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Sample records for clay loam soil

  1. Assessment of fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in present study the fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil was investigated through its adsorption and leaching using hplc. Experimental results revealed that thiodicarb follows first order kinetic with rate constant value of 0.711 h-1 and equilibrium study showed that freundlich model was best fitted with multilayer adsorption capacity 3.749 mol/g and adsorption intensity 1.009. Therefore, adsorption of thiodicarb was multilayer, reversible and non-ideal. Leaching study has indicated intermediate mobility of thiodicarb with water due to its solubility, while field study showed the non-leacher nature. However both adsorption and leaching were heavily affected by soil characteristics. As the soil taken was sandy clay loam hence due to clay texture adsorption was higher because of vacant sites existing and greater surface area. For this the pesticide has remained adsorbed in above 20 cm soil layer as clearly seen from field study, minor amount was recorded in third layer of soil having 21-30 cm depth. The leached amount of thiodicarb in first and last part of water was 1.075 and 0.003 ng/ mu l. The general trend observed for adsorption in column and field soil was decreased downwards from 2.027 to 0.618 and 5.079 to 0.009 ng/mu l. (author)

  2. Assessment of Fate of Thiodicarb Pesticide in Sandy Clay Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bajeer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study the fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil was investigated through its adsorption and leaching using HPLC. Experimental results revealed that thiodicarb follows first order kinetic with rate constant value of 0.711 h-1 and equilibrium study showed that Freundlich model was best fitted with multilayer adsorption capacity 3.749 mol/g and adsorption intensity 1.009. Therefore, adsorption of thiodicarb was multilayer, reversible and non-ideal. Leaching study has indicated intermediate mobility of thiodicarb with water due to its solubility, while field study showed the non-leacher nature. However both adsorption and leaching were heavily affected by soil characteristics. As the soil taken was sandy clay loam hence due to clay texture adsorption was higher because of vacant sites existing and greater surface area. For this the pesticide has remained adsorbed in above 20 cm soil layer as clearly seen from field study, minor amount was recorded in third layer of soil having 21-30 cm depth. The leached amount of thiodicarb in first and last part of water was 1.075 and 0.003 ng/µl. The general trend observed for adsorption in column and field soil was decreased downwards from 2.027 to 0.618 and 5.079 to 0.009 ng/µl.

  3. Reactive Clay Minerals in a land use sequence of disturbed soils of the Belgian Loam Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Lucia; Vandevenne, Floor; Ronchi, Benedicta; Meire, Patrick; Govers, Gerard; Struyf, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Clay minerals play a key role in soil biogeochemistry. They can stabilize organic matter, improve water storage, increase cation exchange capacity of the soil (CEC) and lower nutrient leaching. Phytoliths - the biogenic silica bodies (BSi) deposited in cell walls of plants - are important Si pools in soil horizons due to their higher solubility compared to minerals. They provide the source of Si for plant uptake in short time scales, as litter dissolves within soils. In a recent study, we analyzed the BSi pool differences across a set of different land uses (forests, pastures, croplands) in 6 long-term disturbed (multiple centuries) soil sites in the Belgium Loam Belt. Results from a simultaneous chemical extraction in 0.5M NaOH of Si and Al, showed that soils were depleted in the BSi pool while showing high levels of reactive secondary clay minerals, mainly in the deeper horizons and especially in the forests and the croplands. During the extraction, clays were similar in reactivity to the biogenic pool of phytoliths. In order to study the kinetics in a more natural environment, batch dissolution experiments were conducted. Samples from different soil depths for each land use site (0.5 g) were mixed with 0.5 L of demineralised water modified to pH 4, 7 and 10. Subsamples of 2 ml were taken during 3 months. In the end of the period, results for pH 7 showed that in the pastures, where reactive clays were almost absent, the ratio Si/RSi (defined as the Si concentration in the end of the batch experiment divided by the reactive silica extracted from the soil with the alkaline extraction) was lower than 0.005%. The same ratio was higher in the mineral horizons of forests (Si/RSi>0.01%) and croplands (0.005% < Si/RSi <0.01%) where clay minerals were the dominant fraction. These preliminary results highlight the clay minerals' strong potential for Si mobilization. More attention should be paid to this important fraction as it can contribute strongly to Si availability

  4. THE EFFECT OF MIXING WITH ORGANIC SOIL ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A COMPACTED CLAY LOAM SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah BARAN; BENDER, Damla; ÖZKAN, İlhami

    1996-01-01

    In this research, the effect of organic soil on changes in total pore space, aeration porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam were investigated. By adding organic soil at rates of 0 %, 1 %, 2 % and 4 % to soil, mixtures were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2, 0.21 kg/cm2, 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.95 kg/cm2 Some physical properties of compacted soil were determined. Compaction decreased total pore space, areation porosity, available water content...

  5. Performance Evaluation of Different Tillage Systems in a Clay Loam Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments were conducted to assess the performance of different tillage systems in a clay loam soil. A completely randomized block design with four treatments i.e., conventional tillage (CT), minimum tillage (MT), zero tillage (ZT) and controlled traffic farming (CTF) was carried out to evaluate the performance of tillage systems. Results indicated that the soil pulverization was higher (P<0.05) under MT and lower under CT treatments while, it was non-significant between MT and CTF treatments. Similarly, soil volume disturbed and effective ploughing depth was maximum (P<0.05) under CT followed by MT, CTF and minimum under ZT. Similarly the operating speed was significantly higher (P<0.05) under CTF and lower under CT whereas, wheel slippage/travel reduction was significantly minimum (P<0.05) under CTF and maximum under CT. Significantly, higher field capacity was recorded under CTF and lower (P<0.05) under CT. The maximum fuel consumption (P<0.05) was recorded under CT while it was minimum under ZT. Almost similar trends were observed for all parameters in 2012 and 2013. The results suggested that the control traffic system was more efficient tillage system in terms of soil pulverization, operating speed, travel reduction and over all field capacity. While, zero tillage had minimum fuel consumption and conventional tillage had higher working depth hence, more soil volume was disturbed under this treatment. (author)

  6. Hydrological properties of a clay loam soil after long-term cattle manure application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J J; Sweetland, N J; Chang, C

    2002-01-01

    Limited information exists on the effect of long-term application of beef cattle (Bos taurus) manure on soil hydrological properties in the Great Plains region of North America. A site on a clay loam soil (Typic Haploboroll) was used to examine the effect of manure addition on selected soil hydrological properties in 1997 and 1998. The manure was annually applied in the fall for 24 yr at one, two, and three times the recommended rates (in 1973) under dryland (0, 30, 60, and 90 Mg ha(-1) wet basis) and irrigation (0, 60, 120, and 180 Mg ha(-1)). Manure significantly (P soil water retention (0-5 and 10-15 cm) by 5 to 48% compared with the control at most potentials between 0 and -1500 kPa. Field soil water content (0-5 and 10-15 cm) was increased by 10 to 22% in the summers of 1997 and 1998. Manure increased ponded infiltration by more than 200% at 90 Mg ha(-1) under dryland (1998) and at rates > or = 120 Mg ha(-1) under irrigation (1997). Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) of surface soil (1-cm depth) was significantly increased by 76 to 128% under dryland (1998) and irrigation (1997), as were number of pores > 1120 microm in diameter (37-128% increase). In contrast, manure rate had little or no effect on unsaturated hydraulic conductivity [K(psi)] values (-0.3, -0.5, -0.7, and -1.0 kPa) in 1997 and 1998. Overall, soil hydrological parameters generally had a neutral or positive response to 24 yr of annual manure addition. PMID:12026104

  7. THE EFFECT OF MIXING WITH ORGANIC SOIL ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A COMPACTED CLAY LOAM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah BARAN

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of organic soil on changes in total pore space, aeration porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam were investigated. By adding organic soil at rates of 0 %, 1 %, 2 % and 4 % to soil, mixtures were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2, 0.21 kg/cm2, 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.95 kg/cm2 Some physical properties of compacted soil were determined. Compaction decreased total pore space, areation porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity, but in samples with the mixing rate of 4 %, all properties inspected were affected positively in all compaction levels, except available water content

  8. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT COMPACTION DURATIONS ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A CLAY LOAM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damla BENDER

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different compaction durations on changes of total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam soil were investigated. Soil samples were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2 , 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.00 kg/cm2 for 1, 2 and 4 minutes, then, above mentioned physical properties of soil samples were determined. Total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity of soil samples were not significantly affected from the compaction durations, but significantly decreased with increasing compaction levels.

  9. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT COMPACTION DURATIONS ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A CLAY LOAM SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    BENDER, Damla; Abdullah BARAN; ÖZKAN, İlhami

    1997-01-01

    In this research, the effect of different compaction durations on changes of total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam soil were investigated. Soil samples were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2 , 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.00 kg/cm2 for 1, 2 and 4 minutes, then, above mentioned physical properties of soil samples were determined. Total pore spaces, available water content, aeration porosity and hydraulic conductivity ...

  10. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    OpenAIRE

    EL-Hefnawy, Mohamed E.; Selim, Elmetwaly M.; Assaad, Faiz F.; Ismail, Ali I.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0....

  11. Soil moisture distribution over time in a clay loam soil in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Nishori; Besnik Gjongecaj; Deme Abazi

    2013-01-01

    Studying the soil moisture distribution over time in a given soil profile is the object of the present study. The way the soil moisture gets distributed over soil profile depends particularly on the soil texture and on the soil suction gradients developed. However, it changes continuously over time for a given soil depth. The method of determining the soil moisture distribution over time is based on the measuring of soil moisture suctions developed and the soil moisture contents in various ti...

  12. Investigating the Effect of Three Nitrate Fertilizers on Nitrate Leaching under the Root Zone in Clay Loam Soil

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    Thamer A. Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Nitrogen fertilizer is recognized as an important factor in crop’s yield level, however more application of N fertilizers in the soil have some adverse effects on environment and especially on ground water contamination. Perception and recognition the factors influencing nitrate transport through soil profile is helpful for fertilizer management to minimize adverse impacts on environment and nitrate leaching below the root zone. Approach: In this study, 9 large cylindrical lysimeters with 1 m height and 0.5 m diameter were filled with clay loam soil and planted with maize to investigate nitrate leaching under different types of N-fertilizer, chemical fertilizer, activated sludge and organic manure. Nitrate concentration in the soil and drainage water samples were analyzed by spectrophotometer method and the mass of nitrate was calculated in soil and drainage water. Crop productions for different treatments were compared too. Results: Results showed that cumulative mass of nitrate leaching from organic fertilizer was greater than the other treatments (229 kg ha-1. Organic manure had the greatest nitrate accumulation in soil (15.17 mg kg-1, which was significantly greater than chemical fertilizer. Conclusions/Recommendations: experimental results showed that manure application could result in NO3--N accumulation increase in the deeper soil profiles compared with activated sludge. Results showed that maize production was significantly higher under activated sludge fertilizer. Observations made in the current study suggested activated sludge fertilizer due to a higher crop production with same level of ground water contamination, especially in clay loam soils.

  13. Short-term Effects of Tillage Practices on Organic Carbon in Clay Loam Soil of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A tillage experiment, consisting of moldboard plow (MP), ridge tillage (RT), and no-tillage (NT), was performed in a randomized complete block design with four replicates to study the effect of 3-year tillage management on SOC content and its distribution in surface layer (30 cm) of a clay loam soil in northeast China. NT did not lead to significant increase of SOC in topsoil (0-5 cm) compared with MP and RT; however, the SOC content in NT soil was remarkably reduced at a depth of 5-20 cm. Accordingly, short-term (3-year) NT management tended to stratify SOC concentration, but not necessarily increase its storage in the plow layer for the soil.

  14. Soil moisture distribution over time in a clay loam soil in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Nishori

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Studying the soil moisture distribution over time in a given soil profile is the object of the present study. The way the soil moisture gets distributed over soil profile depends particularly on the soil texture and on the soil suction gradients developed. However, it changes continuously over time for a given soil depth. The method of determining the soil moisture distribution over time is based on the measuring of soil moisture suctions developed and the soil moisture contents in various times, but in a given soil depth (internal drainage method [7]. The soil depths under investigation are four, starting from 0cm to 60cm, which means that the most important depth of soil profile is considered. Such measurements are supposed to be done over soil profile when the soil water flow is already ceased, in the conditions of preventing the evaporation [1, 7, and 9]. Therefore, to determine the soil moisture distribution over time, a plot of 8m x 6m or 48 m2 with no plants was set. The tensiometers and the electronic devices for soil moisture content measurements were installed in four soil depths. The plot was previously wetted and covered by a plastic to prevent the evaporation. In this way, it was made sure that the only possibility for water is to move internally, which gave us the opportunity to measure the changes in soil water content and in soil water suction over time. The final result showed that the dependency of soil water suction and soil moisture content over time is a power function (expressed as a semi logarithmic function, basically.

  15. The influence of clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Getahun, Gizachew Tarekegn; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Schjønning, Per

    2016-01-01

    Tillage and residue management influence soil organic carbon (SOC) and lead to changes in soil physical behav-iour and functioning. We examined the effect of the clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management. Soil...... and DD and MP soil at 10–20 cm, while MP was higher than DD at 10–20 cm depth (p b 0.05). However, there was no difference in the effect of the contrasting tillage manage-ments on carbon sequestration when an equivalent soil mass and the entire topsoil layer were considered. In the top 10 cm soil, DD...... was sampled at the 0–10, 10–20 and 25–30 cm depths of a sandy loam soil at Flakkebjerg, Denmark in 2013. We used the experimental plots of a long-term field experiment with mouldboard ploughing (MP) and direct drilling (DD) treatments. The residue management included straw removal (−S) and straw retention (+S...

  16. Effect of blade vibration on mulch tillage performance under silt clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Goudarzi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mulch tillage system is an intermediate system which covers some of disadvantages of no tillage and conventional tillage systems. In farms in which tillage is done with a chisel plow, runoff and soil erosion have a less important relation to moldboard and disk plow and naturally absorption of rainfall will be developed. Thus, the mulch tillage system is an appropriate alternative to conventional tillage and no tillage (Backingham and Pauli, 1993. The unwanted vibration in machinery and industry mainly processes most harmful factors, for example: bearing wear, cracking and loosening joints. And noise is produced in electrical systems by creating a short circuit (Wok, 2011. Self-induced and induced vibration are used in tillage systems. Induced vibration is created by energy consumption and self-induced vibration is created by collision among the blades and soil at the shank (Soeharsono and Setiawan, 2010. A study by Mohammadi-gol et al. (2005 was conducted. It was found that on the disk plow, plant residues maintained on the soil are more than that of moldboard plow. 99% frequency and amplitude, speed and rack angle of blade directly affect soil inversion and indirectly affect preservation of crop residue on the soil. The effect of vibration frequency and rack angle of blade to reduce the tensile strength is also clear. Moreover, in contrast to previous studies when speed progressing is less than (λ, not only the relative speed (λ, but also frequency can reduce the tensile strength (Beiranvand and Shahgoli, 2010; Awad-Allah et al., 2009. Therefore, aim of this study was to determine the effect of vibration and the speed of tillage on soil parameters and drawbar power in using electric power. Materials and Methods: To perform this test, three different modes of vibration (fixed, variable and induced vibration and two levels of speed in real terms at a depth of 20 cm were used for farming. The test was performed with a split plot

  17. Fingerlike wetting patterns in two water-repellent loam soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    In soils with fingered flow, surface-applied solutes can reach the groundwater more rapidly than in the case of homogeneous wetting. This study was undertaken to demonstrate the occurrence of finger-like wetting patterns in a silt loam soil and a silty clay loam soil, and to investigate the influenc

  18. Rainfall kinetic energy controlling erosion processes and sediment sorting on steep hillslopes: A case study of clay loam soil from the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Shi, Z. H.; Wang, J.; Fang, N. F.; Wu, G. L.; Zhang, H. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy (KE) can break down aggregates in the soil surface. A better understanding of sediment sorting associated with various KEs is essential for the development and verification of soil erosion models. A clay loam soil was used in the experiments. Six KEs were obtained (76, 90, 105, 160, 270, and 518 J m-2 h-1) by covering wire screens located above the soil surface with different apertures to change the size of raindrops falling on the soil surface, while maintaining the same rainfall intensity (90 ± 3.5 mm h-1). For each rainfall simulation, runoff and sediment were collected at 3-min intervals to investigate the temporal variation of the sediment particle size distribution (PSD). Comparison of the sediment effective PSD (undispersed) and ultimate PSD (dispersed) was used to investigate the detachment and transport mechanisms involved in sediment mobilization. The effective-ultimate ratios of clay-sized particles were less than 1, whereas that of sand-sized particles were greater than 1, suggesting that these particles were transported as aggregates. Under higher KE, the effective-ultimate ratios were much closer to 1, indicating that sediments were more likely transported as primary particles at higher KE owing to an increased severity of aggregate disaggregation for the clay loam soil. The percentage of clay-sized particles and the relative importance of suspension-saltation increased with increasing KE when KE was greater than 105 J m-2 h-1, while decreased with increasing KE when KE was less than 105 J m-2 h-1. A KE of 105 J m-2 h-1 appeared to be a threshold level beyond which the disintegration of aggregates was severe and the influence of KE on erosion processes and sediment sorting may change. Results of this study demonstrate the need for considering KE-influenced sediment transport when predicting erosion.

  19. Effects of Different Factors on Water Flow and Solute Transport Investigated by Time Domain Reflectometry in Sandy Clay Loam Field Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-09-01

    Factors affecting preferential flow and transport in the vadose zone need to be investigated by experiments and simulations to protect groundwater against surface applied chemicals. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of several factors (soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate) and their interactions on the extent of preferential flow and transport in a sandy clay loam field soil using the time domain reflectometry (TDR) for measuring SWC and electrical conductivity (EC) in 12 treatments, modeling (by HYDRUS-1D and VS2DTI) the measured SWC and EC, and conducting statistical tests for comparing the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) obtained by inversely fitting in the CXTFIT program. The study results showed that the applied solution moved faster in the undisturbed, wet initial SWC, and higher application rate experimental conditions than in the disturbed, dry initial SWC, and lower application rate, respectively, based on the analysis of the changes in TDR measured SWC and EC with depth at 1, 2, 5, and 15 h of the experiments. However, the effects of interactive factors or treatments on water flow and solute transport were not clear enough. The modeling results showed that HYDRUS-1D was better than VS2DTI in the estimation of EC and especially SWC, but overall the models had relatively low performances in the simulations. Statistical test results also showed that the treatments had different flow and transport characteristics because they were divided into different groups in terms of the means of SWC and EC and solute transport parameters. These results suggest that similar experiments with more distinct interactions and modeling studies with different approaches need to be considered for better understanding the complex flow and transport processes in the vadose zone. PMID:23002311

  20. Response of Soybean [Glycine Max (L. Merrill] to Lime Based Integrated Nutrient Management and Mulching on Nodulation, Nutrient Contents and Yield in Clay Loam Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Jain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was laid out in a randomized block design consisted of 6 treatments viz. (T1-Absolute control,(T2 -Farmer practice (50kg DAP/ha,(T3 RDF+ ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ Ammonium Molybdate 1.0g/kg seed+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha,(T4-RDF+ ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha +Rhizobium+PSB (@Each 5g/kg seed +Ammonium Molybdate 1.0g/kg seed,(T5-50%RDF+ ZnSO4@25 kg/ha +FYM 2.5 t/ha+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha + Rhizobium+PSB (@Each 5g/kg seed + Ammonium Molybdate 1.0g/kg seed + Mulching and(T6-50% RDF + ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ slacked lime@25 Kg Ca(OH 2 + Vermicompost 1.5t/ha + Rhizobium + *PSB (@Each 5g/kg seed + Ammonium Molybdate1.0g/kg seed + Mulching. Variety JS 95-60 was used under experimentation which was conducted in clay loam soil during kharif seasons of 2010, 2011 and 2012 at ZARS Khargone (M.P The effect of lime based integrated nutrient management and mulching on nodulation, its dry weight, nutrient contents in straw & seed at maturity and grain yield(kg/ha were found to increase significantly and beneficial due to the application of 50% RDF + ZnSO4@25 kg/ha+ slacked lime@25Kg Ca(OH 2 /ha + V.C. 1.5t/ha + B.F.+ A.M. + Mulching(T6 followed by treatment T4 and T5 ( Table 1 over other treatments.

  1. Polyacrylamide and water quality effects on infiltration in sandy loam soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ajwa, Husein A; Trout, T J

    2006-01-01

    Slow infiltration rates constrain effective and economical irrigation in some sandy loam soils in California. Polyacrylamide (PAM) has increased soil infiltration in some areas, especially in soils high in clay or silt. Field trials near Fresno, CA, with PAM failed to show improved infiltration. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate PAM effect on infiltration of various quality waters in sandy loam soils. Two formulations of a high molecular weight PAM, a liquid emulsion and a ...

  2. Phosphorus leaching from loamy sand and clay loam topsoils after application of pig slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian; Aronsson, Helena; Bergström, Lars; Sharpley, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate management of animal waste is essential for guaranteeing good water quality. A laboratory leaching study with intact soil columns was performed to investigate the risk of phosphorus (P) leaching from a clay loam and a loamy sand. The columns (0.2 m deep) were irrigated before and after application of pig slurry on the surface or after incorporation, or application of mineral P, each at a rate of 30 kg P ha-1. The two soils had different initial P contents (i.e. the ammonium lactat...

  3. Gardening in Clay Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Katie; Kuhns, Michael; Cardon, Grant

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet covers the basics of clay, silt and sand soils with an emphasis on gardening in soils with a high clay content. It includes information on the composition of clay soils, gardening tips for managing clay soils, and the types of plants that grow best in clay soils.

  4. New way of measurement of thermophysical properties of clay loam materials by transient methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boháč, Vlastimil; Dieška, Peter; Vretenár, Viliam; Lukáč, Vladimír

    2016-07-01

    The problem of the measurement of clay loam materials in plastic consistency is more or less difficult as they can change the shape during the long time measurements. The specimen thickness is expected as the constant during all the experiment measured by transient pulse method. In a case of plastic clay loam, it can change the form during the measurement because of the squeeze of the material even under the gravity condition. Thus the specimen surface wall should be reinforced by special dimensionally well-defined thin wall container. In this paper the special container in a form of thin tube rings bounded by central annular ring was constructed and used for the measurements. The heat source was inserted into the tube rings through the nozzle in the middle part and the thermocouple was inserted through the drilled openings at defined distance from the heat source. System clamped the heat source together with the rings at desired distance from the thermocouple. This distance represents the thickness of tested specimen. The soft plastic material fill the inner space of tube rings in such a way to fulfill the geometry conditions for this method. The need of soft clay loam material measurement is to test its thermal properties because of the interest to use it as the heat storage material below the buildings. The measured clay loam containing some moisture has quite high values of specific heat and thus the use of it as the heat storage material is promising.

  5. Surface Runoff of Pesticides from a Clay Loam Field in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsbo, Mats; Sandin, Maria; Jarvis, Nick; Etana, Ararso; Kreuger, Jenny

    2016-07-01

    Pesticides stored at or close to the soil surface after field application can be mobilized and transported off the field when surface runoff occurs. The objective of our study was to quantify the potential pesticide losses in surface runoff from a conventionally managed agricultural field in a Swedish climate. This was achieved by measuring surface runoff volumes and concentrations in runoff of six spring-applied pesticides and autumn-applied glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). Measurements were performed for 3 yr both during the growing seasons and during intervening winter snowmelt periods on a clay loam field close to Uppsala. During growing seasons, surface runoff was generated on only five occasions during one 25-d period in 2012 when the infiltration capacity of the soil may have been reduced by structural degradation due to large cumulative rainfall amounts after harrowing. Concentrations in surface runoff exceeded Swedish water quality standards in all samples during this growing season for diflufenican and pirimicarb. Surface runoff was generated during three snowmelt periods during the winter of 2012-2013. All of the applied pesticides were found in snowmelt samples despite incorporation of residues by autumn plowing, degradation, and leaching into the soil profile during the period between spraying and sampling. Concentrations of glyphosate ranged from 0.12 to 7.4 μg L, and concentrations of AMPA ranged from 0 to 2.7 μg L. Our results indicate that temporal changes in hydraulic properties during the growing season and when the soil freezes during winter affect pesticide losses through surface runoff. PMID:27380086

  6. Hidráulica do escoamento e transporte de sedimentos em sulcos em solo franco-argilo-arenoso Flow hydraulics and sediment transport in rills of a sandy clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramon Barros Cantalice

    2005-07-01

    capacity to deform the rill and alter flow hydraulics, responsible for rill formation dynamics. The objective of this study was to evaluate flow hydraulic conditions that can provide important information on erosion relationships, soil erodibility and sediment transport in furrows of a recently-tilled Palleudult. Rills were pre-formed in a sandy clay loam soil with an average slope of 0.067 m m-1. Simulated rainfall with an intensity of 74 mm h-1 was applied during 80 min, while rainfall and extra inflows of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 L min-1 were jointly applied for the last 20 min of each run in the rill. Results indicated that the rill flow regime varied from transitional subcritical to turbulent subcritical. The rill erosion detachment rates were linear to shear stress. Rill erodibility (Kr was 0.0024 kg-1 s-1 N and critical shear stress (tauc was 2.75 Pa. Two functions to predict sediment transport based on stream power explained 53% of data variability, which indicates the inherent difficulty of predicting solid transport through shallow flows on eroding agricultural lands, and the physical and mineralogical diversity of particles and aggregates of the studied soil.

  7. Escoamento superficial e desagregação do solo em entressulcos em solo franco-argilo-arenoso com resíduos vegetais Interrill surface runoff and soil detachment on a sandy clay loam soil with residue cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elemar Antonino Cassol

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A presença de resíduos vegetais sobre a superfície do solo altera as características do escoamento superficial gerado pela chuva e a desagregação e transporte de sedimento resultantes do processo erosivo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as condições hidráulicas e as relações de desagregação do solo e de resistência ao escoamento com a presença de resíduos vegetais na erosão em entressulcos. O experimento foi realizado no laboratório, com um Argissolo Vermelho distrófico típico, em parcelas com 0,10 m m-1 de declive sob chuva simulada. O solo foi coberto por resíduos vegetais de palha de soja, nas doses de 0, 0,05, 0,1, 0,2, 0,4 e 0,8 kg m-2. O aumento na cobertura do solo (CS com resíduos vegetais elevou a altura da lâmina de escoamento e a rugosidade hidráulica e reduziu a velocidade média do escoamento, provocada pelo aumento das forças viscosas promovida pela interposição física dos resíduos ao escoamento. O resultado é a redução na taxa de desagregação do solo (Di. A Di foi de 5,35x10-4 kg m-2 s-1 para solo descoberto e 1,50x10-5 kg m-2 s-1 em solo com 100% de cobertura na maior dose de palha. Os modelos de Laflen e potencial foram adequados para estimar o coeficiente de cobertura para resíduo em contato direto com a superfície do solo em função da cobertura do solo.Soil surface cover with crop residue modifies surface flow characteristics, generated by excess rainfall, and soil detachment and sediment transport resulting from the erosion process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hydraulic conditions, detachment and flow resistance on interrill erosion on soil covered with residue. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory, on a Hapludult soil at a slope of 0.10 m m-1, under simulated rainfall and soil surface covered with soybean residue at the rates of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 kg m-2. The increase in soil surface cover (SC with residue, caused an increase in water flow

  8. Distribución de la porosidad de un suelo franco arcilloso (alfisol en condiciones semiáridas después de 15 años bajo siembra directa Soil porosity distribution of a clay loam soil (alfisol in semi-arid conditions after 15 years under direct drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Isabel Cerisola

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un estudio más amplio sobre evolución de las propiedades físicas de un suelo sometido a tres sistemas de labranza, se realizó, en dos campañas consecutivas, un seguimiento de la distribución de la porosidad del suelo según su origen, en parcelas cultivadas bajo siembra directa continua durante 15 años. En el ensayo se consideró un trayecto de 2 metros de longitud, perpendicular a la dirección de las labores, donde se realizaron mediciones de densidad aparente seca y contenido de humedad. El cultivo extensivo de secano (cereal, en cada una de las dos campañas, fue cebada de ciclo corto y de ciclo largo. El calendario de la toma de datos de las variables medidas se fijó en 5 fechas por campaña. La porosidad estructural del suelo, debida principalmente a la alternancia de ciclos de humectación - desecación, fue calculada cada 5 cm y hasta 35 cm de profundidad. Este proceso de fisuración natural resulta suficiente para asegurar un buen drenaje y facilitar el desarrollo radicular de las plantas, siempre y cuando el contenido de humedad se mantenga dentro de la capacidad de retención de agua.On a long-term essay under direct drilling, the evolution of the physical properties of a clay loam soil, such as distribution by origin of soil porosity, has been assessed during two growing seasons. The cereal crops in each growing seasons were spring barley and winter barley, respectively. Soil physical properties were measured on a 2 m length transect located in a perpendicular line to the direction of vehicular traffic for field operations. Five sampling opportunities, within crop cycle, were used to measure the variables. Structural soil porosity, due principally to shrinkage and swelling cycles, was assessed in the 0 to 35 cm depth soil profile. This natural process seemed to be sufficient to guarantee good drainage and normal crop development, unless in the moisture content range included in field capacity.

  9. Aggregate water stability of sandy and clayey loam soils differently compacted with and without wheat plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzoffi P.; Balashov E.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of our studies were to: 1) estimate the effects of compaction of sandy loam and clayey loam soils on growth parameters of winter wheat plants, 2) evaluate the resilien- ce capacity of the root system for the water-stable aggregation of compacted soils. Soil samples at field capacity were placed into pots with an initial bulk density of 1.2 Mg m-3 and compacted with ground contact pressures of 51, 103 and 154 kPa using a hydraulic compressor. Five plants in each pot were allowed...

  10. Soil resistance and resilience to mechanical stresses for three differently managed sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per;

    2012-01-01

    -water potentials than the MCC and CCC soils possibly due to higher biotic binding of soil particles by the greater organic carbon content. The water dispersible claywas negatively correlatedwith the level of clay saturation by organic carbon. The resistance of the soils to compaction, quantified by both......To improve our understanding of how clay-organic carbon dynamics affect soil aggregate strength and physical resilience, we selected three nearby soils (MFC,Mixed Forage Cropping; MCC,Mixed Cash Cropping; CCC, Cereal Cash Cropping)with identical clay content and increasing contents of organic...... carbon (CCCresistance and resilience of the three soils to compaction using air permeability (ka), void ratio (e) and air-filled porosity (ε) as functional indicators and to characterise aggregate stability, strength and friability. Aggregate tensile strength...

  11. Clay dispersibility and soil friability – testing the soil clay-to-carbon saturation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L. W.; Munkholm, L.J.; P. Moldrup; B. T. Christensen; Olesen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled three years in a field varying in clay content (~100 to ~220 g kg-1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay ...

  12. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  13. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Mahmood; Haki E. Yassen

    2013-01-01

    Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region). Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water cont...

  14. Feasibility of on-site bioremediation of loam soil contaminated by diesel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H; Narkis, N

    2001-09-01

    This study originated from an accidental event of diesel oil contamination in a loam soil area of 7,000 m2. Approximately a volume of 1,300 m3 of diesel oil was released into the environment. Reclamation of the contaminated soil by on-site bioremediation was selected as the most appropriate treatment method. A major concern was associated with the nature of the local loam soil. Loam has a very low hydraulic conductivity and very quickly becomes impermeable after its contact with water. The bioremediation approach incorporated excavation of the contaminated soil, mixing it with an agent, which increased its permeability. Following this preliminary treatment came the construction of bioreactors as a suitable environment of nutrients, moisture, dissolved oxygen, and enriched culture of microorganisms, which enabled breakdown of the diesel oil. This case study indicated that the target of 99% of diesel oil clean up could be achieved by using the technology of on-site bioremediation. The selected treatment method was found to be technologically and economically feasible. However, some improvement in the application of the basic treatment approach might increase the bioremediation efficiency. PMID:11597113

  15. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region. Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water content of the soil and spacing between two adjacent dripping sources with different flow rate on the movement of the wetting front.This study included 16 tests for monitoring the advancement of the wetting front with time during and after the water application phase. The water advance and water distribution measurement are carried out for two cases of the soil profile: for the first case with initial volumetric water content of 4.08% and for the second case with initial volumetric water content of 12.24%. Two spacing between the emitter were tested 25cm and 50 cm using application flow rates of 0.606, 1.212, 1.818, and 2.424 cm3 /min/cm to show the combined effect of spacing and flow rate on the performance of two adjacent emitter.The study proposed a method for determining the spacing between the two emitting sources , the water application rate and watering time. The proposed method depends on a wetted zone whose depth is equal to the root zone depth with a values equals to the maximum vertical advance of the wetting front underneath the drip line at time when this depth is equal to the depth of wetting at mid­point between the drip line. the study revealed that both the vertical water advance in soil underneath the emitter and the horizontal advance of the wetting front is larger than those in the case of single emitter.Furthermore, the vertical water advance increases with the decrease spacing between the two drip lines. Also, the horizontal advance of the

  16. Effect of Injecting Hydrogen Peroxide into Heavy Clay Loam Soil on Plant Water Status, NET CO2 Assimilation, Biomass, and Vascular Anatomy of Avocado Trees Efecto de la Inyección de Peróxido de Hidrógeno en Suelo Franco Arcilloso Pesado, sobre el Estado Hídrico, Asimilación Neta de CO2, Biomasa y Anatomía Vascular de Paltos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M Gil M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In Chile, avocado (Persea americana Mill. orchards are often located in poorly drained, low-oxygen soils, situation which limits fruit production and quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of injecting soil with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as a source of molecular oxygen, on plant water status, net CO2 assimilation, biomass and anatomy of avocado trees set in clay loam soil with water content maintained at field capacity. Three-year-old ‘Hass’ avocado trees were planted outdoors in containers filled with heavy loam clay soil with moisture content sustained at field capacity. Plants were divided into two treatments, (a H2O2 injected into the soil through subsurface drip irrigation and (b soil with no H2O2 added (control. Stem and root vascular anatomical characteristics were determined for plants in each treatment in addition to physical soil characteristics, net CO2 assimilation (A, transpiration (T, stomatal conductance (gs, stem water potential (SWP, shoot and root biomass, water use efficiency (plant biomass per water applied [WUEb]. Injecting H2O2 into the soil significantly increased the biomass of the aerial portions of the plant and WUEb, but had no significant effect on measured A, T, gs, or SWP. Xylem vessel diameter and xylem/phloem ratio tended to be greater for trees in soil injected with H2O2 than for controls. The increased biomass of the aerial portions of plants in treated soil indicates that injecting H2O2 into heavy loam clay soils may be a useful management tool in poorly aerated soil.En Chile, los huertos de palto (Persea americana Mill. se ubican comúnmente en suelos pobremente drenados con bajo contenido de oxígeno, lo que limita producción y calidad de fruta. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de la inyección de peróxido de hidrógeno (H2O2 al suelo como fuente de O2, sobre el estado hídrico, asimilación de CO2, biomasa y anatomía de paltos en suelo franco arcilloso con

  17. Effect of biochar on aerobic processes, enzyme activity, and crop yields in two sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Bruun, Esben; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2014-01-01

    of wood-based biochar on soil respiration, water contents, potential ammonia oxidation (PAO), arylsulfatase activity (ASA), and crop yields at two temperate sandy loam soils under realistic field conditions. In situ soil respiration, PAO, and ASA were not significantly different in quadruplicate field......Biochar added to agricultural soils may sequester carbon and improve physico-chemical conditions for crop growth, due to effects such as increased water and nutrient retention in the root zone. The effects of biochar on soil microbiological properties are less certain. We addressed the effects...... plots with or without biochar (20 Mg ha−1); however, in the same plots, volumetric water contents increased by 7.5 % due to biochar (P = 0.007). Crop yields (oat) were not significantly different in the first year after biochar application, but in the second year, total yields of spring barley increased...

  18. A Bioassay Technique to Study Clomazone Residues in Sandy Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Gajić Umiljendić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A bioassay test was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of maize, sunflower and barley toclomazone residues in sandy loam soil. Clomazone was applied at different rates from 0.12 to12 mg a.i./kg of soil. The parameters measured 14 days after treatment were: shoot height, freshand dry weight, and content of pigments (carotenoids, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b. Theresults showed that the lowest clomazone concentration caused a significant reduction in allmeasured parameters for barley and sunflower shoots. Fresh weight of maize shoots was notsensitive to clomazone residual activity in soil while the other parameters were highly inhibited.Nomenclature: clomazone (2-(2-chlorbenzyl-4,4-dimethyl-1,2-oxazolidin-3-one, maize(Zea mays L., sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

  19. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity from percolation test results in layered silt loam soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabro, Jay D

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of the study discussed in this article were to develop an empirical relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of layered soils and their percolation times (PT) in order to understand the influence of individual layers and compare this with the equations developed by Winneberger (1974) and Fritton, Ratvasky, and Petersen (1986). Field research was conducted on three silt loam soils. Six holes were spaced evenly in two parallel rows of three holes. The Ks was measured at three different layers for each soil using a constant head well permeameter. After completion of the second Ks measurement, the percolation test was conducted. Three linear equations for the upper, middle, and lower layers were developed between the Ks values of each individual layer in all three sites and the corresponding PT. Significant differences were found between the author's results and those predicted by Winneberger (1974) and Fritton and co-authors (1986). PMID:20063609

  20. Determining hydraulic properties of a loam soil by alternative infiltrometer techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, Vincenzo; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Di Prima, Simone; Iovino, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Testing alternative infiltrometer techniques to determine soil hydraulic properties is necessary for specific soil types. For a loam soil, the water retention and hydraulic conductivity values predicted by the BEST (Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer parameters) procedure of soil hydraulic characterization were compared with data collected by more standard laboratory and field techniques. In addition, six infiltrometer techniques were compared in terms of estimated saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, Ks. The BEST-intercept algorithm with a saturated soil water content set at 76% of the porosity yielded water retention values statistically similar to those obtained in the laboratory and Ks values practically coinciding with those determined in the field with the pressure infiltrometer (PI) since the means differed by a negligible 1.9%. The unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity measured with the tension infiltrometer (TI) was reproduced satisfactorily by BEST only close to saturation, i.e. for an established pressure head of -10 mm. BEST, the PI, one-potential experiments with both the TI and the mini disk infiltrometer (MDI), the simplified falling head (SFH) technique and the bottomless bucket (BB) method yielded statistically similar estimates of Ks for the sampled area, differing at the most by a factor of three. The suggestion was that smaller values were obtained with longer and more soil-disturbing infiltration runs. In conclusion, an applicative scenario of BEST yielding good predictions of water retention and saturated or near-saturated hydrodynamic parameters was suggested for the sampled loam soil. Any of the tested infiltration techniques appears usable to obtain the order of magnitude of Ks at the field site but the TI, MDI and SFH data seem more representative of a dry, non-disturbed soil whereas the BEST, BB and PI data appear more appropriate to characterize a wet soil at some stage during a rainfall event. Additional investigations carried out

  1. Bulk density, water content and hydraulic properties of a sandy loam soil following conventional or strip tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the effects of conventional (CT) and strip (ST) tillage practices on bulk density ('b), water content ('w), infiltration rate (Ir) and hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of plots in a Lihen sandy loam soil during the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons. We measured 'b and 'w using soil cores collect...

  2. Tillage Effects on Bulk Density and Hydraulic Properties of a Sandy Loam Soil in the Mon-Dak Region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the effects of conventional (CT) and strip (ST) tillage practices on bulk density (BD), water content (MC), infiltration rate (Ir) and hydraulic conductivity (Ks) in a Lihen sandy loam soil. Soil cores were collected from each plot at 0 to 10 and 10 to 30 cm depths under each tillage pr...

  3. Phytotoxicity and uptake of nitroglycerin in a natural sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Kuperman, Roman G; Dodard, Sabine G; Sarrazin, Manon; Savard, Kathleen; Paquet, Louise; Hawari, Jalal; Checkai, Ronald T; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2011-11-15

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is widely used for the production of explosives and solid propellants, and is a soil contaminant of concern at some military training ranges. NG phytotoxicity data reported in the literature cannot be applied directly to development of ecotoxicological benchmarks for plant exposures in soil because they were determined in studies using hydroponic media, cell cultures, and transgenic plants. Toxicities of NG in the present studies were evaluated for alfalfa (Medicago sativa), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) exposed to NG in Sassafras sandy loam soil. Uptake and degradation of NG were also evaluated in ryegrass. The median effective concentration values for shoot growth ranged from 40 to 231 mg kg(-1) in studies with NG freshly amended in soil, and from 23 to 185 mg kg(-1) in studies with NG weathered-and-aged in soil. Weathering-and-aging NG in soil did not significantly affect the toxicity based on 95% confidence intervals for either seedling emergence or plant growth endpoints. Uptake studies revealed that NG was not accumulated in ryegrass but was transformed into dinitroglycerin in the soil and roots, and was subsequently translocated into the ryegrass shoots. The highest bioconcentration factors for dinitroglycerin of 685 and 40 were determined for roots and shoots, respectively. Results of these studies will improve our understanding of toxicity and bioconcentration of NG in terrestrial plants and will contribute to ecological risk assessment of NG-contaminated sites.

  4. Leaching and ponding of viral contaminants following land application of biosolids on sandy-loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin; Harrigan, Tim; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2012-12-15

    Much of the land available for application of biosolids is cropland near urban areas. Biosolids are often applied on hay or grassland during the growing season or on corn ground before planting or after harvest in the fall. In this study, mesophilic anaerobic digested (MAD) biosolids were applied at 56,000 L/ha on a sandy-loam soil over large containment lysimeters seeded to perennial covers of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), or planted annually to maize (Zea mays L.). Portable rainfall simulators were to maintain the lysimeters under a nearly saturated (90%, volumetric basis) conditions. Lysimeter leachate and surface ponded water samples were collected and analyzed for somatic phage, adenoviruses, and anionic (chloride) and microbial (P-22 bacteriophage) tracers. Neither adenovirus nor somatic phage was recovered from the leachate samples. P-22 bacteriophage was found in the leachate of three lysimeters (removal rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.2 log(10)/m). Although the peak of the anionic tracer breakthrough occurred at a similar pore volume in each lysimeter (around 0.3 pore volume) the peak of P-22 breakthrough varied between lysimeters (preferential flow paths, presumably from soil cracks, root channels, worm holes or other natural phenomena. The concentration of viral contaminants collected in ponded surface water ranged from 1 to 10% of the initial concentration in the applied biosolids. The die off of somatic phage and P-22 in the surface water was fit to a first order decay model and somatic phage reached background level at about day ten. In conclusion, sandy-loam soils can effectively remove/adsorb the indigenous viruses leached from the land-applied biosolids, but there is a potential of viral pollution from runoff following significant rainfall events when biosolids remain on the soil surface. PMID:22885066

  5. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Khaldoun; P. Moller; A. Fall; G. Wegdam; B. de Leeuw; Y. Méheust; J.O. Fossum; D. Bonn

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay s

  6. Depth distribution of preferential flow patterns in a sandy loam soil as affected by tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Petersen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-tracer studies using the anionic dye Brilliant Blue FCF were conducted on a structured sandy loam soil (Typic Agrudalf. 25 mm of dye solution was applied to the surface of 11 1.6 x 1.6 m field plots, some of which had been subjected to conventional seed bed preparation (harrowing while others had been rotovated to either 5 or 15 cm depth before sowing. The soil was excavated to about 160 cm depth one or two days after dye application. Flow patterns and structural features appearing on vertical or horizontal cross sections were examined and photographed. The flow patterns were digitized, and depth functions for the number of activated flow pathways and the degree of dye coverage were calculated. Dye was found below 100 cm depth on 26 out of 33 vertical cross sections made in conventionally tilled plots showing that preferential flow was a prevailing phenomenon. The depth-averaged number of stained flow pathways in the 25-100 cm layer was significantly smaller in a plot rotovated to 5 cm depth than in a conventionally tilled plot, both under relatively dry initial soil conditions and when the entire soil profiles were initially at field capacity. There were no examples of dye penetration below 25 cm depth one month after deep rotovation. Distinct horizontal structures in flow patterns appearing at 20-40 cm depth coupled with changes in flow domains indicated soil layering with abrupt changes in soil structure and hydraulic properties.

  7. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. Imazaquin degradation and metabolism in a sandy loam soil amended with farm litters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Imazaquin applied in legume crops has a long residual time in soil,which often impacts safety of the susceptible crops.To increase safety of imazaquin application,two composted litters,bovine manure (BM) and chicken manure (CM),were used to determine their effects on imazaquin environmental behavior by incorporating each kind of manure into the tested sandy loam soil at 10% (w/w).The degradation of imazaquin in BM- and CM-amended soil was about 2.4 and 1.5 times,respectively,faster than that in unamended soil.The half-lives of imazaquin in BM-amended soil varied between 6.7 and 15.4 d over the temperature range of 20 to 40℃,and the degradation rate constant (k) increased by a factor of about 1.5 for every 10℃ change.Higher mix ratio did not significantly increase the degradation,and the optimal active degradation of imazaquin was observed approximately at the mix ratio of 10:1 of soil to BM.The different moisture levels had negligible effect on imazaquin degradation.In both unamended and BM-amended treatments.two metabolites were observed at 5,10 and 30 d after treatment.One metabolite at retention time (RT) of 8.4 min was identified as 2-(4-hydroxyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-y1) quinoline acid,originating from the loss of isopropyl group and hydroxylation at the 4-position of imidazolinone ring.The other at RT of 12.9 min was identified as quinolinc-2,3-dicarboxylic anhydride,resulting from detachment of imidazolinone ring and the forming of dicarboxylic anhydride.This finding suggested that the addition of farm litters into soil might be a good management option since it can not only increase soil fertility but also contribute to increase safety of imazaquin application to the following susceptible crops.

  9. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with ...... of 10 and a Fines20/OC ratio of 20 may serve as corresponding thresholds for clay dispersibility, the latter probably best reflecting organo-mineral interactions of importance to the soil physical properties.......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...... dispersibility and no detectable effects on soil friability. Dispersed clay correlated to soil content of clay, but the correlation increased if subtracting a fraction assumed protected by OC. This trend was less convincing for soil tensile strength and friability. Increased clay dispersibility and reduced soil...

  10. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai;

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... and dry regions) for a given soil and biochar amendment scenarios. This study evaluates how biochar applied to a sandy loam field at rates from 0 to 50 Mg ha−1 yr–1 in 2011, 2012, or both years (2011+2012) influences the full water retention curve. Inorganic fertilizer and pig slurry were added to all...... region-water retention curve increased with increasing biochar rates....

  11. USE OF THE “ROTHC” MODEL TO SIMULATE SOIL ORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS ON A SILTY-LOAM INCEPTISOL IN NORTHERN ITALY UNDER DIFFERENT FERTILIZATION PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Francaviglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the efficiency of the RothC model to simulate Soil Organic Carbon (SOC dynamics after 12 years of organic and mineral fertilization practices in a study area located in northern Italy, on a silty-loam Inceptisol with a rotation including tomato, maize and alfalfa. The model performance was assessed by RMSE and EF coefficients. RothC simulated well observed SOC decreases in 71 samples (RMSE=7.42; EF=0.79, while performed with less accuracy when considering all samples (96 samples; RMSE=12.37; EF=0.58, due to the fact that the model failed in case of measured SOC increases (25 samples; RMSE=20.77; EF=-0.038. The model was used to forecast the SOC dynamics over a 50 year period under the same pedoclimatic conditions. Only clay contents >15% allowed to predict increasing levels of SOC respect to the starting values.

  12. Uncertainty of Deardorff’s soil moisture model based on continuous TDR measurements for sandy loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandyk Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on soil moisture is indispensable for a range of hydrological models, since it exerts a considerable influence on runoff conditions. Proper tools are nowadays applied in order to gain in-sight into soil moisture status, especially of uppermost soil layers, which are prone to weather changes and land use practices. In order to establish relationships between meteorological conditions and topsoil moisture, a simple model would be required, characterized by low computational effort, simple structure and low number of identified and calibrated parameters. We demonstrated, that existing model for shallow soils, considering mass exchange between two layers (the upper and the lower, as well as with the atmosphere and subsoil, worked well for sandy loam with deep ground water table in Warsaw conurbation. GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation linked with GSA (Global Sensitivity Analysis provided for final determination of parameter values and model confidence ranges. Including the uncertainty in a model structure, caused that the median soil moisture solution of the GLUE was shifted from the one optimal in deterministic sense. From the point of view of practical model application, the main shortcoming were the underestimated water exchange rates between the lower soil layer (ranging from the depth of 0.1 to 0.2 m below ground level and subsoil. General model quality was found to be satisfactory and promising for its utilization for establishing measures to regain retention in urbanized conditions.

  13. Nitrogen Mineralization of a Loam Soil Supplemented with Organic–Inorganic Amendments under Laboratory Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M. Kaleem; Khaliq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aims of the present study was to determine the potential N mineralization and subsequent nitrification of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM), wheat straw residues (WSR), and urea N (UN) applied to a loam soil incubated periodically over 140 days period. In addition, changes in total soil N and carbon contents were also monitored during the study. Treatments included: PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized). All the amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg-1. Results indicated that a substantial quantity of N had been released from the added amendments into the soil mineral pool and the net cumulative N mineralized varied between 39 and 147 mg N kg-1, lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50 + PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net mineral N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN) varied between 16 and 126 mg kg-1, highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. On average, percentage conversion of added N into available N by different amendments varied between 21 and 80%, while conversion of applied N into NO3-–N ranged between 9 and 65%, and the treatment UN50 + PM50 displayed the highest N recovery. Urea N when applied alone showed disappearance of 37% N (N unaccounted for) at the end while application of PM and WSR with UN reduced N disappearance and increased N retention in the mineral pool for a longer period. Organic amendments alone or in combination with UN improved organic matter buildup and increased soil N concentration. These results demonstrate the existence of substantial amounts of N reserves present in PM

  14. Nitrogen Mineralization of a Loam Soil Supplemented with Organic-Inorganic Amendments under Laboratory Incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Khaliq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aims of the present study was to determine the potential N mineralization and subsequent nitrification of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM), wheat straw residues (WSR), and urea N (UN) applied to a loam soil incubated periodically over 140 days period. In addition, changes in total soil N and carbon contents were also monitored during the study. Treatments included: PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized). All the amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg(-1). Results indicated that a substantial quantity of N had been released from the added amendments into the soil mineral pool and the net cumulative N mineralized varied between 39 and 147 mg N kg(-1), lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50 + PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net mineral N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN) varied between 16 and 126 mg kg(-1), highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. On average, percentage conversion of added N into available N by different amendments varied between 21 and 80%, while conversion of applied N into NO3 (-)-N ranged between 9 and 65%, and the treatment UN50 + PM50 displayed the highest N recovery. Urea N when applied alone showed disappearance of 37% N (N unaccounted for) at the end while application of PM and WSR with UN reduced N disappearance and increased N retention in the mineral pool for a longer period. Organic amendments alone or in combination with UN improved organic matter buildup and increased soil N concentration. These results demonstrate the existence of substantial amounts of N reserves present

  15. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  16. Phosphorus application to cotton enhances growth, yield, and quality characteristics on a sandy loam soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus (P) is the second most limiting nutrient in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production after nitrogen. Under wheat-cotton cropping system of Pakistan most of the farmers apply P fertilizer only to wheat crop. A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of fertilizer P on the growth, yield and fibre quality of cotton on a sandy loam calcareous soil at farmer's field in cotton growing area of district Khanewal, Punjab. Five levels of P (0, 17, 26, 34 and 43 kg P ha /sup -1/) along with 120 kg N and 53 kg K ha/sup -1/ were applied. The response of cotton growth parameters was greater than quality components to P addition in calcareous soil. There was significant increase in the growth and yield parameters with each additional rate of P. The response of number of bolls per plant, boll weight and seed cotton yield was to the tune of 88.23, 16.82 and 42%, respectively at P application rate of 34 kg ha/sup -1/. Cotton quality components (lint %age, fiber length and fiber strength) improved from 2 to 5% where 43 kg P ha/sup -1/ was added. The lint and seed P concentration was little affected by P application as compared to stem and leaves showing its essentiality for cell division and development of meristematic tissue. Phosphorus use, thus not only valuable for wheat crop but also its application to cotton crop is of vital importance in improving both lint yield and quality. (author)

  17. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  18. Nitrogen mineralization of a loam soil supplemented with organic-inorganic amendments under laboratory incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaleem ABBASI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of nitrogen (N supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aim of the present study was to determine the potential mineralization of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM, wheat (Triticum aestivum L. straw residues (WSR, and urea N (UN applied to a loam soil and incubated periodically over 140 days period. Treatments included PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized. Added amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg−1. Nitrogen supplying capacity of added materials was determined by measuring changes in total mineral N (ammonium-nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen [NH4+–N + NO3––N] and accumulation of NO3––N over different incubation periods. Changes in soil organic matter content and total N concentration were also monitored during the study. Results indicated that added amendments released substantial N into the mineral N pool (net cumulative N mineralized [NCNM] ranged between 39 and 147 mg N kg−1, lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50+PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net inorganic N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. Total inorganic N derived from PM increased from 2.3 mg kg−1 at d 1, to a maximum of 102 to 105 mg kg−1 at 63, 84 and 105 d after PM application. The values were further increase from 31.5 mg kg−1 at d 0 to a maximum of 165 mg kg−1 at d 49 in UN50 + PM50 treatment. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN varied between 16 and 126 mg kg−1, highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. Soil amended with WSR100 showed negative values both for mineralization and nitrification until day 84, displaying net immobilization. On average, percentage conversion of added N into

  19. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Lu; Weixin Ding; Junhua Zhang; Huanjun Zhang; Jiafa Luo; Nanthi Bolan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N) on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant) straw in absence (BC0) and presence (BCN) of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. N amendmen...

  20. Seasonal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil after a forest fire in Galicia (NW Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rodríguez-Alleres; M.E. Varela; Benito, E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze, after a wildfire of moderate severity, the temporal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil under a mixed plantation of pine and eucalyptus and the comparison with an adjacent area not affected by the fire. In the burnt area and in a neighboring area not affected by the fire were collected during one year (1, 4, 6, 8 and 12 months after the fire) 10 soil samples along a transect of 18 m at four depths: 0-2, 2-5, 5-10 and 10-2...

  1. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiwei; Ding, Weixin; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Huanjun; Luo, Jiafa; Bolan, Nanthi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N) on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant) straw in absence (BC0) and presence (BCN) of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. N amendment significantly increased the decomposition of biochar during the first 5 days of incubation (P soil PLFAs concentration at the beginning of incubation, indicating that microorganisms were N-limited in test soil. Furthermore, N amendment significantly (P soil.

  2. Evaluation of Soil Quality Indicators in Sugarcane Management in Sandy Loam Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.A.C.SANT'ANNA; M.F.FERNANDES; W.M.P.M.IVO; J.L.S.COSTA

    2009-01-01

    An important factor for the sustainability of soils highly susceptible to degradation is the use of monitoring tools that promptly and realistically reflect changes imposed on soil by different cropping systems.To select soil quality indicator variables in sugarcane (Saccharum offcinarum L.) production areas that fulfill the criteria of sensitivity to management practices and between-season consistency in the management discrimination,ten composite soil samples (0-10 cm) were collected in July 2005 (rainy season) and again in March 2006 (dry season) from areas under cultivation of organic sugarcane (OS),green sugarcane (GS),burned sugarcane (BS) and from an adjacent native forest (NF) area at Usina Triunfo,Boca da Mata,Alagoas,Brazil.Microbial biomass-C (MBC),total organic C (TOC),soil enzyme activity expressed as the rate of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis,mean weight diameter of water-stable soil aggregates (MWD),and percentage of water-stable macroaggregates (PWSA) were analyzed.Although MBC and TOC were higher in NF than in the cultivated areas,no differences were observed in these C pools between the three sugarcane systems.The response of FDA to the site management was dependent on the sampling time.In the rainy period,the activity followed the order:NF > OS > GS > BS,whereas in the dry season,only NF differed from the other treatments.Irrespective of the sampling time,MWD and PWSA decreased in the order NF > OS = GS > BS.The variables MWD and PWSA are quite sensitive for discriminating between site management histories regardless the sampling season.

  3. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific.

  4. Adsorption, desorption and mobility of cyfluthrin in three Malaysian tropical soils of different textures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lsmail, B S; Choo, Lee Yin; Salmijah, S; Halimah, M; Tayeb, M A

    2015-09-01

    The sorption and desorption of cyfluthrin mixture isomers were determined using batch equilibration method and mobility was studied under laboratory conditions, using packed soil column. The soil types used in the study were clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam obtained from three tomato farms in Cameron Highlands. A low Freundlich adsorption distribution coefficient K(ads(f)) for cyfluthrin was observed for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils (95.69, 21.64 and 8.99 l/kg, respectively). Results showed that cyfluthrin had high Freundlich organic matter (OM) distribution coefficient K(oc) values of 5799, 2278 and 1635 lkg(-1) for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils, respectively. These values indicate that cyfluthrin is considered immobile in Malaysian soils with different textures, based on the value of K(oc) by McCall. Adsorption of cyfluthrin was significantly (P fertilizer NPK, organic matter content and temperature. It was observed that approximately 95.8%, 93.8% and 91.8% of the adsorbed cyfluthrin remained sorbed after four successive rinses for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils. Soil column test showed that cyfluthrin was not detected in leachate. Cyfluthrin was detected in topsoil and its concentration decreased with depth. The downward movement of cyfluthrin in sandy clay loam soil was more than that in clay loam and clayey soils. Approximately, 80.9%, 77.8% and 67.3% cyfluthrin was observed at the depth of 0-5 cm (rainfall 350 mm) for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils respectively. Mobility of cyfluthrin showed that the percentage of cyfluthrin leached into soil was not affected by the amount of rainfall. The result clearly showed that cyfluthrin molecules were bound strongly to all the three Malaysian soil types. PMID:26521552

  5. Influence of salinity on bioremediation of oil in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spills from oil production and processing result in soils being contaminated with oil and salt. The effect of NaCl on degradation of oil in a sandy-clay loam and a clay loam soil was determined. Soils were treated with 50 g kg-1 non-detergent motor oil (30 SAE). Salt treatments included NaCl amendments to adjust the soil solution electrical conductivities to 40, 120, and 200 dS m-1. Soils were amended with nutrients and incubated at 25oC. Oil degradation was estimated from the quantities of CO2 evolved and from gravimetric determinations of remaining oil. Salt concentrations of 200 dS m-1 in oil amended soils resulted in a decrease in oil mineralized by 44% for a clay loam and 20% for a sandy-clay loam soil. A salt concentration of 40 dS m-1 reduced oil mineralization by about 10% in both soils. Oil mineralized in the oil amended clay-loam soil was 2-3 times greater than for comparable treatments of the sandy-clay loam soil. Amending the sandy-clay loam soil with 5% by weight of the clay-loam soil enhanced oil mineralization by 40%. Removal of salts from oil and salt contaminated soils before undertaking bioremediation may reduce the time required for bioremediation. (author)

  6. Mineral N dynamics, leaching and nitrous oxide losses under maize following two-year improved fallows on a sandy loam soil in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikowo, R.; Mapfumo, P.; Nyamugafata, P.; Giller, K.E.

    2004-01-01

    The fate of the added N on a sandy loam soil was determined in an improved fallow - maize sequence field experiment in Zimbabwe. Pre-season mineral N was determined in 20 cm sections to 120 cm depth by soil auguring in seven land use systems. Thereafter, sequential soil auguring was done at two-week

  7. Estimation of soil clay content from hygroscopic water content measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wuddivira, Mark N.; Robinson, David A.; Lebron, Inma; Brechet, Laëtitia; Atwell, Melissa; De Caires, Sunshine; Oatham, Michael; Jones, Scott B.; Abdu, Hiruy; Verma, Aditya K.; Tuller, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Soil texture and the soil water characteristic are key properties used to estimate flow and transport parameters. Determination of clay content is therefore critical for understanding of plot-scale soil heterogeneity. With increasing interest in proximal soil sensing, there is the need to relate obtained signals to soil properties of interest. Inference of soil texture, especially clay mineral content, from instrument response from electromagnetic induction and radiometric methods is of subst...

  8. Factors driving the carbon mineralization priming effect in a sandy loam soil amended with different types of biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely, P.; Tarquis, A. M.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Méndez, A.; Gascó, G.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of biochar on the soil carbon mineralization priming effect depends on the characteristics of the raw materials, production method and pyrolysis conditions. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the impact of three different types of biochar on physicochemical properties and CO2 emissions of a sandy loam soil. For this purpose, soil was amended with three different biochars (BI, BII and BIII) at a rate of 8 wt% and soil CO2 emissions were measured for 45 days. BI is produced from a mixed wood sieving from wood chip production, BII from a mixture of paper sludge and wheat husks and BIII from sewage sludge. Cumulative CO2 emissions of biochars, soil and amended soil were well fit to a simple first-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.97. Results show a negative priming effect in the soil after addition of BI and a positive priming effect in the case of soil amended with BII and BIII. These results can be related to different biochar properties such as carbon content, carbon aromaticity, volatile matter, fixed carbon, easily oxidized organic carbon or metal and phenolic substance content in addition to surface biochar properties. Three biochars increased the values of soil field capacity and wilting point, while effects over pH and cation exchange capacity were not observed.

  9. Seasonal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil after a forest fire in Galicia (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodríguez-Alleres

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyze, after a wildfire of moderate severity, the temporal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil under a mixed plantation of pine and eucalyptus and the comparison with an adjacent area not affected by the fire. In the burnt area and in a neighboring area not affected by the fire were collected during one year (1, 4, 6, 8 and 12 months after the fire 10 soil samples along a transect of 18 m at four depths: 0-2, 2-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm. Soil water repellency was determined using the water drop penetration time test (WDPT test and the infiltration was measured with a mini-disc infiltrometer (pressure head h0 = -2 cm.The results show a temporal pattern of soil water repellency in the burnt and unburnt areas. Significant correlations between water repellency and soil moisture were observed, with higher correlation coefficients in the unburned area and in the surface soil layer.Soil water infiltration was significantly lower than would be expected by the coarse texture of the soil in both burnt and unburnt areas. Temporal fluctuations in unburnt soil infiltration seem to be clearly related to the transient nature of the soil water repellency, with no infiltration in samples extremely repellent. In the burned area, the soil infiltration showed much more variability and temporal fluctuations appear to be less dependent on the persistence of water repellency and more dependent on environmental conditions.The unburnt area show significant and negative correlations of soil water repellency with hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity and positive of these two parameters with soil moisture. These relationships were not observed in the burnt area. The temporal fluctuations of soil water repellency have an evident impact on soil infiltration and seem to be more influent than the effects of fire.

  10. Clay Mineralogy of Various Marginal Soils in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Quang Hai; Egashira, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Various marginal soils derived from different parent materials were collected from different landforms and agro-ecological regions in Vietnam and were subjected to clay mineral analysis in addition to particle-size analysis. The result showed that the particle-size distribution of the soils had a close relationship with the landform. The clay content was highest for the soils from the meander floodplain and inland valley, followed by the soil from the hill and lowest for the soils from the ...

  11. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  12. Changes to soil water content and biomass yield under combined maize and maize-weed vegetation with different fertilization treatments in loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehoczky Éva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Especially during early developmental stages, competition with weeds can reduce crop growth and have a serious effect on productivity. Here, the effects of interactions between soil water content (SWC, nutrient availability, and competition from weeds on early stage crop growth were investigated, to better understand this problem. Field experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 using long-term study plots on loam soil in Hungary. Plots of maize (Zea mays L. and a weed-maize combination were exposed to five fertilization treatments. SWC was observed along the 0–80 cm depth soil profile and harvested aboveground biomass (HAB was measured.

  13. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction is increa...

  14. Absorption of primary macronutrients and soybean growth at different compactation densities and moisture levels in a silt loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Roberto Valicheski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soybean cultivation is increasing rapidly in the region of Alto Vale do Itajaí, State of Santa Catarina, where there is a predominance of silt soils. The objective of this work was to evaluate the content of primary macronutrients in shoots and shoot and root vegetative growth of soybean (Glicine max L. Merrill grown in a silt-loam soil under different compactation densities and moisture levels. A randomized block design in a 4x4 factorial arrangement was used, with four compactation densities: 1.00; 1.20; 1.40 and 1.60 Mg m-3, and four soil moisture levels: 0.130; 0.160; 0.190 and 0.220 kg kg-1 and four replications. Each pot consisted of the overlapping of three 150-mm PVC rings, where soil was maintained in the higher and lower part of the pot with a density of 1.00 Mg m-3 and in the intermediate ring, the compactation densities were increased. Values of soil density higher than 120 Mg m-3 negatively affected N, P and K uptake by soybean plants, as well as the plant mass of the shoots and roots. The higher levels of soil moisture reduced the compaction effect and promoted better absorption of P and K.

  15. Differences in physical properties of two clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Alakukku, Laura; Ristolainen, Antti; nuutinen, Visa

    2008-01-01

    We studied the physical properties of two clay soils (J1 and J2) having relatively similar texture but differing cultivation properties J2 being more sensitive to dry and wet conditions. The general assumption that the productivity of heavy clay soils is mainly threatened by excessive wetness holds in both fields.

  16. Clay mineralogy of weathering rinds and possible implications concerning the sources of clay minerals in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    Weathering rinds on volcanic clasts in Quaternary deposits in the western US contain only very fine-grained and poorly crystalline clay minerals. Rinds were sampled from soils containing well-developed argillic B horizons in deposits approx 105 yr old or more. The clay-size fraction of the rinds is dominated by allophane and iron hydroxy-oxides, whereas the B horizons contain abundant well-crystallized clay minerals. The contrast between the clay mineralogy of the weathering rinds, in which weathering is isolated from other soil processes, and that of the associated soil matrices suggests a need to reassess assumptions concerning the rates at which clay minerals form and the sources of clay minerals in argillic B horizons. It seems that crystalline clay minerals form more slowly in weathering rinds than is generally assumed for soil environments and that the weathering of primary minerals may not be the dominant source of crystalline clay minerals in Middle to Late Pleistocene soil.-A.P.

  17. Dynamics of parameters of Cs137 and Sr90 accumulation by agricultural crops on sod-podzolic sandy loam soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conditions of the Republic of Belarus there was realized the determination of the parameters of Cs137 and Sr90 accumulation by green mass of winter rape (Brassica napus), lupine (Lupinus), pea (Pisum) and corn (Zea mays), as well as dynamics of coefficients of radionuclide transfer from soil into plant products in the after-Chernobyl period. Research results showed that in the conditions of sod-podzolic sandy loam soil the indexes of the coefficients of Cs137 and Sr90 radionuclide transfer from soil into rape green mass were on 1,67 and 1,15 times lower than the standard indexes fixed the green mass of sprig rape in the conditions of the same agronomic indexes. Over the time after the Chernobyl disaster there was the substantial lowering of indexes of Cs137 transfer from soil into plants. For the green mass of pea it lowered in 7,5 times, for maize – 15 times. The values of Sr90 transfer indexes did not substantially change. At present the values of Cs137 and Sr90 do not undergo essential changes as there was developed the dynamic equilibrium between the radionuclide forms in soil

  18. Clay-illuvial soils in the Polish and international soil classifications

    OpenAIRE

    Kabała Cezary; Musztyfaga Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Soil with a clay-illuvial subsurface horizon are the most widespread soil type in Poland and significantly differ in morphology and properties developed under variable environmental conditions. Despite the long history of investigations, the rules of classification and cartography of clay-illuvial soils have been permanently discussed and modified. The distinction of clay-illuvial soils into three soil types, introduced to the Polish soil classification in 2011, has been criticized as excessi...

  19. Main Clay Minerals in Soils of Fujian Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; ZHANGWEIMING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The clay minerals of more than 200 soil samples collected from various sites of Fujian Province were studied by the X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy to study their distribution and evolution.Montmorillonite was found in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit,and some lateritic red soil,red soil and yellow soil with a low weathering degree.Chlorite existed mainly in coastal solonchak and paddy soil developed from marine deposit.1.4nm intergradient mineral appeared frequently in yellow soil,red soil and lateritic red soil.The content of 1.4nm intergradient mineral increased with the decrease of weathering degree from lateritic red soil to red soil to yellow soil.Hydrous micas were more in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit.and puple soil from purple shale than in other soils.Kaolinte was the most important clay mineral in the soils iun this province.The higher the soil weathering degree,the more the kaolinite existed.From yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil,kaolinite increased gradually,Kaolinite was the predominant clay mineral accompanied by few other minerals in typical lateritic red soil. Tubular halloysite was a widespread clay mineral in soils of Fujian Province with varying quantities.The soil derived from the paent rocks rich in feldspar contained more tubular halloysite.Spheroidal halloysite was found in a red soil and a paddy soil developed from olivine basalt gibbsite in the soils in this district was largely“primary gibbsite” which formed in the early weathering stage.Gibbsite decreased with the increase of weathering degree from yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil.Goethite also decreased in the same sequence while hematite increased.

  20. Investigation of Interactive Effects on Water Flow and Solute Transport in Sandy Loam Soil Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Merdun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC, and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different

  1. Investigation of interactive effects on water flow and solute transport in sandy loam soil using time domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  2. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Libo Hao; Qiaoqiao Wei; Yuyan Zhao; Zilong Lu; Xinyun Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative determination of clay minerals in soil based on bulk chemical composition data. The fundamental principles and processes of the calculation are elucidated. Some samples were used for reliability verification of the method and the results prove the simplicity and efficacy of the approach.

  3. Charge Properties and Clay Mineral Composition of Tianbao Mountains Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEJI-ZHENG; LIXUE-YUAN; 等

    1992-01-01

    The clay mineral association,oxides of clay fraction and surface charge properties of 7 soils,which are developed from granite,located at different altitudesof the Tianbao Mountains were studied.Results indicate that with the increase in altitude,1) the weathering process and desilicification of soil clay minerals became weaker,whereas the leaching depotassication and the formation process of hydroxy-aluminum interlayer got stronger;2)the contents of amorphous and complex aluminum and iron,and the activity of aluminum and iron oxides for soil clay fraction increased;and 3) the amount of variable negarive charge,anion exchange capacity and the values of PZC and PZNC also increased.The activity of aluminum and iron oxides,the accumulation of aluminum,and surface charge characteristics and their relation to clay oxides of the vertical zone soils were observed and recorded.

  4. Effect of nutrients and plant growth regulators on growth and yield of black gram in sandy loam soils of Cauvery new delta zone, India

    OpenAIRE

    Marimuthu, S.; U. Surendran

    2015-01-01

    Pulse productivity is very low in some of the sandy soil areas where, soils are having poor water and nutrient holding capacity. To improve the pulse productivity, field experiments were conducted at Agricultural Research Station, Tamil Nadu for two consecutive years to study the effect of phosphorus sources (mono- and diammonium phosphate) with brassinolide and salicylic acid on growth and yield of black gram in sandy loam soils. The experiment was carried out in a randomized block design wi...

  5. Connectivity and percolation of pore networks in a cultivated silt loam soil quantified by X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats

    2016-04-01

    The connectivity of macropore networks is thought to exert an important control on transport processes in soil. However, little progress has been made towards quantifying these effects for natural soils in the field, partly because of the experimental difficulties but also because the concept of connectivity lacks a unique mathematical definition. To investigate this question, X-ray tomography was used to measure pore volume, size distribution and connectivity at an image resolution of 65 microns for 64 samples taken in two consecutive years in the harrowed and ploughed layers of a silt loam soil a few weeks after spring cultivation. Three different connectivity metrics were evaluated and compared: one local metric, the Euler number, and two global measures, the connection probability and the probability of percolation (the fraction of the porosity which is continuous across the sample). The connection probability was found to be a good measure of the long-range connectivity (i.e. continuity) of the pore networks. In contrast, the Euler number was not a sensitive measure of global connectivity, although all samples with negative Euler numbers did percolate. We also found that the way connection is defined in the image analysis (either by 6 or 26 nearest neighbours) did not influence the calculations of percolating porosity. The results also demonstrate that harrowing has a clear homogenizing effect on the distribution of the pore space. However, a comparison with random field simulations and the evidence of small percolation thresholds shows that the macropore system developed in the recently harrowed soil was far from completely random or disordered. In some samples, more than one pore cluster percolated, while in others the percolating cluster was not the largest one. Nevertheless, the macropore networks in this cultivated silt loam soil displayed some key features predicted by percolation theory: a strong relationship was found between the percolating fraction

  6. Overall assessment of soil quality on humid sandy loams: Effects of location, rotation and tillage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Hansen, Elly Møller; Rickson, J.M.;

    2015-01-01

    Conservation tillage and diversified crop rotations have been suggested as appropriate alternative soil management systems to sustain soil quality. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of implementing three crop rotations (R2–R4) on soil structural changes and the “productivity...... function” of soil. R2 is a winter-dominated crop rotation (winter wheat was the main crop) with straw residues incorporated. R3 is a mix of winter and spring crops with straw residues removed. R4 is the same mix of crops as in R3, but with straw residues incorporated. Three tillage systems were used.......e. visual evaluation of soil structure (VESS), overall visual structure (OVS) and overall soil structure (OSS)) were employed to differentiate the effects of these alternative management practices on soil structural quality and relative crop yield (RY). A Pearson correlation was also employed to find...

  7. Removal of non aqueous phase liquid liquid (NAPL) from a loam soil monitored by time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    comegna, alessandro; coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; ajeel, ali; saeed, ali; sommella, angelo

    2016-04-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are compounds with low or no solubility with water. These compounds, due to the several human activities, can be accidentally introduced in the soil system and thus constitute a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and the high mobility. The remediation of contaminated soil sites requires knowledge of the contaminant distribution in the soil profile and groundwater. Methods commonly used to characterize contaminated sites are coring, soil sampling and the installation of monitoring wells for the collection of groundwater samples. The main objective of the present research is to explore the potential application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique in order to evaluate the effect of contaminant removal in a loam soil, initially contaminated with NAPL and then flushed with different washing solutions. The experimental setup consist of: i) a Techtronix cable tester; ii) a three-wire TDR probe with wave guides 14.5 cm long inserted vertically into the soil samples; iii) a testing cell of 8 cm in diameter and 15 cm high; iv) a peristaltic pump for upward injection of washing solution. In laboratory, soil samples were oven dried at 105°C and passed through a 2 mm sieve. Known quantities of soil and NAPL (corn oil, a non-volatile and non-toxic organic compound) were mixed in order to obtain soil samples with different degrees of contamination. Once a soil sample was prepared, it was repacked into a plastic cylinder and then placed into the testing cell. An upward injection of washing solution was supplied to the contaminated sample with a rate q=1.5 cm3/min, which corresponds to a darcian velocity v=6.0 cm/h. The out coming fluid, from the soil column was collected, then the washing solution and oil was separated. Finally both the amount of oil that was remediated and the dielectric permittivity (measured via TDR) of the contaminated soil sample were recorded. Data collected were employed to implement a

  8. Seasonal dynamics in wheel load-carrying capacity of a loam soil in the Swiss Plateau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gut, S.; Chervet, A.; Stettler, Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    ) is defined as the maximum wheel load for a specific tyre and inflation pressure that does not result in soil stress in excess of soil strength. The soil strength and hence WLCC is strongly influenced by soil matric potential (h). The aim of this study was to estimate the seasonal dynamics in WLCC based...... on in situ measurements of h, measurements of precompression stress at various h and simulations of soil stress. In this work, we concentrated on prevention of subsoil compaction. Calculations were made for different tyres (standard and low-pressure top tyres) and for soil under different tillage...... and cropping systems (mouldboard ploughing, direct drilling, permanent grassland), and the computed WLCC was compared with real wheel loads to obtain the number of trafficable days (NTD) for various agricultural machines. Wheel load-carrying capacity was higher for the top than the standard tyres...

  9. Bacterial and fungal taxon changes in soil microbial community composition induced by short-term biochar amendment in red oxidized loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liao; Cao, Lixiang; Zhang, Renduo

    2014-03-01

    To take full advantage of biochar as a soil amendment, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of biochar addition on soil bacterial and fungal diversity and community composition. Incubation experiments with a forest soil (a red oxidized loam soil) with and without biochar amendment were conducted for 96 days. The culture-independent molecular method was utilized to analyze soil bacterial and fungal species after the incubation experiments. Results showed that bacteria and fungi responded differently to the biochar addition during the short-term soil incubation. Twenty four and 18 bacterial genara were observed in the biochar amended and unamended soils, respectively, whereas 11 and 8 fungal genera were observed in the biochar amended and unamended soils, respectively. Microbial taxa analysis indicated that the biochar amendment resulted in significant shifts in both bacterial and fungal taxa during the incubation period. The shift for bacteria occurred at the genus and phylum levels, while for fungi only at the genus level. Specific taxa, such as Actinobacteria of bacteria and Trichoderma and Paecilomyces of fungi, were enriched in the biochar amended soil. The results reveal a pronounced impact of biochar on soil microbial community composition and an enrichment of key bacterial and fungal taxa in the soil during the short time period. PMID:24136343

  10. Physical and hydraulic properties of a sandy loam soil under zero, shallow and deep tillage practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the centuries, tillage has been an important agronomic practice that has been used to mechanically alter soil properties and enhance the soil ecosystem for growth of crops. A 4-yr study investigated the impact of no-tillage (NT), shallow tillage at a 10-cm depth (ST), and deep tillage at a 30-c...

  11. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiwei; Ding, Weixin; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Huanjun; Luo, Jiafa; Bolan, Nanthi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N) on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant) straw in absence (BC0) and presence (BCN) of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. N amendment significantly increased the decomposition of biochar during the first 5 days of incubation (P < 0.05), and the proportions of decomposed biochar carbon (C) were 2.30% and 3.28% in BC0 and BCN treatments, respectively, during 30 days of incubation. The magnitude of decomposed biochar C was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than DOC in biochar (1.75%) and part of relatively recalcitrant biochar C was mineralized in both treatments. N amendment increased soil PLFAs concentration at the beginning of incubation, indicating that microorganisms were N-limited in test soil. Furthermore, N amendment significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proportion of gram-positive (G+) bacteria and decreased that of fungi, while no noticeable changes were observed for gram-negative (G-) bacteria and actinobacteria at the early stage of incubation. Our results indicated that N amendment promoted more efficiently the proliferation of G+ bacteria and accelerated the decomposition of relatively recalcitrant biochar C, which in turn reduced the stability of maize straw-derived biochar in test soil. PMID:26192282

  12. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Lu

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant straw in absence (BC0 and presence (BCN of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2 flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC content. N amendment significantly increased the decomposition of biochar during the first 5 days of incubation (P < 0.05, and the proportions of decomposed biochar carbon (C were 2.30% and 3.28% in BC0 and BCN treatments, respectively, during 30 days of incubation. The magnitude of decomposed biochar C was significantly (P < 0.05 higher than DOC in biochar (1.75% and part of relatively recalcitrant biochar C was mineralized in both treatments. N amendment increased soil PLFAs concentration at the beginning of incubation, indicating that microorganisms were N-limited in test soil. Furthermore, N amendment significantly (P < 0.05 increased the proportion of gram-positive (G+ bacteria and decreased that of fungi, while no noticeable changes were observed for gram-negative (G- bacteria and actinobacteria at the early stage of incubation. Our results indicated that N amendment promoted more efficiently the proliferation of G+ bacteria and accelerated the decomposition of relatively recalcitrant biochar C, which in turn reduced the stability of maize straw-derived biochar in test soil.

  13. The fate of fresh and stored 15N-labelled sheep urine and urea applied to a sandy and a sandy loam soil using different application strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The fate of nitrogen from N-15-labelled sheep urine and urea applied to two soils was studied under field conditions. Labelled and stored urine equivalent to 204 kg N ha(-1) was either incorporated in soil or applied to the soil surface prior to sowing of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.),...... mineralized in the sandy loam soil, when urine was applied prior to sowing. Thus, the fertilizer effect of urine N may be significantly lower than that of urea N on fine-textured soils, even when gaseous losses of urine N are negligible....

  14. Mobility of Arsenic and Heavy Metals in a Sandy-Loam Textured and Carbonated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GARCIA; M.DIEZ; F.MARTIN; M.SIMóN; C.DORRONSORO

    2009-01-01

    The continued effect of the pyrite-tailing oxidation on the mobility of arsenic,lead,zinc,cadmium,and copper was studied in a carbonated soil under natural conditions,with the experimcntal plot preserved with a layer of tailing covering the soil during three years.The experimental area is located in Southern Spain and was affected by a pyrite-mine spill.The climate in the area is typically Mediterranean,which determines the rate of soil alteration and element mobility.The intense alteration processes that occurred in the soil during three years caused important changes in its morphology and a strong degradation of the main soil properties.In this period,lead concentrated in the first 5 mm of the soil,with concentrations higher than 1500 mg kg-1,mainly associated to the neoformation of plumbojarosite.Arsenic was partially leached from the first 5 mm and mainly concentrated between 5-10 mm in the soil,with maximum values of 1 239 mg kg-1;the retention of arsenates was related to the neoformation of iron hydroxysulfates (jarosite,schwertmannite) and oxyhydroxides (goethite,ferrihydrite),both with a variable degree of crystallinity.The mobility of Zn,Cd,and Cu was highly affected by pH,producing a stronger leaching in depth;their retention was related to the forms of precipitated aluminium and,in the case of Cu,also to the neoformation of hydroxysulfate.

  15. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover is influenced by interactions between organic matter and the mineral soil fraction. However, the influence of clay content and type on SOC turnover rates remains unclear, particularly in tropical soils under natural vegetation. We examined the lability....... Basal soil respiration rates were determined from bulk soils and soil fractions. Substrate induced respiration rates were determined from soil fractions. SOC lability was significantly influenced by clay mineralogy, but not by clay content when compared across contrasting clay minerals. The lability...... of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving...

  16. Effects of biochar and manure amendments on water vapor sorption in a sandy loam soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Møldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the application of biochar (BC) as a soil amendment to sequester carbon and mitigate global climate change has received considerable attention. While positive effects of biochar on plant nutrition are well documented, little is known about potential impacts on the physical...

  17. Predicting Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity from Percolation Test Results in Layered Silt Loam Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The size of on-site waste disposal systems is usually determined by one or more percolation tests performed on the proposed site. The objectives of this study were to develop an empirical relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of layered soils and their percolation times (PT)...

  18. Clinoptilolite zeolite influence on inorganic nitrogen in silt loam and sandy agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of best management practices can help improve inorganic nitrogen (N) availability to plants and reduce nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching in soils. This study was conducted to determine the influence of the zeolite mineral Clinoptilolite (CL) additions on NO3-N and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4...

  19. Modeling Tractive Force Requirements of Wheel tractors For Disc Ploughing in Sandy Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O Nkakini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tractive force models at different tillage speeds were developed using dimensional analysis, describing the tractor tyre - soil interaction. In this research study, disc ploughing on an experimental plot at twenty different soil moisture levels in loamy sand soil was carried out using trace tractor techniques. The independent variables: drawbar pull force, rolling (motion resistance, wheel slip, moisture content, cone index, wheel numeric, contact pressure, speed, width of plough, depth of plough, and dependent variable (Tractive force were measured and compared to computed values. High coefficients of determination R2 = 0.9492, 0.9555 and 0.9447 for ploughing at tillage speeds of 1.94m/s, 2.22m/s and 2.5m/s were obtained respectively. Standard errors of 0.3672552, 0.8628 and 0.8047 and the percentage (% errors of -2.272608059 and 2.45655144,-2.304946155 and 2.523126085,-1.424947801 and 2.020155232 at minimum and maximum values, were obtained. These results are clear evidence of the test of goodness of fit of the models between predictive and measured parameters for ploughing at different tillage speeds. The models were verified and validated by comparing the predicted with the measured tractive forces, and shown to closely followed the experimental results.

  20. Mechanical dispersion of clay from soil into water: readily-dispersed and spontaneously-dispersed clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the experimental determination of the amount of clay dispersed from soil into water is described. The method was evaluated using soil samples from agricultural fields in 18 locations in Poland. Soil particle size distributions, contents of organic matter and exchangeable cations were measured by standard methods. Sub-samples were placed in distilled water and were subjected to four different energy inputs obtained by different numbers of inversions (end-over-end movements). The amounts of clay that dispersed into suspension were measured by light scattering (turbidimetry). An empirical equation was developed that provided an approximate fit to the experimental data for turbidity as a function of number of inversions. It is suggested that extrapolation of the fitted equation to zero inversions enables the amount of spontaneously-dispersed clay to be estimated. This method introduces the possibility of replacing the existing subjective, qualitative method of determining spontaneously-dispersed clay with a quantitative, objective method. Even though the dispersed clay is measured under saturated conditions, soil samples retain a `memory' of the water contents at which they have been stored.

  1. Transport of Alachlor, Atrazine, Dicamba, and Bromide through Silt and Loam Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The herbicides alachlor, atrazine, and dicamba, as well as bromide were applied to soils overlying the High Plains aquifer in Nebraska, to both macropore and non-macropore sites. Three of 6 study areas (exhibiting a high percentage of macropores) were used for analysis of chemical transport. Twelve intact soil cores (30 cm diameter; 40 cm height), were excavated (two each from 0-40 cm and 40-80 cm depths). The first three study areas and soil cores were used to study preferential flow characteristics using dye staining and to determine hydraulic properties; the remaining cores were treated the same as field macropore sites. Two undisturbed experimental field plots, each with a 1 m2 surface area, were established in each of the three macropore study areas. Each preferential plot was instrumented with suction lysimeters, tensiometers, and neutron access tubes - 10 cm increments to 80 cm - and planted in corn. Three study areas that did not exhibit macropores had alachlor, atrazine, and dicamba and bromide disked into the top 15 cm of soil; concentrations were tracked for 120 days - samples were collected on a grid, distributed within 3 plots measuring 50 m x 50 m each. Core samples were collected prior to and immediately after application, and then at 30, 60, and 120 days after application. Each lab core sample was in 15-cm lengths from 0-15 cm, 15-30 cm, 45-60 cm, and 75-90 cm. For areas exhibiting macropores, herbicides had begun to move between 10-15 days after application with concentrations peaking at various depths after heavy rainfall events. Field lysimeter samples showed increases in concentrations of herbicides at depths where laboratory data indicated greater percentages of preferential flowpaths. Concentrations of atrazine, alachlor and dicamba exceeding 0.30, 0.30, and 0.05 μg m1-1 respectively were observed with depth (10-30 cm and 50-70 cm) after two months following heavy rainfall events indicating that preferential flowpaths were a significant

  2. Picloram and Aminopyralid Sorption to Soil and Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminopyralid sorption data are lacking, and these data are needed to predict off-target transport and plant available herbicide in soil solution. The objective of this research was to determine the sorption of picloram and aminopyralid to five soils and three clay minerals and determine if the pote...

  3. A theoretical analysis to estimate the hydraulic properties of a loam soil from a capillary-evaporation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Sancho, Carolina; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Latorre, Borja; Moret-Fernández, David

    2015-04-01

    The determination of the water retention curve (WRC) parameters and the hydraulic conductivity (K) is of paramount importance in many scientific fields such as hydrology or environmental science. Their direct characterization, however, is typically cumbersome and time consuming. This work analyze the viability to estimate the α and n Van Genuchten (VG) WRC parameters and K from following processes: a capillary wetting process at saturation, an evaporation process and a capillary wetting at saturation followed by an evaporation process. The theoretical analysis was carried out on a 5 cm high and 5 cm diameter cylinder filled with loam soil using numerically generated data with the HYDRUS 2D code. The error maps for the above mentioned processes and the n-K, α-n and K-α planes were generated from the RMSE calculated between the original and the simulated cumulative curves. The deviation (%) between the optimal and original hydraulic parameters was also calculated. Results showed that the capillary plus evaporation method applied on the n-K and α-n planes was the unique process that allowed a unique and well defined minimum. For this last case, the deviation for the α and n parameter were 6'67 and 0'88%, respectively. Taking into account that K can be easy measured from the same soil cylinder by means of Darcy's law, we conclude the capillary + evaporation process can be a simple and effective alternative to estimate the WRC parameters. To this end, the hysteresis phenomena due to the wetting-evaporation process should be taking into account.

  4. Clay-illuvial soils in the Polish and international soil classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabała Cezary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil with a clay-illuvial subsurface horizon are the most widespread soil type in Poland and significantly differ in morphology and properties developed under variable environmental conditions. Despite the long history of investigations, the rules of classification and cartography of clay-illuvial soils have been permanently discussed and modified. The distinction of clay-illuvial soils into three soil types, introduced to the Polish soil classification in 2011, has been criticized as excessively extended, non-coherent with the other parts and rules of the classification, hard to introduce in soil cartography and poorly correlated with the international soil classifications. One type of clay-illuvial soils (“gleby płowe” was justified and recommended to reintroduce in soil classification in Poland, as well as 10 soil subtypes listed in a hierarchical order. The subtypes may be combined if the soil has diagnostic features of more than one soil subtypes. Clear rules of soil name generalization (reduction of subtype number for one soil were suggested for soil cartography on various scales. One of the most important among the distinguished soil sub-types are the “eroded” or “truncated” clay-illuvial soils.

  5. Development of methods for multiresidue analysis of rice post-emergence herbicides in loam soil and their possible applications to soils of different composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Silvina; Pareja, Lucia; Asteggiante, Lucía Geis; Roehrs, Rafael; Pizzutti, Ionara R; García, Claudio; Heinzen, Horacio; Cesio, María Verónica

    2010-01-01

    Two simple and straightforward sample preparation methods were developed for the multiresidue analysis of post-emergence herbicides in loam soil that are commonly used in rice crop cultivation. A number of strategic soil extraction and cleanup methods were evaluated. The instrumental analysis was performed by HPLC with a diode array detector. The best compromise between the recoveries (69-98%) and good repeatability (RSD clomazone were analyzed simultaneously. Quinclorac and bispyribac sodium were also assayed, but their recoveries were below 50%. Both methods had an LOD of 0.7 microg/kg and could accurately determine the residues at the 2 microg/kg level. These two methods could not be applied directly to other soil types as the recoveries strongly depended on the soil composition. The developed methodologies were successfully applied in monitoring 87 real-world soil samples, in which only propanil (6 to 12 microg/kg) and clomazone (15 to 20 microg/kg) residues could be detected.

  6. Aggregate stability and associated C and N in a silty loam soil as affected by organic material inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Pan; SUI Peng; GAO Wang-sheng; WANG Bin-bin; HUANG Jian-xiong; YAN Peng; ZOU Juan-xiu; YAN Ling-ling; CHEN Yuan-quan

    2015-01-01

    To make recycling utilization of organic materials produced in various agricultural systems, ifve kinds of organic materials were applied in a ifeld test, including crop straw (CS), biogas residue (BR), mushroom residue (MR), wine residue (WR), pig manure (PM), with a mineral fertilizer (CF) and a no-fertilizer (CK) treatment as a control. Our objectives were:i) to quantify the effects of organic materials on soil C and N accumulation;i ) to evaluate the effects of organic materials on soil aggregate stability, along with the total organic carbon (TOC), and N in different aggregate fractions;and i i) to assess the relationships among the organic material components, soil C and N, and C, N in aggregate fractions. The trial was conducted in Wuqiao County, Hebei Province, China. The organic materials were incorporated at an equal rate of C, and combined with a mineral fertilizer in amounts of 150 kg N ha-1, 26 kg P ha-1 and 124 kg K ha-1 respectively during each crop season of a wheat-maize rotation system. The inputted C quantity of each organic material treatment was equivalent to the total amount of C contained in the crop straw harvested in CS treatement in the previous season. TOC, N, water-stable aggregates, and aggregate-associated TOC and N were investigated. The results showed that organic material incorpora-tion increased soil aggregation and stabilization. On average, the soil macroaggregate proportion increased by 14%, the microaggregate proportion increased by 3%, and mean-weight diameter (MWD) increased by 20%. TOC content fol owed the order of PM>WR>MR>BR>CS>CK>CF;N content fol owed the order WR>PM>MR>BR>CS>CF>CK. No signiifcant correlation was found between TOC, N, and the quality of organic material. Soil silt and clay particles contained the largest part of TOC, whereas the smal macroaggregate fraction was the most sensitive to organic materials. Our results indicate that PM and WR exerted better effects on soil C and N accumulation, fol owed by MR

  7. Cultivos de cobertura: efectos sobre la macroporosidad y la estabilidad estructural de un suelo franco-limoso Cover crops: effects on soil macroporosity and soil structural stability in a silt loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Florencia Varela

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Los suelos franco-limosos manejados con siembra directa a menudo poseen porosidad estructural baja e inestable. Con el objetivo de determinar la capacidad de los cultivos de cobertura (CC de mejorar la porosidad y estabilidad estructural de estos suelos se llevaron a cabo experimentos de campo y de invernáculo. Ambos tuvieron tratamientos con y sin CC (avena, Avena sativa L., en rotación con soja (Glicine max L. Merr.. Luego de los CC se midieron densidad aparente (DA, el índice de inestabilidad estructural (IE y en el ensayo de invernáculo además, se midió la evolución de la distribución de tamaño de poros (DTP. En ambos ensayos la introducción de CC no disminuyó la DA, aunque incrementó la estabilidad del suelo (PNo- till (NT silt loam topsoils have often a low and unstable structural porosity. The objective of this study was to determine the capability of cover crops (CC of improving the structural porosity and stability of silt loam soils under NT. Greenhouse and field experiments were carried out on a silt loam soil (Typic Argiudoll with and without CC (oat, Avena sativa L. in crop sequences with soybean (Glicine max L. Merr.. Soil bulk density (DA and aggregate instability index (IE were measured after the CC in both experiments. In the greenhouse experiment, soil pore size distribution (DTP was measured. The use of CC did not change DA, but soil IE was significantly lower in crop sequences with CC (P < 0.05 both under field and greenhouse conditions. Stability increases were likely due to the effect of CC residues and root mass. No differences in DTP were found between treatments, although a significant effect of sampling date was observed (P<0.05. Changes in DTP were due to significant increases in mesopore (517.5% and macropore (52.7% volumes. Such changes occurred in all the treatments, probably due to the soil wetting-drying cycles. The results found in this study agree with other studies carried out on silt loams in the

  8. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  9. Pesticide leaching in macroporous clay soils: field experiment and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords : pesticide leaching, macropores, preferential flow, preferential transport, cracked clay soil, pesticide leaching models, groundwater contamination, inverse modeling, bentazone and imidacloprid. The presence of macropores (i.e. shrinkage c

  10. Effect of Ionic Soil Stabilizers on Soil-Water Characteristic of Special Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The engineering properties of special clay are conventionally improved through the use of chemical additive such as ionic soil stabilizer (ISS). Such special clays are often referred to as stabilized or treated clays. The soil-water characteristic curves (SWCC) of special clays from Henan province and Hubei province were measured both in natural and stabilized conditions using the pressure plate apparatus in the suction range of 0-500 kPa. The SWCC results are used to interpret the special clays behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationships were developed between the basic clay and stabilized properties such as specific surface area and pore size distribution. The analysis showed that specific surface area decreases, cumulative pore volume and average pore size diameter decrease, dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. The research data and interpretation analysis presented here can be extended to understand the water film change behaviors influencing the mechanical and physical properties of stabilized special clay soils. KEY WORDS: ionic soil stabilizer, special clay, pore size diameter, specific surface area, soil water characteristic curve, water film

  11. Biochar increases plant-available water in a sandy loam soil under an aerobic rice crop system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo Carvalho, de M.T.; Holanda Nunes Maia, de A.; Madari, B.E.; Bastiaans, L.; Oort, van P.A.J.; Heinemann, A.B.; Soler da Silva, M.A.; Petter, F.A.; Marimon-Junior, B.H.; Meinke, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of biochar rate (0, 8, 16 and 32 Mg ha-1) on the water retention capacity (WRC) of a sandy loam Dystric Plinthosol. The applied biochar was a by-product of slow pyrolysis (~450 °C) of eucalyptus wood, milled to pass through a 2000 µm sieve th

  12. Clay minerals in a denudation-accumulative soil catena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhikova, N. P.; Sorokina, N. P.; Khitrov, N. B.; Samsonova, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Chernozems and agrochernozems of the Kamennaya Steppe agroforest landscape have a silty clay or clay texture and similar associations of clay minerals. The plow horizons of the agrochernozems on a slope of 2°-3° to the Talovaya Balka have an increased content of the smectite phase (50-70%) compared to the upper horizons of the chernozems on flat watersheds (30-50%) due to the lithological discontinuity of the soil-forming material and the possible total removal of material on the slope by denudation. On slightly eroded areas, the clay minerals display a more intense disturbance of their crystal lattice structures by pedogenetic processes, which increase the degree of disorder in their layers and the accumulation of fine quartz in the clay fraction. In the areas with more significant erosion of the humus horizon, the clay minerals are characterized by their perfect structure and clean reflections, which are indicative of the outcropping of less weathered material from the middle part of the chernozem profile less transformed by pedogenesis.

  13. Clay content evaluation in soils through GPR signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Patriarca, Claudio; Slob, Evert; Benedetto, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which arises some important issues in many fields of employment, such as civil and environmental engineering, geology, and agriculture. This work focuses on pavement engineering, although the method applies to other fields of interest. Clay content in bearing courses of road pavement frequently causes damages and defects (e.g., cracks, deformations, and ruts). Therefore, the road safety and operability decreases, directly affecting the increase of expected accidents. In this study, different ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods and techniques were used to non-destructively investigate the clay content in sub-asphalt compacted soils. Experimental layout provided the use of typical road materials, employed for road bearing courses construction. Three types of soils classified by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as A1, A2, and A3 were used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated test boxes. Percentages of bentonite clay were gradually added, ranging from 2% to 25% by weight. Analyses were carried out for each clay content using two different GPR instruments. A pulse radar with ground-coupled antennae at 500 MHz centre frequency and a vector network analyzer spanning the 1-3 GHz frequency range were used. Signals were processed in both time and frequency domains, and the consistency of results was validated by the Rayleigh scattering method, the full-waveform inversion, and the signal picking techniques. Promising results were obtained for the detection of clay content affecting the bearing capacity of sub-asphalt layers.

  14. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Babacar; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-06-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h -1, on 10 runoff micro-plots of 1 m 2, five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hydraulic properties such as capillary sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity of the sandy loam soil close to saturation were determined by running 48 infiltration tests with a tension disc infiltrometer. That allowed the calculation of a mean characteristic pore size hydraulically active and a time to ponding. Superficial water storage capacity was estimated using data collected with an electronic relief meter. Because the soil was subject to surface crusting, crust-types as well as their spatial distribution within micro-plots and their evolution with time were identified and monitored by taking photographs at different times after tillage. The results showed that the surface crust-types as well as their tillage dependent dynamics greatly explain the decrease of hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity as the cumulative rainfall since tillage increases. The exponential decaying rates were found to be significantly greater for the soil harrowed along the slope (where the runoff crust-type covers more than 60% of the surface after 140 mm of rain) than across to the slope (where crusts are mainly of structural (60%) and erosion (40%) types). That makes ponding time smaller and runoff more important. Also it was shown that soil hydraulic properties after about 160 mm of rain were close to those of untilled plot not submitted to any rain. That indicates that the effects of tillage are short lived.

  15. Soil, crop and emission responses to seasonal-controlled traffic in organic vegetable farming on loam soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, G.D.; Mosquera Losada, J.

    2009-01-01

    Some organic arable and vegetable farms in the Netherlands use cm-precise guidance of machinery to restrict wheel traffic to fixed traffic lanes and to achieve non-trafficked cropping zones with optimized soil structure in between the lanes. Contrary to controlled traffic farming (CTF) the traffic l

  16. Nitrite and Nitrate Removal Efficiencies of Soil Aquifer Treatment Columns

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNGÖR, Kerem; ÜNLÜ, Kahraman

    2005-01-01

    Bench-scale soil column experiments were performed to examine the effects of soil type and infiltration conditions on the removal efficiencies of wastewater nitrites and nitrates during the biological ripening phase of soil aquifer treatment (SAT) columns. SAT was simulated in three 1-m-high soil columns packed with 3 different natural agricultural soils having sandy clay loam (SCL), loamy sand (LS) and sandy loam (SL) textures. All columns were equipped with tensiometers and soil-wa...

  17. Soil precompression stress, penetration resistance and crop yields in relation to differently-trafficked, temperate-region sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2016-01-01

    strength measure predicting resistance to subsoil compaction. The tyre inflation pressure and/or the mean ground pressure were the main predictors of PR in the upper soil layers. For deeper soil layers, PR correlated better to the wheel load. The number of wheel passes (M-treatments vs the S12 treatment...... treatment (labelled M8-1), the soil was loaded only in the first year. A tricycle-like machine with a single pass of wide tyres each carrying 12 Mg (treatment S12) was included at one site. Traffic treatments were applied in a randomized block design with four replicates and with treatments repeated in four...... hypothesis of 3 Mg wheel load as an upper threshold for not inducing subsoil compaction was confirmed for the tractor-trailer treatments with repeated wheel passes but not supported for the single-pass machinery. The results call for further studies of the potential for carrying high loads using wide, low-pressure...

  18. Remediation of copper polluted red soils with clay materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gangya Zhang; Yunqing Lin; Mingkuang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Attapulgite and montmorillonite were utilized to remediate heavy metal polluted red soils in Guixi City, Jiangxi Province, China.The effects of clay minerals on availability, chemical distribution, and biotoxicity of Cu and Zn were evaluated.The results provided a reference for the rational application of clay materials to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils.From the sorption experiment,the maximum adsorbed Cu2+ by attapulgite and montmorillonite was 1501 and 3741 mg/kg, respectively.After polluted red soil was amended with attapulgite or montmorillonite and cultured at 30 and 60 days, soil pH increased significantly compared to the control.An 8% increase in the amount of montmorillonite in soil and 30 days incubation decreased acid exchangeable Cu by 24.7% compared to the control red soil.Acid exchangeable Cu decreased with increasing amounts of attapulgite and montmorillonite, with best remediation effect reached at a dose of 8%.Results also showed that the Cu poisoning effect on earthworms was reduced with the addition of attapulgite and montmorillonite.Montmoriilonite showed the best effect, with the addition of a 2% dose the mortality of earthworms decreased from 60% to zero compared to the control.Our results indicated that the bioavailability of Cu in soils was reduced more effectively with the application of montmorillonite than attapulgite.

  19. Study on Development of Leaf Tissue Structure of Flue-cured Tobacco Produced in Sandy Loam and Clay Loam in Wannan%皖南砂壤土和水稻土烤烟叶片组织结构发育规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国; 时向东; 季学军; 沈思灯; 马称心

    2011-01-01

    为了弄清烤烟叶片组织结构与皖南焦甜香特色风格的关系,对皖南砂壤土和水稻土烤烟叶片组织结构发育规律进行了研究.结果表明,土壤质地影响栅栏组织细胞快速分裂时期,对细胞总数的影响不明显.土壤质地间烟叶各组织厚度指标在叶肉细胞分裂期差异不大;叶肉细胞伸长前期,砂壤土烟叶栅栏组织细胞快速伸长较早,栅栏组织厚度与叶厚的比值和栅栏组织厚度与海绵组织厚度的比值也较大,而土壤质地引起的叶厚和海绵组织厚度发育差异规律在叶位间表现不一;但水稻土烟叶栅栏组织厚度、海绵组织厚度和叶厚均在叶长定长和成熟期达到或超过砂壤土水平.随着叶长的增加,皖南烤烟栅栏组织与海绵组织厚度比值和栅栏组织厚度与叶厚的比值均大体呈上升趋势.%The study results of development of leaf tissue structure of flue-cured tobacco produced in sandy loam soil and paddy soil in wannan area showed that: soil types could affect the time to cell rapid divisional of tobacco leaf palisade tissue, but not the total cell numbers. There were not obvious difference about leaf tissue thickness caused by soil types when the mesophyll cell divided; At the early stage of mesophyll cell elongation period, palisade tissue of tobacco leaf produced in sandy loam soil rapid elongated earlier, thus the thickness ratios of both palisade tissue to leaf and palisade tissue to sponge tissue were higher in this period, and the development changes in both palisade tissue thickness and leaf thickness caused by soil types were different between stalk positions; But palisade tissue thickness of the tobacco leaf produced in paddy soil reached or surpassed the levels of which produced in sandy loam soil, and so did the leaf thickness and the sponge tissue thickness. With the leaf growing, the thickness ratios of both palisade tissue to sponge tissue and palisade tissue to leaf

  20. Effects of long-term amendment of organic manure and nitrogen fertilizer on nitrous oxide emission in a sandy loam soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wei-xin; MENG Lei; CAI Zu-cong; HAN Feng-xiang

    2007-01-01

    To understand the effects of long-term amendment of organic manure and N fertilizer on N2O emission in the North China Plain,a laboratory incubation at different temperatures and soil moistures were carried out using soils treated with organic manure (OM),half organic manure plus half fertilizer N (HOM), fertilizer NPK (NPK), fertilizer NP (NP), fertilizer NK (NK), fertilizer PK (NK) and control (CK) since 1989. Cumulative N2O emission in OM soil during the 17 d incubation period was slightly higher than in NPK soil under optimum nitrification conditions (25C and 60% water-filled pore space, WFPS), but more than twice under the optimum denitrification conditions (35C and 90% WFPS). N2O produced by denitrification was 2.1-2.3 times greater than that by nitrification in OM and HOM soils, but only 1.5 times greater in NPK and NP soils. These results implied that the long-term amendment of organic manure could significantly increase the N2O emission via denitrification in OM soil as compared to NPK soil. This is quite different from field measurement between OM soil and NPK soil. Substantial inhibition of the formation of anaerobic environment for denitrification in field might result in no marked difference in N2O emission between OM and NPK soils. This is due in part to more rapid oxygen diffusion in coarse textured soils than consumption by aerobic microbes until WFPS was 75% and to low easily decomposed organic C of organic manure. This finding suggested that addition of organic manure in the tested sandy loam might be a good management option since it seldom caused a burst of N2O emission but sequestered atmospheric C and maintained efficiently applied N in soil.

  1. Influence of cracking in the desiccation process of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Levatti, Hector Ulises; Prat Catalán, Pere; Ledesma Villalba, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that clayey soils undergoing desiccation tend to shrink and eventually crack. Analysis of the behaviour and influence of cracks in these types of soils is very important in several engineering fields such as mine tailing dams, long-term radioactive waste storage, impervious core of earth dams, and in any situation where clay is used as a barrier to fluid flow. Loss of humidity and cracking changes the permeability of such barriers that may no longer work properly and pose pot...

  2. INFLUENCE OF VERMICOMPOST ON THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF SOIL ALONG WITH YIELD AND QUALITY OF THE PULSE CROP-BLACKGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Parthasarathi, M. Balamurugan, L. S. Ranganathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted during 2002-2003 on clay loam, sandy loam and red loam soil at Sivapuri, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, to evaluate the efficacy of vermicompost on the physico-chemical and biological characteristics of the soils and on the yield and nutrient content of blackgram - Vigna mungo, in comparison to inorganic fertilizers nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium. Vermicompost had increased the pore space, reduced particle and bulk density, increased water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity, reduced pH and electrical conductivity, increased organic carbon content, available nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and microbial population and activity in all the soil types, particularly clay loam. The yield and quality (protein and sugar content in seed of blackgram was enhanced in soils, particularly clay loam soil. On the contrary, the application of inorganic fertilizers has resulted in reduced porosity, compaction of soil, reduced carbon and reduced microbial activity.

  3. Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity along a Clay Gradient Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2013-01-01

    clay content, respectively) at a field site in Lerbjerg, Denmark. The water-holding capacity of soils markedly increased with increasing soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the L1 to L3 soils than for the L4 to L6 soils. Higher air permeability values...

  4. Field methods for studying soil moisture regimes and irrigation practices in clay soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of water flow through swelling clay soils with macropores (''cracks'') requires special techniques because these soils are not isotropic and homogeneous as required by standard flow theory. The techniques should preferably be rapid and inexpensive to allow applications in the field. Three experimental techniques, which were recently developed at the Netherlands Soil Survey Institute, are discussed. The measure: (i) vertical and horizontal Ksub(sat) in a gypsum-covered cube of soil which is carved out in situ (the cube method); (ii) the Ksub(unsat) near saturation down to pressure heads of about -15cm by determining fluxes through a series of crusts and the associated negative pressure heads below the crusts (the crusts test); and (iii) short-circuiting, which is the preferential movement of free water along vertical macropores in unsaturated soil, by applying sprinkling irrigation to large, undisturbed cores. In addition, three examples are discussed whereby soil morphological field data are used for simulation models which characterize soil moisture regimes of clay soils. These examples cover: (i) the effect of horizontal cracks on upward unsaturated flow; (ii) infiltration of sprinkling irrigation in a cracked clay soil; and (iii) ponded infiltration of water in a clay soil with worm channels. (author)

  5. Soil-Water Characteristic Curves of Red Clay treated by Ionic Soil Stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship of red clay particle with water is an important factor to produce geological disaster and environmental damage. In order to reduce the role of adsorbed water of red clay in WuHan, Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) was used to treat the red clay. Soil Moisture Equipment made in U.S.A was used to measure soil-water characteristic curve of red clay both in natural and stabilized conditions in the suction range of 0-500kPa. The SWCC results were used to interpret the red clay behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationship were compared between the basic soil and stabilizer properties such as water content, dry density, liquid limit, plastic limit, moisture absorption rate and stabilizer dosages. The analysis showed that the particle density and specific surface area increase, the dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. After treatment with the ISS, the geological disasters caused by the adsorbed water of red clay can be effectively inhibited.

  6. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using soil sampled from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ul...

  7. A Preliminary Study on Identification of Clay Minerals in Soils with Reference to Reflectance Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUBIN-BIN; LIDE-CHENG; 等

    1995-01-01

    The characteristics of the reflectance spectra of clay minerals and their influences on the reflectance spectra of soils are dealt with in the paper.The results showed that dominant clay minerals in soils could be distinguished in light of the spectral -form parameters of the reflectance spectra of soils,thus making it possible to develop a quick method to determine clay minerals by means of reflectance spectra of soils in the lab.and providing a theoretic basis for remote sensing of clay minerals in soils with a high resolution imaging spectrometer.

  8. Identification of iron oxide and hydroxide in soil clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, S. P.; Raj, D.

    1993-04-01

    Clay fractions of soils collected at different depths from the foothills of Karbi Anglong, Assam (India), have been analysed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mössbauer data, recorded at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, show the presence of iron oxide (α-Fe 2O 3, hematite) and iron oxyhydroxide (α-FeOOH, goethite) in the form of fine particles/Al-substituted. All samples exhibited strong superparamagnetism, characteristic of the fine size of the oxide particles and the effect of aluminum substitution. Both hematite and goethite are present in the lower horizon while only goethite occurs in the upper horizon. In addition, silicate clay minerals e.g. kaolinite and illite are also identified.

  9. Preferential transport of water and 131Iodide in a clay loam assessed with TDR-techniques and boundary-layer flow theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mdaghri Alaoui

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid soil moisture variations were measured with TDR equipment at five depths ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 m during five consecutive infiltration experiments under ponding. Each time, 27 mm of water were applied. The water of the second experiment was spiked with 200 mbq of K131I-tracer. Its activity was recorded as functions of depth and time with Geiger-Müller probes in 12 vertically installed access tubes. The soil moisture variations were classified as showing (i no reaction, (ii monotonous increase, and (iii rapid increase followed by a gradual decrease. Reaction type (iii was investigated further according to the boundary-layer flow theory and diagnosed as preferential flow. Rapid variations of 131I-activities occurred at all depths showing soil moisture reaction type (iii. However, some of the reaction types (i and (ii also included rapid variations of the activities. The approach based on boundary-laver flow theory allows fluxes to be estimated from soil moisture variations. Seven estimated total volumes of rapid flow ranged from 0.15 to 1.1 of the applied volume of water, and in only one case was the total volume badly overestimated by a factor of almost 3. The approach is worth further exploration.

  10. Passive Microwave Observation of Soil Water Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Parlange, Marc B.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration is a time varying process of water entry into soil. Experiments were conducted here using truck based microwave radiometers to observe small plots during and following sprinkler irrigation. Experiments were conducted on a sandy loam soil in 1994 and a silt loam in 1995. Sandy loam soils typically have higher infiltration capabilities than clays. For the sandy loam the observed brightness temperature (TB) quickly reached a nominally constant value during irrigation. When the irrigation was stopped the TB began to increase as drainage took place. The irrigation rates in 1995 with the silt loam soil exceeded the saturated conductivity of the soil. During irrigation the TB values exhibited a pattern that suggests the occurrence of coherent reflection, a rarely observed phenomena under natural conditions. These results suggested the existence of a sharp dielectric boundary (wet over dry soil) that was increasing in depth with time.

  11. Physical-hydraulic properties of a sandy loam typic paleudalf soil under organic cultivation of 'montenegrina' mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Valverde dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are the most important fruit species in the world, with emphasis to oranges, mandarins and lemons. In Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, most fruit production is found on small properties under organic cultivation. Soil compaction is one of the factors limiting production and due to the fixed row placement of this crop, compaction can arise in various manners in the interrows of the orchard. The aim of this study was to evaluate soil physical properties and water infiltration capacity in response to interrow management in an orchard of mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore 'Montenegrina' under organic cultivation. Interrow management was performed through harrowing, logs in em "V", mowing, and cutting/knocking down plants with a knife roller. Soil physical properties were evaluated in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, between the wheel tracks (BWT, and in the area under the line projection of the canopy (CLP, with undisturbed soil samples collected in the 0.00-0.15, 0.15-0.30, 0.30-0.45, and 0.45-0.60 m layers, with four replicates. The soil water infiltration test was performed using the concentric cylinder method, with a maximum time of 90 min for each test. In general, soil analysis showed a variation in the physical-hydraulic properties of the Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico arênico (sandy loam Typic Paleudalf in the three sampling sites in all layers, regardless of the management procedure in the interrows. Machinery traffic leads to heterogeneity in the soil physical-hydraulic properties in the interrows of the orchard. Soil porosity and bulk density are affected especially in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, which causes a reduction in the constant rate of infiltration and in the accumulated infiltration of water in this sampling site. The use of the disk harrow and mower leads to greater harmful effects on the soil, which can interfere with mandarin production.

  12. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg‑1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation.

  13. Preferential flow paths in a water repellent clay soil with grass cover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Grass-covered heavy basin clay soils in the Netherlands appeared to be water-repellent. Water-repellency in the top layers of these soils occurred mainly as a coating on the aggregates. Differences between minimum and maximum soil moisture contents were high in all the layers sampled. When the clay

  14. Hydraulic conductivity in sugar cane cultivated in soils previous vin aza application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work analyzes the hydraulic conductivity in soil clay loams developed in Libertad formation in Bella Union where grows sugar cane with vinaza. In the agricultural activities are used different chemical additives such as organic and inorganic fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides, which interact with the biotic (roots, soil microbiology) and abiotic (clay, soil solution, etc.) elements

  15. Microbial Decomposition of Extracellular DNA in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, E. M.; McHugh, T. A.; Schwartz, E.; Preteska, L.; Hayer, M.; Hungate, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Genomic analysis of soil communities can only be useful in predicting ecosystem processes if the genetic data gathered is representative of the microbial community. Consequently, extracellular DNA (eDNA) represents a pool of unexpressed genetic information that may skew genomic analyses. To date, our understanding of the representation of eDNA in metagenomic data and its decomposition in soil is very limited. To address this deficit, we performed a laboratory experiment wherein soils were amended with eDNA and/or clay minerals in a full factorial design. Specifically, the decomposition of 13C labeled E. coli DNA was monitored over a 30-day period in control, Kaolinite-amended, and Montmorillonite-amended soils. The amount of added eDNA carbon (C) remaining in the soil declined exponentially over time, with the majority of decomposition occurring in the first two weeks. Kaolinite significantly decreased eDNA decomposition rates and retained a higher fraction of eDNA-C (~70% remaining) than unamended and Montmorillonite-soils (~40% remaining) after 30 days. Phylogenetic (16S rRNA) sequencing of DNA extracted over the course of the incubation period enabled detection of the added eDNA. The relative abundance of added E. coli DNA decreased ~10-100 fold over 30 days. These results indicate that while a significant fraction of eDNA-C remained in the soil, this carbon was likely no longer in the form of intact strands of DNA amenable to sequencing. In addition, the eDNA affected the composition of the bacterial community. Specifically, the relative abundance of Planctomycetes and TM7 were elevated in soils that received eDNA regardless of clay addition, suggesting these phyla may be particularly effective at degrading eDNA and using it for growth. In conclusion these results indicate that the representation of eDNA in metagenomic sequence data declines rapidly, likely due to fragmentation. However, a fraction of eDNA material was resistant to decomposition, suggesting a

  16. Fabric and clay activity in soil water retention behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jommi Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling the water retention behaviour requires proper understanding of all the processes which affect the amount of water stored in the pore network, depending on the soil state and the soil history. Traditionally, in many applications a single water content – suction curve is used. This approach limits the applicability of the retention data to practical cases, especially when fine grain soils are dealt with, when the deformability and activity of the clay fraction significantly affect the interaction with water. On the other side, water retention is being recognised more and more as a fundamental information in the description of the mechanical response of the soil, as it provides the key connection to the partial volumetric strains in a deformation process. With reference to the work performed at the Politecnico di Milano in the last years, a contribution on the understanding and modelling the coupled water retention- mechanical response in deformable soils is presented. The contribution aims to: (i summarise the mechanisms which contribute to water retention; (ii point out the role played by an evolving fabric and the fluid properties on water retention; and (iii provide an overview on some of the consequences of evolving water retention properties on the mechanical behaviour.

  17. N leaching to groundwater from dairy production involving grazing over the winter on a clay-loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necpalova, M; Fenton, O; Casey, I; Humphreys, J

    2012-08-15

    This study investigated concentrations of various N species in shallow groundwater (piezometers was installed to determine groundwater flow direction and N spatial and temporal variation. Estimated vertical travel times through the unsaturated zone (piezometer, DOC concentration). A high explanatory power of NO(3)(-)-N/Cl(-) ratio and the distance of the sampling point from the closest receptor indicated the influence of point sources and groundwater-surface water interactions. PMID:22728303

  18. Investigations into aspects of nitrogen and carbon dynamics in grassland used for dairy production on a clay loam soil

    OpenAIRE

    Necpálová, Magdaléna

    2012-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of nitrogen (N) in the waterbodies along with increasing concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have become an international environmental concern. Permanent grasslands are important sources of feed for intensively managed dairy and beef farming systems in North West Europe and represent around 90% of agricultural land in Ireland. However, there is a potential for substantial N losses following grazing during the win...

  19. Effect of nutrients and plant growth regulators on growth and yield of black gram in sandy loam soils of Cauvery new delta zone, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marimuthu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulse productivity is very low in some of the sandy soil areas where, soils are having poor water and nutrient holding capacity. To improve the pulse productivity, field experiments were conducted at Agricultural Research Station, Tamil Nadu for two consecutive years to study the effect of phosphorus sources (mono- and diammonium phosphate with brassinolide and salicylic acid on growth and yield of black gram in sandy loam soils. The experiment was carried out in a randomized block design with three replications during kharif season. The treatments include 100% recommended dose of NPK along with foliar application of monoammonium phosphate (MAP, diammonium phosphate (DAP, brassinolide (0.25 ppm, and salicylic acid (100 ppm along with the combination of these treatments. TNAU pulse wonder at 5.0 kg ha−1 and TNAU micronutrient mixture (MN at 5 kg ha−1 were also tried. The results revealed that application of 100% recommended dose of NPK + DAP 2% + TNAU pulse wonder 5.0 kg ha−1 was statistically significant and recorded higher plant growth (37.62 cm, number of pods / plant (37.15, yield of black gram (1162 kg ha−1, and benefit cost ratio (2.98 over the other treatments. The lowest black gram yield (730 kg ha−1 was recorded for control.

  20. Investigation of Hydraulic Conductivity Coefficient for different Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifan, H.; Komaki, B.; Davari, K.

    2009-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is ability of water movement into saturation soil This parameter is used by irrigation and drainage projects. Parameters of soil texture, soil structure, salts, kind of fluid, soil temperature effect on hydraulic conductivity. This coefficient is measured by inverted auger hole, Guelph permeameter, falling head methods in over water table. This research was performed in research farms of Gorgan university. Soil texture was sandy loam, loam, clay loam. Hydraulic conductivity was between 0.5- 1.8 m/day. Keyword : Hydraulic conductivity, Inverted auger hole, Guelph, Fallin head, Gorgan

  1. Behaviour of radiocesium in a turf weakly podzolic loam soil: critical evaluation of the sequential extraction results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequential extraction procedure was applied to study the behavior of radiocesium in a turf weakly podzolic soil. The soil was sampled within the 30-km zone of the Chernobyl NPP (near Buryakivka village). No significant difference between exchangeable fractions for 1990-1995 was observed. However, there was some decreasing in non extractable residues. The redistribution of radiocesium's fraction in the soil during this procedure was studied; decreasing of first fractions was showed. Therefore, it is confirmed that the value of mobile forms of radiocesium obtained by the extraction procedure is underestimated. These results confirm the necessity of improving the methods of cesium's forms definition for soil

  2. Theoretical Analysis of the Influence of the Thermal Diffusivity of Clay Soil on the Thermal Energy Distribution in Clay Soil of Abakaliki, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ugwu, E. I.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the thermal diffusivity of clay soil on thermal energy distribution in clay soil was studied using one and two dimensioned heat equation, which was solved, by using separation of variables method. In the analysis, heat was assumed to be propagated along rectangular moldedclaywithlength(L)with the width being considered negligible in the case of one dimension with different temperature ranging from 350 to 1290ºC within zero to one minute chosen where some parameters such as th...

  3. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.R. [Reclamation Technology, Inc., Athens, GA (United States); Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Johnson, D.O. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -1} cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems.

  4. Quantity and nature of water-extractable organic matter from sandy loam soils with potato cropping managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) is part of the soil labile organic matter components. In this work, we evaluated the level and nature of soil WEOM from a long-term (6-year) potato crop rotation field experiment. The contents of water-extractable organic C (WEOC) were higher in continuous pot...

  5. Study and Estimation of the Ratio of 137CS and 40K Specific Activities in Sandy and Loam Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Mikalauskienė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes changes in specific activities and fluctuations in the ratio of natural 40K and artificial 137Cs radionuclides in soil samples taken from different places of Lithuanian territory. The samples of soil have been selected from the districts polluted after the accident in Chernobyl nuclear plant performing nuclear testing operations. The study has established the main physical and chemical properties of soil samples and their impact on the concentration of 40K activities. 137Cs/40K specific activities in soil have been observed under the dry weight of the sample that varied from 0.0034 to 0.0240. The results of the study could be used for establishing and estimating 137Cs and 40K transfer in the system “soil-plant”.Article in Lithuanian

  6. Study of moisture migration in clay soils considering rate of freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA Kudriavtcev; AV Kazharskii; ED Goncharova; IB Berestianyi

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents some methods of numerical modeling and a study of moisture changing in frozen clay soils considering rates of freezing in the base of construction. An impact assessment of moisture changes in clay soils affecting strength characteristics during thawing was carried out in stability tests.

  7. Magnitude, modeling and significance of swelling and shrinkage processes in clay soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic process of swelling and shrinkage in clay soils has significant practical consequences, such as the rapid transport of water and solutes via shrinkage cracks to the subsoil, and the destruction of buildings and roads on clay soils. In order to develop measuring methods and computer simul

  8. Effects of organic matter and clay content in soil on pesticide adsorption processes

    OpenAIRE

    Rada Đurović; Jelena Gajić-Umiljendić; Tijana Đorđević

    2009-01-01

    The effect of organic matter and clay content on the adsorption of atrazine, acetochlor, clomazone, pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen in soil samples was studied. In order to determine whether and to what degree different soil properties affect the process of determination of selected pesticides, three soils with different clay and organic matter contents were used. An optimized liquid-solid extraction procedure followed by SPME measurement was applied to analyze the selected pesticides in soil s...

  9. To what extent clay mineralogy affects soil aggregation? Consequences for soil organic matter stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ugalde, O.; Barré, P.; Hubert, F.; Virto, I.; Chenu, C.; Ferrage, E.; Caner, L.

    2012-12-01

    Aggregation is a key process for soil functioning as it influences C storage, vulnerability to erosion and water holding capacity. While the influence of soil organic C on aggregation has been documented, much less is known about the role of soil mineralogy. Soils usually contain a mixture of clay minerals with contrasted surface properties, which should result on different abilities of clay minerals to aggregation. We took advantage of the intrinsic mineral heterogeneity of a temperate Luvisol to compare the role of clay minerals (illite, smectite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite) in aggregation. In a first step, grassland and tilled soil samples were fractionated in water in aggregate-size classes according to the hierarchical model of aggregation (Tisdall and Oades, 1982). Clay mineralogy and organic C in the aggregate-size classes were analyzed. The results showed that interstratified minerals containing swelling phases accumulated in aggregated fractions (>2 μm) compared to free clay fractions (500 μm) to micro-aggregates (50-250 μm). C concentration and C/N ratio followed the opposite trend. These results constitute a clay mineral-based evidence for the hierarchical model of aggregation, which postulates an increasing importance of the reactivity of clay minerals in the formation of micro-aggregates compared to larger aggregates. In the latter aggregates, formation relies on the physical enmeshment of particles by fungal hyphae, and root and microbial exudates. In a second step, micro-aggregates from the tilled soil samples were submitted to increasingly disaggregating treatments by sonication to evaluate the link between their water stability and clay mineralogy. Micro-aggregates with increasing stability showed an increase of interstratified minerals containing swelling phases and C concentration for low intensities of disaggregation (from 0 to 5 J mL-1). This suggests that swelling phases promote their stability. Swelling phases and organic C

  10. THE SIDE-EFFECT OF ORGANIC INSECTICIDE SPINOSAD ON BIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    Arkadiusz Telesiński; Wiera Michalcewicz; Maciej Płatkowski; Michał Stręk; Mirosław Onyszko; Jolanta Wiśniewska

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of spinosad on soil biochemical and microbiological properties. The experiment was carried out on sandy loam with Corg content 10.91 g·kg-l. Spinosad, as Spintor 240 SC was added into soil in dosages: a recommended field dosage, and fivefold, tenfold, and twenty-fivefold higher dosages. The amount of spinosad introduced into soil was between 12.55 and 313.75 g·kg-l. Moreover, soil samples without spinosad supplement were prepared as a reference...

  11. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots. The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14±5% (mean ± standard deviation. Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  12. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality.

  13. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality. PMID:27022106

  14. Leaching of atrazine, metolachlor and diuron in the field in relation to their injection depth into a silt loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delphin, J E; Chapot, J Y

    2006-09-01

    A field experiment was conducted on a Calcaric Cambisol soil to study the consequences of the penetration depth and properties of pesticides on the risk of subsequent leaching. Three pesticides with different mobility characteristics and bromide were injected at 30 cm (where soil organic matter (OM) was 2%) and 80 cm (soil OM 0.5%) on irrigated plots without a crop. The migration of injected solutes was assessed for two years by sampling the soil solution using six porous cups installed at 50 and 150 cm depth and by relating solute contents to drainage water flux estimated by the STICS model (Simulateur mulTIdisciplinaire pour les Cultures Standard). Pesticides injected at 30 cm were strongly retained so that no metolachlor or diuron was detected at 50 and 150 cm. The ratio of atrazine peak concentration in the soil solution to concentration in the injected solution (C/C(0)) was 1 x 10(-3) and 0.2 x 10(-3), respectively, at 50 and 150 cm. When injected at 80 cm, (C/C(0)) of atrazine, metolachlor and diuron were 10 x 10(-3), 1 x 10(-3) and 0.3 x 10(-3) at 150 cm, respectively; 1/(C/C(0)) was correlated with K(oc) values reported from databases. The ratio of drainage volume to the amount of water at field capacity in the soil layer between the injection point at 30 cm and the water sampling level (V/V(0)) at 50 and 150 cm was 0.6 and 0.9, respectively, for bromide and 1.6 and 1.0 for atrazine. V/V(0) of the injected solutes at 80 cm was for bromide, atrazine, metolachlor and diuron 0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.7, respectively; pesticide V/V(0) was correlated with K(oc). The retardation factor was a good indicator of migration risk, but tended to overestimate retardation of molecules with high K(oc). Atrazine desorption represented an additional leaching risk as a source of prolonged low contamination. The large variability in soil solution of bromide and pesticide concentrations in the horizontal plane was attributed to flow paths and clods in the tilled soil layer. This

  15. Effects of the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate and potassium leaching in two soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shao-fu; WU Liang-huan; SHI Qi-wei; WANG Zhong-qiang; CHEN Xian-you; LI Yong-shan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, soil column was used to study the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate (NO3--N) and potassium (K) leaching in the sandy loam soil and clay loam soil. The results showed that DMPP with ammonium sulphate nitrate (ASN) ((NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) or urea could reduce NO3--N leaching significantly, whereas ammonium (NH4+-N) leaching increased slightly. In case of total N (NO3--N+NH4+-N), losses by leaching during the experimental period (40 d) were 37.93 mg (urea), 31.61 mg (urea+DMPP), 108.10 mg (ASN), 60.70 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the sandy loam soil, and 30.54 mg (urea), 21.05 mg (urea+DMPP), 37.86 mg (ASN), 31. 09 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the clay loam soil, respectively. DMPP-amended soil led to the maintenance of relatively high levels of NH4+-N and low levels of NO3--N in soil, and nitrification was slower. DMPP supplementation also resulted in potassium leached less, but the difference was not significant except the treatment ASN and ASN+DMPP in the sandy loam soil. Above results indicate that DMPP is a good nitrification inhibitor, the efficiency of DMPP seems better in the sandy loam soil than in the clay loam soil and lasts longer.

  16. Effect of Clay Minerals on the Chemical Characteristics of Soil Humus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YEWEI; WENQIXIAO

    1996-01-01

    Chemical characteristics of humic substances in soils with different mineralogical characteristics and under different utilization paterns in Zhangpu,Fujian Province,together with two pairs of cultivated soils in North China Plain were studied by chemical analysis,visible and IR spectroscopy and 13C NMR spectrometry.For soils in Zhanpu the HA/FA ratio and both the aromaticity and the degree of humification of HA were higher in soils with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral than in those with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral,provided these soils were under the same utilization pattern.While for each pair of soils with similar mineralogical characteristics the HA/FA ratio was higher and the C/H ratio and the contnet of carboxyl group of HA were lower in paddy soil than in upland soil.Among the upland soils(or paddy soils)studied the Ha/FA ratio of soil in Zhangpu with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral was the lowest,and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest .the lowest.and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest It was concluded that the presence of montmorillonite favored the fromation and maturation of humic acid.

  17. State-space prediction of field-scale soil water content time series in a sandy loam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendroth, O.; Rogasik, H.; Koszinski, S.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.; Nielsen, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The description of field soil water content time series can be affected by uncertainty due to measurement errors of the respective state variables, errors due to assumptions underlying the model, and errors in the determination of boundary conditions. In this study, a simple state-equation was appli

  18. Modeling hydrology, metribuzin degradation and metribuzin transport in macroporous tilled and no-till silt loam soil using RZWQM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert W; Ma, Liwang; Wauchope, R Don; Ahuja, Lajpat R; Rojas, Kenneth W; Ma, Qingli; Warner, Richard; Byers, Matt

    2004-03-01

    Due to the complex nature of pesticide transport, process-based models can be difficult to use. For example, pesticide transport can be effected by macropore flow, and can be further complicated by sorption, desorption and degradation occurring at different rates in different soil compartments. We have used the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) to investigate these phenomena with field data that included two management conditions (till and no-till) and metribuzin concentrations in percolate, runoff and soil. Metribuzin degradation and transport were simulated using three pesticide sorption models available in RZWQM: (a) instantaneous equilibrium-only (EO); (b) equilibrium-kinetic (EK, includes sites with slow desorption and no degradation); (c) equilibrium-bound (EB, includes irreversibly bound sites with relatively slow degradation). Site-specific RZWQM input included water retention curves from four soil depths, saturated hydraulic conductivity from four soil depths and the metribuzin partition coefficient. The calibrated parameters were macropore radius, surface crust saturated hydraulic conductivity, kinetic parameters, irreversible binding parameters and metribuzin half-life. The results indicate that (1) simulated metribuzin persistence was more accurate using the EK (root mean square error, RMSE = 0.03 kg ha(-1)) and EB (RMSE = 0.03 kg ha(-1)) sorption models compared to the EO (RMSE = 0.08 kg ha(-1)) model because of slowing metribuzin degradation rate with time and (2) simulating macropore flow resulted in prediction of metribuzin transport in percolate over the simulation period within a factor of two of that observed using all three pesticide sorption models. Moreover, little difference in simulated daily transport was observed between the three pesticide sorption models, except that the EB model substantially under-predicted metribuzin transport in runoff and percolate >30 days after application when transported concentrations were relatively low

  19. Radiocesium sorption in relation to clay mineralogy of paddy soils in Fukushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Sho; Sano, Oki; Ito, Toyoaki; Yanai, Junta

    2014-01-15

    Relationships between Radiocesium Interception Potential (RIP) and mineralogical characteristics of the clay fraction isolated from 97 paddy soils (Hama-dori, n = 25; Naka-dori, n = 36; Aizu, n = 36) in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan were investigated to clarify the mineralogical factors controlling the (137)Cs retention ability of soils (half-life 30.1 y). Of all the fission products released by the Fukushima accident, (137)Cs is the most important long-term contributor to the environmental contamination. The RIP, a quantitative index of the (137)Cs retention ability, was determined for the soil clays. The composition of clay minerals in the soil clays was estimated from peak areas obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The predominant clay mineral was smectite in soils from Hama-dori and Aizu, while this was variable for those from Naka-dori. Native K content of the soil clays was found to be an indicator of the amount of micaceous minerals. The average RIP for the 97 soil clays was 7.8 mol kg(-1), and ranged from 2.4 mol kg(-1) to 19.4 mol kg(-1). The RIP was significantly and positively correlated with native K content for each of the geographical regions, Hama-dori (r = 0.76, p < 0.001), Naka-dori (r = 0.43, p < 0.05), and Aizu (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), while it was not related to the relative abundance of smectite. The linear relationship between RIP and native K content not only indicate a large contribution of micaceous minerals to the (137)Cs retention ability of the soil clays, but also could be used to predict the (137)Cs retention ability of soil clays for other paddy fields in Fukushima and other areas.

  20. Clay mineral formation and transformation in rocks and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three mechanisms for clay mineral formation (inheritance, neoformation, and transformation) operating in three geological environments (weathering, sedimentary, and diagenetic-hydrothermal) yield nine possibilities for the origin of clay minerals in nature. Several of these possibilities are discussed in terms of the rock cycle. The mineralogy of clays neoformed in the weathering environment is a function of solution chemistry, with the most dilute solutions favoring formation of the least soluble clays. After erosion and transportation, these clays may be deposited on the ocean floor in a lateral sequence that depends on floccule size. Clays undergo little reaction in the ocean, except for ion exchange and the neoformation of smectite; therefore, most clays found on the ocean floor are inherited from adjacent continents. Upon burial and heating, however, dioctahedral smectite reacts in the diagenetic environment to yield mixed-layer illite-smectite, and finally illite. With uplift and weathering, the cycle begins again. Refs.

  1. Soil Compaction and Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Yield in a Clay Textured Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidah Yahya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The impacts of soil compaction on crop yields have been studied extensively by soil scientists due to declining soil productivity associated with mechanisation. However, a relationship between machine-induced soil compaction and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis yield is unclear. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of mechanization on soil physical properties and the influence on oil palm yield. Approach: The palms were planted in Bernam series soil which is clay textured. Compaction treatments were imposed for 6 consecutive years. Comparisons were made between the effects of soil compaction caused by different trailer weights and monthly transportation frequency. Results: The results showed a beneficial effect of soil compaction on the oil palm yield. It significantly increased the yield with increased mean soil bulk density. The transportation frequency played a greater role than the trailer weight. After six years of soil compaction, there was a positive relationship between mean soil bulk density, porosity and oil palm yield. Conclusion: Thus compaction may not often be a problem.

  2. Estimation of the density of the clay-organic complex in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2016-01-01

    Soil bulk density was investigated as a function of soil contents of clay and organic matter in arable agricultural soils at a range of locations. The contents of clay and organic matter were used in an algorithmic procedure to calculate the amounts of clay-organic complex in the soils. Values of soil bulk density as a function of soil organic matter content were used to estimate the amount of pore space occupied by unit amount of complex. These estimations show that the effective density of the clay-organic matter complex is very low with a mean value of 0.17 ± 0.04 g ml-1 in arable soils. This value is much smaller than the soil bulk density and smaller than any of the other components of the soil considered separately (with the exception of the gas content). This low value suggests that the clay-soil complex has an extremely porous and open structure. When the complex is considered as a separate phase in soil, it can account for the observed reduction of bulk density with increasing content of organic matter.

  3. Impact of lfuxapyroxad on the microbial community structure and functional diversity in the silty-loam soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-hu; XU Jun; LIU Yong-zhuo; DONG Feng-shou; LIU Xin-gang; ZHANG Wen-wen; ZHENG Yong-quan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of applying three different doses of lfuxapyroxad on microbial activity, com-munity structure and functional diversity as measured by respiration, microbial biomass C, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and community-level physiological proifles (CLPPs). Our results demonstrated that substrate-induced respiration (on day 15) and microbial biomass C (on days 7 and 15) were inhibited by lfuxapyroxad, but stimulation was observed thereafter. In contrast, lfuxapyroxad addition increased the basal respiration and metabolic quotients (qCO2) and respiratory quotients (QR). Analysis of the PLFA proifles revealed that the total and bacterial biomass (both Gram-positive bacteria (GP) and Gram-negative bacteria (GN)) were decreased within the initial 15 days, whereas those as wel as the GN/GP ratio were increased at days 30 and 60. Fluxapyroxad input decreased the fungi biomass but increased the bacteria/fungi ratio at al incubation time. Moreover, high lfuxapyroxad input (75 mg lfuxapyroxad kg–1 soil dry weight) increased the microbial stress level. A principal component analysis (PCA) of the PLFAs revealed that lfuxapyroxad treatment signiifcantly shifted the microbial community structure, but al of the observed effects were transient. Biolog results showed that average wel color development (AWCD) and functional diversity index (H´) were increased only on day 60. In addition, the dissipation of lfuxa-pyroxad was slow in soil, and the degradation half-lives varied from 158 to 385 days depending on the concentration tested.

  4. Prediction of Soil Moisture Content and Soil Salt Concentration from Hyperspectral Laboratory and Field Data

    OpenAIRE

    Chi Xu; Wenzhi Zeng; Jiesheng Huang; Jingwei Wu; Willem J. D. van Leeuwen

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the simultaneous retrieval of surface soil moisture and salt concentrations using hyperspectral reflectance data in an arid environment. We conducted laboratory and outdoor field experiments in which we examined three key soil variables: soil moisture, salt and texture (silty loam, clay and silty clay). The soil moisture content models for multiple textures (M_SMC models) were based on selected hyperspectral reflectance data located around 1460, 1900 and 2010 nm and res...

  5. Phosphorus leaching from clay soils can be counteracted by structure liming

    OpenAIRE

    Ulen, Barbro; Etana, Ararso

    2014-01-01

    Two field experiments with drained plots on clay soils (60 and 25 % clay) demonstrated a significant reduction in leaching of total phosphorus after application of structure lime. Aggregate stability, was significantly improved. Phosphorus leaching in particulate form was significantly reduced following structure liming at the site with a very high clay content. Sites representing low (50 mg kg-1) and high (140 mg kg-1) levels of phosphorus extractable with acid ammonium lactate in topsoil di...

  6. The Effects of Land Configuration and Wood-Shavings Mulch on the Properties of a Sandy Loam Soil in Northeast Nigeria. 2. Changes in Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiroma, AM.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mulching and ridge tillage are proven technologies for improving soil productivity in semi-arid regions. Yet data quantifying the combined influences of these practices are limited. Our objectives were to determine the changes in selected physical properties of a sandy loam after 4-years of annual tillage and wood-shavings mulching. The tillage and wood-shavings treatments consisted of: Flat bed (FB, Open ridge (OR, Tiedridge (TR, FBM, ORM and TRM were same as FB, OR and TR, respectively except that wood-shavings at a rate of 10 t/ha were surface applied ≈ 2 weeks after sowing each year to serve as both a mulch and an organic amendment. At the end of the trial in 2002, bulk density, penetration resistance, total porosity and soil water content from each of 0-0.075, 0.075-0.15 and 0.15-0.30 m depths were determined. Composite samples from the surface (0.075 and 0.075-0.15 m layers from 3 replicates of each treatment were also collected for the determination of wet aggregate stability and from 0-0.15 m and 0.15-0.30 m layers for determination of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat. After 4 years of annual tillage and addition of woodshavings, soil bulk density and penetration resistance were consistently lower and total porosity higher in the FBM, ORM and TRM treatments than in the FB, OR and TR treatments. Penetration resistance in all treatments was strongly related to soil water content. A 'hoe pan' was established below 0.15 m depth beneath the furrows of the ridged treatments. This could be attributed to human traffic during field operations and ponding of water, which occurred in the furrows following heavy rains. Wet aggregate stability estimated as the proportion of aggregates of size > 0.25 mm (macro-aggregates in the 0-0.15 m layer were significantly (P< 0.05 higher under FBM, ORM and TRM than under FB, OR or TR treatments. Ksat was not influenced by either tillage or wood-shavings treatments but were higher for the mulched plots

  7. Impact of soil texture on soil moisture measurement accuracy by TDR in Sistan plain of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    sarani, noushin; Afrasiab, Peyman

    2014-05-01

    In the recent past, many researchers have developed various techniques for determining moisture content of soil. Among the various methods of estimating soil moisture, Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) method is a relatively new method. TDR has been widely used in water system investigation in Agriculture, Geosciences, etc. The purpose of this study is determination of moisture measurement accuracy by TDR in various soil textures in Sistan plain. For this purpose, six textures and for each of them three Iteration were used. The studied textures were clay, loam, sandy loam, sandy clay loam, clay loam and sandy. The experiments were carried out at the laboratory of water engineering department of Zabol University in Iran. The provided textures were laid in the PVC cylinder with 50 cm height and 30 cm diameter. After 24 h of saturation, the soil water content of the samples was measured by oven-dry gravimetric and TDR methods. In each day the moisture measurement of each texture was carried out by these two methods until a moisture range was determined. For comparison between measured moisture values by TDR and gravimetric method, two statistical parameters include coefficient of determination (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE) were applied here. The results showed that by using SPSS, statistically significant at probably level of 1% indicated no difference between the measured value of moisture by TDR device and gravimetric method. For heavy textures consist of sandy clay loam, clay loam, and clay with increasing clay content when the moisture was low, TDR measured the moisture values less than the gravimetric method. Furthermore for light textures consist of sandy loam and sand, the TDR device measured the moisture values more than the gravimetric method. Also for clay loam and sandy clay at high moisture values, data measured by TDR was close to the gravimetric method. For all studied textures with increasing of clay content, the fitted lines slope and RMSE

  8. Carbon saturation in the silt and clay particles in soils with contrasting mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Matus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The silt and clay particles play a key role as stabilizing agents of soil organic carbon (SOC. Several lines of evidence indicate a theoretical maximum or C saturation in individual particles. In the present study, we hypothesized that a C fraction displaying linear accumulation relative to the SOC is not influenced by C saturation, while a fraction displaying an asymptotic relationship is regarded as saturated (Stewart et al., 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare the amount of C in the silt and clay sized fractions in temperate and subtropical cropping soils across a range of textures with different mineralogy. Twenty-one and 18 soil samples containing 1:1 and 2:1 clay of temperate soil from Chile under monoculture of maize (Zea maiz L. for at least 30 years and 9 subtropical soils from Mexico under maize and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cropping for 9 years having mixed clay were collected at 0-0.1 m. The SOC of 2:1 soils was significantly higher (14±0.5 g kg-1 dry soil than 1:1 soils (10±0.7 g kg-1. However, subtropical soils showed the highest values (59±0.5 g kg-1. A positive (P < 0.01 relationship was observed between the SOC and the C in the silt fraction (R2 0.80-0.97, P < 0.01. In contrast, the clay fraction remained constant or showed asymptotic behavior. We conclude that the silt fraction, unlike clay, showed no evidence of C saturation, while clay accumulates C to a maximum. On average, the 2:1 clay was saturated at 1-2 g C kg-1 and 1:1 at 1 g C kg-1, and subtropical soils at 14 g C kg-1.

  9. Searching the critical soil organic carbon threshold for satisfactory tilth conditions – test of the Dexter clay:carbon hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L. W.; P. Moldrup; B. T. Christensen; Olesen, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    The concern for deteriorating soil structure at low soil organic matter (SOM) contents calls for better knowledge of SOM interaction with soil minerals as well as guidelines for soil conservation. We measured clay dispersibility in a field with a textural gradient. Our results support the concept of differentiating soil content of clay in a complexed and non-complexed part although our data did not point out an exact clay/OC ratio threshold. Our results also indicated that labile fractions of...

  10. Estimation of Wet Bulb Formation in Various Soil During Drip Irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Aimin; Marui, Atsushi; Haraguchi, Tomokazu; Nakano, Yoshisuke

    2007-01-01

    Small water resources can be utilized more effectively in the drip irrigation system. To use limited water effectively, it is important to irrigate exactly in the root zone. First, hydraulic conductivities and diffusivities on various soil types were studied. The experiment was performed on sand (Coastal sand), sandy loam (Masa), loam (Kuroboku, volcanic ash) and clay (Coral clay). Second, cylindrical compartment model to estimate wet bulb size was proposed. Wet bulb formations on various soi...

  11. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2011-01-01

    -textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting...... soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 μm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam...... physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil...

  12. Fate of carbosulfan and monocrotophos in sandy loam soils of Pakistan under field conditions at different watertable depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad Ilyas; Afzal, Shahzad; Shahzad, Farina

    2010-05-01

    Information regarding pesticide mobility is critical for the evaluation of pesticide management practices. For this purpose, lysimetric studies were conducted to develop assessment schemes to protect groundwater from unacceptable effects caused by pesticide use. By using these studies, specific monitoring actions and prevention measures for the protection of waters can be studied, and the results thus obtained can provide the local authorities and the decision makers with an identification tool for demarcating risk areas. Pesticide residues were found at the bottom of lysimeters in the following pattern i.e., 1.52 > 2.1 > 2.74 m which could represent an "index of risk" for groundwater pollution. Regressions built for carbofuran and monocrotophos against watertable depths showed a decreasing trend of pesticide in higher watertable treatments. These findings support the existence of a significant role for chromatographic flow in sandy texture soil. Moreover, the higher values of pesticide residue at the bottom of lysimeters reflect that chromatographic flow as well as preferential flow pattern prevails during higher precipitation events. The precipitation received during the study was higher than the 10 year average and can be considered relatively as a worst case scenario. Finally, the authors have recommended a standardized pesticide monitoring scheme for groundwater in accordance with the already validated generic schemes in developed countries. PMID:21491630

  13. Clays Can Decrease Gaseous Nutrient Losses from Soil-Applied Livestock Manures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Chris; Redding, Matthew; Hill, Jaye; Brown, Grant; Westermann, Maren

    2016-03-01

    Clays could underpin a viable agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement technology given their affinity for nitrogen and carbon compounds. We provide the first investigation into the efficacy of clays to decrease agricultural nitrogen GHG emissions (i.e., NO and NH). Via laboratory experiments using an automated closed-vessel analysis system, we tested the capacity of two clays (vermiculite and bentonite) to decrease NO and NH emissions and organic carbon losses from livestock manures (beef, pig, poultry, and egg layer) incorporated into an agricultural soil. Clay addition levels varied, with a maximum of 1:1 to manure (dry weight). Cumulative gas emissions were modeled using the biological logistic function, with 15 of 16 treatments successfully fitted ( oxide emissions were significantly lower (×3; < 0.05) at the highest clay addition level compared with no clay addition. When assessing manures individually, we observed generally decreasing trends in NH and NO emissions with increasing clay addition, albeit with widely varying statistical significance between manure types. Most of the treatments also showed strong evidence of increased C retention with increasing clay additions, with up to 10 times more carbon retained in treatments containing clay compared with treatments containing no clay. This preliminary assessment of the efficacy of clays to mitigate agricultural GHG emissions indicates strong promise. PMID:27065411

  14. Electrical properties of water in clay and silty soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarenketo, Timo

    1998-10-01

    In order to better understand ground penetrating radar (GPR) results obtained in road surveys and site investigations, the dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of four silt and clay soils were measured at different densities and moisture contents ranging from oven dry material to the plastic state. The real parts K' and imaginary parts K″ of the relative dielectric permittivity values of the soils were measured with an HP Surface Network Analyzer over a frequency range from 30 MHz to 3.0 GHz. A dielectric and electrical conductivity meter produced by Adek was also used. The results suggest that water in soils can be classified according to its electrical properties as: (1) an adsorption water layer, also known as the hygroscopic water layer; (2) a viscous or capillary water layer; and (3) free water. The measurements also showed that the adsorption water layer can be divided into inner and outer layers in accordance with the electrical double layer theory. The imaginary part of the dielectric value of the material is formed mainly in the outer layer and partly in the viscous (capillary) water layer, which also has two layers with differing electrical properties. The measurements also clearly showed that if the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) of a material is low, the water molecules are orderly arranged around the soil particles and the dielectric values of the bound water layers remain almost independent of frequency. If the CEC increases, the molecular structure of the bound water layers is disturbed and the water molecules more easily follow the changing AC field so that the dielectric value is higher. These materials are also highly dielectrically dispersive, especially at GPR frequencies below 400 MHz. Increasing CEC correlates well with increasing imaginary part of the adsorption water layer. Measured ohmic electrical conductivities were low at low moisture content and increased as the outer viscous water layer developed with higher moisture

  15. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis of the soil water characteristic (SWC) has been extensively studied for matric potentials between zero and −1.5 MPa. However, little information is available on how to quantify, evaluate, and identify the causes of hysteresis at potentials below −10 MPa where vapor sorption plays...... an important role. It is clear that modeling physical and biological soil processes is more accurate when SWC hysteresis is considered, particularly at low potentials where small differences in water content are associated with large changes in potential energy. The objectives of the presented study were to......: (i) evaluate and compare recently developed methods (MBET-n, Dh and SPN) for quantifying hysteresis in soils and pure clays, and (ii) investigate the role of organic matter (OM) and clay content and type on hysteresis. Five pure clays and two sets of soils with gradients in organic matter and clay...

  16. Effect of Polypropylene Fibers, Lime and Ceramic Additives on the Compressibility of Silty-Clay Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Hiba D. Saleem; Asad H. Humaish

    2016-01-01

    Soil stabilization is widely used by geotechnical engineers in the world to increase soil strength, soil compressibility and reduce the permeability. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different materials to the silty clayey soil (i.e. polypropylene fibers, lime and ceramic) and to figure out how the compressibility behave under mixture soil and these stabilized material at different percent (investigation their effect on the value of settlement). Silty clay ...

  17. Electron Microscopic Observation of Clays of Calcareous and Noncalcareous Soils in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    ALAM, Md. Lutfe; KAKOI, Teruzane; MIYAUCHI, Nobufumi; SHINAGAWA, Akio; カコイ, テルザネ; ミヤウチ, ノブフミ; シナガワ, アキオ

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopic observation of calcareous and noncalcareous floodplain soils of Bangladesh were carried out by TEM and SEM. Morphological changes in relation to clay formation and weathering process were investigated. Unweathered, partially weathered and weathered micaceous mineralsaccompanying with poorly crystallized kaolinite and halloysite and other primary minerals were observed in silt and coarse clay of both calcareous and noncalcareous soil. Smectite and vermiculite which aredomi...

  18. Electron Microscopic Observation of Clays of Calcareous and Noncalcareous Soils in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    ALAM, Md. Lutfe; KAKOI, Teruzane; MIYAUCHI, Nobufumi; SHINAGAWA, Akio; カコイ, テルザネ; ミヤウチ, ノブフミ; シナガワ, アキオ

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopic observation of calcareous and noncalcareous floodplain soils of Bangladesh were carried out by TEM and SEM. Morphological changes in relation to clay formation and weathering process were investigated. Unweathered, partially weathered and weathered micaceous minerals accompanying with poorly crystallized kaolinite and halloysite and other primary minerals were observed in silt and coarse clay of both calcareous and noncalcareous soil. Smectite and vermiculite which are...

  19. Long-term effects of grass-clover ley on the structure of a silt loam soil in a cold temperate climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats; Taylor, Astrid; Kätterer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soil pore space structure is mediated by interacting biological and physical processes that can be strongly affected by land use or management change. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of grass-clover leys on the structure of a silt loam soil in a cold humid climate. The measurements were made in a long-term field trial established in 1956 at Offer in northern Sweden. This experiment includes four treatments with varying proportions of ley (1, 2, 3 or 5 years) in a 6-year forage-based rotation. We used X-ray tomography to quantify topsoil structural pore networks in the first year of arable cropping following the ley break, a few weeks after sowing in spring. Near-saturated infiltration was also measured as a proxy for soil structure in both topsoil and subsoil. Earthworm populations were quantified by both hand-digging and infiltration of mustard solution. In the topsoil, the treatments with a greater proportion of ley in the rotation had larger organic carbon contents, near-saturated hydraulic conductivity and earthworm biomass as well as smaller bulk densities and larger total porosities. In contrast, no treatment effects were found for the volume, size distribution, connectivity and heterogeneity of the X-ray imaged pore space. Topsoil structure is seasonally dynamic and it seems possible that significant effects of long-term cropping treatments on the architecture of these larger pore networks (image resolution of 65 microns) would have been found later in the season, as a result of the re-establishment of earthworm biopores after tillage. No individuals of deep-burrowing anecic earthworm species were found at the site. Previous work has also showed shallow rooting at this site, with almost all visible roots of spring barley confined to the uppermost 30 cm. Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that no effects of crop treatment on organic carbon content were found in the subsoil. Likewise, there were no apparent treatment

  20. Potential use of lateritic and marine clay soils as landfill liners to retain heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermyanont, Tanit; Arrykul, Surapon; Charoenthaisong, Nanthanit

    2009-01-01

    The potential of a lateritic soil and a marine clay, typical of those found in hot and humid climatic regions, was assessed for use as a landfill liner material. A series of tests were conducted - physical and chemical, batch adsorption, column, hydraulic conductivity, etc., - to evaluate the heavy metal sorption capacity, chemical compatibility of hydraulic conductivity, and transport parameters of the soils. Experimental results showed that the marine clay had better adsorption capacity than that of the lateritic soil and that its hydraulic conductivity was an order of magnitude lower. In addition, the hydraulic conductivities of both soils when permeated with low concentration heavy metal solutions were below 1x10(-7)cm/s. When permeated with Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Ni solutions, the retardation factors of the lateritic soil and the marine clay ranged from 10 to 98 and 37 to 165, respectively, while the diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.0x10(-5) to 7.5x10(-6) and 3.0 to 9.14x10(-7)cm2/s, respectively. For both soils, Cr and Pb were retained relatively well, while Cd, Zn, and Ni were more mobile. The marine clay had higher retardation factors and lower diffusion coefficients, and its hydraulic conductivity was more compatible with Cr solution, than that of the lateritic soil. In general, the properties of the marine clay indicate that it has significant advantages over the lateritic soil as landfill liner material. PMID:18550353

  1. Measurements of Texture of Soils Formed from Glaciolimnic Sediments by Areometric Method, Pipette Method and Laser Diffraction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzechowski Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to compare the results of texture analyses of glaciolimnic sediments deposited in the basins of ice-dammed lakes origin in north eastern Poland. The study was carried out using aerometric method, pipette method and laser diffraction method. The studied soils were classified as Haplic and Mollic Vertisol, Vertic Cambisol, and Gleyic Chernozem. The soils were formed from clayey (clay, heavy clay, loamy (loam, clay loam, sand clay loam and silty (silt loam, clay loam deposits. The studied soils did not contain fractions > 2.0 mm. The amounts of clay fraction (< 0.002 mm measured by areometric and pipette methods were similar and strongly correlated. In comparison to laser diffraction method, these amounts were 3-4-fold higher. The sub-fraction of fine silt (0.02-0.002 mm predominated in soil formations analyzed by laser diffraction method. In comparison to areometric or pipette method, the amounts of fine silt were 2-4 fold higher. Basing on the calculated sedimentological indices, it was stated that the examined soils were well sorted and the mean grain diameter (GSS was very low and did not exceed 0.005 mm in areometric and pipette methods, and 0.011 mm in laser diffraction method for clay sediments.

  2. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity on clay content in soil determined from resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevnin, Vladimir; Delgado-Rodriguez, Omar; Mousatov, Aleksandr [Mexican Petroleum Institute, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ryjov, Albert [Moscow State Geological Prospecting Academy, Geophysical Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The influence of clay content in sandy and clayey soils on hydraulic conductivity (filtration coefficient) is considered. A review of published experimental data on the relationship of hydraulic conductivity with soil lithology and grain size, as dependent on clay content is presented. Theoretical calculations include clay content. Experimental and calculated data agree, and several approximation formulas for filtration coefficient vs clay content are presented. Clay content in soil is estimated from electric resistivity data obtained from 2D VES interpretation. A two-step method is proposed, the first step including clay content calculating from soil resistivity and groundwater salinity, and the second step including filtration coefficient estimating from clay content. Two applications are presented. [Spanish] El contenido de arcilla en suelos areno-arcillosos influye sobre la permeabilidad hidraulica (coeficiente de filtracion). Se presenta una revision de datos experimentales publicados que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el tipo litologico del suelo y el tamano de las particulas. A partir de calculos teoricos, se modifican las conocidas formulas que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el contenido de arcilla. Se estima el contenido de arcilla a partir de los datos interpretados por el metodo SEV, y se propone un procedimiento para la estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion: (a) calculo del contenido de arcilla a partir de la resistividad del suelo y de la salinidad del agua subterranea, (b) estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion a partir del contenido de arcilla. Se presentan algunos ejemplos de la aplicacion de esta metodologia.

  3. Effects of a novel poly (AA-co-AAm)/AlZnFe₂O₄/potassium humate superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposite on water retention of sandy loam soil and wheat seedling growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaukat Ali; Qidwai, Ansar Ahmad; Anwar, Farooq; Ullah, Inam; Rashid, Umer

    2012-01-01

    A novel poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)AlZnFe₂O₄/potassium humate( )superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposite (PHNC) was synthesized and its physical properties characterized using SEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Air dried sandy loam soil was amended with 0.1 to 0.4 w/w% of PHNC to evaluate its soil moisture retention attributes. Effect of PHNC amendment on pH, electrical conductivity (EC), porosity, bulk density and hydraulic conductivity of sandy loam soil was also studied. The soil amendment with 0.1 to 0.4 w/w% of PHNC remarkably enhanced the moisture retention at field capacity as compared to the un-amended soils. Seed germination and seedling growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was considerably increased and a delay by 6-9 days in wilting of seedlings was observed in the soil amended with PHNC, resulting in improved wheat plant establishment and growth. PMID:23099615

  4. Effects of a Novel Poly (AA-co-AAm/AlZnFe2O4/potassium Humate Superabsorbent Hydrogel Nanocomposite on Water Retention of Sandy Loam Soil and Wheat Seedling Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Anwar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamideAlZnFe2O4/potassium humate superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposite (PHNC was synthesized and its physical properties characterized using SEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Air dried sandy loam soil was amended with 0.1 to 0.4 w/w% of PHNC to evaluate its soil moisture retention attributes. Effect of PHNC amendment on pH, electrical conductivity (EC, porosity, bulk density and hydraulic conductivity of sandy loam soil was also studied. The soil amendment with 0.1 to 0.4 w/w% of PHNC remarkably enhanced the moisture retention at field capacity as compared to the un-amended soils. Seed germination and seedling growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. was considerably increased and a delay by 6–9 days in wilting of seedlings was observed in the soil amended with PHNC, resulting in improved wheat plant establishment and growth.

  5. Radiocesium sorption in relation to clay mineralogy of paddy soils in Fukushima, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Atsushi, E-mail: na_4_ka_triplochiton@kpu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Ogasawara, Sho [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Sano, Oki; Ito, Toyoaki [Field Science Center, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Naruko-Onsen 232-3, Osaki, Miyagi 989-6711 (Japan); Yanai, Junta [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between Radiocesium Interception Potential (RIP) and mineralogical characteristics of the clay fraction isolated from 97 paddy soils (Hama-dori, n = 25; Naka-dori, n = 36; Aizu, n = 36) in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan were investigated to clarify the mineralogical factors controlling the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of soils (half-life 30.1 y). Of all the fission products released by the Fukushima accident, {sup 137}Cs is the most important long-term contributor to the environmental contamination. The RIP, a quantitative index of the {sup 137}Cs retention ability, was determined for the soil clays. The composition of clay minerals in the soil clays was estimated from peak areas obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The predominant clay mineral was smectite in soils from Hama-dori and Aizu, while this was variable for those from Naka-dori. Native K content of the soil clays was found to be an indicator of the amount of micaceous minerals. The average RIP for the 97 soil clays was 7.8 mol kg{sup −1}, and ranged from 2.4 mol kg{sup −1} to 19.4 mol kg{sup −1}. The RIP was significantly and positively correlated with native K content for each of the geographical regions, Hama-dori (r = 0.76, p < 0.001), Naka-dori (r = 0.43, p < 0.05), and Aizu (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), while it was not related to the relative abundance of smectite. The linear relationship between RIP and native K content not only indicate a large contribution of micaceous minerals to the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of the soil clays, but also could be used to predict the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of soil clays for other paddy fields in Fukushima and other areas. - Highlights: • RIP was measured for 97 paddy soils from Fukushima to assess {sup 137}Cs retention ability. • The dominant clay mineral was smectite, but this did not control RIP. • RIP was positively correlated with native K content. • Micaceous minerals were found to control the {sup 137}Cs retention

  6. Influence of 20-year organic and inorganic fertilization on organic carbon accumulation and microbial community structure of aggregates in an intensively cultivated sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanjun; Ding, Weixin; He, Xinhua; Yu, Hongyan; Fan, Jianling; Liu, Deyan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of compost (CM) and inorganic fertilizer (NPK) application on microbial community structure and organic carbon (OC) accumulation at aggregate scale, soils from plots amended with CM, NPK and no fertilizer (control) for 20 years (1989-2009) were collected. Soil was separated into large macroaggregate (>2,000 μm), small macroaggregate (250-2,000 μm), microaggregate (53-250 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and clay fraction (organic C in aggregates significantly (P<0.05) negatively correlated with M/B ratios under CM and NPK. Our study suggested that more efficient OC accumulations in aggregates under CM-treated than under NPK-treated soil was not only due to a more effective decrease of actinobacteria, but also a decrease of monounsaturated PLFAs and an increase of branched PLFAs. Aggregations under CM appear to alter micro-habitats to those more suitable for anaerobes, which in turn boosts OC accumulation.

  7. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Brake, B.; M. J. van der Ploeg; Rooij, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil) by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geo...

  8. Effect of Soil Clay Content on RNA Isolation and on Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Gene Transcripts in Soil by Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR ▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Novinscak, A.; Filion, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil clay content on RNA isolation and on quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) quantification of microbial gene transcripts. The amount of clay significantly altered RNA isolation yields and qRT-PCR analyses. Recommendations are made for quantifying microbial gene transcripts in soil samples varying in clay content.

  9. Cations extraction of sandy-clay soils from cavado valley, portugal, using sodium salts solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva João Eudes da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of contamination by metals in the water wells of the Cavado Valley in north-west Portugal can be attributed to the heavy leaching of clay soils due to an excess of nitrogen resulting from the intensive use of fertilisers in agricultural areas. This work focuses on the natural weathering characteristics of soils, particularly the clay material, through the study of samples collected near the River Cavado. Samples taken from various sites, after physico-chemical characterisation, were subjected to clay dissolution tests, using sodium salts of different ionic forces, to detect the relationship between certain physico-chemical parameters of water, such as pH, nitrate, chloride and sulphate content, in the dissolution of clay and the subsequent extraction of such cations as Al, Fe and K. In acidic sandy clay soils, the mineralogical composition of which was characterised by a predominance of quartz, micas, kaolinite and K-feldspars, decreases of the clay material/water pH ratio increases dissolution of the micaceous and K-feldspars phases. The presence of nitrates in the aqueous solution apparently advanced the extraction of all three cations Al, Fe and K. The specific surface area of the clay material showed a significant correlation with the main kinetic parameters of cation extraction.

  10. Relation between various soil phosphorus extraction methods and sorption parameters in calcareous soils with different texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Mohsen; Jalali, Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of soil texture on phosphorus (P) extractability and sorption from a wide range of calcareous soils across Hamedan, western Iran. Fifty seven soil samples were selected and partitioned into five types on the basis of soil texture (clay, sandy, sandy clay loam, sandy loam and mixed loam) and the P extracted with calcium chloride (PCaCl2), citrate (Pcitrate), HCl (PHCl), Olsen (POls), and Mehlich-3 (PM3) solutions. On the average, the P extracted was in the order PHCl>PM3>Pcitrate>POls>PCaCl2. The P extracted by Pcitrate, PHCl, POls, and PM3 methods were significantly higher in sandy, sandy clay loam and sandy loam textures than clay and mixed loam textures, while soil phosphorus buffer capacity (PBC) was significantly higher in clay and mixed loam soil textures. The correlation analysis revealed a significant positive relationship between silt content Freundlich sorption coefficient (KF), maximum P sorption (Qmax), linear distribution coefficient (Kd), and PBC. All extractions were highly correlated with each other and among soil components with silt content. The principal component analysis (PCA) performed on data identified five principal components describing 74.5% of total variation. The results point to soil texture as an important factor and that silt was the crucial soil property associated with P sorption and its extractability in these calcareous soils. DPSM3-2 (PM3PM3+Qmax×100) and DPScitrate (PcitratePcitrate+Qmax×100) proved to be good indicators of soil's potential P release in these calcareous soils. Among the DPS, 21% of soils reported DPSM3-2, values higher than the environmental threshold, indicating build-up of P and P release. Most of the studied sandy clay loam soils had exceeded the environmentally unacceptable P concentration. Various management practices should be taken into account to reduce P losses from these soils. Further inorganic and organic P fertilizer inputs should be reduced

  11. THE SIDE-EFFECT OF ORGANIC INSECTICIDE SPINOSAD ON BIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Telesiński

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of spinosad on soil biochemical and microbiological properties. The experiment was carried out on sandy loam with Corg content 10.91 g·kg-l. Spinosad, as Spintor 240 SC was added into soil in dosages: a recommended field dosage, and fivefold, tenfold, and twenty-fivefold higher dosages. The amount of spinosad introduced into soil was between 12.55 and 313.75 g·kg-l. Moreover, soil samples without spinosad supplement were prepared as a reference. Respective Spintor 240 SC doses were converted into 1 kg soil, taking into account 10 cm depth. After application of insecticide water emulsions, soil moisture was brought to 60% maximum holding water capacity. The soil was thoroughly mixed and stored in tightly-closed polyethylene bags at 20 °C for a period 4 weeks. During the experiment dissipation of spinosad, soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, urease and number of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes were assayed. Obtained results showed, that dissipation of spinosad in soil was relatively fast – the DT50 of this insecticide was ranged between 1.11 and 2.21 days. Spinosad residues had different effects on soil microbiological and biochemical properties. However, over time the impact of this insecticide definitely decreased. This indicated that the use of spinosad in organic farming, particularly in the field dosage, does not pose a long-term threat to the soil environment.

  12. Effects of soil moisture content and tractor wheeling intensity on traffic-induced soil compaction

    OpenAIRE

    AHMADI, Iman; GHAUR, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Soil compaction causes deleterious effects on physical and mechanical proprieties of agricultural soils. In order to investigate the effect of soil moisture content and tractor wheeling intensity on traffic-induced soil compaction, this study was carried out on a field with clay loam soil. Soil dry bulk density and hydraulic conductivity as well as emergence percentage of corn seedlings and dry mass of the sampled mature plants were considered the dependent variables of the experiment. Ind...

  13. Efficient resource management in dairy farming on peat and heavy clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de P.H.B.; Keulen, van H.; Lantinga, E.A.; Udo, H.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peat and heavy clay soils in the Netherlands are mainly used for permanent grassland to support dairy farming. As a result of intensification in dairy farming during the last decades, environmental quality is threatened by high emissions of N and P. Increased drainage of the wet soils has induced hi

  14. Chemical dispersants and pre-treatments to determine clay in soils with different mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rodrigues

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the soil physical properties, including the clay content, is of utmost importance for agriculture. The behavior of apparently similar soils can differ in intrinsic characteristics determined by different formation processes and nature of the parent material. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of separate or combined pre-treatments, dispersion methods and chemical dispersant agents to determine clay in some soil classes, selected according to their mineralogy. Two Brazilian Oxisols, two Alfisols and one Mollisol with contrasting mineralogy were selected. Different treatments were applied: chemical substances as dispersants (lithium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, and hexametaphosphate; pre-treatment with dithionite, ammonium oxalate, and hydrogen peroxide to eliminate organic matter; and coarse sand as abrasive and ultrasound, to test their mechanical action. The conclusion was drawn that different treatments must be applied to determine clay, in view of the soil mineralogy. Lithium hydroxide was not efficient to disperse low-CEC electropositive soils and very efficient in dispersing high-CEC electronegative soils. The use of coarse sand as an abrasive increased the clay content of all soils and in all treatments in which dispersion occurred, with or without the use of chemical dispersants. The efficiency of coarse sand is not the same for all soil classes.

  15. Measurement of recharge rates in soils through detection of tritium in Chinese thermonuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variation in environmental tritium and moisture content with depth was measured at three sites in sandy-loam and sandy-clay-loam soils, sampled near Hyderabad in May 1974. The tritium input function for precipitation around Hyderabad for the years 1969 to 1973 was determined through measurements on available rain samples and through extrapolation of strontium-90 data for HASL network station at Rawalpindi. Three peaks noticed in the tritium input function and probably caused by Chinese thermonuclear tests in 1970, 1971 and 1972, could be matched with those sequentially identified in the soil profiles. This identification has helped in dating the soil moisture and in calculation of average annual recharge to groundwater. The recharge was found to be 15.4 cm and 14.6 cm for sandy-loam and 11.1 cm for sandy-clay-loam soils. (auth.)

  16. Evaluation of pedotransfer functions for estimating the soil water retention points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Omid; Palangi, Sahar

    2016-06-01

    Direct measurement of soil moisture has been often expensive and time-consuming. The aim of this study was determining the best method to estimate the soil moisture using the pedotransfer functions in the soil par2 model. Soil samples selected from the database UNSODA in three textures include sandy loam, silty loam and clay. In clay soil, the Campbell model indicated better results at field capacity (FC) and wilting point (WP) with RMSE = (0.06, 0.09) and d = (0.65, 0.55) respectively. In silty loam soil, the Epic model had accurate estimation with MBE = 0.00 at FC and Campbell model had the acceptable result of WP with RMSE = 0.03 and d = 0.77. In sandy loam, Hutson and Campbell models had a better result to estimation the FC and WP than others. Also Hutson model had an acceptable result to estimation the TAW (Total Available Water) with RMSE = (0.03, 0.04, 0.04) and MBE = (0.02, 0.01, 0.01) for clay, sandy loam and silty loam, respectively. These models demonstrate the moisture points had the internal linkage with the soil textures. Results indicated that the PTFs models simulate the agreement results with the experimental observations.

  17. Effects of acid atmospheric deposition on the chemical composition of loess, clay and peat soils under forest in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klap, J.M.; Vries, de W.; Leeters, E.E.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In addition to a survey of the soils under 150 forest stands on non-calcareous sandy soils, the chemical composition of the soils under 40 stands on non-calcareous loess soil, 30 stands on non-calcareous clay soils and 30 stands on oligotrophous peat soils have been examined, to assess the current s

  18. Effects of Organic Matter and Clay Content in Soil on Pesticide Adsorption Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Đurović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic matter and clay content on the adsorption of atrazine, acetochlor, clomazone, pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen in soil samples was studied. In order to determine whether and to what degree different soil properties affect the process of determinationof selected pesticides, three soils with different clay and organic matter contents were used. An optimized liquid-solid extraction procedure followed by SPME measurement was applied to analyse the selected pesticides in soil samples. Detection and quantificationwere done by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Relative standard deviation (RSD values for multiple analyses of soil samples fortified at 30 μg/kg of each pesticide were below 19%. Limits of detection (LODs for all compounds studied were less than 2 μg/kg. The results indicate that soils with different physico-chemical properties have different effects on the adsorption of most pesticides, especially at higher concentration levels.

  19. Tractor tire aspect ratio effects on soil bulk density and cone index

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 580/70R38 tractor drive tire with an aspect ratio of 0.756 and a 650/75R32 tire with an aspect ratio of 0.804 were operated at two dynamic loads and two inflation pressures on a sandy loam and a clay loam with loose soil above a hardpan. Soil bulk density and cone index were measured just above t...

  20. Effect of potassium on fixation of ammonium by clay minerals in different soil layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agelda Ajazi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In intensive agriculture systems, efficient nutrient use is necessary for high crop yields as well as for sustainable environment management. Fixation of NH4+ and K+ by soil clays affect N and K availability to plants. Latest studies indicates that non-exchangeable NH4+, may affect crop productivity and soil N dynamics more than previously thought. An incubation study with K2SO4 and NH4NO3 was conducted to evaluate NH4+ and K+ fixation in two southern Albanian soils. Soils contained significant amount of native-fixed NH4+ and showed relatively high NH4+ fixing capacity. Native fixed ammonium content varied for horizons Ap and BCg, from 97 to 133 mg/kg and accounted for between 5 to 19, 8 % of the total nitrogen, respectively . Ammonium fixation was increased with N rates and was reduced with increased K rates. When K was added to the soil prior to the NH4, the amount of ammonium fixed was reduced. By contrast, when K+ and NH4+ were added to the soils simultaneously (equivalent amount; 2mEq/100g, the ammonium fixation was increased somewhat in the BCg horizon , whereas no such preference for ammonium fixation was found in the Ap horizon. In case when NH4+ and K+ were added to the soil samples in form of solutions, containing equal amounts of NH4+ (corresponding to 2 mEq NH4+/100 g soil but varying amounts of K+, the capacity of the soil to fix ammonium was reduced in proportion to the amount of K+ added. The soil samples incubated anaerobically, were with high differences in clay minerals content. The dominate clay minerals for profile (I-Ap horizon are smectite > vermiculite > Ilite, while vermiculite plus ilite (as the most important clay fixed minerals, comprised 21% of clay fraction and 13 % of the soil. In the profile (II-BCg horizon, the dominant clay minerals ranged; vermiculite > Ilite > smectite, while (vermiculite + ilite, comprised 52% of the clay fraction and 23, 4 % of the soil. Studies on Ap and BCg horizons comparing the amount of

  1. Mineralization-immobilization and plant uptake of nitrogen as influenced by the spatial distribution of cattle slurry in soils of different texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    were insignificant. Consequently, the availability of slurry N to plants was mainly influenced by the mineralization-immobilization processes. The apparent utilization of slurry NH4+-N mixed into soil was 7%, 14% and 24% lower than the utilization of (NH4)(2)SO4-N in a sand soil, a sandy loam soil...... and a loam soil, respectively. Thus, the net immobilization of N due to slurry application increased with increasing soil clay content, whereas the recovery in plants of N-15-labelled NH4+-N from slurry was similar on the three soils. A parallel incubation experiment showed that the immobilization of slurry......% higher than the utilization of (NH4)(2)SO4-N in the sand, the sandy loam and the loam soil, respectively. It is concluded that the spatial distribution of slurry in soil influenced the net mineralization of N to the same degree as did the soil type....

  2. CO2 emission and structural characteristics of two calcareous soils amended with municipal solid waste and plant residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, N.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examines the effect of different amendments on selected soil physical and biological properties over a 24-month period in two cropland fields. Urban municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and alfalfa residue (AR) were used as different organic amendments at the rates of 0 (control), 10 and 30 Mg ha-1 to a clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil in a semiarid region. Results showed that the soil improvement was controlled by the application rate and decomposability of amendments and soil type. The addition of organic amendments to the soils improved aggregate stability and consequently enhanced total porosity, especially macropore fraction. The increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and total porosity values as compared to the control treatment were greater in the loamy sand soil than in the clay loam soil. Moreover, compared to the microbial respiration of control plots, the application of MSW resulted in higher values of microbial respiration in the clay loam soil than in the loamy sand soil, whereas the reverse was found for AR. Linear and power functions were provided for the relationships between microbial respiration and SOC in the loamy sand and clay loam soils, respectively. Also, CO2 emission was stimulated significantly as power functions of the total porosity and the ratio of macroporosity to microporosity. However, the soil microbial respiration and carbon storage improved aggregate stability and pore size distribution, and as a response, soil porosity, especially the macropore fraction, controlled CO2 flux.

  3. CO2 emission and structural characteristics of two calcareous soils amended with municipal solid waste and plant residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yazdanpanah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This investigation examines the effect of different amendments on selected soil physical and biological properties over a twenty four month period in two cropland fields. Urban municipal solid waste (MSW compost and alfalfa residue (AR were used as different organic amendments at the rates of 0 (control, 10 and 30 Mg ha−1 to a clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil in a semiarid region. Result showed that the soil improvement was controlled by the application rate and decomposability of amendments and soil type. The addition of organic amendments to the soils improved aggregate stability and consequently enhanced total porosity, especially macro pores fraction. The increased soil organic carbon (SOC and total porosity values as compared to the control treatment were greater in the loamy sand soil than in the clay loam soil. Moreover, compared to the microbial respiration of control plots, the application of MSW resulted in higher values of microbial respiration in the clay loam soil than in the loamy sand soil, whereas the reverse order was found for AR. Linear and power functions were provided for the relationships between microbial respiration and SOC in the loamy sand and clay loam soils, respectively. Also, CO2 emission was stimulated significantly as power functions of the total porosity and the ratio of macro to micro pores. However, the soil microbial respiration and carbon storage improved aggregate stability and pore size distribution, as a response, soil porosity especially macro pores fraction controlled CO2 flux.

  4. Soil Clay Minerals in Namibia and their Significance for the Terrestrial and Marine Past Global Change Research

    OpenAIRE

    HEINE, Klaus; Völkel, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    We delineated seven soil clay mineral provinces in Namibia. Many individual clay mineral assemblages occur in fluvial, pan, cave and other environments. Previous researchers have used clay mineral compositions as evidence for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, often without analyzing the formation, the transport and the deposition of these clay minerals. In Namibia, rates of erosion and denudation by water and wind have been very small since early Quaternary times. During the Quaternary, th...

  5. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in anaerobic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of 14C labelled 2,5,2; 2,5,2',5' PCBs was studied in Hagerstown silty clay loam with and without sludge amendments under anaerobic conditions for 42 days. Soil respiration was enhanced by PCBs in soil. PCBs reduced the soil respiration in soil with sludge. Volatilization of PCBs was decreased by sludge in soil. Most of the radioactivity was found in hexane extracts of soils. No further degradation products were observed. (author)

  6. A semi-analytical solution for frost heave prediction of clay soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Bing; Ying Zhang; GuoYu Li

    2014-01-01

    Frost heave is one of the main freezing problems for construction in permafrost regions. The Konrad-Morgenstern seg-regation potential (SP) model is being used in practice for frost heave using numerical techniques. However, the heat re-lease from in-situ and migrated water in the freezing zone could result in some numerical instability, so the simulation of frost fringe is not ideal. In this study, a semi-analytical solution is developed for frost heave prediction of clay soil. The prediction results to the two tests with different freezing mode with clay soil agree well with the tested behavior, which indicates the feasibility of the solution.

  7. Clay Mineralogical Composition of Tea Garden Soils in Shandong Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jing-Long; Yang, Qi-Xia; Ming ZHAO; Liu, Ying-Xia; Egashira, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    For assistance of the appropriate plant-nutrient management practice to keep the sustainable tea production in Shandong Province, particle-size and clay mineral analyses were carried out to the surface layer of soils collected in tea gardens of Laoshan region of Qingdao City and Dahainanchun region of Jimo City, Shandong Province, People's Republic of China. Variation of the particle-size distribution with sites was small in each region. The clay content ranged from 17.6 to 22.7% for soils ...

  8. Comparing Kriging and Regression Approaches for Mapping Soil Clay Content in a diverse Danish Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev;

    2013-01-01

    Information on the spatial variability of soil texture including soil clay content in a landscape is very important for agricultural and environmental use. Different prediction techniques are available to assess and map spatial variability of soil properties, but selecting the most suitable...... technique at a given site has always been a major issue in all soil mapping applications. We studied the prediction performance of ordinary kriging (OK), stratified OK (OKst), regression trees (RT), and rule-based regression kriging (RKrr) for digital mapping of soil clay content at 30.4-m grid size using 6......,919 topsoil (0-20 cm) samples in an approximately 7,100 km2 representative area in Denmark. Eighty percent of the data were used for model calibration and the rest for validation. Twelve derivatives extracted from the digital elevation model, together with the information derived from the maps of landscape...

  9. Clay-associated organic matter in kaolinitic and smectitic soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattel-Koekkoek, E.J.W.

    2002-01-01

    The primary source of soil organic matter is plant debris of all kinds, such as dead roots, leaves and branches that enter into the soil and are then biologically decomposed at variable rates. Organic matter has many different important functions on a local and global scale. Soil organic matter is a

  10. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components Ⅲ. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca2 + -, Mg2 + -. Al3 + -and Fe3 + -saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ ≤ Fe3+ which coincided with the iucreasing aciditv of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  11. Si isotopes record cyclical dissolution and re-precipitation of pedogenic clay minerals in a podzolic soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Weis, Dominique; Lavkulich, Les; Vermeire, Marie-Liesse; Delvaux, Bruno; Barling*, Jane

    2014-05-01

    Soils are a major resource on the planet, acting as a key component for ecosystem function. The secondary minerals in the clay fraction are important players in soil biogeochemical processes as they provide a large reactive surface area. However, the origin and evolution of secondary minerals in soils are not yet fully understood. We determined the Si isotope compositions in the clay fraction of a podzolic soil chronosequence and document light 28Si enrichment during pedogenesis that increases with soil age. Relative to the original 'unweathered' clay-size minerals in deepsoil (δ30Si = -0.52±0.16 permil), the clay fraction of the topsoil eluvial horizon show less negative δ30Si values (δ30Sifrom -0.33 to -0.10 permil), while the clay fraction of the subsoil illuvial horizons is isotopically lighter (δ30Si from -0.60 to -0.84 permil). Geochemical and X-ray diffraction analyses show that the on-going enrichment in light 28Si in pedogenic minerals of illuvial subsoil horizons can only be related to the dissolution in the topsoil horizon of clay minerals previously enriched in 28Si. The 28Si enrichment in the clay fraction with pedogenesis and soil age provides consistent evidence for the cyclical dissolution and re-precipitation of pedogenic minerals. Our study shows that the successive generations of clay minerals occur over very short time scales (ca. 300 years). This is instrumental in the evolution of the clay mineral genesis in soils. This soil-forming process has implications for the modeling of soil evolution. Given the importance of clay minerals in the chemical cycles of elements, deciphering the origin of pedogenic Si in clay mineral genesis is central to a better understanding of soil development and associated terrestrial biogeochemical processes.

  12. Effects of acid atmospheric deposition on the chemical composition of loess, clay and peat soils under forest in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Klap, J.M.; Vries, de, H.J.C.; Leeters, E.E.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In addition to a survey of the soils under 150 forest stands on non-calcareous sandy soils, the chemical composition of the soils under 40 stands on non-calcareous loess soil, 30 stands on non-calcareous clay soils and 30 stands on oligotrophous peat soils have been examined, to assess the current status with repect to acidification and eutrophication, and the provide data for further studies. Only the clay soils are not yet seriously affected by the atmospheric inputs. The loess soils are ge...

  13. Aging Effect of Cs-137 Obtained from Cs-137 in the Kanto Loam Layer from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident and in the Nishiyama Loam Layer from the Nagasaki A-bomb Explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, Tomoko; Mahara, Yasunori; Kubota, Takumi; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    We measured Cs-134 and Cs-137 in the surface soil of the Kanto loam in the eastern Tokyo metropolitan area and the Nishiyama loam in Nagasaki, Japan. The observed Cs-137 deposition in the Kanto loam from the Fukushima nuclear power plant (NPP) accident ranged from 4.0 to 77 kBq m(-2), which corresponds to 0.3 - 5 times of that in the Nishiyama loam. The Cs-137 retardation factor in the Kanto loam obtained seven months after the Fukusima NPP accident and in the Nishiyama loam after 36 and 38 y...

  14. THE EFFECT OF REINFORCEMENT ON THE GBFS AND LIME TREATED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koteswara Rao,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available India being peninsular country has large area coming under coastal region and also it has been the habitat for considerable percentage of population. The marine clays are generally found in the coastal region of West Bengal, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Maharashtra and some parts of Gujarat. Marine or soft clays exists in these region are weak and deformative in nature. The present study deals with the strength characteristics of the marine clay collected from Kakinada Sea Port Ltd, Kakinada, A.P, India. The effect of lime on the strength characteristics of marine clay are studied in this investigation along with the reinforcement effect using geotextile as reinforcement and separator for the foundation soil bed.

  15. Zinc and copper sorption and fixation by an acid soil clay: effect of selective dissolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, N.; McBride, M.B.

    Copper and zinc sorption-desorption studies were carried out over a range of pH values using clay fractions separated from two horizons of an acid soil from New York. In the pH range of high sorption, as much as 95% of the sorbed metal could not be desorbed and thus was considered fixed. Sorption and fixation of Cu and Zn increased rapidly above pH 4 and 5, respectively, for the whole soil clays. Following removal of the oxide fraction by oxalate and citrate-dethionite extractions, sorption and fixation were reduced considerably at pH values below the onset of hydrolysis of the metals in bulk solution. Citrate-dithionite extraction was more effective than oxalate in reducing Zn sorption and fixation. These extraction procedures had less effect on the ability of the clays to sorb and fix Cu. It is concluded that microcrystalline and noncrystalline oxides in the clay fraction of this soil, representing < 20% off the clay by weight, provide reactive surfaces for the chemisorption of Cu and Zn. At low pH, adsorption at these surfaces may be the dominant mechanism of heavy metal immobilization, especially in the subsoil horizons.

  16. S-index and soybean root growth in different soil textural classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro D. de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study tested the hypothesis that the limiting values of S-index, proposed in the literature can not be used to determine the degradation condition of soils under soybean cultivation in the state of Pará, Brazil. The objective was to determine limiting values of S-index using soil physical attributes and validate it with soybean root growth, in soils with different textural classes. For the experimental design, the following treatments were established: five compaction levels for sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils and three levels for clayey and very clayey soils. The following physical parameters were analysed: particle-size distribution, soil bulk density, critical soil bulk density, degree of compaction, soil-water retention curve, S-index and relative root length of soybean. The limiting values of S-index varied according to soil textural class and were equal to 0.037, 0.020 and 0.056 for sandy loam, sandy clay loam and clay, respectively. The S-index does not apply to soils with clay content > 71%, because it does not vary with the degree of compaction of the soil or the root growth of the evaluated crop.

  17. Modified clay sorbents for wastewater treatment and immobilization of heavy metals in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris; Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Stapkevica, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution with heavy metals is the result of both, anthropogenic and natural processes in the environment. Anthropogenic influence in great extent appears from industry, mining, treatment of metal ores and waste incineration. Contamination of soil and water can be induced by diffuse sources such as applications of agrochemicals and fertilizers in agriculture, air pollution from industry and transport, and by point sources, e.g., wastewater streams, runoff from dump sites and factories. Treatment processes used for metal removal from polluted soil and water include methodologies based on chemical precipitation, ion exchange, carbon adsorption, membrane filtration, adsorption and co-precipitation. Optimal removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous medium can be achieved by adsorption process which is considered as one of the most effective methods due to its cost-effectiveness and high efficiency. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soil also can be done with different adsorbents as the in situ technology. Use of natural and modified clay can be developed as one of the solutions in immobilization of lead, zinc, copper and other elements in polluted sites. Within the present study clay samples of different geological genesis were modified with sodium and calcium chlorides, iron oxyhydroxides and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in variable proportions of Ca/P equimolar ratio to test and compare immobilization efficiency of metals by sorption and batch leaching tests. Sorption capacity for raw clay samples was considered as relatively lower referring to the modified species of the same clay type. In addition, clay samples were tested for powder X-ray difractometry, cation exchange, surface area properties, elemental composition, as well as scanning electron microscopy pictures of clay sample surface structures were obtained. Modified clay sorbents were tested for sorption of lead as monocontaminant and for complex contamination of heavy metals. The

  18. Sand and clay mineralogy of sal forest soils of the Doon Siwalik Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh; R K Manhas; A K Tripathi; A K Raina; M K Gupta; S K Kamboj

    2011-02-01

    The peteromineralogical characterization of the soil was carried out for the 12 soil profiles exposed in the Shorea robusta dominated forests of the Siwalik forest division, Dehradun. The quartz was observed as the dominating light mineral fraction (64–80%) in all the profiles studied. Biotite, hornblende, zircon, tourmaline, rutile and opaques comprising of iron minerals constituted the heavy mineral fraction (20%). The mineralogy of both the sand and clay fractions revealed a mixed mineralogy. The clay minerals in the order of their dominance were vermiculite, illite, kaolinite and mixed layer minerals. The presence of vermiculite and illite in appreciable quantities indicates that these were synthesized from the K-rich soil solution, as orthoclase and micas were present in significant quantities in the sand minerals. The mineral suites identified in the study shows that the geological, climatological and topographical factors of the region collectively played a dominant role in their formation and transformation. After critical appraisal of the results, it may be deduced that the mineralogical composition, physicochemical properties and total elemental analysis of the soils do not show any deficiency of the bases and other plant nutrients in general. The inherent fertility of the soil is good as indicated by the sand and clay mineralogy of the soil and the biotite and feldspar together with the mica is an important source of nutrients for the vegetation in the soils of the Doon valley.

  19. Effect of nitrogen and water availability of three soil types on yield, radiation use efficiency and evapotranspiration in field-grown quinoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Plauborg, Finn; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is believed to be tolerant to abiotic stress including salinity, drought and poor soil quality. To investigate the effect of soil type and soil-drying during the seed-filling phase on N-uptake, yield and water use, a Danish-bred cultivar (cv. Titicaca) was grown...... in field lysimeters with sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soil. Despite application of the same amount of nitrogen (120 kg N ha−1) to all plots, there were large differences in crop nitrogen-uptake for sandy clay loam (134 kg ha−1), sandy loam (102 kg ha−1) and sand (77 kg ha−1) under full irrigation....... This lead to higher interception of photosynthetic active radiation and higher seed yield on sandy clay loam (3.3 Mg ha−1) and sandy loam (3.0 Mg ha−1) than on sand (2.3 Mg ha−1). The soil with higher clay content had also the highest transpiration, crop evapotranspiration and yield due to the higher uptake...

  20. Estimating Particle-Size Distribution from Sand, Silt, and Clay Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaee, Maryam; Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Liaghat, Abdolmajid

    2010-05-01

    Particle-size distribution (PSD) is one of the soil properties which not only is used in estimation of soil water retention curve as well as unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, but also is applied in the most hydrological studies. Since the measurement of particle-size distribution, soil water retention curve and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is time consuming and expensive especially in large scale hydrological investigations, in this study, a method was developed based upon the least squares optimization approach to estimate cumulative particle-size distribution from sand, silt and clay content. A revised form of van Genuchten retention model which has been previously applied to represent cumulative particle-size distribution was fitted to the measured three points of PSD, and its two unknown parameters such as N and Dg were determined. For this purpose, we used curve fitting toolbox of MATLAB software. Then estimated N and Dg values were applied to estimate cumulative particle mass for other particle radii in order to determine the whole shape of PSD. A total of 80 soil samples from the UNSODA database including 10 soil textures were selected to verify the presented method. We divided our database into three groups, (1) is coarse soil texture including sand, sandy loam and loamy sand (32 soil samples), (2) medium soil texture such as sandy clay loam, loam, silt loam (31 soil samples), and (3) fine soil texture including clay, sandy clay, silty clay and clay loam (17 soil samples). The RMSE value was calculated to evaluate the presented method. For groups 1, 2 and 3, the RMSE values were 0.071, 0.064, and 0.046, respectively. The linear regression between the estimated and measured cumulative particle mass showed that this method is capable for estimating PSD from three measured points. The line slope for groups 1, 2 and 3 were 0.93, 0.94 and 0.95, respectively, and correlation coefficient (R2) values were obtained greater than 0.96. For all 80 soil samples

  1. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2011-01-01

    The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study was to...... and the so-called degree of P saturation (oxalate-extractable P on iron and aluminum minerals). Because higher colloidal P concentration was countered by a lower colloidal leaching, the total amount of leached P stayed remarkably constant along the natural clay gradient.......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...

  2. The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

  3. Modeling Air Permeability in Variably Saturated Soil from Two Natural Clay Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per;

    2013-01-01

    Understanding soil–gas phase properties and processes is important for finding solutions to critical environmental problems such as greenhouse gas emissions and transport of gaseous-phase contaminants in soils. Soil–air permeability, ka (μm2), is the key parameter governing advective gas movement...... measurements from two Danish arable fields, each located on natural clay gradients, this study presents a pore tortuosity–disconnectivity analysis to characterize the soil–gas phase. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of soil–moisture condition, clay content, and other potential...... drivers of soil texture and structure on soil-gas phase characteristics based on a ka–based pore tortuosity parameter, Xa [= log(ka/ka,1000)/log(ɛ/ɛ,1000)]. Results showed that Xa did not vary significantly with soil matric potential (in the range of –10 to –1000 cm H2O), but the average Xa across...

  4. Effect of potassium on fixation of ammonium by clay minerals in different soil layers

    OpenAIRE

    , Agelda Ajazi; Liri Miho; Aida Bani; , Ardian Maçi

    2013-01-01

    In intensive agriculture systems, efficient nutrient use is necessary for high crop yields as well as for sustainable environment management. Fixation of NH4+ and K+ by soil clays affect N and K availability to plants. Latest studies indicates that non-exchangeable NH4+, may affect crop productivity and soil N dynamics more than previously thought. An incubation study with K2SO4 and NH4NO3 was conducted to evaluate NH4+ and K+ fixation in two southern Albanian soils. Soils contained significa...

  5. Effect of clay minerals on the stabilization of black cotton and lateritic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem associated with black cotton and lateritic soils because of the swelling-shrinkage property of their constituent clay minerals were investigated. Samples of black cotton lateritic soils were collected from different parts of Kenya. The samples were analysed for their mineral compositions and later treated with hydrated lime in order to eliminate the swelling shrinkage behaviour. The samples were subsequently tested for their engineering properties in a soil mechanics laboratory using shear box and Casagrande apparatus. It was found that the chemical treatment of the soils with hydrated lime removes their plastic property and improves their shear strength. (author)

  6. Effects of clay amendment on adsorption and desorption of copper in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, X.; Stagnitti, F.; Allinson, G.; Turoczy, N.; Li, P.; LeBlanc, M.; Cann, M.A.; Doerr, S.H.; Steenhuis, M.M.; Parlange, J.Y.; Rooij, de G.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an important micronutrient and trace amounts are essential for crop growth. However, high concentrations of copper will produce toxic effects. Australia is increasingly developing production of crops in water repellent soils. Clay amendment, a common amelioration techniques used in Austral

  7. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  8. Modeling selenite adsorption envelopes on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenite adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum and iron oxides, clay minerals: kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite, and 45 surface and subsurface soil samples from the Southwestern and Midwestern regions of the USA as a function of solution pH. Selenite adsorption decreased ...

  9. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy clay soil were investigated by measuring nitrogen input, and nitrate concentrations in groundwater and drain discharge for two years. A bromide tracer was applied to study solute transport mechanisms. Nitrate transport in the

  10. Simulation of pesticide leaching in a cracking clay soil with the PEARL model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza, R.P.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2005-01-01

    Testing of pesticide leaching models is important to increase confidence in their use in pesticide registration procedures world-wide. The chromatographic PEARL model was tested against the results of a field leaching study on a cracking clay soil with a tracer (bromide), a mobile pesticide (bentazo

  11. Peculiarities of strength and deformability properties of clay soils in districts of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimenko, Sergey; Efimenko, Vladimir; Sukhorukov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The article demonstrates the methodology of the substantiation of the calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability characteristics of clay subgrade soils for the design of pavements by strength conditions in II, III, and IV road-climatic zones in West Siberia. The main purpose of the work is to ensure the quality of the design of roads in newly developed regions of Russia. To achieve this goal the following problems have been solved: the dislocation of boundary lines of road-climatic zones has been specified, zoning of the investigated territory for the design of roads has been detailed; regularities of changes in strength and deformability characteristics of clay subgrade soils of their moisture have been established; the territorial normalization of the calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability of clay subgrade soils in relation to the allocated road districts has been carried out. Specification of boundary lines of road-climatic zones has been implemented on the basis of the taxonomic system "zone-subzone-road district". The calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability characteristics of clay soils, established and differentiated according to road-climatic zones, will ensure the required level of the reliability of transport infrastructure facilities during the life cycle of roads.

  12. COMPARISON OF GLYPHOSATE PERSISTENCE IN CLAY SOIL ON NO-TILLED AND AUTUMN PLOUGHED PLOTS

    OpenAIRE

    Petruneva, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    The present work was based on the analysis of glyphosate concentrations in six soil layers after continuous multiple applications of herbicide products and various sampling times during the study period of 2010−2012, and aimed to contribute to a better recognition of the glyphosate persistence in clay soil. Two tillage methods (conventional tillage and no-till) were carried out in two replicates on the experimental field located in Jokioinen, South-Western Finland. This experiment was impo...

  13. Influence of cracking clays on satellite observed and model simulated soil moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Liu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertisols are clay soils that are common in the monsoonal and dry warm regions of the world. A defining feature of these soils is the development of shrinking cracks during dry periods, the effects of which are not described in land surface models nor considered in the surface soil moisture estimation from passive microwave satellite observations. To investigate the influence of this process we compared the soil moisture (θ in m3 m−3 from AMSR-E observations and the Community Land Model (CLM simulations over vertisols across mainland Australia. Both products agree reasonably well during wet seasons. However, during dry periods, AMSR-E θ falls below values for surrounding non-clays, while CLM simulations are higher. The impacts of soil property used in the AMSR-E algorithm, vegetation density and rainfall patterns were investigated, but do not explain the observed θ patterns. Analysis of the retrieval model suggests that the most likely reason for the low AMSR-E θ is the increase in soil porosity and surface roughness through cracking. CLM does not consider the behavior of cracking clay, including the further loss of moisture from soil and extremely high infiltration rates that would occur when cracks develop. Analyses show that the corresponding water fluxes can be different when cracks occur and therefore modeled evaporation, surface temperature, surface runoff and groundwater recharge should be interpreted with caution. Introducing temporally dynamic roughness and soil porosity into retrieval algorithms and adding a "cracking clay" module into models, respectively, may improve the representation of vertisol hydrology.

  14. [Occurrence relationship between iron minerals and clay minerals in net-like red soils: evidence from X-ray diffraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Han, Weni; Ma, Yu-Bo; Li, Rong-Biao

    2013-04-01

    The high purity of clay minerals is a key factor to reconstruct the palaeoclimate in clay mineralogy, however, the existence of iron minerals (such as goethite and hematite) and organics lead to the intergrowth of clay minerals and other minerals, producing other mineral impurities in enriched clay minerals. Although the removal of organics in soil sediments has been fully investigated, the occurrence state of iron minerals remains controversial, hindering the preparation of high-purity clay minerals. Therefore, the occurrence relationship of iron minerals and clay minerals in Jiujiang net-like red soils of the middle to lower reaches of the Yangtze River was investigated using the sequential separation method, which provided some implications for the removal of iron minerals in soil sediments. The results indicated that goethite and hematite were mostly absorbed on the surface of hydroxy-interlayered smectite and illite in the form of films, and the rest were absorbed by kaolinite.

  15. Multisensor on-the-go mapping of readily dispersible clay, particle size and soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaene, Guillaume; Niedźwiecki, Jacek; Papierowska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Particle size fractions affect strongly the physical and chemical properties of soil. Readily dispersible clay (RDC) is the part of the clay fraction in soils that is easily or potentially dispersible in water when small amounts of mechanical energy are applied to soil. The amount of RDC in the soil is of significant importance for agriculture and environment because clay dispersion is a cause of poor soil stability in water which in turn contributes to soil erodibility, mud flows, and cementation. To obtain a detailed map of soil texture, many samples are needed. Moreover, RDC determination is time consuming. The use of a mobile visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) platform is proposed here to map those soil properties and obtain the first detailed map of RDC at field level. Soil properties prediction was based on calibration model developed with 10 representative samples selected by a fuzzy logic algorithm. Calibration samples were analysed for soil texture (clay, silt and sand), RDC and soil organic carbon (SOC) using conventional wet chemistry analysis. Moreover, the Veris mobile sensor platform is also collecting electrical conductivity (EC) data (deep and shallow), and soil temperature. These auxiliary data were combined with VIS-NIR measurement (data fusion) to improve prediction results. EC maps were also produced to help understanding RDC data. The resulting maps were visually compared with an orthophotography of the field taken at the beginning of the plant growing season. Models were developed with partial least square regression (PLSR) and support vector machine regression (SVMR). There were no significant differences between calibration using PLSR or SVMR. Nevertheless, the best models were obtained with PLSR and standard normal variate (SNV) pretreatment and the fusion with deep EC data (e.g. for RDC and clay content: RMSECV = 0,35% and R2 = 0,71; RMSECV = 0,32% and R2 = 0,73 respectively). The best models were used to predict soil properties from the

  16. Distinguishing black carbon from biogenic humic substances in soil clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, D.A.; Chappell, M.A.; Martens, D.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thompson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most models of soil humic substances include a substantial component of aromatic C either as the backbone of humic heteropolymers or as a significant component of supramolecular aggregates of degraded biopolymers. We physically separated coarse (0.2-2.0????m e.s.d.), medium (0.02-0.2????m e.s.d.), and fine (> 0.02????m e.s.d.) clay subfractions from three Midwestern soils and characterized the organic material associated with these subfractions using 13C-CPMAS-NMR, DTG, SEM-EDX, incubations, and radiocarbon age. Most of the C in the coarse clay subfraction was present as discrete particles (0.2-5????m as seen in SEM images) of black carbon (BC) and consisted of approximately 60% aromatic C, with the remainder being a mixture of aliphatic, anomeric and carboxylic C. We hypothesize that BC particles were originally charcoal formed during prairie fires. As the BC particles aged in soil their surfaces were oxidized to form carboxylic groups and anomeric and aliphatic C accumulated in the BC particles either by adsorption of dissolved biogenic compounds from the soil solution or by direct deposition of biogenic materials from microbes living within the BC particles. The biogenic soil organic matter was physically separated with the medium and fine clay subfractions and was dominated by aliphatic, anomeric, and carboxylic C. The results indicate that the biogenic humic materials in our soils have little aromatic C, which is inconsistent with the traditional heteropolymer model of humic substances.

  17. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L.) Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Fugen; Soriano, Junel; Tabien, Rodante E; Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic), cultivar ('Cocodrie' and 'Rondo'), and soil texture (clay and sandy loam) on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice.

  18. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L. Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugen Dou

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic, cultivar ('Cocodrie' and 'Rondo', and soil texture (clay and sandy loam on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice.

  19. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk.

  20. Effects of iron and aluminum oxides and clay content on penetration resistance of five Greek soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Stefanou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of amorphous and crystalline iron (Fe and aluminum (Al oxides and oxy-hydroxides as well as clay on soil penetration resistance of five Greek soils, as a function of soil water suction was studied for the whole range of soil moisture. The soils tested were of loamy texture and were collected from cultivated and non-cultivated areas of north and central Greece (Macedonia and Thessaly. The study aimed at understanding the role of the above mentioned soil components on penetration resistance. The findings showed that the increase of iron and aluminum oxides and oxy-hydroxides content resulted in an increase of soil penetration resistance and the relationships between them were significant. Crystalline iron forms found to have a more profound effect on penetration resistance as compared to amorphous iron forms. Finally, positive and significant relationships were also found between penetration resistance and clay content. However, it is not entirely clear which of the two soil components plays the most important role in penetration resistance changes in soils.

  1. Soil adsorption studies of a rice herbicide, cyhalofop-butyl, in two texturally different soils of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhia, Shobha; Khare, Rishi Raj

    2014-10-01

    The ability of herbicides to be adsorbed by the soil and sediment and their tendency to be desorbed are some of the most important factors affecting soil and water contamination. Therefore, a sorption study was conducted to evaluate the adsorption of cyhalofop-butyl, butyl (2R)-2-[4-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenoxy) phenoxy] propanoate, in the sandy clay loam and clayey soils using a batch equilibrium method. The adsorption of cyhalofop-butyl was found positively related with the clay and organic carbon content. Freundlich constants (Kf) of cyhalofop-butyl in the clayey and sandy clay loam were found to be 13.39 and 2.21, respectively. Sorption coefficients (Koc) and distribution coefficients (Kd) were found to be 265.38 and 2,092.79, and 1.38 and 11.48, for sandy clay loam and clayey soils, respectively. The adsorption isotherm suggested a relatively higher affinity of cyhalofop-butyl to the adsorption sites at low equilibrium concentrations. The low value of the soil organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc) of cyhalofop-butyl in the sandy loam soil suggested its weaker adsorption in soil and thus increased its risk of mobility into water sources; hence, it should be used judiciously to prevent groundwater contamination. PMID:24875347

  2. Adsorption-Desorption of Hexaconazole in Soils with Respect to Soil Properties, Temperature, and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maznah Zainol

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature and pH on adsorption-desorption of fungicide hexaconazole was studied in two Malaysian soil types; namely clay loam and sandy loam. The adsorption-desorption experiment was conducted using the batch equilibration technique and the residues of hexaconazole were analysed using the GC-ECD. The results showed that the adsorption-desorption isotherms of hexaconazole can be described with Freundlich equation. The Freundlich sorption coefficient (Kd values were positively correlated to the clay and organic matter content in the soils. Hexaconazole attained the equilibrium phase within 24 h in both soil types studied. The adsorption coefficient (Kd values obtained for clay loam soil and sandy loam soil were 2.54 mL/g and 2.27 mL/g, respectively, indicating that hexaconazole was weakly sorbed onto the soils due to the low organic content of the soils. Regarding thermodynamic parameters, the Gibb’s free energy change (ΔG analysis showed that hexaconazole adsorption onto soil was spontaneous and exothermic, plus it exhibited positive hysteresis. A strong correlation was observed between the adsorption of hexaconazole and pH of the soil solution. However, temperature was found to have no effect on the adsorption of hexaconazole onto the soils; for the range tested.

  3. Soil carbon stock and soil characteristics at Tasik Chini Forest Reserve, Pahang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Aqlili Riana, R.; Sahibin A., R.

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to determine soil carbon stock and soil characteristic at Tasik Chini Forest Reserve (TCFR), Pahang. A total of 10 (20 m x 25 m) permanent sampling plot was selected randomly within the area of TCFR. Soil samples were taken from all subplots using dutch auger based on soil depth of 0-20cm, 20-40cm, 40-60cm. Soil parameters determined were size distribution, soil water content, bulk density, organic matter, organic carbon content, pH and electrical conductivity. All parameters were determined following their respective standard methods. Results obtained showed that the soil in TCFR was dominated by clay texture (40%), followed by sandy clay loam (30%), loam (20%). Silty clay, clay loam and sandy loam constitutes about 10% of the soil texture. Range of mean percentage of organic matter and bulk density are from 2.42±0.06% to 11.64±0.39% and 1.01 to 1.04 (gcm-ł), respectively. Soil pH are relatively very acidic and mean of electrical conductivity is low. Soil carbon content ranged from 0.83±0.03 to 1.87±0.41%. All soil parameter showed a decreasing trend with depth except electrical conductivity. ANOVA test of mean percentage of organic matter, soil water content, soil pH and electrical conductivity showed a significant difference between plot (p0.05). There are no significant difference in mean percentage of soil water content, organic matter and bulk density between three different depth (p>0.05). There were a significant difference on percentage of soil carbon organic between plots and depth. The mean of soil organic carbon stock in soil to a depth of 60 cm calculated was 35.50 t/ha.

  4. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is readily biodegradable in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada); Lapen, David R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa ON, Canada K1A 0C6 (Canada); Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2010-12-01

    Diclofenac, 2-[2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino]phenyl]acetic acid, is an important non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used for human and animals to reduce inflammation and pain. Diclofenac could potentially reach agricultural lands through the application of municipal biosolids or wastewater, and in the absence of any environmental fate data, we evaluated its persistence in agricultural soils incubated in the laboratory. {sup 14}C-Diclofenac was rapidly mineralized without a lag when added to soils varying widely in texture (sandy loam, loam, clay loam). Over a range of temperature and moisture conditions extractable {sup 14}C-diclofenac residues decreased with half lives < 5 days. No extractable transformation products were detectable by HPLC. Diclofenac mineralization in the loam soil was abolished by heat sterilization. Addition of biosolids to sterile or non-sterile soil did not accelerate the dissipation of diclofenac. These findings indicate that diclofenac is readily biodegradable in agricultural soils.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM CHLORIDE ON THE REINFORCED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    OpenAIRE

    Koteswara Rao; D J. Purna Chandra Rao

    2011-01-01

    Weak marine soil deposits have been found both on the coast and in several offshore areas spread over many parts of the world. When clay particles precipitate in salt water, there is a tendency for the clayparticles to flocculate and stick together giving rise to some sort of edge-to-face arrangement. As a result, clay, silt, and fine sand particles settle almost at the same rate and the final sediment formed consists of particles with a very loose card house-like structure. Hence the marine ...

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM CHLORIDE ON THE REINFORCED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koteswara Rao,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Weak marine soil deposits have been found both on the coast and in several offshore areas spread over many parts of the world. When clay particles precipitate in salt water, there is a tendency for the clayparticles to flocculate and stick together giving rise to some sort of edge-to-face arrangement. As a result, clay, silt, and fine sand particles settle almost at the same rate and the final sediment formed consists of particles with a very loose card house-like structure. Hence the marine sediments can be considered loose sediments, usually formed with high void ratios. Problems are associated with these fine-grained soils deposited at a soft consistency. Fine-grained soils are very sensitive to changes in the stress system, moisture content and system chemistry of the pore fluid. In addition to these, the problems arising out ofhigh compressibility and low shear strength of these weak marine deposits expose geotechnical engineers to considerable changes in the construction of various coastal and offshore structures. In this present investigation, the performance of the potassium chloride on the strength characteristics of the marine clay has been studied and also the reinforcement effect on the improvement of load bearing capacity of the KCl treated marine clay has been studied.

  7. Competitive sorption between glyphosphate and inorganic phosphate on clay minerals and low organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic phosphate may influence the adsorption of glyphosate to soil surface sites. It has been postulated that glyphosphate sorption is dominated by the phosphoric acid moiety, therefore, inorganic phosphate could compete with glyphosate for surface sorption sites. Sorption of glyphosate is examined in low organic carbon systems where clay minerals dominate the available adsorption sites using 32P-labeled phosphate and 14C-labeled glyphosate to track sorption. Glyphosate sorption was found to be strongly dependent on phosphate additions. Isotherms were generally of the L type, which is consistent with a limited number of surface sites. Most sorption on whole soils could be accounted for by sorption observed on model clays of the same mineral type as found in the soils. (author)

  8. Effect of water content and soil texture on consolidation in unsaturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lee, Jhe-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Soil consolidation, involving time-dependent coupling between deformation of a porous medium and interstitial fluid flows within it, is of relevance to many subsurface engineering problems. A comprehensive model of poroelasticity for consolidation in unsaturated soils has been recently developed by Lo et al. (2014), but it still remains elusive how variations in soil texture and water content affect consolidation behavior, and the underlying parameters deriving this behavior. In the current study, a boundary-value problem is first setup corresponding to two symmetric semi-permeable drainage conditions, and then solved analytically for describing the excess pore air and water pressures along with the total settlement in response to time-invariant external loading using the Laplace transform. These solutions are numerically calculated for unsaturated soils with eleven texture classes as a function of three initial water saturations as representative examples. Our results reveal that the excess pore water pressure and time-dependent total settlement are indeed significantly sensitive to both soil texture and initial water saturation. We demonstrate that the coefficient of consolidation for water and its loading efficiency are two important physical parameters controlling consolidation behavior. With respect to the same soil texture, the coefficient of consolidation for water increases with an increase in initial water saturation, taking a value approximately four to five orders of magnitude greater in saturated soils than that in unsaturated ones. For a given initial water saturation, the rate of dissipation of excess pore water pressure is smallest in clay, followed by silty clay, silty clay loam, sandy clay, clay loam, silt loam, loam, sandy clay loam, sandy loam, loamy sand, and sand. A comparative study shows that in the early stage of consolidation, unsaturated soils bear smaller excess pore water pressure, but its dissipation is completed faster in saturated

  9. Water retention of rigid soils from a two-factor model for clay

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    Water retention is one of the key soil characteristics. Available models of soil water retention relate to the curve-fitting type. The objective of this work is to suggest a physical model of water retention (drying branch) for soils with a rigid matrix. "Physical" means the prediction based on the a priori measured or estimated soil parameters with a clear physical meaning. We rely on the two-factor model of clay that takes into account the factors of capillarity and shrinkage. The key points of the model to be proposed are some weak pseudo shrinkage that the rigid soils demonstrate according to their experimental water retention curves, and some specific properties of the rigid grain matrix. The three input parameters for prediction of soil water retention with the rigid grain matrix include inter-grain porosity, as well as maximum and minimum grain sizes. The comparison between measured and predicted sand water retention curves for four different sands is promising.

  10. Removal of MTBE from a clay soil using electrokinetic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabragh, A R; Bordbar, A T; Ghaziani, F; Javadi, A A

    2016-01-01

    Remediation of a soil contaminated with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was studied by using the electrokinetic technique. A series of experimental tests were carried out on contaminated soil in an electro-osmotic apparatus at different applied gradients of voltage and time. The tests were conducted with distilled water and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) solution as electrolyte. During each test the values of pH at anode and cathode reservoirs and also the discharge from cathode were measured. At the end of each test a number of soil samples were extracted from the middle of the soil at different distances from the anode and the removal of contaminant was measured by a gas chromatography apparatus. The results indicate that with EDTA as electrolyte the highest efficiency for removal of MTBE is achieved with 2.0 V/cm gradient and in the duration of 14 days. In addition, EDTA causes the values of pH to increase and decrease in the cathode and anode reservoirs, respectively. It also decreases the effluent and electro-osmotic permeability in comparison with distilled water. Experimental data were analysed by ANOVA and t-test methods. These statistical analyses showed significant difference (at 5% level) between the reference and other tests. PMID:26787321

  11. Soil moisture increment as a controlling variable of the Birch effect . Interactions with the pre-wetting soil moisture and litter addition

    OpenAIRE

    Lado Monserrat, Luis; Lull Noguera, Cristina; Bautista Carrascosa, María Inmaculada; Lidón Cerezuela, Antonio Luis; Herrera Fernandez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The Birch effect is a pulse in soil C and N mineralization caused by the wetting of dry soils, but the role of the soil moisture increment (Delta SWC) is still poorly understood. We quantified the relationship between Delta SWC and the Birch effect, and its interactions with pre-wetting soil moisture (preSWC) and substrate supply. Two soils (clay loam and sandy loam) under a Pinus halepensis forest were subjected to rewetting in laboratory treatments combining different Delta SWC and preSWC v...

  12. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdi, Noureddine, E-mail: nouryhamdi@gmail.com [Centre National des Recherches en Science des Materiaux, Borj Cedria Techno-Park, B.P. 95-2050, Hammam Lif, Tunis (Tunisia); Srasra, Ezzeddine [Centre National des Recherches en Science des Materiaux, Borj Cedria Techno-Park, B.P. 95-2050, Hammam Lif, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  13. Time and frequency GPR waveforms analysis for clay content evaluation in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, F.; Patriarca, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical behaviour of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which exerts some considerable effects in many applications in the fields of civil engineering, geology and environmental engineering. This study focuses on pavement engineering, but the approach can be extended to other purposes. The presence of clay in the bearing structural layers of pavements frequently causes damages and defects, such as transversal and longitudinal cracks, deformations and rutting. Consequently, the road safety and operability decrease, while the expected number of accidents increases. In this work Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) laboratory inspections are carried out in order to predict the presence of clay in pavement structural layers. Data are post-processed in the frequency domain, according to the Rayleigh scattering method based on the Fresnel theory. This new technique can be supported by other survey methods, improving the quality of the results. Analysis are carried out using two different GPR systems. A Radar is used with ground-coupled antennae in a bistatic configuration and common offset; the transmitter and receiver are linked by optic fiber electronic modules and operate at 500 MHz central frequency. The received signal is sampled in the time domain at time steps of 7.8125 x 10-2 ns. A Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) acquires ultra-wide band data in a bandwidth from 500 MHz to 3000 MHz. The signal is sampled in the frequency domain with approximately 1.56 MHz frequency steps. A double-ridged broadband horn antenna is connected via a high-quality coaxial cable to the VNA pulse generator and illuminates the analyzed target in a monostatic off-ground configuration. The experimental setting required the use of road material, typically employed for sub-grade and sub-base layers. Three kind of soils, classified as A1, A2, A3 by AASHTO are used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated boxes. Bentonite clay is gradually added from 2% to

  14. 垆土铁棍山药与沙土铁棍山药的性状比较%Characters comparison of the loam soil iron yam and sand iron yam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆岭

    2012-01-01

      Iron yam in Huai yam road real estate area divided into loam soil iron yam and sand iron yam, the article analyze the difference of two kinds of iron yam from plant growth environment, appearance and ingredients, for further research and development.%  怀山药道地产区的铁棍山药分为垆土铁棍山药与沙土铁棍山药两种,本文从植物生长环境以及外观性状以及成分含量入手,分析此两种铁棍山药的区别,为进一步研究和开发提供依据。

  15. Nitrogen Mineralization of Broiler Litter Applied to Southeastern Coastal Plain Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (clayey, kaoliniti...

  16. MINERALIZATION OF NITROGEN FROM BROILER LITTER AS AFFECTED BY SOIL TEXTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted during 2004-2005 to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (...

  17. Soil microbial communities associated to plant rhizospheres in an organic farming system in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial communities under different organic crop rhizospheres (0-10 and 10-20 cm) were characterized using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and pyrosequencing techniques. The soil was a silt loam (12.8% clay, 71.8% silt and15.4% sand). Soils at this site are characterized as having pH of ~6.53, ...

  18. Sustainable irrigation scheduling: effects of saline water on soil physical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedeschi, A.; Hamminga, W.; Postiglione, L.; Menenti, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the Mediterranean environment, characterized by hot and dry summers, a soil salinity research has been carried out on clay loam soil classified as Haplustolls. Spring-summer vegetables were irrigated with NaCl solutions of 0%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1% with intervals of 2, 5 and 10 d. During the

  19. Transport of Pathogen Surrogates in Soil Treatment Units: Numerical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Morales

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Segmented mesocosms (n = 3 packed with sand, sandy loam or clay loam soil were used to determine the effect of soil texture and depth on transport of two septic tank effluent (STE-borne microbial pathogen surrogates—green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli (GFPE and MS-2 coliphage—in soil treatment units. HYDRUS 2D/3D software was used to model the transport of these microbes from the infiltrative surface. Mesocosms were spiked with GFPE and MS-2 coliphage at 105 cfu/mL STE and 105–106 pfu/mL STE, respectively. In all soils, removal rates were >99.99% at 25 cm. The transport simulation compared (1 optimization; and (2 trial-and-error modeling approaches. Only slight differences between the transport parameters were observed between these approaches. Treating both the die-off rates and attachment/detachment rates as variables resulted in an overall better model fit, particularly for the tailing phase of the experiments. Independent of the fitting procedure, attachment rates computed by the model were higher in sandy and sandy loam soils than clay, which was attributed to unsaturated flow conditions at lower water content in the coarser-textured soils. Early breakthrough of the bacteria and virus indicated the presence of preferential flow in the system in the structured clay loam soil, resulting in faster movement of water and microbes through the soil relative to a conservative tracer (bromide.

  20. ESTIMATING SOIL PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION FOR SICILIAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bagarello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil particle-size distribution (PSD is commonly used for soil classification and for estimating soil behavior. An accurate mathematical representation of the PSD is required to estimate soil hydraulic properties and to compare texture measurements from different classification systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Haverkamp and Parlange (HP and Fredlund et al. (F PSD models to fit 243 measured PSDs from a wide range of 38 005_Bagarello(547_33 18-11-2009 11:55 Pagina 38 soil textures in Sicily and to test the effect of the number of measured particle diameters on the fitting of the theoretical PSD. For each soil textural class, the best fitting performance, established using three statistical indices (MXE, ME, RMSE, was obtained for the F model with three fitting parameters. In particular, this model performed better in the fine-textured soils than the coarse-textured ones but a good performance (i.e., RMSE < 0.03 was detected for the majority of the investigated soil textural classes, i.e. clay, silty-clay, silty-clay-loam, silt-loam, clay-loam, loamy-sand, and loam classes. Decreasing the number of measured data pairs from 14 to eight determined a worse fitting of the theoretical distribution to the measured one. It was concluded that the F model with three fitting parameters has a wide applicability for Sicilian soils and that the comparison of different PSD investigations can be affected by the number of measured data pairs.

  1. Influence of Amang (Tin Tailing) on Geotechnical Properties of Clay Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amang or tin tailing is commonly found in the vicinity of disused mining area and responsible in downgrading the water quality, landscape and mechanical behaviour of soils. It was generated from extraction process of separating valuable metal from particular ore. This paper presents the geotechnical characteristics of amang-contaminated clay soil. The geotechnical properties of uncontaminated soils were studied in order to compare to that of amang contaminated soils. The base soil used in this study represents completely weathered horizon of meta sedimentary rock. Meanwhile, tin tailing sample was taken from the disused mine at Sungai Lembing, Pahang. The geotechnical characterisations of base soil and contaminated soils were determined based on consistency index, compaction behaviour, hydraulic conductivity and undrained shear strength (UU tests). Contaminated soil samples were prepared by adding 5, 10 and 20 % of tailing, based on dry weigh of the studied base soil. The results from the particle size distribution analysis showed that residual soil from meta sedimentary rock comprised 42.6 % clay, 32.2 % silt and 25.2 % sand whilst tailing was dominated by 98 % of sand fraction. XRD analysis indicated the presence of quartz, kaolinite and muscovite minerals in the studied soil. The specific gravity of soil used is 2.67 and the pH is 3.88. Tailing found to have higher specific gravity of 3.37. The consistency index of contaminated soils showed that liquid limit, wL and plastic limit, wP decreased with the increase in the percentage of tailing added to the soil samples. The value of maximum dry density, ρ dry max increased while optimum moisture content decreased due to the increase in tailing content in soil sample. The permeability of contaminated soil also increased with the increase in tailing contents ranged from 19.8 cm/ hr to 23.8 cm/ hr. The undrained shear strength, Cu, of contaminated soil decreased from 646 kPa (5 % of tailing) to 312 kPa (20 % of

  2. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  3. Enrichment of trace elements in the clay size fraction of mining soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Patrícia; Valente, Teresa; Braga, M Amália Sequeira; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L

    2016-04-01

    Reactive waste dumps with sulfide minerals promote acid mine drainage (AMD), which results in water and soil contamination by metals and metalloids. In these systems, contamination is regulated by many factors, such as mineralogical composition of soil and the presence of sorption sites on specific mineral phases. So, the present study dedicates itself to understanding the distribution of trace elements in different size fractions (clay size fraction. Hence, the higher degree of contamination by toxic elements, especially arsenic in Penedono as well as the role of clay minerals, jarosite, and goethite in retaining trace elements has management implications. Such information must be carefully thought in the rehabilitation projects to be planned for both waste dumps. PMID:25712883

  4. Traditional Underground Grain Storage in Clay Soils in Sudan Improved by Recent Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla, AT.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the central clay plain of the Sudan, traditional subsistence farmers and small farmers that also produce for local markets want to keep the region near food self-sufficiency. They combine annual production of sorghum with underground pit storage of part of the harvest. With increasing climate variability this food security is coming more and more under pressure. Farmers recently experimented with pit innovations that would allow storage for more than one season. These innovations were quantified and further improvements were suggested. It was found that in the most abundantly occurring cracking clay soils, wide shallow pits, using thick chaff linings, with wider above ground soil caps, are most suitable for longer term storage.

  5. Enrichment of trace elements in the clay size fraction of mining soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Patrícia; Valente, Teresa; Braga, M Amália Sequeira; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L

    2016-04-01

    Reactive waste dumps with sulfide minerals promote acid mine drainage (AMD), which results in water and soil contamination by metals and metalloids. In these systems, contamination is regulated by many factors, such as mineralogical composition of soil and the presence of sorption sites on specific mineral phases. So, the present study dedicates itself to understanding the distribution of trace elements in different size fractions (clay size fraction. Hence, the higher degree of contamination by toxic elements, especially arsenic in Penedono as well as the role of clay minerals, jarosite, and goethite in retaining trace elements has management implications. Such information must be carefully thought in the rehabilitation projects to be planned for both waste dumps.

  6. Carbon-Nitrogen Relationships during the Humification of Cellulose in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1981-01-01

    the 2 soils with the high content of clay had a relatively high content of available unlabeled soil-N which was used for synthesis of metabolic material. The proportionate retention of labeled C for a given soil was largely independent of the size of the amendments, whereas the proportionate amount...... of labeled N incorporated into organic forms increased in the clay-rich soils with increasing size of amendments. Of the total labeled C remaining in the soils after the 1st mo. of incubation 50-70% was acid hydrolyzable, compared to 80-100% of the total remaining labeled organic N. This relationship held...... throughout the incubation and was independent of the size of the amendment and of the temperature of incubation. During the 2nd, 3rd and 4th yr of incubation the half-life of labeled amino acid-N in the soils was longer than the half-life of labeled amino acid-C, presumably due to immobilization reactions...

  7. Treatability of TCE-contaminated clay soils at the Rinsewater Impoundment, Michoud Assembly Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, A.J.; Gilbert, V.P.; Hewitt, J.D.; Koran, L.J. Jr.; Jennings, H.L.; Donaldson, T.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Marshall, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted treatability studies on clay soils taken from the Rinsewater Impoundment at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Michoud Assembly Facility. The soils are contaminated with up to 3000 mg/kg of trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, less than 10 mg/kg of trans-1,2-DCE, and less than 10 mg/kg of vinyl chloride. The goal of the study described in this report was to identify and test in situ technologies and/or develop a modified treatment regime to remove or destroy volatile organic compounds from the contaminated clay soils. Much of the work was based upon previous experience with mixed-region vapor stepping and mixed-region peroxidation. Laboratory treatments were performed on intact soil cores that were taken from contaminated areas at the Rinsewater Impoundment at MAF. Treatability studies were conducted on soil that was close to in situ conditions in terms of soil structure and contaminant concentrations.

  8. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X M; Drury, C F; Reynolds, W D; Yang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and sand (53-2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg(-1) soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg(-1), but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  9. Bulk and clay mineral composition indicate origin of terra rossa soils in Western Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Durn, Goran; Ćorić, Radica; Tadej, Neven; Barudžija, Uroš; Rubinić, Vedran; Husnjak, Stjepan

    2014-01-01

    The B horizons of terra rossa soils developed on three different carbonate lithologies having variable insoluble residue contents were studied in Western Herzegovina. Comparison of  their composition and properties illustrates to what extent mineral (especially clay mineral assemblage) and particle size composition of those horizons and the insoluble residue of the underlying carbonate rocks can be used as indicators of the polygenetic nature of terra rossa in this region. Terra rossa B horiz...

  10. The role of clay minerals on the hardsetting properties of soils in the Carnarvon horticultural district of Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigated the role of clay minerals on the hardsetting properties of soils used for intensive irrigated horticulture in the Carnarvon horticultural district of Western Australia. Hardsetting soils break down when wetted due to a combination of slaking and dispersion processes, resulting in a structureless mass of soil when dry. Soil samples were studied from several horizons from six profiles with hardsetting problems. On bulk samples, we measured the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and following treatment with sodium (Na), measured the tensile strength of (Na saturated) remoulded cores. On clay separates we measured the clay mineralogy using X-ray . diffraction (XRD) analysis and CEC by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis after barium (Ba) saturation. Samples were also investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile strength of the Na saturated remoulded cores was highly correlated (p ≤ 0.001) to both clay % and CEC of the soil. Lugo (1975) working with dried briquettes of soil materials produced similar results, and demonstrated that the increase in tensile strength adversely affected the stand of plants. When the tensile strength of the remoulded cores was compared to the CEC of the clay fractions, the soil clays with higher CEC had greater tensile strength than soils lower in CEC (p=0.09). Initial qualitative XRD results using the SIROQUANT method indicated that the soil clays mainly consisted of kaolinite with some illite, but very little smectite content. However the measured CEC's (by Ba saturation) were higher than expected and could not be explained on the basis of the illite and kaolinite contents. It was therefore inferred that interstratified smectite was also present. Using the proprietary software 'Traces', and a Pseudo-Voigt peak-shape algorithm, each XRD pattern was fitted with calculated peaks for the clay minerals present. Comparison with calculated patterns for interstratified illite/smectite (I/S) using

  11. Evaluation of clay content in soils for pavement engineering applications using GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Patriarca, Claudio; Benedetto, Andrea; Slob, Evert C.; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-04-01

    Clay content significantly influences the mechanical behavior of soils, thereby playing an important role in many fields of applications such as civil engineering, geology and agriculture. In the area of pavement engineering, clay content in structural bearing courses of pavement frequently causes damages and defects, such as transversal and longitudinal cracks, or other faults. The main consequence is a lowering of both the road safety and operability, with the number of expected accidents increasing. In this study, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) laboratory tests were carried out to predict the clay amount in pavement structural layers under different clay and moisture conditions. GPR data processing is performed using two different methods. The first method is based on the Fresnel theory and focuses on the Rayleigh scattering of the radar waves. The approach is based on a different scattering of the various components of the frequency spectrum, mostly depending on both the soil texture and variation in soil moisture content. For the application of this method, we used a pulse radar with ground-coupled, 500 MHz centre-frequency antennas in a common offset, bistatic configuration. The transmitter and receiver were linked by optic fiber electronic modules. The second method is based on full-waveform inversion of the ultra wideband radar data. In particular, a specific radar-antenna electromagnetic model is used to filter out antenna effects and antenna-medium interactions from the raw radar data and retrieve the response of the soil only, expressed in terms of a layered medium Green's function. To estimate the medium geometrical and electrical values, an optimization inverse problem is formulated. For the application of that second method, we used a vector network analyzer (VNA) as continuous-wave stepped-frequency radar system to acquire data in the 500-3000 MHz frequency range. A doubled-ridged broadband horn antenna operating in far-field conditions was used as

  12. Influence of Residue and Nitrogen Fertilizer Additions on Carbon Mineralization in Soils with Different Texture and Cropping Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Xianni Chen; Xudong Wang; Matt Liebman; Michel Cavigelli; Michelle Wander

    2014-01-01

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil]) comparing conventional grain systems (Conv) amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med) and longer (Long), more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double...

  13. Water flow and nitrate leaching in a layered silt loam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A.; Hesterberg, D.L.R.; Raats, P.A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching was studied for a winter leaching period in a layered calcareous silt loam with tile-drains at about 1-m depth and 12-m spacing. Groundwater levels, drain discharge rates, and NO3 concentrations in the drainage water were monitored, and the soil hydraulic characteristics were

  14. Water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Theory, numerical models, and field and laboratory measurements are used to describe and predict water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil. One- and two-dimensional models based on the Darcy equation for water flow and the convection-dispersion equation for solute transport are e

  15. Using Agricultural Residue Biochar to Improve Soil Quality of Desert Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory study was conducted to test the effects of biochars made from different feedstocks on soil quality indicators of arid soils. Biochars were produced from four locally-available agricultural residues: pecan shells, pecan orchard prunings, cotton gin trash, and yard waste, using a lab-scale pyrolyzer operated at 450 °C under a nitrogen environment and slow pyrolysis conditions. Two local arid soils used for crop production, a sandy loam and a clay loam, were amended with these biochars at a rate of 45 Mg·ha−1 and incubated for three weeks in a growth chamber. The soils were analyzed for multiple soil quality indicators including soil organic matter content, pH, electrical conductivity (EC, and available nutrients. Results showed that amendment with cotton gin trash biochar has the greatest impact on both soils, significantly increasing SOM and plant nutrient (P, K, Ca, Mn contents, as well as increasing the electrical conductivity, which creates concerns about soil salinity. Other biochar treatments significantly elevated soil salinity in clay loam soil, except for pecan shell biochar amended soil, which was not statistically different in EC from the control treatment. Generally, the effects of the biochar amendments were minimal for many soil measurements and varied with soil texture. Effects of biochars on soil salinity and pH/nutrient availability will be important considerations for research on biochar application to arid soils.

  16. IMPACT OF POLLUTION ON THE CLAY MINERALOGICAL COMPOSITION OF SOME SOILS FROM ZLATNA AREA (ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Craciun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Zlatna area is a high polluted zone with heavy metals due to industrial activity (extraction and processing of non-ferrous area. In spite of the fact that industrial activity was stoped for 2-3 years, the effect of pollution are still obvious. The aim of this paper is to make evident some aspects concerning the impact of pollution on the mineralogical composition of the clay fraction (below 2μ from some soils belonging to dystric cambisol and luvisol type. From the chemical point of view, the effect of pollution is the acidifiation and depletion of bases, reflected by the decrease of values of indices which express soil reaction (pH and soil exchange properties, especially in the surface horizon. From mineralogical point of view, the acidifiation determines a strong alteration of primary minerals (micas and feldspars and just of secondary minerals (illite, evolution beeing towards hydroxy interlayered minerals (intergrade and kaolinite. As result of this alteration the content of kaolinite increases, achiving a double content in the surface horizon of some polluted soils. Sometimes kaolinite becomes the dominant mineral in the clay fraction of some strong polluted soil.

  17. Impact of clay mineral on air oxidation of PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Kouadio, Olivier; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Faure, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    This work investigated the impact of a clay mineral (bentonite) on the air oxidation of the solvent extractable organic matters (EOMs) and the PAHs from contaminated soils. EOMs were isolated from two coking plant soils and mixed with silica sand or bentonite. These samples, as well as raw soils and bentonite/soil mixtures, were oxidized in air at 60 and 100 °C for 160 days. Mineralization was followed by measuring the CO2 produced over the experiments. EOM, polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC), including PAH, contents were also determined. Oxidation led to a decrease in EOM contents and PAH concentrations, these diminutions were enhanced by the presence of bentonite. Transfer of carbon from EOM to insoluble organic matter pointed out a condensation phenomenon leading to a stabilization of the contamination. Higher mineralization rates, observed during the oxidation of the soil/bentonite mixtures, seem to indicate that this clay mineral had a positive influence on the transformation of PAC into CO2.

  18. Determination of essential and toxic elements in clay soil commonly consumed by pregnant women in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwalongo, D.; Mohammed, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    A habit of eating clay soil especially among pregnant women is a common practice in Tanzania. This practice known as geophagy might introduce toxic elements in the consumer's body to endanger the health of the mother and her child. Therefore it is very important to have information on the elemental composition of the eaten soil so as to assess the safety nature of the habit. In this study 100 samples of clay soil, which were reported to be originating from five regions in Tanzania and are consumed by pregnant women were analyzed to determine their levels of essential and toxic elements. The analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescent technique (EDXRF) of Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, Arusha. Essential elements Fe, Zn, Cu, Se and Mn and toxic elements As, Pb, Co, Ni, U and Th were detected in concentrations above WHO permissible limits in some of the samples. The results from this study show that the habit of eating soil is exposing the pregnant mothers and their children to metal toxicity which is detrimental to their health. Hence, further actions should be taken to discourage the habit of eating soil at all levels.

  19. Wheel traffic effect on air-filled porosity and air permeability in a soil catena across the wheel rut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu;

    experiment was conducted on a clay loam soil at Suberg, Switzerland, in 2010. Four repeated wheeling were performed by driving a forage harvester (wheel load of 6100 kg and a tyre width of 0.8 m) forward and rearward in the same track. We sampled 100 cm3 intact cores at 10, 30 and 50 cm depth in a soil...

  20. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy study of mineral-organic matter associations in pasture soil clay fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Karunakaran, Chithra; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-06-17

    There is a growing acceptance that associations with soil minerals may be the most important overarching stabilization mechanism for soil organic matter. However, direct investigation of organo-mineral associations has been hampered by a lack of methods that can simultaneously characterize organic matter (OM) and soil minerals. In this study, STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at the C 1s, Ca 2p, Fe 2p, Al 1s, and Si 1s edges was used to investigate C associations with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si species in soil clay fractions from an upland pasture hillslope. Bulk techniques including C and N NEXAFS, Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, and XRD were applied to provide additional information. Results demonstrated that C was associated with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si with no separate phase in soil clay particles. In soil clay particles, the pervasive C forms were aromatic C, carboxyl C, and polysaccharides with the relative abundance of carboxyl C and polysaccharides varying spatially at the submicrometer scale. Only limited regions in the soil clay particles had aliphatic C. Good C-Ca spatial correlations were found for soil clay particles with no CaCO3, suggesting a strong role of Ca in organo-mineral assemblage formation. Fe EXAFS showed that about 50% of the total Fe in soils was contained in Fe oxides, whereas Fe-bearing aluminosilicates (vermiculite and Illite) accounted for another 50%. Fe oxides in the soil were mainly crystalline goethite and hematite, with lesser amounts of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite. XRD revealed that soil clay aluminosilicates were hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, Illite, and kaolinite. C showed similar correlation with Fe to Al and Si, implying a similar association of Fe oxides and aluminosilicates with organic matter in organo-mineral associations. These direct microscopic determinations can help improve understanding of organo-mineral interactions in soils.

  1. Novel clay carriers for the controlled release of organic agrochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled-release (CR) formulations of alachlor and atrazine herbicides were prepared using sodium alginate and pectine as natural, biodegradable matrices and clay minerals as inert fillers. The release of the two herbicides from different type of CR formulations was studied in static water. The release of alachlor from alginate based formulations and a commercial formulation in sandy loam soil and its movement in a soil column was also studied. The rate of release was affected by the type of clay and the size of the formulation beads. The addition of Fisher bentonite to the alginate reduced the rate of release of herbicides. The release was slower from the larger beads and from those prepared using high viscosity alginate. The release of alachlor in the soil and its movement through the soil column was faster from the commercial formulation than the CR formulation. (author). 6 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Clay content prediction using on-the-go proximal soil sensor fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabai, Salman; Knadel, Maria; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    There is a growing demand for high quality and reliable data on different soil constituents and properties in different scales. Research in the past decade has shown that traditional soil sampling cannot supply for this demand. Modern methods such as visible-near infrared (VNIR) and mid......-infrared (MIR) in the lab have already shown to be rapid, reliable, robust and low cost substitutes for traditional methods. Previous researchers have tried to use methods such as VNIR spectroscopy for on-the-go modeling of several soil constituents. However, in spite of being a highly influential parameter...... on soil usability, very few studies so far have provided robust and accurate predictions for fields with high clay content variability. An on-the-go multi-sensor platform was used to measure topsoil (25cm) VNIR spectra and temperature as well as electrical conductivity of top 30cm and top 90cm in 5 fields...

  3. 易盐渍区粘土夹层对土壤水盐运动的影响特征%Effect of clay interlayers on soil water-salt movement in easily-salinized regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余世鹏; 杨劲松; 刘广明

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale soil column experiments for simulation water-salt movement in clay interlayers under normal growing conditions were carried out in an easily-salinized region for different textures of soils and groundwater conditions in the Huang-Huai-Hai alluvial plain of China. In this study, the 20-year measurement was analyzed to examine the effect of clay interlayers on soil water-salt movement in easily-salinized regions. Results show that the clay inter-layer has a significant positive effect on the water-holding capacity in the soil and acts as a filter obstructing the salinity infiltration. This is especially true for restraining the penetration of surface accumulated salts. The thicker the clay interlayer is, the greater the effect will be. The range of depth to groundwater is likely to be smaller in the area with surface accumulated salts and clay interlayers around 1.0 m than that with silt loam soils around 1.5 m. And in the latter case, the salinization of soils is easily induced when the groundwater level is lower than a threshold value of 2.5 m. The amount of accumulated salts is found to be higher in clay interlayers than that in silt loam soils. Thus, proper monitoring and measures are necessary to prevent the secondary salinization of soils in the practice of water resources management.%针对黄淮海冲积平原土壤剖面中粘土夹层普遍存在的现象,在典型易盐渍区开展模拟易盐农田常规种植条件下水盐运移的大型土柱实验,基于长达20年的长系列监测数据分析,系统研究易盐渍区不同土体构型和地下水位等代表性条件下的土壤水盐运移规律和粘土夹层的影响特征.研究结果表明:粘土层有良好的保水和隔盐能力,尤其对表土积盐的抑制效果显著,且抑盐效果随粘土层厚度增加而提升;含粘土夹层土体表土积盐的地下水埋深范围更小,表土积盐高峰出现在l m左右地下水埋深,全剖面粉砂壤土土体

  4. Enhancement of physical and hydrological properties of a sandy loam soil via application of different biochar particle sizes during incubation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Esmaeelnejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of many studies that have been carried out, there is a knowledge-gap as to how different sizes of biochars alter soil properties. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different sizes of biochars on soil properties. The biochars were produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (350 and 550°C from two feedstocks (rice husk and apple wood chips. Produced biochars were prepared at two diameters (1-2 mm and <1 mm and mixed with soil at a rate of 2% (w/w. Multiple effects of type, temperature and size of biochars were significant, so as the mixture of soil and finer woodchip biochars produced at 550°C had significant effects on all soil properties. Soil aggregation and stabilization of macro-aggregates, values of mean weight diameter and water stable aggregates were improved due to increased soil organic matter as binding agents and microbial biomass. In addition, plant available water capacity, air capacity, S-index, meso-pores and water retention content were significantly increased compared to control. But, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks was reduced due to blockage of pores by biochar particles, reduction of pore throat size and available space for flow and also, high field capacity of biochars. So, application of biochar to soil, especially the finest particles of high-tempered woody biochars, can improve physical and hydrological properties of coarse-textured soils and reduce their water drainage by modification of Ks.

  5. The origin and early genesis of clay bands in youthful sandy soils along lake Michigan, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A beach ridge and dune complex with good radiocarbon control sampling the last 3500 radiocarbon years B.P. provides new insights on the early genesis of clay bands in sandy soils. Soil profiles were sampled by age groups, described in the field, and then subjected to laboratory analyses for particle-size distribution, pH, organic carbon, carbonate minerals, and extractable iron and manganese. This study suggests that small increases in pH, brought about by small increases in carbonate content within the soil profile, are responsible for flocculating small amounts of illuviated clay. This process, along with a transition to a greater hydraulic conductivity with soil depth due to coarser textures in any given profile, partly explains the existence and possible reason for the initiation of illuvial zones and eventually for clay-band horizons. A pronounced increase in the thickness of incipient clay-band horizons in soils older than 2300 years appears due to finer textures in the parent materials than are present in younger soils. Because of slightly reduced porosity and lower permeability, carbonates and a high pH are retained in both illuvial and eluvial horizons of some of these older soils. In addition, only in those profiles older than 2300 years do clay and iron oxide concentrations coincide and is there some suggestion of greater amounts of extractable manganese in horizons of minimum iron and clay. A pronounced segregation of clay-iron bands is not apparent at the study area but should occur in future years as additional amounts of iron and clay are deposited. ?? 1984.

  6. Effect of Polypropylene Fibers, Lime and Ceramic Additives on the Compressibility of Silty-Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiba D. Saleem

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil stabilization is widely used by geotechnical engineers in the world to increase soil strength, soil compressibility and reduce the permeability. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different materials to the silty clayey soil (i.e. polypropylene fibers, lime and ceramic and to figure out how the compressibility behave under mixture soil and these stabilized material at different percent (investigation their effect on the value of settlement. Silty clay soil it is used in this research in the geotechnical laboratories of the University of Wasit and the samples of soil are subjected to two main stress level using one-dimensional compression apparatus (i.e. 40KP and 80 KPa for both untreated and treated (stabilized soil with additives. A total of 48 hours of loading time is used and conventional reading rate for one-dimensional compression test is followed. Two main percentages (i.e. 1.5% and 3.5% from the total weight of soil specimens and they had been mixed with soil for 30 min using electrical mixer to attain a uniform soil-material mixture prior to consolidation cell preparation and loading procedure. The results of the experimental tests show that the compressibility of the treated soil specimens were decrease when the soil stabilized with these material and minimum compressibility was obtained when the polypropylene fibers at 1.5 % percentages is used at the higher stress level and 3.5% of lime-stabilized at low stress level.

  7. Effect of air injection under subsurface drip irrigation on yield and water use efficiency of corn in a sandy clay loam soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abuarab; Ehab Mostafa; Mohamed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) can substantially reduce the amount of irrigation water needed for corn production. However, corn yields need to be improved to offset the initial cost of drip installation. Air-injection is at least potentially applicable to the (SDI) system. However, the vertical stream of emitted air moving above the emitter outlet directly toward the surface creates a chimney effect, which should be avoided, and to ensure that there are adequate oxygen for root respiration...

  8. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:V.Salt Balance in Soil Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA

    1995-01-01

    Salt balance in simulated soil coulumns was calculated on the basis of a large amount of long term observation data.The results showed that under the climate conditions of semi-arid region of the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain,the soils in the columns were under salt accumulation conditions when the groundwater depth was controlled at less than 2.0m,and under desalinization conditions when at larger than 2.5m.In the soil columns with clay soil and silty loam soil intercalated with a clay layer,the amount of salt accumulated was far less than that in the soil column with silty loam soil throughout the whole profile.Under no irriagtion conditions crop planting may increase groundwater evaporation and hence salt accumulation in soil,making the soil columns under desalinization be under salt accumulation conditions.

  9. Ammonia transformations and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in a clay soil underlying a manure pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Baram, Shahar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Unlined manure ponds are constructed on clay soil worldwide to manage farm waste. Seepage of ammonia-rich liquor into underlying soil layers contributes to groundwater contamination by nitrate. To identify the possible processes that lead to the production of nitrate from ammonia in this oxygen-limited environment, we studied the diversity and abundance of ammonia-transforming microorganisms under an unlined manure pond. The numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria were most abundant in the top of the soil profile and decreased significantly with depth (0.5 m), correlating with soil pore-water ammonia concentrations and soil ammonia concentrations, respectively. On the other hand, the numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea were relatively constant throughout the soil profile (10(7) amoA copies per g(soil)). Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were detected mainly in the top 0.2 m. The results suggest that nitrate accumulation in the vadose zone under the manure pond could be the result of complete aerobic nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and could exist as a byproduct of anammox activity. While the majority of the nitrogen was removed within the 0.5-m soil section, possibly by combined anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, a fraction of the produced nitrate leached into the groundwater.

  10. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY-SODICITY AND GLYPHOSATE FORMULATIONS – AVANS PREMIUM 360 SL ON PHOSPHOMONOESTERASE ACTIVITIES IN SANDY LOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płatkowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to determine the influence of NaCl and glyphosate-based herbicide Avans Premium 360 SL on acid and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activities in sandy loam. The experiment was carried out in laboratory conditions on sandy loam with Corg content 10.90 g/kg. Soil was divided into half kilogram samples and adjusted to 60% of maximum water holding capacity. In the experiment dependent variables were: I – dosages of Avans Premium 360 SL (0, a recommended field dosage – FD, a tenfold higher dosage – 10 FD and hundredfold higher dosage – 100 FD, II – amount of NaCl (0, 3% and 6%, III – day of experiment (1, 7, 14, 28 and 56. On days of experiment the activity of alkaline and acid phosphomonoesterase activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. The obtained result showed that the application of Avans Premium 360 SL decreased in acid and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activity in clay soil. Significant interaction effect between the dosage of Avans Premium 360 SL, NaCl amount and day of experiment was reported in the experiment. The inhibitory effect of Avans Premium 360 SL was the highest in soil with NaCl at the amount of 6%.

  11. Determination of the composition of the organic matter chemically stabilized by agricultural soil clay minerals: Spectroscopy and Density Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufqir, Sofia; Bloom, Paul; Toner, Brandy; Hatcher, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The interactions between soil organic matter and clay minerals are considered important processes because of their ability to sequester C in soil for long periods of time, and hence control C in the global C cycle when present. However, differing results have been reported regarding the composition of the soil organic matter - aromatic fractions versus aliphatic fractions - associated with clay minerals. To clarify this critical issue and better understand the C sequestration process in soils, we aimed to determine the nature of the chemically bound natural organic matter on clay surfaces, and to probe the speciation and spatial distribution of C in the soil clay nanoparticles using direct spectroscopic measurements namely solid-state CP-MAS and DP-MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). We tested the hypotheses that peptides and polysaccharides are stabilized by the smectite-illite clay while the lipids and black carbon are a separate phase; and that they are evenly distributed on clay surfaces. A soil clay fraction (5.5% organic C) was isolated from the surface of a prairie soil (Mollisol) in southwestern Minnesota, characterized by a pH 6.0, 32.5% clay content, and 3.7% organic carbon, using a sonication-sedimentation-siphoning process in distilled water. Then was subjected to density separation combined with low energy ultrasonic dispersion to separate the free organic and black C (light fraction) from the chemically bound C (heavy fraction). The XRD results indicated a dominance of interstratified smectite-illite clays in soil. The 13C-NMR spectra of the soil clay fraction suggested that polysaccharides and polypeptides are the prevailing components of the organic matter associated with the mineral clay, with only a minor component of aromatic C. The light fraction has strong alkyl C-H bands characteristic of fatty acids plus strong C-O bands characteristic of polysaccharides, including

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus enhances P acquisition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a sandy loam soil with long-term inorganic fertilization regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junli; Lin, Xiangui; Wang, Junhua; Cui, Xiangchao; Dai, Jue; Chu, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2010-10-01

    The P efficiency, crop yield, and response of wheat to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus caledonium were tested in an experimental field with long-term (19 years) fertilizer management. The experiment included five fertilizer treatments: organic amendment (OA), half organic amendment plus half mineral fertilizer (1/2 OM), mineral fertilizer NPK, mineral fertilizer NK, and the control (without fertilization). AMF inoculation responsiveness (MIR) of wheat plants at acquiring P were estimated by comparing plants grown in unsterilized soil inoculated with G. caledonium and in untreated soil containing indigenous AMF. Without AMF inoculation, higher crop yields but lower colonization rates were observed in the NPK and two OA-inputted treatments, and NPK had significantly (P soils and thereby P acquisition of wheat plants compared with OA and 1/2 OM. G. caledonium inoculation significantly (P soil alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, only with the NPK treatment. This gave an MIR of ca. 45% on total P acquisition of wheat plants. There were no other remarkable MIRs. It suggested that the MIR is determined by soil available P status, and rational combination of AMF with chemical NPK fertilizer can compensate for organic amendments by improving P-acquisition efficiency in arable soils.

  13. Effects of Humic Acid and Solution pH on Dispersion of Na—and Ca—Soil Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANYEQING; HUQIONGYING; 等

    1996-01-01

    Dispersed soil clays have a negative impact on soil structure and contribute to soil erosion and contaminant movement.In this study,two typical soils from the south of China were chosen for investigating roles of pH and humic acid(HA) on dispersion of soil clays.Critical flocculation concentration (CFC) of the soil clay suspension was determined by using light transmission at a wavelength of 600 nm.The results indicated that effects of pH and HA on dispersion of the soil clays were closely related to the type of the major minerals makin up the soil and to the valence of the exchangeable cations as well.At four rates of pH(4,6,8and 10),the CFC for the Na-yellow-brown soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.32 to 0.56,6.0 to 14.0,10.0 to 24.6 and 26.0 to 52.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively when Na-HA was added at the rate of from 0 to 40mgL-1,With the same Na-HA addition and three pH(6,8and 10)treatments,the CFC for the Na-red soil was incresed from 0.5 to 20.0,1.0 to 40.0 and 6.0 to 141.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively.Obviously,pH and HA has greater effects on clay dispersion of the red soil(dominated by 1:1 minerals and oxides) than on that of the yellow-brown soil(dominated by 2:1minerals).However,at three rates of pH(6,8and 10) and with the addition of Ca-HA from 0 to 40mg L-1,the CFC of the Ca-yellow-brown soil and Ca-red soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.55 to 0.81,0.75 to 1.28,0.55 to 1.45and 0.038 to 0.266.0.25 to 0.62,0.7to 1.6mmol CaCl2 L-1,respectively.So,Na-soil claye are more sensitive to pH and HA than Ca-soil clays.

  14. Study of Various Techniques for Improving Weak and Compressible Clay Soil under a High Earth Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein A.K. M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the suitability of three soil improvement techniques for the construction of a high earth embankment on thick weak and highly compressible clay soil. The eastern approach embankment of Alhalfaya Bridge on the River Nile linking Khartoum North and Omdurman cities was chosen as a case study and a comprehensive site investigation program was carried out to determine the properties the subsurface soils. The study results showed that unless the subsurface soils have been improved they may fail or undergo excessively large settlements due to the embankment construction. Three ground improvement techniques based on the principles of the “staged construction method, SCM”, “vertical sand drain, VSD” and “sand compaction piles, SCP” of embankment foundation soil treatment are discussed and evaluated. Embankment design options based on applications of the above methods have been proposed for foundation treatment to adequately support embankment loads. A method performance evaluation based on the improvement of soil properties achieved; the time required for construction and compared estimated costs criteria was made to assess the effectiveness and expected overall performance. Adoption of any of the soil improvement techniques considered depends mainly on the most critical and decisive factor governing the embankment design. Based on the overall performance for the embankment case studied, the sand drains is considered as the most appropriate improvement method followed by the sand compaction piles technique whereas the staged construction method showed the poorest overall performance.

  15. Estimating of Soil Texture Using Landsat Imagery: a Case Study in Thatta Tehsil, Sindh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Zahid

    2016-07-01

    Soil texture is considered as an important environment factor for agricultural growth. It is the most essential part for soil classification in large scale. Today the precise soil information in large scale is of great demand from various stakeholders including soil scientists, environmental managers, land use planners and traditional agricultural users. With the increasing demand of soil properties in fine scale spatial resolution made the traditional laboratory methods inadequate. In addition the costs of soil analysis with precision agriculture systems are more expensive than traditional methods. In this regard, the application of geo-spatial techniques can be used as an alternative for examining soil analysis. This study aims to examine the ability of Geo-spatial techniques in identifying the spatial patterns of soil attributes in fine scale. Around 28 samples of soil were collected from the different areas of Thatta Tehsil, Sindh, Pakistan for analyzing soil texture. An Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression analysis was used to relate the reflectance values of Landsat8 OLI imagery with the soil variables. The analysis showed there was a significant relationship (pmap in GIS environment. The outcome revealed that the 'sandy loam' was in great quantity followed by loam, sandy clay loam and clay loam. The outcome shows that the Geo-spatial techniques could be used efficiently for mapping soil texture of a larger area in fine scale. This technology helped in decreasing cost, time and increase detailed information by reducing field work to a considerable level.

  16. Alleviation of Soil Acidity and Aluminium Phytotoxicity in Acid Soils by Using Alkaline-Stabilised Biosolids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study alleviation of soil acidity and Al toxicity by applying an alkaline-stabilised sewage sludge product (biosolids) to an acid clay sandy loam (pH 5.7) and a strongly acid sandy loam (pH 4.5). Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Forrester) was used as a test crop and was grown in the sewage sludge-amended (33.5 t sludge DM ha-1) and unamended soils. The results showed that the alkaline biosloids increased soil pH from 5.7 to 6.9 for the clay sandy loam and from 4.5 to 6.0 for the sandy loam. The sludge product decreased KCl-extractable Al from 0.1 to 0.0 cmol kg-1 for the former soil and from 4.0 to 0.1 cmol kg-1 for the latter soil. As a result, barley plants grew much better and grain yield increased greatly in the amended treatments compared with the unamended controls. These observations indicate that alkaline-stabilised biosolids can be used as a liming material for remedying Al phytotoxicity in strongly acid soils by increasing soil pH and lowering Al bioavailability.

  17. Development and evaluation of a new sorption model for organic cations in soil: contributions from organic matter and clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droge, Steven T J; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2013-12-17

    This study evaluates a newly proposed cation-exchange model that defines the sorption of organic cations to soil as a summed contribution of sorption to organic matter (OM) and sorption to phyllosilicate clay minerals. Sorption to OM is normalized to the fraction organic carbon (fOC), and sorption to clay is normalized to the estimated cation-exchange capacity attributed to clay minerals (CECCLAY). Sorption affinity is specified to a fixed medium composition, with correction factors for other electrolyte concentrations. The model applies measured sorption coefficients to one reference OM material and one clay mineral. If measured values are absent, then empirical relationships are available on the basis of molecular volume and amine type in combination with corrective increments for specific polar moieties. The model is tested using new sorption data generated at pH 6 for two Eurosoils, one enriched in clay and the other, OM, using 29 strong bases (pKa > 8). Using experimental data on reference materials for all tested compounds, model predictions for the two soils differed on average by only -0.1 ± 0.4 log units from measured sorption affinities. Within the chemical applicability domain, the model can also be applied successfully to various reported soil sorption data for organic cations. Particularly for clayish soils, the model shows that sorption of organic cations to clay minerals accounts for more than 90% of the overall affinity.

  18. Acceptable levels of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) in soils, depending on their clay and humus content and cation-exchange capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de S.; Rethfeld, H.; Driel, van W.

    1985-01-01

    Three sandy soils differing in humus content and three clay soils differing in clay content were supplied with heavy metals to determine which loading rate of each single metal should be regarded as critical from the viewpoint of crop yield and metal content dependent on soil cation exchange capacit

  19. Simulation of water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a heavy clay soil using the MACRO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Besien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dual-porosity MACRO model has been used to investigate methods of reducing leaching of isoproturon from a structured heavy clay soil. The MACRO model was applied to a pesticide leaching data-set generated from a plot scale experiment on a heavy clay soil at the Oxford University Farm, Wytham, England. The field drain was found to be the most important outflow from the plot in terms of pesticide removal. Therefore, this modelling exercise concentrated on simulating field drain flow. With calibration of field-saturated and micropore saturated hydraulic conductivity, the drain flow hydrographs were simulated during extended periods of above average rainfall, with both the hydrograph shape and peak flows agreeing well. Over the whole field season, the observed drain flow water budget was well simulated. However, the first and second drain flow events after pesticide application were not simulated satisfactorily. This is believed to be due to a poor simulation of evapotranspiration during a period of low rainfall around the pesticide application day. Apart from an initial rapid drop in the observed isoproturon soil residue, the model simulated isoproturon residues during the 100 days after pesticide application reasonably well. Finally, the calibrated model was used to show that changes in agricultural practice (deep ploughing, creating fine consolidated seed beds and organic matter applications could potentially reduce pesticide leaching to surface waters by up to 60%.

  20. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karup, Dan; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Greve, Mogens H.; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-09-01

    Solute transport through the soil matrix is non-uniform and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. Attempts have been made in previous studies to use infiltration experiments to identify the degree of preferential flow, but these attempts have often been based on small datasets or data collected from literature with differing initial and boundary conditions. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. From six agricultural fields in Denmark, 193 intact surface soil columns 20 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter were collected. The soils exhibited a wide range in texture, with clay and organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.03 to 0.41 and 0.01 to 0.08 kg kg- 1, respectively. All experiments were carried out under the same initial and boundary conditions using tritium as a conservative tracer. The breakthrough characteristics ranged from being near normally distributed to gradually skewed to the right along with an increase in the content of the mineral fines (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5% and up to 50% of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. Predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points as a function of time up to 50% of applied tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical advection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer

  1. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, E.; Tuller, M.; Møldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    vapour sorption, which can be measured within a shorter period of time, have recently been developed. Such models are often based on single-point measurements of water adsorption and do not account for sorption hysteresis or organic matter content. The present study introduces regression relationships...... for estimating clay content from hygroscopic water at different relative humidity (RH) levels while considering hysteresis and organic matter content. Continuous adsorption/desorption vapour sorption isotherm loops were measured for 150 differently textured soils with a state-of-the-art vapour sorption analyser...

  2. IMPACT OF POLLUTION ON THE CLAY MINERALOGICAL COMPOSITION OF SOME SOILS FROM ZLATNA AREA (ROMANIA)

    OpenAIRE

    C. Craciun; Alexandrina Manea; Laura Paulette; Marius Eftene; Victoria Mocanu

    2008-01-01

    Zlatna area is a high polluted zone with heavy metals due to industrial activity (extraction and processing of non-ferrous area). In spite of the fact that industrial activity was stoped for 2-3 years, the effect of pollution are still obvious. The aim of this paper is to make evident some aspects concerning the impact of pollution on the mineralogical composition of the clay fraction (below 2μ) from some soils belonging to dystric cambisol and luvisol type. From the chemical point of view, ...

  3. Dynamic compaction treatment technology research of red clay soil embankment in southern mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建华; 袁剑波; 熊虎; 陈伟

    2008-01-01

    High liquid limit soil generally adopted in expressway embankment construction of southern mountains, which often expresses some characteristics including high moisture content, high porosity ratio, low permeability, high compressibility, certain disintegration, and so on. Spring soil phenomenon and inhomogeneous compaction have effects on the quality of embankment construction, just because the water in soil is difficult to evaporate. Based on the study of reinforcement mechanism for high liquid limit soil, in situ tests for dynamic compaction treatment in Yizhang-Fengtouling expressway embankment were developed. The reliable and economical dynamic compaction treatment methods and the construction technology for large range high liquid limit soil embankment in southern mountains expressway were discussed. In the process, convenient measurement methods were adopted to evaluate the treatment effects. The test results show that the dynamic compaction method has good treatment effects on the local red clay embankment. The embankment compaction degree is improved with compactness coming to 90% around tamping pits and compactness over 95% in tamping pits interior after tamping. The bearing capacity, the physical mechanic-property and the shear strength for soil are obviously improved, which are enhanced with cohesive strength increasing over 10 kPa and compression modulus increasing over 3 MPa.

  4. Compressive behaviour of the soil in buffer zones under different management practices in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Räty, Mari; Horn, Rainer; Rasa, Kimmo; Yli-Halla, Markku; Pietola, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Soil structure that favours infiltration is essential for successful functioning of vegetated buffer zones. We measured bulk density, air permeability and precompression stress in a clay soil (Vertic Cambisol) and a sandy loam (Haplic Regosol) in Finland, to identify management-related changes in the physical and mechanical properties in the surface soil of buffer zones. In addition, the impact of texture on these properties was studied at depths down to 180?200 cm. Soil cores (240 cm3) were ...

  5. Risk assessment of gas oil and kerosene contamination on some properties of silty clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, M; Shabanpor, M; Zakerinia, M; Ebrahimi, S

    2015-07-01

    Soil and ground water resource pollution by petroleum compounds and chemical solvents has multiple negative environmental impacts. The aim of this research was to investigate the impacts of kerosene and gas oil pollutants on some physical and chemical properties, breakthrough curve (BTC), and water retention curve (SWRC) of silty clay soil during a 3-month period. Therefore, some water-saturated soils were artificially contaminated in the pulse condition inside some glassy cylinders by applying half and one pore volume of these pollutants, and then parametric investigations of the SWRC were performed using RETC software for Van Genukhten and Brooks-Corey equations in the various suctions and the soil properties were determined before and after pollution during 3 months. The results showed that gas oil and kerosene had a slight effect on soil pH and caused the cumulative enhancement in the soil respiration, increase in the bulk density and organic matter, and reduction in the soil porosity and electrical and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, gas oil retention was significantly more than kerosene (almost 40%) in the soil. The survey of SWRC indicated that the contaminated soil samples had a little higher amount of moisture retention (just under 15% in most cases) compared to the unpolluted ones during this 3-month period. The parametric analysis of SWRC demonstrated an increase in the saturated water content, Θ s, from nearly 49% in the control sample to just under 53% in the polluted ones. Contaminants not only decreased the residual water content, Θ r, but also reduced the SWRC gradient, n, and amount of α parameter. The evaluation of both equations revealed more accurate prediction of SWRC's parameters by Van Genukhten compared to those of Brooks and Corey. PMID:26085279

  6. Irrigation with saline-sodic water: effects on two clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of a 4-year experiment aimed at evaluating the effect of irrigation with saline-sodic water on the soil are reported. The research was carried out at the Campus of the Agricultural Faculty of Bari University (Italy on 2 clay soils (Bologna – T1 and Locorotondo – T2. The soils were cropped to borlotto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., capsicum (Capsicum annuum L., sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., wheat (Triticum durum Desf grown in succession; the crops were irrigated with 9 saline-sodic types of water and subjected to two different leaching fractions (10% and 20% of the watering volume. The 9 solutions were obtained dissolving in de-ionised water weighted amounts of sodium chloride (NaCl and calcium chloride (CaCl2, deriving from the combination of 3 saline concentrations and 3 sodicity levels. The crops were irrigated whenever the water lost by evapotranspiration from the soil contained in the pots was equal to 30% of the soil maximum available water. The results showed that, though the soils were leached during the watering period, they showed a high salt accumulation. Consequently, the saturated soil extract electrical conductivity increased from initial values of 0.65 and 0.68 dS m-1 to 11.24 and 13.61 dS m-1 at the end of the experiment, for the soils T1 and T2, respectively. The saline concentration increase in irrigation water caused in both soils a progressive increase in exchangeable sodium, and a decrease in exchangeable calcium and non-significant variations in exchangeable potassium (K and magnesium (Mg.

  7. Measurements of the streaming potential of clay soils from tropical and subtropical regions using self-made apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Yi; Li, Jiu-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2014-09-01

    The streaming potential has been wildly used in charged parallel plates, capillaries, and porous media. However, there have been few studies involving the ζ potential of clay soils based on streaming potential measurements. A laboratory apparatus was developed in this study to measure the streaming potential (ΔE) of bulk clay soils' coupling coefficient (C) and cell resistance (R) of saturated granular soil samples. Excellent linearity of ΔE versus liquid pressure (ΔP) ensured the validity of measurements. The obtained parameters of C and R can be used to calculate the ζ potential of bulk soils. The results indicated that the ζ potentials measured by streaming potential method were significantly correlated with the ζ potentials of soil colloids determined by electrophoresis (r (2) = 0.960**). Therefore, the streaming potential method can be used to study the ζ potentials of bulk clay soils. The absolute values of the ζ potentials of four soils followed the order: Ultisol from Jiangxi > Ultisol from Anhui > Oxisol from Guangdong > Oxisol from Hainan, and this was consistent with the cation exchange capacities of these soils. The type and concentration of electrolytes affected soil ζ potentials. The ζ potential became less negative with increased electrolyte concentration. The ζ potentials were more negative in monovalent than in divalent cationic electrolyte solutions because more divalent cations were distributed in the shear plane of the diffuse layer as counter-cations on the soil surfaces than monovalent cations at the same electrolyte concentration.

  8. Aging effect of 137Cs obtained from 137Cs in the Kanto loam layer from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident and in the Nishiyama loam layer from the Nagasaki A-bomb explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Tomoko; Mahara, Yasunori; Kubota, Takumi; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    We measured (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the surface soil of the Kanto loam in the eastern Tokyo metropolitan area and the Nishiyama loam in Nagasaki, Japan. The observed (137)Cs deposition in the Kanto loam from the Fukushima nuclear power plant (NPP) accident ranged from 4.0 to 77 kBq m(-2), which corresponds to 0.3-5 times of that in the Nishiyama loam. The (137)Cs retardation factor in the Kanto loam obtained seven months after the Fukusima NPP accident and in the Nishiyama loam after 36 and 38 years from the detonation of the Pu atomic bomb (A-bomb) ranged from 180 to 260 and 2000 to 10,000, respectively. This difference in the retardation factors is attributed to an aging effect that corresponds to seven months and 36 to 38 years after the deposition of (137)Cs occurred on the soil minerals.

  9. Interactions of Cations with Electrodialyzed Clay Fraction of Soils as Inferred from Wien Effect in Soil Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The electrical conductivities (ECs) of suspensions containing 25 and 30 g kg-1 solids prepared from theelectrodialyzed clay fraction (< 2 μm in diameter) of latosol, yellow-brown soil, and black soil, dispersed invarious nitrate solutions having concentrations of 1 × 10-4/z mol L-1, where z is the valence, and in distilledwater, were measured at field strengths ranging from 14 kV cm-1 to 210 kV cm-1. On the basis of analysesof the charge density and exchangeable ion composition on the surfaces of soil particles in the suspensions,and of the characters of the EC-field strength curves of the various suspensions, it was inferred that theincrement of EC (△EC) and/or relative electrical conductivity (REC) can indicate the bonding strengthbetween cations and soil particles. The bonding strengths of various cations with the soils diminished in theorder: K+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ = Ca2+ > Na+ for latosol, Ca2+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ = K+ > Na+ for yellow-brownsoil, and Zn2+ >Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Na+ for black soil.

  10. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos;

    2016-01-01

    (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curve (BTC), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability...... of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5 % and up to 50 % of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. The hereby predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points up to 50% of applied...... tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical convection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were hereby reasonable well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer mass...

  11. Microorganism-induced weathering of clay minerals in a hydromorphic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hanlie; Fang, Qian; Cheng, Liuling; Wang, Chaowen; Churchman, Gordon Jock

    2016-07-01

    In order to improve the understanding of factors influencing weathering in hydromorphic soils, the clay mineral and chemical compositions, iron (hydr)oxides, organic compounds, and Sr and Nd isotopic compositions, of hydromorphic soils on the banks of the Liangzi Lake, Hubei province, south China, were investigated. The B horizon in the lower profile exhibits a distinct net-like pattern, with abundant short white veins within the red-brown matrix. Their various 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic compositions showed only small variations of 0.7270-0.7235 and 0.51200-0.51204, respectively, consistent with the composition of Yangtze River sediments, indicating that the soils were all derived from alluvium from the catchment. The white veins contained notably more SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, and mobile elements relative to the red-brown matrix, while they both showed similar values for the chemical index of alteration of 86.7 and 87.1, respectively, and displayed similar degrees of weathering. The clay minerals in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were illite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite. These same three clay minerals comprised the white net-like veins in the soil B horizon, whereas only illite and kaolinite were observed in the red-brown matrix. Iron (hydr)oxides in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were hematite and goethite, whereas in the red-brown matrix of the B horizon they were hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite. Different organic compounds were observed for the white vein and the red-brown matrix in the soil B horizon: an 18:2 fatty acid biomarker for fungi in the net-like vein, but not in the red-brown matrix. Compared with the red-brown matrix, the white net-like vein also clearly contained more mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are sometimes associated with bacteria that have the capacity to reduce Fe(III). Thus, migration of iron and the formation of the net-like veins involved the participation of biota during the hydromorphic

  12. Clay and Soil Photolysis of the Pesticides Mesotrione and Metsulfuron Methyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Siampiringue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photolysis may represent an important degradation process of pollutants at the surface of soil. In the present work, we report a detailed study on the degradation of two pesticides: mesotrione and metsulfuron methyl using a sunlight simulator. In a first step, we studied the photochemical behaviour at the surface of clays from the kinetic as well as from the analytical point of view. In both cases, the quantum yields were found to be higher when compared to those obtained in aqueous solutions. The effect of iron(III, water, and humic substances contents was studied. In the former cases, an increase of the degradation rate was observed while an inhibition was observed with the latter owing to a filter effect phenomenon. In a second step, we studied the photodegradation at the surface of natural soil and identified the generated byproducts. They appear to mainly arise from photohydrolysis process.

  13. Modelling desiccation cracking in a homogenous soil clay layer: comparison between different hypotheses on constitutive behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jommi Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Desiccation cracks are usually thought to start from the surface of an evaporating soil layer, and the available simplified models for crack initiation and propagation are based on this hypothesis. On the contrary, experimental results on a Dutch river clay showed that cracks in an evaporating soil layer may start and propagate below the surface, confirming earlier findings by other researchers. A simple one-dimensional model was set up to analyse the consequences of different hypotheses about the material behaviour on the crack onset in a homogenous soil layer undergoing surface drying. The results of the model show that dependence of the material behaviour on the rate of water content change is a necessary requirement for cracks to initiate below the surface. The conclusion suggests that, to properly understand cracking in an evaporating soil layer, an intrinsic time scale for the mechanical response must be accounted for, among all the other factors which were previously highlighted by other researchers. The key factor to predict crack onset below the surface is the dependence of the drying branch of the water retention curve of the compressible soil on the rate of drying, which would be justified by a rate dependent fabric evolution.

  14. Water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a drained heavy clay soil: 1. Preferential flow processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haria, A. H.; Johnson, A. C.; Bell, J. P.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1994-12-01

    The processes and mechanisms that control pesticide transport from drained heavy clay catchments are being studied at Wytham Farm (Oxford University) in southern England. In the first field season field-drain water contained high concentrations of pesticide. Soil studies demonstrated that the main mechanism for pesticide translocation was by preferential flow processes, both over the soil surface and through the soil profile via a macropore system that effectively by-passed the soil matrix. This macropore system included worm holes, shrinkage cracks and cracks resulting from ploughing. Rainfall events in early winter rapidly created a layer of saturation in the A horizon perched above a B horizon of very low hydraulic conductivity. Drain flow was initiated when the saturated layer in the A horizon extended into the upper 0.06m of the soil profile; thereafter water moved down slope via horizontal macropores possibly through a band of incorporated straw residues. These horizontal pathways for water movement connected with the fracture system of the mole drains, thus feeding the drains. Overland flow occurred infrequently during the season.

  15. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. te Brake

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geometry factor was applied. The relative overestimation made by assuming constant isotropic shrinkage in the linear (basic shrinkage phase was 26.4% (17.5 mm for the actively shrinking layer between 0 and 60 cm. Aggregate-scale water storage and volume change revealed a linear relation for layers ≥ 30 cm depth. The range of basic shrinkage in the bulk soil was limited by delayed drying of deep soil layers, and maximum water loss in the structural shrinkage phase was 40% of total water loss in the 0–60 cm layer, and over 60% in deeper layers. In the dry period, fitted slopes of the ΔV–ΔW relationship ranged from 0.41 to 0.56 (EC-5 and 0.42 to 0.55 (CS616. Under a dynamic drying and wetting regime, slopes ranged from 0.21 to 0.38 (EC-5 and 0.22 to 0.36 (CS616. Alternating shrinkage and incomplete swelling resulted in limited volume change relative to water storage change. The slope of the ΔV–ΔW relationship depended on the drying regime, measurement scale and combined effect of different soil layers. Therefore, solely relying on surface level elevation changes to infer soil water storage changes will lead to large underestimations. Recent and future developments might provide a basis for application of shrinkage relations to field situations, but in situ observations will be required to do so.

  16. Extraction of an urease-active organo-complex from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. G.; El-Sayed, M. H.; Mclaren, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an extraction from a Dublin clay loam soil of a colloidal organic matter complex that is urease active and, by X-ray analysis, free of clays. Urease activity in the clay-free precipitates, as in the soil, was not destroyed by the activity of an added proteolytic enzyme, pronase. This is attributed to the circumstance that native soil urease resides in organic colloidal particles with pores large enough for water, urea, ammonia, and carbon dioxide to pass freely, but nevertheless small enough to exclude pronase.

  17. Degradation of the pesticide carbofuran on clay and soil surfaces upon sunlight exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountacer, H; Atifi, A; Wong-Wah-Chung, P; Sarakha, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the photolysis of carbofuran has been undertaken under sunlight conditions and at the surface of model supports such as clay films and different soils collected from two different sites in Morocco (Tirs and Dahs). In all conditions, an efficient degradation occurred owing to direct light absorption and also to photoinduced processes involving either clays or natural organic matter moities. On kaolin films, the photodegradation kinetics appears to follow a first-order process that clearly depends on the film thickness. The diffusion of carbofuran from the lower part to the illuminated surface was found to be negligible when compared to the photolysis process within the range of 20-70 μm. Thus, the photolysis rate constant at the surface of the solid support, k (0), was evaluated to be 7.0 × 10(-3) min(-1). Under these experimental conditions, the quantum yield was found equal to 2.1 × 10(-4). On soil surfaces, the disappearance rate constant was mainly attributed to photoinduced processes arising from natural organic matter. From the analytical point of view, the products were formed through (1) hydroxylation on the aromatic ring, (2) homolytic scission of the carbamate C-O bond leading to radical species formation, and (3) photohydrolysis of the carbamate C-O bond.

  18. Analysis of some parameters related to the hydraulic infiltration of a silty-loam soil subjected to organic and mineral fertilizer systems in Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Napolitano

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out to detect the most linear process to calculate the hydraulic conductivity, with the aim to classify the soil of experimental station of the Unit for Research in Cultivations Alternative to Tobacco (CAT, locate in South Italy (Scafati, Province of Salerno, subject to different types of manure: compost and mineral fertilizer. The field tests were made by a system measuring infiltration by double, inner and outer ring, inserted into the ground. Each ring was supplied with a constant level of water from external bottle (3 cm, and hydraulic conductivity is determined when the water flow rate in the inner ring is constant. Four areas, two fertilized by mineral fertilizer (areas I and III and two amended with compost (areas II and IV at two depths, 5 and 10 cm (H1-H2, were analysed. The parameters were recorded at the following dates: on 18th and 19th September 2009, respectively, at 5 and 10 cm of depth (H1-H2 in area I; on 7th and 8th October 2009 in area II; on 13th and 14th October 2009 in area III; on 16th and 17th October 2009 in area IV. The effect of compost, used one time only, is present in all parameters, even if with a low statistical significance (P<0.01-0.05. This biomass stores a better water reserve [g (100 g–1-Δθ] and causes a lower avidity for water (bibacity and a better speed of percolation (Ks of exceeding water. The organic matter decreased the variability of soil along field. The studied soil showed to be almost permeable and not having any serious problem concerning rain intensity.

  19. Comparison of two methods to assess heterogeneity of water flow in soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichner, L.; Dusek, J.; Dekker, L.W.; Zhukova, N.; Fasko, P.; Holko, L.; Sir, M.

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneity of water flow and solute transport was assessed during radioactive tracer infiltration experiment in a black clay loam soil using modified methods to estimate the effective cross section (ECS) and the degree of preferential flow (DPF). The results of field and numerical experiments

  20. Soil Loss by Wind Erosion for Three Different Textured Soils Treated with Polyacrylamide and Crude Oil, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The study is conducted to estimate the resistance of three soils (EL-Hartha clay loam, Barjisiya sandy loam and the soil near the sand dunes in Sheikh sa'ad area sandy soil) to wind erosion, it is also aimed at getting full acquaintance of the relationship between the soil loss and the physical and chemical features of soil. In addition to the experiment of some soil stabilizers, polyacrylamide (PAM) concentration of 0.2 % and crude oil in concentration of 1 % in order to reduce or prevent wind erosion. The study shows that the amendment increased the dry soil aggregate >1 mm, mean weight diameter and soil moisture. It is clear that polyacrylamide had greater effect than that of crude oil, besides the great effectiveness of these amendments in decreasing bulk density and relations of soil loss.

  1. The characterization of soil profile distribution for nitrate leached in the paddy soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShengjia; WANGJiayu; CHENYi

    1998-01-01

    Experiment was conducted for five successive years under large undisturbed monolith lysimeters (2m × 2m in square, 1 m in depth). The soil was silty clay loam texture and had a content of total N 1.55 g/kg. The soil was flooded with penetration rate controlled at approximate 3 mm per day in duration of double-rice season and laid fallow and natural in winter and spring

  2. Investigations of soil cracking and preferential flow in a weighing lysimeter filled with cracking clay soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, A.; Andersen, M. S.; Acworth, R. I.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryAn improved understanding of deep drainage processes in irrigated cracking soils is needed for sustainable irrigation management. To investigate the effect of crack dynamics and macropore flow on drainage in cracking soils, a series of irrigation experiments was carried out in a weighing lysimeter. Subsurface soil cracks of the initially very dry soil were investigated with a videoscope and changes in the surface expression of cracks in response to irrigation events were monitored by time-lapse photography. A bromide tracer was applied to one irrigation event. Variations in the combined soil and moisture mass and the volume of drainage out of the soil column was logged and the drainage EC and bromide content were determined. No drainage occurred out of the soil column during the first 3 out of 6 irrigation events, even though substantial surface runoff into the cracks occurred and, at least initially, soil cracks provided an uninterrupted flow path through the profile. The breakthrough of the bromide tracer, as well as an initially low EC of the drainage water indicate that preferential flow accounted for a substantial part of the first of the two drainage events, even though the soil cracks were sealed on the surface at the onset of the irrigation causing the drainage. The results show that lateral infiltration of macropore flow into the soil matrix can be substantial and should not be neglected while simulating macropore flow and deep drainage in cracking soils. The results also indicate that soil cracks can remain pathways for preferential flow even after they are closed at the soil surface. The type of water application appears to have an impact on the location of crack formation, with flood irrigation favouring reappearance of cracks at previous crack locations and simulated rainfall resulting in shifting crack locations.

  3. CO2 emission and structural characteristics of two calcareous soils amended with municipal solid waste and plant residue

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdanpanah, N.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examines the effect of different amendments on selected soil physical and biological properties over a 24-month period in two cropland fields. Urban municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and alfalfa residue (AR) were used as different organic amendments at the rates of 0 (control), 10 and 30 Mg ha−1 to a clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil in a semiarid region. Results showed that the soil improvement was controlled by the application rate and decomposabili...

  4. Water and nutrient transport on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Salm, Caroline; van den Toorn, Antonie; Chardon, Wim J; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2012-01-01

    In flat areas, transport of dissolved nutrients by water through the soil matrix to groundwater and drains is assumed to be the dominant pathway for nutrient losses to ground- and surface waters. However, long-term data on the losses of nutrients to surface water and the contribution of various pathways is limited. We studied nutrient losses and pathways on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in The Netherlands during a 5-yr period. Average annual nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses to surface water were 15.1 and 3.0 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively. Losses were dominated by particulate N (50%) and P (70%) forms. Rapid discharge through trenches was the dominant pathway (60-90%) for water and nutrient transport. The contribution of pipe drains to the total discharge of water and nutrients was strongly related to the length of the dry period in the preceding summer. This relationship can be explained by the very low conductivity of the soil matrix and the formation of shrinkage cracks during summer. Losses of dissolved reactive P through pipe drains appear to be dominated by preferential flow based on the low dissolved reactive P concentration in the soil matrix at this depth. Rainfall occurring after manure application played an important role with respect to the annual losses of N and P in spring when heavy rainfall occurred within 2 wk after manure application. PMID:22218191

  5. Water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam.

    OpenAIRE

    Vos

    1997-01-01

    Theory, numerical models, and field and laboratory measurements are used to describe and predict water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil. One- and two-dimensional models based on the Darcy equation for water flow and the convection-dispersion equation for solute transport are evaluated. Pressure heads simulated with the one-dimensional water balance model SWATRE are too large. The two-dimensional SWMS_2D model simulates water flow well for the winter leaching periods. Th...

  6. Comparing predictive abilities of three visible-near infrared spectrophotometers for soil organic carbon and clay determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Stenberg, Bo; Deng, Fan;

    2013-01-01

    of spectral preprocessing methods was applied in search for model improvement. Validation for SOC content using an independent data set derived from all three spectrophotometers provided values of RMSEP between 0.45 and 0.52 %, R2=0.44-0.58 and RPD=1.3-1.5. Clay content was predicted with a higher precision...... for SOC and clay predictions. The application of different spectral preprocessing procedures did not generate important improvements of the calibration models either. The results from this study showed that as long as strict laboratory scanning protocols were followed no significant differences...... carbon (SOC) and clay calibrations for 194 Danish top soils. Scanning procedures for the three spectrophotometers where done according to uniform laboratory protocols. SOC and clay calibrations were performed using PLS regression. One third of the data was used as an independent test set. A range...

  7. Reducing the Influence of Soil Moisture on the Estimation of Clay from Hyperspectral Data: A Case Study Using Simulated PRISMA Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Castaldi; Angelo Palombo; Simone Pascucci; Stefano Pignatti; Federico Santini; Raffaele Casa

    2015-01-01

    Soil moisture hampers the estimation of soil variables such as clay content from remote and proximal sensing data, reducing the strength of the relevant spectral absorption features. In the present study, two different strategies have been evaluated for their ability to minimize the influence of soil moisture on clay estimation by using soil spectra acquired in a laboratory and by simulating satellite hyperspectral data. Simulated satellite data were obtained according to the spectral charact...

  8. Study on factitious levels of 131 iodine contamination on its uptake and soil to crop transfer in groundnut (Arachis Hypogaea L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out to determine iodine-131 uptake and transfer factor (TF) in groundnut, pot-grown on three soils of varying texture, viz., a clay loam, a sandy clay loam and a sandy soil. The soils were factitiously contaminated with 131I at the rate 20, 40, 60, and 80 kBq kg-1 of soil. The effect of level of 131I was significant in the case of 131I uptake and TF. The 131I uptake increased significantly with the increasing levels of 131I and recorded a peak at the contamination level of 80 kBq kg-1 of soil. This was so in other plant parts as stem, leaf and shell and in whole plant as well. The uptake by kernel was significantly influenced by the soil texture. The values were lowest in the sandy soil and highest in sandy clay loam and sandy loam soils. The TF values in all plant parts decreased significantly with the 131I contamination levels. The TF values were significantly higher in roots than in the above-ground parts, amongst which the lowest TF was in the edible part kernel. (author)

  9. Determination of dependence between physical clay content in sod-podzolic soils and specific activity of 40K natural isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conditions of the Republic of Belarus there was analyzed the dependence between physical clay content in sod-podzolic soil and specific activity of 40K natural isotope. There was described a new method of determination of soil belonging to a particular soil type in the conditions of identification of the natural isotope K40. Experiments were realized on sod-podzolic automorphous and half-hydromorphic soils of natural and cultural agrocoenosis polluted with 137Cs and 90Sr after the Chernobyl disaster. The pollution density of 137Cs was from 313 to 2480 kBq/m2 and 90Sr – from 2 to 63 kBq/m2. Research results showed that soil texture content influenced on radionuclide fixation. Radionuclide entering into plants from sod-podzolic loamy soils was in 1,5-2,0 times and more lower in comparison with radionuclide entering from sod-podzolic sandy soils. The highest base exchange capacity of 137Cs, 90Sr and 40K was typical for the fraction of physical clay with the minimal particle size of 0,01mm. There was marked a close correlation connection between natural isotope 40K and a content of physical clay

  10. Laboratory investigations of Mars - Chemical and spectroscopic characteristics of a suite of clays as Mars soil analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn C.; Chang, Sherwood; Coyne, Lelia M.; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    A model system of Mars soil analog materials (MSAMs) was prepared, and the properties of these clays, such as chemical composition, surface-ion composition, water adsorption isotherms, and reflectance spectra, were examined. The results of these studies, performed along with simulations of the Viking Labeled Release Experiement using MSAMs, indicate that surface iron and adsorbed water are important determinants of clay behavior, as evidenced by changes in reflectance, water absorption, and clay surface reactions. The paper discusses the relevance of these results to the two major questions raised by prior explorations of Mars: has there ever been abundant water on Mars, and why is the iron found in the Martian soil not readily seen in the reflectance spectra of the surface?

  11. A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) TDR sensor for deep soil water content and bulk EC

    Science.gov (United States)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) TDR sensor was invented and the design optimized through a combination of electromagnetic modeling and several rounds of prototyping and testing in air, water, mixtures of water and ethylene glycol, sand, and silty clay loam soils over a range of water contents and ...

  12. Impact of Long-Term Alfalfa Cropping on Soil Potassium Content and Clay Minerals in a Semi-Arid Loess Soil in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-Cheng; B. VELDE; LI Feng-Min; ZHANG Gan-Lin; ZHAO Ming-Song; HUANG Lai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa cropping has been considered an efficient method of increasing soil fertility.Usually nitrogen increase in root nodules is considered to be the major beneficial effect.A 21-year time series (five sampling periods) of alfalfa cultivation plots on a loess soil,initially containing illite and chlorite,in Lanzhou of northwestern China was selected to investigate the relationships among alfalfa cropping,soil potassium (K) content and soil clay minerals.The results indicated that soil K significantly accumulated after cropping,with a peak value at about 15 years,and decreased afterwards.The accumulated K was associated with the K increase in the well-crystallized illite,which was not extracted by the traditional laboratory K extraction methods in assessing bioavailability.The steep decline in soil K content after 15-year cropping was in accord with the observed fertility loss in the alfalfa soil.Plant biomass productivity peaked at near 9 years of culture,whereas soil K and clay minerals continued to increase until cropping for 15 years.This suggested that K increased in the topsoil came from the deep root zone.Thus alfalfa continued to store K in clays even after peak production occurred.Nitrogen did not follow these trends,showing a general decline compared with the native prairie soils that had not been cropped.Therefore,the traditional alfalfa cropping can increase K content in the topsoil.

  13. Using digital elevation models as an environmental predictor for soil clay contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev;

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) as an environmental predictor for soil clay content (SCC). It was based on the applicability of different DEMs, i.e., SRTM with 90-m resolution and airborne Light Detection...... and Ranging (LIDAR) (in 24- and 90-m resolution), using regression-tree analysis. Ten terrain parameters were generated from these DEMs. These terrain parameters were used along other environmental variables to statistically explain SCC content in Denmark. Results indicated that the SRTM tree model (T1: 90-m...... resolution) explained the variability of SCC measurements quasi-similarly (variance V = 60%) to the LIDAR tree models with 24-m (T2) or 90-m (T3) resolution (V = 60% for T2 and 61.5% for T3). The prediction performances (in terms of RMSE) of the produced maps (using these trees) compared with independent...

  14. Survival of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium in slurry applied to clay soil on a Danish swine farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boes, J.; Alban, L.; Bagger, J.;

    2005-01-01

    the survival times of E. coli and Salmonella in the soil surface following deposition of naturally contaminated pig slurry; and (3) simulate survival of Salmonella in different infection levels using E. coli data as input estimates. Slurry was deposited by four different methods: (1) hose applicator on black...... amended with contaminated pig slurry was an effective means to reduce environmental exposure to E. coli and Salmonella on this clay-soil farm....

  15. Effects of changes in land use on soil physical properties and soil organic carbon content in a wheat-corn-sunflower crop sequence, in a loam soil of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, V.; Costa, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Argentinean Humid Pampas extend over about 60 million hectares, 90% of which are agricultural lands. The Southeast of the Buenos Aires Province is part of the Humid Pampas, it covers over 1,206,162 hectares, the mean annual temperature is 13.3 °C and the climate is sub-humid. At the present only 6% of the lands are used for pasture. The main activities are agriculture and cattle production. The main crops are wheat, sunflower, corn and soybean. The tillage systems used in the area are: moldboard plow (MP), chisel plow (CP) and no-till (NT). Excessive soil cultivation under MP generates decreases in the levels of soil organic carbon (SOC). The magnitude of such decrease depends on the intensity of the tillage system, the tillage timeliness and the amount and quality of the residues. Adopting NT may reduce the effects of intensive agriculture, through the maintenance and accumulation of SOC. However, there are evidences that, under NT, the bulk density (ρb) in the superficial layers of the soil increases. The soil compaction causes degradation of the soil structure, reduces the soil water availability and reduces the soil hydraulic conductivity. With this scenario and the tendency to increase the surface under NT in the Southeast Humid Pampas, we evaluated the evolution of some soil physical properties and the SOC in a 10-year experiment with a wheat-corn-sunflower rotation. The experiment was carried out in four localities at farmerś fields under three different tillage systems: MP, CP and NT in a randomized complete block design, considering each locality as a block. Each plot had 50 m in width by 100 m length and the treatments were: NT, MP and CP. The results of this experiment have allowed us to verify that: i) the wheat-corn-sunflower crop sequence showed a tendency to reduce the values of bulk density (ρb) but NT increased ρb in the superficial soil layers; ii) the more intensive the tillage system, the higher the change in the mean weight diameter

  16. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with (137)Cs and (60)Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  17. Effects of conservation tillage on water infiltration in two soils in south-eastern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Bissett, M.J.; G.J. O'Leary

    1996-01-01

    Metadata only record This paper reports on a study in Southeast Australia comparing water infiltration on two soil types (gray cracking clay and sandy loam) under two tillage systems - conservation tillage (zero and sub-soil, residues retained) and conventional tillage (frequently tined tillage, no surface residues). The objective of the study is to determine if conservation tillage increases the water infiltration rate on two different soils, with the hope of better explaining the mechani...

  18. Iodine-131 uptake and transfer from soil to rice following factitious contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out to determine iodine-131 uptake and transfer factor (TF) in pot-grown rice ('IR 20') with three soils of different texture, viz., a sandy clay loam, a sandy loam, and a sandy soil. The soils were factitiously contaminated with four levels of 131I: 20, 40, 60, and 80 kBq kg-1 of soil. Soil texture greatly influenced biomass yield, 131I uptake and TF in rice. The effect of level of 131I was significant only in the case of grain. In the case of straw, neither the 131I content nor uptake were influenced by the variables. The 131I uptake by grain appeared to increase with the level of 131I contamination. The highest uptake was at the highest level of 131I contamination and in the sandy loam soil. The TF values in all plant parts decreased significantly with the 131I contamination levels and were lowest, quite interestingly, in the sandy clay loam soil for root and in the sandy soil for grain. The TFs followed the order: root > straw > grain. (author)

  19. CO2 emission and structural characteristics of two calcareous soils amended with municipal solid waste and plant residue

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdanpanah, N.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examines the effect of different amendments on selected soil physical and biological properties over a twenty four month period in two cropland fields. Urban municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and alfalfa residue (AR) were used as different organic amendments at the rates of 0 (control), 10 and 30 Mg ha−1 to a clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil in a semiarid region. Result showed that the soil improvement was controlled by the app...

  20. Study on Soil Mobility of Two Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Mörtl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement of two neonicotinoid insecticide active ingredients, clothianidin (CLO and thiamethoxam (TMX, was investigated in different soil types (sand, clay, or loam and in pumice. Elution profiles were determined to explore differences in binding capacity. Soil characterized by high organic matter content retained the ingredients, whereas high clay content resulted in long release of compounds. Decrease in concentration was strongly influenced by soil types: both CLO and TMX were retained in loam and clay soils and showed ready elution through sandy soil and pumice. Elution capability of the active ingredients in sandy soil correlated with their water solubility, indicating approximately 30% higher rapidity for TMX than for CLO. Soil organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc determined were in good agreement with literature values with somewhat lower value for CLO in sandy soil and substantially higher values for TMX in clay soil. High mobility of these neonicotinoid active ingredients in given soil types urges stronger precautionary approach taken during their application.

  1. Fate of the antiretroviral drug tenofovir in agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne; Chapman, Ralph; Lapen, David R.; Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Tenofovir (9-(R)-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)-adenine) is an antiretroviral drug widely used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. Tenofovir is extensively and rapidly excreted unchanged in the urine. In the expectation that tenofovir could potentially reach agricultural lands through the application of municipal biosolids or wastewater, and in the absence of any environmental fate data, we evaluated its persistence in selected agricultural soils. Less than 10% of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir added to soils varying widely in texture (sand, loam, clay loam) was mineralized in a 2-month incubation under laboratory conditions. Tenofovir was less readily extractable from clay soils than from a loam or a sandy loam soil. Radioactive residues of tenofovir were removed from the soil extractable fraction with DT{sub 50}s ranging from 24 {+-} 2 to 67 + 22 days (first order kinetic model) or 44 + 9 to 127 + 55 days (zero order model). No extractable transformation products were detectable by HPLC. Tenofovir mineralization in the loam soil increased with temperature (range 4 {sup o}C to 30 {sup o}C), and did not occur in autoclaved soil, suggesting a microbial basis. Mineralization rates increased with soil moisture content, ranging from air-dried to saturated. In summary, tenofovir was relatively persistent in soils, there were no extractable transformation products detected, and the response of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir mineralization to soil temperature and heat sterilization indicated that the molecule was biodegraded by aerobic microorganisms. Sorption isotherms with dewatered biosolids suggested that tenofovir residues could potentially partition into the particulate fraction during sewage treatment.

  2. Effect of Alumina Colloid on the Sorption of Cs+ onto Sand and Clay Soils under Different Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution coefficient of cesium on soil (yellow sand and clay) with and without alumina as a colloidal material was measured by batch technique. The adsorption of Cs+ ions from aqueous sodium chloride solution onto yellow sand and clay in absences and presence of Al2O3, was investigated under different physicochemical conditions including contact time between liquid and solid phases, ph, ionic strength, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. Pseudo first order and pseudo second-order kinetic models were used to analyze the sorption rate data and the results showed that the pseudo second-order model is best correlation the kinetics data in all studied sorption processes. Both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were applicable to describe the adsorption of Cs+ ions by yellow sand with and without alumina but in case of clay with and without alumina Langmuir model not applicable. The maximum sorption capacities of clay in absences and presence of Al2O3 were found to be greater than that of yellow sand with and without Al2O3. The maximum sorption capacities for two sorbents were increased in presence of colloid alumina thane in absences. The sorption capacity is reduced at high temperature was related to the partial enhancement of desorption from yellow sand and clay surfaces. The adsorption of Cs+ ions by yellow sand and clay with and without alumina was exothermic reaction.

  3. Soil Microbial and Faunal Community Responses to Bt-Maize and Insecticide in Two Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, B. S.; Caul, S.; Thompson, J.;

    2006-01-01

    The effects of maize (Zea mays L.), genetically modified to express the Cry1Ab protein (Bt), and an insecticide on soil microbial and faunal communities were assessed in a glasshouse experiment. Soil for the experiment was taken from field sites where the same maize cultivars were grown to allow...... comparison between results under glasshouse conditions with those from field trials. Plants were grown in contrasting sandy loam and clay loam soils, half were sprayed with a pyrethroid insecticide (deltamethrin) and soil samples taken at the five-leaf stage, flowering, and maturity. The main effect on all...... measured parameters was that of soil type and there were no effects of Bt trait or insecticide on plant growth. The Bt trait resulted in more soil nematodes and protozoa (amoebae), whereas insecticide application increased plant Bt concentration and altered nematode community structure. The only...

  4. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongzhen; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Huang, Panming; Jilani, Ghulam

    2008-03-01

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe2O3 content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that Koc would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface.

  5. Effect of land-use changes and site variables on surface soil organic carbon pool at Mediterranean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-hashim, Mohamed; Elsayed, Mohamed; Belal, Abd-ElAziz

    2016-02-01

    Soil organic carbon pool (SOCP) is affected by several factors particularly soil type, climate, topography, crop management, and anthropogenic factors. The study was carried out to clarify relationships between SOCP under different soil types and land-use changes in the Mediterranean region. Data of 26 pedons were investigated in Tanta catchment, middle Nile Delta, Egypt (30°45 N, 30°55 E), that the collected soil samples covered different soil types and land-uses. There were significant differences of SOCP among soils: loam and clay loams were rather similar. Clay soils were the most extensive and have mean SOCP of 4.08 ± 1.41 kg C m-2. The highest SOCP of 7.07 kg C m-2 was in clay loam soil associated with bare soil, while the lowest of 2.57 kg C m-2 in sandy clay loam soil associated with bare soil. Losing cropland showed highest increase from 1990 to 2015 with increasing urban encroachment by 15.3%. The overall average results of SOCP in cropland area showed 53.85 Mg C ha-1 under different soils. Losing the arable lands to urbanization resulted in a decrease of 285.421 Gg C of SOCP. With the decrease in SOCP sequestrated within the soil surface, carbon dioxide would be emitted to the atmosphere. The emitted CO2 resulted from losing the cropland equal to 1047.5 Gg CO2. Land-use changes have marked impact on surface SOCP and C sequestration.

  6. [Mineralogy and genesis of mixed-layer clay minerals in the Jiujiang net-like red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Li, Rong-Biao; Han, Wen; Wu, Yu; Gao, Wen-Peng; Jia, Jin-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Mineralogy and genesis were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to understand the mineralogy and its genesis significance of mixed-layer clay minerals in Jiujiang red soil section. XRD and FTIR results show that the net-like red soil sediments are composed of illite, kaolinite, minor smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite and minor mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite. HRTEM observation indicates that some smectite layers have transformed into kaolinite layers in net-like red soil. Mixed-layer illite-smectite is a transition phase of illite transforming into smectite, and mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite is a transitional product relative to kaolinite and smectite. The occurrence of two mixed-layer clay species suggests that the weathering sequence of clay minerals in net-like red soil traversed from illite to mixed-layer illite-smectite to smectite to mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite to kaolinite, which indicates that net-like red soil formed under a warm and humid climate with strengthening of weathering.

  7. Clay mineralogy in agrochernozems of western Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papish, I. Ya.; Chizhikova, N. P.; Poznyak, S. P.; Varlamov, E. B.

    2016-10-01

    The mineralogy of clay fractions separated from deep low-humus deep-gleyic loamy typical agrochernozems on loess-like loams of the Upper Bug and Dniester uplands in the Central Russian loess province of Ukraine consists of complex disordered interstratifications with the segregation of mica- and smectite-type layers (hereafter, smectite phase), tri- and dioctahedral hydromicas, kaolinite, and chlorite. The distribution of the clay fraction is uniform. The proportions of the layered silicates vary significantly within the profile: a decrease in the content of the smectite phase and a relative increase in the content of hydromicas up the soil profile are recorded. In the upper horizons, the contents of kaolinite and chlorite increase, and some amounts of fine quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases are observed. This tendency is observed in agrochernozems developed on the both Upper Bug and Dniester uplands. The differences include the larger amounts of quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases in the clay material of the Upper Bug Upland, while the contents of the smectite phase in the soil profiles of the areas considered are similar. An analogous mineral association is noted in podzolized agrochernozems on loess-like deposits in the Cis-Carpathian region of the Southern Russian loess province developed on the Prut-Dniester and Syan-Dniester uplands. The distribution of particle-size fractions and the mineralogy of the clay fraction indicate the lithogenic heterogeneity of the soil-forming substrate. When the drifts change, the mineral association of the soils developed within the loess-like deposits gives place to minerals dominated by individual smectite with some mica-smectite inter stratifications, hydromicas, and chlorite.

  8. An Improved Description of the Seismic Response of Sites with High Plasticity Soils, Organic Clays, and Deep Soft Soil Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Brian

    Near surface soils can greatly influence the amplitude, duration, and frequency content of ground motions. The amount of their influence depends on many factors, such as the geometry and engineering properties of the soils and underlying bedrock, as well as the earthquake source mechanism and travel path. Building codes such as the 2012 International Building Code (IBC) define six site categories for seismic design of structures, which are based on the sites defined by the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). Site categories A, B, C, D, and E are defined by the time averaged shear wave velocity over the top 30 meters of the soil deposit. Site category F is defined as sites that include liquefiable or sensitive soils, as well as sites with more than 3 meters (10 ft) of peat or highly organic clays, more than 7.5 meters (25 ft) of soil with PI > 75, and more than 37 meters (120 ft) of soft to medium stiff clays. The IBC specifies simplified procedures to calculate design spectra for NEHRP sites A through E, and requires a site specific investigation for NEHRP F sites. However, established procedures for performing the required site specific investigations for NEHRP F sites are limited. The objective of this research is to develop a simplified procedure to estimate design spectra for non-liquefiable NEHRP F sites, specifically sites with organic soils, highly plastic soils, and deep soft soil deposits. The results from this research will directly affect US practice by developing much needed guidelines in this area. There is little empirical data on the seismic response of non-liquefiable NEHRP F sites. As a result, this study focused on generating data from site response analyses. To capture the variability of ground motions, this study selected five base case scenarios according to tectonic environments and representative cases encountered in common US practice. Suites of ground motions for each scenario were created by collecting ground motions

  9. Production of CO2 in crude oil bioremediation in clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro José Baptista

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to evaluate the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in clay soil a 45-days experiment. The experiment was conducted using an aerobic fixed bed reactor, containing 300g of contaminated soil at room temperature with an air rate of 6 L/h. The growth medium was supplemented with 2.5% (w/w (NH42SO4 and 0.035% (w/w KH2PO4. Biodegradation of the crude oil in the contaminated clay soil was monitored by measuring CO2 production and removal of organic matter (OM, oil and grease (OandG, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH, measured before and after the 45-days experiment, together with total heterotrophic and hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial count. The best removals of OM (50%, OandG (37% and TPH (45% were obtained in the bioreactors in which the highest CO2 production was achieved.O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a biodegradação de petróleo em solo argiloso durante 45 dias de ensaios. Os ensaios de biodegradação foram conduzidos em biorreatores aeróbios de leito fixo, com 300 g de solo contaminado, à temperatura ambiente e com uma vazão de ar de 6 L/h. As deficiências nutricionais foram corrigidas com 2,5% (p/p (NH42SO4 e com 0,035% (p/p KH2PO4. O monitoramento foi realizado em função da produção de CO2, da remoção de matéria orgânica (OM, de óleos e graxas (OandG e de hidrocarbonetos totais de petróleo (TPH, além bactérias heterotróficas totais (BHT e hidrocarbonoclásticas (BHc, no início e após 45 dias. Nos biorreatores onde houve maior crescimento de bactérias hidrocarbonoclásticas e maior produção de CO2, obteve-se os melhores percentuais de remoções de MO (50%, OandG (37% e TPH (45%.

  10. Carbon sequestration in clay and silt fractions of Brazilian soils under conventional and no-tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Estima Sacramento dos Reis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of soils to sequestrate carbon (C is mainly related to the formation of organo-mineral complexes. In this study, we investigated the influence of soil management systems on the C retention capacity of soil with an emphasis on the silt and clay fractions of two subtropical soils with different mineralogy and climate. Samples from a Humic Hapludox and a Rhodic Hapludox, clayey soils cultivated for approximately 30 years under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT were collected from six layers distributed within 100-cm soil depth from each site and from an adjacent native forest. After the removal of particulate organic matter (POM, the suspension (<53 µm was sonicated, the silt and clay fractions were separated in accordance with Stokes' law and the carbon content of whole soil and physical fractions was determined. In the Humic Hapludox, the clay and silt fractions under NT showed a higher maximum C retention (72 and 52 g kg-1, respectively in comparison to those under CT (54 and 38 g kg-1, respectively. Moreover, the C concentration increase in both fractions under NT occurred mainly in the topsoil (up to 5 cm. The C retention in physical fractions of Rhodic Hapludox varied from 25 to 32 g kg-1, and no difference was observed whether under an NT or a CT management system. The predominance of goethite and gibbsite in the Humic Hapludox, as well as its exposure to a colder climate, may have contributed to its greater C retention capacity. In addition to the organo-mineral interaction, a mechanism of organic matter self-assemblage, enhanced by longer periods of soil non-disturbance, seems to have contributed to the carbon stabilization in both soils.

  11. Enhanced degradation of 14C-HCB in two tropical clay soils using multiple anaerobic–aerobic cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to induce and enhance the degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a highly-chlorinated persistent organic pollutant, in two ecologically different tropical soils: a paddy soil (PS) and a non-paddy soil (FS). The degradation of HCB was enhanced using two anaerobic–aerobic cycles in model laboratory experiments. There was greater degradation of HCB in the PS (half-life of 224 days) relative to the FS (half-life of 286 days). It was further shown that soils amended with compost had higher metabolite concentrations relative to the non-amended soils. In the first cycle, there was little degradation of HCB in both soils. However, in the second cycle, there was enhanced mineralization in the PS under aerobic conditions, with the compost-treated samples showing higher mineralization. There was also extensive volatilization in both soils. The metabolite pattern revealed that the increased mineralization and volatilization was due to the formation of lower chlorinated benzenes. - Highlights: ► Two anaerobic–aerobic cycles enhanced the dissipation of HCB in two tropical soils – a paddy and non-paddy soil. ► The paddy soil was more effective in degrading HCB. ► The non-paddy soil adapted and degraded HCB in the second anaerobic–aerobic cycle. ► An additional carbon source enhanced degradation and mineralisation of HCB in both soils. - Two anaerobic–aerobic cycles enhance the degradation of HCB in two ecologically different tropical clay soils.

  12. Estimating of Soil Texture Using Landsat Imagery: a Case Study in Thatta Tehsil, Sindh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Zahid

    2016-07-01

    Soil texture is considered as an important environment factor for agricultural growth. It is the most essential part for soil classification in large scale. Today the precise soil information in large scale is of great demand from various stakeholders including soil scientists, environmental managers, land use planners and traditional agricultural users. With the increasing demand of soil properties in fine scale spatial resolution made the traditional laboratory methods inadequate. In addition the costs of soil analysis with precision agriculture systems are more expensive than traditional methods. In this regard, the application of geo-spatial techniques can be used as an alternative for examining soil analysis. This study aims to examine the ability of Geo-spatial techniques in identifying the spatial patterns of soil attributes in fine scale. Around 28 samples of soil were collected from the different areas of Thatta Tehsil, Sindh, Pakistan for analyzing soil texture. An Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression analysis was used to relate the reflectance values of Landsat8 OLI imagery with the soil variables. The analysis showed there was a significant relationship (p<0.05) of band 2 and 5 with silt% (R2 = 0.52), and band 4 and 6 with clay% (R2 =0.40). The equation derived from OLS analysis was then used for the whole study area for deriving soil attributes. The USDA textural classification triangle was implementing for the derivation of soil texture map in GIS environment. The outcome revealed that the 'sandy loam' was in great quantity followed by loam, sandy clay loam and clay loam. The outcome shows that the Geo-spatial techniques could be used efficiently for mapping soil texture of a larger area in fine scale. This technology helped in decreasing cost, time and increase detailed information by reducing field work to a considerable level.

  13. Field corrosion characterization of soil corrosion of X70 pipeline steel in a red clay soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengrong Wang; Cuiwei Dun; Xiaogang Li; Zhiyong Liunn; Min Zhu; Dawei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of X70 pipeline steel buried in red soil environment has been studied. The surface morphology and elemental distribution were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion kinetics was evaluated by weight loss measurement. The results show that in red soil, the corrosion rate of X70 steel decreases with time, and follows the exponential decay law. General corrosion with non-uniform and localized pitting occurred on the steel surface.α-FeOOH was the dominate products during corrosion in whole buried periods, and the corrosion products exhibited well protective properties. The potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that icorr decreased with time, indicating the improvement of corrosion resistance. The results of Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS) are consistent with potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  14. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Ploughing in good soil moisture conditions in soil structure protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Dell'Abate

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been carried out within the framework on the EFFICOND Project, focused at evaluating the effectiveness of the standards of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs established for Cross Compliance implementation under EC Regulation 1782/2003. In particular the standard 3.1b deals with soil structure protection through appropriate machinery use, with particular reference to ploughing in good soil moisture conditions. The study deals with the evaluation of soil structure after tillage in tilth and no-tilth conditions at soil moisture contents other than the optimum water content for tillage. The Mean Weight Diameter (MWD of water stable aggregates was used as an indicator of tillage effectiveness. The study was carried out in the period 2008-2009 at six experimental farms belonging to Research Centres and Units of the Italian Agricultural Research Council (CRA with different pedo-climatic and cropping conditions. Farm management and data collection in the different sites were carried out by the local CRA researchers and technicians. The comparison of MWD values in tilth and no tilth theses showed statistically significant differences in most cases, depending on topsoil texture. On clay, clay loam, silty clay, and silty clay loam topsoils a general and significant increase of MWD values under no tilth conditions were observed. No significant differences were observed in silt loam and sandy loam textures, probably due to the weak soil structure of the topsoils. Moreover, ploughing in good soil moisture condition determined higher crop production and less weed development than ploughing in high soil moisture conditions.

  15. Source zone remediation by ZVI-clay soil-mixing: Reduction of tetrachloroethene mass and mass discharge at a Danish DNAPL site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Binning, Philip John;

    2012-01-01

    ) technologies have proven effective for remediation of chlorinated compounds. ZVI-Clay soil-mixing is a new remediation technology, which combines abiotic degradation (via ZVI addition) and immobilization (via soil-mixing and clay addition), whereby a great potential for reduction of both contaminant mass...... and mass discharge is obtained. The technology was tested at a Danish DNAPL site, where the secondary aquifer was heavily contaminated by tetrachloroethene (PCE). ZVI-Clay soil-mixing was tested at a small source zone (~200 m3) with soil concentrations ranging up to 12,000 mg/kg. The objective of the field...... test was to document in situ destruction of the contaminant mass and the down-gradient response in contaminant mass discharge. The field sampling consisted of baseline measurements and a 19-month monitoring program (7 sampling campaigns) subsequent to the implementation of ZVI-Clay soil mixing...

  16. Estimation model of Cs-137 activity in soil samples derives from percentage of organic carbon and silt-clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of Cs-137 activity in soil samples was conducted at Nganjuk area through its soil organic carbon and silt-clay percentage. Twenty-six soil samples taken from Nganjuk area have been used to establish the relationship of Cs-137 activity and its soil samples quality parameters by using SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions) software. Chemical parameters of samples have higher variation compared to the physical. Estimated of Cs-137 activity in soil samples can be established by two parameters, those are percent of total organic carbon and percent of silt-clay contents. However, these two parameters could only explained 69.3 % of Cs-137 activity, the remaining 30.7 % potentially could be due to 10 % of error measurement, run-on redistribution of soil, farming as well as tillage system. By using the soil quality parameters, the Cs-137 activity under the limit detection could be estimated, hence, its usefulness to estimate the erosion rate through applying the Cs-model. (author)

  17. Influence of the insecticides acetamiprid and carbofuran on arylamidase and myrosinase activities in the tropical black and red clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiddin, G Jaffer; Srinivasulu, M; Maddela, N R; Manjunatha, B; Rangaswamy, V; Koch Kaiser, Alma Rosel; Maisincho Asqui, Jessica Cristina; Darwin Rueda, O

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of two insecticides, namely, acetamiprid and carbofuran on the enzymatic activities of arylamidase (as glucose formed from sinigrin) and myrosinase (as β-naphthylamine formed from L-leucine β-naphthylamide) in the black and red clay soils collected from a fallow groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) fields in the Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India. The study was realized within the framework of the laboratory experiments in which the acetamiprid and carbofuran were applied to the soils at different doses (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 kg ha(-1)). Initially, the physicochechemical properties of the soil samples were analyzed. After 10 days of pesticide application, the soil samples were analyzed for the enzyme activities. Acetamiprid and carbofuran stimulated the arylamidase and myrosinase activities at lower concentrations after 10 days incubation. Striking stimulation in soil enzyme activities was noticed at 2.5 kg ha(-1), persists for 20 days in both the soils. Overall, higher concentrations (5.0-10.0 kg ha(-1)) of acetamiprid and carbofuran were toxic or innocuous to the arylamidase and myrosinase activities. Nevertheless, the outcomes of the present study clearly indicate that the use of these insecticides (at field application rates) in the groundnut fields (black and red clay soils) stimulated the enzyme (arylamidase and myrosinase) activities.

  18. Mineralization of 14C-ring Labelled 2,4-D in Egyptian Soils Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Obiectives To study the mineralization of 2,4-D in clay and clay loam Egyptian soils under subtropical conditions over a period of 90 d. Methods Using 14C-ring labelled pesticide, laboratory studies under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were conducted. 14C-activity in solutions was directly determined by liquid scintillation counting. Unextractable soil residues were determined by combustion.The nature of methanolic 14C-residues was determined by thin layer and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Results Under aerobic conditions 10%-14% of applied dose was mineralized during 90 d irrespective of soil type. The soil extractable pesticide residues decreased with time and the bound residues gradually increased. The highest binding capacity of about 26%-29% was observed in clay soil under aerobic conditions after 90 d. A good balance sheet was obtained and the percentage recovery was generally between 91% and 100%. Conclusion The mineralization of 2,4-D in clay soil was higher than that in clay loam soil under anaerobic conditions.Under aerobic conditions, the soil type had no influence on mineralizaion capacity of 2,4-D during 90 d. The soil binding increased with time whereby the extractable 14C-residues simultaneously decreased.Chromatographic analysis of the methanol extractable 14C-residues of soils revealed the presence of 2,4-D as a main product together with 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  19. Influence of Accompanying Anions on Potassium Retention and Leaching in Potato Growing Alluvial Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.SHARMA; K.N.SHARMA

    2013-01-01

    A column study was carried out to assess the influence of accompanying anions on potassium (K) leaching at potato growing sites with different soil textures (sandy loam and clay loam) in northwestern India.Potassium was applied in the top 15 cm layer of soil column at 30 and 60 mg K kg-1 through different sources having different accompanying anions (Cl-,SO42-,NO3-and H2PO4-).Maximum K was retained in the top 0-15 cm layer with a sharp decrease in K content occurring in 15-30 cm layer of the soil column.The trend was similar for both levels of applied K as well as frequency of leaching and soil type.The decrease of K content in soil column after four leaching events was maximum in case of Khanaura sandy loam,while only minor decrease was observed in Hundowal clay loam when K was applied at 60 mg K kg-1,indicating higher potential of clay rich soil to adsorb K.In general,the K leaching in presence of the accompanying anions followed the order of SO42-≤ H2PO42-< NO3-=Cl-.Highest 1 mol L-1 CH3COONH4-extractable K was retained when K was applied along with SO42-and H2PO4-anions,and the least was retained when accompanying anion was Cl-.The influence of anions was more pronounced in the light textured soil and at high amounts of K application.Higher levels of K application resulted in higher losses of K,especially in sandy loam soil as observed from the leachate concentration.Among the different K sources,the maximum amount of K leaching was noticed in the soil column amended with KCl.After four leachings,the maximum amount of K leached out was 6.40 mg L-1 in Hundowal clay loam and 9.29 mg L-1 in Khanaura sandy loam at 60 mg K kg-1 of soil application through KCl.These concentrations were lower than the recommended guideline of the World Health Organisation (12.00 mg L-1).

  20. Comparative assessment of water infiltration of soils under different tillage systems in eastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroke, T. S.; Dikinya, O.; Patrick, C.

    Water infiltration is an important component of water balance for improving crop production potential in dryland soil tillage systems in Botswana, particularly in the eastern region. Hardsetting soils common in arable lands of Botswana, often require some kind of tillage such as mouldboard ploughing, chiselling and ripping to improve waterharvesting and crop growth conditions. The objective of this study was to compare ponded cumulative infiltration, steady state infiltration rate and sorptivity of soils cultivated using deep ripping, single and double mouldboard ploughing. This study was conducted on Chromic Luvisols (sandy loam), Haplic Luvisols (sandy clay loam), Ferric Luvisols (clay loam), and Ferric Arenosols (sand). Infiltration was measured using double ring infiltrometer method for 4 h. Although infiltration was smaller on traffic line of deep ripping system at all sites, it was only significantly ( P 0.05) different under deep ripped. Cumulative and steady state infiltration rate was greater under sandy than loamy soils, smaller under double ploughing compared with single ploughed and deep ripped soils. Sorptivity was not significantly ( P > 0.05) different among tillage systems but was greater under sandy than sandy loam soils. Information on tillage and infiltration can improve implementation of waterharvesting technologies and crop production in Botswana.

  1. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe2O3 content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that Koc would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface. - The relative importance of organic matter and clay in butachlor adsorption in soil will depend on the ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content

  2. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhongzhen; He Yan [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Xu Jianming [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)], E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn; Huang Panming [Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Jilani Ghulam [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that K{sub oc} would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface. - The relative importance of organic matter and clay in butachlor adsorption in soil will depend on the ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content.

  3. Microbial assimilation of 14C of ground and unground plant materials decomposing in a loamy sand and a clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Ladd, J.N.; Amato, M.

    1996-01-01

    . More C-14 and N were mineralized and less microbial biomass C-14 accumulated in soils amended with unground than with ground subclover leaves. Differences in the amounts of (CO2)-C-14 and biomass C-14 were established during the initial 7 days of decomposition. At this time, biomass C-14 in the two...... of particle sizes >50 mu m accounted fro 5-6% input C-14 in the loamy sand; the proportions were little affected by grinding of the clover leaf amendment. In contrast, the amounts of biomass C-14 in the fraction of particle sizes soils. Thus......, the increased amounts of biomass C-14 in soils amended with ground leaves were mainly associated with clay plus silt size particles and microaggregates. After 7 d of decomposition, non-biomass C-14 in the two soil fractions accounted for about 40% of input C-14, irrespective of soil type and particle size...

  4. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  5. THE EFFECT OF REINFORCEMENT ON THE GBFS AND LIME TREATED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    OpenAIRE

    D. Koteswara Rao,; G.V.R. Prasada Raju,; N. L. Manikanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    India being peninsular country has large area coming under coastal region and also it has been the habitat for considerable percentage of population. The marine clays are generally found in the coastal region of West Bengal, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Maharashtra and some parts of Gujarat. Marine or soft clays exists in these region are weak and deformative in nature. The present study deals with the strength characteristics of the marine clay collected from Kakinad...

  6. Leaching of Nutrient Elements in a Red Soil Derived from Quaternary Red Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENRENFANG; ZHAOQIGUO

    1998-01-01

    A red soil derived from Quaternary red clay was employed to study nutrient leaching with woil columns repacked in laboratory,The objective was to identify the effects of fertilization practices on leaching patterns and magnitudes of Ca2+,Mg2+,K+,NH4+,and NO3-,The treatments were CK (as a control),CaCO3, CaSO4,MgCO3,Ca(H2PO4)2,urea,KCl,and multiple (a mixture of the above-mentioned fertilizers),The fertilizers were added to the bare surface of the soil columns,and then the columns were leached with 120 mL deionized water daily through peristaltic pumps over a period of 92 days.Leaching processes of NH4+,and NO3- wer e only measured in CK,ured,and multiple treatments which were directly related to N leaching, Results showed that sole application of CaSO4,and Ca(H2PO4)2 scarcely hd any effect on the leching losses of Ca2+,Mg2+,and K+; the application of MgCO3 sthimulated the leaching of Mg2+;the application of CaCO3 promoted the leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+ and K+; urea treatment also promoted the leaching of K+ and NH4+,and NO3- leaching mainly occurred at late stage of leaching process in particular;under KCl treatment,leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+,and K+ was promoted to a large extent;under multiple treatment, leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+,K+,NH4+,and NO3- was all increased and NO3- was mainly leached at the end of leaching process and still had a trend of increase.

  7. Tropical dryland agroforestry on clay soils: : Analysis of systems based on Acacia senegal in the Blue Nile region, Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Raddad, Elamin Yousif Abdalla

    2006-01-01

    Acacia senegal, the gum arabic producing tree, is the most important component in traditional dryland agroforestry systems in the Blue Nile region, Sudan. The aim of the present study was to provide new knowledge on the potential use of A. senegal in dryland agroforestry systems on clay soils, as well as information on tree/crop interaction, and on silvicultural and management tools, with consideration on system productivity, nutrient cycling and sustainability. Moreover, the aim was also to ...

  8. Influence of foliar application of algae extract and amino acids mixture on fenugreek plants in sandy and clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    SHAHIRA A. TARRAF; Talaat, Iman M.; ABO EL-KHAIR B. EL-SAYED; LAILA K. BALBAA

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Tarraf SA, Talaat IM, El-Sayed AEB, Balbaa LK. 2015. Influence of foliar application of algae extract and amino acids mixture on fenugreek plants in sandy and clay soils. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 33-37. Two pot experiments were conducted to study the effect of foliar application of algae extract and amino acids mixture on the growth and chemical constituents of fenugreek plants (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.). Plants were sprayed with different concentrations of algae extract (0.0, 2....

  9. Effects of soil type, moisture content, redox potential and methyl bromide fumigation on Kd values of radio-selenium in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, D J; Moore, J; Shaw, G

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the processes that determine the solid-liquid partitioning (K(d) value) of Se is of fundamental importance in assessing the risk associated with the disposal of radio-selenium-containing waste. Using a mini-column (rather than batch) approach, K(d) values for (75)Se were determined over time in relation to soil moisture content (field capacity or saturated), redox potential and methyl bromide fumigation (used to disrupt the soil microbial population) in three contrasting soil types: clay loam, organic and sandy loam. The K(d) values were generally in the range 50-500 L kg(-1), with mean soil K(d) increasing with increasing organic matter content. Saturation with water lowered the measured redox potentials in the soils. However, only in the sandy loam soil did redox potential become negative, and this led to an increase in (75)Se K(d) value in this soil. Comparison of the data with the Eh-pH stability diagram for Se suggested that such strong reduction may have been consistent with the formation of the insoluble Se species, selenide. These findings, coupled with the fact that methyl bromide fumigation had no discernible effect on (75)Se K(d) value in the sandy loam soil, suggest that geochemical, rather than microbial, processes controlled (75)Se partitioning. The inter-relations between soil moisture content, redox potential and Se speciation should be considered in the modelling and assessment of radioactive Se fate and transport in the environment. PMID:18328605

  10. An automated microinfiltrometer to measure small-scale soil water infiltration properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Dennis C.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed an automated miniature constant-head tension infiltrometer that measures very small infiltration rates at millimetre resolution with minimal demands on the operator. The infiltrometer is made of 2.9 mm internal radius glass tube, with an integrated bubbling tower to maintain constant negative head and a porous mesh tip to avoid air-entry. In the bubbling tower, bubble formation and release changes the electrical resistance between two electrodes at the air-inlet. Tests were conducted on repacked sieved sands, sandy loam soil and clay loam soil, packed to a soil bulk density ρd of 1200 kg m-3 or 1400 kg m-3 and tested either air-dried or at a water potential ψ of -50 kPa. The change in water volume in the infiltrometer had a linear relationship with the number of bubbles, allowing bubble rate to be converted to infiltration rate. Sorptivity measured with the infiltrometer was similar between replicates and showed expected differences from soil texture and ρd, varying from 0.15 ± 0.01 (s.e. mm s-1/2 for 1400 kg m-3 clay loam at ψ = -50 kPa to 0.65 ± 0.06 mm s-1/2 for 1200 kg m-3 air dry sandy loam soil. An array of infiltrometers is currently being developed so many measurements can be taken simultaneously.

  11. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, Paul H.; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil Corg content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e., Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91 % of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78 % of the variability). The results obtained could enable robust scaling up exercises at a low cost as part of blue carbon stock assessments.

  12. Changes in labile soil organic matter fractions following land use change from monocropping to poplar-based agroforestry systems in a semiarid region of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Rong; Zeng, De-Hui; Li, Lu-Jun; Hu, Ya-Lin

    2012-11-01

    Labile fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) respond rapidly to land management practices and can be used as a sensitive indicator of changes in SOM. However, there is little information about the effect of agroforestry practices on labile SOM fractions in semiarid regions of China. In order to test the effects of land use change from monocropping to agroforestry systems on labile SOM fractions, we investigated soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N, particulate organic matter C (POMC) and N (POMN), as well as total organic C (TOC) and total N (TN) in the 0- to 15-cm and the 15- to 30-cm layers in 4-year-old poplar-based agroforestry systems and adjoining monocropping systems with two different soil textures (sandy loam and sandy clay loam) in a semiarid region of Northeast China. Our results showed that poplar-based agroforestry practices affected soil MBC, POMC, and POMN, albeit there was no significant difference in TOC and TN. Agroforestry practices increased MBC, POMC, and POMN in sandy clay loam soils. However, in sandy loam soils, agroforestry practices only increased MBC and even decreased POMC and POMN at the 0- to 15-cm layer. Our results suggest that labile SOM fractions respond sensitively to poplar-based agroforestry practices and can provide early information about the changes in SOM in semiarid regions of Northeast China and highlight that the effects of agroforestry practices on labile SOM fractions vary with soil texture.

  13. The development of a multi-surface soil speciation model for Cd (II) and Pb (II): Comparison of two approaches for metal adsorption to clay fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A two-site surface complexation model was used to predict metal binding onto clays. • Five different surfaces are included in the multi-surface speciation model. • The improved model well predicted metal adsorption under various I and pH. • Adsorption on clays should be considered especially at low I and high pH condition. - Abstract: The mobility of toxic metals in soils or sediments is of great concern to scientists and environmentalists since it directly affects the bioavailability of metals and their movement to surface and ground waters. In this study, a multi-surface soil speciation model for Cd (II) and Pb (II) was developed to predict the partition of metals on various soil solid components (e.g. soil organic matter (SOM), oxide mineral, and clay mineral). In previous study, the sorption of metal cations on SOM and oxide minerals has been evaluated by thermodynamically based surface complexation model. However, metal binding to soil clay fractions was normally treated in a simplistic manner: only cation exchange reactions were considered and exchange coefficient was assumed unity. In this study, the binding of metals onto clays was described by a two-site surface sorption model (a basal surface site and an edge site). The model was checked by predicting the adsorption behavior of Cd (II) and Pb (II) onto three selected Chinese soils as a function of pH and ionic strengths. Results showed that the proposed model more accurately predicted the metal adsorption on soils under studied condition, especially in low ionic strength condition, suggesting that adsorption of metals to soil clay fractions need to be considered more carefully when modeling the partition of trace elements in soils. The developed soil speciation model will be useful when evaluating the movement and bioavailability of toxic metals in soil environment

  14. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, O.

    2016-01-18

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e. silt and clay), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between Corg and mud (i.e. silt and clay, particle sizes <63 μm) contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relative high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (i.e. mud-Corg saturation) together with significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter could overall disrupt the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud (i.e. silt and clay content) is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass

  15. A modelling approach to evaluate the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity under a rain-fed condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Hou, Lingling; Wang, Hong; Hu, Kelin; McConkey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Soil surface texture is an important environmental factor that influences crop productivity because of its direct effect on soil water and complex interactions with other environmental factors. Using 30-year data, an agricultural system model (DSSAT-CERES-Wheat) was calibrated and validated. After validation, the modelled yield and water use (WU) of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from two soil textures (silt loam and clay) under rain-fed condition were analyzed. Regression analysis showed that wheat grown in silt loam soil is more sensitive to WU than wheat grown in clay soil, indicating that the wheat grown in clay soil has higher drought tolerance than that grown in silt loam. Yield variation can be explained by WU other than by precipitation use (PU). These results demonstrated that the DSSAT-CERES-Wheat model can be used to evaluate the WU of different soil textures and assess the feasibility of wheat production under various conditions. These outcomes can improve our understanding of the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity in rain-fed condition. PMID:25074796

  16. Spatial Trends in the Texture, Moisture Content, and pH of a Virginia Coastal Plain Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharais, S.; Heatwole, C.D.; Campbell, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    Soil texture, moisture content, and pH data from an agricultural field area of 48 _ 32 m in a Suffolk sandy loam soil in the Virginia Coastal Plain was examined for spatial trends. Trend surface analysis of sand, silt, and clay content data (n = 35) found that 68%, 74%, and 31% of the total variability in sand, silt, and clay content, respectively, was explained by second-order trend surfaces. Soil moisture content and pH also exhibited spatial trends, which resulted in statistically signific...

  17. Influences of composted hazelnut husk on some physical properties of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeytin, Serhat; Baran, Abdullah

    2003-07-01

    Some physical properties of clay loam and sandy loam soils amended with hazelnut husk (HH) were investigated. HH collected from hazelnut trees were dried, ground and composted for four months. Before use the composted material obtained was separated to three different aggregate sizes, smaller than 0.84 mm, 0.84-2.38 mm and bigger than 2.38 mm. Then these fractions were mixed with soil samples, at 0%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 8% by weight. Huzelnut husk compost-soil mixtures were placed to plastic pots and kept in an incubator at 25+/-5 degrees C for 45 and 90 days. At the end of incubation periods, water stable aggregate (WSA), hydraulic conductivity, total porosity, aeration porosity and macro- and micro-pore percentages of the mixtures were determined. Results obtained showed that composted HH increased the WSA, hydraulic conductivity, total porosity and macro-pore percentage in both clay loam and sandy loam soils depending on the incubation time and aggregate sizes. PMID:12618046

  18. Some Fertility Characteristics and Fertilizer Requirements of a Newly Reclaimed Upland Red Soil Derived from Quaternary Red Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of field experiments from 1990 to 1994 in Yingtan, Jiangxi Province, were conducted on an upland red soil derived from Quaternary red clay which had been reclaimed three years before the experiments, in order to study the fertility characteristics and fertilizer requirements of the newly reclaimed soil. The field experiments included that on nutrient characteristics and fertilizer effect, that on K-supplying potential and K-Mg relationship, that on fertilization rates of K and N, etc. The newly reclaimed upland soil was low in both N and P, and its responses to nitrogen and phosphate application were very significant. The K-supplying potential was also low, so the soil was highly responsive to K fertilizer. The effect of Ca and Mg fertilizers was not so great for the reason that certain amounts of Ca and Mg were incorporated into the soil through application of calcium magnesium phosphate during land leveling before the experiments. Among the four micronutrients, B, Mo, Zn and Cu, B had the greatest effect on the soil. The fertilizer requirements of the soil were in an order of P and N > K > lime and B > Mg > Mo, Zn and Cu. Eight crops tested had different fertilizer-requiring characteristics. Rapeseed was very sensitive to P and B fertilizers. Barely was especially sensitive to P and lime and it also responded to B, Mo, Zn and Cu. And sweet potato was especially sensitive to K.

  19. Effect of Soil Texture on Starch Accumulation and Activities of Key Enzymes of Starch Synthesis in the Kernel of ZM 9023

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-jing; ZHAN Hai-hong

    2008-01-01

    Three kinds of soil texture (clay-loam, mid-loam, and sand-loam soil) were used to study the effects of soil texture on starch accumulating rate and the changes in activities of the key enzymes of starch synthesis in the kernel during grain filling in high gluten content wheat ZM 9023, under conditions of pond culture. The content of starch and its components were measured according to the method of double-wave length described by Bao (1996). ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPP) activity was tested according to the method described by Doehlert et al. (1988). Soluble starch synthase (SSS) and starch branching enzyme (SBE) activities were tested according to the method described by Nakamura et al. (1989). The amylose, amylopectin, and total starch accumulating rate in the kernel of ZM 9023 were found to be a single-peak curve in three different soil textures during grain filling, and peaked 20, 15, and 15 d after anthesis, respectively. The activities of the enzymes, AGPP, SSS, and SBE, in the kernel of ZM 9023 had a single-peaked curve, which peaked 20, 15, and 15 d after anthesis, respectively. The activities of the above three enzymes of ZM 9023 were higher in the sand-loam soil. The accumulating peak of amylose formed later compared to that of amylopectin. The sand-loam soil could help high gluten content cultivars to synthesize starch.

  20. Effect of Cadmium Stress on Wheat Rhizosphere Environment in Three Soil Textures during Filling Stage%不同质地土壤中Cd胁迫对灌浆期小麦根际环境的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵云; 王钰亮; 姜丽娜; 张黛静; 刘会娟; 赵院利; 李春喜

    2012-01-01

    concentration of cadmium was more than 60 mg/kg. Considering the soil texture, the growth of wheat root and the enzyme activities of soil in loam were better than in sandy soil and clay soil. Besides, total cadmium in three textures of soil was listed as loam>clay> sandy soil, available cadmium as sandy soil>clay>loam, cadmium in wheat root as sandy soil>loam >clay, and cadmium in wheat grain as sandy soil>loam>clay, which indicated that clay and loam had stronger adsorption ability to cadmium than sandy soil. And so, cadmium stress to wheat plantswas more alleviated in clay and loam for less transport of cadmium than in sandy soil. In conclusion, cadmium pollution for grown wheat was less in loam and clay than in sandy soil.

  1. Selectivity sequences and sorption capacities of phosphatic clay and humus rich soil towards the heavy metals present in zinc mine tailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Pranav Kumar; Seth, Chandra Shekhar; Misra, Virendra

    2007-08-25

    Sorption efficacy of phosphatic clay and humus rich soil alone and on combination were tested towards heavy metals present in zinc mine tailing (Zawar Zinc Mine), Udaipur (India). Characterization of the zinc mine tailing sample indicated the presence of Pb, Cu, Zn and Mn in the concentration of 637, 186, 720 and 577microg(-1), respectively. For sorption efficacy, the zinc mine tailing soil were properly amended with phosphatic clay and humus rich soil separately and in combination and leachability study was performed by batch experiment at different pH range from 3 to 9. The data showed that the percent leachability of heavy metal in non-amended soil was 75-90%. After amendment with phosphatic clay percent leachability of heavy metals became 35-45%. Further, the addition of humus soil to phosphatic clay decreased the percent leachability up to 5-15% at all tested pH. Column leachability experiment was performed to evaluate the rate of leachability. The shape of cumulative curves of Pb, Cu, Zn and Mn showed an increase in its concavity in following order: PbCu>Zn>Mn. Further, Langmuir isotherms applied for the sorption studies indicated that phosphatic clay in the presence of humus soil had high affinity for Pb followed by Cu, Zn and Mn, with sorption capacities (b) 139.94, 97.02, 83.32 and 67.58microgg(-1), respectively.

  2. Effects of different fertilizers on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in a yellow clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huaiying; Huang, Sha; Qiu, Qiongfen; Li, Yaying; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Dai, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Yellow clay paddy soil (Oxisols) is a typical soil with low productivity in southern China. Nitrification inhibitors and slow release fertilizers have been used to improve nitrogen fertilizer utilization and reduce environmental impaction of the paddy soil. However, their effects on ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in paddy soil have rarely been investigated. In the present work, we compared the influences of several slow release fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors on the community structure and activities of the ammonia oxidizers in yellow clay soil. The abundances and community compositions of AOA and AOB were determined with qPCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and clone library approaches. Our results indicated that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) of the soil was significantly related to the abundances of both AOA and AOB. Nitrogen fertilizer application stimulated the growth of AOA and AOB, and the combinations of nitrapyrin with urea (NPU) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) inhibited the growth of AOA and AOB, respectively. Compared with other treatments, the applications of NPU and UF also led to significant shifts in the community compositions of AOA and AOB, respectively. NPU showed an inhibitory effect on AOA T-RF 166 bp that belonged to Nitrosotalea. UF had a negative effect on AOB T-RF 62 bp that was assigned to Nitrosospira. These results suggested that NPU inhibited PNR and increased nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by inhibiting the growth of AOA and altering AOA community. UF showed no effect on NUE but decreased AOB abundance and shifted AOB community. PMID:27063014

  3. Interactions between soil texture and placement of dairy slurry application: I. Flow characteristics and leaching of nonreactive components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesner, Nadia; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Rubaek, Gitte H; Magid, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Land application of manure can exacerbate nutrient and contaminant transfers to the aquatic environment. This study examined the effect of injecting a dairy cattle (Bostaurus L.) manure slurry on mobilization and leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components across a range of agricultural soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 microm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam-textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil texture as an important factor influencing leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components in soils amended with manure slurry. PMID:21520740

  4. Multitracer and filter-separated half-cell method for measuring solute diffusion in undisturbed soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægdsmand, Mette; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2010-01-01

    Solute diffusion controls important processes in soils: plant uptake of nutrients, sorption-desorption processes, degradation of organic matter, and leaching of radionuclides through clay barriers. We developed a new method for measuring the solute diffusivity (solute diffusion coefficient in the...... soil relative to water) in intact soil samples (the Multiple Tracer, Filter Separated half-cell method using a Dynamic Model for parameter estimation [MT-FS-DM]). The MT-FS-DM method consists of half-cell diffusion of two pairs of counterdiffusing anionic tracers and a parameter estimation scheme that...... the MT-FS-DM method provided reliable results. We compared diffusivities measured on a sandy loam soil using the MT-FS-DM method with diffusivities from six sandy loam test soils from the literature. The new method can be used to estimate solute diffusivity in intact structured soil and provides a...

  5. Properties of a clay soil from 1.5 to 3.5 years after biochar application and the impact on rice yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, M.T.M.; Madari, B.E.; Bastiaans, L.; Oort, van P.A.J.; Leal, W.G.O.; Heinemann, A.B.; Silva, da M.A.S.; Maia, A.H.N.; Parsons, D.; Meinke, H.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the impact of a single application of wood biochar on soil chemical and physical properties and aerobic rice grain yield on an irrigated kaolinitic clay Ferralsol in a tropical Savannah. We used linear mixed models to analyse the response of soil and plant variables to application rat

  6. Source Zone Remediation by ZVI-Clay Soil-Mixing: Reduction of Tetrachloroethene Mass and Mass Discharge at a Danish DNAPL Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Binning, Philip John;

    2012-01-01

    -mixing. The concentrations of chlorinated ethenes were monitored via soil sampling at the source zone and groundwater sampling at a downgradient control plane. The results showed that within one year ZVI-Clay soil-mixing resulted in significant mass depletion of PCE (2-3 orders in magnitude) with ethene as the main...

  7. Xiphinema americanum as Affected by Soil Organic Matter and Porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchillia, P E

    1972-07-01

    The effects of four soil types, soil porosity, particle size, and organic matter were tested on survival and migration of Xiphinema americanum. Survival and migration were significantly greater in silt loam than in clay loam and silty clay soils. Nematode numbers were significantly greater in softs planted with soybeans than in fallow softs. Nematode survival was greatest at the higher of two pore space levels in four softs. Migration of X. americanum through soft particle size fractions of 75-150, 150-250, 250-500, 500-700, and 700-1,000 mu was significantly greater in the middle three fractions, with the least occurring in the smallest fraction. Additions of muck to silt loam and loamy sand soils resulted in reductions in survival and migration of the nematode. The fulvic acid fraction of muck, extracted with sodium hydroxide, had a deleterious effect on nematode activity. I conclude that soils with small amounts of air-filled pore space, extremes in pore size, or high organic matter content are deleterious to the migration and survival of X. americanum, and that a naturally occurring toxin affecting this species may be present in native soft organic matter.

  8. Innovative Uses of Organo-philic Clays for Remediation of Soils, Sediments and Groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCBs and similar low-solubility organic compounds continue to offer significant challenges in terrestrial and sediment remediation applications. While selective media such as granular activated carbon (GAC) have proven to be successful at absorbing soluble organics, these media may have reduced performance due to blinding in the presence of high molecular weight organic matter. An alternative technology addresses this problem with a clay-based adsorption media, which effectively and efficiently stabilizes low-solubility organic matter. OrganoclayTM reactive media utilizes granular sodium bentonite, which has been chemically modified to attract organic matter without absorbing water. The unique platelet structure of bentonite clays provides tremendous surface area and the capacity of the media to absorb over 60 percent of its own weight in organic matter. Because of these properties, organo-clays allow for several cost-effective in-situ remediation techniques, such as: - Flow-through filtration for removal of organic matter from aqueous solutions. Organo-clay can be utilized as a fixed-bed media in a column operation. This specialty media offers a high efficient alternative to Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) when applied as a flow through media to remove oil, PCB and other low soluble organic contaminates from water. - Placement in a Reactive Core MatTM. Organo-clay may be encapsulated into carrier textiles which are adhered together to create a thin reactive layer with high strength and even distribution of the reactive media. This type of delivery mechanism can be successfully applied in a sub aqueous or terrestrial environment for sediment capping applications - Permeable reactive barriers. Organo-clay can deliver high sorption capacity, high efficiency, and excellent hydraulic conductivity as a passive reactive media in these applications. (authors)

  9. Mapping of Total Carbon and Clay Contents in Glacial Till Soil Using On-the-Go Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy and Partial Least Squares Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhang-Quan; SHAN Ying-Jie; PENG Li; JIANG Yu-Gen

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing spatial variability of soil attributes,using traditional soil sampling and laboratory analysis,is cost prohibitive.The potential benefit of managing soils on a site-specific basis is well established.High variations in glacial till soil render detailed soil mapping difficult with limited number of soil samples.To overcome this problem,this paper demonstrates the feasibility of soil carbon and clay mapping using the newly developed on-the-go near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS).Compared with the geostatistics method,the partial least squares regression (PLSR),with NIRS measurements,could yield a more detailed map for both soil carbon and clay.Further,by using independent validation dataset,the accuracy of predicting could be improved significantly for soil clay content and only slightly for soil carbon content.Owing to the complexity of field conditions,more work on data processing and calibration modeling might be necessary for using on-the-go NIRS measurements.

  10. Soil Property Influences on Xiphinema americanum Populations as Related to Maturity of Loess-Derived Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D P

    1973-10-01

    Field populations of Xiphinerna americanum around roots of Syringa vulgaris 'President Lincoln' were larger in Marshall silty clay loam, a medially developed loess soil, than in Monona silt loam, a minimally developed loess soil. Most X. amerieanum occurred in the top 15 cm of soil, with few below 30 cm. Maximum numbers occurred in August of both years in the Marshall soil, and in August 1969 and June 1970 in the Monona soil. Population fluctuations during the growing season were coincident with changes in soil moisture content. Although the population fluctuation pattern was the same at each depth tested, the adult-to-juvenile ratio increased in one soil while it decreased in the other. Numbers of X. americanum decreased as root weights decreased within a soil profile, but they were not correlated with root weights over all soils and depths. More X. americanum were recovered from the Marshall than from the Monona soil, but fibrous root weights were greater in the Monona soil. Survival of X. americanum in soil columns in growth chamber experiments was better in the Marshall than in the Monona soil. Movement and survival were different in identically textured Monona A and B horizon soils. Factors related to the ion exchange sites may affect X. americanum.

  11. Size and Persistence of the Microbial Biomass Formed during the Humification of Glucose Hemicellulose Cellulose, and Straw in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1983-01-01

    straw. The half-life of labelled C in biomass during the second year of incubation ranged from 2 to 3 years.Native C in biomass ranged from 0.5 to 1.4% of the total C in native soil organic matter, the highest values occurring in the clay-rich soils. The half-life of native soil C, estimated from CO2...

  12. CONSTRUCTION OF A NEW HIGHWAY EMBANKMENT ON THE SOFT CLAY SOIL TREATMENT BY STONE COLUMNS IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QASIM A. ALJANABI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To continue of the second phase of the East Coast Expressway between Kuantan and Kula Terengganu in Malaysia system innovative solution are required. In this new phase there are embankment region has been subjected to extensive soft clay soil. These comprise typically of clayey silts of very high water content and undrained shear strengths in the range of 8 to 11 kPa to depths of up to 8m. To support an embankment height of up to 12 m, were filled and thereafter Vibro Replacement treatment was carried out to treat the very soft soil. Extensive instrumentation using rod settlement gauges, inclinometers and piezometers were installed to monitor the performance of the Vibro Replacement treatment. This paper reports on aspects of design, installation and the measured results from the instrumentation scheme.

  13. Effects of Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Interaction on the Stability of a Clay Slope: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedone Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep and slow landslide processes are frequently observed in clay slopes located along the Southern Apennines (Italy. A case study representative of these processes, named Pisciolo case study, is discussed in the paper. The geo-hydro-mechanical characteristics of the materials involved in the instability phenomena are initially discussed. Pluviometric, piezometric, inclinometric and GPS monitoring data are subsequently presented, suggesting that rainfall infiltration constitutes the main factor inducing slope movements. The connection between formation of landslide bodies and slope-atmosphere interaction has been demonstrated through a hydro-mechanical finite element analysis, whose results are finally reported in the work. This analysis has been conducted employing a constitutive model that is capable of simulating both saturated and unsaturated soil behaviour, as well as a boundary condition able to simulate the effects of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interaction.

  14. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossadeghi-Björklund, M; Arvidsson, J.; Keller, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Soil compaction by vehicular traffic modifies the pore structure and soil hydraulic properties. These changes potentially influence the occurrence of preferential flow, which so far has been little studied. Our aim was to study the effect of compaction on soil hydraulic and transport properties...... in subsoil. A randomized block design trial at two sites on a well-structured clay soil in central Sweden was established. Plots with two levels of compaction were created at both sites, in the following referred to as trafficked and control. The trafficked treatment was created by 4 passes track......-by-track with a three-axle dumper with a maximum wheel load of 5.8 Mg. After one year, undisturbed soil columns (20 cm height 20 cm diameter) from both trafficked and control plots at a depth of 30–50 cm were sampled. The columns were analyzed using X-ray CT imaging, together with measures of the degree of preferential...

  15. Self diffusion coefficient of phosphorus in different soils of Egypt as affected by soil moisture and phosphate fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of soil water content and phosphate fertilization vz. phosphate diffusion on plant growth and p-uptake was studied by use of tracer technique. Two experiments were conducted using three different Egyptian soils, i.e. clay from Bahtim, loamy from Burg El-Arab and sandy loam from Abou-Zaabal. The first was a laboratory experiment and aimed to determine the self diffusion coefficient of 32P, sup(D)P, in these different soils, as affected by soil moisture content and phosphate fertilization. The second was a pot experiment conducted to further investigate the uptake and dry matter yield of corn plants under the same conditions mentioned in the first experiment. The data revealed that as the P applied was raised from 0 to 100 Kgp/Fed, the values of sup(D)P were increased with different magnitude according to the soil texture and its moisture content. The highest values for the sup(D)P were of the clay soil of Bahtim, while the lowest were of the sandy loam soil of Abou-Zaabal. The data showed the positive trends towards increasing the sup(D)P values with increasing soil moisture contents. The study of pot experiment showed that plant uptake of P is closely related to the diffusion coefficient of P in soils. The practical implication of the present study indicates that more phosphorus needs to be applied to crops during periods of moisture stress than during periods of adequate soil moisture level to provide optimum phosphorus nutrition to plants. The clay soils should show less tendency toward P deficiency during dry conditions than would sandy soils having less clay. Similarly, irrigation should help to overcome P-deficiencies, particularly on light-textured soils. (author)

  16. Identification of hydraulic parameters with slug test in clay soils%粘性土层井孔抽水试验的参数识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨利超; 王旭升; 焦赳赳; 王亚; 匡星星

    2011-01-01

    Clay soils belong to aquitards in hydrogeology. Groundwater flow, solute transport and geochemical process within clay soils play important roles in hydrological conditions and environmental changes. It is necessary to obtain the in-situ hydraulic parameters in clay soils with pumping tests when the hydrogeological problems in clay soils are investigated. However, due to weak permeability of clay soils, the analysis method of the pumping test in clay is different from those applied for pumping tests in aquifers. It is indicated that single-well pumping test in clay soils is similar to slug test in aquifers. This similarity suggests that the parameter estimation method of a slug test can be applied in pumping test in clay soils. In this study, the equation using the radius of influence and the exact analytical solution ofpumping test are applied in identifying hydraulic parameters of the clayed silt in Pearl river delta withpumping test data in boreholes. Hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of this silt are estimated andthe efficiency of the method is discussed.%粘性土层属于弱透水层,其水流、溶质运移和地球化学过程对于水文地质条件和环境变化具有重要意义.通过抽水试验来获取粘性土原位水力学参数是对粘性土水文地质问题进行研究的必要手段,但由于其渗透性很小,不能采用和常规含水层一样的方法求参.粘性土中的单孔抽水试验与一般含水层中的微水试验具有较大的相似性,因此可以借用微水试验的计算公式求参.本文以珠江三角洲淤泥质粘土井孔抽水试验为例,采用微水试验分析中的影响半径法和精确解法两种方法进行参数识别,获得了粘性土渗透系数和贮水率的参考值.

  17. Predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokas, Kurt; Lim, Tae Jun; Feyereisen, Gary; Novak, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    Different physical and chemical properties of biochar, which is made out of a variety of biomass materials, can impact water movement through amended soil. The objective of this research was to develop a decision support tool predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). Four different kinds of biochar were added to four different textured soils (coarse sand, fine sand, loam, and clay texture) to assess these effects at the rates of 0, 1, 2, and 5 % (w/w). The Ksat of the biochar amended soils were significantly influenced by the rate and type of biochar, as well as the original particle size of soil. The Ksat decreased when biochar was added to coarse and fine sands. Biochar with larger particles sizes (60%; >1 mm) decreased Ksat to a larger degree than the smaller particle size biochar (60%; soils. Increasing tortuosity in the amended sandy soil could explain this behavior. On the other hand, for the clay loam 1% and 2% biochar additions universally increased the Ksat with higher biochar amounts providing no further alterations. The developed model utilizes soil texture pedotransfer functions for predicting agricultural soil Ksat as a function of soil texture. The model accurately predicted the direction of the Ksat influence, even though the exact magnitude still requires further refinement.

  18. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tombul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h and hydraulic conductivity K(q or K(h, may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3 and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5 have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future. Keywords: soil hydraulic properties, soil characteristic curves, PTFs

  19. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:I.Salt—Water Dynamics in Unsaturated Soils Under Stable Evaporation Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA; 等

    1992-01-01

    A long term simulation test on salt-water dynamics in unsaturated soils with different groundwater depths and soil texture profiles under stable evaporation condition was conducted.Salinity sensors and tensiometers were used to monitor salt and water variation in soils.The experiment revealed that in the process of fresh groundwater moving upwards by capillary rise in the column,the salts in subsoil were brought upwards and accumulated in the surface soil,and consequently the salinization of surface soil took place.The rate of salt accumulation is determined mainly by the volume of capillary water flow and the conditions of salts contained in the soil profile.Water flux in soils decreased obviously when groundwater depths fell below 1.5m.When there was an interbedded clay layer 30cm in thickness in the silty loam soil profile or a clay layer 100cm in thickness at the top layer,the water flux was 3-5 times less than in the soil profile of homogeneous silty loam soil.Therefore,the rate of salt accumulation was decreased and the effect of variation of groundwater depth on the water flux in soils was weakened comparatively.If there was precipitation or irrigation supplying water to the soil,the groundwater could rarely take a direct part in the process of salt accumulation in surface soil,especially,in soil profiles with an interbedded stratum or a clayey surface soil layer.

  20. Prediction of Nitrogen Responses of Corn by Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Simard

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen mineralization potential (Nmin has to be spatially quantified to enable farmers to vary N fertilizer rates, optimize crop yields, and minimize N transfer from soils to the environment. The study objectives were to assess the spatial variability in soil Nmin potential based on clay and organic matter (OM contents and the impact of grouping soils using these criteria on corn grain (Zea mays L. yield, N uptake response curves to N fertilizer, and soil residual N. Four indicators were used: OM content and three equations involving OM and clay content. The study was conducted on a 15-ha field near Montreal, Quebec, Canada. In the spring 2000, soil samples (n = 150 were collected on a 30- x 30-m grid and six rates of N fertilizer (0 to 250 kg N ha-1 were applied. Kriged maps of particle size showed areas of clay, clay loam, and fine sandy loam soils. The Nmin indicators were spatially structured but soil nitrate (NO3– was not. The N fertilizer rate to reach maximum grain yield (Nmax, as estimated by a quadratic model, varied among textural classes and Nmin indicators, and ranged from 159 to 250 kg N ha-1. The proportion of variability (R2 and the standard error of the estimate (SE varied among textural groups and Nmin indicators. The R2 ranged from 0.53 to 0.91 and the SE from 0.13 to 1.62. Corn grain N uptake was significantly affected by N fertilizer and the pattern of response differed with soil texture. For the 50 kg N ha-1 rate, the apparent Nmin potential (ANM was significantly larger in the clay loam (122 kg ha-1 than in the fine sandy loam (80 kg ha-1 or clay (64 kg ha-1 soils. The fall soil residual N was not affected by N fertlizer inputs. Textural classes can be used to predict Nmax. The Nmin indicators may also assist the variable rate N fertilizer inputs for corn production.

  1. Prediction of nitrogen responses of corn by soil nitrogen mineralization indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, R R; Ziadi, N; Nolin, M C; Cambouris, A N

    2001-11-01

    Soil nitrogen mineralization potential (N min) has to be spatially quantified to enable farmers to vary N fertilizer rates, optimize crop yields, and minimize N transfer from soils to the environment. The study objectives were to assess the spatial variability in soil N min potential based on clay and organic matter (OM) contents and the impact of grouping soils using these criteria on corn grain (Zea mays L.) yield, N uptake response curves to N fertilizer, and soil residual N. Four indicators were used: OM content and three equations involving OM and clay content. The study was conducted on a 15-ha field near Montreal, Quebec, Canada. In the spring 2000, soil samples (n = 150) were collected on a 30- x 30-m grid and six rates of N fertilizer (0 to 250 kg N ha(-1)) were applied. Kriged maps of particle size showed areas of clay, clay loam, and fine sandy loam soils. The N min indicators were spatially structured but soil nitrate (NO3-) was not. The N fertilizer rate to reach maximum grain yield (N max), as estimated by a quadratic model, varied among textural classes and Nmin indicators, and ranged from 159 to 250 kg N ha(-1). The proportion of variability (R2) and the standard error of the estimate (SE) varied among textural groups and N min indicators. The R2 ranged from 0.53 to 0.91 and the SE from 0.13 to 1.62. Corn grain N uptake was significantly affected by N fertilizer and the pattern of response differed with soil texture. For the 50 kg N ha(-1) rate, the apparent N min potential (ANM) was significantly larger in the clay loam (122 kg ha(-1)) than in the fine sandy loam (80 kg ha(-1)) or clay (64 kg ha(-1)) soils. The fall soil residual N was not affected by N fertlizer inputs. Textural classes can be used to predict N max. The N min indicators may also assist the variable rate N fertilizer inputs for corn production. PMID:12805786

  2. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (Pconservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  3. 不同根部微灌水器对云南红壤和黄沙土水分分布的影响%Impacts of different root miroirrigation emitters on water distribution of red loam and yellow sand soils in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余杨; 杨振杰; 张建生; 国攀; 薛翔; 张新星; 胡红超; 油瑞菊

    2015-01-01

    It is important to explore the effect of different root micro emitters on soil water distribution, which improves the efficiency of root micro irrigation system. The influence of micro emitter type on soil water distribution was studied in this paper. Two different irrigation systems (surface drip irrigation and root micro irrigation), two different irrigation emitter types (flow adjustable irrigation emitter and drip irrigation belt embedded with inner patch) and three different irrigation times (5, 15 and 30 minutes) were applied on the Yunnan red loam and the yellow sand soils. Soil moisture was determined. The results showed that there was a very significant interaction between the emitter type and the soil type, the emitter type and the irrigation time (P 0.05). The flow adjustable irrigation emitter has 8 horizontal drainage holes. The horizontal width of the irrigation water in the 2 soils was both wide (about 25 cm). The drip irrigation belt embedded with inner patch has a downward single hole. The horizontal width of the irrigation water in the 2 soils was both narrow (about 16 cm). Therefore, for the wide root extension of crops, the application of the flow adjustable irrigation emitter should be more suitable, on the contrary, the drip irrigation belt embedded with inner patch are used instead. In the Yunnan red loam, the areas with higher water content for the root micro-irrigation using belt embedded with inner patch were more close to those of crop roots, the areas with higher water content for the surface drip irrigation basically concentrated on the upper part of the soil of the flower pot. Therefore, compared to the surface drip irrigation, water loss due to evaporation in root irrigation greatly reduced. In the Yunnan red loam, the matric potential to the movement of irrigation water played the main role and water was easy to sink; In yellow sand soil, the gravitational potential to the movement of irrigation water played a main role which could

  4. Liquefaction Susceptibility of Soils With Clay Particles from Earthquake-induced Landslides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-sheng; JIANG Xin; ZHANG Xu

    2007-01-01

    The main reason for earthquake-induced landslides is liquefaction of soil, a process considered to occur mostly in sandy soils. Liquefaction can occur in clayey soils has also been reported and proven in the recent literature, but liquefaction in clayey soils still remains unclear and there are many questions that need to be addressed. In order to address these questions, an depth study on the liquefaction potential of clayey soils was conducted on the basis of field investigation and a series of laboratory tests on the samples collected from the sliding surface of the landslides. The liquefaction potential of the soils was studied by means of undrained cyclic ring-shear tests. Research results show that the liquefaction potential of sandy soils is higher than that of clayey soils given the same void ratio;the soil resistance to liquefaction rises with an increase in plasticity for clayey soils; relation between plasticity index and the liquefaction potential of soil can be used in practical application to estimate the liquefaction potential of soil.

  5. Coastal soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy%反射光谱估算滨海土壤黏粒含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦彩霞; 郑光辉; 赏刚; 孙东敏

    2016-01-01

    Clay content is an important soil property that affects the structure, nutrient supply and other characteristics of soils. Variations in clay content can indicate the degree of soil development or soil age. In traditional chemical analyses of soil properties, the extractant interacts in the solution and at the solution-particle interface, thus altering the equilibrium between the soil solid and solution phases. Soil reflectance spectroscopy has been developed as an effective alternative method of measuring soil properties primarily because it requires minimal sample preparation and it is fast, cost-effective, non-destructive and non-hazardous to the soil. In recent decades, research on the use of reflectance spectroscopy in soil science has achieved rapid advances. Reflectance spectroscopy can be successfully applied to estimate the soil clay content. However, the mechanisms of soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy are not very clear. The goals of this study were to identify the bands within the range of 360-2490 nm that can be used to estimate the clay content and explore the mechanisms of the clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy. A total of 150 coastal soil samples were collected. The soil reflectance spectra were measured in a dark room using a FieldSpec 3 portable spectrometer. Raw spectral data were pre-processed by smoothing (R) and then by first derivative (FD), continuum removal (CR) or reciprocal transformation (DS). Calibration (75 soil samples) and validation datasets (75 soil samples) were obtained from 1,000 random selections of the data. Stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were performed to estimate the soil clay content and to further identify the bands useful for modeling this parameter. The results indicated that the SMLR analysis of CR and R spectra and the PLSR analysis of R and FD spectra were characterized by good calibration and validation accuracies

  6. Evaluation of biostimulation in clay soil contaminated by petroleum; Avaliacao da bioestimulacao em solos argilosos contaminados com petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Sandro J.; Cammarota, Magali C.; Freire, Denize D.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Bioquimica. Lab. de Tecnologia Ambiental]. E-mail: baptista@eq.ufrj.br; denize@eq.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    Biostimulation has been used as a technic in order to increase the microbial activity adding inorganic nutrients and/or terminal electron acceptor in the contaminated place. The main goal of this work was evaluate how each inorganic nutrient could help the biodegradation at a given petroleum contaminated clay soil. At first, the work was designed to investigate the optimal relation between C:N:P that could influence the best organic matter removal (OMR) in aerobic bioreactors with 50 ml during 30 days. It was noticed that when one worked with 35 mg KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}/100 g soil, without adding nitrogen source, the OMR was 35%. Furthermore, it was noticed that the highest concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus was a limiting factor for microbial degradation and this resulted in the lowest OMR. At second, it was designed in aerobic bioreactor with 500 ml for 45 days and worked with the optimal concentrations of added phosphorus from the last stage. Although the assays have focused that nitrogen was not necessary to add to the soil, it was worked with 2,5 g (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}/100 g soil. The OMR was 46%, Oil and Grease removal was around 38% and TPH removal was around 45%. (author)

  7. Pupal development of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) at different moisture values in four soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, F de M M; Marques, R N; Costa, M L Z; Walder, J M M; Silva, A P; Parra, J R P

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate adult emergence and duration of the pupal stage of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), and emergence of the fruit fly parasitoid, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead), under different moisture conditions in four soil types, using soil water matric potential. Pupal stage duration in C. capitata was influenced differently for males and females. In females, only soil type affected pupal stage duration, which was longer in a clay soil. In males, pupal stage duration was individually influenced by moisture and soil type, with a reduction in pupal stage duration in a heavy clay soil and in a sandy clay, with longer duration in the clay soil. As matric potential decreased, duration of the pupal stage of C. capitata males increased, regardless of soil type. C. capitata emergence was affected by moisture, regardless of soil type, and was higher in drier soils. The emergence of D. longicaudata adults was individually influenced by soil type and moisture factors, and the number of emerged D. longicaudata adults was three times higher in sandy loam and lower in a heavy clay soil. Always, the number of emerged adults was higher at higher moisture conditions. C. capitata and D. longicaudata pupal development was affected by moisture and soil type, which may facilitate pest sampling and allow release areas for the parasitoid to be defined under field conditions. PMID:22127183

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of the Hybrid Clay- Based Material Montmorillonite-Melanoidin: A Potential Soil Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V Vilas; B Matthiasch; J Huth; J Kratz; S Rubert de la Rosa; P Michel; T Schäfer

    2011-12-31

    The study of the interactions among metals, minerals, and humic substances is essential in understanding the migration of inorganic pollutants in the geosphere. A considerable amount of organic matter in the environment is associated with clay minerals. To understand the role of organic matter in the environment and its association with clay minerals, a hybrid clay-based material (HCM), montmorillonite (STx-1)-melanoidin, was prepared from L-tyrosine and L-glutamic acid by the Maillard reaction. The HCM was characterized by elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), and thermal analysis. The presence of organic materials on the surface was confirmed by XPS and STXM. The STXM results showed the presence of organic spots on the surface of the STx-1 and the characterization of the functional groups present in those spots. Thermal analysis confirmed the existence of organic materials in the montmorillonite interlayer, indicating the formation of a composite of melanoidin and montmorillonite. The melanoidin appeared to be located partially between the layers of montmorillonite and partially at the surface, forming a structure that resembles the way a cork sits on the top of a champagne bottle.

  9. Effects of different soil textures on wine quality of Cabernet Gernischt%土壤质地对蛇龙珠葡萄酿酒品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏安; 李记明; 姜文广; 高敏; 梁海忠

    2013-01-01

    With Cabernet Gernischt from Yantai region as the materials, the effects of four different soil textures, including sand, loam, clay loam and clay, on the wine quality were investigated. The physical-chemical parameters, color, phenols content, and sensory quality were evaluated and systematically compared. The results showed that the soil texture had significant effect on the berry and wine quality, and the grape in sandy loam had the better wine-making quality. Compared with clay loam and clay soils, the grape in vineyard of sand and loam soils had smaller berry size, looser cluster and its corresponding wine presented better color and sensory quality.%  以蛇龙珠葡萄为试材,分别选定了烟台地区砂土、壤土、粘壤土和粘土4种典型土壤质地进行研究,分析比较了4种土壤质地所产蛇龙珠葡萄的酿酒品质的差异。结果表明,土壤质地对蛇龙珠葡萄果实和葡萄酒品质影响较大,含砂石的壤土条件下葡萄酿酒品质较佳。砂土、壤土与粘壤土、粘土相比,生产出的蛇龙珠葡萄果实小,果穗疏松,酿出的葡萄酒酚类物质含量高,颜色深,感官品质较好。

  10. Pore Structure Characteristics after 2 Years of Biochar Application to a Sandy Loam Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen;

    2015-01-01

    Soil pore structure comprises the size and shape of soil pores and has a major impact on water retention and gas movement. The porous nature of biochar suggests that its application to soil can potentially alter soil pore structure characteristics, and the purpose of this study was to evaluate...... the effects of birch wood biochar (20, 40, and 100 Mg ha-1) applied to a sandy loam on soil total porosity and pore structure indices. Bulk and intact soil samples were collected for physicochemical analyses and water retention and gas diffusivity measurements between pF 1.0 and pF 3.0. Biochar application......, biochar increased soil air-filled porosity by up to 25%. However, there was no difference in gas diffusivities between biochar-amended soil and the reference soil. At pF 3.0, the soil pore system became more tortuous after biochar application, with a trend that pore tortuosity increased with increasing...

  11. Environmental Factors Influencing Numbers of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii and Its Bacteriophages in Two Field Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, K A; Barnet, Y M; McGilchrist, C A

    1987-05-01

    Fluctuations in numbers of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii and its bacteriophages in two fields with different soil types were followed during a 17-month period in 1981 and 1982. Mean levels of both phage and rhizobia varied significantly (P soil and phage from 0 to 1.7 x 10 PFU/g of soil. Multivariate regression analysis showed rhizobial levels to be significantly and positively related to vegetation height and solar radiation, but not to mean temperature, precipitation, soil matric potential, or soil type. Rhizobiophage concentrations were significantly and positively related to soil matric potential and vegetation height. They were reduced in the silty clay loam soil, although the presence of 34% clay did not prevent phage multiplication and the occurrence of high phage levels. PMID:16347339

  12. Tensile behaviour of unsaturated compacted clay soils — A direct assessment method.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, R.A.; Hughes, P N; Davie, C. T.; Glendinning, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for testing the behaviour of soils placed under tensile load and demonstrates its suitability for testing a number of soil types under various conditions including saturation, compaction and stabilisation. Validation of the results obtained for the soils at relatively low saturation has been conducted using the established Brazilian (indirect) test for measuring the tensile strength of brittle materials. A fair comparison has been found and the results highlig...

  13. Nutrient leaching potential following application of papermill lime-sludge to an acidic clay soil

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Vettorazzo; F. C. S. Amaral; J. C. Chitolina

    2001-01-01

    This experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions with soil pots during 210 days, to evaluate the effect of calcitic papermill lime-sludge application (at the rates 0, 773, 1.547, and 2.320 mg kg-1 or respective equivalents to control, 2, 4, and 6 t ha-1), on chemical composition of soil leachate and its effects on eucalypt growth and yield. Highest soil leachate pH, SO4, and Na concentrations occurred in the 4 and 6 t ha-1 treatments. Soil leachate nitrate concentrations decreased ...

  14. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, Paul H.; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-Corg saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil Corg content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e., Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91 % of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78 % of

  15. Innovative uses of organo-philic clays for remediation of soils, sediments and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCBs and similar low-solubility organic compounds continue to offer significant challenges in terrestrial and sediment remediation applications. While selective media such as granular activated carbon (GAC) have proven to be successful at absorbing soluble organics, these media may have reduced performance due to blinding in the presence of high molecular weight organic matter. An alternative technology addresses this problem with a clay-based adsorption media, which effectively and efficiently stabilizes low-solubility organic matter. OrganoclayTM reactive media utilizes granular sodium bentonite, which has been chemically modified to attract organic matter without absorbing water. The unique platelet structure of bentonite clays provides tremendous surface area and the capacity of the media to absorb over 60 percent of its own weight in organic matter. Because of these properties, organo-clays allow for several cost-effective in-situ remediation techniques, such as: - Flow-through filtration for removal of organic matter from aqueous solutions: Organoclay can be utilized as a fixed-bed media in a column operation. This specialty media offers a high efficient alternative to Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) when applied as a flow through media to remove oil, PCB and other low soluble organic contaminates from water. - Placement in a Reactive Core MatTM: Organoclay may be encapsulated into carrier textiles which are adhered together to create a thin reactive layer with high strength and even distribution of the reactive media. This type of delivery mechanism can be successfully applied in a sub aqueous or terrestrial environment for sediment capping applications - Permeable reactive barriers: Organoclay can deliver high sorption capacity, high efficiency, and excellent hydraulic conductivity as a passive reactive media in these applications. (authors)

  16. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombul, M.; Akyürek, Z.; Ünal Sorman, A.

    Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h) and hydraulic conductivity K(q) or K(h), may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs) are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak) in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3) and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5) have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future.

  17. Removal of Pah from clay soil contaminated with diesel oil by bioremediation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesel oil is one of the most common soil organic pollutants, as a consequence of spilling of storage tank spills and accidental leaks. In Pernambuco State, Northeast part of Brazil, there are several evidences of soil contamination by petroleum derivates due to gas station leaking. (Author)

  18. CLAY MINERALS AND THE ACCUMULATION OF SOIL ORGANIC MATTER IN NORTHWESTERN U.S. FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globally soils are an important terrestrial reservoir of carbon, storing approximately 3 times the carbon held in vegetation and 2 times the amount contained in the atmosphere. With the potential for global climate change it is imperative that world soils continue to be a sink f...

  19. Assessment of the regional variation in weathering rates of loess and clay soils in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.

    2001-01-01

    To calculate critical acid loads or to predict element concentrations in the soil solution, information on weathering rates is essential. Several studies have taken place in the Netherlands to obtain weathering rates for non-calcareous sandy soils. Recently information on weathering rates in less vu

  20. Removal of Pah from clay soil contaminated with diesel oil by bioremediation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changas-spinelli, A. C. O.; Kato, M. T.; Lima, E. S.; Gavazza, S.

    2009-07-01

    Diesel oil is one of the most common soil organic pollutants, as a consequence of spilling of storage tank spills and accidental leaks. In Pernambuco State, Northeast part of Brazil, there are several evidences of soil contamination by petroleum derivates due to gas station leaking. (Author)

  1. The effect of kauri (Agathis australis) on grain size distribution and clay mineralogy of andesitic soils in the Waitakere Ranges, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongkind, A.G.; Buurman, P.

    2006-01-01

    Kauri (Agathis australis) is generally associated with intense podzolisation, but little research has been carried out to substantiate this. We studied soil profiles, grain size distribution patterns and clay mineralogy under kauri and broadleaf/tree fern vegetation in the Waitakere Ranges, North Is

  2. Effect of soil texture on phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, C. E.; Matzen, S. L.; Olson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil arsenic (As) contamination is a global problem, resulting in part from anthropogenic activities, including the use of arsenical pesticides and treated wood, mining, and irrigated agriculture. Phytoextraction using the hyperaccumulating fern Pteris vittata is a promising new technology to remediate soils with shallow arsenic contamination with minimal site disturbance. However, many challenges still lie ahead for a global application of phytoremediation. For example, remediation times using P. vittata are on the order of decades. In addition, most research on As phytoextraction with P. vittata has examined As removal from sandy soils, where As is more available, with little research focusing on As removal from clayey soils, where As is less available. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of soil texture and soil fertilization on As extraction by P. vittata, to optimize remediation efficiency and decrease remediation time under complex field conditions. A field study was established 2.5 years ago in an abandoned railroad grade contaminated with As (average 85.5 mg kg-1) with texture varying from sandy loam to silty clay loam. Organic N, inorganic N, organic P, inorganic P, and compost were applied to separate sub-plots; control ferns were grown in untreated soil. In a parallel greenhouse experiment, ferns were grown in sandy loam soil extracted from the field (180 mg As kg-1), with similar treatments as those used at the field site, plus a high phosphate treatment and treatments with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In the field study, fern mortality was 24% higher in clayey soil than in sandy soil due to waterlogging, while As was primarily associated with sandy soil. Results from the sandy loam soil indicate that soil treatments did not significantly increase As phytoextraction, which was lower in phosphate-treated ferns than in control ferns, both in the field and greenhouse study. Under greenhouse conditions, ferns treated with organic N were

  3. New Technique Assessment of Plastic Limit of Soft Clay Particularly Peat Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Adon, Rashidah; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Ishikura, Ryohei; Wijeyesekera, Devapriya

    2013-01-01

    Plastic Limit (PL) is considered as the moisture content at which soil becomes too dry to remain plastic. Both the British Standards Institute (BS 1377 (1990)) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM D4318 (2001)) are consistent with their proposition of determining PL as the moisture content when the soil crumbles upon rolling it to thread of 3 mm diameter. However for challenging soils such as peat which is naturally organic substance derived from the remains of plants, the “ro...

  4. Root-Zone Redox Dynamics - In Search for the Cause of Damage to Treated-Wastewater Irrigated Orchards in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, David; Shenker, Moshe; Schwartz, Amnon; Assouline, Shmuel; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Treated wastewater (TW) has become a common source of water for agriculture. However recent findings raise concern regarding its use: a marked decrease (up to 40%) in yield appeared in orchards irrigated with TW compared with fresh water (FW) irrigated orchards. These detrimental effects appeared predominantly in orchards cultivated in clay soils. The association of the damage with clay soils rather than sandy soils led us to hypothesize that the damage is linked to soil aeration problems. We suspected that in clay soils, high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and high levels of organic material, both typical of TW, may jointly lead to an extreme decrease in soil oxygen levels, so as to shift soil reduction-oxidation (redox) state down to levels that are known to damage plants. Two-year continuous measurement of redox potential, pH, water tension, and oxygen were conducted in the root-zone (20-35 cm depth) of avocado trees planted in clay soil and irrigated with either TW or FW. Soil solution composition was sampled periodically in-situ and mineral composition was sampled in tree leaves and woody organs biannually. In dry periods the pe+pH values indicated oxic conditions (pe+pH>14), and the fluctuations in redox values were small in both TW and FW plots. Decreases in soil water tension following irrigation or rain were followed by drops in soil oxygen and pe+pH values. TW irrigated plots had significantly lower minimum pe+pH values compared with FW-irrigated plots, the most significant differences occurred during the irrigation season rather than the rain season. A linear correlation appeared between irrigation volume and reduction severity in TW-irrigated plots, but not in the FW plots, indicating a direct link to the irrigation regime in TW-irrigated plots. The minimum pe+pH values measured in the TW plots are indicative of suboxic conditions (9soil solution and in

  5. Nutrient leaching potential following application of papermill lime-sludge to an acidic clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Vettorazzo

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions with soil pots during 210 days, to evaluate the effect of calcitic papermill lime-sludge application (at the rates 0, 773, 1.547, and 2.320 mg kg-1 or respective equivalents to control, 2, 4, and 6 t ha-1, on chemical composition of soil leachate and its effects on eucalypt growth and yield. Highest soil leachate pH, SO4, and Na concentrations occurred in the 4 and 6 t ha-1 treatments. Soil leachate nitrate concentrations decreased with increasing lime-sludge rate. Soil leachate phosphate remained low (below the detection limit in all treatments until 120 days, while the concentration increased in the lime-sludge treatments at 210 days (last sampling in about 600 mg L-1. Lime-sludge decreased leachate Mg concentration, but had no significant effect among rates. Soil leachate Ca, K, B, Cu, Fe, and Zn did not change significantly for any lime-sludge application rates. The maximum NO3, Ca, Mg, K, and Na concentrations in the soil leachate occurred at 60 days after lime-sludge application (leaching equivalent to 1 pore volume, but for pH and SO4, the maximum occurred at 210 days (leaching equivalent to 4 pore volumes. Lime-sludge application decreased the concentration of exchangeable Al in the soil. Plant diameter growth and dry matter yield were increased with increasing lime-sludge rate. Beneficial effects on mineral nutrition (P, K, Ca, B, and Zn of eucalypts were also obtained by the application of 4 and 6 t ha-1 of lime-sludge.

  6. Butachlor degradation in tropical soils: effect of application rate, biotic-abiotic interactions and soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, R; Das, P; Chakrabarti, K; Chakraborty, A; Chowdhury, A

    2006-01-01

    The degradative characteristics of butachlor (N-Butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyla- cetanilide) were studied under controlled laboratory conditions in clay loam alluvial (AL) soil (Typic udifluvent) and coastal saline (CS) soil (Typic endoaquept) from rice cultivated fields. The application rates included field rate (FR), 2-times FR (2FR) and 10-times FR (10FR). The incubation study was carried out at 30 degrees C with and without decomposed cow manure (DCM) at 60% of maximum water holding capacity (WHC) and waterlogged soil condition. The half-life values depended on the soil types and initial concentrations of butachlor. Butachlor degraded faster in AL soil and in soil amended with DCM under waterlogged condition. Microbial degradation is the major avenue of butachlor degradation from soils.

  7. A mechanistic study of arsenate removal from artificially contaminated clay soils by electrokinetic remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tasuma; Moribe, Mai; Okabe, Yohhei; Niinae, Masakazu

    2013-06-15

    Batch desorption experiments and bench-scale electrokinetic experiments were performed to elucidate the electrokinetic remediation mechanisms of arsenate from artificially contaminated kaolinite. The electrokinetic experiments in which a constant voltage was applied demonstrated that high soil pH favored arsenate remediation with respect to both the remediation time and electricity consumption. It was also demonstrated that applying a pulse voltage (1 h ON, 1 h OFF) significantly improved the electricity consumption efficiency when the soil pH was maintained at the initial value during the experiments; this trend was not observed when the soil pH was gradually increased from the cathode side. These electrokinetic experimental results, with the support of arsenate desorption data obtained from batch experiments, indicate that the remediation rate-limiting step varied with soil pH. When the soil pH was maintained at the initial value of 7.2 during the experiments, arsenate desorption was the remediation rate-limiting step rather than the migration of dissolved arsenate toward the anode. Conversely, when the cathode pH was not controlled and the soil pH was correspondingly increased gradually from the cathode side, the migration of hydroxyl and desorbed arsenate ions toward the anode played a more important role in the control of the overall remediation efficiency. PMID:23643955

  8. Clay:organic-carbon and organic carbon as determinants of the soil physical properties: reassessment of the Complexed Organic Carbon concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Adrien; Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is well known to largely determine the soil physical properties and fertility. Total porosity, structural porosity, aeration, structural stability among others are reported to increase linearly with increasing SOC in most studies. Is there an optimal SOC content as target in soil management, or is there no limit in physical fertility improvement with SOC? Dexter et al. (2008) investigated the relation between clay:SOC ratio and the physical properties of soils from different databases. They observed that the R2 of the relation between SOC and the physical properties were maximized when considering the SOC fraction limited to a clay:SOC ratio of 10. They concluded that this fraction of the SOC was complexed, and that the additional SOC was not influencing the physical properties as strongly as the complexed one. In this study, we reassessed this approach, on a database of 180 undisturbed soil samples collected from cambiluvisols of the Swiss Plateau, on an area of 2400 km2, and from different soil uses. The physical properties were obtained with Shrinkage Analysis, which involved the parameters used in Dexter et al., 2008. We used the same method, but detected biases in the statistical approach, which was, therefore, adapted. We showed that the relation between the bulk density and SOC was changing with the score of visual evaluation of the structure (VESS) (Ball et al., 2007). Therefore, we also worked only on the "good" structures according to VESS. All shrinkage parameters were linearly correlated to SOC regardless of the clay:SOC ratio, with R2 ranging from 0.45 to 0.8. Contrarily to Dexter et al. (2008), we did not observed an optimum in the R2 of the relation when considering a SOC fraction based on the clay:SOC ratio. R2 was increasing until a Clay:SOC of about 7, where it reached, and kept, its maximum value. The land use factor was not significant. The major difference with the former study is that we worked on the same soil group

  9. Biochar Effects on Soil Aggregate Properties Under No-Till Maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Naveed, Muhammad; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2014-01-01

    -over-end shaking, a Yoder-type wet-sieving method, and an unconfined compression test in soil samples collected 7 and 19 months after final biochar application. The highest rates of biochar and swine manure application resulted in the highest aggregate stability and lowest clay dispersibility. Applying both......Soil aggregates are useful indicators of soil structure and stability, and the impact on physical and mechanical aggregate properties is critical for the sustainable use of organic amendments in agricultural soil. In this work, we evaluated the short-term soil quality effects of applying biochar (0......–10 kg m−2), in combination with swine manure (2.1 and 4.2 kg m−2), to a no-till maize (Zea mays L.) cropping system on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Topsoil (0–20 cm) aggregates were analyzed for clay dispersibility, aggregate stability, tensile strength (TS), and specific rupture energy (SRE) using end...

  10. Impact of Extreme Events and Soil Hydraulic Conductivity on the Evolution of a Mesa-top Waste Repository Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, K. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Lane, L. J.; Newman, B. D.; Schofield, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Siberia model was used to optimize the design of a mesa-top waste repository cover at Los Alamos National Laboratory on the Pajarito Plateau in Northern New Mexico, USA. The cover was designed to meet criteria that the depth to waste from the cover surface would be greater than 1 meter after 1000 years of erosion. The model was run using two steady-state landscape forming events (2 and 5 year return periods) derived from a 20 year data set at the Santa Rita Experimental Watershed in Arizona, and hydraulic properties of two soils, loam and sandy loam. Although we were able to show that the final design cover met the performance criteria for both high and moderate erosion scenarios, concerns remained about the impact of extreme events. In addition, Hydrus simulations, based on saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) measurements from cores of cover material comprised of crushed tuff and a bentonite admixture, suggested that surface runoff on the cover might be orders of magnitude higher than the landscape forming runoff events used for the Siberia simulations. The Siberia runoff events were based on Ksat values for loam and sandy loam soils with identical texture (% sand , silt and clay) to the engineered cover soil, but these values assume soil structure that may or may not develop in the engineered cover. This work summarizes the impacts of both 1) the timing and size of extreme events and 2) the impact of soil structure and Ksat, on long-term repository cover evolution.

  11. Effects of soil moisture content and tractor wheeling intensity on traffic-induced soil compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman AHMADI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil compaction causes deleterious effects on physical and mechanical proprieties of agricultural soils. In order to investigate the effect of soil moisture content and tractor wheeling intensity on traffic-induced soil compaction, this study was carried out on a field with clay loam soil. Soil dry bulk density and hydraulic conductivity as well as emergence percentage of corn seedlings and dry mass of the sampled mature plants were considered the dependent variables of the experiment. Independent variables consisted of soil moisture content with five levels (12, 15, 17, 19, and 21%, traffic intensity with three levels (four, two, and zero passes of tractor wheel (tractor model: John Deere 3350 from the entire area of the plot, and soil sampling depth with three levels (0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm. According to the results of this study, gradual increase in soil water content generally resulted in an increase in soil bulk density; moreover, increasing the tractor wheeling intensity from 0 to 4 passes increased bulk density by 13%. Furthermore, the driest soil water content had the highest and the wettest soil water content had the lowest emergence percentage of corn seedlings among the treatments; moreover, traffic intensity treatment inversely affected the emergence percentage of corn seedlings and the dry mass of mature plants. To sum up, these results indicate that, for improving water permeability and reducing dry bulk density of the examined clay loam soil, as well as better emergence of corn seedlings and ultimately increasing crop yield, it is recommended to avoid wheeling when soil moisture content is high, reduce the number of machinery wheel passes from the farm as low as possible, and restrict the wheel passes to fixed strips along the field, whenever possible.

  12. 土柱尺寸对扰动黏壤土饱和导水率的影响%Effects of column size on soil saturated hydraulic conductivity of clay loam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹瑞雪; 邵明安

    2014-01-01

    土壤饱和导水率Ks是最基本的水力参数之一,而已知实验室内其值的确定受土柱尺寸的影响.以关中的塿土为研究对象,在室内,采用定水头法,研究5~30 cm内6个不同土柱尺寸对扰动黏壤土Ka测定的影响.结果表明:随着时间的延伸,Ks逐渐减小,其值最初降幅较大,其后趋于稳定,且在5 ~ 30 cm土柱直径范围内,Ks随着土柱直径的变大,扰动黏壤土的Ks递增,二者线性相关,y=0.000 4x+0.003 7(R2=0.965 1).研究结果可为测定Ks合理测定时间段及合理尺寸的选择提供参考.

  13. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus;

    2011-01-01

    dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were...... with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water...... and SA. It is therefore recommended to apply the empirical CSRN model for predicting the dry part of the water retention curve (−10 to −800 MPa) from measured soil texture or surface area. Further research should aim to modify the more physically based TO model to obtain better descriptions of the SWRC...

  14. Preferential flow of bromide, bentazon, and imidacloprid in a Dutch clay soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.; Smelt, J.H.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Leaching to ground water and tile drains are important parts of the environmental assessment of pesticides. The aims of the present study were to (i) assess the significance of preferential flow for pesticide leaching under realistic worst-case conditions for Dutch agriculture (soil profile with thi

  15. The role of dissolved organic matter in adsorbing heavy metals in clay-rich soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Refaey; B. Jansen; A.H. El-Shater; A.A. El-Haddad; K. Kalbitz

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of tested heavy metals on Egyptian soils was large in all situations tested and follows the order: Cu >> Ni ≈ Zn. Copper was influenced by the timing of dissolved organic matter addition more than Ni and Zn. Specific binding mechanisms (inner-sphere complexes) dominated the affinity of Cu

  16. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolan, N.S., E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Kunhikrishnan, A. [Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro-Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Naidu, R. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts > biosolids > biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2–2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha{sup −1} yr{sup −1} Mg{sup −1} biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C

  17. Improvement of Soil Moisture Retrieval from Hyperspectral VNIR-SWIR Data Using Clay Content Information: From Laboratory to Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Oltra-Carrió

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the constraints and performance of SMC retrieval methodologies in the VNIR (Visible-Near InfraRed and SWIR (ShortWave InfraRed regions (from 0.4 to 2.5 µm when passing from controlled laboratory conditions to field conditions. Five different approaches of signal processing found in literature were considered. Four local criteria are spectral indices (WISOIL, NSMI, NINSOL and NINSON. These indices are the ratios between the spectral reflectances acquired at two specific wavelengths to characterize moisture content in soil. The last criterion is based in the convex hull concept and it is a global method, which is based on the analysis of the full spectral signature of the soil. The database was composed of 464 and 9 spectra, respectively, measured over bare soils in laboratory and in-situ. For each measurement, SMC and texture were well-known and the database was divided in two parts dedicated to calibration and validation steps. The calibration part was used to define the empirical relation between SMC and SMC retrieval approaches, with coefficients of determination (R2 between 0.72 and 0.92. A clay content (CC dependence was detected for the NINSOL and NINSON indices. Consequently, two new criteria were proposed taking into account the CC contribution (NINSOLCC and NINSONCC. The well-marked regression between SMC and global/local indices, and the interest of using the CC, were confirmed during the validation step using laboratory data (R² superior to 0.76 and Root mean square errors inferior to 8.3% m3∙m−3 in all cases and using in-situ data, where WISOIL, NINSOLCC and NINSONCC criteria stand out among the NSMI and CH.

  18. Dynamic model for the transfer of CS-137 through the soil-grass-lamb foodchain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic radioecological model for the transfer of radiocaesium through the soil-grass-lamb foodchain was constructed on the basis of field data collected in 1990–1993 from the Nordic countries: Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The model assumes an initial soil...... contamination of one kilobecquerel of 137Cs per square metre and simulates the transfer to grass through root uptake in addition to direct contamination from resuspended activity. The model covers two different soil types: clay-loam and organic, with significantly different transfers of radiocaesium to grass...

  19. Effect of organic matter on the parameters of the selective sorption of cobalt and zinc by soils and their clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. S.; Kochetkov, I. V.; Kruglov, S. V.; Aleksakhin, R. M.

    2011-06-01

    The sorption and ion-exchange behavior of Co(II) and Zn in the soil-equilibrium solution system was studied for different types and varieties of native soils and their clay fractions before and after mild oxidation with H2O2 to remove the organic carbon. The parameters of the ion-exchange adsorption and the selectivity coefficients of the (Co(II), Zn)/Ca ion exchange were determined using different models for describing the relationship between the dissolved and sorbed forms of the metals. These were the empirical Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and the model of the ion-exchange adsorption based on the acting mass law. It was found that the soil organic matter played an important role in the selectivity of the ion-exchange adsorption of Co(II) and Zn by the soils and their clay fractions. This was confirmed by an abrupt decrease (to almost 1) of the selectivity coefficients of the Co2+/Ca2+ and Zn2+/Ca2+ exchange after the treatment of the clay fraction with hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Transport, sorption and degradation of atrazine in two clay soils from Mexico : Andosol and Vertisol

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, B.; Duwig, Céline; Hidalgo, C; Muller, K.; de Mora, L.; Raymundo, E.; Etchevers, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Although atrazine has been banned in the European Union, it is still one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. It is has been detected in surface and groundwater and has been shown to be associated with major human health problems. Atrazine fate in the environment, e.g. sorption, leaching and degradation depends, inter alia, on soil characteristics. Independent static and dynamic experiments were conducted to identify and uncouple the processes governing the fate of atrazine. Two a...

  1. Natural clay based soil as an effective barrier against radionuclide migration in a uranium tailings structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olympic Dam Operations mines and processes copper, uranium, silver and gold from a vast underground ore body located in the far north of South Australia. The tailings from the milling operation are pumped at the current rate of 2.3 million tonnes annually into an above ground Tailings Retention System (TRS) covering an area of 180 hectares. Initial studies conducted at a small scale pilot plant TRS in 1985 indicated that contaminants in the acid based tailings were reduced to background levels within a short distance after the tailings/soil interface. This study was commenced to confirm the effectiveness of the natural soils at the base of the current TRS in preventing downward migration of radionuclides. Core samples have been taken at a number of locations, and radionuclide concentrations plotted against depth. Results from the core samples taken to date have confirmed that downward radionuclide movement is effectively stopped within the first 40 centimeters after the tailings/soil interface. 5 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  2. Soil and plant response to used potassium silicate drilling fluid application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Linjun; Anne Naeth, M

    2015-10-01

    Use of drilling waste generated from the oil and gas industry for land reclamation has potential to be a practical and economical means to improve soil fertility and to decrease landfills. A four month greenhouse experiment with common barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) on three different textured soils was conducted to determine soil and plant response to incorporated or sprayed potassium silicate drilling fluid (PSDF). Two PSDF types (used once, used twice) were applied at six rates (10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 120m(3)ha(-1)) as twelve PSDF amendments plus a control (non PSDF). Effects of PSDF amendment on plant properties were significant, and varied through physiological growth stages. Barley emergence and below ground biomass were greater with used once than used twice PSDF at the same application rate in clay loam soil. Used twice PSDF at highest rates significantly increased barley above ground biomass relative to the control in loam and sand soil. All PSDF treatments significantly increased available potassium relative to the control in all three soils. Soil electrical conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio increased with PSDF addition, but not to levels detrimental to barley. Soil quality rated fair to poor with PSDF amendments in clay loam, and reduced plant performance at the highest rate, suggesting a threshold beyond which conditions are compromised with PSDF utilization. PSDF application method did not significantly affect plant and soil responses. This initial greenhouse research demonstrates that PSDF has potential as a soil amendment for reclamation, with consideration of soil properties and plant species tolerances to determine PSDF types and rates to be used. PMID:26099463

  3. Use of a flashiness index to predict phosphorus losses from subsurface drains on a Swedish farm with clay soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro; Stenberg, Maria; Wesström, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    Risk assessment for elevated leaching losses of phosphorus (P) from agricultural land is commonly based on indices, since such losses are highly episodic and difficult to predict. Here a flashiness index (FI) representing changes in daily water flow from drainage systems was estimated from measured discharge (agrohydrological years 2004-2013) after reconstruction of subsurface drainage systems in 16 fields on a former swine farm. The fields were analysed for ammonium lactate-extractable soil P (P-AL), clay, carbon and other soil parameters in 2004. Transport of total P (TP), dissolved reactive P (DRP) and unreactive P (UP) was estimated from concentrations in composite water samples taken flow-proportionally up to 20 times per year. On average, 2.20 kg TP ha-1 yr-1 was leached, with 27% in DRP form, from the entire farm. FI was significantly negatively correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient p < 0.05) to mean yearly discharge from each field. Stepwise regression demonstrated that FI index was the most important single explanatory parameter for flow-proportional yearly mean concentration of unreactive P losses (UP) from each field, with a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.67. The corresponding concentration of dissolved reactive P (DRP) was significantly positively correlated (p = 0.015) to soil P-AL and FI. A regression model for TP leaching losses based on FI, P-AL and yearly discharge (Q) from 11 of the fields over nine years (r2 = 0.67, p = 0.002) was validated against TP leaching from the remaining five fields (32% of farm area). Root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.43, which represented 20% of measured leaching (mean 2.14 kg TP ha-1 yr-1). For individual years, RMSE for different fields was 37-80% of measured TP leaching (0.8-3.7 kg TP ha-1 yr-1). The FI index could be used together with soil P test to predict P leaching from individual fields of a drained farm.

  4. Effects of Organic Anions on Phosphate Adsorption and Desorption from Variable—Charge Clay Minerals and Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEZHEN-LI; YUANKE-NENG; 等

    1992-01-01

    Effects of citrate and tartrate on phosphate adsorption and desorption from kaolinite,goethite,amorphous Al-oxide and Ultisol were studied.P adsorption was significantly decreased as the concentration of the organic anions increased from 10-5 to 10-1 M.At 0.1 M and pH 7.0,tartrate decreased P adsorption by 27.6%-50.6% and citrate by 37.9-80.4%,depending on the kinds of adsorbent.Little Al and/or Fe were detected in the equilibrium solutions,even at the highest concentration of the organic anions.Effects of the organic anions on phosphate adsorption follow essentially the competitive adsorption mechanism.The selectivity coefficients for competitive adsorption can be used to compare the effectiveness of different organic anions in reducing P adsorption under given gonditions. Phosphate desorption was increased by 3 to 100 times in the presence of 0.001 M citrate or tartrate compared to that in 0.02 M KCl solution alone.However,for all the soil and clay minerals studied the amount of P desorbed by citrate or tartrate was generally lower than or close to that of isotopically exchangeable P.The effect of organic anions on phosphate desorption arises primarily from ligand exchange.

  5. In-situ studies on the performance of landfill caps (compacted soil liners, geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners, capillary barriers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, S. [IGB - Ingenieurbuero fuer Grundbau, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Since 1986 different types of landfill covers have been studied in-situ on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg, Germany. Water balance data are available for eight years. The performance of different carriers has been measured by collecting the leakage on areas ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to 500 m{sup 2}. Composite liners with geomembranes performed best, showing no leakage. An extended capillary barrier also performed well. The performance of compacted soil liners, however, decreased severely within five years due to desiccation, shrinkage and plant root penetration (liner leakage now ranging from 150 mm/a to 200 mm/a). About 50 % of the water that reaches the surface of the liner is leaking through it. The maximum leakage rates have increased from 2 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} to 4 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Two types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) have been tested for two years now with disappointing results. The GCL desiccated during the first dry summer of the study. High percolation rates through the GCL were measured during the following winter (45 mm resp. 63 mm in four months). Wetting of the GCL did not significantly reduce the percolation rates.

  6. Introducing Fractal Dimension to Estimation of Soil Sensitivity to Preferential Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Food dye Brilliant Blue was introduced as the tracer in a dye-tracing experiment to obtain dye profile patterns of sandy loam soil, aeolian sandy soil, percolating paddy soil and permeable paddy soil. The dyed soil profiles were then photographed and the photos were scanned into a computer. Edited with certain software, only the dyed areas were left on the profile photos, which indicted the preferential flow paths for water and solute transport. Fractal dimensions of the dye patterns were calculated according to Arnold's function. Soil particle size distribution was analyzed by pipette method. The regression analysis showed that there was significant relationship between soil clay content and fractal dimension D of the dye pattern of soil profile. Based on the experiment results, the possibility of introducing fractal dimension to estimation of soil sensitivity to preferential flow is discussed.

  7. Sedimentos arcillosos en un suelo del valle inferior del río Colorado (Argentina Clay sediments in a soil of the lower Colorado river valley (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Peinemann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la presencia de capas sedimentarias ricas en minerales de arcilla en un subsuelo del valle inferior del río Colorado por su importancia para el régimen hídrico de suelos bajo riego. Difractogramas de rayos X efectuados sobre la fracción arcilla fina de estos sedimentos revelaron que está compuesta por smectitas con muy buena cristalización. La caracterización fisicoquímica del perfil de suelo mostró que el fuerte incremento de minerales de arcilla en el subsuelo estuvo vinculado con un aumento de pH y PSI y en consecuencia una marcada disminución en la conductividad hidráulica, motivo por el cual la eventual presencia de estas capas sedimentarias debe ser muy tenida en cuenta en la programación de las prácticas de riego para evitar el posible deterioro de los suelos.The presence of sedimentary clay layers in subsoils of the lower Colorado river valley are described due to their impact on the water balance of soils under irrigation. X-ray difractograms of the fine clay fraction of these sediments show that they are composed of smectites with a very good crystallization. The physicochemical characterization of the soil profile indicates that the abrupt increase of clay minerals was associated with high pH and ESP values as well as a sharp decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, the presence of sedimentary clay layers in soils has to be considered when planning irrigation practices to avoid soil degradation.

  8. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil

  9. Influence of elevation factor on soil profile texture configuration: a case study of the alluvial plain of Fengqiu County%冲积平原区高程因子对土壤剖面质地构型的影响——以封丘县为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    檀满枝; 密术晓; 李开丽; 陈杰

    2011-01-01

    Profile texture configuration of the soil in alluvial plains is a crucial factor determining soil water and nutrient conserving and supplying capacity and water and salt movement in the soil.Among the six major soil-forming factors in this regional soil, topography stands out to be the most prominent one.Analysis of the influence of topography on soil profile texture configuration is of important theoretical and practical significance to guiding agricultural production.Using the fuzzy c-means algorithm model nine soil profiles different in texture configuration was defined.Based on the data of thicknesses of the characteristic texture layers of nine soil profiles including sandy, loamy and clayey, surface layers, (0 -(30±10)cm),sandy, loamy and clayey center layers ( ( 30 ± 10 ) cm - ( 60 ± 10) cm) and sandy, loamy and clayey bottom layers ( ( 60 ± 10 )cm-(90±10) cm), nine types of soil profile texture configuration were identified, i.e.loam-clay-loam, loam-loam-clay,loam-clay-clay, clay-clay-clay, sand-sand-clay, sand-sand-sand, sand-loam-loam, loam-loam-sand and loam-loam-loam,among which loam-loam-loam and sand-sand-sand were the dominant types.As a result of frequent flooding by the Yellow River in history, oomplex process of sediment deposition, and in addition fanning practices and soil amelioration measures,like irrigation, deep plowing and field leveling, soil profile texture configuration varied sharply in distribution at a small spatial scale.Comparison analysis of the influence of landform on soil texture profile configuration in the whole study area and the typical area relatively concentrated with various types of soil profile texture configuration, shows that a positive correlation always exists between membership value of the soil profile texture configuration of the sand-sand-sand type and elevation,suggesting that the law prevails that soils in lands relatively high in elevation tend to be sandy, while the influence of landform on soil profile

  10. Water and nutrient productivity in melon crop by fertigation under subsurface drip irrigation and mulching in contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Câmara Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cropping intensification and technical, economic and environmental issues require efficient application of production factors to maintain the soil productive capacity and produce good quality fruits and vegetables. The production factors, water and NPK nutrients, are the most frequent limiting factors to higher melon yields. The objective of the present study was to identify the influence of subsurface drip irrigation and mulching in a protected environment on the water and NPK nutrients productivity in melon cropped in two soil types: sandy loam and clay. The melon crop cultivated under environmental conditions with underground drip irrigation at 0.20m depth, with mulching on sandy loam soil increased water and N, P2O5 and K use efficiency.

  11. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  12. Adsorption-desorption and leaching behavior of kresoxim-methyl in different soils of India: kinetics and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabale, Rupali P; Shabeer T P, Ahammed; Dasgupta, Soma; Utture, Sagar C; Banerjee, Kaushik; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Adsule, Pandurang G; Deshmukh, Madhukar B

    2015-07-01

    The sorption and leaching behavior of kresoxim-methyl was explored in four different soils, viz., clay, sandy loam, loamy sand, and sandy loam (saline), representing vegetables and fruits growing regions of India. Adsorption of kresoxim-methyl in all the soils reached equilibrium within 48 h. The rate constants for adsorption and desorption at two different temperatures were obtained from the Lindstrom model, which simultaneously evaluated adsorption and desorption kinetics. The data for rate constants, activation energies, enthalpy of activation, entropy of activation, and free energy indicated physical adsorption of kresoxim-methyl on soil. The relative adsorptivity of the test soils could be attributed to different organic matter and clay contents of the soils. A good fit to the linear and Freundlich isotherms was observed for both adsorption as well as desorption. The groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) for different soils varied between 0 and 2.26. The GUS and leaching study indicated moderately low leaching potential of kresoxim-methyl. The adsorption on four soil types largely depended on the soil physicochemical properties such as organic carbon content, cation-exchange capacity, and texture of the soil. PMID:26082423

  13. Clay minerals and sedimentary basin history

    OpenAIRE

    Merriman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Clay minerals in the mud and soil that coat the Earth's surface are part of a clay cycle that breaks down and creates rock in the crust. Clays generated by surface weathering and shallow diagenetic processes are transformed into mature clay mineral assemblages in the mudrocks found in sedimentary basins. During metamorphism, the release of alkali elements and boron from clay minerals generates magmas that are subsequently weathered and recycled, representing the magma-to-mud pathway of the cl...

  14. Potential for Recycling Nutrients from Biosolids Amended with Clay and Lime in Coarse-Textured Water Repellence, Acidic Soils of Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjutha Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biosolids in soils is an efficient method of recycling nutrients from biosolids and it is considered even safer when it is modified after mixing and diluting with other suitable soil organic amendments. A variety of soil organic amendments, such as green manures and composts, are used for modifying and co-composting with biosolids. However, these may not be considered as appropriate biosolids disposal and remedial measures for soils with unique problems such as low soil pH, water repellence nature, and poor water and nutrient retention capacities due to soil textural issues. Historically, soil amendments such as lime, clay, and recently biochar are being applied for such problematic soils at Western Australia and these researches focused mostly on improvement in soil physical and chemical properties. However, studies with potential for applying modified biosolids with these amendments are not complete yet. This review focused on identifying such gaps in these studies from over 170 peer-reviewed key research and review articles published over decades to latest in these areas.

  15. Metal oxides, clay minerals and charcoal determine the composition of microbial communities in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Doreen; Ding, Guo-Chun; Pronk, Geertje Johanna; Heister, Katja; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Smalla, Kornelia

    2013-10-01

    Microbial communities in soil reside in a highly heterogeneous habitat where diverse mineral surfaces, complex organic matter and microorganisms interact with each other. This study aimed to elucidate the long-term effect of the soil mineral composition and charcoal on the microbial community composition established in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene. One year after adding sterile manure to different artificial soils and inoculating microorganisms from a Cambisol, the matured soils were spiked with phenanthrene or not and incubated for another 70 days. 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer fragments amplified from total community DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Metal oxides and clay minerals and to a lesser extent charcoal influenced the microbial community composition. Changes in the bacterial community composition in response to phenanthrene differed depending on the mineral composition and presence of charcoal, while no shifts in the fungal community composition were observed. The abundance of ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes was increased in phenanthrene-spiked soils except for charcoal-containing soils. Here we show that the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil is an ongoing process and that different properties present in artificial soils influenced the bacterial response to the phenanthrene spike.

  16. Point of zero salt effect: Relationships with clay mineralogy of representative soils of the S(a)o Paulo State, Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. E. ALVES; A. LAVORENTI

    2005-01-01

    The point of zero salt effect (PZSE) is the soil pH value at which the magnitude of the variable surface charges is not changed due to variations in the ionic concentration of the soil solution. This property influences not only electrochemical phenomena occurring at the solid-solution interface but also the flocculation degree of the soil particles. In this study we investigated the relationships between the clay mineralogy and the PZSE values of representative soils of the Sao Paulo State, Brazil. The results confirmed the usefulness of the difference between the soil pH values measured in 1 mol L-1 KCl (pHKC1) and in water (pHH2O) (2 pHKC1 - pHH2O) for estimating the PZSE of tropical soils, except for the ones rich in exchangeable Al; furthermore, the △pH index (pHKCI - pHH2O) was highly correlated with the difference between the PZSE and pHH2O values, reiterating the △pH utility for estimating both the signal and the magnitude of the net surface charge of tropical soils. Finally, correlation and multiple regression analyses showed that the PZSE value of weathered non-allophanic tropical soils tends to increase and to equal the soil pH due to the weathering-induced kaolinite destabilization and concomitant Fe- and Al-oxide accumulation.

  17. Prediction of Soil Moisture Content and Soil Salt Concentration from Hyperspectral Laboratory and Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the simultaneous retrieval of surface soil moisture and salt concentrations using hyperspectral reflectance data in an arid environment. We conducted laboratory and outdoor field experiments in which we examined three key soil variables: soil moisture, salt and texture (silty loam, clay and silty clay. The soil moisture content models for multiple textures (M_SMC models were based on selected hyperspectral reflectance data located around 1460, 1900 and 2010 nm and resulted in R2 values higher than 0.933. Meanwhile, the soil salt concentrations were also accurately (R2 > 0.748 modeled (M_SSC models based on wavebands located at 540, 1740, 2010 and 2350 nm. When the different texture samples were mixed (SL + C + SC models, soil moisture was still accurately retrieved (R2 = 0.937 but the soil salt not as well (R2 = 0.47. After stratifying the samples by retrieved soil moisture levels, the R2 of calibrated M_SSCSMC models for soil salt concentrations improved to 0.951. This two-step method also showed applicability for analyzing soil-salt samples in the field. The M_SSCSMC models resulted in R2 values equal to 0.912 when moisture is lower than 0.15, and R2 values equal to 0.481 when soil moisture is between 0.15 and 0.2.

  18. Boron and Zinc Transport Through Intact Columns of Calcareous Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. MAHMOOD-UL-HASSAN; M. S. AKHTAR; G. NABI

    2008-01-01

    Leaching of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) can be significant in some pedomorphic conditions, which can cause contamination of shallow groundwater and economic losses. Boron and Zn adsorption and transport was studied using 8.4 cm diameter ×28 cm long intact columns from two calcareous soil series with differing clay contents and vadose zone structures:Lyallpur soil series, clay loam (fine-silty, mixed, hyperthermic Ustalfic Haplargid), and Sultanpur soil series, sandy loam (coarse-silty, mixed, hyperthermic Ustollic Camborthid). The adsorption isotherms were developed by equilibrating soil with 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 aqueous solution containing varying amounts of B and Zn and were fitted to the Langmuir equation. The B and Zn breakthrough curves were fitted to the two-domain convective-dispersive equation. At the end of the leaching experiment, 0.11 L 10 g L-1 blue dye solution was also applied to each column to mark the flow paths.The Lyallpur soil columns had a slightly greater adsorption partition coefficient both for B and Zn than the Sultanpur soil columns. In the Lyallpur soil columns, B arrival was immediate but the peak concentration ratio (the concentration in solution at equilibrium/concentration applied) was lower than that in the Sultanpur soil columns. The breakthrough of B in the Sultanpur soil columns occurred after about 10 cm of cumulative drainage in both the columns; the rise in effluent concentration was fast and the peak concentration ratio was almost 1. Zinc leaching through the soil columns was very limited as only one column from the Lyallpur soil series showed Zn breakthrough in the effluent where the peak concentration ratio was only 0.05. This study demonstrates the effect of soil structure on B transport and has implications for the nutrient management in field soils.

  19. Mass relocation through soil exhaustion: Transformation of habitation patterns in the southern Netherlands (1000 BC-500 AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluiving, Sjoerd; Bekkema, Marijke; Roymans, Nico; van Mourik, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Long-term archaeological data gathering in the southern Netherlands may deliver an unprecedented regional comparison that could be exemplary for the Pleistocene sand areas of the Northwest European Plain. On a micro-scale level, it has become clear that Bronze Age (2000-800 BC) and Iron Age (800-12 BC) farmers intensively used the landscape, resulting in a relatively dense distribution pattern of settlements all over the ridges and planes of the cover sand landscape. However, this agricultural use of the landscape related to the "celtic field" system led to a process of soil degradation by increased acidification during which Umbric Podzols gradually transformed into Carbic Podzols that could no longer be used as farmland. According to established "models," this process of "secondary podzolization" particularly affected those sections of the landscape that were dominated by dry sandy soils with a low loam content (loam = clay and silt, between c. 10% and 20%). In the Late Iron Age (250-12 BC), the changing soil conditions resulted in a dramatic shift in the habitation pattern that clearly manifests itself in the Roman period (12 BC-410 AD); on the local scale, the habitation moved from the degenerated soils to nearby areas with better soil conditions (higher loam content), which became more densely inhabited now than in the Bronze Age/Early Iron Age (2000-500 BC). The introduction of new land management (in the later Iron Age, and also by Romans) could also have been important for soil degradation. The areas where the Roman period settlements concentrated became also the areas where we can find the early medieval habitation (447-751 AD) and where the Plaggic Anthrosols started to develop in the late medieval period (1270-1500 AD). This poster is based on the analysis of soil properties. Measured loam values of soil samples (n=181) in Veldhoven, southern Netherlands, are in agreement with the described model that the plaggen cover is located on soils containing high

  20. Dielectric properties of soils as a function of moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    Soil dielectric constant measurements are reviewed and the dependence of the dielectric constant on various soil parameters is determined. Moisture content is given special attention because of its practical significance in remote sensing and because it represents the single most influential parameter as far as soil dielectric properties are concerned. Relative complex dielectric constant curves are derived as a function of volumetric soil water content at three frequencies (1.3 GHz, 4.0 GHz, and 10.0 GHz) for each of three soil textures (sand, loam, and clay). These curves, presented in both tabular and graphical form, were chosen as representative of the reported experimental data. Calculations based on these curves showed that the power reflection coefficient and emissivity, unlike skin depth, vary only slightly as a function of frequency and soil texture.

  1. Sorption of cesium and strontium by arid region desert soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption and ion exchange in soil systems are the principal mechanisms that retard the migration of nuclear waste to the biosphere. Cesium and strontium are two elements with radioactive isotopes (Cs137 and Sr90) that are commonly disposed of as nuclear waste. The sorption and ion exchange properties of nonradioactive cesium and strontium were studied in this investigation. The soil used in this study was collected at an experimental infiltration site on Frenchman Flat, a closed drainage basin on the Nevada Test Site. This soil is mostly nonsaline-alkali sandy loam and loamy sand with a cation exchange capacity ranging from 13 to 30 me/100g. The clay fraction of the soil contains illite, montmorillonite, and clinoptilolite. Ion exchange studies have shown that this soil sorbs cesium preferentially relative to strontium, and that charge for charge, the exchange-phase cations released from exchange sites exceed the cesium and strontium sorbed by the soil. 38 references, 22 figures

  2. Hierarchical set of models to estimate soil thermal diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhangelskaya, Tatiana; Lukyashchenko, Ksenia

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties significantly affect the land-atmosphere heat exchange rates. Intra-soil heat fluxes depend both on temperature gradients and soil thermal conductivity. Soil temperature changes due to energy fluxes are determined by soil specific heat. Thermal diffusivity is equal to thermal conductivity divided by volumetric specific heat and reflects both the soil ability to transfer heat and its ability to change temperature when heat is supplied or withdrawn. The higher soil thermal diffusivity is, the thicker is the soil/ground layer in which diurnal and seasonal temperature fluctuations are registered and the smaller are the temperature fluctuations at the soil surface. Thermal diffusivity vs. moisture dependencies for loams, sands and clays of the East European Plain were obtained using the unsteady-state method. Thermal diffusivity of different soils differed greatly, and for a given soil it could vary by 2, 3 or even 5 times depending on soil moisture. The shapes of thermal diffusivity vs. moisture dependencies were different: peak curves were typical for sandy soils and sigmoid curves were typical for loamy and especially for compacted soils. The lowest thermal diffusivities and the smallest range of their variability with soil moisture were obtained for clays with high humus content. Hierarchical set of models will be presented, allowing an estimate of soil thermal diffusivity from available data on soil texture, moisture, bulk density and organic carbon. When developing these models the first step was to parameterize the experimental thermal diffusivity vs. moisture dependencies with a 4-parameter function; the next step was to obtain regression formulas to estimate the function parameters from available data on basic soil properties; the last step was to evaluate the accuracy of suggested models using independent data on soil thermal diffusivity. The simplest models were based on soil bulk density and organic carbon data and provided different

  3. Palevye (pale) soils of Central Yakutia: Genetic specificity, properties, and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desyatkin, R. V.; Lesovaya, S. N.; Okoneshnikova, M. V.; Zaitseva, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    Permafrost-affected palevye (pale) soils of Central Yakutia are developed from mantle calcareous deposits of different textures and are characterized by the common mica-chloritic association of clay minerals with a higher content of chlorite in comparison with the soils developed from mantle loams and loess-like loams in the European part of Russia. In the pale soils, the distribution of clay minerals in the profile has an even pattern in the loamy variants and a differentiated pattern typical of podzols in the loamy sandy variants. Data on the chemical extracts and Mössbauer spectroscopy indicate that the iron in the pale soils is mainly fixed in silicate minerals. The content of nonsilicate iron represented by the amorphous and weakly crystallized compounds in the pale soils is relatively low. The humus-accumulative horizon in these soils is close to the gray-humus (soddy) AY horizon according to its acid-base characteristics (the soil pH and the degree of base saturation) despite the presence of exchangeable sodium and the shallow occurrence of the calcareous horizon.

  4. Fate of {sup 14}C-triclocarban in biosolids-amended soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges, E-mail: lizah@ufl.edu [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, 408 Newell Hall, Gainesville, Florida, 32611 (United States); Department of Health Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage, DPL 404, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508-4614 (United States); O' Connor, George A., E-mail: gao@ufl.edu [Soil and Water Science Department, P.O. Box 110510, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-01519 (United States); McAvoy, Drew C., E-mail: mcavoy.dc@pg.com [Environmental Safety Department, P.O. Box 538707, The Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH, 45253-8707 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antibacterial compound commonly detected in biosolids at parts-per-million concentrations. Approximately half of the biosolids produced in the United States are land-applied, resulting in a systematic release of TCC into the soil environment. The extent of biosolids-borne TCC environmental transport and potential human/ecological exposures will be greatly affected by its bioavailability and the rate of degradation in amended soils. To investigate these factors, radiolabeled TCC ({sup 14}C-TCC) was incorporated into anaerobically digested biosolids, amended to two soils, and incubated under aerobic conditions. The evolution of {sup 14}CO2 (biodegradation) and changes in chemical extractability (bioavailability) was measured over time. Water extractable TCC over the study period was low and significantly decreased over the first 3 weeks of the study (from 14% to 4% in a fine sand soil and from 3 to < 1% in a silty clay loam soil). Mineralization (i.e. ultimate degradation), as measured by evolution of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, was < 4% over 7.5 months. Methanol extracts of the amended soils were analyzed by radiolabel thin-layer chromatography (RAD-TLC), but no intermediate degradation products were detected. Approximately 20% and 50% of the radioactivity in the amended fine sand and silty clay loam soils, respectively, was converted to bound residue as measured by solids combustion. These results indicate that biosolids-borne TCC becomes less bioavailable over time and biodegrades at a very slow rate.

  5. Testing Some Pedo-Transfer Functions (PTFs in Apulia Region. Evaluation on the Basis of Soil Particle Size Distribution and Organic Matter Content for Estimating Field Capacity and Wilting Point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriano Buccigrossi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of soil water retention vs. soil water matric potential is applied to study irrigation and drainage scheduling, soil water storage capacity (plant available water, solute movement, plant growth and water stress. To measure field capacity and wilting point is expensive, laborious and is time consuming, so, frequently, matemathic models, called pedo-transfer functions (PTFs are utilized to estimate field capacity and wilting point through physical-chemical soil characteristics. Six PTFs have been evaluated (Gupta and Larson, 1979; Rawls et al., 1982; De Jong et al., 1983; Rawls and Brakensiek, 1985; Saxton et al., 1986; Vereecken et al., 1989 by comparing measured soil moisture values with estimated ones at soil water matric potential of -33 and -1500 kPa. Soil samples were collected (361 from 185 pedons of Apulian Region (Southern Italy. Accuracy of the soil moisture predictions is quantified with Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD between estimated and measured water retention values. In Apulia Region the tested PTFs give different results on soils grouped on the basis of textural composition and organic matter (O.M. content both at the Field Capacity (FC and Wilting Point (WP. At the FC, Gupta and Larson model has given the best performance in Clayey (C, Sandy clay loam (SaCL, Sandy loam (SaL and Silty (Si soil, in loamy and tendency silty soils with O.M. content less than 1.9% and in tendency sandy soils with O.M. content less than 1.5% and greater than 2%; the Rawls model in Silty clay (SiC and Silty loam (SiL soils, in tendency clayey soils with O.M. less than 2.3% and in loamy and tendency silty soils with O.M. greater than 1.9%; the Rawls and Brakensiek model in tendency sandy soils with O.M. content between 1.5 and 2%; the Saxton model in Silty clay loam (SiCL, Loamy sand (LSa soils and in tendency clayey soils with O.M. content greater than 2.3% and the Vereecken model in Sandy clay (SaC, Loamy (L, Clay loam (CL and Sandy (Sa

  6. Hydraulic Anisotropy Characterization Using Azimuthal Self Potential Gradient [ASPG]: Results from Pneumatic Fracturing of Tight Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, L.; Wishart, D.; Schnell, D.; Hermann, G.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that bulk hydraulic anisotropy associated with fractures in fractured rock aquifers can be inferred from Azimuthal Self Potential Gradient (ASPG) measurements. This extremely simple technique involves measuring the self potential gradient as a function of azimuth with a pair of non polarizing electrodes connected to a voltmeter. The electrokinetic effect associated with the flow of fluids within fractures is the source of the ASPG signal. Fracture strike mapping at multiple sites has repeatedly demonstrated the effectiveness of the method at the field scale and indicated that the direction of flow can be determined from the polarity of relatively large ASPG signals. A laboratory study was conducted to determine whether ASPG could also be used to characterize the hydraulic anisotropy associated with the enhancement of permeability and porosity of tight unconsolidated soils (e.g. clays) as a result of pneumatic fracturing, a technique to improve the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Compressed kaolinite sediments were pneumatically fractured following industry procedures. The resulting fracture geometry was quantified from strike analysis of visible fractures combined with strike data from optical borehole televiewer (BHTV) imaging. ASPG measurements were then made during injection of a simulated remedial treatment (electrolyte/dye) under an applied gas pressure. Consistent with previous findings in fractured rock aquifers, ASPG lobes are well correlated with azimuths of high fracture strike density suggesting that the ASPG anisotropy is a proxy measure of hydraulic anisotropy created by the pneumatic fracturing. The magnitude of the ASPG signal scales linearly (linear correlation coefficients > 0.74) with the applied gas pressure gradient for any particular hydraulically-active fracture set and the positive lobe of the ASP anomaly denotes the flow direction within that fracture set. These findings demonstrate that applications of the

  7. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    Science.gov (United States)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  8. Micromorphology and stable-isotope geochemistry of historical pedogenic siderite formed in PAH-contaminated alluvial clay soils, Tennessee, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, J.A.; Fowle, D.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, J.J.; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400-450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (FeCO3) was present and whether siderite occurrence was related to organic contaminant distribution. Samples from shallow depths were generally more heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than those at greater depth. The upper 1 m in most boreholes consisted of mixtures of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth) consisted of highly structured clays exhibiting fine subangular blocky ped structures, as well as redox-related features. Pedogenic siderite was abundant in the upper 2 m of most cores and in demonstrably historical (< 100 years old) soil matrices. Two morphologies were identified: (1) sphaerosiderite crystal spherulites ranging from 10 to 200 um in diameter, and (2) coccoid siderite comprising grape-like "clusters" of crystals 5-20 ??n in diameter. The siderite, formed in both macropores and within fine-grained clay matrices, indicates development of localized anaerobic, low-Eh conditions, possibly due to microbial degradation of organic contaminants. Stable-isotope compositions of the siderite have ??13C values spanning over 25%o (+7 to - 18%o VPDB) indicating fractionation of DIC by multiple microbial metabolic pathways, but with relatively constant ??18O values from (-4.8 ?? 0.66%o VPDB) defining a meteoric sphaerosiderite line (MSL). Calculated isotope equilibrium water ??18O values from pedogenic siderites at the CCP site are from 1 to 5 per mil lighter than the groundwater ??18O values that we estimate for the site. If confirmed by field studies in progress, this observation might call for a reevaluation of

  9. Study on soil water characteristics of tobacco fields based on canonical correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hou SHAO

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the principal factors influencing soil water characteristics (SWC and evaluate SWC effectively, the multivariate-statistical canonical correlation analysis (CCA method was used to study and analyze the correlation between SWC and soil physical and chemical properties. Twenty-two soil samples were taken from 11 main tobacco-growing areas in Guizhou Province in China and the soil water characteristic curves (SWCC and basic physical and chemical properties of the soil samples were determined. The results show that: (1 The soil bulk density, soil total porosity and soil capillary porosity have significant effects on SWC of tobacco fiels. Bulk density and total porosity are positively correlated with soil water retention characteristics (SWRC, and soil capillary porosity is positively correlated with soil water supply characteristics (SWSC. (2 Soil samples from different soil layers at the same soil sampling point show similarity or consistency in SWC. Inadequate soil water supply capability and imbalance between SWRC and SWSC are problems of tobacco soil. (3 The SWC of loamy clay are generally superior to those of silty clay loam.

  10. Study on soil water characteristics of tobacco fields based on canonical correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hou SHAO; Yu WANG; Li-dong BI; You-bo YUAN; Xian-kun SU; Jian-guo MO

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify the principal factors influencing soil water characteristics (SWC) and evaluate SWC effectively, the multivariate-statistical canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method was used to study and analyze the correlation between SWC and soil physical and chemical properties. Twenty-two soil samples were taken from 11 main tobacco-growing areas in Guizhou Province in China and the soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) and basic physical and chemical properties of the soil samples were determined. The results show that: (1) The soil bulk density, soil total porosity and soil capillary porosity have significant effects on SWC of tobacco fiels. Bulk density and total porosity are positively correlated with soil water retention characteristics (SWRC), and soil capillary porosity is positively correlated with soil water supply characteristics (SWSC). (2) Soil samples from different soil layers at the same soil sampling point show similarity or consistency in SWC. Inadequate soil water supply capability and imbalance between SWRC and SWSC are problems of tobacco soil. (3) The SWC of loamy clay are generally superior to those of silty clay loam.

  11. INFLUENCE OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR AND/OR INOCULATION WITH SULFUR OXIDIZING BACTERIA ON GROWTH, AND NUTRIENT CONTENT OF SORGHUM PLANTS GROWN ON DIFFERENT SOILS

    OpenAIRE

    Hala Kandil; M. H. El-Halfawi; Ibrahim, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of elemental sulfur(E.S) rates (300 and 600 ppm) and/or sulfur oxidizing bacteria (S.O.B. ATCC 8158) on growth and nutrients content of sorghum plants grown on different soils (sandy soils(I & II) and clay loam soil).The obtained results could be summarized in the followings:Sorghum plants:Significant increases over the control were observed in fresh and dry weights of sorghum plant as well as its content of SO4=, N, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu b...

  12. Rapid Changes in Soil Carbon and Structural Properties Due to Stover Removal from No-Till Corn Plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-06-01

    Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover for producing ethanol may be beneficial to palliate the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, but stover harvesting may deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) and degrade soil structure. We investigated the impacts of variable rates of stover removal from no-till (NT) continuous corn systems on SOC and soil structural properties after 1 year of stover removal in three soils in Ohio: Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. This study also assessed relationships between SOC and soil structural properties as affected by stover management. Six stover treatments that consisted of removing 100, 75, 50, 25, and 0, and adding 100% of corn stover corresponding to 0 (T0), 1.25 (T1.25), 2.50 (T2.5), 3.75 (T3.75), 5.00 (T5), and 10.00 (T10) Mg haj1 of stover, respectively, were studied for their total SOC concentration, bulk density (>b), aggregate stability, and tensile strength (TS) of aggregates. Effects of stover removal on soil properties were rapid and significant in the 0- to 5-cm depth, although the magnitude of changes differed among soils after only 1 year of stover removal. The SOC concentration declined with increase in removal rates in silt loams but not in clay loam soils. It decreased by 39% at Coshocton and 30% at Charleston within 1 year of complete stover removal. At the same sites, macroaggregates contained 10% to 45% more SOC than microaggregates. Stover removal reduced 94.75-mm macroaggregates and increased microaggregates (P G 0.01). Mean weight diameter (MWD) and TS of aggregates in soils without stover (T0) were 1.7 and 3.3 times lower than those in soils with normal stover treatments (T5) across sites. The SOC concentration was negatively correlated with >b and positively with MWD and

  13. Two years of gaseous emissions from contrasting soils amended with organic and synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelster, D. E.; Chantigny, M. H.; Rochette, P.; Angers, D. A.; Rieux, C.; Vanasse, A.

    2012-04-01

    Animal manures are often used as a source of nitrogen (N) for agriculture; however impacts of amendment type on N2O production may vary. In this study, N2O emissions from two soil types with contrasting texture and carbon (C) content (a silty clay mixed frigid dystric eutrudept and a sandy loam mixed frigid typic dystrudept) were measured for two years under a cool, humid climate. Treatments consisted of a no N control (CTL), calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN), poultry manure (PM), liquid cattle manure (LCM), or liquid swine manure (LSM). The N sources were surface applied and immediately incorporated at 90 kg N ha-1 before seeding of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Leaching losses of N were also measured using zero-tension lysimeters located at approximately 0.35 m depth. Cumulative growing season N2O-N emissions from the silty clay ranged from 2.2 to 8.3 kg ha-1 yr-1 and were slightly lower in CTL plots than in the fertilized plots (P = 0.067). The mean N2O emission factors ranged from 2.0 to 4.4% of added N with no difference among treatments. Emissions of N2O from the sandy loam soil ranged from 0.3 to 2.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, with greatest emissions following PM application (P amended with PM was 1.7%, more than double that of the other treatments (0.3 to 0.9%), likely because of the high C content of the PM. On the silty clay the yield-based N2O emissions (g N2O-N kg-1 grain yield N) were similar between treatments; while on the sandy loam, they were greatest when amended with PM. Annual N leaching losses averaged 28.7 kg ha-1 for the silty clay and 19.6 kg ha-1 for the sandy loam and were similar for all amendment types suggesting that off-site N2O emissions will also be similar amongst treatments. Preliminary data indicate that overwinter N2O emissions from sandy loam plots were consistently greater when amended with pig slurry compared with unamended soils, and that these overwinter losses may exceed growing season losses. Our findings suggest that

  14. Organic Control of Dioctahedral and Trioctahedral Clay Formation in an Alkaline Soil System in the Pantanal Wetland of Nhecolândia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Jean-François; Martins-Silva, Elisângela R.; Furian, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on the formation of authigenic clays in an alkaline soil system surrounding lakes of the Nhecolândia region, Pantanal wetland. The presence of trioctahedral Mg-smectites (stevensite and saponite types), which requires low Al and Fe contents in the soil solution for its formation, contrasts with the neoformation of dioctahedral Fe-mica (glauconite, and Fe-illite), which instead requires solutions relatively enriched in Al and Fe. This study aims to understand the conditions of co-existence of both, Mg-smectite and Fe-mica a common clay association in former or modern alkaline soil systems and sediments. The study was carried out along an alkaline soil catena representative of the region. The soil organization revealed that Mg-smectite occur in top soil close to the lake, whereas Fe-mica dominate in the clay fraction of deeper greenish horizons a few meters apart. We propose here that this spatial distribution is controlled by the lateral transfer of Fe and Al with organic ligands. Alkaline organic rich solutions (DOC up to 738 mg L-1) collected in the watertable were centrifuged and filtered through membranes of decreasing pore size (0.45 μm, 0.2 μm, 30 KDa, 10 KDa, 3 KDa) to separate colloidal and dissolved fractions. Fe, Al, Si, Mg and K were analysed for each fraction. Although the filtration had no influence on Si and K contents, almost 90% of Fe (up to 2.3 mg L-1) and Al (up to 7 mg L-1) are retained at the first cutoff threshold of 0.45μm. The treatment of the same solutions by oxygen peroxide before filtration shows that a large proportion of Fe and Al were bonded to organic colloids in alkaline soil solution at the immediate lake border, allowing Mg-smectite precipitation. The fast mineralization of the organic matter a few meters apart from the lake favors the release of Fe and Al necessary for Fe-mica neoformation. In comparison with chemical and mineralogical characteristics of alkaline environments described in the

  15. Transport of contaminants from energy-process-waste leachates through subsurface soils and soil components: laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subsurface transport and attenuation of inorganic contaminants common to a variety of energy process waste leachates are being studied using laboratory column methods. Anionic species currently being emphasized are As, B, Mo, and Se. Transport of the cations Cd and Ni is also being studied. The solid adsorbents consist of three soil mineral components (silica sand, kaolinite, and goethite), and four subsurface soils (a dunal sand, an oxidic sandy clay loam, an acidic clay loam, and an alkaline clay loam). Breakthrough patterns of these species from packed soil columns are followed by monitoring eluent concentrations vs time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. This report describes the experimental methods being used, the results of preliminary batch adsorption studies, and the results of column experiments completed through calendar year 1981. Using column influent concentrations of about 10 mg/l, adsorption (mmoles/100 g) has been determined from the eluent volume corresponding to 50% breakthrough. On silica sand, kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, these are 2.0 x 10-4, 0.020, 0.013, and 0.31 for cadmium, 4.4 x 10-4, 0.039, 0.020, and 0.98 for nickel. On kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, adsorption values (mmoles/100 g) are As (0.24, 0.019, and 20.5), B (0.041, 0.0019, and 1.77), Mo (0.048, 0.0010, and 5.93), and Se (0.029, 0.00048, and 1.30). Arsenic is the most highly adsorbed contaminant species and goethite has the largest adsorption capacity of the adsorbents

  16. Transport of contaminants from energy-process-waste leachates through subsurface soils and soil components: laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangen, L.E.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.

    1982-08-01

    The subsurface transport and attenuation of inorganic contaminants common to a variety of energy process waste leachates are being studied using laboratory column methods. Anionic species currently being emphasized are As, B, Mo, and Se. Transport of the cations Cd and Ni is also being studied. The solid adsorbents consist of three soil mineral components (silica sand, kaolinite, and goethite), and four subsurface soils (a dunal sand, an oxidic sandy clay loam, an acidic clay loam, and an alkaline clay loam). Breakthrough patterns of these species from packed soil columns are followed by monitoring eluent concentrations vs time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. This report describes the experimental methods being used, the results of preliminary batch adsorption studies, and the results of column experiments completed through calendar year 1981. Using column influent concentrations of about 10 mg/l, adsorption (mmoles/100 g) has been determined from the eluent volume corresponding to 50% breakthrough. On silica sand, kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, these are 2.0 x 10/sup -4/, 0.020, 0.013, and 0.31 for cadmium, 4.4 x 10/sup -4/, 0.039, 0.020, and 0.98 for nickel. On kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, adsorption values (mmoles/100 g) are As (0.24, 0.019, and 20.5), B (0.041, 0.0019, and 1.77), Mo (0.048, 0.0010, and 5.93), and Se (0.029, 0.00048, and 1.30). Arsenic is the most highly adsorbed contaminant species and goethite has the largest adsorption capacity of the adsorbents.

  17. Effects of dissolved organic matter from sewage sludge on sorption of tetrabromobisphenol A by soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhaohai; MAO Li; XIAN Qiming; YU Yijun; LI Hui; YU Hongxia

    2008-01-01

    Sorption of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) by soil influences its fate and transport in the environment. The presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may complicate the sorption process in soil. The effects of DOM from sewage sludge on TBBPA sorption by three soils were investigated using batch equilibration experiments in the study. DOM was observed to be sorbed on the soils and the isotherms could be fitted by the Langmuir model. The effects of DOM on TBBPA sorption were dependent on the characteristics of soils and the concentrations of DOM present. TBBPA sorption by Henan (HN) soil (sandy loam) and Liaoning (LN) soil (loamy clay) was promoted in the presence of DOM at low concentration (≤ 90 mg organic carbon (OC)/L), and the sorption was promoted by HN soil and inhibited by LN soil at DOM added concentration of 180 mg OC/L. TBBPA sorption by Guangxi (GX) soil (silt loam) was always inhibited in the presence of DOM. It was also found that the amount of TBBPA sorbed decreased with the increase in the solution pH value in the absence of DOM. The influencing mechanisms of DOM on the sorption of TBBPA by soils were also discussed.

  18. Water consumption and soil moisture distribution in melon crop with mulching and in a protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Câmara Monteiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mulching has become an important technique for land cover, but there are some technical procedures which should be adjusted for these new modified conditions to establish optimum total water depth. It is also important to observe the soil-water relations as soil water distribution and wetted volume dimensions. The objective of the present study was to estimate melon evapotranspiration under mulching in a protected environment and to verify the water spatial distribution around the melon root system in two soil classes. Mulching provided 27 mm water saving by reducing water evaporation. In terms of volume each plant received, on average, the amount of 175.2 L of water in 84 days of cultivation without mulching, while when was used mulching the water requirement was 160.2 L per plant. The use of mulching reduced the soil moisture variability throughout the crop cycle and allowed a greater distribution of soil water that was more intense in the clay soil. The clayey soil provided on average 43 mm more water depth retention in 0.50 m soil deep relative to the sandy loam soil, and reduced 5.6 mm the crop cycle soil moisture variation compared to sandy loam soil.

  19. Spatially resolved nanoscale observations of soil carbon multidecadal persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, S.; Chenu, C.; Bernard, S.; Le Guillou, C.; Barré, P.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing how mineral surfaces, especially at small scale, can protect soil organic carbon (SOC) from biodegradation is crucial. The question we address in this work is whether different mineral species lead to different organo-mineral interactions and stabilize different quantities of SOM and different types of SOC. Here we used the unique opportunity offered by long term bare fallows (BF) to study in situ C dynamics in several fine fractions of a silty loam soil. With no vegetation i.e. no external input of fresh C, the plant-free soil of the Versailles 42 Plots (INRA, France) has been progressively enriched in persistent SOC during the 80 years of BF. Contrasted mineral phases of the clay size fraction were isolated by size fractionation on samples from 5 different dates (0, 10, 22, 52, and 79 years after the beginning of the BF, four field replicates per date). Four fractions were studied: total clays (STXM at the carbon K edge of 280 eV, CLS Saskatoon, Canada) to study the dynamics, the distribution and the chemical speciation of the SOC in these fractions. The quantity of C appears to be stabilized after 50 years of BF, even though the dynamics are different for the three clay fractions. Indeed, coarse and intermediate clays have the same final C content but coarse clays lose more C. Fine clay experiences the highest C losses and displays the highest final C content suggesting that fine clays contained more labile C and more persistent C. In all fractions, C:N ratios are really low (below 8) and are decreasing with time, evidencing the dominant presence of microbial SOC. STXM-NEXAFS data shows that, in the fine and intermediate clay fractions, during the first 50 years of BF all mineral particles are associated with SOC. On the contrary, in the coarse clays, SOC displays more diversity: the chemical signature is more diverse and mineral particles not associated with SOC appear more quickly.

  20. Evaluation of Turf-Grass and Prairie-Vegetated Rain Gardens in a Clay and Sand Soil, Madison, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Balster, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with a consortium of 19 cities, towns, and villages in Dane County, Wis., undertook a study to compare the capability of rain gardens with different vegetative species and soil types to infiltrate stormwater runoff from the roof of an adjacent structure. Two rain gardens, one planted with turf grass and the other with native prairie species, were constructed side-by-side in 2003 at two locations with different dominant soil types, either sand or clay. Each rain garden was sized to a ratio of approximately 5:1 contributing area to receiving area and to a depth of 0.5 foot. Each rain garden, regardless of vegetation or soil type, was capable of storing and infiltrating most of the runoff over the 5-year study period. Both rain gardens in sand, as well as the prairie rain garden in clay, retained and infiltrated 100 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during water years 2004-07. The turf rain garden in clay occasionally had runoff exceed its confining boundaries, but was still able to retain 96 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during the same time period. Precipitation intensity and number of antecedent dry days were important variables that influenced when the storage capacity of underlying soils would become saturated, which resulted in pooled water in the rain gardens. Because the rooftop area that drained runoff to each rain garden was approximately five times larger than the area of the rain garden itself, evapotranspiration was a small percentage of the annual water budget. For example, during water year 2005, the maximum evapotranspiration of total influent volume ranged from 21 percent for the turf rain garden in clay to 25 percent for the turf rain garden in sand, and the minimum ranged from 12 percent for the prairie rain garden in clay to 19 percent for the prairie rain garden in sand. Little to no runoff left each rain garden as effluent and a small percentage of runoff returned to the

  1. Minimum quantity of urban refuse compost affecting physical and chemical soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    Full Text Available The increasing production of urban waste requires urgent responses because of various environmental problems that arise when urban refuse is stored in landfills or incinerated. Recycling of domestic waste and composting of its organic fraction has been indicated as a possible disposal solution. A three-year experiment was conducted to quantify the minimum rate of urban refuse compost (URC addition able to improve some physical and chemical soil properties at the lowest cost and environmental impact. URC was added to a silty clay soil and to a sandy loam soil 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% rate (w/w. Samplings were made 12, 24 and 36 months after URC application. To study the only effect of compost on soil due to its interaction with the soil matrix, each soil-compost mixture was divided into three boxes and kept outdoors weed free. After 12 months, 3% URC resulted the minimum quantity able to ameliorate several soil properties. In silty clay soil this rate significantly ameliorated microaggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity, but negative effects were observed on electrical conductivity. After 24 months, 3% rate significantly increased soil organic matter content. In the sandy loam soil, after 12 months, 3% rate of URC determined a positive effect on organic matter and cone resistance in dry soil condition. Electrical conductivity increased at 3% URC addition. The minimum URC quantity affecting hydraulic conductivity and plastic limit was 6%, and 9% for the liquid limit. Under these experimental conditions, the lowest rate (3% of URC incorporation to soils appears to be the minimum quantity able to improve most of the soil properties influencing fertility. What the results show is that, to achieve sustainability of urban refuse compost application to agricultural soil, further research is needed to investigate soil property changes in the range between 0% and 3%.

  2. Minimum quantity of urban refuse compost affecting physical and chemical soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rocchini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing production of urban waste requires urgent responses because of various environmental problems that arise when urban refuse is stored in landfills or incinerated. Recycling of domestic waste and composting of its organic fraction has been indicated as a possible disposal solution. A three-year experiment was conducted to quantify the minimum rate of urban refuse compost (URC addition able to improve some physical and chemical soil properties at the lowest cost and environmental impact. URC was added to a silty clay soil and to a sandy loam soil 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% rate (w/w. Samplings were made 12, 24 and 36 months after URC application. To study the only effect of compost on soil due to its interaction with the soil matrix, each soil-compost mixture was divided into three boxes and kept outdoors weed free. After 12 months, 3% URC resulted the minimum quantity able to ameliorate several soil properties. In silty clay soil this rate significantly ameliorated microaggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity, but negative effects were observed on electrical conductivity. After 24 months, 3% rate significantly increased soil organic matter content. In the sandy loam soil, after 12 months, 3% rate of URC determined a positive effect on organic matter and cone resistance in dry soil condition. Electrical conductivity increased at 3% URC addition. The minimum URC quantity affecting hydraulic conductivity and plastic limit was 6%, and 9% for the liquid limit. Under these experimental conditions, the lowest rate (3% of URC incorporation to soils appears to be the minimum quantity able to improve most of the soil properties influencing fertility. What the results show is that, to achieve sustainability of urban refuse compost application to agricultural soil, further research is needed to investigate soil property changes in the range between 0% and 3%.

  3. The velocity of shear waves in unsaturated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Whalley, W. R.; Jenkins, M; Attenborough, K.

    2012-01-01

    The velocities of shear waves Vs in two soils, a loamy sand and a sandy clay loam, were measured at various matric potentials and confining pressures. We used a combination of Haines apparatus, pressure plate apparatus and a Bishop and Wesley tri-axial cell to obtain a range of saturation and consolidation states. We proposed a single effective stress variable based on a modification to Bishop’s equation which could be used in a published empirical model (Santamarina et al., 2001) to relate s...

  4. Radionuclides in milk of dairy heifers raised on forages harvested from phosphatic clay soils on reclaimed mined land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, C.R.; Umana, R.; Hayen, M.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    Alfalfa (AR; Medicago sativa L.) and corn (CSR; Zea mays L.) were grown in phosphatic clay soils on phosphate-mined reclaimed land in central Florida. Corn (CSC) also was grown on unmined land and served as a control forage. Upon harvesting, plants were chopped and ensiled. Concentrations of {sup 226}Ra averaged 2.44, 0.26 and 0.15; {sup 210}Pb averaged 1.04, 0.63, and 0.52; and {sup 210}Po averaged 1.59, 0.59, and 1.26 Bq kg{sup -1} DM for AR, CSR, and CSC, respectively. These forages were fed separately to Holstein dairy replacement heifers (Bos taurus) (n=15 per forage) from approximately 9 to 25 mo of age. Heifers gave birth to calves at approximately 24 mo of age. Samples of milk were collected on d 1, 15, and 30 of lactation and analyzed for radionuclides. Averaged across sampling days, heifers fed AR had greater milk concentrations of {sup 226}Ra compared with those fed CSR (0.27 vs. 0.22 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.10), which, in turn, had greater milk concentrations compared with heifers fed CSC (0.22 vs. 0.13 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.05). Heifers fed AR also had greater milk concentrations of {sup 210}Po compared with heifers fed CSR (0.58 vs. 0.30 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.10), but values of CSR-fed heifers were not different from CSC-fed heifers (0.45 Bq kg{sup -1} DM). Lead-210 was greater in milk from heifers fed CSR compared with those fed AR or CSC (1.38 vs. 0.94 and 0.92 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.13), respectively. Plasma S and Cu concentrations suggested subclinical molybdenosis in heifers fed AR. However, all heifers grew at an acceptable rate, conceived normally, had normal gestation periods, gave high quality colostrum at calving, and produced similar amounts of milk. 17 refs., 9 tabs.

  5. The key role of micromorphology in studies of the genesis of clay minerals and their associations in soils and its relevance to advances in the philosophy of soil science

    OpenAIRE

    CHURCHMAN, Gordon Jock

    2013-01-01

    Micromorphological observations from 3 different published works have been studied to aid understanding of aggregation and of colloids, both unique to soils. Saprolites in Hong Kong included ‘veins’ of different thicknesses and colours. Optical mineralogy identified them as infill from the neogenesis of clays in rock fractures. The common thicker infills resulted from weathering. Dark infill contained comminuted primary minerals whereas thin pale infill originated hydrothe...

  6. Effect of Soil texture on Photosynthetic traits and the deposition of Dry matter accumulation of peanut%土壤质地对花生光合特性及干物质积累分配的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾立华; 王月福; 陈安余; 冯锴

    2013-01-01

    The paper explored the effect of soil texture on photosynthetic traits and detribution of dry matter accumulation of peanut,in order to explicit the suitable soil texture appropriated for high-yielding peanut cultivation.The soil texture including Sandy soil,Clay and Loam,and the experiment were implemented in box plant method.The results showed that the early period of peanut growth and development is Sandy soil>Loam>Clay and the later period is Loam>Sandy soil>Clay on Leaf area per plant,Functional leaf chlorophyll content,Net photosynthetic rate and Distribution of dry matter accumulation of peanut.Sandy soil is in favor of early period of photosynthetic matter accumulation,Loam is in favor of whole period,and Clay is not conductive to the whole period.Loam is more suitable than Clay and Sandy soil on distribution ratio of peanut organ dry matter accumulation.Loam has a higher pod yield than Sandy soil and Clay.%为了明确适合花生生长获得高产的土壤类型,采用箱栽的方法,研究了不同质地土壤(砂土、壤土、粘土)对花生光合特性及干物质积累分配的影响.结果表明,花生单株叶面积、功能叶叶绿素SPAD值、净光合速率和植株总干物质重在生育前期表现为砂土>壤土>粘土,在生育后期则表现为壤土>砂土>粘土.砂土有利于花生前期光合物质积累,壤土则在整个生育期内均有利于花生光合物质积累,而粘土则在整个生育期内均不利于花生光合物质积累.壤土花生各器官干物质分配比例较粘土和砂土合理.壤土的荚果产量显著高于砂土和粘土.

  7. Clay properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report an overview will be given of the basic properties of (suspended) clay particles. In section 2 the structure of clay minerals will be described. The forces between suspended particles (section 3) and the possible consequences of them, flocculation or deflocculation (sections 4 and 5) w

  8. Effects of temperature, water content and nitrogen fertilisation on emissions of nitrous oxide by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. A.; Thomson, P. E.; Clayton, H.; Mctaggart, I. P.; Conen, F.

    Nitrous oxide emissions were measured from several grassland and arable soils in the field, and from two of these soils and a forest soil transferred in large monoliths to a greenhouse. The effects of fertiliser N additions and of soil water content and temperature were investigated. Emissions were in the order grazed grassland>grassland cut for conservation>potatoes>cereal crops, and generally were higher than those from temperate natural ecosystems. Based on these data, agricultural soils constitute the major soil source of N 2O in the U.K. The highest emission recorded was 8 kg N 2O-N ha -1 over 10 months, from a grazed grassland site. Emissions varied from year to year, depending particularly on rainfall at the time of fertilisation. When soil mineral N was not limiting, exponential relationships between N 2O flux and both water-filled pore space (WFPS) and temperature were observed. The Q10 value for a sandy loam was 1.6, but ranged up to 12 for a clay loam soil at high WFPS. The high values were attributed to the increase in anaerobic zones where denitrification could take place, as respiratory demand for O 2 increased. A forest soil (peaty gley) showed an optimum water potential for N 2O emission. Diurnal fluctuations in emissions were associated with diurnal cycles in soil temperature, but with varying time lags, which could be explained by the N 2O being produced at different depths.

  9. INTEGRATED NITROGEN AND BORON FERTILIZATION IMPROVES THE PRODUCTIVITY AND OIL QUALITY OF SUNFLOWER GROWN IN A CALCAREOUS SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    SHEHZAD, Muhammad Asif; Maqsood, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Among biotic and abiotic factors, imbalanced plant nutrition is more indispensable for low sunflower productivity. To assess the interaction behavior of nitrogen with boron on sunflower growth, yield and its oil quality in alkaline-calcareous soils, a field experiment was conducted for two consecutive growing seasons of 2011 and 2012. Sunflower hybrid (Helianthus annuus ‘Hysun-33’) was grown on sandy clay loam soil that was amended with diverse boron rates of 0, 2, 4, and 6 kg ha-1 under vari...

  10. Use of different organic wastes in reducing the potential leaching of propanil, isoxaben, cadusafos and pencycuron through the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, José; Garrido, Isabel; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Vela, Nuria; Navarro, Simón

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of four different organic wastes (OW)-composted sheep manure (CSM), spent coffee grounds (SCG), composted pine bark (CPB) and coir (CR)-on the potential groundwater pollution of propanil and isoxaben (herbicides), cadusafos (insecticide) and pencycuron (fungicide) under laboratory conditions. For this purpose, leaching studies were conducted using disturbed soil columns filled with a clay loam soil (Hipercalcic calcisol). The addition of organic matter (OM) drastically reduced the movement of the studied pesticides. The results obtained point to the interest in the use of agro-industrial and composted OW in reducing the groundwater pollution by pesticide drainage.

  11. Multidecadal persistence of organic matter in soils: insights from spatially resolved investigations at the submicrometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Barré, Pierre; Bernard, Sylvain; Le Guillou, Corentin; Alléon, Julien; Chenu, Claire