quaternary sediments from Western Deccan Trap Region, India, and their palaeoclimatic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena U. Joshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Quartz sand grains obtained from a deeply gullied topography along the banks of two tributaries of River Pravara in Maharashtra (India have been examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Quartz grains have been selected after a heavy mineral separation and micro-photographs of each grain were taken at various angles and magnifications. The sediments reveal features resulting from mechanical grinding as well as from chemical alteration. Conchoidal fractures, cleavage planes, grooves, v-shaped indentations etc. are the mechanical features documented on the grains whereas solution pits of varying sizes and intensity, precipitation surfaces, oriented v-pits, solution crevasses and etching are the features of chemical origin. Several evidences indicate that the samples have undergone digenetic changes. Few grains show the features of intense chemical breakdown. The overall assemblages of the grain surface features suggest that the samples have been subjected to subaqueous transport for a considerable period of time. The minor chemical features such as solution pits or semi circular arcuate steps found in abundance on these grains are due to the dissolution of the sediments in a low energy fluviatile environment. For clay mineralogy, fractions between <2 and <0.2 mm were separated out from the sediments. The clay fractions were then subjected to examination by X-ray diffraction (XRD of oriented K/Ca saturated samples using a Philips Diffractometer and Ni-filtered Cu Ka radiation with the scanning speed of 10 2Ө min -1. The main clay minerals for all the samples are identical and show the presence of hydroxy-interlayered smectites with minor quantities of mica, kaolinite, smectites, quartz and feldspar. The first weathering product of the Deccan Basalt (DB is the dioctahedral smectite. Since the present semi aridic climatic condition of the study area can not transform a smectite to HIS and either smectite to kaolin, it is quite likely that

  6. Late Eocene clay boron-derived paleosalinity in the Qaidam Basin and its implications for regional tectonics and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chengcheng; Yang, Yibo; Fang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Weilin

    2016-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin, located on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and containing Cenozoic sediments with a maximum thickness of 12,000 m, is an ideal place to study the phased uplift of the NE Tibetan Plateau and regional climate change. The estimation of the paleosalinity of sedimentary environments not only helps to evaluate the evolution of lakes in this region but offers insights into contemporaneous climate change. We present detailed geochemical and mineralogical investigations from the lacustrine interval of the Hongliugou section in the northern Qaidam Basin to reconstruct salinity fluctuations in the paleolake during the late Eocene era ( 42.0-35.5 Ma). The clay mineral assemblages mainly contain smectite, illite, chlorite, kaolinite and irregular illite/smectite mixed layers. Clay boron-derived paleosalinity estimates (equivalent boron content, Couch's paleosalimeter and B/Ga ratios) along with other proxies sensitive to salinity changes (e.g., Rb/K ratios and ostracod assemblages) collectively indicate an overall brackish sedimentary environment with a higher-salinity period at approximately 40.0-39.2 Ma. This higher-salinity period indicates a more arid environment and is probably related to global cooling. However, the global cooling in late Eocene cannot explain the overall stable long-term salinity pattern, implying that other factors exist. We propose that the migration of the Yiliping depression depocenter in the northern Qaidam and increased orographic rainfall induced by late Eocene tectonic activity at the northern margin of the basin might have partly offset the increase in salinity driven by global cooling.

  7. Clay fraction mineralogy of a Cambisol in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastacio, A. S.; Fabris, J. D., E-mail: jdfabris@ufmg.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Stucki, J. W. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences (United States); Coelho, F. S.; Pinto, I. V. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Viana, J. H. M. [Embrapa Milho e Sorgo (Brazil)

    2005-11-15

    Clay minerals having a 2:1 (tetrahedral:octahedral sheet) structure may be found in strongly weathering soils only if the local pedo-climatic environment prevents them from further weathering to other minerals such as iron oxides. The clay minerals impart important chemical properties to soils, in part by virtue of changes in the redox state of iron in their crystal structures. Knowing the chemical nature of soil clays is a first step in evaluating their potential reactivity with other soil constituents and processes, such as the chemical decomposition of organic substrates to be potentially used in environmental remediation. The purpose of this work was to characterize the iron oxides and iron-bearing clay minerals from a B horizon of a Cambisol developed on tuffite in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The iron oxides of this NaOH-treated clay-fraction were found to contain mainly maghemite ({gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and superparamagnetic goethite ({alpha}FeOOH). Kaolinite (Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}), smectite, and minor portions of anatase (TiO{sub 2}) were identified in the CBD-treated sample.

  8. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  9. Geological and technological characterization of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous clay deposits (Jebel Ammar, northeastern Tunisia) for ceramic industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben M'barek-Jemaï, Moufida; Sdiri, Ali; Ben Salah, Imed; Ben Aissa, Lassaad; Bouaziz, Samir; Duplay, Joelle

    2017-05-01

    Late Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous clays of the Jebel Ammar study site were used as raw materials for potential applications in ceramic industry. Physico-chemical characterization of the collected samples was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and dilatometry (Bugot's curve). Geotechnical study was also undertaken by the assessment of plasticity and liquidity limits. It was found that high concentrations of silica, alumina with SiO2/Al2O3 ratio characterized the studied clays; its high amounts of CaO and Fe2O3 in the Late Jurassic clays indicated their calcareous nature. In addition, technological tests indicated moderate to low plasticity values for the Late Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous clays, respectively. Clay fraction (<2 μm) reached 50% of the natural clay in some cases. Mineralogical analysis showed that Jurassic clays were dominated by smectite, illite and kaolinite, as clay mineral species; calcite was the main associated mineral. Lower Cretaceous clays were mainly composed of abundant illite accompanied by well-crystallized smectite and kaolinite. Kaolinite gradually increased upwards, reaching 70% of the total clay fraction (i.e. <2 μm). Quartz, calcite and feldspar were the main non-clay minerals. Based on these analyses, the clays meet technological requirements that would allow their use in the ceramic industry and for the manufacturing of ceramic tiles.

  10. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundl, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  11. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. III - Generation of bitumen in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, I. R.

    A series of pyrolysis experiments, utilizing two different immature kerogens (from the Monterey and Green River Formations) mixed with common sedimentary minerals (calcite, illite, or Na-montmorillonite), was conducted to study the impact of the mineral matrix on the bitumen that was generated. Calcite has no significant influence on the thermal evolution of bitumen and also shows virtually no adsorption capacity for any of the pyrolysate. In contrast, montmorillonite (M) and illite, to a lesser extent, alter bitumen during dry pyrolysis. M and illite also display strong adsorption capacities for the polar constituents of bitumen. By this process, hydrocarbons are substantially concentrated within the pyrolysate that is not strongly adsorbed on the clay matrices. The effects of the clay minerals are significantly reduced during hydrous pyrolysis. The strong adsorption capacities of M and illite, as well as their thermocatalytic properties, may in part explain why light oils and gases are generated from certain argillaceous source-rock assemblages, whereas heavy immature oils are often derived from carbonate source rocks.

  12. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter--III. Generation of bitumen in laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, B J; Tannenbaum, E; Kaplan, I R

    1987-01-01

    A series of pyrolysis experiments, utilizing two different immature kerogens (from the Monterey and Green River Formations) mixed with common sedimentary minerals (calcite, illite, or Na-montmorillonite), was conducted to study the impact of the mineral matrix on the bitumen that was generated. Calcite has no significant influence on the thermal evolution of bitumen and also shows virtually no adsorption capacity for any of the pyrolysate. In contrast, montmorillonite and illite, to a lesser extent, alter bitumen during dry pyrolysis. Montmorillonite and illite also display strong adsorption capacities for the polar constituents of bitumen. By this process, hydrocarbons are substantially concentrated within the pyrolysate that is not strongly adsorbed on the clay matrices. The effects of the clay minerals are significantly reduced during hydrous pyrolysis. The strong adsorption capacities of montmorillonite and illite, as well as their thermocatalytic properties, may in part explain why light oils and gases are generated from certain argillaceous source-rock assemblages, whereas heavy immature oils are often derived from carbonate source rocks.

  13. Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of French green clays used for healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L.B.; Haydel, S.E.; Giese, R.F.; Eberl, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    The worldwide emergence of infectious diseases, together with the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, elevate the need to properly detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. The overuse and misuse of common antibiotics in recent decades stimulates the need to identify new inhibitory agents. Therefore, natural products like clays, that display antibacterial properties, are of particular interest. The absorptive properties of clay minerals are well documented for healing skin and gastrointestinal ailments. However, the antibacterial properties of clays have received less scientific attention. French green clays have recently been shown to heal Buruli ulcer, a necrotic or 'flesh-eating' infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Assessing the antibacterial properties of these clays could provide an inexpensive treatment for Buruli ulcer and other skin infections. Antimicrobial testing of the two clays on a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens showed that one clay promotes bacterial growth (possibly provoking a response from the natural immune system), while another kills bacteria or significantly inhibits bacterial growth. This paper compares the mineralogy and chemical composition of the two French green clays used in the treatment of Buruli ulcer. Mineralogically, the two clays are dominated by 1Md illite and Fe-smectite. Comparing the chemistry of the clay minerals and exchangeable ions, we conclude that the chemistry of the clay, and the surface properties that affect pH and oxidation state, control the chemistry of the water used to moisten the clay poultices and contribute the critical antibacterial agent(s) that ultimately debilitate the bacteria. Copyright ?? 2008, The Clay Minerals Society.

  14. The composition and origin of Ghana medicine clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Bart E; Fraser, Sharon E; Insoll, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The mineral, organic and elemental composition of medicine clays from three shrines in the Tong Hills in northern Ghana (Gbankil, Kusanaab, and Yaane) are assessed to ascertain what additives they might contain and the implications for their recognition, for example in archaeological contexts. These are clays that are widely used for healing purposes being perceived efficacious in curing multiple ailments and which are given a divine provenance, but their collection is ascribed human agency. The Yaane clay is also supplied as part of the process of obtaining the right to operate the shrine elsewhere making it widely dispersed. Organic geochemical analyses revealed a predominance of plant-derived material with a substantial contribution of microbial origin. Based on these (supported by elemental and mineral analyses), no unnatural organic material could be detected, making an exogenous contribution to these clays unlikely. The implications are that these are wholly natural medicinal substances with no anthropogenic input into their preparation, as the traditions suggest. The very similar mineralogy of all the clays, including a non-medicine clay sampled, suggests that, unless the geology radically differed, differentiating between them analytically in an archaeological contexts would be doubtful.

  15. Surface clay formation during short-term warmer and wetter conditions on a largely cold ancient Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Michalski, Joseph R.; Gago-Duport, Luis; Baker, Leslie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; Gross, Christoph; Rampe, Elizabeth B.

    2018-03-01

    The ancient rock record for Mars has long been at odds with climate modelling. The presence of valley networks, dendritic channels and deltas on ancient terrains points towards running water and fluvial erosion on early Mars1, but climate modelling indicates that long-term warm conditions were not sustainable2. Widespread phyllosilicates and other aqueous minerals on the Martian surface3-6 provide additional evidence that an early wet Martian climate resulted in surface weathering. Some of these phyllosilicates formed in subsurface crustal environments5, with no association with the Martian climate, while other phyllosilicate-rich outcrops exhibit layered morphologies and broad stratigraphies7 consistent with surface formation. Here, we develop a new geochemical model for early Mars to explain the formation of these clay-bearing rocks in warm and wet surface locations. We propose that sporadic, short-term warm and wet environments during a generally cold early Mars enabled phyllosilicate formation without requiring long-term warm and wet conditions. We conclude that Mg-rich clay-bearing rocks with lateral variations in mixed Fe/Mg smectite, chlorite, talc, serpentine and zeolite occurrences formed in subsurface hydrothermal environments, whereas dioctahedral (Al/Fe3+-rich) smectite and widespread vertical horizonation of Fe/Mg smectites, clay assemblages and sulphates formed in variable aqueous environments on the surface of Mars. Our model for aluminosilicate formation on Mars is consistent with the observed geological features, diversity of aqueous mineralogies in ancient surface rocks and state-of-the-art palaeoclimate scenarios.

  16. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  17. Microanalysis of clay-based pigments in paintings by XRD techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradil, David; Bezdička, Petr; Hradilová, J.; Vašutová, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 125, MAR (2016), s. 10-20 ISSN 0026-265X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22984S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Clay minerals * Earth pigments * Clay -binder interaction * Powder X-ray micro-diffraction * Quantitative phase microanalysis Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.034, year: 2016

  18. Characterization of karak clay from pakistan for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, L.A. [University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Silva-Valenzuela, M.G.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F.R.; Sayeg, I.J.; Carvalho, F.M.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Clay, the most important, plentiful, and low cost naturally occurring mineral, is widely used in variety of industrial application including Pharmaceutical and cosmetic. Clay is the fine grained aluminosilicate mineral which shows the property of plasticity at appropriate water content, and becomes hard upon drying. In Pakistan there are different types of clay but till now neither of them properly identified nor characterize for specific industrial application. The objective of this work is to characterize Karak clay for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications collected from deposit located at Shagai region, District Karak, Pakistan. The clay was characterized through Xray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), trace elemental Analysis, Microbiological analysis, Cation exchange capacity (CEC), pH and swelling assays according to European, United States of America and Brazilian Pharmacopeias. Bulk Chemical analysis shows that the Aluminum oxide and silica oxide are present in large quantity which was confirmed by XRD that this sample has montmorillonite as a major while illite and kaolinite as minor clay minerals. Quartz of small quantity was also found as a non-clay mineral. After analyzing the results for sample it was concluded that the clay is a strong candidate for cosmetic purposes. (author)

  19. a study of the physico-chemistry and mineralogy of agbaja clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    Halloysite and Illite were the accessory minerals present. Agbaja clay is suitable for use in the production of super-heat duty refractory materials and vitreous ceramic wares. It is also suitable for use in the paper, rubber, plastic and pharmaceutical industries. The clay color changed from milk white to light grey upon firing.

  20. The Clay that Cures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Hydrotalcite - The Clay that Cures. N Bejoy. General Article Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 57-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0057-0061. Author Affiliations.

  1. Magnificent Clay Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2007-01-01

    Each August, third grade artists at Apple Glen Elementary in Bentonville, Arkansas, start the school year planning, creating, and exhibiting a clay relief mural. These mural projects have helped students to acquire not only art knowledge and techniques, but an even more important kind of knowledge: what it means to plan and successfully complete a…

  2. Clay-fulleropyrrolidine nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gournis, D; Jankovic, L; Maccallini, E; Benne, D; Rudolf, P; Colomer, JF; Sooambar, C; Georgakilas, [No Value; Prato, M; Fanti, M; Zerbetto, F; Sarova, GH; Guldi, DM; Jankovič, Luboš; Colomer, Jean-François; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Sarova, Ginka H.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we describe the insertion of a water-soluble bisadduct fulleropyrrolidine derivative into the interlayer space of three layered smectite clays. The composites were characterized by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoemission and FTIR

  3. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brick is one of the most used and versatile building materials in use today. Bricks can be defined as modular units connected by mortar in the formation of a building system or product. Commonly the word brick is used to refer to clay bricks, which...

  4. Mineral composite assessment of Kelkit River Basin in Turkey by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Utilizing remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) tools, mineral composite characteristics (ferrous minerals (FM), iron oxide (IO), and clay minerals (CM)) of the Kelkit River Basin (15913.07 km2) in Turkey were investigated and mapped. Mineral composite (MC) index maps were produced from three ...

  5. A 25 ky BP record of Himalayan aridity using muscovite and clays as proxy climate indicators

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gujar, A.R.; Chauhan, O.S.

    Based upon the temporal variations in the grain size parameters, characteristic clay minerals, their ratios and detrital muscovite content in a isotopically dated turbidity free core from hemipelagic environment. (2713 m water depth), the climatic...

  6. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2007-03-31

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  7. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2006-12-06

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  8. Modeling diffusion of an alkaline plume in a clay barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Gaucher, Eric C.; Blanc, Philippe; Matray, Jean-Michel; Michau, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The design of clay plugs used for sealing access galleries to a radioactive waste repository built with concrete structures in a deep clayey formation must take into consideration their chemical evolution over time. Diffusion of an alkaline plume from concrete into bentonite was therefore modeled over a 100 ka period with the PHREEQC geochemical code in order to determine, as a function of time, modifications to mineral surfaces, dissolution of existing minerals and pr...

  9. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  10. Lithium Isotopic Fractionation in Subduction Zones: Clues From Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. B.; Hervig, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Lithium isotope ratios show such large variations in nature (>30 per mil), that many areas of geosciences are exploring the usefulness of this system in explaining the evolution of particular rocks. Here we show how the lithium isotope ratios change during the transformation of smectite clay minerals to illite during burial metamorphism. Such a transition may be a common feature in the shallow regions of subduction zones and may ultimately affect the Li isotope compositions of fluids contributing to arc magmatism. Lithium is a ubiquitous trace element in natural formation waters that, like B, shows large isotopic fractionation especially during interactions with clay minerals. Lithium is adsorbed in the interlayer region of expandable clay minerals but is easily exchanged. Lithium is also incorporated into the octahedral sites. The substitutions of Li in two crystallographic sites of clay minerals may complicate interpretations of bulk Li-isotope ratios. We suggest that the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of Li between fluid and clay is different in the interlayer sites of clay minerals than in the octahedral sites of clay minerals. Examination of Li contents and isotope variations in experimental reactions of smectite to illite (300C, 100MPa) shows changes with structural re-arrangement of the clay layers. The Li-isotope trend declines (from ~+6 to -13 per mil, expressed as ratios of 7/6) throughout R1-ordering of the mixed-layered illite smectite (I/S). However, the equilibrium end products of the reaction have R3-ordering and show a heavier isotope ratio (~0 per mil). This observation is very similar to the trends we observed for B-isotopes, where the interlayer B initially overprinted the tetrahedral-layer B isotope composition, but as the interlayer sites were collapsed during illitization, the equilibrium isotope composition was approached. The significant Li and B isotopic changes that occur during ordering of I/S coincides with the temperatures

  11. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  12. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  13. Mineral resources of Novokuznetsk administrative district of Kemerovo region (metallic and non-metallic minerals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutak, Ja M.

    2017-09-01

    The article summarizes data on metallic and non-metallic minerals of Novokuznetsk district of Kemerovo region. Consistently reviewed are iron deposits (Tersinskaya group of deposits), gold deposits (placer accumulations and vein gold deposits), mineral water deposits (Tersinskoe deposit), deposit of refractory clay (Barkinskoe) and wide spread mineral deposits such as brick clay, keramzite materials, sand and gravel, building stones, ornamental stones, facing stones, peat, materials for lime production. It is indicated that resource base of metallic and nonmetallic minerals is inferior to that of mineral coal. At the same time it can be of considerable interest to small and medium-size businesses as objects with quick return of investment (facing and ornamental stones). For a number of wide spread mineral resources (brick clay, keramzite materials, sand and gravel) it is an important component of local industry.

  14. Clay mineralogy of the mud banks of Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The mineralogy of the sediments constituting the mud banks formed off Cochin, Kerala, India was studied. The clay mineral composition was used as a means of understanding the nature and source of origin of the muds. Fine fraction of the mud samples...

  15. New membranes made of sintered clay application to crossflow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The new mineral membranes made of sintered clay are performed and characterized in terms of porosity, hydraulic resistance, pore diameter and mechanical resistance. It is shown that these membranes can be used as microfiltration membrane. The variations of the filtrate flux as a function of time are measured during the ...

  16. 25 The Geotechnical Properties Of Clay Occurrences Around Kutigi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    been indispensable in architecture, in industry, and agriculture. Today they are among the most important minerals used by manufacturing and ..... containing a significant proportion of organic matter (e.g. MHO). 3. chart is based on material passing a 425µm BS sieve. Fig. 2: Plasticity classification chart plotted for Kutigi clay ...

  17. Mineralogy and thermal properties of clay from Slatina (Ub, Serbia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Maja; Logar, Mihovil; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Jelic, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    The "Slatina" deposit, Ub, Serbia was opened in 1965 and represents one of few deposits exploited by "Kopovi" a.d., Ub, company. Deposit is composed of clay layers belonging to Neogene sediments that are widespread transgressive over granitoid rocks of Cer mountain and Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Clay is mostly of illite-montmorillonite-kaolinite type and they are generally used as ceramic materials while some of the layers are used as fire-resistant materials. In this study we present mineralogical and thermal characterization of two samples to determine their application as industrial materials. Chemical and mineral composition was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), X-ray diffraction (XRD) on powder and oriented samples, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and granulometry. Cationic exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SSA) was determined using spectrophotometry and methylene blue (MB). Thermal properties where determined by gravimetry (120, 350, 600 and 1000 oC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Quantitative mineral composition obtained by Rietveld refinement of combined chemical and XRD data shows that the sample 1(SC) is mainly smectite-illite (45%) and kaolinite (14%) clay with 19% of quartz, 10% feldspars and 7% of limonite, while sample 2(SV) is smectite-illite (43%) and kaolinite (11%) clay with 10% of quartz, 15% feldspars and 7% of limonite. Both samples have low content of impurities (carbonate minerals). Medium grain size (μm) goes from 1.02 (SSA = 104 m2/g) for sample 1(SC) to 0.71 (SSA = 117 m2/g) for sample 2(SV) while their CEC is 12.7 and 14.9 mmol/100g for 1(SC) and 2(SV) respectively. IR spectra of the samples shows larger amount of smectite clays with quartz and carbonate minerals for both samples which is in accordance with XRD data. DTA data shows couple of events that are endothermic. First one (100-200 oC) is associated with loss of moisture and constitutive water, second

  18. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eLongo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  19. The utilization of waste clay from coal basin in the wall tile body formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isik, I.; Gocmez, H.; Yanik, G. [Dumlupinar Univ., Dept. of Ceramics Engineering, Kutahya (Turkey); Ceylantekin, R. [Anadolu Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    In this study, the waste clays extracted from coal basin were used as a wall tile ingredient instead of the clay materials of the standardized biscuit formulation of the wall tile. XRD data show that waste clay contains major clay minerals such as illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite. It was found that clay-size particles (equal or less than 2{mu}m) distributed between 19.85 and 47%. The green and dry strength of the specimen containing illite and/or montmorillonite were increased 35% compared with the standard biscuit specimen. The fired strength of the samples having alkaline Earth oxides has been improved 20%, whereas water absorption reduced 28%. It was also found that the substitution of 5% waste clay in the wall tile biscuit formulation has revealed relatively better physical properties. (orig.)

  20. Cyclic voltammetry of aquocobalamin on clay-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, V.; Morra, M.J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Soil Science Div.

    1998-07-15

    Halogenated synthetic compounds are widespread contaminants of the environment. Although corrinoids reductively dehalogenate synthetic contaminants in solution, the redox behavior of sorbed tetrapyrroles has received limited attention. Colloidal clay suspensions were prepared as Ca{sup 2+} forms of hectorite (SHCa-1), montmorillonite (SWy-1, Syn-1, and SAz-1), and vermiculite (VTx-1) and spin coated on platinum electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry was performed with the clay-modified electrodes immersed in buffered solutions containing 1.0 mM aquocobalamin. Aquocobalamin in the presence of vermiculite-coated electrodes displayed the same cathodic and anodic peak potentials as unmodified electrodes immersed in aquocobalamin solutions. All other clay-modified electrodes shifted cathodic peaks to more negative values, while anodic peak shifts varied with the clay. Hectorite caused the largest shift in formal redox potential as compared to aquocobalamin in solution. The redox behavior of aquocobalamin as modified by sorption to clay minerals potentially affects dehalogenation rates of synthetic organic compounds in the environment. Clays lowering the formal redox potential of the tetrapyrrole create a potentially more efficient catalyst for pollutant degradation. However, thermodynamic data as obtained using cyclic voltammetry cannot be used to make definitive predictions about the kinetics of contaminant dehalogenation. Reductive dehalogenation will be a function of altered electrochemical properties of the tetrapyrrole as well as rates of contaminant diffusion to the site of tetrapyrrole sorption.

  1. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  2. The effects of worms, clay and biochar on CO2 emissions during production and soil application of co-composts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthod, Justine; Rumpel, Cornélia; Paradelo, Remigio; Dignac, Marie-France

    2016-12-01

    In this study we evaluated CO2 emissions during composting of green wastes with clay and/or biochar in the presence and absence of worms (species of the genus Eisenia), as well as the effect of those amendments on carbon mineralization after application to soil. We added two different doses of clay, biochar or their mixture to pre-composted green wastes and monitored carbon mineralization over 21 days in the absence or presence of worms. The resulting co-composts and vermicomposts were then added to a loamy Cambisol and the CO2 emissions were monitored over 30 days in a laboratory incubation. Our results indicated that the addition of clay or clay/biochar mixture reduced carbon mineralization during co-composting without worms by up to 44 %. In the presence of worms, CO2 emissions during composting increased for all treatments except for the low clay dose. The effect of the amendments on carbon mineralization after addition to soil was small in the short term. Overall, composts increased OM mineralization, whereas vermicomposts had no effect. The presence of biochar reduced OM mineralization in soil with respect to compost and vermicompost without additives, whereas clay reduced mineralization only in the composts. Our study indicates a significant role of the conditions of composting on mineralization in soil. Therefore, the production of a low CO2 emission amendment requires optimization of feedstocks, co-composting agents and worm species.

  3. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  4. CHEMICAL AND MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FRENCH GREEN CLAYS USED FOR HEALING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B; Haydel, Shelley E; Giese, Rossman F; Eberl, Dennis D

    2008-08-01

    The worldwide emergence of infectious diseases, together with the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, elevate the need to properly detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. The overuse and misuse of common antibiotics in recent decades stimulates the need to identify new inhibitory agents. Therefore, natural products like clays, that display antibacterial properties, are of particular interest.The absorptive properties of clay minerals are well documented for healing skin and gastrointestinal ailments. However, the antibacterial properties of clays have received less scientific attention. French green clays have recently been shown to heal Buruli ulcer, a necrotic or 'flesh-eating' infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Assessing the antibacterial properties of these clays could provide an inexpensive treatment for Buruli ulcer and other skin infections.Antimicrobial testing of the two clays on a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens showed that one clay promotes bacterial growth (possibly provoking a response from the natural immune system), while another kills bacteria or significantly inhibits bacterial growth. This paper compares the mineralogy and chemical composition of the two French green clays used in the treatment of Buruli ulcer.Mineralogically, the two clays are dominated by 1Md illite and Fe-smectite. Comparing the chemistry of the clay minerals and exchangeable ions, we conclude that the chemistry of the clay, and the surface properties that affect pH and oxidation state, control the chemistry of the water used to moisten the clay poultices and contribute the critical antibacterial agent(s) that ultimately debilitate the bacteria.

  5. Effect of red clay on diesel bioremediation and soil bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Choi, Sungjong; Hong, Hyerim; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-08-01

    Red clay is a type of soil, the red color of which results from the presence of iron oxide. It is considered an eco-friendly material, with many industrial, cosmetic, and architectural uses. A patented method was applied to red clay in order to change its chemical composition and mineral bioavailability. The resulting product was designated processed red clay. This study evaluates the novel use of red clay and processed red clay as biostimulation agents in diesel-contaminated soils. Diesel biodegradation was enhanced in the presence of red clay and processed red clay by 4.9- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and the number of culturable bacterial cells was correlated with the amount of diesel biodegradation. The growth of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, and Cupriavidus necator was promoted by both types of red clays. Culture-independent community analysis determined via barcoded pyrosequencing indicated that Nocardioidaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Caulobacteraceae were enriched by diesel contamination. Bacterial strain isolation from naphthalene- and liquid paraffin-amended media was affiliated with enriched taxa based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity. We suggest that the biostimulating mechanism of red clay and processed red clay is able to support bacterial growth without apparent selection for specific bacterial species.

  6. Removal of waterborne microorganisms by filtration using clay-polymer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabeytia, Tomas; Posada, Rosa; Nir, Shlomo; Galindo, Irene; Laiz, Leonila; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2014-08-30

    Clay-polymer composites were designed for use in filtration processes for disinfection during the course of water purification. The composites were formed by sorption of polymers based on starch modified with quaternary ammonium ethers onto the negatively charged clay mineral bentonite. The performance of the clay-polymer complexes in removal of bacteria was strongly dependent on the conformation adopted by the polycation on the clay surface, the charge density of the polycation itself and the ratio between the concentrations of clay and polymer used during the sorption process. The antimicrobial effect exerted by the clay-polymer system was due to the cationic monomers adsorbed on the clay surface, which resulted in a positive surface potential of the complexes and charge reversal. Clay-polymer complexes were more toxic to bacteria than the polymers alone. Filtration employing our optimal clay-polymer composite yielded 100% removal of bacteria after the passage of 3L, whereas an equivalent filter with granular activated carbon (GAC) hardly yielded removal of bacteria after 0.5L. Regeneration of clay-polymer complexes saturated with bacteria was demonstrated. Modeling of the filtration processes permitted to optimize the design of filters and estimation of experimental conditions for purifying large water volumes in short periods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Creep in buffer clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Adey, R. [Computational Mechanics BEASY, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    The study involved characterization of the microstructural arrangement and molecular forcefields in the buffer clay for getting a basis for selecting suitable creep models. It is concluded that the number of particles and wide range of the particle bond spectrum require that stochastical mechanics and thermodynamics will be considered and they are basic to the creep model proposed for predicting creep settlement of the canisters. The influence of the stress level on creep strain of MX-80 clay is not well known but for the buffer creep is approximately proportional to stress. Theoretical considerations suggest a moderate impact for temperatures up to 90 deg C and this is supported by model experiments. It is believed that the assumption of strain being proportional to temperature is conservative. The general performance of the stochastic model can be illustrated in principle by use of visco-elastic rheological models implying a time-related increase in viscosity. The shear-induced creep settlement under constant volume conditions calculated by using the proposed creep model is on the order of 1 mm in ten thousand years and up to a couple of millimeters in one million years. It is much smaller than the consolidation settlement, which is believed to be on the order of 10 mm. The general conclusion is that creep settlement of the canisters is very small and of no significance to the integrity of the buffer itself or of the canisters.

  8. A study of the physico-chemistry and mineralogy of Agbaja clay for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    X – ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis showed kaolinite as the main mineral phase while Halloysite and Illite were the accessory minerals present. Agbaja clay is suitable for use in the production of super-heat duty refractory materials and vitreous ceramic wares. It is also suitable for use in the paper, rubber, plastic and ...

  9. Occurrence and origin of minerals in a chamosite-bearing coal of Late Permian age, Zhaotong, Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Chou, C.-L.

    2007-01-01

    The minerals found in the no.5 coal (Late Permian) from the Zhaotong Coalfield, Yunnan Province, southwestern China, have been examined and found to consist mainly of kaolinite, pyrite, chamosite, quartz, and calcite, with trace amounts of illite and mixed-layer illite-smectite. The proportion of chamosite in clay minerals ranges from 32 to 56 wt%, with an average of 46 wt%. Chamosite is distributed not only in collodetrinite, but also occurs as cell fillings in fusinite, semifusinite, and telinite. The high content and mode of occurrence of chamosite in this mine indicate its formation by interaction of kaolinite with Fe-Mg-rich fluids during early diagenesis. Except for a minor amount of terfigenous quartz, most quartz is of authigenic origin and formed from kaolinite desilication. The calcite content of the no. 5 coal is 1.4-6.3% (with an average of 3%) and is distributed in collodetrinite and as cell fillings of coal-forming plants. Calcite originated from seawater invasion during peat accumulation. Pyrite occurs in several ways: as massive, framboidal, isolated enhedral/ anhedral, and euhedral forms. In addition, the presence of a large amount of pyritized red algae provides strong evidence of seawater invasion during peat accumulation. The red algae may have played an important role in the enrichment of sulfur in the coal. The characteristic assemblage of minerals in this mine resulted from a unique basinal environment in which the mineral matter was derived from a basaltic source region, volcanic activity, and seawater transgression during coal formation.

  10. Lead removal from aqueous solutions by a Tunisian smectitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaari, Islem [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia)], E-mail: chaariislem@yahoo.fr; Fakhfakh, Emna; Chakroun, Salima [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia); Bouzid, Jalel; Boujelben, Nesrine [Laboratoire Eau Energie et Environnement, departement de genie geologique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Feki, Mongi [Unite de chimie industrielle I, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Rocha, Fernando [MIA, Universite d' Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810 Aveiro (Portugal)], E-mail: frocha@geo.ua.pt; Jamoussi, Fakher [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2008-08-15

    The adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} ions onto Tunisian smectite-rich clay in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. Four samples of clay (AYD, AYDh, AYDs, AYDc) were used. The raw AYD clay was sampled in the Coniacian-Early Campanian of Jebel Aidoudi in El Hamma area (South of Tunisia). AYDh and AYDs corresponds to AYD activated by 2.5 mol/l hydrochloric acid and 2.5 mol/l sulphuric acid, respectively. AYDc corresponds to AYD calcined at different temperatures (100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 deg. C). The raw AYD clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy and coupled DTA-TGA. Specific surface area of all the clay samples was determined from nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Preliminary adsorption tests showed that sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid activation of raw AYD clay enhanced its adsorption capacity for Pb{sup 2+} ions. However, the uptake of Pb{sup 2+} by AYDs was very high compared to that by AYDh. This fact was attributed to the greater solubility of clay minerals in sulphuric acid compared to hydrochloric acid. Thermic activation of AYD clay reduced the Pb{sup 2+} uptake as soon as calcination temperature reaches 200 deg. C. All these preliminary results were well correlated to the variation of the specific surface area of the clay samples. The ability of AYDs sample to remove Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solutions has been studied at different operating conditions: contact time, adsorbent amount, metal ion concentration and pH. Kinetic experiments showed that the sorption of lead ions on AYDs was very fast and the equilibrium was practically reached after only 20 min. The results revealed also that the adsorption of lead increases with an increase in the solution pH from 1 to 4.5 and then decreases, slightly between pH 4.5 and 6, and rapidly at pH 6.5 due to the precipitation of some Pb{sup 2+} ions. The equilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q{sub 0

  11. Lead removal from aqueous solutions by a Tunisian smectitic clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Islem; Fakhfakh, Emna; Chakroun, Salima; Bouzid, Jalel; Boujelben, Nesrine; Feki, Mongi; Rocha, Fernando; Jamoussi, Fakher

    2008-08-15

    The adsorption of Pb(2+) ions onto Tunisian smectite-rich clay in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. Four samples of clay (AYD, AYDh, AYDs, AYDc) were used. The raw AYD clay was sampled in the Coniacian-Early Campanian of Jebel Aïdoudi in El Hamma area (South of Tunisia). AYDh and AYDs corresponds to AYD activated by 2.5 mol/l hydrochloric acid and 2.5 mol/l sulphuric acid, respectively. AYDc corresponds to AYD calcined at different temperatures (100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C). The raw AYD clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy and coupled DTA-TGA. Specific surface area of all the clay samples was determined from nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Preliminary adsorption tests showed that sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid activation of raw AYD clay enhanced its adsorption capacity for Pb(2+) ions. However, the uptake of Pb(2+) by AYDs was very high compared to that by AYDh. This fact was attributed to the greater solubility of clay minerals in sulphuric acid compared to hydrochloric acid. Thermic activation of AYD clay reduced the Pb(2+) uptake as soon as calcination temperature reaches 200 degrees C. All these preliminary results were well correlated to the variation of the specific surface area of the clay samples. The ability of AYDs sample to remove Pb(2+) from aqueous solutions has been studied at different operating conditions: contact time, adsorbent amount, metal ion concentration and pH. Kinetic experiments showed that the sorption of lead ions on AYDs was very fast and the equilibrium was practically reached after only 20 min. The results revealed also that the adsorption of lead increases with an increase in the solution pH from 1 to 4.5 and then decreases, slightly between pH 4.5 and 6, and rapidly at pH 6.5 due to the precipitation of some Pb(2+) ions. The equilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q(0)) increased from 25 to 25

  12. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 1. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts - Clays for 'Green Chemistry'. Gopalpur Nagendrappa. General Article Volume 7 Issue 1 January 2002 pp 64-77. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    His work includes organic synthesis and reaction mechanisms mainly in the area of organosilicon chemistry. Presently he is also working on organic synthesis under solvent- free conditions and using clay-catalyses. Keywords. Montmorillonite, ion-exchange, clay-nanomaterials, dehydration pyrolysis, rearrangement, steric.

  14. Radiocesium sorption in relation to clay mineralogy of paddy soils in Fukushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Sho; Sano, Oki; Ito, Toyoaki; Yanai, Junta

    2014-01-15

    Relationships between Radiocesium Interception Potential (RIP) and mineralogical characteristics of the clay fraction isolated from 97 paddy soils (Hama-dori, n = 25; Naka-dori, n = 36; Aizu, n = 36) in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan were investigated to clarify the mineralogical factors controlling the (137)Cs retention ability of soils (half-life 30.1 y). Of all the fission products released by the Fukushima accident, (137)Cs is the most important long-term contributor to the environmental contamination. The RIP, a quantitative index of the (137)Cs retention ability, was determined for the soil clays. The composition of clay minerals in the soil clays was estimated from peak areas obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The predominant clay mineral was smectite in soils from Hama-dori and Aizu, while this was variable for those from Naka-dori. Native K content of the soil clays was found to be an indicator of the amount of micaceous minerals. The average RIP for the 97 soil clays was 7.8 mol kg(-1), and ranged from 2.4 mol kg(-1) to 19.4 mol kg(-1). The RIP was significantly and positively correlated with native K content for each of the geographical regions, Hama-dori (r = 0.76, p < 0.001), Naka-dori (r = 0.43, p < 0.05), and Aizu (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), while it was not related to the relative abundance of smectite. The linear relationship between RIP and native K content not only indicate a large contribution of micaceous minerals to the (137)Cs retention ability of the soil clays, but also could be used to predict the (137)Cs retention ability of soil clays for other paddy fields in Fukushima and other areas. © 2013.

  15. Magnetic and microscopic characterization of magnetite nanoparticles adhered to clay surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galindo-Gonzalez, C; Feinberg, JM; Kasama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    When suspended in solution, clay platelets coated with nanometer-scale magnetite particles behave as magnetorheologic fluids that are important to a variety of industrial applications. Such dual-phase assemblages are also similar to natural aggregates that record the direction and intensity...... of the Earth's magnetic field in lake and marine depositional environments. This study characterizes the mineralogical structure and magnetic behavior of montmorillonite platelets coated with aggregates of nanometer-scale magnetite crystals. The distribution of magnetite crystal sizes in three different clay...

  16. Radionuclide interaction with clays in dilute and heavily compacted systems: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew W; Wang, Yifeng

    2012-02-21

    Given the unique properties of clays (i.e., low permeability and high ion sorption/exchange capacity), clays or clay formations have been proposed either as an engineered material or as a geologic medium for nuclear waste isolation and disposal. A credible evaluation of such disposal systems relies on the ability to predict the behavior of these materials under a wide range of thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMc) conditions. Current model couplings between THM and chemical processes are simplistic and limited in scope. This review focuses on the uptake of radionuclides onto clay materials as controlled by mineral composition, structure, and texture (e.g., pore size distribution), and emphasizes the connections between sorption chemistry and mechanical compaction. Variable uptake behavior of an array of elements has been observed on various clays as a function of increasing compaction due to changes in pore size and structure, hydration energy, and overlapping electric double layers. The causes for this variability are divided between "internal" (based on the fundamental structure and composition of the clay minerals) and "external" (caused by a force external to the clay). New techniques need to be developed to exploit known variations in clay mineralogy to separate internal from external effects.

  17. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    In the northern part of Vendsyssel, Denmark, the deposits made in the late glacial time are formed by the sea. The deposits are named after two mussels: Yoldia clay and Saxicava sand. However, in the southern part of Vendsyssel and in the area of Aalborg the clay and sand deposits from the late...... glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  18. Mineral resource of the month: vermiculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Arnold O.

    2014-01-01

    Vermiculite comprises a group of hydrated, laminar magnesium-aluminum-iron silicate minerals resembling mica. They are secondary minerals, typically altered biotite, iron-rich phlogopite or other micas or clay-like minerals that are themselves sometimes alteration products of amphibole, chlorite, olivine and pyroxene. Vermiculite deposits are associated with volcanic ultramafic rocks rich in magnesium silicate minerals, and flakes of the mineral range in color from black to shades of brown and yellow. The crystal structure of vermiculite contains water molecules, a property that is critical to its processing for common uses.

  19. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolery, Thomas J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, William L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-04

    Deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in clay/shale/argillaceous rock formations has received much consideration given its desirable attributes such as isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, slow diffusion, sorbtive mineralogy, and geologically widespread (Jové Colón et al., 2014). There is a wealth of gained scientific expertise on the behavior of clay/shale/ argillaceous rock given its focus in international nuclear waste repository programs that includes underground research laboratories (URLs) in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. Jové Colón et al. (2014) have described some of these investigative efforts in clay rock ranging from site characterization to research on the engineered barrier system (EBS). Evaluations of disposal options that include nuclear waste disposition in clay/shale/argillaceous rock have determined that this host media can accommodate a wide range of waste types. R&D work within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) assessing thermal effects and fluid-mineral interactions for the disposition of heat-generating waste have so far demonstrated the feasibility for the EBS and clay host rock to withstand high thermal loads. This report represents the continuation of disposal R&D efforts on the advancement and refinement of coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), hydrothermal experiments on clay interactions, used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development. The development and implementation of a clay/shale/argillite reference case described in Jové Colón et al. (2014) for FY15 will be documented in another report (Mariner et al. 2015) – only a brief description will be given here. This clay reference case implementation is the result of integration efforts between the GDSA PA and disposal in argillite work packages. The assessment of sacrificial zones in the EBS is being addressed through experimental work along with 1D reactive

  20. Trace fossils from the eocene Lillebælt clay formation, Røsnæs Peninsula, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Kresten; Milàn, Jesper; Mesfun, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A cliff exposure of the Eocene Lillebælt Clay Formation, on the Røsnæs peninsula of Zealand, Denmark, has yielded a diverse trace-fossil assemblage. The trace fossils are described formally for the first time and assigned to Phymatoderma melvillensis, unnamed clusters of small burrows, Ophiomorpha...... nodosa, Spongeliomorpha isp., Dreginozoum beckumensis, Bichordites isp., Chondrites isp., Atollites zitteli? and ?Rhizocorallium isp. The preservation of the trace fossils is strongly related to early diagenetic enhancement. The trace-fossil assemblage is dominated by a combination of dwelling...... and feeding burrows. The bioturbation took place in very clean clay of a shelf setting far offshore. The trace-fossil assemblage is indicative of the distal Cruziana ichnofacies....

  1. Effect of combined application of organic and mineral nitrogen and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (VC) combined with three levels of mineral NP (25, 50 and 75% of recommended rates of NP), 100% recommended rate of inorganic NP (23 kg N ha-1 and 46 kg P2O5 ha-1) and no fertilizer application (control) in randomized complete block design on clay soil in Ghimbo and clay loam soil in Adiyo with three replications.

  2. A Comparative Analyses of Granulometry, Mineral Composition and Major and Trace Element Concentrations in Soils Commonly Ingested by Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica M. Ngole-Jeme

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the granulometric properties, mineralogical composition and concentrations of major and trace element oxides of commonly ingested soils (geophagic soil collected from different countries with a view of understanding how varied they may be in these properties and to understand the possible health implications of ingesting them. Soil samples were collected from three different countries (South Africa, Swaziland and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC and their granulometric properties, concentrations of major and trace element oxides as well as mineralogical composition determined. Differences were observed in the granulometric properties of geophagic soil from the three different countries with most of them having <20% clay content. The soils also showed varied degrees of weathering with values of Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA and Chemical Index of Weathering (CIW being between 60% and 99.9% respectively. The mineral assemblages of the soils from South Africa and Swaziland were dominated by the primary minerals quartz and feldspar whereas soils from DRC had more of kaolinite, a secondary mineral than primary minerals. Soils from DRC were associated with silt, clay, Al2O3, and CIA unlike most samples from South Africa which were associated with SiO2, sand, K2O, CaO, and MgO. The soils from Swaziland were closely associated with silt, H2O and Fe2O3(t. These associations reflect the mineralogy of the samples. These soils are not likely to serve as nutrient supplements because of the low concentrations of the nutrient elements contained. The coarse texture of the samples may also result in dental destruction during mastication. Sieving of the soils before ingestion to remove coarse particles is recommended to reduce the potential health threat associated with the ingestion of coarse-textured soils.

  3. Electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clays. Role in U and Hg(II) transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Michelle [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    During this project, we investigated Fe electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. We used selective chemical extractions, enriched Fe isotope tracer experiments, computational molecular modeling, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that structural Fe(III) in clay minerals is reduced by aqueous Fe(II) and that electron transfer occurs when Fe(II) is sorbed to either basal planes and edge OH-groups of clay mineral. Findings from highly enriched isotope experiments suggest that up to 30 % of the Fe atoms in the structure of some clay minerals exhanges with aqueous Fe(II). First principles calculations using a small polaron hopping approach suggest surprisingly fast electron mobility at room temperature in a nontronite clay mineral and are consistent with temperature dependent Mössbauer data Fast electron mobility suggests that electrons may be able to conduct through the mineral fast enough to enable exchange of Fe between the aqueous phase and clay mineral structure. over the time periods we observed. Our findings suggest that Fe in clay minerals is not as stable as previously thought.

  4. Healing and edible clays: a review of basic concepts, benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Celso de Sousa Figueiredo

    2017-02-01

    The use of clay by humans for medicinal and wellness purposes is most probably as old as mankind. Within minerals, due to its ubiquitous occurrence in nature and easy availability, clay was the first to be used and is still used worldwide. Healing clays have been traditionally used by man for therapeutic, nutritional and skin care purposes, but they could impart some important health and skin care risks. For instance, clay particles could adsorb and make available for elimination or excretion any potential toxic elements or toxins being ingested or produced, but they could adsorb and make available for incorporation, through ingestion or through dermal absorption, toxic elements, e.g. heavy metals. Edible clays, a particular case of healing clays, have been traditionally used by man for nutritional and therapeutic purposes. Geophagy, the deliberate soil eating, earth eating, clay eating and pica (medical condition or eating disorder shown by individuals addicted to eat earth substances), has been observed in all parts of the world since antiquity, reflecting cultural practice, religious belief and physiological needs, be they nutritional (dietary supplementation) or as a remedy for disease. This paper pretends to review historical data, basic concepts and functions, as well as benefits and risks of the use of healing clays, in general, for therapeutic and cosmetic purposes, and of edible clays, in particular, for therapeutic purposes.

  5. Color measurement of methylene blue dye/clay mixtures and its application using economical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Maja; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Logar, Mihovil

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the clay mineral components of clay materials by staining tests is rapid and simple, but their applicability is restricted because of the mutual interference of the common components of clay materials and difficulties in color determination. The change of color with concentration of the dye is related to the use of colorants as a field test for identifying clay minerals and has been improved over the years to assure the accuracy of the tests (Faust G. T., 1940). The problem of measurement and standardization of color may be solved by combination of colors observed in staining tests with prepared charts of color chips available in the Munsell Book of Color, published by Munsell Color Co. Under a particular set of illumination conditions, a human eye can achieve an approximate match between the color of the dyed clay sample and that of a standard color chip, even though they do have different spectral reflectance characteristics. Experiments were carried out with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy on selected clay samples (three montmorillonite, three kaolinite and one mix-layer clay samples) saturated with different concentration of methylene blue dye solution. Dominant wavelength and purity of the color was obtained on oriented dry samples and calculated by use of the I. C. I. (x, y) - diagram in the region of 400-700 nm (reflectance spectra) without MB and after saturation with different concentrations of MB solutions. Samples were carefully photographed in the natural light environment and processed with user friendly and easily accessible applications (Adobe color CC and ColorHexa encyclopedia) available for android phones or tablets. Obtained colors were compared with Munsell standard color chips, RGB and Hexa color standards. Changes in the color of clay samples in their interaction with different concentration of the applied dye together with application of economical methods can still be used as a rapid fieldwork test. Different types of clay

  6. Improving bioavailability of phosphorous from cattle dung by using phosphatase immobilized on natural clay and nanoclay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabi-Floody, Marcela; Velásquez, Gabriela; Gianfreda, Liliana; Saggar, Surinder; Bolan, Nanthi; Rumpel, Cornelia; Mora, María Luz

    2012-10-01

    The high P retention of acidic Andisols makes necessary to increase our technological approaches in pasture management in the animal system production. Here, we evaluated the clay- or nanoclay-acid phosphatase complexes for improving phosphorus mineralization from degraded cattle dung. We implemented an immobilization mechanism of acid phosphatase (AP) using natural clays (allophanic and montmorillonite) and nanoclays as support materials. Also, we evaluated the mineralization of organic P containing in decomposed cattle dung with clay- and nanoclay-AP complexes by incubation studies. Clays and nanoclays were characterized by microscopy techniques as atomic force and confocal-laser scanning microscopy. We found that these support materials stabilized AP by encapsulation. Our results showed that immobilization on allophanic or montmorillonite materials improved both the specific activity (4-48%) and the V(max) (28-38%) of AP. Moreover, the enzyme had a better performance when immobilized on clay and nanoclay from Andisol than on montmorillonite materials. Phosphorous mineralization of cattle dung was regulated by water-soluble P present in the dung and P re-adsorption on allophanic materials. However, we were able to detect a potential capacity of AP immobilized on allophanic nanoclays as the best alternative for P mineralization. Further research with initially low water-soluble P containing organic materials is required to quantify the P mineralization potential and bioavailability of P from dung. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...

  8. Clay and pillard clay membranes: Synthesis, characterization and transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, Sven

    In this work, the preparation and characterization of ceramic multilayer membranes with an Alsb2Osb3-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) and a Laponite separating layer have been studied. Al-PILC is a pillared clay prepared by intercalation of polyoxo cations of aluminium between the montmorillonite clay sheets, followed by a thermal treatment (400sp°C) to obtain rigid oxide pillars. The free spacing between the clay plates is about 0.8 nm. Laponite is a synthetic clay with a pore structure formed by the stacking of very small clay plates. To deposit an Al-PILC top layer on a macro- or mesoporous aluminiumoxide support membrane, two preparation routes were considered. According to the standard preparation route of a pillared clay, the easiest way is to use a suspension of clay mixed with the pillaring solution in which the support membrane is dipped. However, it is not possible to deposit uniform and crack-free top layers in this way because of the formation of unstable suspensions. A second preparation route is based on an indirect pillaring procedure. By dipping a support membrane in a stable clay suspension, a thin clay film is deposited in a first step. Pillaring is achieved via immersion of the supported clay film in the pillaring solution in a second step. After a washing procedure, the membrane is dried and calcined at 400sp°C. Laponite membranes were simply prepared by dipping a support membrane in a suspension of this synthetic clay in water. Afterwards a drying at room temperature and a calcination at 400 ar 500sp°C is performed. Both membrane types were tested for gas separation and pervaporation purposes. Transport of permanent gases (He, N2) occurs by means of Knudsen diffusion. Diffusion is kinetically controlled and for a binary mixture, the maximum separation factor is determined by the difference in molecular weight of both components. From pervaporation experiments with water/alcohol mixtures it was found that Al-PILC membranes can be used for

  9. Hydrometallurgical extraction of Al and Si from kaolinitic clays

    OpenAIRE

    Eliana G. Pinna; Suarez, Daniela S.; Gustavo D. Rosales; Mario Humberto Rodriguez

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Herein is presented the results of a study on the hydrometallurgic extraction and recovery of aluminum and silicon by leaching of kaolinitic clays with HF. The studied extraction parameters were: temperature, reaction time, solid/liquid ratio, concentration, and precipitating agent mass. In the leaching process, mineral dissolutions near 100% were obtained when working at 348 K, solid/liquid ratio 2% w/v, HF 12% v/v, for 120 minutes. The HF leach liquor generated from the dissolution...

  10. Unearthing the Antibacterial Mechanism of Medicinal Clay: A Geochemical Approach to Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Keith D.; Misra, Rajeev; Williams, Lynda B.

    2016-01-01

    Natural antibacterial clays, when hydrated and applied topically, kill human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains proliferating worldwide. Only certain clays are bactericidal; those containing soluble reduced metals and expandable clay minerals that absorb cations, providing a capacity for extended metal release and production of toxic hydroxyl radicals. Here we show the critical antibacterial components are soluble Fe2+ and Al3+ that synergistically attack multiple cellular systems in pathogens normally growth-limited by Fe supply. This geochemical process is more effective than metal solutions alone and provides an alternative antibacterial strategy to traditional antibiotics. Advanced bioimaging methods and genetic show that Al3+ misfolds cell membrane proteins, while Fe2+ evokes membrane oxidation and enters the cytoplasm inflicting hydroxyl radical attack on intracellular proteins and DNA. The lethal reaction precipitates Fe3+-oxides as biomolecular damage proceeds. Discovery of this bactericidal mechanism demonstrated by natural clays should guide designs of new mineral-based antibacterial agents.

  11. Mineral resources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    Marine minerals have been center of attraction to mankind since ancient times. The technological advances in the recent years show that the retrieval of underwater minerals from deep-sea can no longer be a dream. Marine minerals are terrigenous...

  12. In vitro antibacterial activity and in vivo efficacy of hydrated clays on Mycobacterium ulcerans growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusumilli, Sarojini; Haydel, Shelley E

    2016-01-30

    Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a localized skin lesion that can progress to extensive ulceration and necrosis if left untreated. Unpublished studies of hydrated clays for therapeutic, topical treatment of Buruli ulcer suggest that specific clay mineral products may have beneficial effects on wound healing. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antibacterial activity of a panel of clay mixtures and their derivative leachates against M. ulcerans and assessed the in vivo efficacy of topically-applied, hydrated clays on Buruli ulcer progression in mice infected with M. ulcerans. M. ulcerans 1615 was incubated with 10% suspensions of CB07, CB08, CB09, CB10, and BY07 clay mixtures, and survival was determined over 28 days. For animal experiments, we examined the effect of topical hydrated clay therapy on Buruli ulcer progression in vivo in mouse tails subcutaneously infected with M. ulcerans 1615. The CB07, CB08, and CB09 clays exhibited bactericidal activity against M. ulcerans after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of incubation. In contrast, clay leachates exhibited inhibitory, bacteriostatic effects on M. ulcerans growth in vitro. After establishing an ulcerative M. ulcerans infection for three months, ulcerated regions of the tails were treated once daily (five consecutive days per week) for 22 days with hydrated CB09 clay poultices. Mice in the clay treatment group exhibited healing as assessed by gross morphological changes and a reduction in M. ulcerans present in the wounds. These data reveal that specific clays exhibit in vitro bactericidal activity against M. ulcerans and that hydrated clay poultices may offer a complementary and integrative strategy for topically treating Buruli ulcer disease.

  13. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine–grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  14. SO2 gas adsorption by modified kaolin clays: influence of previous heating and time acid treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volzone, Cristina; Ortiga, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Modified kaolin clays were used as adsorbents for SO(2) gas adsorptions. The clays were heated up to 900 °C previous to acid treatments with 0.5 N sulfuric acid solutions at boiling temperature during different times up to 1440 min. Equilibrium adsorption at 25 °C and 0.1 MPa was carried out by using a volumetric apparatus. The samples were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis. The heating of the clays followed by acid treatment improved the adsorption capacity of the kaolin clays. The presence of amorphous silica and hydroxyl in the final products improved SO(2) adsorption capacity. Better properties for SO(2) adsorption were found in kaolin rich in not well ordered kaolinite clay mineral. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal chemistry and Moessbauer spectroscopic analysis of clays around Riyadh for brick industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Mutasim I., E-mail: mkhalil@ksu.edu.sa [King Saud University, Department of Chemistry, College of Science (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-04-15

    A total of 30 clay samples were collected from the area around Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. A complete chemical analysis was carried out using different techniques. X-ray diffraction studies showed that the clay samples were mainly of the smectite group with traces of the kaolinite one. The samples studied were classified as nontronite clay minerals. One of the clay fraction has been studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy as raw clay fraction and after being fired at 950-1,000 Degree-Sign C. The Moessbauer spectra showed accessory iron compounds in the form of hematite and goethite. The structural iron contents disintegrate on firing transforming into magnetic iron oxide and a paramagnetic small particles iron oxide.

  16. An Evidence-Based Review on medicinal value of clays in traditional Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Montaseri, Hashem; Hosamo, Ammar; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-10-07

    The use of earths and clays for medical purposes dates back to antiquity. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in researches on traditional remedies in the hope of discovering new drug. Iran is an ancient country with a medical backbone acquired from the experiences of ancient Persian scholars, who had made a great contribution to the development of the medical sciences. Many medical and pharmaceutical books by early Persian scientists still exist and may have the potential of leading researchers to new drug discoveries. Owing to the emergence of new and antimicrobial-resistant infections, present-day medicine has recently begun focusing on medicinal earths and clays especially as mineral antimicrobials. The current study is, therefore, aimed at gathering information regarding medicinal clays in traditional Persian medicine (TPM). Five main Persian materia medica with the key word 'tin' (clay) and current databases such as PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched by key words 'white, green, red, maroon, violet, black, grey and pink clays' and 'pharmacological effects'. Twenty three clays were found in Persian manuscripts. Although their mineralogical compositions are unknown, different pharmacological properties have been attributed to these mineral medicaments. Clay's properties were widely used in medieval times for the treatment of infections to poisoning. They were also used in compound formulations, possibly for their pharmaceutical formulation modifying effects. Modern scientific proofs have also been found of many of the medicinal clays reported in Persian manuscripts. Although many of reported clays are still unknown, their characterization may lead to new medicinal developments. Novel analytical methods available today makes it possible to elucidate the chemical compositions of these minerals as parameters responsible for their medicinal effects.

  17. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaoui, A; Sekkal, W

    2015-03-06

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation.

  18. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  19. Interaction of ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay: Dual porosity modelling compared to experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, A.; Gimmi, T.; Alt-Epping, P.; Mäder, U.; Cloet, V.

    2017-06-01

    Interactions between concrete and clays are driven by the strong chemical gradients in pore water and involve mineral reactions in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, these reactions may influence safety-relevant clay properties such as swelling pressure, permeability or radionuclide retention. Interfaces between ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay show weaker, but more extensive chemical disturbance compared to a contact between low-pH cement and Opalinus Clay. As a consequence of chemical reactions porosity changes occur at cement-clay interfaces. These changes are stronger and may lead to complete pore clogging in the case of low-pH cements. The prediction of pore clogging by reactive transport simulations is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusive solute fluxes, cement clinker chemistry, and phase reaction kinetics. For instance, the consideration of anion-depleted porosity in clays substantially influences overall diffusion and pore clogging at interfaces. A new concept of dual porosity modelling approximating Donnan equilibrium is developed and applied to an ordinary Portland cement - Opalinus Clay interface. The model predictions are compared with data from the cement-clay interaction (CI) field experiment in the Mt Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland), which represent 5 y of interaction. The main observations such as the decalcification of the cement at the interface, the Mg enrichment in the clay detached from the interface, and the S enrichment in the cement detached from the interface, are qualitatively predicted by the new model approach. The model results reveal multiple coupled processes that create the observed features. The quantitative agreement of modelled and measured data can be improved if uncertainties of key input parameters (tortuosities, reaction kinetics, especially of clay minerals) can be reduced.

  20. Clays in radioactive waste disposal

    OpenAIRE

    DELAGE, Pierre; CUI, Yu-Jun; TANG, Anh-Minh

    2010-01-01

    Clays and argillites are considered in some countries as possible host rocks for nuclear waste disposal at great depth. The use of compacted swelling clays as engineered barriers is also considered within the framework of the multi-barrier concept. In relation to these concepts, various research programs have been conducted to assess the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of radioactive waste disposal at great depth. After introducing the concepts of waste isolation developed in Belgium, Fran...

  1. Reconstructing grazer assemblages for protected area restoration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A Venter

    Full Text Available Protected area management agencies often struggle to reliably reconstruct grazer assemblages due to a lack of historical distribution data for their regions. Wrong predictions of grazing assemblages could potentially affect biodiversity negatively. The objective of the study was to determine how well grazing herbivores have become established since introduction to the Mkambati Nature Reserve, South Africa, how this was influenced by facilitation and competition, and how indigenous grazer assemblages can best be predicted for effective ecological restoration. Population trends of several grazing species were investigated in in order to determine how well they have become established since introduction. Five different conceivable grazing assemblages reflecting a range of approaches that are commonly encountered during conservation planning and management decision making were assessed. Species packing was used to predict whether facilitation, competition or co-existence were more likely to occur, and the species packing of the different assemblages were assessed using ANCOVA. Reconstructing a species assemblage using biogeographic and biological information provides the opportunity for a grazer assemblage that allows for facilitatory effects, which in turn leads to an ecosystem that is able to maintain its grazer assemblage structure. The strength of this approach lies in the ability to overcome the problem of depauperate grazer assemblages, resulting from a lack of historical data, by using biogeographical and biological processes, to assist in more effectively reconstructing grazer assemblages. Adaptive management of grazer assemblage restoration through reintroduction, using this approach would further mitigate management risks.

  2. Simulation of flash dehydroxylation of clay particle using gPROMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Bøjer, Martin; Adelsward, Anicka

    2014-01-01

    The use of SCMs (supplementary cementitious materials) to replace part of the clinker in cement industry is gaining an increasing interest in order to reduce the CO2 footprint. The abundantly available clay minerals are potential sources of SCMs. Thermal treatment of kaolinite clay under moderate...... presents the development of a numerical model for the simulation of dehydroxylation of kaolinite clay using gPROMS (general PROcess Modeling System). Accordingly, a 1D dehydroxylation model is used to examine the thermal transformation of kaolinite into different phases. This model is used to predict...

  3. Public Sphere as Digital Assemblage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    ), and subjectivity (agency). This changed the public sphere into an assemblage consisting of both human and non-human actors interactingin a highly dynamic, networked environment. This paper proposes a framework for considering this new materiality in the field of the public sphere: the assemblage and complexity......Normative theories of public sphere have struggled with the topic of materiality. The historical narrative of the ‘public sphere’ situated the phenomenon in specific spaces, where practices (public deliberation) and language (discourse) constructed political agencies, and further publics. From...... the 1990s onwards digitalization brought concepts of network and complexity into the theoretical discourse. This relational turn changed the social ontology of the public sphere into a dynamic and complex system, erasing the division between the fields of reality (the world), representation (discourse...

  4. Primordial clays on Mars formed beneath a steam or supercritical atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin M; Parman, Stephen W; Mustard, John F

    2017-12-06

    On Mars, clay minerals are widespread in terrains that date back to the Noachian period (4.1 billion to 3.7 billion years ago). It is thought that the Martian basaltic crust reacted with liquid water during this time to form hydrated clay minerals. Here we propose, however, that a substantial proportion of these clays was formed when Mars' primary crust reacted with a dense steam or supercritical atmosphere of water and carbon dioxide that was outgassed during magma ocean cooling. We present experimental evidence that shows rapid clay formation under conditions that would have been present at the base of such an atmosphere and also deeper in the porous crust. Furthermore, we explore the fate of a primordial clay-rich layer with the help of a parameterized crustal evolution model; we find that the primordial clay is locally disrupted by impacts and buried by impact-ejected material and by erupted volcanic material, but that it survives as a mostly coherent layer at depth, with limited surface exposures. These exposures are similar to those observed in remotely sensed orbital data from Mars. Our results can explain the present distribution of many clays on Mars, and the anomalously low density of the Martian crust in comparison with expectations.

  5. Primordial clays on Mars formed beneath a steam or supercritical atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Mustard, John F.

    2017-12-01

    On Mars, clay minerals are widespread in terrains that date back to the Noachian period (4.1 billion to 3.7 billion years ago). It is thought that the Martian basaltic crust reacted with liquid water during this time to form hydrated clay minerals. Here we propose, however, that a substantial proportion of these clays was formed when Mars’ primary crust reacted with a dense steam or supercritical atmosphere of water and carbon dioxide that was outgassed during magma ocean cooling. We present experimental evidence that shows rapid clay formation under conditions that would have been present at the base of such an atmosphere and also deeper in the porous crust. Furthermore, we explore the fate of a primordial clay-rich layer with the help of a parameterized crustal evolution model; we find that the primordial clay is locally disrupted by impacts and buried by impact-ejected material and by erupted volcanic material, but that it survives as a mostly coherent layer at depth, with limited surface exposures. These exposures are similar to those observed in remotely sensed orbital data from Mars. Our results can explain the present distribution of many clays on Mars, and the anomalously low density of the Martian crust in comparison with expectations.

  6. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction...... is increased with increasing clay content, up to 30%, beyond which the mixture of silt and clay is not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction resistant under waves....

  7. Temporal and spatial distribution of alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusions in the transitional high-sulfidation epithermal-porphyry copper system at Red Mountain, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Newton, M. Claiborne; Westman, Erik C.; Kamilli, Robert J.; Canby, Vertrees M.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Red Mountain, Arizona, is a Laramide porphyry Cu system (PCD) that has experienced only a modest level of erosion compared to most other similar deposits in the southwestern United States. As a result, the upper portion of the magmatic–hydrothermal system, which represents the transition from shallower high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization to deeper porphyry Cu mineralization, is well preserved. Within the Red Mountain system, alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusion assemblages show a systematic distribution in both time and space. Early-potassic alteration (characterized by the minerals biotite and magnetite) is paragenetically earlier than late-potassic alteration (K-feldspar–anhydrite) and both are followed by later phyllic (sericite–pyrite) alteration. Advanced argillic alteration (pyrophyllite–alunite–other clay minerals) is thought to be coeval with or postdate phyllic alteration. Minerals characteristic of advanced argillic alteration are present in the near surface. Phyllic alteration extends to greater depths compared to advanced argillic alteration. Early-potassic and late-potassic alteration are only observed in the deepest part of the system. Considerable overlap of phyllic alteration with both early-potassic and late-potassic alteration zones is observed. The hypogene mineralization contains 0.4–1.2% Cu and is spatially and temporally related to the late-potassic alteration event. Molybdenum concentration is typically In the deepest part of the system, an early generation of low-to-moderate density and salinity liquid + vapor inclusions with opaque daughter minerals is followed in time by halite-bearing inclusions that also contain opaque daughter minerals indicating that an early intermediate-density magmatic fluid evolved to a high-density, high-salinity mineralizing fluid. The increase in density and salinity of fluids with time observed in the deeper parts of the system may be the result of immiscibility (“boiling”) of

  8. Physical capture and release of drug molecules, water and cations by a smectite clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho dos Santos, Éverton

    Clay minerals have been widely applied through human history. For instance research in archaeological sites shows their use to build tools or applied as medicine from prehistoric times. This wide range of applications results from the unique clay minerals properties, such as porosity, water......-fluorohectorite (LiFh, Li1.2(Mg4.8Li1.2)Si8O20F4), a synthetic clay mineral from the smectite family, have been experimentally analyzed. By means of X-rays powder diffraction (XRD), using both an in-house instrument and synchrotron radiation, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis coupled to an Infrared...... spectrometer (TGA/IR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and Inelastic Neutron Scattering using the Elastic Fixed Window approach (EFW), the dynamics of cation exchange process, hydration behavior as a function of interlayer cation and, most importantly, CIPRO...

  9. Kisameet Glacial Clay: an Unexpected Source of Bacterial Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Sarah L; Behroozian, Shekooh; Xu, Wanjing; Surette, Michael G; Li, Loretta; Davies, Julian

    2017-05-23

    Widespread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is providing the impetus to explore novel sources of antimicrobial agents. Recently, the potent antibacterial activity of certain clay minerals has stimulated scientific interest in these materials. One such example is Kisameet glacial clay (KC), an antibacterial clay from a deposit on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. However, our understanding of the active principles of these complex natural substances is incomplete. Like soils, clays may possess complex mixtures of bacterial taxa, including the Actinobacteria , a clade known to be rich in antibiotic-producing organisms. Here, we present the first characterization of both the microbial and geochemical characteristics of a glacial clay deposit. KC harbors surprising bacterial species richness, with at least three distinct community types. We show that the deposit has clines of inorganic elements that can be leached by pH, which may be drivers of community structure. We also note the prevalence of Gallionellaceae in samples recovered near the surface, as well as taxa that include medically or economically important bacteria such as Actinomycetes and Paenibacillus These results provide insight into the microbial taxa that may be the source of KC antibacterial activity and suggest that natural clays may be rich sources of microbial and molecular diversity. IMPORTANCE Identifying and characterizing the resident microbial populations (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi) is key to understanding the ecology, chemistry, and homeostasis of virtually all sites on Earth. The Kisameet Bay deposit in British Columbia, Canada, holds a novel glacial clay with a history of medicinal use by local indigenous people. We previously showed that it has potent activity against a variety of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, suggesting it could complement our dwindling arsenal of antibiotics. Here, we have characterized the microbiome of this deposit to gain insight

  10. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron oxide/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these "Mars-soil analogs" were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging, specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The clay acted as an effective matrix, both chemically and sterically, preventing the major part of the synthesized iron oxides from ripening, i.e., growing and developing larger crystals. The precipitated iron oxides appear as isodiametric or slightly elongated particles in the size range 1-10 nm, having large specific surface area. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxy mineral such as "green rust," or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) by extensive heat treatment. After mild heating, the iron-enriched clay became slightly magnetic, to the extent that it adheres to a hand-held magnet, as was observed with Mars soil. The chemical reactivity of the iron-enriched clays strongly resembles, and offers a plausible mechanism

  11. Adsorption capacity of methylene blue, an organic pollutant, by montmorillonite clay

    KAUST Repository

    Feddal, I.

    2013-11-19

    The isotherms and kinetics of the adsorption of a cationic dye in aqueous solution, methylene blue, on a local Algerian montmorillonite clay mineral (raw, sodium and thermally activated at 300 and 500°C) were determined experimentally. Various parameters influencing the adsorption were optimized, mainly solid-liquid contact time, mass of adsorbent, initial concentration of dye, pH of the solution and temperature. Results showed that the adsorption kinetics were fast: 30 min for the raw clay mineral, and 20 min for sodium clay mineral (SC) and thermally activated at 300°C, whereas with the clay mineral calcined at 500°C, the equilibrium was reached after 150 min only. The maximum adsorption capacity was reached at pH 6.6. Results deducted from the adsorption isotherms also showed that the retention follows the Langmuir model. In addition, it was found that the kinetics were in the order of 2 (K = 2.457 × 106 g/mg.h) for sodium clay and were limited by an intra-particle diffusion. SC was found to be a better adsorbent to remove methylene blue from industrial wastewater. © 2013 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  12. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  13. Organoclay hybrid materials as precursors of porous ZnO/silica-clay heterostructures for photocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkari, Marwa; Aranda, Pilar; Ben Haj Amara, Abdessalem; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile two-step process applied to two types of clays: montmorillonite layered silicate and sepiolite microfibrous clay mineral. In the first step, intermediate silica-organoclay hybrid heterostructures were prepared following a colloidal route based on the controlled hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of the starting organoclay. Later on, pre-formed ZnO nanoparticles (NP) dispersed in 2-propanol were incorporated under ultrasound irradiation to the silica-organoclay hybrid heterostructures dispersed in 2-propanol, and finally, the resulting solids were calcinated to eliminate the organic matter and to produce ZnO nanoparticles (NP) homogeneously assembled to the clay-SiO2 framework. In the case of montmorillonite the resulting materials were identified as delaminated clays of ZnO/SiO2-clay composition, whereas for sepiolite, the resulting heterostructure is constituted by the assembling of ZnO NP to the sepiolite-silica substrate only affecting the external surface of the clay. The structural and morphological features of the prepared heterostructures were characterized by diverse physico-chemical techniques (such as XRD, FTIR, TEM, FE-SEM). The efficiency of these new porous ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures as potential photocatalysts in the degradation of organic dyes and the removal of pharmaceutical drugs in water solution was tested using methylene blue and ibuprofen compounds, respectively, as model of pollutants.

  14. Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Leaching of Alumina from Lampang Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweena Numluk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the global alumina industry has led to a considerable increase in the production alumina and processing of alumina from non-bauxitic sources. Lampang clays comprise various minerals that contain about 22.70 wt% of extractable alumina. Local clay was ground, activated by calcination and treated with sulfuric acid to extract alumina. In the activation step, the effects of temperature and time on the extraction of alumina and iron were investigated. The leaching experiments were performed on clay samples with particle sizes less than 200 mesh. The samples were calcined at different temperatures, ranging from 450°C to 1050°C, and for different periods, ranging from 30 to 150 min. The optimum conditions for the extraction of alumina from Lampang clay include grinding the clay to pass through a 200 mesh sieve, calcining the ground clay at 750°C for 30 min, extracting the alumina from the calcined clay by leaching with 3M sulfuric acid, and using an acid to clay ratio of 80 wt% at 100°C for 120 min. An aluminum dissolution efficiency of 95.1 % was achieved under the conditions that resulted in the maximum dissolution efficiency of iron (26.6 %.

  15. Pengaruh Proses Pelapukan Clay Shale terhadap Perubahan Parameter Rasio Disintegritas (DR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrus M Alatas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The background of this research because of the frequent occurrence of the failure in the geotechnical design of clay shale caused by weathering. Disintegration ratio is a comparison of physical changes due to weathering at certain times of the initial conditions. Changes in physical properties due to clay shale weathering determined by the disintegration ratio (DR.Clay shale weathering will occur more quickly as a result of wetting and drying cycles when compared with the drying process. While due to the increased number of cycles of wetting at the same time, causing weathering on clay shale will be faster again. Until the 80th day of drying time, the magnitude DRof Semarang-Bawenclay shaleand Hambalang are the same, namely DR = 0.916 (completelly durable. However, due to wetting and drying cycles on day 32, samples of Semarang-Bawenclay shale is DR = 0.000 or non durable completelly, while on Hambalang clay shale in same day DR between 0.2117 to 0.3344. Generally Semarang-Bawen clay shale will be faster weathered than Hambalang clay shale. It is caused by the mineralogy content of Semarang-Bawen clay shale has dominated by Smectite, and Hambalangclay shalehas dominated mineral Kaolinite and Illlite.

  16. Identification of Clay Minerals of the Eastern Southern Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Journal of Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 37 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Significance of saturation index of certain clay minerals in shallow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In reality, a number of kinetic reasons exist that may ..... of SI with increase of pH. This increase of pH reduces the availability of H+ for ion exchange. Group B: The SI of Gibbsite ranges from near saturation to saturation. This may be due to the .... tion of ions in solution which emphasizes increased contribution of species with ...

  18. Significance of saturation index of certain clay minerals in shallow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Earth Sciences, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, India. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, India. Department of Applied Geology School of Engineering and Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, Australia. NRSC Data Centre, Hyderabad 500 625, India.

  19. Study of Usage Areas of Clay Samples of Asphaltite Quarries in Sirnak, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Oyku

    2017-12-01

    The asphaltite of Sirnak, Turkey are in the form of 12 veins and their total reserves are anticipated to be approximately 200 million tons in a field of 25.000 hectares. The asphaltites at the Sirnak region are in the form of fault and crack fillings and take place together with clay minerals at their side rock. The main raw materials used in the production of cement are limestone, clay and marn known as sedimentary rocks. Limestone for CaO and clay minerals for SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, which are the main compounds of clinker production, are the main raw materials. Other materials containing these four oxides like marn are also used as cement raw material. Conformity levels of the raw materials to be used in cement production vary according to their chemical compounds. The rocks to be used as clay mineral are evaluated by taking the rate of silicate and alumina into consideration. The soils suitable for brick-tile productions are named as sandy clay. Their difference from the ceramic clays is that they are richer in terms of iron, silica and carbonate. These soils are also known under the names such as clay, arid, alluvium, silt, loam and argil. Inside these soils, minerals such as quartz, montmorillonite, kaolinite, calcite, limonite, hidromika, sericite, illite, and chlorite are available. Some parts of the soils consist of clays in amorphous structure. Limestone parts, gypsums, organic substances and bulky rock residuals spoil the quality. The soils suitable for brick production may not be suitable for tile production. In this case, their sandy soils should be mixed up with the clays with fine granule structure which is high in plasticity. During asphaltite mining in Sirnak region, clays forming side rock are gathered at dump sites. In this study; SQX analyses of the clay samples taken from Avgamasya, Seridahli and Segürük asphaltite veins run in Sirnak region are carried out and their usage areas are searched.

  20. The Precursor of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Clays at Stevns Klint, Denmark, and DSDP Hole 465A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, M; Asaro, F; Michel, H V; Alvarez, W; Alvarez, L W

    1984-10-12

    Results of detailed mineralogical, chemical, and oxygen isotope analyses of the clay minerals and zeolites from two Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary regions, Stevns Klint, Denmark, and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Hole 465A in the north central Pacific Ocean, are presented. In the central part of the Stevns Klint K/T boundary layer, the only clay mineral detected by x-ray diffraction is a pure smectite with > 95 percent expandable layers. No detrital clay minerals or quartz were observed in the clay size fraction in these beds, whereas the clay minerals above and below the boundary layer are illite and mixed-layer smectite-illite of detrital origin as well as quartz. The mineralogical purity of the clay fraction, the presence of smectite only at the boundary, and the delta(18)O value of the smectite (27.2 +/- 0.2 per mil) suggest that it formed in situ by alteration of glass. Formation from impact rather than from volcanic glass is supported by its major element chemistry. The high content of iridium and other siderophile elements is not due to the cessation of calcium carbonate deposition and resulting slow sedimentation rates. At DSDP Hole 465A, the principal clay mineral in the boundary zone (80 to 143 centimeters) is a mixed-layer smectite-illite with >/=90 percent expandable layers, accompanied by some detrital quartz and small amounts of a euhedral authigenic zeolite (clinoptilolite). The mixed-layer smectite-illite from the interval 118 to 120 centimeters in the zone of high iridium abundance has a very low rare earth element content; the negative cerium anomaly indicates formation in the marine environment. This conclusion is corroborated by the delta(18)O value of this clay mineral (27.1 +/- 0.2 per mil). Thus, this mixed-layer smectite-illite formed possibly from the same glass as the K/T boundary smectite at Stevns Klint, Denmark.

  1. Searching for reciclability of modified clays for an environmental application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Antequera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants related to the food industry by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and

  2. Late Quaternary evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon: Clay and magnetic mineralogical records retrieved from the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Liu, Z.; Kissel, C.

    2016-12-01

    East Asian monsoon is a major component of global monsoon system. Acting as the largest marginal sea in the western Pacific, the South China Sea is a natural laboratory recording East Asian monsoon evolution. In order to reconstruct the late Quaternary evolution of the monsoon, we analyzed in details the 50.8-m-long Core MD12-3432 retrieved from the northern South China Sea at 2125 m water depth. Carbonate and magnetic stratigraphy indicates that Core MD12-3432 covers the last 400 ka. Clay mineralogical analysis was performed every 10 cm using XRD method. Bulk magnetic properties (susceptibility, NRM, ARM, and IRM) were measured on u-channel samples with a resolution of 2 cm. Cumulative log Gaussian decomposition analysis was performed on 33 high resolution IRM acquisition curves to evaluate the contribution of coercivity components. Three-axis thermal demagnetization was conducted on 14 samples to identify the nature of magnetic minerals. Clay mineral assemblage of Core MD12-3432 is dominated by smectite (23-59%) and illite (22-43%), with minor chlorite (13-27%) and kaolinite (4-13%). Because smectite is formed by rapid chemical weathering of volcanic rocks in Luzon, while illite and chlorite are primary minerals formed by physical erosion, smectite/(illite+chlorite) ratio constitutes a proxy of chemical weathering intensity. Magnetic fraction of Core MD12-3432 is composed by minerals with different coercivities, the relative proportion of which varies along the core. The high coercivity is carried by hematite and the low coercivity fraction is mainly composed by magnetite with some iron-sulphides. Luzon is the most efficient source of magnetite because of the rapid eluviation and weathering of volcanic rocks, while the Pearl River basin is the only source that produces hematite mainly through physical degradation of bedrocks. Thus, the bulk coercivity as indicated by S-ratio can serve as a proxy of chemical weathering. Both indicators, smectite

  3. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  4. Aflatoxin toxicity reduction in feed by enhanced binding to surface-modified clay additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, William F; Zartman, Richard E

    2011-06-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (K(d) = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (K(d) = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (K(d) = 13,800) and carnitine (K(d) = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (K(d) = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (K(d) = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (K(d) = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (K(d) = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity.

  5. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Zartman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA, more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100 retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944. Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy treated with choline (Kd = 13,800 and carnitine (Kd = 3960 adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944. A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100 adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340 or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293. Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity.

  6. Pillared clays : preparation and characterization of clay minerals and aluminum-based pillaring agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloprogge, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    After an extensive introductory chapter (Chapter I), in which the background and the aim of the research is dealt with, the hydrothermal synthesis and the characterization of Na-beidellite is discussed in Chapter II and III. The conditions of temperature, water pressure, and sodium activity under

  7. Fluorescence and structure of methyl red-clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Kulhánková, Lenka; Malý, Petr; Capková, Pavla

    2008-04-01

    Two types of clay minerals-montmorillonite and vermiculite have been chosen as a host matrix for the intercalation of methyl red (MR) in order to investigate a possible fluorescence tuning via dye-clay interactions. The effect of silicate layer charge on the structure and fluorescence of dye-clay intercalated hybrid nanostructures was investigated using combination of molecular modeling with experiment. Structure of both intercalates MR-vermiculite (MR-VER) and MR-montmorillonite (MR-MMT) exhibits high degree of structural disorder resulting in broaden emission band. The fluorescence wavelength range of MR intercalated in clays is shifted to lower wavelengths compared with the pristine MR polycrystalline sample (800 nm). Results showed the strong dependence of fluorescence band maximum on the silicate layer charge, lambda(max) = 565 nm for MR-MMT, 645 nm for MR-VER and 800 nm for the methyl red fine crystalline powder, whereas the structural disorder in the arrangement of dye molecules affects the emission band broadening.

  8. Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in clays

    KAUST Repository

    Loch, J. P. Gustav

    2010-02-13

    Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in bentonite clay are studied in the laboratory, where a 6 mm thick bentonite layer is subjected to direct current. Acidification and alkalization near anode and cathode are expected, possibly causing mineral deterioration, ion mobilization and precipitation of new solids. Afterwards the clay is analysed by XRF and anolyte and catholyte are analysed by ICP-MS. In addition, as a preliminary experiment treated bentonite is analysed by high resolution μ-XRF. Electro-osmotic flow is observed. Due to its carbonate content the bentonite is pH-buffering. Alkalization in the catholyte is substantial. Ca, Na and Sr are significantly removed from the clay and accumulate in the catholyte. Recovery in the catholyte accounts for a small fraction of the element-loss from the clay. The rest will have precipitated in undetected solid phases. μ-XRF indicates the loss of Ca-content throughout the bentonite layer. © The Author(s) 2010.

  9. Mineralogy and instrumental neutron activation analysis of seven National Bureau of Standards and three Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas clay reference samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosterman, John W.; Flanagan, F.J.; Bragg, Anne; Doughten, M.W.; Filby, R.H.; Grimm, Catherine; Mee, J.S.; Potts, P.J.; Rogers, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of 3 oxides and 29 elements in 7 National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and 3 Instituto de Pesquisas Techno16gicas (IPT) reference clay samples were etermined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The analytical work was designed to test the homogeneity of constituents in three new NBS reference clays, NBS-97b, NBS-98b, and NBS-679. The analyses of variance of 276 sets of data for these three standards show that the constituents are distributed homogeneously among bottles of samples for 94 percent of the sets of data. Three of the reference samples (NBS-97, NBS-97a, and NBS-97b) are flint clays; four of the samples (NBS-98, NBS-98a, NBS-98b, and IPT-32) are plastic clays, and three of the samples (NBS-679, IPT-28, and IPT-42) are miscellaneous clays (both sedimentary and residual). Seven clays are predominantly kaolinite; the other three clays contain illite and kaolinite in the approximate ratio 3:2. Seven clays contain quartz as the major nonclay mineral. The mineralogy of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri (NBS-97a and NBS-98a) differs markedly from that of the flint and plastic clays from Pennsylvania (NBS-97, NBS-97b, NBS-98, and NBS-98b). The flint clay NBS-97 has higher average chromium, hafnium, lithium, and zirconium contents than its replacement, reference sample NBS-97b. The differences between the plastic clay NBS-98 and its replacement, NBS-98b, are not as pronounced. The trace element contents of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri, NBS-97a and NBS-98a, differ significantly from those of the clays from Pennsylvania, especially the average rare earth element (REE) contents. The trace element contents of clay sample IPT-32 differ from those of the other plastic clays. IPT-28 and IPT-42 have some average trace element contents that differ not only between these two samples but also from all the other clays. IPT-28 has the highest summation of the average REE contents of the 10 samples. The uranium content of NBS-98a, 46

  10. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romas Girkontas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m; b tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide; c cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height. According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bearing capacity and failure mode were determined. For investigations Vilnius Gediminas Technical University Civil Engineering Scientific Research Center infrastructure was used.

  11. Geopolymers Based on Phosphoric Acid and Illito-Kaolinitic Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Louati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New three-dimensional geopolymer materials based on illito-kaolinitic clay and phosphoric acid were synthesized. The effect of Si/P molar ratio on the geopolymers properties was studied. Raw, calcined clay, and geopolymers structures were investigated using XRD, IR spectroscopy, and SEM. The phosphoric acid-based geopolymers mechanical properties were evaluated by measuring the compressive strength. The Si/P molar ratio was found to increase with the increase of the compressive strength of the obtained geopolymers, which attained a maximum value at Si/P equal to 2.75. Beyond this ratio, the mechanical strength decreases. The XRD patterns of these geopolymers samples have proven that when the Si/P molar ratio decreases, the amorphous phase content increases. Besides, the structural analyses have revealed the presence of aluminum phosphate and Si-O-Al-O-P polymeric structure, whatever the Si/P molar ratio is (between 2.25 and 3.5. The obtained results have confirmed that the presence of the associated minerals such as hematite and quartz in the clay does not prevent the geopolymerization reaction, but the presence of illite mineral seems to have a modest contribution in the geopolymerization.

  12. Role of clay constituents in stone decay processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniale, F.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Stone alterability/durability is depending upon a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors among which "clay minerals" constituents, either diffused throughout the stone framework or as coating-filling of void spaces, can play an important role. Swelling-shrinking and aggregation-disaggregation phenomena occurring by interaction of argillaceous particles with water and other fluids can cause destructuration of the stone resulting in a variety of pathologies. Also salt crystallization which is depending on fluid transfer, moisture evaporation and ion concentration in the circulating solutions, can be influenced by clay mineral reactivity. Furthermore, saline solutions can drastically change the clay minerals behaviour, resulting in enhanced "osmotic" swelling and variations in clay aggregation geometry; these phenomena resulting in significant stone damage. Case histories concerning several lithotypes used for monumental buildings and artistic manufacts are reported for showing the role of different clay mineral types in determining trend and intensity of decay processes.

    Varios factores, tanto intrínsecos como extrínsecos, pueden condicionar la alterabilidad/durabilidad de materiales pétreos. Entre ellos, la presencia de minerales arcillosos, bien como constituyentes difusos o recubriendo-rellenando huecos, puede jugar un papel importante. El resultado de la interacción de las partículas arcillosas y el agua (u otros fluidos da lugar a patologías que son consecuencia de una serie de daños internos producidos por las continuas variaciones plásticas, asociadas a parámetros físicos y cristaloquímicos de este tipo de minerales. Entre los que podemos citar la desestructuración de la piedra (bien por agregación-desagregación de las partículas arcillosas o por procesos de hinchamiento-contracción que está asociado, por ejemplo, con la cristalización de sales, producida por la transferencia de fluidos a su través, o a

  13. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  14. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  15. Mitigating Fish-Killing Prymnesium parvum Algal Blooms in Aquaculture Ponds with Clay: The Importance of pH and Clay Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Seger

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay minerals have previously been used to mitigate algal blooms because of their ability to flocculate algal cells or remove nutrients, but also offer considerable potential to remove ichthyotoxins. When a barramundi farm in tropical Australia suffered substantial fish mortalities due to a bloom of the ichthyotoxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum, the farm manager decided to manipulate pond water N:P ratios through removal of phosphorus by the addition of lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock™ to successfully mitigate ichthyotoxic effects. We conducted Prymnesium culture experiments under a range of N:P ratios, screening 14 different clays (two zeolites, four kaolins, six bentonites and two types of Korean loess at pH 7 and 9 for cell flocculation and removal of ichthyotoxicity assessed with the RTgill-W1 cell line assay. Application of Phoslock™ to cultures grown at different N:P effectively removed 60%–100% of water-soluble toxicity of live Prymnesium (dependent on nutritional status. While most clays efficiently flocculated Prymnesium cells (≥80% removal, cell removal proved a poor predictor of ichthyotoxin adsorption. Extensive clay screening revealed that at elevated pH, as commonly associated with dense algal blooms, most clays either exacerbated ichthyotoxicity or exhibited significantly reduced toxin adsorption. Interpretation of changes in clay zeta potential at pH 7 and 9 provided valuable insight into clay/ichthyotoxin interactions, yet further research is required to completely understand the adsorption mechanisms. Bentonite-type clays proved best suited for ichthyotoxin removal purposes (100% removal at ecologically relevant pH 9 and offer great potential for on-farm emergency response.

  16. Potential Of Fired Clay Bricks Produced From Aponmu Clay Deposits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of fired clay obtained from Aponmu river, Ondo State. Nigeria for brick production have been investigated. Properties of produced bricks investigated was compressive strength, density and water absorption. The results shows that the Compressive strength, density and water absorption values ranged from 2.48 ...

  17. Ring shear characteristics of clays in fractured-zone-landslide. Hasaitai chisuberichi no nenseido no ring sendan tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatabe, R.; Yagi, N.; Enoki, M. (Ehime Univ., Ehime (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-09-20

    The importance of study on the residual strength, in addition to the peak strength, has been pointed out for the study of landslides. The residual strength characteristics, effects of shearing rate, and grain size of clays, as well as the residual strength characteristics of clay minerals of a fractured zone landslide were examined by ring shear tests. The residual friction angles {phi}{sub r} of the tested clays of the fractured zone landslide were from 10 to 31{degree}, and were smaller than those of shearing resistance angles {phi}{prime} obtained by triaxial tests by 5 to 15{degree}. Contrary to the pointing out made hitherto, no correlation between clay content CF and plastic index was recognized for {phi}{sub r} of clays of a fractured zone landslide. As regards CF, the relation with CF was far below the lowest limit indicated by now. Ring shear characteristics of principal structural clay minerals, vermiculite, mica, illite, chlorite, and kaolinite were investigated. {phi}{sub r} of these clay minerals were in the range from 10 to 25{degree}. 20 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Transparent heavy minerals in the coastal sediments of south Maharashtra and their significance in delineating source and environment of transportation and deposition

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mislankar, P.G.; Gujar, A.R.; Ambre, N.V.

    of transportation and deposition. 16 transparent minerals have been identified which represent three different mineral assemblage viz. (1) tourmaline, amphibole, epidote and pyroxene (2) zircon, rutile and titanite (3) staurolite kynaite garnet and olivine...

  19. Predicting the abundance of clays and quartz in oil sands using hyperspectral measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari, Iman; Rivard, Benoit; Geramian, Mirjavad; Lipsett, Michael G.

    2017-07-01

    Clay minerals play a crucial role in the processability of oil sands ores and in the management of tailings. An increase in fine content generally leads to a decrease in both bitumen recovery performance and tailings settling rate. It is thus important to identify clay types and their abundance in oil sands ores and tailings. This study made use of oil sands samples characterized for quantitative mineralogy by x-ray diffraction, to gain an understanding of changes in the reflectance spectra of oil sands. The sample suite included bitumen-removed oil sands ore samples and their different fine size fractions. Spectral metrics applicable to the prediction of quartz and clay contents in oil sands were then derived with a focus on metrics correlating with sample content in total 2:1 clays (total of illite and illite-smectite) and kaolinite. Metrics in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) and longwave infrared (LWIR) were found to correlate with mineral contents. The best predictions of clays and quartz were achieved using LWIR metrics (R2 > 0.89). Results also demonstrated the applicability of LWIR metrics in the prediction of kaolinite and total 2:1 clays.

  20. Mineral oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furby, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of lubricants made from mineral oils are discussed. Types and compositions of base stocks are reviewed and the product demands and compositions of typical products are outlined. Processes for commercial production of mineral oils are examined. Tables of data are included to show examples of product types and requirements. A chemical analysis of three types of mineral oils is reported.

  1. Stools - pale or clay-colored

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003129.htm Stools - pale or clay-colored To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stools that are pale, clay, or putty-colored may be due to problems ...

  2. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  3. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  4. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Brunner, Anna; Archer, Paul Douglas; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise approx 20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000 C and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the approx 20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection underscores the complementary nature of the MSL CheMin and SAM instruments for investigations of martian sample mineralogy. Information on the nature of Yellowknife Bay clay minerals may also be available from the detection of H2 evolved during SAM EGA-MS at high temperature. A likely source of at least some of this H2 is H2O evolved from the smectite clays at high temperature, and it is possible these evolutions can

  5. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  6. Sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihao; Ding, Yunjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    Carbamazepine is a prescription anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing pharmaceutical administered to humans. Carbamazepine is persistent in the environment and frequently detected in water systems. In this study, sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water was measured for smectite clays with the surface negative charges compensated with K+, Ca2+, NH4+, tetramethylammonium (TMA), trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) cations. The magnitude of sorption followed the order: TMPA-smectite≥HDTMA-smectite>NH4-smectite>K-smectite>Ca-smectite⩾TMA-smectite. The greatest sorption of carbamazepine by TMPA-smectite is attributed to the interaction of conjugate aromatic moiety in carbamazepine with the phenyl ring in TMPA through π-π interaction. Partitioning process is the primary mechanism for carbamazepine uptake by HDTMA-smectite. For NH4-smectite the urea moiety in carbamazepine interacts with exchanged cation NH4+ by H-bonding hence demonstrating relatively higher adsorption. Sorption by K-, Ca- and TMA-smectites from water occurs on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces. These results implicate that carbamazepine sorption by soils occurs primarily in soil organic matter, and soil mineral fractions play a secondary role. Desorption of carbamazepine from the sorbents manifested an apparent hysteresis. Increasing irreversibility of desorption vs. sorption was observed for K-, Ca-, TMA-, TMPA- and HDTMA-clays as aqueous carbamazepine concentrations increased. Desorption hysteresis of carbamazepine from K-, Ca-, NH4-smectites was greater than that from TMPA- and HDTMA-clays, suggesting that the sequestrated carbamazepine molecules in smectite interlayers are more resistant to desorption compared to those sorbed by organic phases in smectite clays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of used fuel disposition in clay-bearing rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Hao. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maner, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolery, Thomas J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atkins-Duffin, Cindy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, William L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The R&D program from the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) has documented key advances in coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) modeling of clay to simulate its complex dynamic behavior in response to thermal and hydrochemical feedbacks. These efforts have been harnessed to assess the isolation performance of heat-generating nuclear waste in a deep geological repository in clay/shale/argillaceous rock formations. This report describes the ongoing disposal R&D efforts on the advancement and refinement of coupled THMC process models, hydrothermal experiments on barrier clay interactions, used fuel and canister material degradation, thermodynamic database development, and reactive transport modeling of the near-field under non-isothermal conditions. These play an important role to the evaluation of sacrificial zones as part of the EBS exposure to thermally-driven chemical and transport processes. Thermal inducement of chemical interactions at EBS domains enhances mineral dissolution/precipitation but also generates mineralogical changes that result in mineral H2O uptake/removal (hydration/dehydration reactions). These processes can result in volume changes that can affect the interface / bulk phase porosities and the mechanical (stress) state of the bentonite barrier. Characterization studies on bentonite barrier samples from the FEBEX-DP international activity have provided important insight on clay barrier microstructures (e.g., microcracks) and interactions at EBS interfaces. Enhancements to the used fuel degradation model outlines the need to include the effects of canister corrosion due the strong influence of H2 generation on the source term.

  8. Recent saltmarsh foraminiferal assemblages from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübbers, Julia; Schönfeld, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    This study reports for the first time boreal to subarctic intertidal foraminiferal assemblages from saltmarshes at Borgarnes and Faskrudsfjördur on Iceland. The composition of living and dead foraminiferal assemblages was investigated along transects from the tidal flat to the highest reach of halophytic plants. The foraminiferal assemblages from Borgarnes showed 18 species in the total foraminiferal assemblage of which only 7 species were recorded in the living fauna. The assemblages were dominated by agglutinated taxa, whereas 3 calcareous species were recorded, of which only Haynesina orbicularis was found in the living fauna. The distribution limit of calcifying species corresponds to the lower boundary of the lower saltmarsh vegetation zone. Furthermore, calcareous tests showed many features of dissolution, which is an indication of a carbonate corrosive environment. The species forming the dead assemblages were mainly derived from the ambient intertidal areas and were displaced by tidal currents into the saltmarsh. The foraminiferal assemblages from Faskrudsfjördur showed two species, of which only one species was recorded in the living fauna. The assemblage was dominated by the agglutinated foraminifer Trochaminita irregularis. The foraminiferal species recorded on Iceland were the same as commonly found elsewhere in Europa. Since no species was found which is endemic to North America, Iceland is considered part of the European bio province. The foraminiferal could have been immigrated to Iceland from Europe through warm water currents, migratory birds or marine traffic since the last Ice Age.

  9. Spatial variability in macroinvertebrate assemblages: comparing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial variability in macroinvertebrate assemblages was examined with the aim of evaluating the utility of regional classification systems in aquatic ... process that allows for subjective a priori regional classifications to be modified on the basis of independent, objective a posteriori classification of biological assemblages.

  10. Clay-based drug-delivery systems: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppe; Riela, Serena; Fakhrullin, Rawil F

    2017-07-01

    Clays for drug delivery have been used from ancient time due to the large availability of clay minerals and their unprecedented properties. The empirical use of nanoclays from the past is converted in a stimulating scientific task aimed at building up nanoarchitectonic vehicles for drug delivery in a targeted and stimuli-responsive fashion. Here the historical aspects are discussed; next the modern examples of applications of different clay-based materials are discussed. A special focus is given to halloysite clay nanotubes, which are an emerging and very promising nanomaterial for drug-delivery purposes due to its special morphology and unique chemical properties. Advantages and limitations of these natural nanomaterials are critically discussed pointing out the future perspectives and directions for further research.

  11. Spectroscopic investigation on the production of clay bricks with SCBA waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruthagiri, G; Sathiya priya, S; Shanmugam, N; Balaji, A; Balamurugan, K; Gopinathan, E

    2015-10-05

    In this paper, the effect of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) addition to the brick making clay has been analyzed using spectroscopic techniques. For that, mixtures of brick making clay (BMC) with sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) in proportions of 0-20 wt.% were hydraulic uniaxially pressed and sintered at temperatures of 800-1100 °C. The partial replacement of the brick making clay with SCBA was studied with chemical and mineralogical analyzes (XRF and X-ray diffraction). The quantitative estimation of minerals was made by FTIR analysis. The results of FT-IR reveal that kaolinite, quartz, and lignin are predominant, whereas, cellulose and calcite are in moderate levels. In addition, magnetite and hematite are found in trace level. The overall results reveal that the brick making clay substituted with 15 wt.% of SCBA can open up a new path for the fabrication of quality bricks at low cost. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Organoclay hybrid materials as precursors of porous ZnO/silica-clay heterostructures for photocatalytic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Akkari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile two-step process applied to two types of clays: montmorillonite layered silicate and sepiolite microfibrous clay mineral. In the first step, intermediate silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures were prepared following a colloidal route based on the controlled hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of the starting organoclay. Later on, pre-formed ZnO nanoparticles (NP dispersed in 2-propanol were incorporated under ultrasound irradiation to the silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures dispersed in 2-propanol, and finally, the resulting solids were calcinated to eliminate the organic matter and to produce ZnO nanoparticles (NP homogeneously assembled to the clay–SiO2 framework. In the case of montmorillonite the resulting materials were identified as delaminated clays of ZnO/SiO2-clay composition, whereas for sepiolite, the resulting heterostructure is constituted by the assembling of ZnO NP to the sepiolite–silica substrate only affecting the external surface of the clay. The structural and morphological features of the prepared heterostructures were characterized by diverse physico-chemical techniques (such as XRD, FTIR, TEM, FE-SEM. The efficiency of these new porous ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures as potential photocatalysts in the degradation of organic dyes and the removal of pharmaceutical drugs in water solution was tested using methylene blue and ibuprofen compounds, respectively, as model of pollutants.

  13. Organoclay hybrid materials as precursors of porous ZnO/silica-clay heterostructures for photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkari, Marwa; Aranda, Pilar; Ben Haj Amara, Abdessalem

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile two-step process applied to two types of clays: montmorillonite layered silicate and sepiolite microfibrous clay mineral. In the first step, intermediate silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures were prepared following a colloidal route based on the controlled hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of the starting organoclay. Later on, pre-formed ZnO nanoparticles (NP) dispersed in 2-propanol were incorporated under ultrasound irradiation to the silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures dispersed in 2-propanol, and finally, the resulting solids were calcinated to eliminate the organic matter and to produce ZnO nanoparticles (NP) homogeneously assembled to the clay–SiO2 framework. In the case of montmorillonite the resulting materials were identified as delaminated clays of ZnO/SiO2-clay composition, whereas for sepiolite, the resulting heterostructure is constituted by the assembling of ZnO NP to the sepiolite–silica substrate only affecting the external surface of the clay. The structural and morphological features of the prepared heterostructures were characterized by diverse physico-chemical techniques (such as XRD, FTIR, TEM, FE-SEM). The efficiency of these new porous ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures as potential photocatalysts in the degradation of organic dyes and the removal of pharmaceutical drugs in water solution was tested using methylene blue and ibuprofen compounds, respectively, as model of pollutants. PMID:28144545

  14. Mineralogical characterization of clays used in the structural ceramic industry in west of S. Paulo State, Brazil Caracterização mineralógica de argilas usadas na indústria de cerâmica estrutural no oeste do estado de S. Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Teixeira

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity and the grain-size distribution of the raw material used to make structural bricks and roof tiles are very important to the production process. These two parameters and the mineral composition will define the quality and properties of the final product: color, mechanical resistance, water absorption, cracks, swell and shrink during drying and firing the ceramic pieces etc. In the Brazilian ceramic industry it is very common to mix together two or more different kinds of raw material to achieve the ceramic mass with the desired grain-size distribution. The objective of this work was to characterize the raw material collected at the floodplains of the Paraná and Paranapanema Rivers and the ceramic mass used by the ceramic industry in western São Paulo State, Brazil. Particle size distribution, organic matter and X-ray diffraction were used to study this material. The textural analysis indicates that the raw materials have the clay fraction ranging from 38.2% to 66.3%, the silt from 22.2% to 49.7% and the sand from 3.1% to 34.1%. The results indicate that all mixed raw materials have more clay in its composition than would be necessary. The organic matter ranges from 5 to 7%. All samples have kaolinite and many of them have smectites, HIV and mica. Gibbsite, iron and titanium oxides, and quartz are also identified. One of the samples (yellow is rich in goethite.A plasticidade e a granulometria da massa cerâmica são dois parâmetros importantes para o processo de produção de tijolos e telhas. Estes dois parâmetros e a composição mineralógica definirão a qualidade e propriedades (cor, resistência mecânica, absorção de água, trincas, mudanças nas dimensões durante a secagem e queima, etc. do produto final. Na indústria cerâmica brasileira é comum misturar dois ou mais tipos de "barro" para se obter a massa cerâmica com a granulometria e plasticidade desejada. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar a matéria prima

  15. Cinética de liberação de potássio e magnésio pelos minerais da fração argila de solos do Triângulo Mineiro Kinetics of potassium and magnesium release from clay minerals of soils in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander de Freitas Melo

    2005-07-01

    o K e menor para o Mg. Este comportamento diferenciado indica o predomínio de K na forma não-trocável em sítios de média/alta energia de adsorção e de Mg na estrutura de minerais ferromagnesianos, predominantemente a biotita, retardando a liberação do nutriente pela dependência de reações de intemperismo promovidas pelo ácido cítrico.Studies on the kinetics of K and Mg release improve our understanding of nutrient dynamics in soils and can provide information to adjust fertilization recommendations and increase plant yields. The selected soils represented different parent materials (sandstone - Bauru Group, Granite - Araxá Group, basalt - São Bento Group and sediments - Detritic-Lateritic-Tertiary Cover and weathering degrees. The total K content in soil and its fractions were determined by HF, HNO3 and H2SO4 digestion. To estimate the potential of clay minerals to release K and Mg from non-exchangeable and structural forms to plants, nine sequential extractions were used with 0.1 mol L-1 citric acid solution, with the following contact times: 2, 12, 24, 48, 96, 144, 192, 288, and 576 h. The total contact time was 1.382 h. Reserve K and Mg release were determined by parent materials and weathering degree. The clay fraction of Ultisols developed from sandstone (Uberaba Formation and granite (Araxa Group generally presented higher total K and Mg concentrations and amounts extracted by 0.1 mol L-1 citric acid during the the entire kinetics study. Nevertheless, even in Oxisols (low total contents a relatively high K and Mg release was observed (accumulated contents after 1.382 h compared to the exchangeable contents, evidencing the ability to supply plants' with non-exchangeable and structural K and Mg throughout the cultivation period. The parabolic diffusion equation showed that K and Mg release occurred at different rates and in two stages: for the majority of the samples, the release rate was higher for K and lower for Mg in the first stage. This

  16. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  17. Hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.; Visser, P.J.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay due to the turbulent flow, based on theoretical analysis and experimental results. The undisturbed clay has the unique and complicated characteristics of cohesive force among clay particles, which are highly different from

  18. The Efficacy of the clay meat ball as a method of traditional meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: meat ball, protein, mineral content. This work was carried out to determine the effectiveness of the use of clay meat balls (an African traditional method of preserving meat) in extending the shelf life of meat over a period of months against microbial (bacterial and fungal) spoilage and contamination without ...

  19. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores; Lixiviacion estatica de minerales arcillosos de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.; Sedano, A.

    1973-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  20. Natural Ferrihydrite as an Agent for Reducing Turbidity Caused by Suspended Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The turbidity of water can be reduced by the addition of positively charged compounds which coagulate negatively charged clay particles in suspension causing them to flocculate. This research was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Fe oxide mineral ferrihydrite as a flocculating agent fo...

  1. Incorporation of Pure Fullerene into Organoclays : Towards C60-Pillared Clay Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Georgakilas, Vasileios; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Rudolf, Petra; Gournis, Dimitrios

    In this work, we demonstrate the successful incorporation of pure fullerene from solution into two-dimensional layered aluminosilicate minerals. Pure fullerenes are insoluble in water and neutral in terms of charge, hence they cannot be introduced into the clay galleries by ion exchange or

  2. Lithological and hydrological influences on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous carbonate-clay aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, S.J.; Herman, J.S.; Jones, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of clay units on ground-water composition was investigated in a heterogeneous carbonate aquifer system of Miocene age in southwest Florida, known as the Intermediate aquifer system. Regionally, the ground water is recharged inland, flows laterally and to greater depths in the aquifer systems, and is discharged vertically upward at the saltwater interface along the coast. A depth profile of water composition was obtained by sampling ground water from discrete intervals within the permeable carbonate units during coring and by squeezing pore water from a core of the less-permeable clay layers. A normative salt analysis of solute compositions in the water indicated a marine origin for both types of water and an evolutionary pathway for the clay water that involves clay diagenesis. The chemical composition of the ground water in the carbonate bedrock is significantly different from that of the pore water in the clay layers. Dissolution of clays and opaline silica results in high silica concentrations relative to water in other parts of the Intermediate aquifer system. Water enriched in chloride relative to the overlying and underlying ground water recharges the aquifer inland where the confining clay layer is absent, and it dissolves carbonate and silicate minerals and reacts with clays along its flow path, eventually reaching this coastal site and resulting in the high chloride and silica concentrations observed in the middle part of the Intermediate aquifer system. Reaction-path modeling suggests that the recharging surficial water mixes with sulfate-rich water upwelling from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and carbonate mineral dissolution and precipitation, weathering and exchange reactions, clay mineral diagenesis, clay and silica dissolution, organic carbon oxidation, and iron and sulfate reduction result in the observed water compositions.A study was conducted to clarify the influence of clay units on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous

  3. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  4. Prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism in the Cenozoic Abanico Formation, Andes of central Chile (33°50'S: chemical and scale controls on mineral assemblages, reaction progress and the equilibrium state Metamorfismo de facies prehnita-pumpellyita en la Formación Abanico del Cenozoico, Andes centrales de Chile (33°50'S: controles químicos y de escala sobre las asociaciones minerales, el progreso de la reacción y el estado de equilibrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Muñoz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the El Volcan and Rodeo de los Bueyes areas, Andean Principal Cordillera (east of Santiago; 33°50'S, an Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene volcanic series belonging to the Abanico Formation (Late Eocene-Early Miocene is exposed. The rock successions outcropping in both areas, ca. 3,300 m total thickness, have been affected by very low-grade, non-deformative metamorphism in the prehnite-pumpellyite facies. This is represented by the widespread development of secondary mineral assemblages composed of epidote, mixed-layer chlorite-smectite, albite, quartz, white mica, and titanite. These mineral assemblages also contain pumpellyite, prehmte or prehnite+actinolite in a few samples. Chemical characteristics, such as low compositional variability of mixed-layer chlorite-smectite and actino-lite independent from the metadomain where these phases are hosted, along with a high proportion of chlorite layers in the former, suggest that these phases closely represent the whole rock effective bulk composition. On the contrary, pumpellyite compositions show a higher variability and a strong metadomain control evidencing its lower equilibration kinetics and leaving only those that grow in the rock matrix as the more closely representative of a whole rock effective bulk compositional control. Mineral assemblages from both areas show evidence of having been formed during the same metamorphic event where reactions have ocurred equivalently between them. However, local differences in chemical variables controlling this process are recognizable. A higher CO2 concentration in the fluids during the metamorphism in the El Volcán area than in the Rodeo de los Bueyes area is suggested by the scarce development of prehnite and the ubiquitous presence of calcite in the metamorphic assemblages of the former. Pressure and temperature of this metamorphic event have been roughly estimated to be lower than 2-3 kbar and 320°C, respectively.En las areas de El Volcán y Rodeo de

  5. Reflectance Spectroscopy of Palagonite and Iron-Rich Montmorillonite Clay Mixtures: Implications for the Surface Composition of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenberg, James; Handy, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Mixtures of a Hawaiian palagonite and an iron-rich, montmorillonite clay (15.8 +/- 0.4 wt% Fe as Fe2O3) were evaluated as Mars surface spectral analogs from their diffuse reflectance spectra. The presence of the 2.2 microns absorption band in the reflectance spectrum of clays and its absence in the Mars spectrum have been interpreted as indicating that highly crystalline aluminous hydroxylated clays cannot be a major mineral component of the soil on Mars. The palagonite sample used in this study does not show this absorption feature in its spectrum. In mixtures of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite, the 2.2 microns Al-OH clay lattice band is not seen below 15 wt% montmorillonite. This suggests the possibility that iron-rich montmorillonite clay may be present in the soil of Mars at up to 15 wt% in combination with palagonite, and remain undetected in remotely sensed spectra of Mars.

  6. Characterization of bentonite clay from “Greda” deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadežda Stanković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on mineralogical and technological investigations of the deposit “Greda” important characteristics of bentonite clay were determined. Representative samples of the deposit were characterized with X-ray diffraction, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that the main mineral is montmorillonite and in subordinate quantities kaolinite, quartz and pyrite. The chemical composition generally shows high silica and alumina contents in all samples and small quantities of Fe3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations. Based on technological and mineralogical research, bentonite from this deposit is a high-quality raw material for use in the ceramic industry.

  7. Clays on Mars: Review of chemical and mineralogical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, Amos; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Mafic igneous bedrock is inferred for Mars, based on spectrophotometric evidence for pyroxene (principally in optically dark areas of the globe) and the pyroxenite-peridotite petrology of shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) meteorites. Visible and infrared spectra of reddish-brown surface fines (which dominate Martian bright areas) indicate ferric iron and compare favorably (though not uniquely) with spectra of palagonitic soils. Laboratory studies of SNC's and Viking Lander results support a model for Martian soil based on chemical weathering of mafic rocks to produce layer structured silicates (clay minerals), salts, and iron oxides.

  8. Tunable Exfoliation of Synthetic Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöter, Matthias; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Breu, Josef

    2015-07-01

    The large hydration enthalpy of inorganic interlayer cations sandwiched between moderately negatively charged silicate layers endows to smectites (e.g., hectorite) remarkably rich intracrystalline reactivity compared with most other layered materials. Moreover, they are transparent and inert in most potential suspension media. Upon suspension in water, smectites readily swell. For homogeneous, melt-synthesized smectites, the degree of swelling can be tuned by choice of interlayer cation and charge density of the layer. Because swelling renders the clay stacks more shear labile, the efficiency of exfoliation by applying shearing forces can in turn be adjusted. Certain smectites even spontaneously delaminate into clay platelets of uniform thickness of 1 nm by progressive osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling can also be applied to produce well-defined double stacks when one starts with ordered, interstratified heterostructures. Nanocomposites made with high-aspect-ratio fillers obtained this way show superior mechanical, flame retardancy, and permeability properties.

  9. GAS PERMEABILITY OF GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Vučenović

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geosynthetic clay liners (GCL are manufactured hydraulic barriers consisting of mineral and geosynthetic components. They belong to a group of geosynthetic products whose primary purpose is to seal and they have been used in many geotechnical and hydrotechnical applications, landfi lls and liquid waste lagoons for quite a while. They are used in landfill final cover systems to prevent the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body and the penetration of gases and liquids from the landfill into the atmosphere and environment. Laboratory and fi eld research and observations on regulated landfi lls have proven the eff ectiveness of GCL as a barrier for the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body as well as the drainage of fl uid beneath the landfill. Due to the presence of high concentrations of gases in the landfill body, there is a growing interest in determining the efficiency of GCL as a gas barrier. It was not until the last twenty years that the importance of this topic was recognized. In this article, current GCL gas permeability studies, the testing methods and test results of gas permeability in laboratory conditions are described.

  10. Small proportions of silt linked to distinct and predictable differences in marine macrofaunal assemblages on the continental shelf of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, S. K.; Politano, K. K.

    2017-07-01

    Increasing interest in offshore development has motivated intensified efforts to map the seafloor for marine spatial planning. However, surficial geologic maps do not accurately represent habitats for various species groups of concern. This study used a bottom-up approach to integrate macrofaunal densities and benthic conditions on the Pacific Northwest shelf to identify macrofaunal assemblages and associated habitat features. Benthic cores and water-column profiles were collected from 137 stations from 50 to 110 m depth. Analyses grouping stations based on both similar species abundances and benthic conditions resulted in six broad habitats. Within the sampled depth and latitudinal range, sediment characteristics were the primary structuring variable. A major break in assemblages was detected between sediment that had less than 1% silt/clay and those containing more than 1% silt/clay. Assemblages differed primarily in the bivalve species present and secondarily in polychaete species. Within the greater than and less than 1% silt/clay habitats, further discretization of assemblages was based mostly on differing abundances of characteristic bivalves and polychaetes associated with differing median grain sizes, which did not correspond to traditional definitions of fine or medium sand. These data show that a bottom-up methodology is necessary to discern habitats for macrofauna and that site-specific physical sampling is necessary to predict macrofaunal assemblage composition. However, if detailed sediment characteristics are known, macrofaunal assemblages may be predicted without time-intensive biological sampling and processing. These results also indicate that seemingly small sedimentary changes due to offshore installations may have measureable effects on the relative abundances and even the species composition of macrofauna.

  11. Modernity and putty-clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  13. Effect of clay distribution in synthetic sand-clay mixtures on hydraulic and geophysical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, G. K.; Keating, K.; Slater, L. D.; Sugand, M.; Binley, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of porous geological media is known to be controlled by clay content as well as the distribution of clay. Although numerous studies have explored the effect of clay content on geophysical measurements, most studies of synthetic sediment packs focus on a homogenous distribution of clay particles. In this laboratory experiment, we explore how both clay content and clay distribution impact hydraulic and geophysical parameters. Using two clays—kaolinite and montmorillonite—we prepared homogeneous and heterogeneous sand-clay mixtures containing 0 to 10% clay by mass. To create the heterogeneous mixtures, small (nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) mean-log T2 relaxation time, parameters known to be sensitive to changes in pore geometry. Our results show that for the homogenous clay samples, the hydraulic conductivity decreases with increasing clay content, as expected, and both SIP and NMR parameters correlate with the changing hydraulic conductivity. For the aggregated clay samples, there is no correlation between hydraulic conductivity and clay content; however, increasing clay content still impacts the geophysical data. The SIP data are less sensitive to increasing aggregated clay content than the NMR data, which display a similar degree of variability with clay content in mean-log T­2 relaxation time for both homogenous and aggregated clay samples. The results suggest that in heterogeneous clay-bearing sediments, NMR measured parameters are less sensitive to the specific pore geometries controlling fluid flow than the SIP parameters. This research represents a first step towards understanding how the distributions of clay in porous media impacts relationships between geophysical measurements and hydraulic conductivity.

  14. Mineral resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M.L.C.M.; Ierland, van E.C.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Worrell, E.

    2016-01-01

    The extractable ores of the world's geologically scarcest mineral resources (e.g. antimony, molybdenum and zinc) may be exhausted within several decades to a century, if their extraction continues to increase. This paper explores the likelihood that these scarce mineral resources can be conserved

  15. Combining Catalytic Microparticles with Droplets Formed by Phase Coexistence: Adsorption and Activity of Natural Clays at the Aqueous/Aqueous Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pir Cakmak, Fatma; Keating, Christine D

    2017-06-12

    Natural clay particles have been hypothesized as catalysts on the early Earth, potentially facilitating the formation of early organic (bio) molecules. Association of clay particles with droplets formed by liquid-liquid phase separation could provide a physical mechanism for compartmentalization of inorganic catalysts in primitive protocells. Here we explore the distribution of natural clay mineral particles in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/dextran (Dx) aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). We compared the three main types of natural clay: kaolinite, montmorillonite and illite, all of which are aluminosilicates of similar composition and surface charge. The three clay types differ in particle size, crystal structure, and their accumulation at the ATPS interface and ability to stabilize droplets against coalescence. Illite and kaolinite accumulated at the aqueous/aqueous interface, stabilizing droplets against coalescence but not preventing their eventual sedimentation due to the mass of adsorbed particles. The ability of each clay-containing ATPS to catalyze reaction of o-phenylenediamine with peroxide to form 2,3-diaminophenazone was evaluated. We observed modest rate increases for this reaction in the presence of clay-containing ATPS over clay in buffer alone, with illite outperforming the other clays. These findings are encouraging because they support the potential of combining catalytic mineral particles with aqueous microcompartments to form primitive microreactors.

  16. Mineralogical variables that control the antibacterial effectiveness of a natural clay deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Keith D; Underwood, Jennifer C; Metge, David W; Eberl, Dennis D; Williams, Lynda B

    2014-08-01

    As antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains emerge and pose increased global health risks, new antibacterial agents are needed as alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. Naturally occurring antibacterial clays have been identified which are effective in killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study examines a hydrothermally formed antibacterial clay deposit near Crater Lake, OR (USA). Our hypothesis is that antibacterial clays buffer pH and Eh conditions to dissolve unstable mineral phases containing transition metals (primarily Fe(2+)), while smectite interlayers serve as reservoirs for time release of bactericidal components. Model pathogens (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 14990) were incubated with clays from different alteration zones of the hydrothermal deposit. In vitro antibacterial susceptibility testing showed that reduced mineral zones were bactericidal, while more oxidized zones had variable antibacterial effect. TEM images showed no indication of cell lysis. Cytoplasmic condensation and cell wall accumulations of 630 mV and contain elevated level (mM) of soluble Fe (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)) and Al(3+). Our interpretation is that rapid uptake of Fe(2+) impairs bacterial metabolism by flooding the cell with excess Fe(2+) and overwhelming iron storage proteins. As the intracellular Fe(2+) oxidizes, it produces reactive oxygen species that damage biomolecules and precipitates Fe-oxides. The ability of antibacterial clays to buffer pH and Eh in chronic non-healing wounds to conditions of healthy skin appears key to their healing potential and viability as an alternative to conventional antibiotics.

  17. Effects of mixing energy on the sedimentation of vegetable oil spills by clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrenn, B A; Downer, R J; Venosa, A D

    2010-11-01

    The effects of clay dose and mixing energy on the efficiency of vegetable oil sedimentation by clay are investigated. The sedimentation efficiency increased with increasing clay dose to a maximum of about 80% of added oil. The maximum sedimentation efficiency was achieved at a lower clay dose, and the sedimentation efficiency was greater for a given clay dose when the oil was present as a thick oil film rather than as a thinner film. Sedimentation efficiency was relatively constant for mixing energies less than about 0.01 m2 s(-3) (0.01 W kg(-1)) but decreased dramatically at higher energy dissipation rates. Mixing energy may not be an important factor in determining the effectiveness of this response alternative because energy dissipation rates in natural surface water bodies under most typical conditions are less than 0.01 m2 s(-3). The effects of oil film thickness and mixing energy on the efficiency of vegetable oil sedimentation suggests that vegetable oil-mineral aggregates (VOMA) form through a different mechanism to that of petroleum oil-mineral aggregates (OMA). One consequence of the different formation mechanisms is that VOMA are much larger than petroleum OMA.

  18. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability - Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... friability for 1 yr of measurements could be ascribed to wet conditions for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) harvest and tillage the preceding year. Literature data indicate soils’ content of clay and silt (Fines20) to be a better predictor of specific surface area than clay. We conclude that a clay/OC ratio...

  19. Seasonal variations in heavy mineral placer sand from Kalbadevi Bay, Ratnagiri, Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    Heavy mineral sand from Kalbadevi Bay, Ratnagiri, Maharashtra is well known for ilmenite placer deposits. Study along the central profile of the Bay shows that the sand is major constituent followed by silt, and clay content is present in negligible...

  20. A Comparative Analyses of Granulometry, Mineral Composition and Major and Trace Element Concentrations in Soils Commonly Ingested by Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngole-Jeme, Veronica M.; Ekosse, Georges-Ivo E.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the granulometric properties, mineralogical composition and concentrations of major and trace element oxides of commonly ingested soils (geophagic soil) collected from different countries with a view of understanding how varied they may be in these properties and to understand the possible health implications of ingesting them. Soil samples were collected from three different countries (South Africa, Swaziland and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)) and their granulometric properties, concentrations of major and trace element oxides as well as mineralogical composition determined. Differences were observed in the granulometric properties of geophagic soil from the three different countries with most of them having soils also showed varied degrees of weathering with values of Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) and Chemical Index of Weathering (CIW) being between 60% and 99.9% respectively. The mineral assemblages of the soils from South Africa and Swaziland were dominated by the primary minerals quartz and feldspar whereas soils from DRC had more of kaolinite, a secondary mineral than primary minerals. Soils from DRC were associated with silt, clay, Al2O3, and CIA unlike most samples from South Africa which were associated with SiO2, sand, K2O, CaO, and MgO. The soils from Swaziland were closely associated with silt, H2O and Fe2O3(t). These associations reflect the mineralogy of the samples. These soils are not likely to serve as nutrient supplements because of the low concentrations of the nutrient elements contained. The coarse texture of the samples may also result in dental destruction during mastication. Sieving of the soils before ingestion to remove coarse particles is recommended to reduce the potential health threat associated with the ingestion of coarse-textured soils. PMID:26264010

  1. Fish assemblages in southern California kelp forests.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a point file of fish assemblages calculated from diver surveys in kelp forests in Southern California. Visual census data was combined for two separate...

  2. Investigation into the Properties of Sintered Ceramics from Dysna Clay and Non-Plastics Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Pranckevičienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Recycling mineral wool spinning waste represents a rather serious problem. The results of the present research show that the suggested sintering ceramics out of low melting illite clay and mineral wool spinning waste is a promising way for solving the problem of mineral wool waste utilization. The conducted research into the properties of this compound has shown that by introducing 20% of waste into low melting clay allows producing ceramic materials possessing the following parameters: value of absorption is equal to 2,2%, density – 2169 kg/m3.The data of dilatometric investigation have demonstrated that adding 20 % of MVCF component leads to reducing length from 2,8% to 1,4% at the temperature of 1070 ºC. Article in Lithuanian

  3. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  4. Zheltozems of Russia: Micromorphology, clay minerals, and pedogenetic analysis Zheltozems de Rusia: micromorfología, minerales de la arcilla y análisis edafogenético Zheltozems da Russia: Micromorfología, Minerais de Argila e Análise Pedogenética

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gerasimova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Zheltozems (literally "yellow earths" that can be classified as Acrisols, Alisols, or Ultisols, occupy very small areas in Russia; they are strongly modified by human activities. The unchanged profiles are preserved only locally, in particular, in the Sochi arboretum. When compiling the soil map of the arboretum, different Zheltozems were described on gentle and moderately steep slopes and diverse parent materials: calcareous claystone and its heavy-textured derivates. The micromorphology of three characteristic Zheltozem profiles developed on these different parent materials was also studied. The features that they have in common are the following: in all profiles, a specific heavy-textured Bw, or BM 'metamorphic' horizon was identified with a certain set of micromorphological properties: a massive microstructure with fine planes merging into deformed biogenic pores, a monic groundmass with few silt grains that are sometimes oriented, and impregnative iron-oxides pedofeatures. The b-fabric was defined as stipple speckled, poro- and granostriated, locally (monostriated ressembling stress coatings. There are almost no clay coatings except for very few fine internal ones that are light yellow and homogeneous; clay and iron pseudomorphs (alteromorphs occur over some skeleton grains. Many of these properties are related to the clay mineral composition. There are varying quantities of smectites and kaolinite-smectites, whereby the former increase with depth. The presence of expanding minerals is known to contribute to the disintegration of coatings. Remnants of these are observed in typic iron-manganic nodules. In terms of WRB, this horizon is an intergrade between cambic and argic, which is not accounted for in soil diagnostics. As three different Zheltozems are studied in the same area, the following genesis of this specific intergrade can be given. The saprolite in one of the profiles is composed of fragments of weathered calcareous argillites

  5. Geology and Refractory Clay Deposits of the Haldeman and Wrigley Quadrangles, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Sam H.; Hosterman, John W.; Huddle, John Warfield

    1962-01-01

    The Haldeman and Wrigley 7th-minute quadrangles are near the western edge of the eastern Kentucky coal field and cover an area of approximately 117 square miles in parts of Carter, Rowan, Elliott, and Morgan Counties, Ky. The rocks exposed in the two quadrangles are of Early and Late Mississippian and Early and Middle Pennsylvanian age. The Mississippian rocks are composed of the thick Brodhead formation, which consists of siltstone and shale, and eleven thin marine limestone and shale formations, having an aggregate thickness of about 150 feet. The Lee and Breathitt formations, of Pennsylvanian age, consist of sandstone, siltstone, and shale; they also contain thin beds of coal and several beds of underclay, including the economically important Olive Hill clay bed of Crider, 1913. Pennsylvanian rocks include beds of both continental and marine origin. The eleven thin Mississippian formations and the upper-most part of the thick Brodhead formation are truncated by a prominent unconformity on which rocks of Pennsylvanian age rest. The rocks occupy a region of gentle dips between the Cincinnati arch and the Appalachian Mountains. Refractory clay deposits are in the Olive Hill clay bed, which occurs in the lower part of the Lee formation. The Olive Hill clay bed is discontinuous and consists of a series of irregularly shaped lenses. The bed is approximately two-thirds semifiint clay and one-third flint clay, and it contains minor amounts of plastic clay. Some of the flint clay is nearly pure kaolinite, but the semi flint and plastic clay consists of mixtures of kaolinite, illite, and mixed-layer clay minerals. The structure of the kaolinite ranges from highly crystalline to very poorly crystalline 'fireclay' type. The degree of crystallinity of the kaolinite and the hardness of the clay vary inversely with the amount of illite and mixed-layer clay minerals present. The nearly pure kaolinite is believed to have formed by the removal of alkalies and some silica fram

  6. Significance of the long-chain organic cation structure in the sorption of the penconazole and metalaxyl fungicides by organo clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cruz, M S; Andrades, M S; Sánchez-Martín, M J

    2008-12-15

    Sorption-desorption of two different hydrophobic fungicides, penconazole and metalaxyl, by a series of clay minerals layered and non-layered (montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite, muscovite, sepiolite and palygorskite) modified with the two-chain cationic surfactant, dihexadecyldimetylammonium (DHDDMA) was studied by first time in this work. DHDDMA-clays showed a good capacity to sorb both fungicides from water. Freundlich sorption constants (K(f)) increased 22-268-fold for penconazole and 4-112-fold for metalaxyl in relation to natural clays. High sorption irreversibility was observed for penconazole for all modified clays, while for metalaxyl this occurred only for some of the modified clays. Additionally, a comparative study of the sorption of the fungicides by clay minerals modified with organic cations of different structure was carried out by a statistical approach. Non-layered and layered clay minerals modified with the two-chain alkylammonium organic cation DHDDMA, and with single-chain organic cations octadecyltrimethylammonium (ODTMA) and hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY) were used as sorbents. The study indicated a significant linear regression between the distribution coefficients K(d) of fungicides and the organic carbon (OC) content of the organo clays (r(2)>or=0.80, pclays and their relative OC contents revealed higher increase in sorption for HDPY-clays (penconazole) and for ODTMA-clays (metalaxyl) pointing out different effectiveness of the OC provided by each organic cation. These effects were also supported by the values of K(d) relative to OC, K(d)(oc). The results evidenced the different relative weight of alkyl cations to make organo clays effective barriers to prevent the mobility of pesticides from a point source of pollution.

  7. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of Alfisols in two slope curvatures: III - spatial variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A good knowledge of the spatial distribution of clay minerals in the landscape facilitates the understanding of the influence of relief on the content and crystallographic attributes of soil minerals such as goethite, hematite, kaolinite and gibbsite. This study aimed at describing the relationships between the mineral properties of the clay fraction and landscape shapes by determining the mineral properties of goethite, hematite, kaolinite and gibbsite, and assessing their dependence and spatial variability, in two slope curvatures. To this end, two 100 × 100 m grids were used to establish a total of 121 regularly spaced georeferenced sampling nodes 10 m apart. Samples were collected from the layer 0.0-0.2 m and analysed for iron oxides, and kaolinite and gibbsite in the clay fraction. Minerals in the clay fraction were characterized from their X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, which were interpreted and used to calculate the width at half height (WHH and mean crystallite dimension (MCD of iron oxides, kaolinite, and gibbsite, as well as aluminium substitution and specific surface area (SSA in hematite and goethite. Additional calculations included the goethite and hematite contents, and the goethite/(goethite+hematite [Gt/(Gt+Hm] and kaolinite/(kaolinite+gibbsite [Kt/(Kt+Gb] ratios. Mineral properties were established by statistical analysis of the XRD data, and spatial dependence was assessed geostatistically. Mineralogical properties differed significantly between the convex area and concave area. The geostatistical analysis showed a greater number of mineralogical properties with spatial dependence and a higher range in the convex than in the concave area.

  8. Intensified Pozzolanic Reaction on Kaolinite Clay-Based Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hee Kwon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to develop and characterize kaolinite clay-based structural mortar. The pozzolanic reaction induced from two mineral additives, i.e., calcium hydroxide and silica fume (SF, and the physical filling effect from SF, were found to be effective on the enhancement of structural properties. Based on several preliminary experiments, 7:3 ratio of kaolinite clay/calcium hydroxide was selected as a basic binder. Then, the amount of SF was chosen as 0%, 7.5%, and 15% of the total binder to consider both the chemical and physical effects. The results showed that compressive strengths of samples with 7.5% and 15% SF are significantly increased by approximately 200% and 350%, respectively, at 28 days compared to the sample without SF. However, based on the results of the sample with 15% SF, it is found that excessive addition of SF causes long-term strength loss, possibly owing to micro cracks. With the careful consideration on this long-term behavior, this suggested new mix design can be further extended to develop sustainable structural materials using natural minerals or waste materials with nonbinding properties.

  9. Effect of steatite waste additions on the physical and mechanical properties of clay composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Hallak Panzera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mineral rock wastes are being widely investigated due to possible damage to the environment when discarded indiscriminately in the nature, but also because of their great potential as ceramic raw materials. This work aims to study the effect of steatite particle additions on the mechanical properties of clay composites. A comprehensive series of experiments have been conducted to assess the influence of: steatite particle size, steatite fraction and compacting pressure on the performance of clay composites. The composite of superior properties was manufactured with 20 wt. (% of steatite, 100-200 US-Tyler of steatite particle size and 30 MPa of compacting pressure.

  10. Experimental constraints on the relationship between clay abundance, clay fabric, and frictional behavior for the Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojatschke, Jasmaria; Scuderi, Marco M.; Warr, Laurence N.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Saffer, Demian; Marone, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The presence of smectite (saponite) in fault gouge from the Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, CA has been linked to low mechanical strength and aseismic slip. However, the precise relationship between clay mineral structure, fabric development, fault strength, and the stability of frictional sliding is not well understood. We address these questions through the integration of laboratory friction tests and FIB-SEM analysis of fault rock recovered from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole. Intact fault rock was compared with experimentally sheared fault gouge and different proportions of either quartz clasts or SAFOD clasts extracted from the sample. Nano-textural measurements show the development of localized clay particle alignment along shear folia developed within synthetic gouges; such slip planes have multiples of random distribution (MRD) values of 3.0-4.9. The MRD values measured are higher than previous estimates (MRD 1.5) that show lower degrees of shear localization and clay alignment averaged over larger volumes. The intact fault rock exhibits less well-developed nano-clay fabrics than the experimentally sheared materials, and MRD values decrease with smectite content. We show that the abundance, strength, and shape of clasts all influence fabric evolution via strain localization: quartz clasts yield more strongly developed clay fabrics than serpentine-dominated SAFOD clasts. Our results suggest that (1) both clay abundance and the development of nano-scale fabrics play a role in fault zone weakening and (2) aseismic creep is promoted by slip along clay shears with >20 wt % smectite content and MRD values ≥2.7.

  11. Physicochemical characterization of organophilic clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL Messabeb-Ouali, A.; Benna-Zayani, M.; Kbir-Ariguib, N.; Trabelsi-Ayadi, M.

    2009-11-01

    Organophilic smectite were obtained by intercalation of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) in the interlayer space of a purified Tunisian sodic-smectite. The HDTMA amounts were varied from 0.5 to 3 times the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the purified clay. Adsorption isotherm shows a total adsorption of HDTMA by purified smectite when the quantity of salt is less or equal to 2 CEC. Beyond this value, adsorption becomes limited and tends to saturation. All organoclays were characterized by X-ray diffraction which shows an increase of the basal distance. Infrared spectroscopy and differential thermic and thermogravimetric analysis results confirm the intercalation HDTMA.

  12. Alteration, adsorption and nucleation processes on clay-water interfaces: Mechanisms for the retention of uranium by altered clay surfaces on the nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Michael; Legrand, Christine A.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2015-03-01