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Sample records for clay loam soil

  1. Effect of Application of Increasing Concentrations of Contaminated Water on the Different Fractions of Cu and Co in Sandy Loam and Clay Loam Soils

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    John Volk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish the fate of copper (Cu and cobalt (Co in sandy loam and clay loam soils that had been irrigated with increasing concentrations of contaminated water. A sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the fractions of Cu and Co in these soils. The concentration of bioavailable Cu and Co on clay loam was 1.7 times that of sandy loam soil. Cu on sandy loam soil was largely in the organic > residual > exchangeable > water-soluble > carbonate fractions, whereas on clay loam soil the element was largely in organic > exchangeable > residual > carbonate > water-soluble fractions. Co was largely observed in the exchangeable, water-soluble, and carbonate fractions, but with no particular trend observed in both soil types. When crops are grown on sandy soils that have a low capacity to hold heavy metals, the resulting effect would be high uptake of the heavy metals in crop plants. Because the predominant forms of Cu and Co vary in soils, it is expected that the metals will behave differently in the soils.

  2. Assessment of Fate of Thiodicarb Pesticide in Sandy Clay Loam Soil

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    M. A. Bajeer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study the fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil was investigated through its adsorption and leaching using HPLC. Experimental results revealed that thiodicarb follows first order kinetic with rate constant value of 0.711 h-1 and equilibrium study showed that Freundlich model was best fitted with multilayer adsorption capacity 3.749 mol/g and adsorption intensity 1.009. Therefore, adsorption of thiodicarb was multilayer, reversible and non-ideal. Leaching study has indicated intermediate mobility of thiodicarb with water due to its solubility, while field study showed the non-leacher nature. However both adsorption and leaching were heavily affected by soil characteristics. As the soil taken was sandy clay loam hence due to clay texture adsorption was higher because of vacant sites existing and greater surface area. For this the pesticide has remained adsorbed in above 20 cm soil layer as clearly seen from field study, minor amount was recorded in third layer of soil having 21-30 cm depth. The leached amount of thiodicarb in first and last part of water was 1.075 and 0.003 ng/µl. The general trend observed for adsorption in column and field soil was decreased downwards from 2.027 to 0.618 and 5.079 to 0.009 ng/µl.

  3. Influence of crop residues on trifluralin mineralization in a silty clay loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenhorst, Annemieke

    2007-01-01

    Trifluralin is typically applied onto crop residues (trash, stubble) at the soil surface, or onto the bare soil surface after the incorporation of crop residues into the soil. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the type and amount of crop residues in soil on trifluralin mineralization in a Wellwood silty clay loam soil. Leaves and stubble of Potato (Solanum tuberosum) (P); Canola (Brassica napus) (C), Wheat (Triticum aestivum) (W), Oats (Avena sativa), (O), and Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) (A) were added to soil microcosms at rates of 2%, 4%, 8% and 16% of the total soil weight (25 g). The type and amount of crop residues in soil had little influence on the trifluralin first-order mineralization rate constant, which ranged from 3.57E-03 day(-1) in soil with 16% A to 2.89E-02 day(-1) in soil with 8% W. The cumulative trifluralin mineralization at 113 days ranged from 1.15% in soil with 16% P to 3.21% in soil with 4% C, again demonstrating that the observed differences across the treatments are not of agronomic or environmental importance.

  4. Effect of biochar amendment on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil

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    Angela Libutti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biochar incorporation into agricultural soils has been proposed as a strategy to decrease nutrient leaching. The present study was designed to assess the effect of biochar on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil. Biochar obtained from the pyrogasification of fir wood chips was applied to soil and tested in a range of laboratory sorption experiments. Four soil treatments were considered: soil only (control, soil with 2, 4 and 8% of biochar by mass. The Freundlich sorption isotherm model was used to fit the adsorbed amount of nitrate in the soil-biochar mixtures. The model performed very well in interpreting the experimental data according to a general linear regression (analysis of co-variance statistical approach. Nitrate retention in the soilbiochar mixtures was always higher than control, regardless the NO3 – concentration in the range of 0-400 mg L–1. Different sorption capacities and intensities were detected depending on the biochar application rate. The highest adsorption capacity was observed in the soils added with 2 and 4% of biochar, respectively. From the results obtained is possible to infer that nitrate retention is higher at lower biochar addition rate to soil (2 and 4% and at lower nitrate concentration in the soil water solution. These preliminary laboratory results suggest that biochar addition to a typical Mediterranean agricultural soil could be an effective management option to mitigate nitrate leaching.

  5. Leaching of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin in a clay loam soil of Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Feagley, Sam E

    2002-09-01

    Trifluralin[2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-(trifluormethyl)benzenamine], metolachlor[2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide], and metribuzin[4-amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)one] were applied in field plots located on a Commerce clay loam soil near Baton Rouge, Louisiana at the rate of 1683 g/ha, 2759 g/ha and 609 g/ha, respectively. The half-lives of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin in the top 0-15 cm soil depth were found to be 54.7 days, 35.8 days and 29.8 days, respectively. The proportion of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin in the top 0-15 cm soil depth was 94.7%, 86.6%, and 75.4%, respectively of that found in the top 0-60 cm soil depth 30 days after application. Trifluralin concentrations were within a range of 0.026 ng/mL to 0.058 ng/mL in 1 m deep well water, and between 0.007 ng/mL and 0.039 ng/mL in 2 m deep well water over a 62 day period after application. Metolachlor concentrations in the 1 m and 2 m wells ranged from 3.62 ng/mL to 82.32 ng/mL and 8.44 ng/mL to 15.53 ng/mL, respectively. Whereas metribuzin concentrations in the 1 m and 2 m wells ranged from 0.70 ng/mL to 27.75 ng/mL and 1.71 ng/mL to 3.83 ng/mL, respectively. Accordingly, trifluralin was found to be strongly adsorbed on the soil and showed negligible leaching. Although metolachlor and metribuzin were also both readily adsorbed on the soil, their leaching potential was high. As a result, in the clay loam soil studied, metribuzin concentration in groundwater with shallow aquifers is likely to exceed the 10 mg/L US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advisory level for drinking water early in the application season, whereas trifluralin and metolachlor concentrations are expected to remain substantially lower than their respective 2 ng/mL and 175 ng/mL EPA advisory levels.

  6. Influence of tebuconazole and copper hydroxide on phosphatase and urease activities in red sandy loam and black clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    B. Anuradha; Rekhapadmini, A.; Rangaswamy, V.

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of two selected fungicides i.e., tebuconazole and coppoer hydroxide, was conducted experiments in laboratory and copper hydroxide on the two specific enzymes phosphatase and urease were determined in two different soil samples (red sandy loam and black clay soils) of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from cultivated fields of Anantapuramu District, Andhra Pradesh. The activities of the selected soil enzymes were determined by incubating the selected fungicides-treated (1.0, 2.5, 5....

  7. THE EFFECT OF MIXING WITH ORGANIC SOIL ON CHANGES IN SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A COMPACTED CLAY LOAM SOIL

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    Abdullah BARAN

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of organic soil on changes in total pore space, aeration porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay loam were investigated. By adding organic soil at rates of 0 %, 1 %, 2 % and 4 % to soil, mixtures were compacted at compaction levels of 0 kg/cm2, 0.21 kg/cm2, 1.98 kg/cm2 and 3.95 kg/cm2 Some physical properties of compacted soil were determined. Compaction decreased total pore space, areation porosity, available water content and hydraulic conductivity, but in samples with the mixing rate of 4 %, all properties inspected were affected positively in all compaction levels, except available water content

  8. Runoff of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin from a clay loam soil of Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Feagley, Sam E

    2002-09-01

    Trifluralin[2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-(trifluormethyl)benzenamine], metolachlor[2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] and metribuzin[4-amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)one] were applied as pre-emergent herbicides to soybean plots in Louisiana (LA) at the rate of 1683 g/ha, 2759 g/ha and 609 g/ha, respectively. The concentrations of trifluralin in the runoff water ranged between 0.09 ng/mL and 0.02 ng/mL, which is lower than the 2 ng/mL US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advisory level for trifuralin in drinking water. Metolachlor concentrations in the runoff water ranged from 9.0 ng/mL to 221.5 ng/mL, which is both lower and higher than the 175 ng/mL EPA advisory level for metolachlor. Similarly, metribuzin concentrations in the runoff water ranged between 1.5 ng/mL and 56.2 ng/mL, which is also lower and higher than the 10 ng/mL EPA advisory level for metribuzin. Accordingly, from the field plots located on a Commerce clay loam soil in LA, although the concentration of trifluralin in runoff water were substantially lower than the EPA advisory level, metolachlor and metribuzin concentrations are likely to exceed the EPA advisory levels early on in the application season with a subsequent rapid decrease to safe levels. The total loss of trifluralin in runoff water was 0.005% of the applied amount over an 89 day period after application. The total loss of metolachlor and metribuzin in the runoff water was 4.67% and 5.36% of the applied amount, respectively, over a 22 day period after application. As such, there was almost no movement of trifluralin in the runoff water, whereas metolachlor and metribuzin were much more easily moved.

  9. Short-term Effects of Tillage Practices on Organic Carbon in Clay Loam Soil of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A tillage experiment, consisting of moldboard plow (MP), ridge tillage (RT), and no-tillage (NT), was performed in a randomized complete block design with four replicates to study the effect of 3-year tillage management on SOC content and its distribution in surface layer (30 cm) of a clay loam soil in northeast China. NT did not lead to significant increase of SOC in topsoil (0-5 cm) compared with MP and RT; however, the SOC content in NT soil was remarkably reduced at a depth of 5-20 cm. Accordingly, short-term (3-year) NT management tended to stratify SOC concentration, but not necessarily increase its storage in the plow layer for the soil.

  10. The influence of clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Getahun, Gizachew Tarekegn; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Schjønning, Per

    2016-01-01

    Tillage and residue management influence soil organic carbon (SOC) and lead to changes in soil physical behav-iour and functioning. We examined the effect of the clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management. Soil...... was sampled at the 0–10, 10–20 and 25–30 cm depths of a sandy loam soil at Flakkebjerg, Denmark in 2013. We used the experimental plots of a long-term field experiment with mouldboard ploughing (MP) and direct drilling (DD) treatments. The residue management included straw removal (−S) and straw retention (+S...... and DD and MP soil at 10–20 cm, while MP was higher than DD at 10–20 cm depth (p b 0.05). However, there was no difference in the effect of the contrasting tillage manage-ments on carbon sequestration when an equivalent soil mass and the entire topsoil layer were considered. In the top 10 cm soil, DD...

  11. Effect of blade vibration on mulch tillage performance under silt clay loam soil

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    B Goudarzi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mulch tillage system is an intermediate system which covers some of disadvantages of no tillage and conventional tillage systems. In farms in which tillage is done with a chisel plow, runoff and soil erosion have a less important relation to moldboard and disk plow and naturally absorption of rainfall will be developed. Thus, the mulch tillage system is an appropriate alternative to conventional tillage and no tillage (Backingham and Pauli, 1993. The unwanted vibration in machinery and industry mainly processes most harmful factors, for example: bearing wear, cracking and loosening joints. And noise is produced in electrical systems by creating a short circuit (Wok, 2011. Self-induced and induced vibration are used in tillage systems. Induced vibration is created by energy consumption and self-induced vibration is created by collision among the blades and soil at the shank (Soeharsono and Setiawan, 2010. A study by Mohammadi-gol et al. (2005 was conducted. It was found that on the disk plow, plant residues maintained on the soil are more than that of moldboard plow. 99% frequency and amplitude, speed and rack angle of blade directly affect soil inversion and indirectly affect preservation of crop residue on the soil. The effect of vibration frequency and rack angle of blade to reduce the tensile strength is also clear. Moreover, in contrast to previous studies when speed progressing is less than (λ, not only the relative speed (λ, but also frequency can reduce the tensile strength (Beiranvand and Shahgoli, 2010; Awad-Allah et al., 2009. Therefore, aim of this study was to determine the effect of vibration and the speed of tillage on soil parameters and drawbar power in using electric power. Materials and Methods: To perform this test, three different modes of vibration (fixed, variable and induced vibration and two levels of speed in real terms at a depth of 20 cm were used for farming. The test was performed with a split plot

  12. Solid beef cattle manure application impacts on soil properties and 17β-estradiol fate in a clay loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Emmanuelle; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Hao, Xiying; Sheedy, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Livestock manure applied to agricultural land is one of the ways natural steroid estrogens enter soils. To examine the impact of long-term solid beef cattle (Bos Taurus) manure on soil properties and 17β-estradiol sorption and mineralization, this study utilized a soil that had received beef cattle manure over 35 years. The 17β-estradiol was strongly sorbed and sorption significantly increased (P applied.

  13. Impact of industrial effluent on growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.) in silty clay loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar Hossain, Mohammad; Rahman, Golum Kibria Muhammad Mustafizur; Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Molla, Abul Hossain; Mostafizur Rahman, Mohammad; Khabir Uddin, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Degradation of soil and water from discharge of untreated industrial effluent is alarming in Bangladesh. Therefore, buildup of heavy metals in soil from contaminated effluent, their entry into the food chain and effects on rice yield were quantified in a pot experiment. The treatments were comprised of 0, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% industrial effluents applied as irrigation water. Effluents, initial soil, different parts of rice plants and post-harvest pot soil were analyzed for various elements, including heavy metals. Application of elevated levels of effluent contributed to increased heavy metals in pot soils and rice roots due to translocation effects, which were transferred to rice straw and grain. The results indicated that heavy metal toxicity may develop in soil because of contaminated effluent application. Heavy metals are not biodegradable, rather they accumulate in soils, and transfer of these metals from effluent to soil and plant cells was found to reduce the growth and development of rice plants and thereby contributed to lower yield. Moreover, a higher concentration of effluent caused heavy metal toxicity as well as reduction of growth and yield of rice, and in the long run a more aggravated situation may threaten human lives, which emphasizes the obligatory adoption of effluent treatment before its release to the environment, and regular monitoring by government agencies needs to be ensured.

  14. Field Performance of the Disk Harrow, Power Harrow and Rotary Tiller at Different Soil Moisture Contents on a Clay Loam Soil in Mazandaran

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    M Rajabi Vandechali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available About 60% of the mechanical energy consumed in mechanized agriculture is used for tillage operations and seedbed preparation. On the other hand, unsuitable tillage system resulted in soil degradation, affecting soil physical properties and destroying soil structure. The objective of this research was to compare the effects of three types of secondary tillage machines on soil physical properties and their field performances. An experiment was conducted in a wheat farm in Jouybar area of Mazandaran as split plots based on randomized complete block design with three replications. The main independent variable (plot was soil moisture with three levels (23.6-25, 22.2-23.6 and 20.8-22.2 percent based on dry weight and the subplot was three types of machine (two-disk perpendicular passing harrow, Power harrow and Rotary tiller. The measured parameters included: clod mean weight diameter, soil bulk density, specific fuel consumption, machine efficiency and machine capacity. The effects of treatments and their interactions on the specific fuel consumption, machine efficiency and machine capacity and also the effects of treatments on bulk density were significant (P

  15. Gas entrapment and microbial N2O reduction reduce N2O emissions from a biochar-amended sandy clay loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Johannes; Guzman-Bustamante, Ivan; Kuehfuss, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Well, Reinhard; Spott, Oliver; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that is produced during microbial nitrogen transformation processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Soils represent the largest sources of N2O emissions with nitrogen fertilizer application being the main driver of rising atmospheric N2O concentrations. Soil biochar amendment has been proposed as a promising tool to mitigate N2O emissions from soils. However, the underlying processes that cause N2O emission suppression in biochar-amended soils are still poorly understood. We set up microcosm experiments with fertilized, wet soil in which we used 15N tracing techniques and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the impact of biochar on mineral and gaseous nitrogen dynamics and denitrification-specific functional marker gene abundance and expression. In accordance with previous studies our results showed that biochar addition can lead to a significant decrease in N2O emissions. Furthermore, we determined significantly higher quantities of soil-entrapped N2O and N2 in biochar microcosms and a biochar-induced increase in typical and atypical nosZ transcript copy numbers. Our findings suggest that biochar-induced N2O emission mitigation is based on the entrapment of N2O in water-saturated pores of the soil matrix and concurrent stimulation of microbial N2O reduction resulting in an overall decrease of the N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio.

  16. New way of measurement of thermophysical properties of clay loam materials by transient methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boháč, Vlastimil; Dieška, Peter; Vretenár, Viliam; Lukáč, Vladimír

    2016-07-01

    The problem of the measurement of clay loam materials in plastic consistency is more or less difficult as they can change the shape during the long time measurements. The specimen thickness is expected as the constant during all the experiment measured by transient pulse method. In a case of plastic clay loam, it can change the form during the measurement because of the squeeze of the material even under the gravity condition. Thus the specimen surface wall should be reinforced by special dimensionally well-defined thin wall container. In this paper the special container in a form of thin tube rings bounded by central annular ring was constructed and used for the measurements. The heat source was inserted into the tube rings through the nozzle in the middle part and the thermocouple was inserted through the drilled openings at defined distance from the heat source. System clamped the heat source together with the rings at desired distance from the thermocouple. This distance represents the thickness of tested specimen. The soft plastic material fill the inner space of tube rings in such a way to fulfill the geometry conditions for this method. The need of soft clay loam material measurement is to test its thermal properties because of the interest to use it as the heat storage material below the buildings. The measured clay loam containing some moisture has quite high values of specific heat and thus the use of it as the heat storage material is promising.

  17. Hidráulica do escoamento e transporte de sedimentos em sulcos em solo franco-argilo-arenoso Flow hydraulics and sediment transport in rills of a sandy clay loam soil

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    José Ramon Barros Cantalice

    2005-07-01

    capacity to deform the rill and alter flow hydraulics, responsible for rill formation dynamics. The objective of this study was to evaluate flow hydraulic conditions that can provide important information on erosion relationships, soil erodibility and sediment transport in furrows of a recently-tilled Palleudult. Rills were pre-formed in a sandy clay loam soil with an average slope of 0.067 m m-1. Simulated rainfall with an intensity of 74 mm h-1 was applied during 80 min, while rainfall and extra inflows of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 L min-1 were jointly applied for the last 20 min of each run in the rill. Results indicated that the rill flow regime varied from transitional subcritical to turbulent subcritical. The rill erosion detachment rates were linear to shear stress. Rill erodibility (Kr was 0.0024 kg-1 s-1 N and critical shear stress (tauc was 2.75 Pa. Two functions to predict sediment transport based on stream power explained 53% of data variability, which indicates the inherent difficulty of predicting solid transport through shallow flows on eroding agricultural lands, and the physical and mineralogical diversity of particles and aggregates of the studied soil.

  18. Effect of Injecting Hydrogen Peroxide into Heavy Clay Loam Soil on Plant Water Status, NET CO2 Assimilation, Biomass, and Vascular Anatomy of Avocado Trees Efecto de la Inyección de Peróxido de Hidrógeno en Suelo Franco Arcilloso Pesado, sobre el Estado Hídrico, Asimilación Neta de CO2, Biomasa y Anatomía Vascular de Paltos

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In Chile, avocado (Persea americana Mill.) orchards are often located in poorly drained, low-oxygen soils, situation which limits fruit production and quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of injecting soil with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a source of molecular oxygen, on plant water status, net CO2 assimilation, biomass and anatomy of avocado trees set in clay loam soil with water content maintained at field capacity. Three-year-old ‘Hass’ avocado trees were planted...

  19. Escoamento superficial e desagregação do solo em entressulcos em solo franco-argilo-arenoso com resíduos vegetais Interrill surface runoff and soil detachment on a sandy clay loam soil with residue cover

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    Elemar Antonino Cassol

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A presença de resíduos vegetais sobre a superfície do solo altera as características do escoamento superficial gerado pela chuva e a desagregação e transporte de sedimento resultantes do processo erosivo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as condições hidráulicas e as relações de desagregação do solo e de resistência ao escoamento com a presença de resíduos vegetais na erosão em entressulcos. O experimento foi realizado no laboratório, com um Argissolo Vermelho distrófico típico, em parcelas com 0,10 m m-1 de declive sob chuva simulada. O solo foi coberto por resíduos vegetais de palha de soja, nas doses de 0, 0,05, 0,1, 0,2, 0,4 e 0,8 kg m-2. O aumento na cobertura do solo (CS com resíduos vegetais elevou a altura da lâmina de escoamento e a rugosidade hidráulica e reduziu a velocidade média do escoamento, provocada pelo aumento das forças viscosas promovida pela interposição física dos resíduos ao escoamento. O resultado é a redução na taxa de desagregação do solo (Di. A Di foi de 5,35x10-4 kg m-2 s-1 para solo descoberto e 1,50x10-5 kg m-2 s-1 em solo com 100% de cobertura na maior dose de palha. Os modelos de Laflen e potencial foram adequados para estimar o coeficiente de cobertura para resíduo em contato direto com a superfície do solo em função da cobertura do solo.Soil surface cover with crop residue modifies surface flow characteristics, generated by excess rainfall, and soil detachment and sediment transport resulting from the erosion process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hydraulic conditions, detachment and flow resistance on interrill erosion on soil covered with residue. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory, on a Hapludult soil at a slope of 0.10 m m-1, under simulated rainfall and soil surface covered with soybean residue at the rates of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 kg m-2. The increase in soil surface cover (SC with residue, caused an increase in water flow

  20. Distribución de la porosidad de un suelo franco arcilloso (alfisol en condiciones semiáridas después de 15 años bajo siembra directa Soil porosity distribution of a clay loam soil (alfisol in semi-arid conditions after 15 years under direct drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Isabel Cerisola

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un estudio más amplio sobre evolución de las propiedades físicas de un suelo sometido a tres sistemas de labranza, se realizó, en dos campañas consecutivas, un seguimiento de la distribución de la porosidad del suelo según su origen, en parcelas cultivadas bajo siembra directa continua durante 15 años. En el ensayo se consideró un trayecto de 2 metros de longitud, perpendicular a la dirección de las labores, donde se realizaron mediciones de densidad aparente seca y contenido de humedad. El cultivo extensivo de secano (cereal, en cada una de las dos campañas, fue cebada de ciclo corto y de ciclo largo. El calendario de la toma de datos de las variables medidas se fijó en 5 fechas por campaña. La porosidad estructural del suelo, debida principalmente a la alternancia de ciclos de humectación - desecación, fue calculada cada 5 cm y hasta 35 cm de profundidad. Este proceso de fisuración natural resulta suficiente para asegurar un buen drenaje y facilitar el desarrollo radicular de las plantas, siempre y cuando el contenido de humedad se mantenga dentro de la capacidad de retención de agua.On a long-term essay under direct drilling, the evolution of the physical properties of a clay loam soil, such as distribution by origin of soil porosity, has been assessed during two growing seasons. The cereal crops in each growing seasons were spring barley and winter barley, respectively. Soil physical properties were measured on a 2 m length transect located in a perpendicular line to the direction of vehicular traffic for field operations. Five sampling opportunities, within crop cycle, were used to measure the variables. Structural soil porosity, due principally to shrinkage and swelling cycles, was assessed in the 0 to 35 cm depth soil profile. This natural process seemed to be sufficient to guarantee good drainage and normal crop development, unless in the moisture content range included in field capacity.

  1. Seasonal differences in tillage draught on a sandy loam soil with long-term additions of animal manure and mineral fertilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltre, Clément; Nyord, T.; Christensen, B.T.;

    2016-01-01

    Energy requirements for soil tillage are closely linked to soil properties, such as clay, water and soil organic carbon (SOC) contents. Long-term application of inorganic fertilizer and organic amendments affects SOC content but little is known about seasonal differences in tillage draught...... requirements of soils subject to contrasting nutrient management regimes. We assessed autumn and spring tillage draught following harvest of early-sown and timely sown winter wheat grown on a sandy loam in the Askov Long-Term Experiment on Animal Manure and Mineral Fertilizers. Draught force was related...... to soil texture, soil water and SOC content, shear strength and bulk density, nutrient management, and yield of the preceding winter wheat. Contents of clay and SOC ranged from 8.9 to 10.6% and from 0.98 to 1.36%, respectively. In the autumn and spring, SOC normalized by clay content explained 38 and 5...

  2. Soil resistance and resilience to mechanical stresses for three differently managed sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per;

    2012-01-01

    carbon (CCC resistance and resilience of the three soils to compaction using air permeability (ka), void ratio (e) and air-filled porosity (ε) as functional indicators and to characterise aggregate stability, strength and friability. Aggregate tensile...... at both soil-water potentials than the MCC and CCC soils possibly due to higher biotic binding of soil particles by the greater organic carbon content. The water dispersible clay was negatively correlated with the level of clay saturation by organic carbon. The resistance of the soils to compaction......, quantified by both the compression index and a proposed functional index, was significantly greater for the MFC soil compared to the other two soils. The change in compression index with initial void ratio was significantly less for the MFC than the other soils. Plastic reorganisation of the soil particles...

  3. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  4. Feasibility of on-site bioremediation of loam soil contaminated by diesel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H; Narkis, N

    2001-09-01

    This study originated from an accidental event of diesel oil contamination in a loam soil area of 7,000 m2. Approximately a volume of 1,300 m3 of diesel oil was released into the environment. Reclamation of the contaminated soil by on-site bioremediation was selected as the most appropriate treatment method. A major concern was associated with the nature of the local loam soil. Loam has a very low hydraulic conductivity and very quickly becomes impermeable after its contact with water. The bioremediation approach incorporated excavation of the contaminated soil, mixing it with an agent, which increased its permeability. Following this preliminary treatment came the construction of bioreactors as a suitable environment of nutrients, moisture, dissolved oxygen, and enriched culture of microorganisms, which enabled breakdown of the diesel oil. This case study indicated that the target of 99% of diesel oil clean up could be achieved by using the technology of on-site bioremediation. The selected treatment method was found to be technologically and economically feasible. However, some improvement in the application of the basic treatment approach might increase the bioremediation efficiency.

  5. Effect of Injecting Hydrogen Peroxide into Heavy Clay Loam Soil on Plant Water Status, NET CO2 Assimilation, Biomass, and Vascular Anatomy of Avocado Trees Efecto de la Inyección de Peróxido de Hidrógeno en Suelo Franco Arcilloso Pesado, sobre el Estado Hídrico, Asimilación Neta de CO2, Biomasa y Anatomía Vascular de Paltos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M Gil M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In Chile, avocado (Persea americana Mill. orchards are often located in poorly drained, low-oxygen soils, situation which limits fruit production and quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of injecting soil with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as a source of molecular oxygen, on plant water status, net CO2 assimilation, biomass and anatomy of avocado trees set in clay loam soil with water content maintained at field capacity. Three-year-old ‘Hass’ avocado trees were planted outdoors in containers filled with heavy loam clay soil with moisture content sustained at field capacity. Plants were divided into two treatments, (a H2O2 injected into the soil through subsurface drip irrigation and (b soil with no H2O2 added (control. Stem and root vascular anatomical characteristics were determined for plants in each treatment in addition to physical soil characteristics, net CO2 assimilation (A, transpiration (T, stomatal conductance (gs, stem water potential (SWP, shoot and root biomass, water use efficiency (plant biomass per water applied [WUEb]. Injecting H2O2 into the soil significantly increased the biomass of the aerial portions of the plant and WUEb, but had no significant effect on measured A, T, gs, or SWP. Xylem vessel diameter and xylem/phloem ratio tended to be greater for trees in soil injected with H2O2 than for controls. The increased biomass of the aerial portions of plants in treated soil indicates that injecting H2O2 into heavy loam clay soils may be a useful management tool in poorly aerated soil.En Chile, los huertos de palto (Persea americana Mill. se ubican comúnmente en suelos pobremente drenados con bajo contenido de oxígeno, lo que limita producción y calidad de fruta. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de la inyección de peróxido de hidrógeno (H2O2 al suelo como fuente de O2, sobre el estado hídrico, asimilación de CO2, biomasa y anatomía de paltos en suelo franco arcilloso con

  6. Degradation of roxarsone in a silt loam soil and its toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tengfang; Ke, Zhengchen; Chen, Qing; Liu, Li; Chen, Guowei

    2014-10-01

    The land application of poultry or swine litter, containing large amounts of roxarsone, causes serious arsenic pollution in soil. Understanding biotransformation process of roxarsone and its potential risks favors proper disposal of roxarsone-contaminated animal litter, yet remains not achieved. We report an experimental study of biotransformation process of roxarsone in a silt loam soil under various soil moisture and temperature conditions, and the toxicity of roxarsone and its products from degradation. Results showed that soil moisture and higher temperature promoted roxarsone degradation, associating with emergent pentavalent arsenic. Analysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis activity revealed that roxarsone does not exert acute toxic on soil microbes. With the release of inorganic arsenic, FDA hydrolysis activity was inhibited gradually, as evidenced by ecotoxicological assessment using Photobacterium leiognathi. The results shade new lights on the dynamic roxarsone biotransformation processes in soil, which is important for guiding appropriate disposal of poultry or swine litter in the environment.

  7. Effect of biochar on aerobic processes, enzyme activity, and crop yields in two sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Bruun, Esben; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2014-01-01

    Biochar added to agricultural soils may sequester carbon and improve physico-chemical conditions for crop growth, due to effects such as increased water and nutrient retention in the root zone. The effects of biochar on soil microbiological properties are less certain. We addressed the effects...... of wood-based biochar on soil respiration, water contents, potential ammonia oxidation (PAO), arylsulfatase activity (ASA), and crop yields at two temperate sandy loam soils under realistic field conditions. In situ soil respiration, PAO, and ASA were not significantly different in quadruplicate field......, it was found that soil pH, rather than biochar rates, was a driving environmental variable. For ASA, the methodological approach was challenged by product sorption, but results did not suggest that biochar significantly stimulated the enzyme activity. Crop yields of maize in field experiments with 10–100 Mg...

  8. Effects of biochar and manure amendments on water vapor sorption in a sandy loam soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    properties of soils, especially on water retention at low matric potentials. To overcome this knowledge gap, the effects of combined BC (0 to 100 Mg ha-1) and manure (21 and 42 Mg ha-1) applications on water vapor sorption and specific surface area was investigated for a sandy loam soil. In addition......, potential impacts of BC aging were evaluated. All considered BC-amendment rates led to a distinct increase of water retention, especially for low matric potentials. The observed increases were attributed to a significant increase of soil organic matter contents and specific surface areas in BCamended soils......Over the last few years, the application of biochar (BC) as a soil amendment to sequester carbon and mitigate global climate change has received considerable attention. While positive effects of biochar on plant nutrition are well documented, little is known about potential impacts on the physical...

  9. Effect of Corn Residue Biochar on the Hydraulic Properties of Sandy Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanthi Deshani Igalavithana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochar has an ability to alter the biological, chemical, and physical properties of soil due to its physicochemical properties such as surface area, porosity, nutrient retention ability, available nutrient contents, aromaticity, etc. The present study was designed to evaluate the impact of physical properties and application rate of biochar on the hydraulic properties of a sandy loam soil in the short term. Biochar was produced at 500 °C from dried corn residue (BC500. The BC500 was incorporated at the rates of 0, 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10% (w·w−1 into the sandy loam soil and filled up to a height of 4 cm, in cores having 5 cm diameter and height. Each treatment was performed in triplicate and equilibrated for 30 days. Then saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat, water holding capacity (WHC, and bulk density were determined in each sample after four days of saturation at room temperature in a water bath. The BC500 particle size distribution, pores, and surface functional groups were assessed. The Ksat exhibited a highly significant exponential reduction from 0% to 7.5% of BC500 application and approached an asymptote at 10% BC500. Bulk density showed a significant negative correlation to biochar application rate. The WHC and BC500 application rate illustrated a strong positive relationship. Biochar surface was free from hydrophobic functional groups. The addition of BC500 has a positive influence on soil hydraulic properties, primarily due to the increased soil porosity. The BC500 is composed of a microporous structure and hydrophilic surface that retain water in sandy textured soils. The application of BC500 would be a wise investment to maximize the water use efficiency in soils for agricultural production.

  10. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  11. A Bioassay Technique to Study Clomazone Residues in Sandy Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Gajić Umiljendić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A bioassay test was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of maize, sunflower and barley toclomazone residues in sandy loam soil. Clomazone was applied at different rates from 0.12 to12 mg a.i./kg of soil. The parameters measured 14 days after treatment were: shoot height, freshand dry weight, and content of pigments (carotenoids, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b. Theresults showed that the lowest clomazone concentration caused a significant reduction in allmeasured parameters for barley and sunflower shoots. Fresh weight of maize shoots was notsensitive to clomazone residual activity in soil while the other parameters were highly inhibited.Nomenclature: clomazone (2-(2-chlorbenzyl-4,4-dimethyl-1,2-oxazolidin-3-one, maize(Zea mays L., sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

  12. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base) by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the...

  13. Phytotoxicity and uptake of nitroglycerin in a natural sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Kuperman, Roman G; Dodard, Sabine G; Sarrazin, Manon; Savard, Kathleen; Paquet, Louise; Hawari, Jalal; Checkai, Ronald T; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2011-11-15

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is widely used for the production of explosives and solid propellants, and is a soil contaminant of concern at some military training ranges. NG phytotoxicity data reported in the literature cannot be applied directly to development of ecotoxicological benchmarks for plant exposures in soil because they were determined in studies using hydroponic media, cell cultures, and transgenic plants. Toxicities of NG in the present studies were evaluated for alfalfa (Medicago sativa), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) exposed to NG in Sassafras sandy loam soil. Uptake and degradation of NG were also evaluated in ryegrass. The median effective concentration values for shoot growth ranged from 40 to 231 mg kg(-1) in studies with NG freshly amended in soil, and from 23 to 185 mg kg(-1) in studies with NG weathered-and-aged in soil. Weathering-and-aging NG in soil did not significantly affect the toxicity based on 95% confidence intervals for either seedling emergence or plant growth endpoints. Uptake studies revealed that NG was not accumulated in ryegrass but was transformed into dinitroglycerin in the soil and roots, and was subsequently translocated into the ryegrass shoots. The highest bioconcentration factors for dinitroglycerin of 685 and 40 were determined for roots and shoots, respectively. Results of these studies will improve our understanding of toxicity and bioconcentration of NG in terrestrial plants and will contribute to ecological risk assessment of NG-contaminated sites.

  14. Aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen in reclaimed sandy loam soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, A.F.; Stahl, P.D.; Ingram, L.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Minimal research has been conducted on aggregate, C, and N in coarse-textured soils used to reclaim surface coal mine lands. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution different plant communities make to the recovery of aggregation in these soils. Two chronosequences of semiarid reclaimed sites with sandy loam soils were sampled under shrub- and grass-dominated communities. Aggregation, aggregate fractions, and associated C and N were measured. No definitive trends of increasing macroaggregates between sites were observed undershrubs; however, macro- and microaggregation was greater in the 16-yr-old (0.20 and 0.23 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) than in the 5-yr-old soils (0.02 and 0.08 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) under grasses. Although C and N concentrations were drastically reduced (50-75%) with mining activity between the <1-yr-old and native soils, aggregate C and N concentrations tinder shrubs and grasses were similar to each other and to the native soils in the 5-yr-old site. Sods under grass in the 16-yr-old site had lower available and aggregate-occluded C and N concentrations than the 5-yr-old site, while C and N concentrations did not change between 5- and 16-yr-old soils under shrubs. Conversely, aggregate C and N pool sizes under shrubs and grasses both increased with site age to conditions similar to those observed in the native soil. Reclaimed shrub site soils had consistently higher C concentrations in the older reclaimed sites (10 and 16 yr old) than the soils under grasses, indicating greater accumulation and retention of C and N in organic material under shrub than grass communities in semiarid reclaimed sites.

  15. Estimation of the Potential for Atrazine Transport in a Silt Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, D.A.V.; Wagenet, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The transport potential of the herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethyl-6-isopropyl-s-triazine) through a 1-meter-thick root zone of corn (Zea mays L.) in a silty-loam soil in Kansas was estimated for a 22-year period (1972-93) using the one-dimensional water-flow and solute-transport model LEACHM. Results demonstrate that, for this soil, atrazine transport is directly related to the amount and timing of rain that follows spring applications of atrazine. Two other critical transport factors were important in wet years - [1] variability in atrazine application rate, and [2] atrazine degradation rates below the root zone. Results demonstrate that the coincidence of heavy rain soon after atrazine application can cause herbicide to move below the rooting zone into depths at which biodegradation rates are assumed to be low but are often unknown. Atrazine that reaches below the rooting zone and persists in the underlying soil can subsequently be transported into ground water as soil water drains, typically after the growing season. A frequency analysis of atrazine concentrations in subsurface drainage, combined with field data, demonstrates the relative importance of critical transport factors and confirms a need for definitive estimates of atrazine-degradation rates below the root zone. The analysis indicates that periodic leaching of atrazine can be expected for this soil when rainfall that exceeds 20 cm/mo coincides with atrazine presence in soil.

  16. Leaching and ponding of viral contaminants following land application of biosolids on sandy-loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin; Harrigan, Tim; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2012-12-15

    Much of the land available for application of biosolids is cropland near urban areas. Biosolids are often applied on hay or grassland during the growing season or on corn ground before planting or after harvest in the fall. In this study, mesophilic anaerobic digested (MAD) biosolids were applied at 56,000 L/ha on a sandy-loam soil over large containment lysimeters seeded to perennial covers of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), or planted annually to maize (Zea mays L.). Portable rainfall simulators were to maintain the lysimeters under a nearly saturated (90%, volumetric basis) conditions. Lysimeter leachate and surface ponded water samples were collected and analyzed for somatic phage, adenoviruses, and anionic (chloride) and microbial (P-22 bacteriophage) tracers. Neither adenovirus nor somatic phage was recovered from the leachate samples. P-22 bacteriophage was found in the leachate of three lysimeters (removal rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.2 log(10)/m). Although the peak of the anionic tracer breakthrough occurred at a similar pore volume in each lysimeter (around 0.3 pore volume) the peak of P-22 breakthrough varied between lysimeters (worm holes or other natural phenomena. The concentration of viral contaminants collected in ponded surface water ranged from 1 to 10% of the initial concentration in the applied biosolids. The die off of somatic phage and P-22 in the surface water was fit to a first order decay model and somatic phage reached background level at about day ten. In conclusion, sandy-loam soils can effectively remove/adsorb the indigenous viruses leached from the land-applied biosolids, but there is a potential of viral pollution from runoff following significant rainfall events when biosolids remain on the soil surface.

  17. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaldoun, A.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Wegdam, G.; de Leeuw, B.; Méheust, Y.; Fossum, J.O.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay s

  18. Imazaquin degradation and metabolism in a sandy loam soil amended with farm litters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Imazaquin applied in legume crops has a long residual time in soil,which often impacts safety of the susceptible crops.To increase safety of imazaquin application,two composted litters,bovine manure (BM) and chicken manure (CM),were used to determine their effects on imazaquin environmental behavior by incorporating each kind of manure into the tested sandy loam soil at 10% (w/w).The degradation of imazaquin in BM- and CM-amended soil was about 2.4 and 1.5 times,respectively,faster than that in unamended soil.The half-lives of imazaquin in BM-amended soil varied between 6.7 and 15.4 d over the temperature range of 20 to 40℃,and the degradation rate constant (k) increased by a factor of about 1.5 for every 10℃ change.Higher mix ratio did not significantly increase the degradation,and the optimal active degradation of imazaquin was observed approximately at the mix ratio of 10:1 of soil to BM.The different moisture levels had negligible effect on imazaquin degradation.In both unamended and BM-amended treatments.two metabolites were observed at 5,10 and 30 d after treatment.One metabolite at retention time (RT) of 8.4 min was identified as 2-(4-hydroxyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-y1) quinoline acid,originating from the loss of isopropyl group and hydroxylation at the 4-position of imidazolinone ring.The other at RT of 12.9 min was identified as quinolinc-2,3-dicarboxylic anhydride,resulting from detachment of imidazolinone ring and the forming of dicarboxylic anhydride.This finding suggested that the addition of farm litters into soil might be a good management option since it can not only increase soil fertility but also contribute to increase safety of imazaquin application to the following susceptible crops.

  19. Characterisation of phosphate solubilising bacteria in sandy loam soil under chickpea cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Machiavelli; Tejo Prakash, N

    2012-06-01

    With the aim to explore the possible role of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) in phosphorus (P) cycling in agricultural soils, we isolated PSB inhabiting naturally in the sandy loam soils under chickpea cropping of Patiala (Punjab State). A total of 31 bacterial isolates showing solubilizing activities were isolated on Pikovskaya agar plates. The potent phosphate solubilizers were selected for further characterization. These isolates were shown to belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Serratia by partial sequencing analysis of their respective 16S rDNA genes. ERIC-PCR based fingerprinting was done for tracking the survival of introduced populations of the PSB during mass inoculation of these strains under chickpea plots. The results showed positive correlation (r(2) = 0.853) among soil phosphatase activity and phosphate solubilizers population, which was also positively correlated (r(2) = 0.730) to available phosphorus. Identification and characterization of soil PSB for the effective plant growth-promotion broadens the spectrum of phosphate solubilizers available for field application.

  20. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai;

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... and dry regions) for a given soil and biochar amendment scenarios. This study evaluates how biochar applied to a sandy loam field at rates from 0 to 50 Mg ha−1 yr–1 in 2011, 2012, or both years (2011+2012) influences the full water retention curve. Inorganic fertilizer and pig slurry were added to all...... region-water retention curve increased with increasing biochar rates....

  2. USE OF THE “ROTHC” MODEL TO SIMULATE SOIL ORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS ON A SILTY-LOAM INCEPTISOL IN NORTHERN ITALY UNDER DIFFERENT FERTILIZATION PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Francaviglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the efficiency of the RothC model to simulate Soil Organic Carbon (SOC dynamics after 12 years of organic and mineral fertilization practices in a study area located in northern Italy, on a silty-loam Inceptisol with a rotation including tomato, maize and alfalfa. The model performance was assessed by RMSE and EF coefficients. RothC simulated well observed SOC decreases in 71 samples (RMSE=7.42; EF=0.79, while performed with less accuracy when considering all samples (96 samples; RMSE=12.37; EF=0.58, due to the fact that the model failed in case of measured SOC increases (25 samples; RMSE=20.77; EF=-0.038. The model was used to forecast the SOC dynamics over a 50 year period under the same pedoclimatic conditions. Only clay contents >15% allowed to predict increasing levels of SOC respect to the starting values.

  3. IMPACT OF THE REPEATED TRACTOR PASSES ON SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SILTY LOAM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravko Filipović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to quantify soil compaction induced by tractor traffic on untilled wet silty loam soil (Mollic Fluvisol. Changes in penetration resistance, bulk density and total porosity were measured for detecting the soil compaction. Treatments include ten passes of a four-wheel drive tractor with the engine power of 54.0 kW and weight of 3560 kg (1580 kg on the front axle and 1980 kg on the rear axle, 2.41 m distance between axles. The tyres on the tractor were cross-ply, front 11.2-24 and rear 16.9-30, with the inflation pressure of 160 kPa and 100 kPa, respectively. The speed of tractor during passes over experimental plots was 5.0 km h-1. In comparison to control, each tractor pass induced an increase in soil penetration resistance at all depths, and the average increment ratios, determined as the average of all layers, were 9.8, 18.5 and 26.1% after one, five and ten passes, respectively. The bulk density also increased with number of tractor passes, but with less percentage increasing. The increment ratios comparison to the control were 3.6, 9.5 and 12.9% after one, five and ten passes, respectively. The total porosity decreased with the number of passes, and the decrement ratios were 4.5, 16.5 and 20.8% after one, five and ten passes, respectively.

  4. Uncertainty of Deardorff’s soil moisture model based on continuous TDR measurements for sandy loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandyk Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on soil moisture is indispensable for a range of hydrological models, since it exerts a considerable influence on runoff conditions. Proper tools are nowadays applied in order to gain in-sight into soil moisture status, especially of uppermost soil layers, which are prone to weather changes and land use practices. In order to establish relationships between meteorological conditions and topsoil moisture, a simple model would be required, characterized by low computational effort, simple structure and low number of identified and calibrated parameters. We demonstrated, that existing model for shallow soils, considering mass exchange between two layers (the upper and the lower, as well as with the atmosphere and subsoil, worked well for sandy loam with deep ground water table in Warsaw conurbation. GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation linked with GSA (Global Sensitivity Analysis provided for final determination of parameter values and model confidence ranges. Including the uncertainty in a model structure, caused that the median soil moisture solution of the GLUE was shifted from the one optimal in deterministic sense. From the point of view of practical model application, the main shortcoming were the underestimated water exchange rates between the lower soil layer (ranging from the depth of 0.1 to 0.2 m below ground level and subsoil. General model quality was found to be satisfactory and promising for its utilization for establishing measures to regain retention in urbanized conditions.

  5. Nitrogen Mineralization of a Loam Soil Supplemented with Organic–Inorganic Amendments under Laboratory Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M. Kaleem; Khaliq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aims of the present study was to determine the potential N mineralization and subsequent nitrification of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM), wheat straw residues (WSR), and urea N (UN) applied to a loam soil incubated periodically over 140 days period. In addition, changes in total soil N and carbon contents were also monitored during the study. Treatments included: PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized). All the amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg-1. Results indicated that a substantial quantity of N had been released from the added amendments into the soil mineral pool and the net cumulative N mineralized varied between 39 and 147 mg N kg-1, lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50 + PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net mineral N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN) varied between 16 and 126 mg kg-1, highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. On average, percentage conversion of added N into available N by different amendments varied between 21 and 80%, while conversion of applied N into NO3-–N ranged between 9 and 65%, and the treatment UN50 + PM50 displayed the highest N recovery. Urea N when applied alone showed disappearance of 37% N (N unaccounted for) at the end while application of PM and WSR with UN reduced N disappearance and increased N retention in the mineral pool for a longer period. Organic amendments alone or in combination with UN improved organic matter buildup and increased soil N concentration. These results demonstrate the existence of substantial amounts of N reserves present in PM

  6. Nitrogen Mineralization of a Loam Soil Supplemented with Organic-Inorganic Amendments under Laboratory Incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Khaliq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aims of the present study was to determine the potential N mineralization and subsequent nitrification of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM), wheat straw residues (WSR), and urea N (UN) applied to a loam soil incubated periodically over 140 days period. In addition, changes in total soil N and carbon contents were also monitored during the study. Treatments included: PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized). All the amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg(-1). Results indicated that a substantial quantity of N had been released from the added amendments into the soil mineral pool and the net cumulative N mineralized varied between 39 and 147 mg N kg(-1), lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50 + PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net mineral N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN) varied between 16 and 126 mg kg(-1), highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. On average, percentage conversion of added N into available N by different amendments varied between 21 and 80%, while conversion of applied N into NO3 (-)-N ranged between 9 and 65%, and the treatment UN50 + PM50 displayed the highest N recovery. Urea N when applied alone showed disappearance of 37% N (N unaccounted for) at the end while application of PM and WSR with UN reduced N disappearance and increased N retention in the mineral pool for a longer period. Organic amendments alone or in combination with UN improved organic matter buildup and increased soil N concentration. These results demonstrate the existence of substantial amounts of N reserves present

  7. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  8. [Effects of long-term fertilization on pH buffer system of sandy loam calcareous fluvor-aquic soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Dong; Qi, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Yong-Chun; Zhang, Ai-Jun; Ning, Yun-Wang; Xu, Xian-Ju; Zhang, Hui; Ma, Hong-Bo

    2012-04-01

    Soil samples (0-80 cm) were collected from a 30-year fertilization experimental site in Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province of East China to study the variations of the pH, calcium carbonate and active calcium carbonate contents, and pH buffer capacity of sandy loam calcareous fluvor-aquic soil under different fertilization treatments. Thirty-year continuous application of different fertilizers accelerated the acidification of topsoil (0-20 cm), with the soil pH decreased by 0.41-0.70. Under different fertilization, the soil pH buffer capacity (pHBC) varied from 15.82 to 21.96 cmol x kg(-1). As compared with no fertilization, single N fertilization decreased the pHBC significantly, but N fertilization combined with organic fertilization could significantly increase the pHBC. The soil pHBC had significant positive correlations with soil calcium carbonate and active calcium carbonate contents, but less correlation with soil organic matter content and soil cation exchange capacity, suggesting that after a long-term fertilization, the sandy loam calcareous fluvor-aquic soil was still of an elementary calcium carbonate buffer system, and soil organic matter and cation exchange capacity contributed little to the buffer system. The soil calcium carbonate and active calcium carbonate contents were greater in 0-40 cm than in 40-80 cm soil layer. Comparing with soil calcium carbonate, soil active calcium carbonate was more sensitive to reflect the changes of soil physical and chemical properties, suggesting that the calcium carbonate buffer system could be further classified as soil active calcium carbonate buffer system.

  9. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  10. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  11. Nitrogen mineralization of a loam soil supplemented with organic-inorganic amendments under laboratory incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaleem ABBASI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of nitrogen (N supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aim of the present study was to determine the potential mineralization of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM, wheat (Triticum aestivum L. straw residues (WSR, and urea N (UN applied to a loam soil and incubated periodically over 140 days period. Treatments included PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized. Added amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg−1. Nitrogen supplying capacity of added materials was determined by measuring changes in total mineral N (ammonium-nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen [NH4+–N + NO3––N] and accumulation of NO3––N over different incubation periods. Changes in soil organic matter content and total N concentration were also monitored during the study. Results indicated that added amendments released substantial N into the mineral N pool (net cumulative N mineralized [NCNM] ranged between 39 and 147 mg N kg−1, lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50+PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net inorganic N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. Total inorganic N derived from PM increased from 2.3 mg kg−1 at d 1, to a maximum of 102 to 105 mg kg−1 at 63, 84 and 105 d after PM application. The values were further increase from 31.5 mg kg−1 at d 0 to a maximum of 165 mg kg−1 at d 49 in UN50 + PM50 treatment. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN varied between 16 and 126 mg kg−1, highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. Soil amended with WSR100 showed negative values both for mineralization and nitrification until day 84, displaying net immobilization. On average, percentage conversion of added N into

  12. Rapid Stabilization/Polymerization of Wet Clay Soils; Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Conference, 182- 193. 70. Heller, H. and Keren, R. (2002). "Anionic Polyacrylamide Polymers Effect on Rheological Behavior of Sodium-Montmorillonite...34 Engineering Geology, 44(1-4), 107-120. 198. Zaitoun, A. and Berton, N. (1996). "Stabilization of Montmorillonite Clay in Porous Media by Polyacrylamides ."SPE...Rate Secondary Additive Secondary Rate Raub silty loam N/A Starch graft polymer Solid 0.04, 0.1, and 0.4% N/A N/A Fincastle silty loam N/A

  13. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  14. Effects of Nitramine Explosive CL-20 on the Soil Microinvertebrate Community in a Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    by individually combining and gently mixing CL-20- amended soil concentrates with clean SSL field soil in a plastic bag . This approach ensured that...Hawari, J.; Spain, J.C. Biodegradation of the Nitramine Explosive CL- 20. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2003, 69, 1871–1874. U.S. Department of

  15. Field performance of nine soil water content sensors on a sandy loam soil in new brunswick, maritime region, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lien; Xing, Zisheng; Rees, Herb W; Meng, Fanrui; Monteith, John; Stevens, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    An in situ field test on nine commonly-used soil water sensors was carried out in a sandy loam soil located in the Potato Research Center, Fredericton, NB (Canada) using the gravimetric method as a reference. The results showed that among the tested sensors, regardless of installation depths and soil water regimes, CS615, Trase, and Troxler performed the best with the factory calibrations, with a relative root mean square error (RRMSE) of 15.78, 16.93, and 17.65%, and a r(2) of 0.75, 0.77, and 0.65, respectively. TRIME, Moisture Point (MP917), and Gopher performed slightly worse with the factory calibrations, with a RRMSE of 45.76, 26.57, and 20.41%, and a r(2) of 0.65, 0.72, and 0.78, respectively, while the Gypsum, WaterMark, and Netafim showed a frequent need for calibration in the application in this region.

  16. Field Performance of Nine Soil Water Content Sensors on a Sandy Loam Soil in New Brunswick, Maritime Region, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Stevens

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available An in situ field test on nine commonly-used soil water sensors was carried out in a sandy loam soil located in the Potato Research Center, Fredericton, NB (Canada using the gravimetric method as a reference. The results showed that among the tested sensors, regardless of installation depths and soil water regimes, CS615, Trase, and Troxler performed the best with the factory calibrations, with a relative root mean square error (RRMSE of 15.78, 16.93, and 17.65%, and a r2 of 0.75, 0.77, and 0.65, respectively. TRIME, Moisture Point (MP917, and Gopher performed slightly worse with the factory calibrations, with a RRMSE of 45.76, 26.57, and 20.41%, and a r2 of 0.65, 0.72, and 0.78, respectively, while the Gypsum, WaterMark, and Netafim showed a frequent need for calibration in the application in this region.

  17. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiwei; Ding, Weixin; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Huanjun; Luo, Jiafa; Bolan, Nanthi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N) on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant) straw in absence (BC0) and presence (BCN) of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. N amendment significantly increased the decomposition of biochar during the first 5 days of incubation (P soil PLFAs concentration at the beginning of incubation, indicating that microorganisms were N-limited in test soil. Furthermore, N amendment significantly (P soil.

  18. Evaluation of Soil Quality Indicators in Sugarcane Management in Sandy Loam Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.A.C.SANT'ANNA; M.F.FERNANDES; W.M.P.M.IVO; J.L.S.COSTA

    2009-01-01

    An important factor for the sustainability of soils highly susceptible to degradation is the use of monitoring tools that promptly and realistically reflect changes imposed on soil by different cropping systems.To select soil quality indicator variables in sugarcane (Saccharum offcinarum L.) production areas that fulfill the criteria of sensitivity to management practices and between-season consistency in the management discrimination,ten composite soil samples (0-10 cm) were collected in July 2005 (rainy season) and again in March 2006 (dry season) from areas under cultivation of organic sugarcane (OS),green sugarcane (GS),burned sugarcane (BS) and from an adjacent native forest (NF) area at Usina Triunfo,Boca da Mata,Alagoas,Brazil.Microbial biomass-C (MBC),total organic C (TOC),soil enzyme activity expressed as the rate of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis,mean weight diameter of water-stable soil aggregates (MWD),and percentage of water-stable macroaggregates (PWSA) were analyzed.Although MBC and TOC were higher in NF than in the cultivated areas,no differences were observed in these C pools between the three sugarcane systems.The response of FDA to the site management was dependent on the sampling time.In the rainy period,the activity followed the order:NF > OS > GS > BS,whereas in the dry season,only NF differed from the other treatments.Irrespective of the sampling time,MWD and PWSA decreased in the order NF > OS = GS > BS.The variables MWD and PWSA are quite sensitive for discriminating between site management histories regardless the sampling season.

  19. Effect of silver nano-particles on soil microbial growth, activity and community diversity in a sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, A D; Velicogna, J R; Princz, J I; Subasinghe, R M; Scroggins, R P; Beaudette, L A

    2017-01-01

    Silver nano-particles (AgNPs) are widely used in a range of consumer products as a result of their antimicrobial properties. Given the broad spectrum of uses, AgNPs have the potential for being released to the environment. As a result, environmental risks associated with AgNPs need to be assessed to aid in the development of regulatory guidelines. Research was performed to assess the effects of AgNPs on soil microbial activity and diversity in a sandy loam soil with an emphasis on using a battery of microbial tests involving multiple endpoints. The test soil was spiked with PVP coated (0.3%) AgNPs at the following concentrations of 49, 124, 287, 723 and 1815 mg Ag kg(-1) dry soil. Test controls included an un-amended soil; soil amended with PVP equivalent to the highest PVP concentration of the coated AgNP; and soil amended with humic acid, as 1.8% humic acid was used as a suspension agent for the AgNPs. The impact on soil microbial community was assessed using an array of tests including heterotrophic plate counting, microbial respiration, organic matter decomposition, soil enzyme activity, biological nitrification, community level physiological profiling (CLPP), Ion Torrent™ DNA sequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). An impact on microbial growth, activity and community diversity was evident from 49 to 1815 mg kg(-1) with the median inhibitory concentrations (IC50) as low as 20-31 mg kg(-1) depending on the test. AgNP showed a notable impact on microbial functional and genomic diversity. Emergence of a silver tolerant bacterium was observed at AgNP concentrations of 49-287 mg kg(-1) after 14-28 days of incubation, but not detectable at 723 and 1815 mg kg(-1). The bacterium was identified as Rhodanobacter sp. The study highlighted the effectiveness of using multiple microbial endpoints for inclusion to the environmental risk assessment of nanomaterials.

  20. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific.

  1. Weeds of cereal stubble-fields on various soils in the Kielce region. P. 1. Podzolic and brown soils developed from sands and loams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Pawłowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Occupying cereal stubble-fields weed flora is the most characteristic of the environmental (especially soil conditions. Because of its developing and accomplishing the reproductive stages there it can threatens cultivated plants. They are considered to complete the seed store in a soil by 393 min per ha. The results presented in the paper concern the species composition, number and constancy (S and indice of coverage (D of the cereal stubble-field weed species on various soils in the Kielce region (the central part of Poland. The report was based upon 885 phytosociological records collected in the 268 stands. The records were carried out after the crop harvest, in the latter part of September, in 1976-1980. Soil were chosen on the base of soil maps. The analyse of soil samples, taken at the investigation process, were done in order to confirm the soil quality. The worked out material was divided into three parts. The first part, including 369 phytosociological records collected in the 112 stands (in 90 localities concerns stubble-field weeds on podzolic and brown soils developed from sands (loose, weakly loamy and loamy and loams (light and medium. It was found that these soils were grown by 108 (loamy sands to 132 (weakly loamy sands weed species. Among them 66 species were common for all of the soils. Species composition was not differentiated by the soil type (brown, podzolic within kind of the. soil (sand or loams. Among soil examined, the brown loams was the most abundant with species of high constancy degree (30 species but brown loose sands and podzolic loamy sands was the poorest one with (16 species.

  2. Sorption-desorption of imidacloprid onto a lacustrine Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mahrous M; El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Koskinen, William C

    2015-01-01

    Sorption-desorption of the insecticide imidacloprid 1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)-methyl]-N-nitro-2-imidazolidinimine onto a lacustrine sandy clay loam Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid (HA) fractions was investigated in 24-h batch equilibrium experiments. Imidacloprid (IMDA) sorption-desorption isotherms onto the three sorbents were found to belong to a non-linear L-type and were best described by the Freundlich model. The value of the IMDA adsorption distribution coefficient, Kd(ads), varied according to its initial concentration and was ranged 40-84 for HA, 14-58 for clay and 1.85-4.15 for bulk soil. Freundlich sorption coefficient, Kf(ads), values were 63.0, 39.7 and 4.0 for HA, clay and bulk soil, respectively. The normalized soil Koc value for imidacloprid sorption was ∼800 indicating its slight mobility in soils. Nonlinear sorption isotherms were indicated by 1/n(ads) values imidacloprid sorption process with all tested sorbents. Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values indicated a spontaneous and physicosorption process for IMDA and a more favorable sorption to HA than clay and soil. In conclusion, although the humic acid fraction showed the highest capacity and affinity for imidacloprid sorption, the clay fraction contributed to approximately 95% of soil-sorbed insecticide. Clay and humic acid fractions were found to be the major two factors controlling IMDA sorption in soils. The slight mobility of IMDA in soils and the hysteresis phenomenon associated with the irreversibility of its sorption onto, mainly, clay and organic matter of soils make its leachability unlikely to occur.

  3. Factors driving the carbon mineralization priming effect in a sandy loam soil amended with different types of biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely, P.; Tarquis, A. M.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Méndez, A.; Gascó, G.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of biochar on the soil carbon mineralization priming effect depends on the characteristics of the raw materials, production method and pyrolysis conditions. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the impact of three different types of biochar on physicochemical properties and CO2 emissions of a sandy loam soil. For this purpose, soil was amended with three different biochars (BI, BII and BIII) at a rate of 8 wt% and soil CO2 emissions were measured for 45 days. BI is produced from a mixed wood sieving from wood chip production, BII from a mixture of paper sludge and wheat husks and BIII from sewage sludge. Cumulative CO2 emissions of biochars, soil and amended soil were well fit to a simple first-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.97. Results show a negative priming effect in the soil after addition of BI and a positive priming effect in the case of soil amended with BII and BIII. These results can be related to different biochar properties such as carbon content, carbon aromaticity, volatile matter, fixed carbon, easily oxidized organic carbon or metal and phenolic substance content in addition to surface biochar properties. Three biochars increased the values of soil field capacity and wilting point, while effects over pH and cation exchange capacity were not observed.

  4. Rapid development of enhanced atrazine degradation in a Dundee silt loam soil under continuous corn and in rotation with cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotowicz, Robert M; Krutz, L Jason; Reddy, Krishna N; Weaver, Mark A; Koger, Clifford H; Locke, Martin A

    2007-02-07

    Mississippi Delta cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production in rotation with corn (Zea mays L.) was evaluated in field experiments from 2000 to 2005 at Stoneville, Mississippi. Plots maintained under minimum tillage were established in 2000 on a Dundee silt loam with treatments including continuous cotton or corn and alternate cotton-corn rotations. Mineralization and dissipation of 14C [ring]-labeled atrazine were evaluated in the laboratory on soils collected prior to herbicide application in the first, second, third, and sixth years of the study. In soils collected in 2000, a maximum of 10% of the atrazine was mineralized after 30 days. After 1 year of herbicide application, atrazine-treated soils mineralized 52-57% of the radiolabeled atrazine in 30 days. By the sixth year of the study, greater than 59% of the atrazine was mineralized after 7 days in soils treated with atrazine, while soils from plots with no atrazine treatment mineralized less than 36%. The data also indicated rapid development of enhanced atrazine degradation in soils following 1 year of corn production with atrazine use. Atrazine mineralization was as rapid in soils under a rotation receiving biannual atrazine applications as in soils under continuous corn receiving annual applications of atrazine. Cumulative mineralization kinetics parameters derived from the Gompertz model (k and ti) were highly correlated with a history of atrazine application and total soil carbon content. Changes in the soil microbial community assessed by total fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis indicated significant interactions of cropping system and sampling date, with FAME indicators for soil bacteria responsible for differences in community structure. Autoclaved soil lost all ability to mineralize atrazine, and atrazine-mineralizing bacteria were isolated from these plots, confirming the biological basis for atrazine mineralization. These results indicate that changes in degradative potential of a soil can

  5. Changes to soil water content and biomass yield under combined maize and maize-weed vegetation with different fertilization treatments in loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehoczky Éva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Especially during early developmental stages, competition with weeds can reduce crop growth and have a serious effect on productivity. Here, the effects of interactions between soil water content (SWC, nutrient availability, and competition from weeds on early stage crop growth were investigated, to better understand this problem. Field experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 using long-term study plots on loam soil in Hungary. Plots of maize (Zea mays L. and a weed-maize combination were exposed to five fertilization treatments. SWC was observed along the 0–80 cm depth soil profile and harvested aboveground biomass (HAB was measured.

  6. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  7. Overall assessment of soil quality on humid sandy loams: Effects of location, rotation and tillage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Hansen, Elly Møller; Rickson, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    .e. visual evaluation of soil structure (VESS), overall visual structure (OVS) and overall soil structure (OSS)) were employed to differentiate the effects of these alternative management practices on soil structural quality and relative crop yield (RY). A Pearson correlation was also employed to find...... the correlation between the soil quality indices and relative crop yield. Relevant soil properties for calculating the soil quality indices were measured or obtained from previous publications. Crop rotation affected the soil structure and RY. The winter-dominated crop rotation (R2) resulted in the poorest soil...... correlations were found in most cases between soil quality indices (including M-SQR) and RY. This highlights the influence of soil quality (as measured by the selected indicators) – and soil structure in particular – on crop yield potential....

  8. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction...... is increased with increasing clay content, up to 30%, beyond which the mixture of silt and clay is not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction resistant under waves....

  9. Connectivity and percolation of pore networks in a cultivated silt loam soil quantified by X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats

    2016-04-01

    The connectivity of macropore networks is thought to exert an important control on transport processes in soil. However, little progress has been made towards quantifying these effects for natural soils in the field, partly because of the experimental difficulties but also because the concept of connectivity lacks a unique mathematical definition. To investigate this question, X-ray tomography was used to measure pore volume, size distribution and connectivity at an image resolution of 65 microns for 64 samples taken in two consecutive years in the harrowed and ploughed layers of a silt loam soil a few weeks after spring cultivation. Three different connectivity metrics were evaluated and compared: one local metric, the Euler number, and two global measures, the connection probability and the probability of percolation (the fraction of the porosity which is continuous across the sample). The connection probability was found to be a good measure of the long-range connectivity (i.e. continuity) of the pore networks. In contrast, the Euler number was not a sensitive measure of global connectivity, although all samples with negative Euler numbers did percolate. We also found that the way connection is defined in the image analysis (either by 6 or 26 nearest neighbours) did not influence the calculations of percolating porosity. The results also demonstrate that harrowing has a clear homogenizing effect on the distribution of the pore space. However, a comparison with random field simulations and the evidence of small percolation thresholds shows that the macropore system developed in the recently harrowed soil was far from completely random or disordered. In some samples, more than one pore cluster percolated, while in others the percolating cluster was not the largest one. Nevertheless, the macropore networks in this cultivated silt loam soil displayed some key features predicted by percolation theory: a strong relationship was found between the percolating fraction

  10. Main Clay Minerals in Soils of Fujian Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; ZHANGWEIMING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The clay minerals of more than 200 soil samples collected from various sites of Fujian Province were studied by the X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy to study their distribution and evolution.Montmorillonite was found in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit,and some lateritic red soil,red soil and yellow soil with a low weathering degree.Chlorite existed mainly in coastal solonchak and paddy soil developed from marine deposit.1.4nm intergradient mineral appeared frequently in yellow soil,red soil and lateritic red soil.The content of 1.4nm intergradient mineral increased with the decrease of weathering degree from lateritic red soil to red soil to yellow soil.Hydrous micas were more in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit.and puple soil from purple shale than in other soils.Kaolinte was the most important clay mineral in the soils iun this province.The higher the soil weathering degree,the more the kaolinite existed.From yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil,kaolinite increased gradually,Kaolinite was the predominant clay mineral accompanied by few other minerals in typical lateritic red soil. Tubular halloysite was a widespread clay mineral in soils of Fujian Province with varying quantities.The soil derived from the paent rocks rich in feldspar contained more tubular halloysite.Spheroidal halloysite was found in a red soil and a paddy soil developed from olivine basalt gibbsite in the soils in this district was largely“primary gibbsite” which formed in the early weathering stage.Gibbsite decreased with the increase of weathering degree from yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil.Goethite also decreased in the same sequence while hematite increased.

  11. Seasonal dynamics in wheel load-carrying capacity of a loam soil in the Swiss Plateau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gut, S.; Chervet, A.; Stettler, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    on in situ measurements of h, measurements of precompression stress at various h and simulations of soil stress. In this work, we concentrated on prevention of subsoil compaction. Calculations were made for different tyres (standard and low-pressure top tyres) and for soil under different tillage......) is defined as the maximum wheel load for a specific tyre and inflation pressure that does not result in soil stress in excess of soil strength. The soil strength and hence WLCC is strongly influenced by soil matric potential (h). The aim of this study was to estimate the seasonal dynamics in WLCC based......, demonstrating the potential of tyre equipment in reducing compaction risks. The NTD varied between years and generally decreased with increasing wheel load of the machinery. The WLCC simulations presented here provide a useful and easily interpreted tool to guide the avoidance of soil compaction....

  12. Removal of non aqueous phase liquid liquid (NAPL) from a loam soil monitored by time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    comegna, alessandro; coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; ajeel, ali; saeed, ali; sommella, angelo

    2016-04-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are compounds with low or no solubility with water. These compounds, due to the several human activities, can be accidentally introduced in the soil system and thus constitute a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and the high mobility. The remediation of contaminated soil sites requires knowledge of the contaminant distribution in the soil profile and groundwater. Methods commonly used to characterize contaminated sites are coring, soil sampling and the installation of monitoring wells for the collection of groundwater samples. The main objective of the present research is to explore the potential application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique in order to evaluate the effect of contaminant removal in a loam soil, initially contaminated with NAPL and then flushed with different washing solutions. The experimental setup consist of: i) a Techtronix cable tester; ii) a three-wire TDR probe with wave guides 14.5 cm long inserted vertically into the soil samples; iii) a testing cell of 8 cm in diameter and 15 cm high; iv) a peristaltic pump for upward injection of washing solution. In laboratory, soil samples were oven dried at 105°C and passed through a 2 mm sieve. Known quantities of soil and NAPL (corn oil, a non-volatile and non-toxic organic compound) were mixed in order to obtain soil samples with different degrees of contamination. Once a soil sample was prepared, it was repacked into a plastic cylinder and then placed into the testing cell. An upward injection of washing solution was supplied to the contaminated sample with a rate q=1.5 cm3/min, which corresponds to a darcian velocity v=6.0 cm/h. The out coming fluid, from the soil column was collected, then the washing solution and oil was separated. Finally both the amount of oil that was remediated and the dielectric permittivity (measured via TDR) of the contaminated soil sample were recorded. Data collected were employed to implement a

  13. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Libo Hao; Qiaoqiao Wei; Yuyan Zhao; Zilong Lu; Xinyun Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative determination of clay minerals in soil based on bulk chemical composition data. The fundamental principles and processes of the calculation are elucidated. Some samples were used for reliability verification of the method and the results prove the simplicity and efficacy of the approach.

  14. Charge Properties and Clay Mineral Composition of Tianbao Mountains Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEJI-ZHENG; LIXUE-YUAN; 等

    1992-01-01

    The clay mineral association,oxides of clay fraction and surface charge properties of 7 soils,which are developed from granite,located at different altitudesof the Tianbao Mountains were studied.Results indicate that with the increase in altitude,1) the weathering process and desilicification of soil clay minerals became weaker,whereas the leaching depotassication and the formation process of hydroxy-aluminum interlayer got stronger;2)the contents of amorphous and complex aluminum and iron,and the activity of aluminum and iron oxides for soil clay fraction increased;and 3) the amount of variable negarive charge,anion exchange capacity and the values of PZC and PZNC also increased.The activity of aluminum and iron oxides,the accumulation of aluminum,and surface charge characteristics and their relation to clay oxides of the vertical zone soils were observed and recorded.

  15. The fate of fresh and stored 15N-labelled sheep urine and urea applied to a sandy and a sandy loam soil using different application strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The fate of nitrogen from N-15-labelled sheep urine and urea applied to two soils was studied under field conditions. Labelled and stored urine equivalent to 204 kg N ha(-1) was either incorporated in soil or applied to the soil surface prior to sowing of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.),...... mineralized in the sandy loam soil, when urine was applied prior to sowing. Thus, the fertilizer effect of urine N may be significantly lower than that of urea N on fine-textured soils, even when gaseous losses of urine N are negligible....

  16. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Lu

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant straw in absence (BC0 and presence (BCN of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2 flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC content. N amendment significantly increased the decomposition of biochar during the first 5 days of incubation (P < 0.05, and the proportions of decomposed biochar carbon (C were 2.30% and 3.28% in BC0 and BCN treatments, respectively, during 30 days of incubation. The magnitude of decomposed biochar C was significantly (P < 0.05 higher than DOC in biochar (1.75% and part of relatively recalcitrant biochar C was mineralized in both treatments. N amendment increased soil PLFAs concentration at the beginning of incubation, indicating that microorganisms were N-limited in test soil. Furthermore, N amendment significantly (P < 0.05 increased the proportion of gram-positive (G+ bacteria and decreased that of fungi, while no noticeable changes were observed for gram-negative (G- bacteria and actinobacteria at the early stage of incubation. Our results indicated that N amendment promoted more efficiently the proliferation of G+ bacteria and accelerated the decomposition of relatively recalcitrant biochar C, which in turn reduced the stability of maize straw-derived biochar in test soil.

  17. Mobility of Arsenic and Heavy Metals in a Sandy-Loam Textured and Carbonated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GARCIA; M.DIEZ; F.MARTIN; M.SIMóN; C.DORRONSORO

    2009-01-01

    The continued effect of the pyrite-tailing oxidation on the mobility of arsenic,lead,zinc,cadmium,and copper was studied in a carbonated soil under natural conditions,with the experimcntal plot preserved with a layer of tailing covering the soil during three years.The experimental area is located in Southern Spain and was affected by a pyrite-mine spill.The climate in the area is typically Mediterranean,which determines the rate of soil alteration and element mobility.The intense alteration processes that occurred in the soil during three years caused important changes in its morphology and a strong degradation of the main soil properties.In this period,lead concentrated in the first 5 mm of the soil,with concentrations higher than 1500 mg kg-1,mainly associated to the neoformation of plumbojarosite.Arsenic was partially leached from the first 5 mm and mainly concentrated between 5-10 mm in the soil,with maximum values of 1 239 mg kg-1;the retention of arsenates was related to the neoformation of iron hydroxysulfates (jarosite,schwertmannite) and oxyhydroxides (goethite,ferrihydrite),both with a variable degree of crystallinity.The mobility of Zn,Cd,and Cu was highly affected by pH,producing a stronger leaching in depth;their retention was related to the forms of precipitated aluminium and,in the case of Cu,also to the neoformation of hydroxysulfate.

  18. Determination of Selenium Toxicity for Survival and Reproduction of Enchytraeid Worms in a Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    present study have been submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Eco-SSL Workgroup, and the EC20 value was used in developing soil...development of Eco-SSL values for soil invertebrates (USEPA, 2005) and were therefore the main focus of the present study. All ecotoxicological parameters...comparison with the EC50 values for other anionic contaminants, since EC50 values are more commonly reported in the literature. The results of the present

  19. Clinoptilolite zeolite influence on inorganic nitrogen in silt loam and sandy agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of best management practices can help improve inorganic nitrogen (N) availability to plants and reduce nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching in soils. This study was conducted to determine the influence of the zeolite mineral Clinoptilolite (CL) additions on NO3-N and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4...

  20. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover is influenced by interactions between organic matter and the mineral soil fraction. However, the influence of clay content and type on SOC turnover rates remains unclear, particularly in tropical soils under natural vegetation. We examined the lability...... of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving....... Basal soil respiration rates were determined from bulk soils and soil fractions. Substrate induced respiration rates were determined from soil fractions. SOC lability was significantly influenced by clay mineralogy, but not by clay content when compared across contrasting clay minerals. The lability...

  1. Olive Mill Effluent Spreading Effects on Water Retention of Tunisian Sandy Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi SAHRAOUI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill effluents (OME are characterized by their nutrients content and their adhesive and hydrophobic properties. An experiment was carried out at an olive growing area in Tunisia, “Sidi Bou Ali”, to identify the impact of spreading over OME on physical soil characteristics. Three treatments were in situ monitored, namely T0 (Control, T1 (25 m3/ha and T2 (50 m3/ha, over a period of 4 months. Measurements were conducted monthly corresponding respectively to D1, D2, D3 and D4. Water retention curves were established by a physical capillary model in porous medium. Results showed that the two applied OME doses induced a decrease in water retention, especially for potential matrixes above pF 2 corresponding to the water available range. No significant differences were found between the treated soil plots T1 and T2.doi:10.14456/WJST.2014.27

  2. Modeling Tractive Force Requirements of Wheel tractors For Disc Ploughing in Sandy Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O Nkakini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tractive force models at different tillage speeds were developed using dimensional analysis, describing the tractor tyre - soil interaction. In this research study, disc ploughing on an experimental plot at twenty different soil moisture levels in loamy sand soil was carried out using trace tractor techniques. The independent variables: drawbar pull force, rolling (motion resistance, wheel slip, moisture content, cone index, wheel numeric, contact pressure, speed, width of plough, depth of plough, and dependent variable (Tractive force were measured and compared to computed values. High coefficients of determination R2 = 0.9492, 0.9555 and 0.9447 for ploughing at tillage speeds of 1.94m/s, 2.22m/s and 2.5m/s were obtained respectively. Standard errors of 0.3672552, 0.8628 and 0.8047 and the percentage (% errors of -2.272608059 and 2.45655144,-2.304946155 and 2.523126085,-1.424947801 and 2.020155232 at minimum and maximum values, were obtained. These results are clear evidence of the test of goodness of fit of the models between predictive and measured parameters for ploughing at different tillage speeds. The models were verified and validated by comparing the predicted with the measured tractive forces, and shown to closely followed the experimental results.

  3. Transport of Alachlor, Atrazine, Dicamba, and Bromide through Silt and Loam Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The herbicides alachlor, atrazine, and dicamba, as well as bromide were applied to soils overlying the High Plains aquifer in Nebraska, to both macropore and non-macropore sites. Three of 6 study areas (exhibiting a high percentage of macropores) were used for analysis of chemical transport. Twelve intact soil cores (30 cm diameter; 40 cm height), were excavated (two each from 0-40 cm and 40-80 cm depths). The first three study areas and soil cores were used to study preferential flow characteristics using dye staining and to determine hydraulic properties; the remaining cores were treated the same as field macropore sites. Two undisturbed experimental field plots, each with a 1 m2 surface area, were established in each of the three macropore study areas. Each preferential plot was instrumented with suction lysimeters, tensiometers, and neutron access tubes - 10 cm increments to 80 cm - and planted in corn. Three study areas that did not exhibit macropores had alachlor, atrazine, and dicamba and bromide disked into the top 15 cm of soil; concentrations were tracked for 120 days - samples were collected on a grid, distributed within 3 plots measuring 50 m x 50 m each. Core samples were collected prior to and immediately after application, and then at 30, 60, and 120 days after application. Each lab core sample was in 15-cm lengths from 0-15 cm, 15-30 cm, 45-60 cm, and 75-90 cm. For areas exhibiting macropores, herbicides had begun to move between 10-15 days after application with concentrations peaking at various depths after heavy rainfall events. Field lysimeter samples showed increases in concentrations of herbicides at depths where laboratory data indicated greater percentages of preferential flowpaths. Concentrations of atrazine, alachlor and dicamba exceeding 0.30, 0.30, and 0.05 μg m1-1 respectively were observed with depth (10-30 cm and 50-70 cm) after two months following heavy rainfall events indicating that preferential flowpaths were a significant

  4. Pine Woodchip Biochar Impact on Soil Nutrient Concentrations and Corn Yield in a Silt Loam in the Mid-Southern U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy E. Brantley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochar has altered plant yields and soil nutrient availability in tropical soils, but less research exists involving biochar additions to temperate cropping systems. Of the existing research, results vary based on soil texture, crop grown, and biochar properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of pine (Pinus spp. woodchip biochar at 0, 5, and 10 Mg·ha−1 rates combined with urea nitrogen (N on soil chemical properties and corn (Zea mays L. yield under field conditions in the first growing season after biochar addition in a silt-loam alluvial soil. Biochar combined with fertilizer numerically increased corn yields, while biochar alone numerically decreased corn yields, compared to a non-amended control. Corn nitrogen uptake efficiency (NUE was greater with 10 Mg·ha−1 biochar compared to no biochar. There were limited biochar effects on soil nutrients, but biochar decreased nitrate, total dissolved N, and Mehlich-3 extractable sulfur and manganese concentrations in the top 10 cm. Pine woodchip biochar combined with N fertilizer has the potential to improve corn production when grown in silt-loam soil in the mid-southern U.S. by improving NUE and increasing yield. Further research will be important to determine impacts as biochar ages in the soil.

  5. Picloram and Aminopyralid Sorption to Soil and Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminopyralid sorption data are lacking, and these data are needed to predict off-target transport and plant available herbicide in soil solution. The objective of this research was to determine the sorption of picloram and aminopyralid to five soils and three clay minerals and determine if the pote...

  6. Clay dispersability in moist earthworm casts of different soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinissen, J.C.Y.; Nijhuis, E.; Breemen, van N.

    1996-01-01

    Earthworms were fed soil from two polders, differing in soil age and land use (grass and arable). Sterilised and non-sterilised moist earthworm casts were, directly or after ageing (for 2, 4, 8 and 20 weeks), analysed for clay dispersability and polysaccharide content, either as such, or after treat

  7. Improvement in the water retention characteristics of sandy loam soil using a newly synthesized poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid)/AlZnFe2O4 superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaukat Ali; Qidwai, Ansar Ahmad; Anwar, Farooq; Ullah, Inam; Rashid, Umer

    2012-08-03

    The use of some novel and efficient crop nutrient-based superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposites (SHNCs), is currently becoming increasingly important to improve the crop yield and productivity, due to their water retention properties. In the present study a poly(Acrylamide-co-acrylic acid)/AlZnFe2O4 superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposite was synthesized and its physical properties characterized using Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), FE-SEM and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The effects of different levels of SHNC were studied to evaluate the moisture retention properties of sandy loam soil (sand 59%, silt 21%, clay 19%, pH 7.4, EC 1.92 dS/m). The soil amendment with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 w/w% of SHNC enhanced the moisture retention significantly at field capacity compared to the untreated soil. Besides, in a separate experiment, seed germination and seedling growth of wheat was found to be notably improved with the application of SHNC. A delay in wilting of seedlings by 5-8 days was observed for SHNC-amended soil, thereby improving wheat plant growth and establishment.

  8. Development of methods for multiresidue analysis of rice post-emergence herbicides in loam soil and their possible applications to soils of different composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Silvina; Pareja, Lucia; Asteggiante, Lucía Geis; Roehrs, Rafael; Pizzutti, Ionara R; García, Claudio; Heinzen, Horacio; Cesio, María Verónica

    2010-01-01

    Two simple and straightforward sample preparation methods were developed for the multiresidue analysis of post-emergence herbicides in loam soil that are commonly used in rice crop cultivation. A number of strategic soil extraction and cleanup methods were evaluated. The instrumental analysis was performed by HPLC with a diode array detector. The best compromise between the recoveries (69-98%) and good repeatability (RSD clomazone were analyzed simultaneously. Quinclorac and bispyribac sodium were also assayed, but their recoveries were below 50%. Both methods had an LOD of 0.7 microg/kg and could accurately determine the residues at the 2 microg/kg level. These two methods could not be applied directly to other soil types as the recoveries strongly depended on the soil composition. The developed methodologies were successfully applied in monitoring 87 real-world soil samples, in which only propanil (6 to 12 microg/kg) and clomazone (15 to 20 microg/kg) residues could be detected.

  9. Soil microbial community response to surfactants and herbicides in two soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of herbicides on more than just the target weed and the effect of some herbicides on the soil biota is of environmental interest. The surfactants that are often used with herbicides are also coming under fire as a potential harm to the soil life. We used a silt loam and a silty clay loam ...

  10. Clay-illuvial soils in the Polish and international soil classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabała Cezary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil with a clay-illuvial subsurface horizon are the most widespread soil type in Poland and significantly differ in morphology and properties developed under variable environmental conditions. Despite the long history of investigations, the rules of classification and cartography of clay-illuvial soils have been permanently discussed and modified. The distinction of clay-illuvial soils into three soil types, introduced to the Polish soil classification in 2011, has been criticized as excessively extended, non-coherent with the other parts and rules of the classification, hard to introduce in soil cartography and poorly correlated with the international soil classifications. One type of clay-illuvial soils (“gleby płowe” was justified and recommended to reintroduce in soil classification in Poland, as well as 10 soil subtypes listed in a hierarchical order. The subtypes may be combined if the soil has diagnostic features of more than one soil subtypes. Clear rules of soil name generalization (reduction of subtype number for one soil were suggested for soil cartography on various scales. One of the most important among the distinguished soil sub-types are the “eroded” or “truncated” clay-illuvial soils.

  11. Cultivos de cobertura: efectos sobre la macroporosidad y la estabilidad estructural de un suelo franco-limoso Cover crops: effects on soil macroporosity and soil structural stability in a silt loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Florencia Varela

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Los suelos franco-limosos manejados con siembra directa a menudo poseen porosidad estructural baja e inestable. Con el objetivo de determinar la capacidad de los cultivos de cobertura (CC de mejorar la porosidad y estabilidad estructural de estos suelos se llevaron a cabo experimentos de campo y de invernáculo. Ambos tuvieron tratamientos con y sin CC (avena, Avena sativa L., en rotación con soja (Glicine max L. Merr.. Luego de los CC se midieron densidad aparente (DA, el índice de inestabilidad estructural (IE y en el ensayo de invernáculo además, se midió la evolución de la distribución de tamaño de poros (DTP. En ambos ensayos la introducción de CC no disminuyó la DA, aunque incrementó la estabilidad del suelo (PNo- till (NT silt loam topsoils have often a low and unstable structural porosity. The objective of this study was to determine the capability of cover crops (CC of improving the structural porosity and stability of silt loam soils under NT. Greenhouse and field experiments were carried out on a silt loam soil (Typic Argiudoll with and without CC (oat, Avena sativa L. in crop sequences with soybean (Glicine max L. Merr.. Soil bulk density (DA and aggregate instability index (IE were measured after the CC in both experiments. In the greenhouse experiment, soil pore size distribution (DTP was measured. The use of CC did not change DA, but soil IE was significantly lower in crop sequences with CC (P < 0.05 both under field and greenhouse conditions. Stability increases were likely due to the effect of CC residues and root mass. No differences in DTP were found between treatments, although a significant effect of sampling date was observed (P<0.05. Changes in DTP were due to significant increases in mesopore (517.5% and macropore (52.7% volumes. Such changes occurred in all the treatments, probably due to the soil wetting-drying cycles. The results found in this study agree with other studies carried out on silt loams in the

  12. Aggregate stability and associated C and N in a silty loam soil as affected by organic material inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Pan; SUI Peng; GAO Wang-sheng; WANG Bin-bin; HUANG Jian-xiong; YAN Peng; ZOU Juan-xiu; YAN Ling-ling; CHEN Yuan-quan

    2015-01-01

    To make recycling utilization of organic materials produced in various agricultural systems, ifve kinds of organic materials were applied in a ifeld test, including crop straw (CS), biogas residue (BR), mushroom residue (MR), wine residue (WR), pig manure (PM), with a mineral fertilizer (CF) and a no-fertilizer (CK) treatment as a control. Our objectives were:i) to quantify the effects of organic materials on soil C and N accumulation;i ) to evaluate the effects of organic materials on soil aggregate stability, along with the total organic carbon (TOC), and N in different aggregate fractions;and i i) to assess the relationships among the organic material components, soil C and N, and C, N in aggregate fractions. The trial was conducted in Wuqiao County, Hebei Province, China. The organic materials were incorporated at an equal rate of C, and combined with a mineral fertilizer in amounts of 150 kg N ha-1, 26 kg P ha-1 and 124 kg K ha-1 respectively during each crop season of a wheat-maize rotation system. The inputted C quantity of each organic material treatment was equivalent to the total amount of C contained in the crop straw harvested in CS treatement in the previous season. TOC, N, water-stable aggregates, and aggregate-associated TOC and N were investigated. The results showed that organic material incorpora-tion increased soil aggregation and stabilization. On average, the soil macroaggregate proportion increased by 14%, the microaggregate proportion increased by 3%, and mean-weight diameter (MWD) increased by 20%. TOC content fol owed the order of PM>WR>MR>BR>CS>CK>CF;N content fol owed the order WR>PM>MR>BR>CS>CF>CK. No signiifcant correlation was found between TOC, N, and the quality of organic material. Soil silt and clay particles contained the largest part of TOC, whereas the smal macroaggregate fraction was the most sensitive to organic materials. Our results indicate that PM and WR exerted better effects on soil C and N accumulation, fol owed by MR

  13. [Effects of soil texture and water content on the mineralization of soil organic carbon in paddy soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong-lin; Wu, Jin-shui; Ge, Ti-da; Tang, Guo-yong; Tong, Cheng-li

    2009-01-01

    To understand how soil texture and water content affect the mineralization of organic C in paddy soil, 3 selected soils (sandy loam, clay loam, and silty clay) were incubated (25 degrees C) with 14 C-labelled rice straw (1.0 g x kg(-1)) at water content varied from 45% to 105% of water holding capacity (WHC). Data indicated that, in the sandy loam and clay loam, the mineralization rate of 14 C-labelled rice straw reached the maximum at 75% WHC, as 53% and 58% of the straw C mineralized in the incubation period of 160 d, whereas in the silty clay, it increased gradually (from 41.8% to 49.0%) as water content increased up to 105% WHC. For all of the three soils, the mineralization rate of soil native organic C reached the maximum at 75% WHC, with 5.8% of the organic C mineralized in the same period for the sandy loam, and 8.0% and 4.8% for the clay loam and silty clay, respectively. As water content increased further, the mineralization rate of native organic C in the three soils significantly declined. The mineralization rate of added rice straw and native organic C in all the three soils, was well fitted with a conic curve. These results suggest that water-logging can decrease the mineralization of organic C in paddy soils.

  14. Soil precompression stress, penetration resistance and crop yields in relation to differently-trafficked, temperate-region sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2016-01-01

    . Undisturbed soil cores were used for quantifying the precompression stress (spc) of non-compacted soil. Tractor-trailer combinations for slurry application with wheel loads of 3, 6 and 8 Mg (treatments M3, M6, M8) were used for the experimental traffic in the spring at field-capacity. For one additional...... consecutive years (2010–2013). After two years of repeated experimental traffic, penetration resistance (PR) was measured to a depth of 1 m. The yield of a spring barley crop (Hordeum vulgare L.) was recorded in all four years of the experiment. The results did not support our hypothesis of spc as a soil...... strength measure predicting resistance to subsoil compaction. The tyre inflation pressure and/or the mean ground pressure were the main predictors of PR in the upper soil layers. For deeper soil layers, PR correlated better to the wheel load. The number of wheel passes (M-treatments vs the S12 treatment...

  15. "Clay grounds” in Denmark: from soil to canvas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buti, David; Vila, Anna; Haack Christensen, Anne;

    Poster Presentation Abstract: “Clay grounds” in Denmark: from soil to canvas In the framework of the CATS’ project to study the painting technique and materials in Dutch and Danish 17th Century paintings, with a key interest on the materials, techniques and trade of artists’ practice in Denmark...... decorative scheme showed that at least two grounds from those paintings consist mainly of clay mixed with iron and magnesium-containing compounds. Furthermore, both SEM-EDX and µRaman measurements clearly highlighted the presence of a large amount of quartz particles. It is well known that clay is a sheet...... from Rembrandt’s workshop after 1640. Written sources from outside the Netherlands -such as Francisco Pacheco and Pierre Lebrun- mention this practice, also before Rembrandt's time. It was known that clay was cheaper than chalk or earth pigments and it gave more flexibility to the painting support...

  16. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Babacar; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-06-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h -1, on 10 runoff micro-plots of 1 m 2, five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hydraulic properties such as capillary sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity of the sandy loam soil close to saturation were determined by running 48 infiltration tests with a tension disc infiltrometer. That allowed the calculation of a mean characteristic pore size hydraulically active and a time to ponding. Superficial water storage capacity was estimated using data collected with an electronic relief meter. Because the soil was subject to surface crusting, crust-types as well as their spatial distribution within micro-plots and their evolution with time were identified and monitored by taking photographs at different times after tillage. The results showed that the surface crust-types as well as their tillage dependent dynamics greatly explain the decrease of hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity as the cumulative rainfall since tillage increases. The exponential decaying rates were found to be significantly greater for the soil harrowed along the slope (where the runoff crust-type covers more than 60% of the surface after 140 mm of rain) than across to the slope (where crusts are mainly of structural (60%) and erosion (40%) types). That makes ponding time smaller and runoff more important. Also it was shown that soil hydraulic properties after about 160 mm of rain were close to those of untilled plot not submitted to any rain. That indicates that the effects of tillage are short lived.

  17. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  18. Pesticide leaching in macroporous clay soils: field experiment and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords : pesticide leaching, macropores, preferential flow, preferential transport, cracked clay soil, pesticide leaching models, groundwater contamination, inverse modeling, bentazone and imidacloprid. The presence of macropores (i.e. shrinkage c

  19. Soil, crop and emission responses to seasonal-controlled traffic in organic vegetable farming on loam soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, G.D.; Mosquera Losada, J.

    2009-01-01

    Some organic arable and vegetable farms in the Netherlands use cm-precise guidance of machinery to restrict wheel traffic to fixed traffic lanes and to achieve non-trafficked cropping zones with optimized soil structure in between the lanes. Contrary to controlled traffic farming (CTF) the traffic l

  20. Simulation of Soil Water Content Variability in a Heavy Clay Soil under Contrasting Soil Managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, A.; Vanderlinden, K.; Martínez, G.; Espejo, A. J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is a key variable for numerous physical, chemical and biological processes that take place at or near the soil surface. Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of SWC at the field scale is of prime importance for implementing efficient measurement strategies in applications. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of gravimetric SWC in a heavy clay soil, in a wheat-sunflower-legume rotation under conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) using a simple water balance model. An experimental field in SW Spain, where conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) management of a heavy clay soil are being compared since 1983, was sampled for gravimetric SWC on 38 occasions during 2008 and 2009. Topsoil clay content across the six plots was on average 55%, with a standard deviation of 2.7%. The soil profile was sampled at 54 locations, evenly distributed over the three CT and NT plots, at depths of 0-10, 25-35, and 55-65 cm. Topsoil water retention curves (SWRC) were determined in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples from each of the 54 locations. A weather station recorded daily precipitation and evapotranspiration, as calculated by the Penman-Monteith FAO equation. The water balance was calculated using the Thornthwaite-Mather model with a daily time step. Three parameters, water holding capacity, and water evaporation corrector coefficients for each of the two years, were inversely estimated at the 54 SWC observation points and probability density functions were identified. Spatial variability of SWC was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, and simulated and observed variability were compared. This Monte Carlo scheme, using a simple water balance model with only three parameters, was found to be useful for evaluating the influence of soil management on the variability of SWC in heavy clay soils.

  1. Reversibility of soil forming clay mineral reactions induced by plant - clay interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, P.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Recent data based upon observations of field experiments and laboratory experiments suggest that changes in phyllosilicate mineralogy, as seen by X-ray diffraction analysis, which is induced by plant action can be reversed in relatively short periods of time. Changes from diagenetic or metamorphic mineral structures (illite and chlorite) to those found in soils (mixed layered minerals in the smectite, hydroxy-interlayer mineral and illites) observed in Delaware Bay salt marsh sediments in periods of tens of years and observed under different biologic (mycorhize) actions in coniferous forests in the soil environment can be found to be reversed under other natural conditions. Reversal of this process (chloritisation of smectitic minerals in soils) has been observed in natural situations over a period of just 14 years under sequoia gigantia. Formation of smectite minerals from illite (potassic mica-like minerals) has been observed to occur under intensive agriculture conditions over periods of 80 years or so under intensive zea mais production. Laboratory experiments using rye grass show that this same process can be accomplished to a somewhat lesser extent after one growing season. However experiments using alfalfa for 30 year growing periods show that much of the illite content of a soil can be reconstituted or even increased. Observations on experiments using zea mais under various fertilizer and mycorhize treatments indicate that within a single growing season potassium can be extracted from the clay (illite layers) but at the end of the season the potassium can be restored to the clay structures and more replaced that extracted. Hence it is clear that the change in clay mineralogy normally considered to be irreversible, illite to smectite or chlorite to smectite observed in soils, is a reversible process where plant systems control the soil chemistry and the soil mineralogy. The changes in clay mineralogy concern mostly the chemical composition of the interlayer

  2. Clay content evaluation in soils through GPR signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Patriarca, Claudio; Slob, Evert; Benedetto, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which arises some important issues in many fields of employment, such as civil and environmental engineering, geology, and agriculture. This work focuses on pavement engineering, although the method applies to other fields of interest. Clay content in bearing courses of road pavement frequently causes damages and defects (e.g., cracks, deformations, and ruts). Therefore, the road safety and operability decreases, directly affecting the increase of expected accidents. In this study, different ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods and techniques were used to non-destructively investigate the clay content in sub-asphalt compacted soils. Experimental layout provided the use of typical road materials, employed for road bearing courses construction. Three types of soils classified by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as A1, A2, and A3 were used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated test boxes. Percentages of bentonite clay were gradually added, ranging from 2% to 25% by weight. Analyses were carried out for each clay content using two different GPR instruments. A pulse radar with ground-coupled antennae at 500 MHz centre frequency and a vector network analyzer spanning the 1-3 GHz frequency range were used. Signals were processed in both time and frequency domains, and the consistency of results was validated by the Rayleigh scattering method, the full-waveform inversion, and the signal picking techniques. Promising results were obtained for the detection of clay content affecting the bearing capacity of sub-asphalt layers.

  3. Remediation of copper polluted red soils with clay materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gangya Zhang; Yunqing Lin; Mingkuang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Attapulgite and montmorillonite were utilized to remediate heavy metal polluted red soils in Guixi City, Jiangxi Province, China.The effects of clay minerals on availability, chemical distribution, and biotoxicity of Cu and Zn were evaluated.The results provided a reference for the rational application of clay materials to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils.From the sorption experiment,the maximum adsorbed Cu2+ by attapulgite and montmorillonite was 1501 and 3741 mg/kg, respectively.After polluted red soil was amended with attapulgite or montmorillonite and cultured at 30 and 60 days, soil pH increased significantly compared to the control.An 8% increase in the amount of montmorillonite in soil and 30 days incubation decreased acid exchangeable Cu by 24.7% compared to the control red soil.Acid exchangeable Cu decreased with increasing amounts of attapulgite and montmorillonite, with best remediation effect reached at a dose of 8%.Results also showed that the Cu poisoning effect on earthworms was reduced with the addition of attapulgite and montmorillonite.Montmoriilonite showed the best effect, with the addition of a 2% dose the mortality of earthworms decreased from 60% to zero compared to the control.Our results indicated that the bioavailability of Cu in soils was reduced more effectively with the application of montmorillonite than attapulgite.

  4. INFLUENCE OF VERMICOMPOST ON THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF SOIL ALONG WITH YIELD AND QUALITY OF THE PULSE CROP-BLACKGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Parthasarathi, M. Balamurugan, L. S. Ranganathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted during 2002-2003 on clay loam, sandy loam and red loam soil at Sivapuri, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, to evaluate the efficacy of vermicompost on the physico-chemical and biological characteristics of the soils and on the yield and nutrient content of blackgram - Vigna mungo, in comparison to inorganic fertilizers nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium. Vermicompost had increased the pore space, reduced particle and bulk density, increased water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity, reduced pH and electrical conductivity, increased organic carbon content, available nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and microbial population and activity in all the soil types, particularly clay loam. The yield and quality (protein and sugar content in seed of blackgram was enhanced in soils, particularly clay loam soil. On the contrary, the application of inorganic fertilizers has resulted in reduced porosity, compaction of soil, reduced carbon and reduced microbial activity.

  5. Effects of long-term amendment of organic manure and nitrogen fertilizer on nitrous oxide emission in a sandy loam soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wei-xin; MENG Lei; CAI Zu-cong; HAN Feng-xiang

    2007-01-01

    To understand the effects of long-term amendment of organic manure and N fertilizer on N2O emission in the North China Plain,a laboratory incubation at different temperatures and soil moistures were carried out using soils treated with organic manure (OM),half organic manure plus half fertilizer N (HOM), fertilizer NPK (NPK), fertilizer NP (NP), fertilizer NK (NK), fertilizer PK (NK) and control (CK) since 1989. Cumulative N2O emission in OM soil during the 17 d incubation period was slightly higher than in NPK soil under optimum nitrification conditions (25C and 60% water-filled pore space, WFPS), but more than twice under the optimum denitrification conditions (35C and 90% WFPS). N2O produced by denitrification was 2.1-2.3 times greater than that by nitrification in OM and HOM soils, but only 1.5 times greater in NPK and NP soils. These results implied that the long-term amendment of organic manure could significantly increase the N2O emission via denitrification in OM soil as compared to NPK soil. This is quite different from field measurement between OM soil and NPK soil. Substantial inhibition of the formation of anaerobic environment for denitrification in field might result in no marked difference in N2O emission between OM and NPK soils. This is due in part to more rapid oxygen diffusion in coarse textured soils than consumption by aerobic microbes until WFPS was 75% and to low easily decomposed organic C of organic manure. This finding suggested that addition of organic manure in the tested sandy loam might be a good management option since it seldom caused a burst of N2O emission but sequestered atmospheric C and maintained efficiently applied N in soil.

  6. Study on Development of Leaf Tissue Structure of Flue-cured Tobacco Produced in Sandy Loam and Clay Loam in Wannan%皖南砂壤土和水稻土烤烟叶片组织结构发育规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国; 时向东; 季学军; 沈思灯; 马称心

    2011-01-01

    为了弄清烤烟叶片组织结构与皖南焦甜香特色风格的关系,对皖南砂壤土和水稻土烤烟叶片组织结构发育规律进行了研究.结果表明,土壤质地影响栅栏组织细胞快速分裂时期,对细胞总数的影响不明显.土壤质地间烟叶各组织厚度指标在叶肉细胞分裂期差异不大;叶肉细胞伸长前期,砂壤土烟叶栅栏组织细胞快速伸长较早,栅栏组织厚度与叶厚的比值和栅栏组织厚度与海绵组织厚度的比值也较大,而土壤质地引起的叶厚和海绵组织厚度发育差异规律在叶位间表现不一;但水稻土烟叶栅栏组织厚度、海绵组织厚度和叶厚均在叶长定长和成熟期达到或超过砂壤土水平.随着叶长的增加,皖南烤烟栅栏组织与海绵组织厚度比值和栅栏组织厚度与叶厚的比值均大体呈上升趋势.%The study results of development of leaf tissue structure of flue-cured tobacco produced in sandy loam soil and paddy soil in wannan area showed that: soil types could affect the time to cell rapid divisional of tobacco leaf palisade tissue, but not the total cell numbers. There were not obvious difference about leaf tissue thickness caused by soil types when the mesophyll cell divided; At the early stage of mesophyll cell elongation period, palisade tissue of tobacco leaf produced in sandy loam soil rapid elongated earlier, thus the thickness ratios of both palisade tissue to leaf and palisade tissue to sponge tissue were higher in this period, and the development changes in both palisade tissue thickness and leaf thickness caused by soil types were different between stalk positions; But palisade tissue thickness of the tobacco leaf produced in paddy soil reached or surpassed the levels of which produced in sandy loam soil, and so did the leaf thickness and the sponge tissue thickness. With the leaf growing, the thickness ratios of both palisade tissue to sponge tissue and palisade tissue to leaf

  7. Predicting soil particle density from clay and soil organic matter contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; McBride, R.A.; Keller, T.

    2017-01-01

    Soil particle density (Dp) is an important soil property for calculating soil porosity expressions. However, many studies assume a constant value, typically 2.65Mgm−3 for arable, mineral soils. Fewmodels exist for the prediction of Dp from soil organic matter (SOM) content. We hypothesized...... that better predictions may be obtained by including the soil clay content in least squares prediction equations. A calibration data set with 79 soil samples from 16 locations in Denmark, comprising both topsoil and subsoil horizons, was selected from the literature. Simple linear regression indicated that Dp...... against a combined data set with 227 soil samples representing A, B, and C horizons from temperate North America and Europe. The new prediction equation performed better than two SOM-based models from the literature. Validation of the new clay and SOM model using the 227 soil samples gave a root mean...

  8. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using soil sampled from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ul...

  9. Sorption/desorption of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane(4,4'-DDT) on a sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Ziya; Cutright, Teresa J

    2015-02-01

    1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane(4,4'-DDT) is a pesticide well-known for its negative health and environmental effects. Despite being banned by a majority of world countries more than 30 years ago, its persistence in the environment is a continuing problem even today. The objective of the study was the investigation of sorption/desorption behavior of 4,4'-DDT in sandy loam soil. The impact of contaminant concentration and age was observed with three different experiments. The sorption percentages at the end of the short time step (8 h) were 50 and 92 %, for initial concentrations 2.26 and 5.28 mg/L, respectively. When freshly spiked soil was subjected to a conventional sorption study, 82 to 99.6 % of the initial aqueous DDT concentrations were sorbed within 24 h. When modeled with a Freundlich isotherm, the log K f was found to be 3.62. After six consecutive 24 h desorption steps, 33 to 96.6 % still remained in the soil. This was more pronounced for soils that had been aged for 60 days. After seven consecutive 24 h desorption steps of aged soil, the percent remaining sorbed to the soil were 44, 64, and 77 %, for 25, 250, and 500 mg/kg, respectively. All results show that 4,4-DDT has a tendency of sorbing to the soil rapidly and showing resistance to desorption. When comparing desorption values, aged soils were seen to desorb less than non-aged soils. This result was attributed to stronger binding to soil with increased contact time.

  10. Diffusion of inorganic chemical species in compacted clay soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Charles D.; Daniel, David E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.

    1989-08-01

    This research was conducted to study the diffusion of inorganic chemicals in compacted clay soil for the design of waste containment barriers. The effective diffusion coefficients ( D ∗) of anionic (Cl -, Br -, and I -) and cationic (K +, Cd 2+, and Zn 2+) species in a synthetic leachate were measured. Two clay soils were used in the study. The soils were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize mass transport due to suction in the soil. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution, POLLUTE 3.3. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. Errors in mass balance were attributed to problems with the chemical analysis (I -), the inefficiency of the extraction procedure (K +), precipitation (Cd 2+ and Zn 2+), and chemical complexation (Cl - and Br -). The D ∗ values for Cl - reported in this study are in excellent agreement with previous findings for other types of soil. The D ∗ values for the metals (K +, Cd 2+, and Zn 2+) are thought to be high (conservative) due to: (1) Ca 2+ saturation of the exchange complex of the clays; (2) precipitation of Cd 2+ and Zn 2+; and (3) nonlinear adsorption behavior. In general, high D ∗ values and conservative designs of waste containment barriers will result if the procedures described in this study are used to determine D ∗ and the adsorption behavior of the solutes is similar to that described in this study.

  11. Physical-hydraulic properties of a sandy loam typic paleudalf soil under organic cultivation of 'montenegrina' mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Valverde dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are the most important fruit species in the world, with emphasis to oranges, mandarins and lemons. In Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, most fruit production is found on small properties under organic cultivation. Soil compaction is one of the factors limiting production and due to the fixed row placement of this crop, compaction can arise in various manners in the interrows of the orchard. The aim of this study was to evaluate soil physical properties and water infiltration capacity in response to interrow management in an orchard of mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore 'Montenegrina' under organic cultivation. Interrow management was performed through harrowing, logs in em "V", mowing, and cutting/knocking down plants with a knife roller. Soil physical properties were evaluated in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, between the wheel tracks (BWT, and in the area under the line projection of the canopy (CLP, with undisturbed soil samples collected in the 0.00-0.15, 0.15-0.30, 0.30-0.45, and 0.45-0.60 m layers, with four replicates. The soil water infiltration test was performed using the concentric cylinder method, with a maximum time of 90 min for each test. In general, soil analysis showed a variation in the physical-hydraulic properties of the Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico arênico (sandy loam Typic Paleudalf in the three sampling sites in all layers, regardless of the management procedure in the interrows. Machinery traffic leads to heterogeneity in the soil physical-hydraulic properties in the interrows of the orchard. Soil porosity and bulk density are affected especially in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, which causes a reduction in the constant rate of infiltration and in the accumulated infiltration of water in this sampling site. The use of the disk harrow and mower leads to greater harmful effects on the soil, which can interfere with mandarin production.

  12. A Preliminary Study on Identification of Clay Minerals in Soils with Reference to Reflectance Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUBIN-BIN; LIDE-CHENG; 等

    1995-01-01

    The characteristics of the reflectance spectra of clay minerals and their influences on the reflectance spectra of soils are dealt with in the paper.The results showed that dominant clay minerals in soils could be distinguished in light of the spectral -form parameters of the reflectance spectra of soils,thus making it possible to develop a quick method to determine clay minerals by means of reflectance spectra of soils in the lab.and providing a theoretic basis for remote sensing of clay minerals in soils with a high resolution imaging spectrometer.

  13. Effect of nutrients and plant growth regulators on growth and yield of black gram in sandy loam soils of Cauvery new delta zone, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marimuthu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulse productivity is very low in some of the sandy soil areas where, soils are having poor water and nutrient holding capacity. To improve the pulse productivity, field experiments were conducted at Agricultural Research Station, Tamil Nadu for two consecutive years to study the effect of phosphorus sources (mono- and diammonium phosphate with brassinolide and salicylic acid on growth and yield of black gram in sandy loam soils. The experiment was carried out in a randomized block design with three replications during kharif season. The treatments include 100% recommended dose of NPK along with foliar application of monoammonium phosphate (MAP, diammonium phosphate (DAP, brassinolide (0.25 ppm, and salicylic acid (100 ppm along with the combination of these treatments. TNAU pulse wonder at 5.0 kg ha−1 and TNAU micronutrient mixture (MN at 5 kg ha−1 were also tried. The results revealed that application of 100% recommended dose of NPK + DAP 2% + TNAU pulse wonder 5.0 kg ha−1 was statistically significant and recorded higher plant growth (37.62 cm, number of pods / plant (37.15, yield of black gram (1162 kg ha−1, and benefit cost ratio (2.98 over the other treatments. The lowest black gram yield (730 kg ha−1 was recorded for control.

  14. Rapid Soil Stabilization of Soft Clay Soils for Contingency Airfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    LiquiBlock 40K and 41K are both potassium salts of crosslinked polyacrylic acids/ polyacrylamide copolymers in granular form that also gel in the presence...with the soil water and cure. Unlike strength loss due to the fibers bunching, adding the cement on the second day only results in a reduction of the...the method of treatment, which Maclean (1956) has found to have significantly different correlated CBR and UCS values, where soils with higher friction

  15. Toxicity of Nitro-Heterocyclic and Nitroaromatic Energetic Materials to Folsomia candida in a Natural Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    determined at the beginning of each definitive toxicity test using a method adapted from the Soil Survey Laboratory Methods Manual (USDA, 1996... Environmental Chemistry ; Hutzinger, O., Ed.; Springer- Verlag: Berlin, 1991; 3 (Part G); pp 195–234. Schafer, R.; Achazi, R.K. The Toxicity of Soil Samples... Laboratory and Field Approaches to Characterize the Soil Ecotoxicology of Polynitro Explosives. In Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment: Science

  16. Microbial Decomposition of Extracellular DNA in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, E. M.; McHugh, T. A.; Schwartz, E.; Preteska, L.; Hayer, M.; Hungate, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Genomic analysis of soil communities can only be useful in predicting ecosystem processes if the genetic data gathered is representative of the microbial community. Consequently, extracellular DNA (eDNA) represents a pool of unexpressed genetic information that may skew genomic analyses. To date, our understanding of the representation of eDNA in metagenomic data and its decomposition in soil is very limited. To address this deficit, we performed a laboratory experiment wherein soils were amended with eDNA and/or clay minerals in a full factorial design. Specifically, the decomposition of 13C labeled E. coli DNA was monitored over a 30-day period in control, Kaolinite-amended, and Montmorillonite-amended soils. The amount of added eDNA carbon (C) remaining in the soil declined exponentially over time, with the majority of decomposition occurring in the first two weeks. Kaolinite significantly decreased eDNA decomposition rates and retained a higher fraction of eDNA-C (~70% remaining) than unamended and Montmorillonite-soils (~40% remaining) after 30 days. Phylogenetic (16S rRNA) sequencing of DNA extracted over the course of the incubation period enabled detection of the added eDNA. The relative abundance of added E. coli DNA decreased ~10-100 fold over 30 days. These results indicate that while a significant fraction of eDNA-C remained in the soil, this carbon was likely no longer in the form of intact strands of DNA amenable to sequencing. In addition, the eDNA affected the composition of the bacterial community. Specifically, the relative abundance of Planctomycetes and TM7 were elevated in soils that received eDNA regardless of clay addition, suggesting these phyla may be particularly effective at degrading eDNA and using it for growth. In conclusion these results indicate that the representation of eDNA in metagenomic sequence data declines rapidly, likely due to fragmentation. However, a fraction of eDNA material was resistant to decomposition, suggesting a

  17. Quantity and nature of water-extractable organic matter from sandy loam soils with potato cropping managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) is part of the soil labile organic matter components. In this work, we evaluated the level and nature of soil WEOM from a long-term (6-year) potato crop rotation field experiment. The contents of water-extractable organic C (WEOC) were higher in continuous pot...

  18. Non-Linear finite element analysis of cone penetration in layered sandy loam soil-considering precompression stress state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axisymmetric finite element (FE) method was developed using a commercial computer program to simulate cone penetration process in layered granular soil. Soil was considered as a non-linear elastic plastic material which was modeled using variable elastic parameters of Young’s Modulus and Poisson’s r...

  19. Study and Estimation of the Ratio of 137CS and 40K Specific Activities in Sandy and Loam Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Mikalauskienė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes changes in specific activities and fluctuations in the ratio of natural 40K and artificial 137Cs radionuclides in soil samples taken from different places of Lithuanian territory. The samples of soil have been selected from the districts polluted after the accident in Chernobyl nuclear plant performing nuclear testing operations. The study has established the main physical and chemical properties of soil samples and their impact on the concentration of 40K activities. 137Cs/40K specific activities in soil have been observed under the dry weight of the sample that varied from 0.0034 to 0.0240. The results of the study could be used for establishing and estimating 137Cs and 40K transfer in the system “soil-plant”.Article in Lithuanian

  20. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots. The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14±5% (mean ± standard deviation. Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  1. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.R. [Reclamation Technology, Inc., Athens, GA (United States); Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Johnson, D.O. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -1} cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems.

  2. Effect of Clay Content and Soil-water Potential On Mobilization and Leaching of Colloids In Unsaturated Macroporous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, C.; de Jonge, L. W.; Moldrup, P.

    The transport of strongly sorbed environmental contaminants may be enhanced due to sorption to mobile soil colloids. The most common source of mobile colloids in soil is the in-situ release of water-dispersible colloids (WDC), however experimental investigations of colloid mobilization in unsaturated macroporous soil are scarce. An understanding of the arrangement of colloids in aggregates, and the influence of clay on the development of the soil fabric and pore-size distributions is essential for the in- terpretation of colloid mobilization in soils. This emphasizes the important role of clay content, when evaluating the susceptibility of soils to release colloids and associated contaminants. This study was conducted to determine the effect of clay content and initial soil- water potential on colloid mobilization and leaching. Intact soil cores were sampled from an arable field at six locations along a naturally occurring texture gradient. Soil dispersibility was investigated using capillary saturation and drainage of field-moist packed aggregates. The amount of WDC in the soil was measured for each com- bination of clay content and initial soil-water potential (-2.5, -98 and -15530 hPa). Mobilization and leaching of colloids was investigated from unsaturated intact soil cores. The soils were irrigated at low intensity (1 mm/h), and effluent sampling was conducted at 5 cm tension. The results showed that colloid dispersion was significantly affected by both clay con- tent and initial soil-water potential. With a soil-water potential of -15530 hPa the col- loid release was generally low and no variation occurred between the soils. With in- creasing soil-water potential there was an increase in the amount of WDC for all soils. The increase in WDC was negatively correlated with clay content. The leaching of colloids from intact soil cores also decreased with increasing clay content at an ini- tial soil-water potential of -98 and -2.5 hPa, and no difference between

  3. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality.

  4. Effects of a new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate and potassium leaching in two soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Fu; Wu, Liang-Huan; Shi, Qi-Wei; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Chen, Xian-You; Li, Yong-Shan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, soil column was used to study the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate (NO3(-)-N) and potassium (K) leaching in the sandy loam soil and clay loam soil. The results showed that DMPP with ammonium sulphate nitrate (ASN) ((NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) or urea could reduce NO3(-)-N leaching significantly, whereas ammonium (NH4(+)-N) leaching increased slightly. In case of total N (NO3(-)-N+NH4(+)-N), losses by leaching during the experimental period (40 d) were 37.93 mg (urea), 31.61 mg (urea+DMPP), 108.10 mg (ASN), 60.70 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the sandy loam soil, and 30.54 mg (urea), 21.05 mg (urea+DMPP), 37.86 mg (ASN), 31.09 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the clay loam soil, respectively. DMPP-amended soil led to the maintenance of relatively high levels of NH4(+)-N and low levels of NO3(-)-N in soil, and nitrification was slower. DMPP supplementation also resulted in less potassium leached, but the difference was not significant except the treatment of ASN and ASN+DMPP in the sandy loam soil. Above results indicate that DMPP is a good nitrification inhibitor, the efficiency of DMPP seems better in the sandy loam soil than in the clay loam soil and lasts longer.

  5. Effects of the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate and potassium leaching in two soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shao-fu; WU Liang-huan; SHI Qi-wei; WANG Zhong-qiang; CHEN Xian-you; LI Yong-shan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, soil column was used to study the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate (NO3--N) and potassium (K) leaching in the sandy loam soil and clay loam soil. The results showed that DMPP with ammonium sulphate nitrate (ASN) ((NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) or urea could reduce NO3--N leaching significantly, whereas ammonium (NH4+-N) leaching increased slightly. In case of total N (NO3--N+NH4+-N), losses by leaching during the experimental period (40 d) were 37.93 mg (urea), 31.61 mg (urea+DMPP), 108.10 mg (ASN), 60.70 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the sandy loam soil, and 30.54 mg (urea), 21.05 mg (urea+DMPP), 37.86 mg (ASN), 31. 09 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the clay loam soil, respectively. DMPP-amended soil led to the maintenance of relatively high levels of NH4+-N and low levels of NO3--N in soil, and nitrification was slower. DMPP supplementation also resulted in potassium leached less, but the difference was not significant except the treatment ASN and ASN+DMPP in the sandy loam soil. Above results indicate that DMPP is a good nitrification inhibitor, the efficiency of DMPP seems better in the sandy loam soil than in the clay loam soil and lasts longer.

  6. Magnitude, modeling and significance of swelling and shrinkage processes in clay soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic process of swelling and shrinkage in clay soils has significant practical consequences, such as the rapid transport of water and solutes via shrinkage cracks to the subsoil, and the destruction of buildings and roads on clay soils. In order to develop measuring methods and computer simul

  7. To what extent clay mineralogy affects soil aggregation? Consequences for soil organic matter stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ugalde, O.; Barré, P.; Hubert, F.; Virto, I.; Chenu, C.; Ferrage, E.; Caner, L.

    2012-12-01

    Aggregation is a key process for soil functioning as it influences C storage, vulnerability to erosion and water holding capacity. While the influence of soil organic C on aggregation has been documented, much less is known about the role of soil mineralogy. Soils usually contain a mixture of clay minerals with contrasted surface properties, which should result on different abilities of clay minerals to aggregation. We took advantage of the intrinsic mineral heterogeneity of a temperate Luvisol to compare the role of clay minerals (illite, smectite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite) in aggregation. In a first step, grassland and tilled soil samples were fractionated in water in aggregate-size classes according to the hierarchical model of aggregation (Tisdall and Oades, 1982). Clay mineralogy and organic C in the aggregate-size classes were analyzed. The results showed that interstratified minerals containing swelling phases accumulated in aggregated fractions (>2 μm) compared to free clay fractions (500 μm) to micro-aggregates (50-250 μm). C concentration and C/N ratio followed the opposite trend. These results constitute a clay mineral-based evidence for the hierarchical model of aggregation, which postulates an increasing importance of the reactivity of clay minerals in the formation of micro-aggregates compared to larger aggregates. In the latter aggregates, formation relies on the physical enmeshment of particles by fungal hyphae, and root and microbial exudates. In a second step, micro-aggregates from the tilled soil samples were submitted to increasingly disaggregating treatments by sonication to evaluate the link between their water stability and clay mineralogy. Micro-aggregates with increasing stability showed an increase of interstratified minerals containing swelling phases and C concentration for low intensities of disaggregation (from 0 to 5 J mL-1). This suggests that swelling phases promote their stability. Swelling phases and organic C

  8. Toxicity of a New Polynitramine Energetic Material, CL-20, to the Enchytraeid Worm, Enchytraeus Crypticus, in a Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    due to photodecomposition, hydrolysis, reaction with organic matter, sorption/fixation, precipitation , immobilization, occlusion, microbial...ASTM Type II water, analytical reagent grade nitric acid 1% (volume/volume), then with ASTM Type I water. 2.3 Soil Amendment Procedures. Studies were...Initial reaction(s) in biotransformation of CL-20 is catalyzed by salicylate -l-monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ATCC 29352. Appl. Environ

  9. Effect of Clay Minerals on the Chemical Characteristics of Soil Humus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YEWEI; WENQIXIAO

    1996-01-01

    Chemical characteristics of humic substances in soils with different mineralogical characteristics and under different utilization paterns in Zhangpu,Fujian Province,together with two pairs of cultivated soils in North China Plain were studied by chemical analysis,visible and IR spectroscopy and 13C NMR spectrometry.For soils in Zhanpu the HA/FA ratio and both the aromaticity and the degree of humification of HA were higher in soils with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral than in those with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral,provided these soils were under the same utilization pattern.While for each pair of soils with similar mineralogical characteristics the HA/FA ratio was higher and the C/H ratio and the contnet of carboxyl group of HA were lower in paddy soil than in upland soil.Among the upland soils(or paddy soils)studied the Ha/FA ratio of soil in Zhangpu with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral was the lowest,and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest .the lowest.and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest It was concluded that the presence of montmorillonite favored the fromation and maturation of humic acid.

  10. Clays Can Decrease Gaseous Nutrient Losses from Soil-Applied Livestock Manures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Chris; Redding, Matthew; Hill, Jaye; Brown, Grant; Westermann, Maren

    2016-03-01

    Clays could underpin a viable agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement technology given their affinity for nitrogen and carbon compounds. We provide the first investigation into the efficacy of clays to decrease agricultural nitrogen GHG emissions (i.e., NO and NH). Via laboratory experiments using an automated closed-vessel analysis system, we tested the capacity of two clays (vermiculite and bentonite) to decrease NO and NH emissions and organic carbon losses from livestock manures (beef, pig, poultry, and egg layer) incorporated into an agricultural soil. Clay addition levels varied, with a maximum of 1:1 to manure (dry weight). Cumulative gas emissions were modeled using the biological logistic function, with 15 of 16 treatments successfully fitted ( clay addition level compared with no clay addition, but this difference was not significant ( = 0.17). Nitrous oxide emissions were significantly lower (×3; clay addition level compared with no clay addition. When assessing manures individually, we observed generally decreasing trends in NH and NO emissions with increasing clay addition, albeit with widely varying statistical significance between manure types. Most of the treatments also showed strong evidence of increased C retention with increasing clay additions, with up to 10 times more carbon retained in treatments containing clay compared with treatments containing no clay. This preliminary assessment of the efficacy of clays to mitigate agricultural GHG emissions indicates strong promise.

  11. 有机氯代烃在壤土中的吸附和解吸特性%Sorption and Desorption of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons onto Loam Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤君; 贾晗; 刘佳露; 董佳新; 卢伟; 吕聪

    2015-01-01

    The sorption and desorption characteristics of the four organic chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene (TCE) ,cis 1 ,2 dichloroethylene (cis 1 ,2 DCE) ,1 ,1 ,1 trichloroethane (1 ,1 , 1 TCA ) , and 1 ,2 dichloroethane (1 ,2 DCA )) onto loam soil are investigated by a batch of experiments in this study .The results indicate that the sorption equilibrium time of the four chlorinated hydrocarbons onto the loam soil is about three days .The sorption isotherm for all compounds is nearly linear , and fits to Freundlich isotherm slightly over the entire concentration range . As for chloroethylenes ,TCE is strongly sorbed to the loam samples (Kd = 0 .624 L/kg) ,and followed by cis‐DCE (Kd = 0 .238 L/kg) .For chloroethanes ,1 ,1 ,1 TCA is strongly sorbed (Kd = 0 .520 L/kg) ,and followed by 1 ,2 DCA (Kd = 0 .353 L/kg) .This is consistent with the order of hydrophobicity of the compounds .In addition , the lg Koc value is estimated by Abdul , Dobbs , Rao and Cong empirical regression formula respectively in this study , and the results show that the estimated lg Koc value determined by Abdul regression is significantly lower than the calculated value ,and the estimated lgKoc value determined by Cong regression is significantly higher than the calculated value , while the estimated lg Koc values determined by Dobbs and Rao regression are much closer to the calculated values . This demonstrates that the Dobbs and Rao regression is more suitable for lg Koc estimation for chlorinated hydrocarbons .Besides ,it is found that there is a certain lag in desorption of chlorinated hydrocarbons from the loam soil ;and the higher the sorption capacity of chlorinated hydrocarbon ,the lower the desorption capacity of chlorinated hydrocarbon .%选取三氯乙烯(TCE)、顺1,2二氯乙烯(cis 1,2 DCE)、1,1,1三氯乙烷(1,1,1 TCA)、1,2二氯乙烷(1,2 DCA)4种常见的有机氯代烃,通过批次实验研究其在壤土中的吸附和

  12. Modified centroid for estimating sand, silt and clay from soil texture class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models that require inputs of soil particle size commonly use soil texture class for input; however, texture classes do not represent the continuum of soil size fractions. Soil texture class and clay percentage are collected as a standard practice for many land management agencies (e.g., NRCS, BLM, ...

  13. The Effects of Land Configuration and Wood-Shavings Mulch on the Properties of a Sandy Loam Soil in Northeast Nigeria. 2. Changes in Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiroma, AM.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mulching and ridge tillage are proven technologies for improving soil productivity in semi-arid regions. Yet data quantifying the combined influences of these practices are limited. Our objectives were to determine the changes in selected physical properties of a sandy loam after 4-years of annual tillage and wood-shavings mulching. The tillage and wood-shavings treatments consisted of: Flat bed (FB, Open ridge (OR, Tiedridge (TR, FBM, ORM and TRM were same as FB, OR and TR, respectively except that wood-shavings at a rate of 10 t/ha were surface applied ≈ 2 weeks after sowing each year to serve as both a mulch and an organic amendment. At the end of the trial in 2002, bulk density, penetration resistance, total porosity and soil water content from each of 0-0.075, 0.075-0.15 and 0.15-0.30 m depths were determined. Composite samples from the surface (0.075 and 0.075-0.15 m layers from 3 replicates of each treatment were also collected for the determination of wet aggregate stability and from 0-0.15 m and 0.15-0.30 m layers for determination of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat. After 4 years of annual tillage and addition of woodshavings, soil bulk density and penetration resistance were consistently lower and total porosity higher in the FBM, ORM and TRM treatments than in the FB, OR and TR treatments. Penetration resistance in all treatments was strongly related to soil water content. A 'hoe pan' was established below 0.15 m depth beneath the furrows of the ridged treatments. This could be attributed to human traffic during field operations and ponding of water, which occurred in the furrows following heavy rains. Wet aggregate stability estimated as the proportion of aggregates of size > 0.25 mm (macro-aggregates in the 0-0.15 m layer were significantly (P< 0.05 higher under FBM, ORM and TRM than under FB, OR or TR treatments. Ksat was not influenced by either tillage or wood-shavings treatments but were higher for the mulched plots

  14. Impact of lfuxapyroxad on the microbial community structure and functional diversity in the silty-loam soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-hu; XU Jun; LIU Yong-zhuo; DONG Feng-shou; LIU Xin-gang; ZHANG Wen-wen; ZHENG Yong-quan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of applying three different doses of lfuxapyroxad on microbial activity, com-munity structure and functional diversity as measured by respiration, microbial biomass C, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and community-level physiological proifles (CLPPs). Our results demonstrated that substrate-induced respiration (on day 15) and microbial biomass C (on days 7 and 15) were inhibited by lfuxapyroxad, but stimulation was observed thereafter. In contrast, lfuxapyroxad addition increased the basal respiration and metabolic quotients (qCO2) and respiratory quotients (QR). Analysis of the PLFA proifles revealed that the total and bacterial biomass (both Gram-positive bacteria (GP) and Gram-negative bacteria (GN)) were decreased within the initial 15 days, whereas those as wel as the GN/GP ratio were increased at days 30 and 60. Fluxapyroxad input decreased the fungi biomass but increased the bacteria/fungi ratio at al incubation time. Moreover, high lfuxapyroxad input (75 mg lfuxapyroxad kg–1 soil dry weight) increased the microbial stress level. A principal component analysis (PCA) of the PLFAs revealed that lfuxapyroxad treatment signiifcantly shifted the microbial community structure, but al of the observed effects were transient. Biolog results showed that average wel color development (AWCD) and functional diversity index (H´) were increased only on day 60. In addition, the dissipation of lfuxa-pyroxad was slow in soil, and the degradation half-lives varied from 158 to 385 days depending on the concentration tested.

  15. Sorption and distribution of Zn in a sludge-amended soil: influence of the soil clay mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    Proust, D.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Purpose Conventional pedological survey generally assesses soil metal pollution by comparing total metal concentrations in soil to geochemical baselines in parent rock. This global approach overlooks the sorption capacities of the clay minerals which form at micrometric scale in weathering microsystems and are essential for the behaviour of metals in soil. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the impact of these weathering microsystems and their clay mineralogy upon Z...

  16. Bioremediation of a tropical clay soil contaminated with diesel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas-Spinelli, Alessandra C O; Kato, Mario T; de Lima, Edmilson S; Gavazza, Savia

    2012-12-30

    The removal of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in tropical clay soil contaminated with diesel oil was evaluated. Three bioremediation treatments were used: landfarming (LF), biostimulation (BS) and biostimulation with bioaugmentation (BSBA). The treatment removal efficiency for the total PAHs differed from the efficiencies for the removal of individual PAH compounds. In the case of total PAHs, the removal values obtained at the end of the 129-day experimental period were 87%, 89% and 87% for LF, BS and BSBA, respectively. Thus, the efficiency was not improved by the addition of nutrients and microorganisms. Typically, two distinct phases were observed. A higher removal rate occurred in the first 17 days (P-I) and a lower rate occurred in the last 112 days (P-II). In phase P-I, the zero-order kinetic parameter (μg PAH g(-1) soil d(-1)) values were similar (about 4.6) for all the three treatments. In P-II, values were also similar but much lower (about 0.14). P-I was characterized by a sharp pH decrease to less than 5.0 for the BS and BSBA treatments, while the pH remained near 6.5 for LF. Concerning the 16 individual priority PAH compounds, the results varied depending on the bioremediation treatment used and on the PAH species of interest. In general, compounds with fewer aromatic rings were better removed by BS or BSBA, while those with 4 or more rings were most effectively removed by LF. The biphasic removal behavior was observed only for some compounds. In the case of naphthalene, pyrene, chrysene, benzo[k]fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene, removal occurred mostly in the P-I phase. Therefore, the best degradation process for total or individual PAHs should be selected considering the target compounds and the local conditions, such as native microbiota and soil type.

  17. Carbon saturation in the silt and clay particles in soils with contrasting mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Matus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The silt and clay particles play a key role as stabilizing agents of soil organic carbon (SOC. Several lines of evidence indicate a theoretical maximum or C saturation in individual particles. In the present study, we hypothesized that a C fraction displaying linear accumulation relative to the SOC is not influenced by C saturation, while a fraction displaying an asymptotic relationship is regarded as saturated (Stewart et al., 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare the amount of C in the silt and clay sized fractions in temperate and subtropical cropping soils across a range of textures with different mineralogy. Twenty-one and 18 soil samples containing 1:1 and 2:1 clay of temperate soil from Chile under monoculture of maize (Zea maiz L. for at least 30 years and 9 subtropical soils from Mexico under maize and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cropping for 9 years having mixed clay were collected at 0-0.1 m. The SOC of 2:1 soils was significantly higher (14±0.5 g kg-1 dry soil than 1:1 soils (10±0.7 g kg-1. However, subtropical soils showed the highest values (59±0.5 g kg-1. A positive (P < 0.01 relationship was observed between the SOC and the C in the silt fraction (R2 0.80-0.97, P < 0.01. In contrast, the clay fraction remained constant or showed asymptotic behavior. We conclude that the silt fraction, unlike clay, showed no evidence of C saturation, while clay accumulates C to a maximum. On average, the 2:1 clay was saturated at 1-2 g C kg-1 and 1:1 at 1 g C kg-1, and subtropical soils at 14 g C kg-1.

  18. Long-term effects of grass-clover ley on the structure of a silt loam soil in a cold temperate climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats; Taylor, Astrid; Kätterer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soil pore space structure is mediated by interacting biological and physical processes that can be strongly affected by land use or management change. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of grass-clover leys on the structure of a silt loam soil in a cold humid climate. The measurements were made in a long-term field trial established in 1956 at Offer in northern Sweden. This experiment includes four treatments with varying proportions of ley (1, 2, 3 or 5 years) in a 6-year forage-based rotation. We used X-ray tomography to quantify topsoil structural pore networks in the first year of arable cropping following the ley break, a few weeks after sowing in spring. Near-saturated infiltration was also measured as a proxy for soil structure in both topsoil and subsoil. Earthworm populations were quantified by both hand-digging and infiltration of mustard solution. In the topsoil, the treatments with a greater proportion of ley in the rotation had larger organic carbon contents, near-saturated hydraulic conductivity and earthworm biomass as well as smaller bulk densities and larger total porosities. In contrast, no treatment effects were found for the volume, size distribution, connectivity and heterogeneity of the X-ray imaged pore space. Topsoil structure is seasonally dynamic and it seems possible that significant effects of long-term cropping treatments on the architecture of these larger pore networks (image resolution of 65 microns) would have been found later in the season, as a result of the re-establishment of earthworm biopores after tillage. No individuals of deep-burrowing anecic earthworm species were found at the site. Previous work has also showed shallow rooting at this site, with almost all visible roots of spring barley confined to the uppermost 30 cm. Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that no effects of crop treatment on organic carbon content were found in the subsoil. Likewise, there were no apparent treatment

  19. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis of the soil water characteristic (SWC) has been extensively studied for matric potentials between zero and −1.5 MPa. However, little information is available on how to quantify, evaluate, and identify the causes of hysteresis at potentials below −10 MPa where vapor sorption plays...... an important role. It is clear that modeling physical and biological soil processes is more accurate when SWC hysteresis is considered, particularly at low potentials where small differences in water content are associated with large changes in potential energy. The objectives of the presented study were to......: (i) evaluate and compare recently developed methods (MBET-n, Dh and SPN) for quantifying hysteresis in soils and pure clays, and (ii) investigate the role of organic matter (OM) and clay content and type on hysteresis. Five pure clays and two sets of soils with gradients in organic matter and clay...

  20. Organic farming effects on clay dispersion in carbon-exhausted soils

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    2009-01-01

    Many Danish soils are depleted in organic matter (OM) after decades of intensive cereal cultivation (Schjønning et al., 2009). In this paper we show that clay particles (colloids) in soils that are low in OM content are easily dispersed in the soil water, which in turn has important effects on soil ecosystem functions and services. Organic farming systems generally tend to increase soil OM contents and may thus mitigate the negative effects.

  1. Influence of 20-year organic and inorganic fertilization on organic carbon accumulation and microbial community structure of aggregates in an intensively cultivated sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanjun; Ding, Weixin; He, Xinhua; Yu, Hongyan; Fan, Jianling; Liu, Deyan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of compost (CM) and inorganic fertilizer (NPK) application on microbial community structure and organic carbon (OC) accumulation at aggregate scale, soils from plots amended with CM, NPK and no fertilizer (control) for 20 years (1989-2009) were collected. Soil was separated into large macroaggregate (>2,000 μm), small macroaggregate (250-2,000 μm), microaggregate (53-250 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and clay fraction (soil oxygen diffusion coefficient. NPK mainly increased OC in macroaggregates and displayed weaker influence on aggregation. Bacteria distributed in all aggregates, while fungi and actinobacteria were mainly in macroaggregates and microaggregates. The ratio of monounsaturated to branched (M/B) PLFAs, as an indicator for the ratio of aerobic to anaerobic microorganisms, increased inversely with aggregate size. Both NPK and especially CM significantly (Psoil was not only due to a more effective decrease of actinobacteria, but also a decrease of monounsaturated PLFAs and an increase of branched PLFAs. Aggregations under CM appear to alter micro-habitats to those more suitable for anaerobes, which in turn boosts OC accumulation.

  2. Cations extraction of sandy-clay soils from cavado valley, portugal, using sodium salts solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Silva João Eudes da; Castro Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Cases of contamination by metals in the water wells of the Cavado Valley in north-west Portugal can be attributed to the heavy leaching of clay soils due to an excess of nitrogen resulting from the intensive use of fertilisers in agricultural areas. This work focuses on the natural weathering characteristics of soils, particularly the clay material, through the study of samples collected near the River Cavado. Samples taken from various sites, after physico-chemical characterisation, were sub...

  3. Potential use of lateritic and marine clay soils as landfill liners to retain heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermyanont, Tanit; Arrykul, Surapon; Charoenthaisong, Nanthanit

    2009-01-01

    The potential of a lateritic soil and a marine clay, typical of those found in hot and humid climatic regions, was assessed for use as a landfill liner material. A series of tests were conducted - physical and chemical, batch adsorption, column, hydraulic conductivity, etc., - to evaluate the heavy metal sorption capacity, chemical compatibility of hydraulic conductivity, and transport parameters of the soils. Experimental results showed that the marine clay had better adsorption capacity than that of the lateritic soil and that its hydraulic conductivity was an order of magnitude lower. In addition, the hydraulic conductivities of both soils when permeated with low concentration heavy metal solutions were below 1x10(-7)cm/s. When permeated with Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Ni solutions, the retardation factors of the lateritic soil and the marine clay ranged from 10 to 98 and 37 to 165, respectively, while the diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.0x10(-5) to 7.5x10(-6) and 3.0 to 9.14x10(-7)cm2/s, respectively. For both soils, Cr and Pb were retained relatively well, while Cd, Zn, and Ni were more mobile. The marine clay had higher retardation factors and lower diffusion coefficients, and its hydraulic conductivity was more compatible with Cr solution, than that of the lateritic soil. In general, the properties of the marine clay indicate that it has significant advantages over the lateritic soil as landfill liner material.

  4. Advances in characterization of the soil clay mineralogy using X-ray diffraction: from decomposition to profile fitting

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Structural characterization of soil clay minerals often remains limited despite their key influence on soil properties. In soils, complex clay parageneses result from the coexistence of clay species with contrasting particle sizes and crystal-chemistry and from the profusion of mixed layers with variable compositions. The present study aimed at characterizing the mineralogy and crystal chemistry of the < 2 μm fraction along a profile typical of soils from Western Europ...

  5. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2011-01-01

    The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  6. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity on clay content in soil determined from resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevnin, Vladimir; Delgado-Rodriguez, Omar; Mousatov, Aleksandr [Mexican Petroleum Institute, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ryjov, Albert [Moscow State Geological Prospecting Academy, Geophysical Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The influence of clay content in sandy and clayey soils on hydraulic conductivity (filtration coefficient) is considered. A review of published experimental data on the relationship of hydraulic conductivity with soil lithology and grain size, as dependent on clay content is presented. Theoretical calculations include clay content. Experimental and calculated data agree, and several approximation formulas for filtration coefficient vs clay content are presented. Clay content in soil is estimated from electric resistivity data obtained from 2D VES interpretation. A two-step method is proposed, the first step including clay content calculating from soil resistivity and groundwater salinity, and the second step including filtration coefficient estimating from clay content. Two applications are presented. [Spanish] El contenido de arcilla en suelos areno-arcillosos influye sobre la permeabilidad hidraulica (coeficiente de filtracion). Se presenta una revision de datos experimentales publicados que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el tipo litologico del suelo y el tamano de las particulas. A partir de calculos teoricos, se modifican las conocidas formulas que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el contenido de arcilla. Se estima el contenido de arcilla a partir de los datos interpretados por el metodo SEV, y se propone un procedimiento para la estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion: (a) calculo del contenido de arcilla a partir de la resistividad del suelo y de la salinidad del agua subterranea, (b) estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion a partir del contenido de arcilla. Se presentan algunos ejemplos de la aplicacion de esta metodologia.

  7. Radiocesium sorption in relation to clay mineralogy of paddy soils in Fukushima, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Atsushi, E-mail: na_4_ka_triplochiton@kpu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Ogasawara, Sho [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Sano, Oki; Ito, Toyoaki [Field Science Center, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Naruko-Onsen 232-3, Osaki, Miyagi 989-6711 (Japan); Yanai, Junta [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho 1-5, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between Radiocesium Interception Potential (RIP) and mineralogical characteristics of the clay fraction isolated from 97 paddy soils (Hama-dori, n = 25; Naka-dori, n = 36; Aizu, n = 36) in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan were investigated to clarify the mineralogical factors controlling the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of soils (half-life 30.1 y). Of all the fission products released by the Fukushima accident, {sup 137}Cs is the most important long-term contributor to the environmental contamination. The RIP, a quantitative index of the {sup 137}Cs retention ability, was determined for the soil clays. The composition of clay minerals in the soil clays was estimated from peak areas obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The predominant clay mineral was smectite in soils from Hama-dori and Aizu, while this was variable for those from Naka-dori. Native K content of the soil clays was found to be an indicator of the amount of micaceous minerals. The average RIP for the 97 soil clays was 7.8 mol kg{sup −1}, and ranged from 2.4 mol kg{sup −1} to 19.4 mol kg{sup −1}. The RIP was significantly and positively correlated with native K content for each of the geographical regions, Hama-dori (r = 0.76, p < 0.001), Naka-dori (r = 0.43, p < 0.05), and Aizu (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), while it was not related to the relative abundance of smectite. The linear relationship between RIP and native K content not only indicate a large contribution of micaceous minerals to the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of the soil clays, but also could be used to predict the {sup 137}Cs retention ability of soil clays for other paddy fields in Fukushima and other areas. - Highlights: • RIP was measured for 97 paddy soils from Fukushima to assess {sup 137}Cs retention ability. • The dominant clay mineral was smectite, but this did not control RIP. • RIP was positively correlated with native K content. • Micaceous minerals were found to control the {sup 137}Cs retention

  8. Effects of aluminium water treatment residuals, used as a soil amendment to control phosphorus mobility in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro; Etana, Ararso; Lindström, Bodil

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) leaching from agricultural soils is a serious environmental concern. Application of aluminium water treatment residuals (Al-WTRs) at a rate of 20 Mg ha(-1) to clay soils from central Sweden significantly increased mean topsoil P sorption index (PSI) from 4.6 to 5.5 μmol kg(-1) soil. Mean degree of P saturation in ammonium lactate extract (DPS-AL) significantly decreased from 17 to 13%, as did plant-available P (P-AL). Concentrations of dissolved reactive P (DRP) decreased by 10-85% in leaching water with Al-WTR treatments after exposure of topsoil lysimeters to simulated rain. Soil aggregate stability (AgS) for 15 test soils rarely improved. Three soils (clay loam, silty loam and loam sand) were tested in greenhouse pot experiments. Aluminium-WTR application of 15 or 30 ton ha(-1) to loam sand and a clay loam with P-AL values of 80-100 mg kg(-1) soil significantly increased growth of Italian ryegrass when fertilised with P but did not significantly affect growth of spring barley on any soil. Al-WTR should only be applied to soils with high P fertility where improved crop production is not required.

  9. Peanut plant growth and yield as influenced by co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium and some rhizo-microorganisms under sandy loam soil conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Sh.F. Badawi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of tested rhizomicrobial isolates (Serratia marcescens and Trichoderma harzianum along with a strain of root nodule bacteria (Bradyrhizobium spp. to exhibit some PGP-properties was evaluated in vitro conditions. The main PGP-properties, namely the ability to solubilize-P and production of IAA, as well as production of siderophores and HCN were examined. Additionally, field trials were conducted on sandy loam soil at El-Tahrir Province during two successive summer seasons to study the effect of co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium either individually or together with S. marcescens and/or T. harzianum on nodulation, some plant growth characters, peanut yield and its yield components. The in vitro experiment revealed that all of the tested microorganisms were apparently able to trigger PGP-properties. Phosphate solubilization was the common feature of the employed microorganisms. However, T. harzianum appeared to be superior to other microorganisms, and Bradyrhizobium displayed the lowest capacity. The ability of the microorganisms to produce indole compounds showed that S. marcescens was more effective in IAA production and followed by Bradyrhizobium. Capacity of S. marcescens and T. harzianum to excrete ferric-specific ligands (siderophores and HCN was detected, while Bradyrhizobium failed to produce such compounds. Results of field trials showed that the uninoculated peanut had the least nodulation status, N2-ase activity and all vegetative growth characters in both studied seasons. Bacterization of peanut seeds with bradyrhizobia exerted considerable improvement in number and mass of root nodules, increased the rate of acetylene reduction and all growth characters in comparison to the uninoculated control. The synergy inoculation between bradyrhizobia and any of the tested microorganisms led to further increases of all mentioned characters and strengthened the stimulating effect of the bacterial inoculation. However, the promotive

  10. Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity along a Clay Gradient Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The influence of clay content in soil-pore structure development and the relative importance of macroporosity in governing convective fluid flow are two key challenges toward better understanding and quantifying soil ecosystem functions. In this study, soil physical measurements (soil......-water retention and air permeability) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning were combined and used from two scales on intact soil columns (100 and 580 cm3). The columns were sampled along a natural clay gradient at six locations (L1, L2, L3, L4, L5 and L6 with 0.11, 0.16, 0.21, 0.32, 0.38 and 0.46 kg kg−1...... clay content, respectively) at a field site in Lerbjerg, Denmark. The water-holding capacity of soils markedly increased with increasing soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the L1 to L3 soils than for the L4 to L6 soils. Higher air permeability values...

  11. Evaluation of pedotransfer functions for estimating the soil water retention points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Omid; Palangi, Sahar

    2016-06-01

    Direct measurement of soil moisture has been often expensive and time-consuming. The aim of this study was determining the best method to estimate the soil moisture using the pedotransfer functions in the soil par2 model. Soil samples selected from the database UNSODA in three textures include sandy loam, silty loam and clay. In clay soil, the Campbell model indicated better results at field capacity (FC) and wilting point (WP) with RMSE = (0.06, 0.09) and d = (0.65, 0.55) respectively. In silty loam soil, the Epic model had accurate estimation with MBE = 0.00 at FC and Campbell model had the acceptable result of WP with RMSE = 0.03 and d = 0.77. In sandy loam, Hutson and Campbell models had a better result to estimation the FC and WP than others. Also Hutson model had an acceptable result to estimation the TAW (Total Available Water) with RMSE = (0.03, 0.04, 0.04) and MBE = (0.02, 0.01, 0.01) for clay, sandy loam and silty loam, respectively. These models demonstrate the moisture points had the internal linkage with the soil textures. Results indicated that the PTFs models simulate the agreement results with the experimental observations.

  12. Cations extraction of sandy-clay soils from cavado valley, portugal, using sodium salts solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva João Eudes da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of contamination by metals in the water wells of the Cavado Valley in north-west Portugal can be attributed to the heavy leaching of clay soils due to an excess of nitrogen resulting from the intensive use of fertilisers in agricultural areas. This work focuses on the natural weathering characteristics of soils, particularly the clay material, through the study of samples collected near the River Cavado. Samples taken from various sites, after physico-chemical characterisation, were subjected to clay dissolution tests, using sodium salts of different ionic forces, to detect the relationship between certain physico-chemical parameters of water, such as pH, nitrate, chloride and sulphate content, in the dissolution of clay and the subsequent extraction of such cations as Al, Fe and K. In acidic sandy clay soils, the mineralogical composition of which was characterised by a predominance of quartz, micas, kaolinite and K-feldspars, decreases of the clay material/water pH ratio increases dissolution of the micaceous and K-feldspars phases. The presence of nitrates in the aqueous solution apparently advanced the extraction of all three cations Al, Fe and K. The specific surface area of the clay material showed a significant correlation with the main kinetic parameters of cation extraction.

  13. THE SIDE-EFFECT OF ORGANIC INSECTICIDE SPINOSAD ON BIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Telesiński

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of spinosad on soil biochemical and microbiological properties. The experiment was carried out on sandy loam with Corg content 10.91 g·kg-l. Spinosad, as Spintor 240 SC was added into soil in dosages: a recommended field dosage, and fivefold, tenfold, and twenty-fivefold higher dosages. The amount of spinosad introduced into soil was between 12.55 and 313.75 g·kg-l. Moreover, soil samples without spinosad supplement were prepared as a reference. Respective Spintor 240 SC doses were converted into 1 kg soil, taking into account 10 cm depth. After application of insecticide water emulsions, soil moisture was brought to 60% maximum holding water capacity. The soil was thoroughly mixed and stored in tightly-closed polyethylene bags at 20 °C for a period 4 weeks. During the experiment dissipation of spinosad, soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, urease and number of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes were assayed. Obtained results showed, that dissipation of spinosad in soil was relatively fast – the DT50 of this insecticide was ranged between 1.11 and 2.21 days. Spinosad residues had different effects on soil microbiological and biochemical properties. However, over time the impact of this insecticide definitely decreased. This indicated that the use of spinosad in organic farming, particularly in the field dosage, does not pose a long-term threat to the soil environment.

  14. Consequences of preferential flow in cracking clay soils for contamination-risk of shallow aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Bronswijk, J.J.B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented to asses the contamination risk of aquifers covered with cracking clay soils, with special emphasis on preferential flow through shrinkage cracks. A water extraction area was divided into units with homogeneous soil types and hydrological conditions. For each unit, a one-dimens

  15. Comparing Kriging and Regression Approaches for Mapping Soil Clay Content in a diverse Danish Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2013-01-01

    technique at a given site has always been a major issue in all soil mapping applications. We studied the prediction performance of ordinary kriging (OK), stratified OK (OKst), regression trees (RT), and rule-based regression kriging (RKrr) for digital mapping of soil clay content at 30.4-m grid size using 6...

  16. Description of the phosphorus sorption and desorption processes in lowland peaty clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoumans, O.F.

    2013-01-01

    To determine phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface water, information is needed about the behavior of P in soils. In this study, the sorption and desorption characteristics of lowland peaty clay soils are described based on experimental laboratory studies. The maximum P sorption ca

  17. Chemical dispersants and pre-treatments to determine clay in soils with different mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rodrigues

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the soil physical properties, including the clay content, is of utmost importance for agriculture. The behavior of apparently similar soils can differ in intrinsic characteristics determined by different formation processes and nature of the parent material. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of separate or combined pre-treatments, dispersion methods and chemical dispersant agents to determine clay in some soil classes, selected according to their mineralogy. Two Brazilian Oxisols, two Alfisols and one Mollisol with contrasting mineralogy were selected. Different treatments were applied: chemical substances as dispersants (lithium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, and hexametaphosphate; pre-treatment with dithionite, ammonium oxalate, and hydrogen peroxide to eliminate organic matter; and coarse sand as abrasive and ultrasound, to test their mechanical action. The conclusion was drawn that different treatments must be applied to determine clay, in view of the soil mineralogy. Lithium hydroxide was not efficient to disperse low-CEC electropositive soils and very efficient in dispersing high-CEC electronegative soils. The use of coarse sand as an abrasive increased the clay content of all soils and in all treatments in which dispersion occurred, with or without the use of chemical dispersants. The efficiency of coarse sand is not the same for all soil classes.

  18. CO2 emission and structural characteristics of two calcareous soils amended with municipal solid waste and plant residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, N.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examines the effect of different amendments on selected soil physical and biological properties over a 24-month period in two cropland fields. Urban municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and alfalfa residue (AR) were used as different organic amendments at the rates of 0 (control), 10 and 30 Mg ha-1 to a clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil in a semiarid region. Results showed that the soil improvement was controlled by the application rate and decomposability of amendments and soil type. The addition of organic amendments to the soils improved aggregate stability and consequently enhanced total porosity, especially macropore fraction. The increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and total porosity values as compared to the control treatment were greater in the loamy sand soil than in the clay loam soil. Moreover, compared to the microbial respiration of control plots, the application of MSW resulted in higher values of microbial respiration in the clay loam soil than in the loamy sand soil, whereas the reverse was found for AR. Linear and power functions were provided for the relationships between microbial respiration and SOC in the loamy sand and clay loam soils, respectively. Also, CO2 emission was stimulated significantly as power functions of the total porosity and the ratio of macroporosity to microporosity. However, the soil microbial respiration and carbon storage improved aggregate stability and pore size distribution, and as a response, soil porosity, especially the macropore fraction, controlled CO2 flux.

  19. Effects of iron and aluminum oxides and clay content on penetration resistance of five Greek soils

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The effect of amorphous and crystalline iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) oxides and oxy-hydroxides as well as clay on soil penetration resistance of five Greek soils, as a function of soil water suction was studied for the whole range of soil moisture. The soils tested were of loamy texture and were collected from cultivated and non-cultivated areas of north and central Greece (Macedonia and Thessaly). The study aimed at understanding the role of the above mentioned soil components on penetration ...

  20. Interaction of Uranium Mill Tailings Leachate with Soils and Clay Liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, G. W.; Campbell, A. C.; Sherwood, D. R.; Strickert, R. G.; Phillips, S. J.

    1980-06-01

    This study evaluates leachate-soil interactions that will take place at the Morton Ranch for certain disposal alternatives. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the following: 1) physical and chemical characteristics of geologic materials from the Morton Ranch. 2) physical and chemical characteristics of acid leach tailings and tallings solution, 3) leaching tests with selected tailings materials and leach solutions to evaluate the leachability of contaminants with time under specific disposal alternatives, 4) adsorption studies measuring the sorption characteristics of heavy metals and radionuclides on the geologic materials at Morton Ranch, 5) clay liner stability tests to evaluate effects of acid leachate on clay mineralogy and clay permeability.

  1. Effects of Organic Matter and Clay Content in Soil on Pesticide Adsorption Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Đurović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic matter and clay content on the adsorption of atrazine, acetochlor, clomazone, pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen in soil samples was studied. In order to determine whether and to what degree different soil properties affect the process of determinationof selected pesticides, three soils with different clay and organic matter contents were used. An optimized liquid-solid extraction procedure followed by SPME measurement was applied to analyse the selected pesticides in soil samples. Detection and quantificationwere done by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Relative standard deviation (RSD values for multiple analyses of soil samples fortified at 30 μg/kg of each pesticide were below 19%. Limits of detection (LODs for all compounds studied were less than 2 μg/kg. The results indicate that soils with different physico-chemical properties have different effects on the adsorption of most pesticides, especially at higher concentration levels.

  2. Contact angles at the water-air interface of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofinskaya, O. A.; Kosterin, A. V.; Kosterina, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Contact angles at the water-air interface have been measured for triturated preparations of clays and soils in order to assess changes in their hydrophobic properties under the effect of oil hydrocarbons. Tasks have been to determine the dynamics of contact angle under soil wetting conditions and to reveal the effect of chemical removal of organic matter from soils on the hydrophilicity of preparations. The potentialities of static and dynamic drop tests for assessing the hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties of soils have been estimated. Clays (kaolinite, gumbrine, and argillite) have been investigated, as well as plow horizons of soils from the Republic of Tatarstan: heavy loamy leached chernozem, medium loamy dark gray forest soil, and light loamy soddy-calcareous soil. The soils have been contaminated with raw oil and kerosene at rates of 0.1-3 wt %. In the uncontaminated and contaminated chernozem, capillary water capacity has been maintained for 250 days. The contact angles have been found to depend on the degree of dispersion of powdered preparation, the main type of clay minerals in the soil, the presence and amount of oxidation-resistant soil organic matter, and the soil-water contact time. Characteristic parameters of mathematical models for drop behavior on triturated preparations have been calculated. Contamination with hydrocarbons has resulted in a reliable increase in the contact angles of soil preparations. The hydrophobization of soil surface in chernozem is more active than in soils poorer in organic matter. The complete restoration of the hydrophilic properties of soils after hydrocarbon contamination is due to the oxidation of easily oxidizable organic matter at the low content of humus, or to wetting during several months in the absence of the mazut fraction.

  3. Can corn plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi affect soil clay assemblage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, P.; Cozzolino, V.; Di Meo, V.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Plants can extract K from exchangeable and non-exchangeable sites in the soil clay mineral structures. The latter, known as fixed K, is usually seen as an illite layer, i.e. an anhydrous K layer that forms a 1.0 nm structural layer unit as seen by X-ray diffraction. Nutrient availability can be enhanced in the root zone by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi. In this study, the effects of non-inoculated and Glomus intraradices inoculated corn plant growth under different experimental conditions on soil K-bearing clay minerals were identified. The soil, a Vertic Xerofluvent, was planted in corn in a 2008-2010 randomized field experiment. Bulk and rhizosphere soil sampling was carried out from May to September 2010 from fertilized plots (N200P90K160 and N200P0K160) with and without plants. According to XRD analysis, three major K-bearing minerals were present in soil: smectite-rich mixed layer mineral, illite-rich mixed layer mineral and illite. Results at 40DAS indicate extraction of K from clay minerals by plant uptake, whereas at 130DAS much of the nutrient seems to be returned to the soil. There is an apparent difference between bulk and rhizophere clays. The XRD patterns are not unequivocally affected by Glomus inoculation. There are observable changes in clay mineralogy in fallow unfertilized compared with fertilized soil. In the studied soil, the illite rich mixed-layer minerals seem to be the source of K absorbed by plants, while illite acts as sink of K released from the plant-microorganisms system at the end of the growing season and as source for the following crop.

  4. Clay-associated organic matter in kaolinitic and smectitic soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattel-Koekkoek, E.J.W.

    2002-01-01

    The primary source of soil organic matter is plant debris of all kinds, such as dead roots, leaves and branches that enter into the soil and are then biologically decomposed at variable rates. Organic matter has many different important functions on a local and global scale. Soil organic matter is a

  5. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components Ⅲ. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca2 + -, Mg2 + -. Al3 + -and Fe3 + -saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ ≤ Fe3+ which coincided with the iucreasing aciditv of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  6. THE EFFECT OF REINFORCEMENT ON THE GBFS AND LIME TREATED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koteswara Rao,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available India being peninsular country has large area coming under coastal region and also it has been the habitat for considerable percentage of population. The marine clays are generally found in the coastal region of West Bengal, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Maharashtra and some parts of Gujarat. Marine or soft clays exists in these region are weak and deformative in nature. The present study deals with the strength characteristics of the marine clay collected from Kakinada Sea Port Ltd, Kakinada, A.P, India. The effect of lime on the strength characteristics of marine clay are studied in this investigation along with the reinforcement effect using geotextile as reinforcement and separator for the foundation soil bed.

  7. Zinc and copper sorption and fixation by an acid soil clay: effect of selective dissolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, N.; McBride, M.B.

    Copper and zinc sorption-desorption studies were carried out over a range of pH values using clay fractions separated from two horizons of an acid soil from New York. In the pH range of high sorption, as much as 95% of the sorbed metal could not be desorbed and thus was considered fixed. Sorption and fixation of Cu and Zn increased rapidly above pH 4 and 5, respectively, for the whole soil clays. Following removal of the oxide fraction by oxalate and citrate-dethionite extractions, sorption and fixation were reduced considerably at pH values below the onset of hydrolysis of the metals in bulk solution. Citrate-dithionite extraction was more effective than oxalate in reducing Zn sorption and fixation. These extraction procedures had less effect on the ability of the clays to sorb and fix Cu. It is concluded that microcrystalline and noncrystalline oxides in the clay fraction of this soil, representing < 20% off the clay by weight, provide reactive surfaces for the chemisorption of Cu and Zn. At low pH, adsorption at these surfaces may be the dominant mechanism of heavy metal immobilization, especially in the subsoil horizons.

  8. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L.) Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Fugen; Soriano, Junel; Tabien, Rodante E; Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic), cultivar ('Cocodrie' and 'Rondo'), and soil texture (clay and sandy loam) on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice.

  9. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L. Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugen Dou

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic, cultivar ('Cocodrie' and 'Rondo', and soil texture (clay and sandy loam on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice.

  10. Modified clay sorbents for wastewater treatment and immobilization of heavy metals in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris; Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Stapkevica, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution with heavy metals is the result of both, anthropogenic and natural processes in the environment. Anthropogenic influence in great extent appears from industry, mining, treatment of metal ores and waste incineration. Contamination of soil and water can be induced by diffuse sources such as applications of agrochemicals and fertilizers in agriculture, air pollution from industry and transport, and by point sources, e.g., wastewater streams, runoff from dump sites and factories. Treatment processes used for metal removal from polluted soil and water include methodologies based on chemical precipitation, ion exchange, carbon adsorption, membrane filtration, adsorption and co-precipitation. Optimal removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous medium can be achieved by adsorption process which is considered as one of the most effective methods due to its cost-effectiveness and high efficiency. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soil also can be done with different adsorbents as the in situ technology. Use of natural and modified clay can be developed as one of the solutions in immobilization of lead, zinc, copper and other elements in polluted sites. Within the present study clay samples of different geological genesis were modified with sodium and calcium chlorides, iron oxyhydroxides and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in variable proportions of Ca/P equimolar ratio to test and compare immobilization efficiency of metals by sorption and batch leaching tests. Sorption capacity for raw clay samples was considered as relatively lower referring to the modified species of the same clay type. In addition, clay samples were tested for powder X-ray difractometry, cation exchange, surface area properties, elemental composition, as well as scanning electron microscopy pictures of clay sample surface structures were obtained. Modified clay sorbents were tested for sorption of lead as monocontaminant and for complex contamination of heavy metals. The

  11. Sand and clay mineralogy of sal forest soils of the Doon Siwalik Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh; R K Manhas; A K Tripathi; A K Raina; M K Gupta; S K Kamboj

    2011-02-01

    The peteromineralogical characterization of the soil was carried out for the 12 soil profiles exposed in the Shorea robusta dominated forests of the Siwalik forest division, Dehradun. The quartz was observed as the dominating light mineral fraction (64–80%) in all the profiles studied. Biotite, hornblende, zircon, tourmaline, rutile and opaques comprising of iron minerals constituted the heavy mineral fraction (20%). The mineralogy of both the sand and clay fractions revealed a mixed mineralogy. The clay minerals in the order of their dominance were vermiculite, illite, kaolinite and mixed layer minerals. The presence of vermiculite and illite in appreciable quantities indicates that these were synthesized from the K-rich soil solution, as orthoclase and micas were present in significant quantities in the sand minerals. The mineral suites identified in the study shows that the geological, climatological and topographical factors of the region collectively played a dominant role in their formation and transformation. After critical appraisal of the results, it may be deduced that the mineralogical composition, physicochemical properties and total elemental analysis of the soils do not show any deficiency of the bases and other plant nutrients in general. The inherent fertility of the soil is good as indicated by the sand and clay mineralogy of the soil and the biotite and feldspar together with the mica is an important source of nutrients for the vegetation in the soils of the Doon valley.

  12. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is readily biodegradable in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada); Lapen, David R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa ON, Canada K1A 0C6 (Canada); Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2010-12-01

    Diclofenac, 2-[2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino]phenyl]acetic acid, is an important non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used for human and animals to reduce inflammation and pain. Diclofenac could potentially reach agricultural lands through the application of municipal biosolids or wastewater, and in the absence of any environmental fate data, we evaluated its persistence in agricultural soils incubated in the laboratory. {sup 14}C-Diclofenac was rapidly mineralized without a lag when added to soils varying widely in texture (sandy loam, loam, clay loam). Over a range of temperature and moisture conditions extractable {sup 14}C-diclofenac residues decreased with half lives < 5 days. No extractable transformation products were detectable by HPLC. Diclofenac mineralization in the loam soil was abolished by heat sterilization. Addition of biosolids to sterile or non-sterile soil did not accelerate the dissipation of diclofenac. These findings indicate that diclofenac is readily biodegradable in agricultural soils.

  13. Modeling Air Permeability in Variably Saturated Soil from Two Natural Clay Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda T K K; Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    Understanding soil–gas phase properties and processes is important for finding solutions to critical environmental problems such as greenhouse gas emissions and transport of gaseous-phase contaminants in soils. Soil–air permeability, ka (μm2), is the key parameter governing advective gas movement...... in soil and is controlled by soil physical characteristics representing soil texture and structure. Models predicting ka as a function of air-filled porosity (ɛ) often use a reference-point measurement, for example, ka,1000 at ɛ1000 (where the measurement is done at a suction of –1000 cm H2O). Using ka...... measurements from two Danish arable fields, each located on natural clay gradients, this study presents a pore tortuosity–disconnectivity analysis to characterize the soil–gas phase. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of soil–moisture condition, clay content, and other potential...

  14. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  15. Simulation of pesticide leaching in a cracking clay soil with the PEARL model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza, R.P.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2005-01-01

    Testing of pesticide leaching models is important to increase confidence in their use in pesticide registration procedures world-wide. The chromatographic PEARL model was tested against the results of a field leaching study on a cracking clay soil with a tracer (bromide), a mobile pesticide (bentazo

  16. Using digital elevation models as an environmental predictor for soil clay contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) as an environmental predictor for soil clay content (SCC). It was based on the applicability of different DEMs, i.e., SRTM with 90-m resolution and airborne Light Detection...

  17. Crystal structure control of aluminized clay minerals on the mobility of caesium in contaminated soil environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzene, Liva; Ferrage, Eric; Viennet, Jean-Christophe; Tertre, Emmanuel; Hubert, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive caesium pollution resulting from Fukushima Dai-ichi and Chernobyl nuclear plant accidents involves strong interactions between Cs+ and clays, especially vermiculite-type minerals. In acidic soil environments, such as in Fukushima area, vermiculite is subjected to weathering processes, resulting in aluminization. The crystal structure of aluminized clays and its implications for Cs+ mobility in soils remain poorly understood due to the mixture of these minerals with other clays and organic matter. We performed acidic weathering of a vermiculite to mimic the aluminization process in soils. Combination of structure analysis and Cs+ extractability measurements show that the increase of aluminization is accompanied by an increase in Cs+ mobility. Crystal structure model for aluminized vermiculite is based on the interstratification of unaltered vermiculite layers and aluminized layers within the same particle. Cs+ in vermiculite layers is poorly mobile, while the extractability of Cs+ is greatly enhanced in aluminized layers. The overall reactivity of the weathered clay (cation exchange capacity, Cs+ mobility) is then governed by the relative abundance of the two types of layers. The proposed layer model for aluminized vermiculite with two coexisting populations of caesium is of prime importance for predicting the fate of caesium in contaminated soil environments. PMID:28233805

  18. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy clay soil were investigated by measuring nitrogen input, and nitrate concentrations in groundwater and drain discharge for two years. A bromide tracer was applied to study solute transport mechanisms. Nitrate transport in the

  19. Modeling selenite adsorption envelopes on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenite adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum and iron oxides, clay minerals: kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite, and 45 surface and subsurface soil samples from the Southwestern and Midwestern regions of the USA as a function of solution pH. Selenite adsorption decreased ...

  20. Effects of clay amendment on adsorption and desorption of copper in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, X.; Stagnitti, F.; Allinson, G.; Turoczy, N.; Li, P.; LeBlanc, M.; Cann, M.A.; Doerr, S.H.; Steenhuis, M.M.; Parlange, J.Y.; Rooij, de G.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an important micronutrient and trace amounts are essential for crop growth. However, high concentrations of copper will produce toxic effects. Australia is increasingly developing production of crops in water repellent soils. Clay amendment, a common amelioration techniques used in Austral

  1. Peculiarities of strength and deformability properties of clay soils in districts of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimenko, Sergey; Efimenko, Vladimir; Sukhorukov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The article demonstrates the methodology of the substantiation of the calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability characteristics of clay subgrade soils for the design of pavements by strength conditions in II, III, and IV road-climatic zones in West Siberia. The main purpose of the work is to ensure the quality of the design of roads in newly developed regions of Russia. To achieve this goal the following problems have been solved: the dislocation of boundary lines of road-climatic zones has been specified, zoning of the investigated territory for the design of roads has been detailed; regularities of changes in strength and deformability characteristics of clay subgrade soils of their moisture have been established; the territorial normalization of the calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability of clay subgrade soils in relation to the allocated road districts has been carried out. Specification of boundary lines of road-climatic zones has been implemented on the basis of the taxonomic system "zone-subzone-road district". The calculated values of moisture, strength, and deformability characteristics of clay soils, established and differentiated according to road-climatic zones, will ensure the required level of the reliability of transport infrastructure facilities during the life cycle of roads.

  2. Crystal structure control of aluminized clay minerals on the mobility of caesium in contaminated soil environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzene, Liva; Ferrage, Eric; Viennet, Jean-Christophe; Tertre, Emmanuel; Hubert, Fabien

    2017-02-01

    Radioactive caesium pollution resulting from Fukushima Dai-ichi and Chernobyl nuclear plant accidents involves strong interactions between Cs+ and clays, especially vermiculite-type minerals. In acidic soil environments, such as in Fukushima area, vermiculite is subjected to weathering processes, resulting in aluminization. The crystal structure of aluminized clays and its implications for Cs+ mobility in soils remain poorly understood due to the mixture of these minerals with other clays and organic matter. We performed acidic weathering of a vermiculite to mimic the aluminization process in soils. Combination of structure analysis and Cs+ extractability measurements show that the increase of aluminization is accompanied by an increase in Cs+ mobility. Crystal structure model for aluminized vermiculite is based on the interstratification of unaltered vermiculite layers and aluminized layers within the same particle. Cs+ in vermiculite layers is poorly mobile, while the extractability of Cs+ is greatly enhanced in aluminized layers. The overall reactivity of the weathered clay (cation exchange capacity, Cs+ mobility) is then governed by the relative abundance of the two types of layers. The proposed layer model for aluminized vermiculite with two coexisting populations of caesium is of prime importance for predicting the fate of caesium in contaminated soil environments.

  3. Multisensor on-the-go mapping of readily dispersible clay, particle size and soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaene, Guillaume; Niedźwiecki, Jacek; Papierowska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Particle size fractions affect strongly the physical and chemical properties of soil. Readily dispersible clay (RDC) is the part of the clay fraction in soils that is easily or potentially dispersible in water when small amounts of mechanical energy are applied to soil. The amount of RDC in the soil is of significant importance for agriculture and environment because clay dispersion is a cause of poor soil stability in water which in turn contributes to soil erodibility, mud flows, and cementation. To obtain a detailed map of soil texture, many samples are needed. Moreover, RDC determination is time consuming. The use of a mobile visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) platform is proposed here to map those soil properties and obtain the first detailed map of RDC at field level. Soil properties prediction was based on calibration model developed with 10 representative samples selected by a fuzzy logic algorithm. Calibration samples were analysed for soil texture (clay, silt and sand), RDC and soil organic carbon (SOC) using conventional wet chemistry analysis. Moreover, the Veris mobile sensor platform is also collecting electrical conductivity (EC) data (deep and shallow), and soil temperature. These auxiliary data were combined with VIS-NIR measurement (data fusion) to improve prediction results. EC maps were also produced to help understanding RDC data. The resulting maps were visually compared with an orthophotography of the field taken at the beginning of the plant growing season. Models were developed with partial least square regression (PLSR) and support vector machine regression (SVMR). There were no significant differences between calibration using PLSR or SVMR. Nevertheless, the best models were obtained with PLSR and standard normal variate (SNV) pretreatment and the fusion with deep EC data (e.g. for RDC and clay content: RMSECV = 0,35% and R2 = 0,71; RMSECV = 0,32% and R2 = 0,73 respectively). The best models were used to predict soil properties from the

  4. Effects of deep tillage and straw returning on soil microorganism and enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baoyi; Hu, Hao; Zhao, Yali; Mu, Xinyuan; Liu, Kui; Li, Chaohai

    2014-01-01

    Two field experiments were conducted for two years with the aim of studying the effects of deep tillage and straw returning on soil microorganism and enzyme activity in clay and loam soil. Three treatments, (1) conventional tillage (CT), shallow tillage and straw returning; (2) deep tillage (DT), deep tillage and straw returning; and (3) deep tillage with no straw returning (DNT), were carried out in clay and loam soil. The results showed that deep tillage and straw returning increased the abundance of soil microorganism and most enzyme activities. Deep tillage was more effective for increasing enzyme activities in clay, while straw returning was more effective in loam. Soil microorganism abundance and most enzyme activities decreased with the increase of soil depth. Deep tillage mainly affected soil enzyme activities in loam at the soil depth of 20-30 cm and in clay at the depth of 0-40 cm. Straw returning mainly affected soil microorganism and enzyme activities at the depths of 0-30 cm and 0-40 cm, respectively.

  5. [Occurrence relationship between iron minerals and clay minerals in net-like red soils: evidence from X-ray diffraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Han, Weni; Ma, Yu-Bo; Li, Rong-Biao

    2013-04-01

    The high purity of clay minerals is a key factor to reconstruct the palaeoclimate in clay mineralogy, however, the existence of iron minerals (such as goethite and hematite) and organics lead to the intergrowth of clay minerals and other minerals, producing other mineral impurities in enriched clay minerals. Although the removal of organics in soil sediments has been fully investigated, the occurrence state of iron minerals remains controversial, hindering the preparation of high-purity clay minerals. Therefore, the occurrence relationship of iron minerals and clay minerals in Jiujiang net-like red soils of the middle to lower reaches of the Yangtze River was investigated using the sequential separation method, which provided some implications for the removal of iron minerals in soil sediments. The results indicated that goethite and hematite were mostly absorbed on the surface of hydroxy-interlayered smectite and illite in the form of films, and the rest were absorbed by kaolinite.

  6. Electrokinetic movement of hexachlorobenzene in clayed soils enhanced by Tween 80 and beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Songhu; Tian, Meng; Lu, Xiaohua

    2006-09-21

    This study describes the comparative behavior of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) contaminated clayed soils in an electrokinetic (EK) system enhanced by Tween 80 and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). The pH of the soils was controlled by Na2CO3/NaHCO3 buffer. Negligible HCB movement was observed when NaOH or Na2CO3/NaHCO3 buffer was used as anodic flushing solution. While Tween 80 or beta-CD was introduced to Na2CO3/NaHCO3 buffer, obvious HCB movement was achieved. Although beta-CD led to a less desorption of HCB from kaolin than Tween 80, the removal of HCB with beta-CD was much higher than that with Tween 80 in the EK system. Tween 80 could be sorped by kaolin more than beta-CD, which was responsible for the result. The mechanism of the movement of HCB was proposed as the enhanced desorption of HCB from soil, the dissolving of HCB in the soil pore fluid and the movement of HCB with the electroosmotic flow. Obvious movement of HCB was also observed in the EK treatment of real HCB-contaminated clayed soil enhanced by beta-CD. It is an alternative approach to use facilitating agents such as beta-CD to enhance the EK movement of HCB in the contaminated clayed soils.

  7. Distinguishing black carbon from biogenic humic substances in soil clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, D.A.; Chappell, M.A.; Martens, D.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thompson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most models of soil humic substances include a substantial component of aromatic C either as the backbone of humic heteropolymers or as a significant component of supramolecular aggregates of degraded biopolymers. We physically separated coarse (0.2-2.0????m e.s.d.), medium (0.02-0.2????m e.s.d.), and fine (> 0.02????m e.s.d.) clay subfractions from three Midwestern soils and characterized the organic material associated with these subfractions using 13C-CPMAS-NMR, DTG, SEM-EDX, incubations, and radiocarbon age. Most of the C in the coarse clay subfraction was present as discrete particles (0.2-5????m as seen in SEM images) of black carbon (BC) and consisted of approximately 60% aromatic C, with the remainder being a mixture of aliphatic, anomeric and carboxylic C. We hypothesize that BC particles were originally charcoal formed during prairie fires. As the BC particles aged in soil their surfaces were oxidized to form carboxylic groups and anomeric and aliphatic C accumulated in the BC particles either by adsorption of dissolved biogenic compounds from the soil solution or by direct deposition of biogenic materials from microbes living within the BC particles. The biogenic soil organic matter was physically separated with the medium and fine clay subfractions and was dominated by aliphatic, anomeric, and carboxylic C. The results indicate that the biogenic humic materials in our soils have little aromatic C, which is inconsistent with the traditional heteropolymer model of humic substances.

  8. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk.

  9. Effects of iron and aluminum oxides and clay content on penetration resistance of five Greek soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Stefanou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of amorphous and crystalline iron (Fe and aluminum (Al oxides and oxy-hydroxides as well as clay on soil penetration resistance of five Greek soils, as a function of soil water suction was studied for the whole range of soil moisture. The soils tested were of loamy texture and were collected from cultivated and non-cultivated areas of north and central Greece (Macedonia and Thessaly. The study aimed at understanding the role of the above mentioned soil components on penetration resistance. The findings showed that the increase of iron and aluminum oxides and oxy-hydroxides content resulted in an increase of soil penetration resistance and the relationships between them were significant. Crystalline iron forms found to have a more profound effect on penetration resistance as compared to amorphous iron forms. Finally, positive and significant relationships were also found between penetration resistance and clay content. However, it is not entirely clear which of the two soil components plays the most important role in penetration resistance changes in soils.

  10. Soil microbial communities associated to plant rhizospheres in an organic farming system in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial communities under different organic crop rhizospheres (0-10 and 10-20 cm) were characterized using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and pyrosequencing techniques. The soil was a silt loam (12.8% clay, 71.8% silt and15.4% sand). Soils at this site are characterized as having pH of ~6.53, ...

  11. Nitrogen Mineralization of Broiler Litter Applied to Southeastern Coastal Plain Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (clayey, kaoliniti...

  12. MINERALIZATION OF NITROGEN FROM BROILER LITTER AS AFFECTED BY SOIL TEXTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted during 2004-2005 to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (...

  13. FIELD STUDIES ON THE MARINE CLAY FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS TREATED WITH LIME, GBFS AND REINFORCEMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koteswara Rao,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Majority of the population in India are living in costal corridor, where the existing soils are weak and more deformative. It is becoming a great challenge for the civil engineers to design suitable foundation for the structures in these regions. The effect of GBFS, lime and geotextile as reinforcement & separator on the marine clay foundation soil bed in field has been investigated. A test track of 8m long and 2m wide was laid in the field for testing the treated and untreated conditions of the marine clay foundation soil beds. The ultimate load carrying capacity of the test tracks for untreated and treated conditions have been studied and also the degree of compaction of the test tract was found.

  14. ESTIMATING SOIL PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION FOR SICILIAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bagarello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil particle-size distribution (PSD is commonly used for soil classification and for estimating soil behavior. An accurate mathematical representation of the PSD is required to estimate soil hydraulic properties and to compare texture measurements from different classification systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Haverkamp and Parlange (HP and Fredlund et al. (F PSD models to fit 243 measured PSDs from a wide range of 38 005_Bagarello(547_33 18-11-2009 11:55 Pagina 38 soil textures in Sicily and to test the effect of the number of measured particle diameters on the fitting of the theoretical PSD. For each soil textural class, the best fitting performance, established using three statistical indices (MXE, ME, RMSE, was obtained for the F model with three fitting parameters. In particular, this model performed better in the fine-textured soils than the coarse-textured ones but a good performance (i.e., RMSE < 0.03 was detected for the majority of the investigated soil textural classes, i.e. clay, silty-clay, silty-clay-loam, silt-loam, clay-loam, loamy-sand, and loam classes. Decreasing the number of measured data pairs from 14 to eight determined a worse fitting of the theoretical distribution to the measured one. It was concluded that the F model with three fitting parameters has a wide applicability for Sicilian soils and that the comparison of different PSD investigations can be affected by the number of measured data pairs.

  15. Water retention of rigid soils from a two-factor model for clay

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    Water retention is one of the key soil characteristics. Available models of soil water retention relate to the curve-fitting type. The objective of this work is to suggest a physical model of water retention (drying branch) for soils with a rigid matrix. "Physical" means the prediction based on the a priori measured or estimated soil parameters with a clear physical meaning. We rely on the two-factor model of clay that takes into account the factors of capillarity and shrinkage. The key points of the model to be proposed are some weak pseudo shrinkage that the rigid soils demonstrate according to their experimental water retention curves, and some specific properties of the rigid grain matrix. The three input parameters for prediction of soil water retention with the rigid grain matrix include inter-grain porosity, as well as maximum and minimum grain sizes. The comparison between measured and predicted sand water retention curves for four different sands is promising.

  16. The Influence of Clay on the Rate of Decay of Amino Acid Metabolites Synthesized in Soils during Decomposition of Cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1975-01-01

    14C-labelled cellulose was added to seven different soils containing silt + clay (particles .... The amounts of labelled amino acid C in the soils were proportional to their content of silt + clay. After 30 days of incubation labelled amino acid C remaining in the soil with the lowest content of silt + clay constituted 6 per cent of the carbon added in cellulose, as compared with 18 per cent in the soil...... with the highest content of silt + clay. These values had decreased to 5 and 13 per cent respectively after 2 years of incubation. The order between the soils in the content of labelled amino acid C established during the first month of incubation, was thus roughly maintained throughout the period of incubation...

  17. Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at different scales in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhao, Gengxing; Gao, Mingxiu; Chang, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at macro, meso and micro scales in the Yellow River delta, China. Soil electrical conductivities (ECs) were measured at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm soil depths at 49 sampling sites during November 9 to 11, 2013. Soil salinity was converted from soil ECs based on laboratory analyses. Our results indicated that at the macro scale, soil salinity was high with strong variability in each soil layer, and the content increased and the variability weakened with increasing soil depth. From east to west in the region, the farther away from the sea, the lower the soil salinity was. The degrees of soil salinization in three deeper soil layers are 1.14, 1.24 and 1.40 times higher than that in the surface soil. At the meso scale, the sequence of soil salinity in different topographies, soil texture and vegetation decreased, respectively, as follows: depression >flatland >hillock >batture; sandy loam >light loam >medium loam >heavy loam >clay; bare land >suaeda salsa >reed >cogongrass >cotton >paddy >winter wheat. At the micro scale, soil salinity changed with elevation in natural micro-topography and with anthropogenic activities in cultivated land. As the study area narrowed down to different scales, the spatial variability of soil salinity weakened gradually in cultivated land and salt wasteland except the bare land.

  18. Clay Components in Soil Dictate Environmental Stability and Bioavailability of Cervid Prions in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, A. Christy; Kane, Sarah; Lockwood, Krista; Seligman, Jeff; Michel, Brady; Hill, Dana; Ortega, Aimee; Mangalea, Mihnea R.; Telling, Glenn C.; Miller, Michael W.; Vercauteren, Kurt; Zabel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) affects cervids and is the only known prion disease to affect free-ranging wildlife populations. CWD spread continues unabated, and exact mechanisms of its seemingly facile spread among deer and elk across landscapes in North America remain elusive. Here we confirm that naturally contaminated soil contains infectious CWD prions that can be transmitted to susceptible model organisms. We show that smectite clay content of soil potentiates prion binding capacity of different soil types from CWD endemic and non-endemic areas, likely contributing to environmental stability of bound prions. The smectite clay montmorillonite (Mte) increased prion retention and bioavailability in vivo. Trafficking experiments in live animals fed bound and unbound prions showed that mice retained significantly more Mte-bound than unbound prions. Mte promoted rapid uptake of prions from the stomach to the intestines via enterocytes and M cells, and then to macrophages and eventually CD21+ B cells in Peyer's patches and spleens. These results confirm clay components in soil as an important vector in CWD transmission at both environmental and organismal levels. PMID:27933048

  19. Using Agricultural Residue Biochar to Improve Soil Quality of Desert Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory study was conducted to test the effects of biochars made from different feedstocks on soil quality indicators of arid soils. Biochars were produced from four locally-available agricultural residues: pecan shells, pecan orchard prunings, cotton gin trash, and yard waste, using a lab-scale pyrolyzer operated at 450 °C under a nitrogen environment and slow pyrolysis conditions. Two local arid soils used for crop production, a sandy loam and a clay loam, were amended with these biochars at a rate of 45 Mg·ha−1 and incubated for three weeks in a growth chamber. The soils were analyzed for multiple soil quality indicators including soil organic matter content, pH, electrical conductivity (EC, and available nutrients. Results showed that amendment with cotton gin trash biochar has the greatest impact on both soils, significantly increasing SOM and plant nutrient (P, K, Ca, Mn contents, as well as increasing the electrical conductivity, which creates concerns about soil salinity. Other biochar treatments significantly elevated soil salinity in clay loam soil, except for pecan shell biochar amended soil, which was not statistically different in EC from the control treatment. Generally, the effects of the biochar amendments were minimal for many soil measurements and varied with soil texture. Effects of biochars on soil salinity and pH/nutrient availability will be important considerations for research on biochar application to arid soils.

  20. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  1. Treatability of TCE-contaminated clay soils at the Rinsewater Impoundment, Michoud Assembly Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, A.J.; Gilbert, V.P.; Hewitt, J.D.; Koran, L.J. Jr.; Jennings, H.L.; Donaldson, T.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Marshall, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted treatability studies on clay soils taken from the Rinsewater Impoundment at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Michoud Assembly Facility. The soils are contaminated with up to 3000 mg/kg of trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, less than 10 mg/kg of trans-1,2-DCE, and less than 10 mg/kg of vinyl chloride. The goal of the study described in this report was to identify and test in situ technologies and/or develop a modified treatment regime to remove or destroy volatile organic compounds from the contaminated clay soils. Much of the work was based upon previous experience with mixed-region vapor stepping and mixed-region peroxidation. Laboratory treatments were performed on intact soil cores that were taken from contaminated areas at the Rinsewater Impoundment at MAF. Treatability studies were conducted on soil that was close to in situ conditions in terms of soil structure and contaminant concentrations.

  2. Diversity of clay minerals in soils of solonetzic complexes in the southeast of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhikova, N. P.; Khitrov, N. B.

    2016-12-01

    Data on the mineralogical composition of clay in soils of solonetzic complexes of the Priobskoe Plateau and the Kulunda and Baraba lowlands have been generalized. The parent materials predominating in these regions have loamy and clayey textures and are characterized by the association of clay minerals represented by dioctahedral and trioctahedral mica-hydromica, chlorite, kaolinite, and a number of irregular interstratifications. They differ in the proportions between the major mineral phases and in the qualitative composition of the minerals. Mica-hydromica and chlorites with a small amount of smectitic phase predominate on the Priobskoe Plateau and in the Kulunda Lowland; in the Baraba Lowland, the portion of mica-smectite interstratifications is higher. An eluvial-illuvial distribution of clay fraction in solonetzes is accompanied by the acid-alkaline destruction and lessivage of clay minerals, including the smectitic phase in the superdispersed state. This results in the strong transformation of the mineralogical composition of the upper (suprasolonetzic) horizons and in the enrichment of the solonetzic horizons with the products of mineral destruction; superdispersed smectite; and undestroyed particles of hydromica, kaolinite, and chlorite from the suprasolonetzic horizons. A significant decrease in the content of smectitic phase in the surface solodic horizons of solonetzic complexes has different consequences in the studied regions. In the soils of the Priobskoe Plateau and Kulunda Lowland with a relatively low content (10-30%) of smectitic phase represented by chlorite-smectite interstratifications, this phase virtually disappears from the soils (there are only rare cases of its preservation). In the soils of the Baraba Lowland developed from the parent materials with the high content (30-50%) of smectitic phase represented by mica-smectite interstratifications, the similar decrease (by 10-20%) in the content of smectitic phase does not result in its

  3. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:V.Salt Balance in Soil Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA

    1995-01-01

    Salt balance in simulated soil coulumns was calculated on the basis of a large amount of long term observation data.The results showed that under the climate conditions of semi-arid region of the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain,the soils in the columns were under salt accumulation conditions when the groundwater depth was controlled at less than 2.0m,and under desalinization conditions when at larger than 2.5m.In the soil columns with clay soil and silty loam soil intercalated with a clay layer,the amount of salt accumulated was far less than that in the soil column with silty loam soil throughout the whole profile.Under no irriagtion conditions crop planting may increase groundwater evaporation and hence salt accumulation in soil,making the soil columns under desalinization be under salt accumulation conditions.

  4. Enhancement of physical and hydrological properties of a sandy loam soil via application of different biochar particle sizes during incubation period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeelnejad, L.; Shorafa, M.; Gorji, M.; Hosseini, S.M.

    2016-11-01

    In spite of many studies that have been carried out, there is a knowledge-gap as to how different sizes of biochars alter soil properties. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different sizes of biochars on soil properties. The biochars were produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (350 and 550°C) from two feedstocks (rice husk and apple wood chips). Produced biochars were prepared at two diameters (1-2 mm and <1 mm) and mixed with soil at a rate of 2% (w/w). Multiple effects of type, temperature and size of biochars were significant, so as the mixture of soil and finer woodchip biochars produced at 550°C had significant effects on all soil properties. Soil aggregation and stabilization of macro-aggregates, values of mean weight diameter and water stable aggregates were improved due to increased soil organic matter as binding agents and microbial biomass. In addition, plant available water capacity, air capacity, S-index, meso-pores and water retention content were significantly increased compared to control. But, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was reduced due to blockage of pores by biochar particles, reduction of pore throat size and available space for flow and also, high field capacity of biochars. So, application of biochar to soil, especially the finest particles of high-tempered woody biochars, can improve physical and hydrological properties of coarse-textured soils and reduce their water drainage by modification of Ks. (Author)

  5. Enhancement of physical and hydrological properties of a sandy loam soil via application of different biochar particle sizes during incubation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Esmaeelnejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of many studies that have been carried out, there is a knowledge-gap as to how different sizes of biochars alter soil properties. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different sizes of biochars on soil properties. The biochars were produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (350 and 550°C from two feedstocks (rice husk and apple wood chips. Produced biochars were prepared at two diameters (1-2 mm and <1 mm and mixed with soil at a rate of 2% (w/w. Multiple effects of type, temperature and size of biochars were significant, so as the mixture of soil and finer woodchip biochars produced at 550°C had significant effects on all soil properties. Soil aggregation and stabilization of macro-aggregates, values of mean weight diameter and water stable aggregates were improved due to increased soil organic matter as binding agents and microbial biomass. In addition, plant available water capacity, air capacity, S-index, meso-pores and water retention content were significantly increased compared to control. But, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks was reduced due to blockage of pores by biochar particles, reduction of pore throat size and available space for flow and also, high field capacity of biochars. So, application of biochar to soil, especially the finest particles of high-tempered woody biochars, can improve physical and hydrological properties of coarse-textured soils and reduce their water drainage by modification of Ks.

  6. Pine Woodchip Biochar Impact on Soil Nutrient Concentrations and Corn Yield in a Silt Loam in the Mid-Southern U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Katy E. Brantley; Mary C. Savin; Brye, Kristofor R.; David E. Longer

    2015-01-01

    Biochar has altered plant yields and soil nutrient availability in tropical soils, but less research exists involving biochar additions to temperate cropping systems. Of the existing research, results vary based on soil texture, crop grown, and biochar properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of pine ( Pinus spp.) woodchip biochar at 0, 5, and 10 Mg·ha −1 rates combined with urea nitrogen (N) on soil chemical properties and corn ( Zea mays L.) yield under field con...

  7. Comparison of revegetation techniques on mineral clay soil: analysis of quantitative response of vegetation cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Muzzi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Revegetation of mineral-clay soils is a notably complex ecological and technically challenging undertaking that depends on substrate profile and local micro-environmental conditions, factors making it a particularly long procedure as well. This study compared and assessed the medium-term effectiveness of four treatments employed to promote stable pedogenesis and herbaceous recolonisation of abandoned clay quarries in the Apennine foothills of northern Italy’s Emilia- Romagna region. The treatments included: slow-release N organic fertiliser, phosphate fertiliser, organic amendment and topsoil [the soil top layer (0-0.2 m of a local natural meadow]. The state of the vegetative cover was monitored monthly from 1994 through 2004, until problems of slope stability at the site compromised the integrity of the trial plots. Significant effects were achieved by the recycled topsoil through 8 years and by organic amendment through 6 years; the effects of slow-release nitrogen were notably limited over time and phosphorous delivered a medium-term response but of notable year-toyear swings. No interactions among factors emerged in the mediumterm. After 11 years, treatments did not induce effects statistical appreciable. Our results suggest that the tested agronomic strategies on mineral clay soil did not trigger, in the medium-term, secondary succession processes able to potentially alter the spontaneous revegetation course.

  8. 易盐渍区粘土夹层对土壤水盐运动的影响特征%Effect of clay interlayers on soil water-salt movement in easily-salinized regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余世鹏; 杨劲松; 刘广明

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale soil column experiments for simulation water-salt movement in clay interlayers under normal growing conditions were carried out in an easily-salinized region for different textures of soils and groundwater conditions in the Huang-Huai-Hai alluvial plain of China. In this study, the 20-year measurement was analyzed to examine the effect of clay interlayers on soil water-salt movement in easily-salinized regions. Results show that the clay inter-layer has a significant positive effect on the water-holding capacity in the soil and acts as a filter obstructing the salinity infiltration. This is especially true for restraining the penetration of surface accumulated salts. The thicker the clay interlayer is, the greater the effect will be. The range of depth to groundwater is likely to be smaller in the area with surface accumulated salts and clay interlayers around 1.0 m than that with silt loam soils around 1.5 m. And in the latter case, the salinization of soils is easily induced when the groundwater level is lower than a threshold value of 2.5 m. The amount of accumulated salts is found to be higher in clay interlayers than that in silt loam soils. Thus, proper monitoring and measures are necessary to prevent the secondary salinization of soils in the practice of water resources management.%针对黄淮海冲积平原土壤剖面中粘土夹层普遍存在的现象,在典型易盐渍区开展模拟易盐农田常规种植条件下水盐运移的大型土柱实验,基于长达20年的长系列监测数据分析,系统研究易盐渍区不同土体构型和地下水位等代表性条件下的土壤水盐运移规律和粘土夹层的影响特征.研究结果表明:粘土层有良好的保水和隔盐能力,尤其对表土积盐的抑制效果显著,且抑盐效果随粘土层厚度增加而提升;含粘土夹层土体表土积盐的地下水埋深范围更小,表土积盐高峰出现在l m左右地下水埋深,全剖面粉砂壤土土体

  9. Determination of essential and toxic elements in clay soil commonly consumed by pregnant women in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwalongo, D.; Mohammed, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    A habit of eating clay soil especially among pregnant women is a common practice in Tanzania. This practice known as geophagy might introduce toxic elements in the consumer's body to endanger the health of the mother and her child. Therefore it is very important to have information on the elemental composition of the eaten soil so as to assess the safety nature of the habit. In this study 100 samples of clay soil, which were reported to be originating from five regions in Tanzania and are consumed by pregnant women were analyzed to determine their levels of essential and toxic elements. The analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescent technique (EDXRF) of Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, Arusha. Essential elements Fe, Zn, Cu, Se and Mn and toxic elements As, Pb, Co, Ni, U and Th were detected in concentrations above WHO permissible limits in some of the samples. The results from this study show that the habit of eating soil is exposing the pregnant mothers and their children to metal toxicity which is detrimental to their health. Hence, further actions should be taken to discourage the habit of eating soil at all levels.

  10. Impact of clay mineral on air oxidation of PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Kouadio, Olivier; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Faure, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    This work investigated the impact of a clay mineral (bentonite) on the air oxidation of the solvent extractable organic matters (EOMs) and the PAHs from contaminated soils. EOMs were isolated from two coking plant soils and mixed with silica sand or bentonite. These samples, as well as raw soils and bentonite/soil mixtures, were oxidized in air at 60 and 100 °C for 160 days. Mineralization was followed by measuring the CO2 produced over the experiments. EOM, polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC), including PAH, contents were also determined. Oxidation led to a decrease in EOM contents and PAH concentrations, these diminutions were enhanced by the presence of bentonite. Transfer of carbon from EOM to insoluble organic matter pointed out a condensation phenomenon leading to a stabilization of the contamination. Higher mineralization rates, observed during the oxidation of the soil/bentonite mixtures, seem to indicate that this clay mineral had a positive influence on the transformation of PAC into CO2.

  11. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy study of mineral-organic matter associations in pasture soil clay fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Karunakaran, Chithra; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-06-17

    There is a growing acceptance that associations with soil minerals may be the most important overarching stabilization mechanism for soil organic matter. However, direct investigation of organo-mineral associations has been hampered by a lack of methods that can simultaneously characterize organic matter (OM) and soil minerals. In this study, STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at the C 1s, Ca 2p, Fe 2p, Al 1s, and Si 1s edges was used to investigate C associations with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si species in soil clay fractions from an upland pasture hillslope. Bulk techniques including C and N NEXAFS, Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, and XRD were applied to provide additional information. Results demonstrated that C was associated with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si with no separate phase in soil clay particles. In soil clay particles, the pervasive C forms were aromatic C, carboxyl C, and polysaccharides with the relative abundance of carboxyl C and polysaccharides varying spatially at the submicrometer scale. Only limited regions in the soil clay particles had aliphatic C. Good C-Ca spatial correlations were found for soil clay particles with no CaCO3, suggesting a strong role of Ca in organo-mineral assemblage formation. Fe EXAFS showed that about 50% of the total Fe in soils was contained in Fe oxides, whereas Fe-bearing aluminosilicates (vermiculite and Illite) accounted for another 50%. Fe oxides in the soil were mainly crystalline goethite and hematite, with lesser amounts of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite. XRD revealed that soil clay aluminosilicates were hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, Illite, and kaolinite. C showed similar correlation with Fe to Al and Si, implying a similar association of Fe oxides and aluminosilicates with organic matter in organo-mineral associations. These direct microscopic determinations can help improve understanding of organo-mineral interactions in soils.

  12. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY-SODICITY AND GLYPHOSATE FORMULATIONS – AVANS PREMIUM 360 SL ON PHOSPHOMONOESTERASE ACTIVITIES IN SANDY LOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płatkowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to determine the influence of NaCl and glyphosate-based herbicide Avans Premium 360 SL on acid and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activities in sandy loam. The experiment was carried out in laboratory conditions on sandy loam with Corg content 10.90 g/kg. Soil was divided into half kilogram samples and adjusted to 60% of maximum water holding capacity. In the experiment dependent variables were: I – dosages of Avans Premium 360 SL (0, a recommended field dosage – FD, a tenfold higher dosage – 10 FD and hundredfold higher dosage – 100 FD, II – amount of NaCl (0, 3% and 6%, III – day of experiment (1, 7, 14, 28 and 56. On days of experiment the activity of alkaline and acid phosphomonoesterase activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. The obtained result showed that the application of Avans Premium 360 SL decreased in acid and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activity in clay soil. Significant interaction effect between the dosage of Avans Premium 360 SL, NaCl amount and day of experiment was reported in the experiment. The inhibitory effect of Avans Premium 360 SL was the highest in soil with NaCl at the amount of 6%.

  13. Alleviation of Soil Acidity and Aluminium Phytotoxicity in Acid Soils by Using Alkaline-Stabilised Biosolids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study alleviation of soil acidity and Al toxicity by applying an alkaline-stabilised sewage sludge product (biosolids) to an acid clay sandy loam (pH 5.7) and a strongly acid sandy loam (pH 4.5). Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Forrester) was used as a test crop and was grown in the sewage sludge-amended (33.5 t sludge DM ha-1) and unamended soils. The results showed that the alkaline biosloids increased soil pH from 5.7 to 6.9 for the clay sandy loam and from 4.5 to 6.0 for the sandy loam. The sludge product decreased KCl-extractable Al from 0.1 to 0.0 cmol kg-1 for the former soil and from 4.0 to 0.1 cmol kg-1 for the latter soil. As a result, barley plants grew much better and grain yield increased greatly in the amended treatments compared with the unamended controls. These observations indicate that alkaline-stabilised biosolids can be used as a liming material for remedying Al phytotoxicity in strongly acid soils by increasing soil pH and lowering Al bioavailability.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus enhances P acquisition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a sandy loam soil with long-term inorganic fertilization regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junli; Lin, Xiangui; Wang, Junhua; Cui, Xiangchao; Dai, Jue; Chu, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2010-10-01

    The P efficiency, crop yield, and response of wheat to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus caledonium were tested in an experimental field with long-term (19 years) fertilizer management. The experiment included five fertilizer treatments: organic amendment (OA), half organic amendment plus half mineral fertilizer (1/2 OM), mineral fertilizer NPK, mineral fertilizer NK, and the control (without fertilization). AMF inoculation responsiveness (MIR) of wheat plants at acquiring P were estimated by comparing plants grown in unsterilized soil inoculated with G. caledonium and in untreated soil containing indigenous AMF. Without AMF inoculation, higher crop yields but lower colonization rates were observed in the NPK and two OA-inputted treatments, and NPK had significantly (P soils and thereby P acquisition of wheat plants compared with OA and 1/2 OM. G. caledonium inoculation significantly (P soil alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, only with the NPK treatment. This gave an MIR of ca. 45% on total P acquisition of wheat plants. There were no other remarkable MIRs. It suggested that the MIR is determined by soil available P status, and rational combination of AMF with chemical NPK fertilizer can compensate for organic amendments by improving P-acquisition efficiency in arable soils.

  15. Ammonia transformations and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in a clay soil underlying a manure pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Baram, Shahar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Unlined manure ponds are constructed on clay soil worldwide to manage farm waste. Seepage of ammonia-rich liquor into underlying soil layers contributes to groundwater contamination by nitrate. To identify the possible processes that lead to the production of nitrate from ammonia in this oxygen-limited environment, we studied the diversity and abundance of ammonia-transforming microorganisms under an unlined manure pond. The numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria were most abundant in the top of the soil profile and decreased significantly with depth (0.5 m), correlating with soil pore-water ammonia concentrations and soil ammonia concentrations, respectively. On the other hand, the numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea were relatively constant throughout the soil profile (10(7) amoA copies per g(soil)). Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were detected mainly in the top 0.2 m. The results suggest that nitrate accumulation in the vadose zone under the manure pond could be the result of complete aerobic nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and could exist as a byproduct of anammox activity. While the majority of the nitrogen was removed within the 0.5-m soil section, possibly by combined anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, a fraction of the produced nitrate leached into the groundwater.

  16. Community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria under long-term application of mineral fertilizer and organic manure in a sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haiyan; Fujii, Takeshi; Morimoto, Sho; Lin, Xiangui; Yagi, Kazuyuki; Hu, Junli; Zhang, Jiabao

    2007-01-01

    The effects of mineral fertilizer (NPK) and organic manure on the community structure of soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated in a long-term (16-year) fertilizer experiment. The experiment included seven treatments: organic manure, half organic manure N plus half fertilizer N, fertilizer NPK, fertilizer NP, fertilizer NK, fertilizer PK, and the control (without fertilization). N fertilization greatly increased soil nitrification potential, and mineral N fertilizer had a greater impact than organic manure, while N deficiency treatment (PK) had no significant effect. AOB community structure was analyzed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of the amoA gene, which encodes the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. DGGE profiles showed that the AOB community was more diverse in N-fertilized treatments than in the PK-fertilized treatment or the control, while one dominant band observed in the control could not be detected in any of the fertilized treatments. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the DGGE bands derived from N-fertilized treatments belonged to Nitrosospira cluster 3, indicating that N fertilization resulted in the dominance of Nitrosospira cluster 3 in soil. These results demonstrate that long-term application of N fertilizers could result in increased soil nitrification potential and the AOB community shifts in soil. Our results also showed the different effects of mineral fertilizer N versus organic manure N; the effects of P and K on the soil AOB community; and the importance of balanced fertilization with N, P, and K in promoting nitrification functions in arable soils.

  17. Smectite clays in Mars soil - Evidence for their presence and role in Viking biology experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Rishpon, J.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of smectite clays in Martian soils is reviewed and results of experiments with certain active clays simulating the Viking biology experiments are reported. Analyses of Martian soil composition by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and dust storm spectroscopy and Martian geological history strongly suggest the presence of a mixture of weathered ferro-silicate minerals, mainly nontronite and montmorillonite, accompanied by soluble sulphate salts, as major constituents. Samples of montmorillonite and nontronite incubated with (C-14)-formate or the radioactive nutrient medium solution used in the Viking Labeled Release experiment, were found to produce patterns of release of radioactive gas very similar to those observed in the Viking experiments, indicating the iron-catalyzed decomposition of formate as the reaction responsible for the Viking results. The experimental results of Hubbard (1979) simulating the results of the Viking Pyrolytic Release experiment using iron montmorillonites are pointed out, and it is concluded that many of the results of the Viking biology experiments can be explained in terms of the surface activity of smectite clays in catalysis and adsorption.

  18. Soil compaction effects on water status of ponderosa pine assessed through 13C/12C composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, G Armando; Singer, Michael J; Powers, Robert F; Horwath, William R

    2002-05-01

    Soil compaction is a side effect of forest reestablishment practices resulting from use of heavy equipment and site preparation. Soil compaction often alters soil properties resulting in changes in plant-available water. The use of pressure chamber methods to assess plant water stress has two drawbacks: (1) the measurements are not integrative; and (2) the method is difficult to apply extensively to establish seasonal soil water status. We evaluated leaf carbon isotopic composition (delta13C) as a means of assessing effects of soil compaction on water status and growth of young ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) stands across a range of soil textures. Leaf delta13C in cellulose and whole foliar tissue were highly correlated. Leaf delta13C in both whole tissue and cellulose (holocellulose) was up to 1.0 per thousand lower in trees growing in non-compacted (NC) loam or clay soils than in compacted (SC) loam or clay soils. Soil compaction had the opposite effect on leaf delta13C in trees growing on sandy loam soil, indicating that compaction increased water availability in this soil type. Tree growth response to compaction also varied with soil texture, with no effect, a negative effect and a positive effect as a result of compaction of loam, clay and sandy loam soils, respectively. There was a significant correlation between 13C signature and tree growth along the range of soil textures. Leaf delta13C trends were correlated with midday stem water potentials. We conclude that leaf delta13C can be used to measure retrospective water status and to assess the impact of site preparation on tree growth. The advantage of the leaf delta13C approach is that it provides an integrative assessment of past water status in different aged leaves.

  19. Effects of Humic Acid and Solution pH on Dispersion of Na—and Ca—Soil Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANYEQING; HUQIONGYING; 等

    1996-01-01

    Dispersed soil clays have a negative impact on soil structure and contribute to soil erosion and contaminant movement.In this study,two typical soils from the south of China were chosen for investigating roles of pH and humic acid(HA) on dispersion of soil clays.Critical flocculation concentration (CFC) of the soil clay suspension was determined by using light transmission at a wavelength of 600 nm.The results indicated that effects of pH and HA on dispersion of the soil clays were closely related to the type of the major minerals makin up the soil and to the valence of the exchangeable cations as well.At four rates of pH(4,6,8and 10),the CFC for the Na-yellow-brown soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.32 to 0.56,6.0 to 14.0,10.0 to 24.6 and 26.0 to 52.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively when Na-HA was added at the rate of from 0 to 40mgL-1,With the same Na-HA addition and three pH(6,8and 10)treatments,the CFC for the Na-red soil was incresed from 0.5 to 20.0,1.0 to 40.0 and 6.0 to 141.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively.Obviously,pH and HA has greater effects on clay dispersion of the red soil(dominated by 1:1 minerals and oxides) than on that of the yellow-brown soil(dominated by 2:1minerals).However,at three rates of pH(6,8and 10) and with the addition of Ca-HA from 0 to 40mg L-1,the CFC of the Ca-yellow-brown soil and Ca-red soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.55 to 0.81,0.75 to 1.28,0.55 to 1.45and 0.038 to 0.266.0.25 to 0.62,0.7to 1.6mmol CaCl2 L-1,respectively.So,Na-soil claye are more sensitive to pH and HA than Ca-soil clays.

  20. Determination of the composition of the organic matter chemically stabilized by agricultural soil clay minerals: Spectroscopy and Density Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufqir, Sofia; Bloom, Paul; Toner, Brandy; Hatcher, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The interactions between soil organic matter and clay minerals are considered important processes because of their ability to sequester C in soil for long periods of time, and hence control C in the global C cycle when present. However, differing results have been reported regarding the composition of the soil organic matter - aromatic fractions versus aliphatic fractions - associated with clay minerals. To clarify this critical issue and better understand the C sequestration process in soils, we aimed to determine the nature of the chemically bound natural organic matter on clay surfaces, and to probe the speciation and spatial distribution of C in the soil clay nanoparticles using direct spectroscopic measurements namely solid-state CP-MAS and DP-MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). We tested the hypotheses that peptides and polysaccharides are stabilized by the smectite-illite clay while the lipids and black carbon are a separate phase; and that they are evenly distributed on clay surfaces. A soil clay fraction (5.5% organic C) was isolated from the surface of a prairie soil (Mollisol) in southwestern Minnesota, characterized by a pH 6.0, 32.5% clay content, and 3.7% organic carbon, using a sonication-sedimentation-siphoning process in distilled water. Then was subjected to density separation combined with low energy ultrasonic dispersion to separate the free organic and black C (light fraction) from the chemically bound C (heavy fraction). The XRD results indicated a dominance of interstratified smectite-illite clays in soil. The 13C-NMR spectra of the soil clay fraction suggested that polysaccharides and polypeptides are the prevailing components of the organic matter associated with the mineral clay, with only a minor component of aromatic C. The light fraction has strong alkyl C-H bands characteristic of fatty acids plus strong C-O bands characteristic of polysaccharides, including

  1. Study of Various Techniques for Improving Weak and Compressible Clay Soil under a High Earth Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein A.K. M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the suitability of three soil improvement techniques for the construction of a high earth embankment on thick weak and highly compressible clay soil. The eastern approach embankment of Alhalfaya Bridge on the River Nile linking Khartoum North and Omdurman cities was chosen as a case study and a comprehensive site investigation program was carried out to determine the properties the subsurface soils. The study results showed that unless the subsurface soils have been improved they may fail or undergo excessively large settlements due to the embankment construction. Three ground improvement techniques based on the principles of the “staged construction method, SCM”, “vertical sand drain, VSD” and “sand compaction piles, SCP” of embankment foundation soil treatment are discussed and evaluated. Embankment design options based on applications of the above methods have been proposed for foundation treatment to adequately support embankment loads. A method performance evaluation based on the improvement of soil properties achieved; the time required for construction and compared estimated costs criteria was made to assess the effectiveness and expected overall performance. Adoption of any of the soil improvement techniques considered depends mainly on the most critical and decisive factor governing the embankment design. Based on the overall performance for the embankment case studied, the sand drains is considered as the most appropriate improvement method followed by the sand compaction piles technique whereas the staged construction method showed the poorest overall performance.

  2. Construction and validation of two metagenomic DNA libraries from Cerrado soil with high clay content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Alinne Pereira; Quirino, Betania Ferraz; Allen, Heather; Williamson, Lynn L; Handelsman, Jo; Krüger, Ricardo Henrique

    2011-11-01

    A challenge of metagenomic studies is in the extraction and purification of DNA from environmental samples. The soils of the Cerrado region of Brazil present several technical difficulties to DNA extraction: high clay content (>55% w/w), low pH (4.7) and high iron levels (146 ppm). Here we describe for the first time the efficient recovery and purification of microbial DNA associated with these unusual soil characteristics and the construction and validation of two metagenomic libraries: a 150,000 clones library with insert size of approximately 8 kb and a 65,000 clones library with insert size of approximately 35 kb. The construction of these metagenomic libraries will allow the biotechnological exploitation of the microbial community present in the soil from this endangered biome.

  3. Clay content prediction using on-the-go proximal soil sensor fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabai, Salman; Knadel, Maria; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector machines regression (SVMR) were performed using VNIR spectra, EC and soil temperature as predictors and clay content as the response variable. PLSR and SVMR models were validated using full and 20-segment cross-validation respectively. The results were......There is a growing demand for high quality and reliable data on different soil constituents and properties in different scales. Research in the past decade has shown that traditional soil sampling cannot supply for this demand. Modern methods such as visible-near infrared (VNIR) and mid...... in different regions in Denmark. 125 calibration samples were collected from the points found by clustering the principal components (PC) of the spectra. Several pretreatments such as mean-centering, auto-scaling, spectral transformations and removal of faulty measurements were performed on the data. Partial...

  4. Aging effect of 137Cs obtained from 137Cs in the Kanto loam layer from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident and in the Nishiyama loam layer from the Nagasaki A-bomb explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Tomoko; Mahara, Yasunori; Kubota, Takumi; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    We measured (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the surface soil of the Kanto loam in the eastern Tokyo metropolitan area and the Nishiyama loam in Nagasaki, Japan. The observed (137)Cs deposition in the Kanto loam from the Fukushima nuclear power plant (NPP) accident ranged from 4.0 to 77 kBq m(-2), which corresponds to 0.3-5 times of that in the Nishiyama loam. The (137)Cs retardation factor in the Kanto loam obtained seven months after the Fukusima NPP accident and in the Nishiyama loam after 36 and 38 years from the detonation of the Pu atomic bomb (A-bomb) ranged from 180 to 260 and 2000 to 10,000, respectively. This difference in the retardation factors is attributed to an aging effect that corresponds to seven months and 36 to 38 years after the deposition of (137)Cs occurred on the soil minerals.

  5. Preliminary exploration of the relationships between soil characteristics and PAH desorption and biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sangchul; Cutright, Teresa J

    2004-01-01

    Desorption and biodegradation of pyrene (PYR) were investigated and their relationships to soil characteristics were addressed. The results indicated that maximum achievable desorption was 30.2, 10.4, and 1.0 mg/kg for soils that had 1.7, 2.2, and 4.4 wt.% of expandable clays (smectite and vermiculite), respectively. Neither dissolved organic matter (DOM) nor total clay amounts made a good prediction of the desorption trend. Subsequently, the ease of desorption facilitated a faster aqueous biodegradation rate. The slowest aqueous biodegradation rate, 0.02 l/h, was achieved for the soil system that had the greatest amount of expandable clays, whereas the soil containing 1.7% expandable clays only achieved 0.73 l/h. The soil with 2.2% expandable clays depicted 0.41 l/h of aqueous biodegradation rate. A good linear correlation was obtained between maximum achievable desorption and aqueous biodegradation rate (R(2)=0.92). Soil analysis revealed that the total (soil+water) biodegradation reached was 65%, 78.3%, and 81.8% of the initial concentration (100 mg/kg) for the sandy clay loam (Colombian), sandy loam (Ohio), and silty loam (New Mexico) soils, respectively. This biodegradation extent was also in good agreement of expandable clay amount. Although aqueous PYR bioavailability was limited due to the strong association with the expandable clays, microbial movement and adhesion to those clays seemed to result in a great extent of the soil-phase biodegradation.

  6. The Adsorption Capacity and Geotechnical Properties of Modified Clay Containing SSA Used as Landfill Liner-Soil Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of clay containing 0~5% sewage sludge ash (SSA is assessed for use as a landfill liner-soil material. Low temperature N2 adsorption, batch adsorption, permeability, and unconfined compressive strength tests are performed to evaluate pore structure, adsorption capacity, hydraulic conductivity, and unconfined compressive strength of the clays. The pore size distribution of the modified clay containing SSA is mainly composed of micropores (<2 nm and mesopores (2~7 nm. With the increasing of SSA from 0% to 5%, the adsorption capacity of Zn(II and Cu(II to the clay increases 37% and 273%, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of modified clay is from 3.62 × 10−8 to 2.17 × 10−8 cm/s. At SSA = 3%, the unconfined compressive strength of the clay reaches the maximum value of 601.1 kPa. After the clay containing SSA is contaminated by acid and alkali chemical solutions, the amount of mesopores and hydraulic conductivity increase. The adsorption capacity and unconfined compressive strength of contaminated clay decrease about 2∼44% and 25.7∼38.2%, respectively. The modified clay containing SSA can meet the adsorption and geotechnical requirement of landfill liners.

  7. Development and evaluation of a new sorption model for organic cations in soil: contributions from organic matter and clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droge, Steven T J; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2013-12-17

    This study evaluates a newly proposed cation-exchange model that defines the sorption of organic cations to soil as a summed contribution of sorption to organic matter (OM) and sorption to phyllosilicate clay minerals. Sorption to OM is normalized to the fraction organic carbon (fOC), and sorption to clay is normalized to the estimated cation-exchange capacity attributed to clay minerals (CECCLAY). Sorption affinity is specified to a fixed medium composition, with correction factors for other electrolyte concentrations. The model applies measured sorption coefficients to one reference OM material and one clay mineral. If measured values are absent, then empirical relationships are available on the basis of molecular volume and amine type in combination with corrective increments for specific polar moieties. The model is tested using new sorption data generated at pH 6 for two Eurosoils, one enriched in clay and the other, OM, using 29 strong bases (pKa > 8). Using experimental data on reference materials for all tested compounds, model predictions for the two soils differed on average by only -0.1 ± 0.4 log units from measured sorption affinities. Within the chemical applicability domain, the model can also be applied successfully to various reported soil sorption data for organic cations. Particularly for clayish soils, the model shows that sorption of organic cations to clay minerals accounts for more than 90% of the overall affinity.

  8. The effects of worms, clay and biochar on CO2 emissions during production and soil application of co-composts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthod, Justine; Rumpel, Cornélia; Paradelo, Remigio; Dignac, Marie-France

    2016-12-01

    In this study we evaluated CO2 emissions during composting of green wastes with clay and/or biochar in the presence and absence of worms (species of the genus Eisenia), as well as the effect of those amendments on carbon mineralization after application to soil. We added two different doses of clay, biochar or their mixture to pre-composted green wastes and monitored carbon mineralization over 21 days in the absence or presence of worms. The resulting co-composts and vermicomposts were then added to a loamy Cambisol and the CO2 emissions were monitored over 30 days in a laboratory incubation. Our results indicated that the addition of clay or clay/biochar mixture reduced carbon mineralization during co-composting without worms by up to 44 %. In the presence of worms, CO2 emissions during composting increased for all treatments except for the low clay dose. The effect of the amendments on carbon mineralization after addition to soil was small in the short term. Overall, composts increased OM mineralization, whereas vermicomposts had no effect. The presence of biochar reduced OM mineralization in soil with respect to compost and vermicompost without additives, whereas clay reduced mineralization only in the composts. Our study indicates a significant role of the conditions of composting on mineralization in soil. Therefore, the production of a low CO2 emission amendment requires optimization of feedstocks, co-composting agents and worm species.

  9. Acceptable levels of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) in soils, depending on their clay and humus content and cation-exchange capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de S.; Rethfeld, H.; Driel, van W.

    1985-01-01

    Three sandy soils differing in humus content and three clay soils differing in clay content were supplied with heavy metals to determine which loading rate of each single metal should be regarded as critical from the viewpoint of crop yield and metal content dependent on soil cation exchange capacit

  10. Microwave Acid Extraction to Analyze K and Mg Reserves in the Clay Fraction of Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araína Hulmann Batista

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Extraction of K and Mg with boiling 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an open system for predicting K and Mg uptake by plants is a method of low reproducibility. The aim of this study was to compare the extraction capacity of different acid methods relative to hydrofluoric acid extraction for K and Mg. A further objective was to develop a chemical extraction method using a closed system (microwave for nonexchangeable and structural forms of these nutrients in order to replace the traditional method of extraction with boiling HNO3 on a hot plate (open system. The EPA 3051A method can be used to estimate the total content of K in the clay fraction of soils developed from carbonate and phyllite/mica schist rocks. In the clay fraction of soils developed from basalt, recoveries of K by the EPA 3051A (pseudo-total method were higher than for the EPA 3052 (total hydrofluoric extraction method. The relative abundance of K and Mg for soils in carbonate rocks, phyllite/mica schist, granite/gneiss, and basalt determined by aqua regia digestion is unreliable. The method using 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an closed system (microwave showed potential for replacing the classical method of extraction of nonexchangeable forms of K (boiling 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an open system - hot plate and reduced the loss of Si by volatilization.

  11. Simulation of water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a heavy clay soil using the MACRO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Besien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dual-porosity MACRO model has been used to investigate methods of reducing leaching of isoproturon from a structured heavy clay soil. The MACRO model was applied to a pesticide leaching data-set generated from a plot scale experiment on a heavy clay soil at the Oxford University Farm, Wytham, England. The field drain was found to be the most important outflow from the plot in terms of pesticide removal. Therefore, this modelling exercise concentrated on simulating field drain flow. With calibration of field-saturated and micropore saturated hydraulic conductivity, the drain flow hydrographs were simulated during extended periods of above average rainfall, with both the hydrograph shape and peak flows agreeing well. Over the whole field season, the observed drain flow water budget was well simulated. However, the first and second drain flow events after pesticide application were not simulated satisfactorily. This is believed to be due to a poor simulation of evapotranspiration during a period of low rainfall around the pesticide application day. Apart from an initial rapid drop in the observed isoproturon soil residue, the model simulated isoproturon residues during the 100 days after pesticide application reasonably well. Finally, the calibrated model was used to show that changes in agricultural practice (deep ploughing, creating fine consolidated seed beds and organic matter applications could potentially reduce pesticide leaching to surface waters by up to 60%.

  12. Enrichment of trace elements in the clay size fraction of mining soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Patrícia; Valente, Teresa; Braga, M Amália Sequeira; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L

    2016-04-01

    Reactive waste dumps with sulfide minerals promote acid mine drainage (AMD), which results in water and soil contamination by metals and metalloids. In these systems, contamination is regulated by many factors, such as mineralogical composition of soil and the presence of sorption sites on specific mineral phases. So, the present study dedicates itself to understanding the distribution of trace elements in different size fractions (mining soils and to evaluate the relationship between chemical and mineralogical composition. Cerdeirinha and Penedono, located in Portugal, were the waste dumps under study. The results revealed that the two waste dumps have high degree of contamination by metals and arsenic and that these elements are concentrated in the clay size fraction. Hence, the higher degree of contamination by toxic elements, especially arsenic in Penedono as well as the role of clay minerals, jarosite, and goethite in retaining trace elements has management implications. Such information must be carefully thought in the rehabilitation projects to be planned for both waste dumps.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBILITY OF ENERGY USE BLACK LOCUST (Robinia pseudoacacia L. DENDROMASS ACQUIRED IN FOREST STANDS GROWING ON CLAY SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur KRASZKIEWICZ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, in the assessed capacity using for energy purposes dendromass black locust acquired in three forest stands growing on clay soils. It was found that the test conditions black locust grows well in clay soils very rich, and its timber, in terms of energy use, has a desirable physicochemical properties. Whereas the energy of black locust plantations located on clay soils may be an alternative to gain valuable energy resource.

  14. Dialysis experiments for assessing the pH-dependent sorption of sulfonamides to soil clay fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anskjær, G G; Krogh, K A; Halling-Sørensen, B

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis experiments, a novel approach for conducting soil/water distribution experiments in environmental samples, were found to be applicable for assessing pH-dependent partitioning and to quantify the sorption of three sulfonamides, sulfadiazine, sulfadoxine, and sulfacetamide. Clay fractions from two agricultural soils including both particulate and dissolved soil matter were used in the experiments to achieve a high sorption capacity when varying pH in a relevant environmental range. Stabilizing and controlling pH was done by using organic buffers. In two clay fractions, Kd for sulfadiazine was determined to be 43 and 129 L kg(-1), and 1.3 and 4.6 L kg(-1) at pH 4.0 and pH 9.0, respectively. This corresponded to Kd for the neutral and ionized form of sulfadiazine, respectively. The difference in sulfadiazine sorption between the two clay fractions could to some extent be related to the difference in the amount of organic carbon. Sorption experiments with sulfacetamide and sulfadoxine also exhibited decreasing sorption when increasing pH. At low pH, maximum Kd for sulfacetamide and sulfadoxine was determined to be 83 and 211 L kg(-1), respectively, while at high pH minimum Kd was 4.8 and 1.2 L kg(-1), respectively. Hence, compound speciation was important for the quantity of sorbed sulfonamide, which was confirmed by a correlation (R(2)) close to unity, when using the experimentally obtained Kd values with a simple model weighing the contribution from the neutral and the ionized compound, respectively.

  15. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karup, Dan; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Greve, Mogens H.; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-09-01

    Solute transport through the soil matrix is non-uniform and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. Attempts have been made in previous studies to use infiltration experiments to identify the degree of preferential flow, but these attempts have often been based on small datasets or data collected from literature with differing initial and boundary conditions. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. From six agricultural fields in Denmark, 193 intact surface soil columns 20 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter were collected. The soils exhibited a wide range in texture, with clay and organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.03 to 0.41 and 0.01 to 0.08 kg kg- 1, respectively. All experiments were carried out under the same initial and boundary conditions using tritium as a conservative tracer. The breakthrough characteristics ranged from being near normally distributed to gradually skewed to the right along with an increase in the content of the mineral fines (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5% and up to 50% of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. Predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points as a function of time up to 50% of applied tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical advection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer

  16. SHEARING AND WATER RETENTION BEHAVIOR OF UNSATURATED LOAM WITH MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Yukoh; Kazama, Motoki

    Unsaturated triaxial tests were carried out to study deformation behavior, effective stress path and water retention property of consolidated loam during consolidation and shearing processes. Initial matric suction was set as 0, 50, and 90 kPa, and confining pressures (net normal stresses) were set as 100 kPa. Then shearing processes were done under undrained and drained conditions. We clarified the relation between void ratio and Van Genuchten model parameter by using water retention curve. To predict the unsaturated shearing behavior, a modified Cam Clay model considering void ratio dependent Van Genuchten parameter was proposed. Those numerical test results were agreed well with laboratory tests results.

  17. Dynamic compaction treatment technology research of red clay soil embankment in southern mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建华; 袁剑波; 熊虎; 陈伟

    2008-01-01

    High liquid limit soil generally adopted in expressway embankment construction of southern mountains, which often expresses some characteristics including high moisture content, high porosity ratio, low permeability, high compressibility, certain disintegration, and so on. Spring soil phenomenon and inhomogeneous compaction have effects on the quality of embankment construction, just because the water in soil is difficult to evaporate. Based on the study of reinforcement mechanism for high liquid limit soil, in situ tests for dynamic compaction treatment in Yizhang-Fengtouling expressway embankment were developed. The reliable and economical dynamic compaction treatment methods and the construction technology for large range high liquid limit soil embankment in southern mountains expressway were discussed. In the process, convenient measurement methods were adopted to evaluate the treatment effects. The test results show that the dynamic compaction method has good treatment effects on the local red clay embankment. The embankment compaction degree is improved with compactness coming to 90% around tamping pits and compactness over 95% in tamping pits interior after tamping. The bearing capacity, the physical mechanic-property and the shear strength for soil are obviously improved, which are enhanced with cohesive strength increasing over 10 kPa and compression modulus increasing over 3 MPa.

  18. Carbon-Nitrogen Relationships during the Humification of Cellulose in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1981-01-01

    the 1st mo. of incubation at temperatures of 10, 20 and 30.degree. C, respectively, 38-65% of the labeled C added in cellulose had disappeared from the soils as CO2, and 60-nearly 100% of the labeled N added as NH4+ were incorporated into organic forms. The retention of total labeled C was largest....... Some of the labeled organic N when mineralized was re-incorporated into organic compounds containing increasing proportions of native soil-C, whereas labeled C when mineralized as CO2 disappeared from the soils. The amount of labeled amino acid-C, formed during decomposition of the labeled cellulose......14C-labeled cellulose and 15N-labeled (NH4)2SO4 were added to 4 soils with clay contents of 4, 11, 18 and 34%, respectively. Labeled cellulose was added to each soil in amounts corresponding to 1, 2 and 4 mg Cg-1 soil, respectively, and labeled NH4+ at the rate of 1 mg N/25 mg labeled C. After...

  19. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    vapour sorption, which can be measured within a shorter period of time, have recently been developed. Such models are often based on single-point measurements of water adsorption and do not account for sorption hysteresis or organic matter content. The present study introduces regression relationships...... for estimating clay content from hygroscopic water at different relative humidity (RH) levels while considering hysteresis and organic matter content. Continuous adsorption/desorption vapour sorption isotherm loops were measured for 150 differently textured soils with a state-of-the-art vapour sorption analyser...

  20. Extraction of an urease-active organo-complex from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. G.; El-Sayed, M. H.; Mclaren, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an extraction from a Dublin clay loam soil of a colloidal organic matter complex that is urease active and, by X-ray analysis, free of clays. Urease activity in the clay-free precipitates, as in the soil, was not destroyed by the activity of an added proteolytic enzyme, pronase. This is attributed to the circumstance that native soil urease resides in organic colloidal particles with pores large enough for water, urea, ammonia, and carbon dioxide to pass freely, but nevertheless small enough to exclude pronase.

  1. Different Behavior of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Clay and Sandy Soils after Biofertilization with Swine Digestate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongaro, Gislaine; García-González, María C.; Hernández, Marta; Kunz, Airton; Barardi, Célia R. M.; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2017-01-01

    Enteric pathogens from biofertilizer can accumulate in the soil, subsequently contaminating water and crops. We evaluated the survival, percolation and leaching of model enteric pathogens in clay and sandy soils after biofertilization with swine digestate: PhiX-174, mengovirus (vMC0), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were used as biomarkers. The survival of vMC0 and PhiX-174 in clay soil was significantly lower than in sandy soil (iT90 values of 10.520 ± 0.600 vs. 21.270 ± 1.100 and 12.040 ± 0.010 vs. 43.470 ± 1.300, respectively) and PhiX-174 showed faster percolation and leaching in sandy soil than clay soil (iT90 values of 0.46 and 2.43, respectively). S. enterica Typhimurium was percolated and inactivated more slowly than E. coli O157:H7 (iT90 values of 9.340 ± 0.200 vs. 6.620 ± 0.500 and 11.900 ± 0.900 vs. 10.750 ± 0.900 in clay and sandy soils, respectively), such that E. coli O157:H7 was transferred more quickly to the deeper layers of both soils evaluated (percolation). Our findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may serve as a useful microbial biomarker of depth contamination and leaching in clay and sandy soil and that bacteriophage could be used as an indicator of enteric pathogen persistence. Our study contributes to development of predictive models for enteric pathogen behavior in soils, and for potential water and food contamination associated with biofertilization, useful for risk management and mitigation in swine digestate recycling. PMID:28197137

  2. Risk assessment of gas oil and kerosene contamination on some properties of silty clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, M; Shabanpor, M; Zakerinia, M; Ebrahimi, S

    2015-07-01

    Soil and ground water resource pollution by petroleum compounds and chemical solvents has multiple negative environmental impacts. The aim of this research was to investigate the impacts of kerosene and gas oil pollutants on some physical and chemical properties, breakthrough curve (BTC), and water retention curve (SWRC) of silty clay soil during a 3-month period. Therefore, some water-saturated soils were artificially contaminated in the pulse condition inside some glassy cylinders by applying half and one pore volume of these pollutants, and then parametric investigations of the SWRC were performed using RETC software for Van Genukhten and Brooks-Corey equations in the various suctions and the soil properties were determined before and after pollution during 3 months. The results showed that gas oil and kerosene had a slight effect on soil pH and caused the cumulative enhancement in the soil respiration, increase in the bulk density and organic matter, and reduction in the soil porosity and electrical and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, gas oil retention was significantly more than kerosene (almost 40%) in the soil. The survey of SWRC indicated that the contaminated soil samples had a little higher amount of moisture retention (just under 15% in most cases) compared to the unpolluted ones during this 3-month period. The parametric analysis of SWRC demonstrated an increase in the saturated water content, Θ s, from nearly 49% in the control sample to just under 53% in the polluted ones. Contaminants not only decreased the residual water content, Θ r, but also reduced the SWRC gradient, n, and amount of α parameter. The evaluation of both equations revealed more accurate prediction of SWRC's parameters by Van Genukhten compared to those of Brooks and Corey.

  3. Irrigation with saline-sodic water: effects on two clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of a 4-year experiment aimed at evaluating the effect of irrigation with saline-sodic water on the soil are reported. The research was carried out at the Campus of the Agricultural Faculty of Bari University (Italy on 2 clay soils (Bologna – T1 and Locorotondo – T2. The soils were cropped to borlotto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., capsicum (Capsicum annuum L., sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., wheat (Triticum durum Desf grown in succession; the crops were irrigated with 9 saline-sodic types of water and subjected to two different leaching fractions (10% and 20% of the watering volume. The 9 solutions were obtained dissolving in de-ionised water weighted amounts of sodium chloride (NaCl and calcium chloride (CaCl2, deriving from the combination of 3 saline concentrations and 3 sodicity levels. The crops were irrigated whenever the water lost by evapotranspiration from the soil contained in the pots was equal to 30% of the soil maximum available water. The results showed that, though the soils were leached during the watering period, they showed a high salt accumulation. Consequently, the saturated soil extract electrical conductivity increased from initial values of 0.65 and 0.68 dS m-1 to 11.24 and 13.61 dS m-1 at the end of the experiment, for the soils T1 and T2, respectively. The saline concentration increase in irrigation water caused in both soils a progressive increase in exchangeable sodium, and a decrease in exchangeable calcium and non-significant variations in exchangeable potassium (K and magnesium (Mg.

  4. Biochar Effects on Soil Aggregate Properties Under No-Till Maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Naveed, Muhammad; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2014-01-01

    –10 kg m−2), in combination with swine manure (2.1 and 4.2 kg m−2), to a no-till maize (Zea mays L.) cropping system on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Topsoil (0–20 cm) aggregates were analyzed for clay dispersibility, aggregate stability, tensile strength (TS), and specific rupture energy (SRE) using end...

  5. Soil Loss by Wind Erosion for Three Different Textured Soils Treated with Polyacrylamide and Crude Oil, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The study is conducted to estimate the resistance of three soils (EL-Hartha clay loam, Barjisiya sandy loam and the soil near the sand dunes in Sheikh sa'ad area sandy soil) to wind erosion, it is also aimed at getting full acquaintance of the relationship between the soil loss and the physical and chemical features of soil. In addition to the experiment of some soil stabilizers, polyacrylamide (PAM) concentration of 0.2 % and crude oil in concentration of 1 % in order to reduce or prevent wind erosion. The study shows that the amendment increased the dry soil aggregate >1 mm, mean weight diameter and soil moisture. It is clear that polyacrylamide had greater effect than that of crude oil, besides the great effectiveness of these amendments in decreasing bulk density and relations of soil loss.

  6. Measurements of the streaming potential of clay soils from tropical and subtropical regions using self-made apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Yi; Li, Jiu-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2014-09-01

    The streaming potential has been wildly used in charged parallel plates, capillaries, and porous media. However, there have been few studies involving the ζ potential of clay soils based on streaming potential measurements. A laboratory apparatus was developed in this study to measure the streaming potential (ΔE) of bulk clay soils' coupling coefficient (C) and cell resistance (R) of saturated granular soil samples. Excellent linearity of ΔE versus liquid pressure (ΔP) ensured the validity of measurements. The obtained parameters of C and R can be used to calculate the ζ potential of bulk soils. The results indicated that the ζ potentials measured by streaming potential method were significantly correlated with the ζ potentials of soil colloids determined by electrophoresis (r (2) = 0.960**). Therefore, the streaming potential method can be used to study the ζ potentials of bulk clay soils. The absolute values of the ζ potentials of four soils followed the order: Ultisol from Jiangxi > Ultisol from Anhui > Oxisol from Guangdong > Oxisol from Hainan, and this was consistent with the cation exchange capacities of these soils. The type and concentration of electrolytes affected soil ζ potentials. The ζ potential became less negative with increased electrolyte concentration. The ζ potentials were more negative in monovalent than in divalent cationic electrolyte solutions because more divalent cations were distributed in the shear plane of the diffuse layer as counter-cations on the soil surfaces than monovalent cations at the same electrolyte concentration.

  7. Interactions of Cations with Electrodialyzed Clay Fraction of Soils as Inferred from Wien Effect in Soil Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The electrical conductivities (ECs) of suspensions containing 25 and 30 g kg-1 solids prepared from theelectrodialyzed clay fraction (< 2 μm in diameter) of latosol, yellow-brown soil, and black soil, dispersed invarious nitrate solutions having concentrations of 1 × 10-4/z mol L-1, where z is the valence, and in distilledwater, were measured at field strengths ranging from 14 kV cm-1 to 210 kV cm-1. On the basis of analysesof the charge density and exchangeable ion composition on the surfaces of soil particles in the suspensions,and of the characters of the EC-field strength curves of the various suspensions, it was inferred that theincrement of EC (△EC) and/or relative electrical conductivity (REC) can indicate the bonding strengthbetween cations and soil particles. The bonding strengths of various cations with the soils diminished in theorder: K+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ = Ca2+ > Na+ for latosol, Ca2+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ = K+ > Na+ for yellow-brownsoil, and Zn2+ >Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Na+ for black soil.

  8. Microorganism-induced weathering of clay minerals in a hydromorphic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hanlie; Fang, Qian; Cheng, Liuling; Wang, Chaowen; Churchman, Gordon Jock

    2016-07-01

    In order to improve the understanding of factors influencing weathering in hydromorphic soils, the clay mineral and chemical compositions, iron (hydr)oxides, organic compounds, and Sr and Nd isotopic compositions, of hydromorphic soils on the banks of the Liangzi Lake, Hubei province, south China, were investigated. The B horizon in the lower profile exhibits a distinct net-like pattern, with abundant short white veins within the red-brown matrix. Their various 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic compositions showed only small variations of 0.7270-0.7235 and 0.51200-0.51204, respectively, consistent with the composition of Yangtze River sediments, indicating that the soils were all derived from alluvium from the catchment. The white veins contained notably more SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, and mobile elements relative to the red-brown matrix, while they both showed similar values for the chemical index of alteration of 86.7 and 87.1, respectively, and displayed similar degrees of weathering. The clay minerals in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were illite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite. These same three clay minerals comprised the white net-like veins in the soil B horizon, whereas only illite and kaolinite were observed in the red-brown matrix. Iron (hydr)oxides in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were hematite and goethite, whereas in the red-brown matrix of the B horizon they were hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite. Different organic compounds were observed for the white vein and the red-brown matrix in the soil B horizon: an 18:2 fatty acid biomarker for fungi in the net-like vein, but not in the red-brown matrix. Compared with the red-brown matrix, the white net-like vein also clearly contained more mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are sometimes associated with bacteria that have the capacity to reduce Fe(III). Thus, migration of iron and the formation of the net-like veins involved the participation of biota during the hydromorphic

  9. Clay and Soil Photolysis of the Pesticides Mesotrione and Metsulfuron Methyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Siampiringue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photolysis may represent an important degradation process of pollutants at the surface of soil. In the present work, we report a detailed study on the degradation of two pesticides: mesotrione and metsulfuron methyl using a sunlight simulator. In a first step, we studied the photochemical behaviour at the surface of clays from the kinetic as well as from the analytical point of view. In both cases, the quantum yields were found to be higher when compared to those obtained in aqueous solutions. The effect of iron(III, water, and humic substances contents was studied. In the former cases, an increase of the degradation rate was observed while an inhibition was observed with the latter owing to a filter effect phenomenon. In a second step, we studied the photodegradation at the surface of natural soil and identified the generated byproducts. They appear to mainly arise from photohydrolysis process.

  10. Water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a drained heavy clay soil: 1. Preferential flow processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haria, A. H.; Johnson, A. C.; Bell, J. P.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1994-12-01

    The processes and mechanisms that control pesticide transport from drained heavy clay catchments are being studied at Wytham Farm (Oxford University) in southern England. In the first field season field-drain water contained high concentrations of pesticide. Soil studies demonstrated that the main mechanism for pesticide translocation was by preferential flow processes, both over the soil surface and through the soil profile via a macropore system that effectively by-passed the soil matrix. This macropore system included worm holes, shrinkage cracks and cracks resulting from ploughing. Rainfall events in early winter rapidly created a layer of saturation in the A horizon perched above a B horizon of very low hydraulic conductivity. Drain flow was initiated when the saturated layer in the A horizon extended into the upper 0.06m of the soil profile; thereafter water moved down slope via horizontal macropores possibly through a band of incorporated straw residues. These horizontal pathways for water movement connected with the fracture system of the mole drains, thus feeding the drains. Overland flow occurred infrequently during the season.

  11. Degradation of the pesticide carbofuran on clay and soil surfaces upon sunlight exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountacer, H; Atifi, A; Wong-Wah-Chung, P; Sarakha, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the photolysis of carbofuran has been undertaken under sunlight conditions and at the surface of model supports such as clay films and different soils collected from two different sites in Morocco (Tirs and Dahs). In all conditions, an efficient degradation occurred owing to direct light absorption and also to photoinduced processes involving either clays or natural organic matter moities. On kaolin films, the photodegradation kinetics appears to follow a first-order process that clearly depends on the film thickness. The diffusion of carbofuran from the lower part to the illuminated surface was found to be negligible when compared to the photolysis process within the range of 20-70 μm. Thus, the photolysis rate constant at the surface of the solid support, k (0), was evaluated to be 7.0 × 10(-3) min(-1). Under these experimental conditions, the quantum yield was found equal to 2.1 × 10(-4). On soil surfaces, the disappearance rate constant was mainly attributed to photoinduced processes arising from natural organic matter. From the analytical point of view, the products were formed through (1) hydroxylation on the aromatic ring, (2) homolytic scission of the carbamate C-O bond leading to radical species formation, and (3) photohydrolysis of the carbamate C-O bond.

  12. Influence of Hillside Gradient on Forest Road Cross Section Components in a Loamy Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidin Parsakhoo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study to evaluate the effects of hillside gradient on forest road cross section components in a loamy clay soil the amount of cut and fill slopes gradient and length, road bed and earthwork width were taken on tangent sections in a lat talar forest roads of Iran. Approach: The objective of this study were: (i to evaluate the direct effects of hillside gradient on cross section components such as cut and fill slopes, road bed and earthwork width in a loamy clay soil, (ii to use the model to predict the effect of hillside gradient on cross section components. Results: Results indicated that the regression analysis between hillside gradient and cut slope length had a significant linear relationship (p2 = 0.60. The equation for the calculation of earthwork width (Y from hillside gradient was Y = 4.928+0.132 X (R2 = 0.44. A significant linear relationship (p Conclusion: Through analysis of variance it was also found that the hillside gradient had a significant influence (p<0.0001 on the cross section components.

  13. Comparing predictive abilities of three visible-near infrared spectrophotometers for soil organic carbon and clay determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Stenberg, Bo; Deng, Fan;

    2013-01-01

    -NIRS sensors for soil characterization. There is a need for more work on the effects of scanning strategies, and use of different soil instrumentation. We compared three vis-NIR sensors with varying resolution, signal-to-noise ratios and spectral range. Their performance was evaluated based on soil organic...... carbon (SOC) and clay calibrations for 194 Danish top soils. Scanning procedures for the three spectrophotometers where done according to uniform laboratory protocols. SOC and clay calibrations were performed using PLS regression. One third of the data was used as an independent test set. A range......Due to advances in optical technology a wide range of spectrometers is available. Recent interests in soil global libraries and sensor fusion presents a challenge with respect to combining data from different instrumentation. Only little research, however, has been done on the comparison of vis...

  14. A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) TDR sensor for deep soil water content and bulk EC

    Science.gov (United States)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) TDR sensor was invented and the design optimized through a combination of electromagnetic modeling and several rounds of prototyping and testing in air, water, mixtures of water and ethylene glycol, sand, and silty clay loam soils over a range of water contents and ...

  15. Interface Shear Strength of Geosynthetic Clay Liner (GCL and Residual Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Izzuddin Zaini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, direct shear box with dimension of 100 mm x 100 mm was used to determine interface shear strength of a GCL and compacted residual soil at optimum moisture content. The tests were carried out using dry GCL sample at shearing rate of 0.5 mm/min. Normal stresses used were between 100 kPa to 300 kPa to represent the depth of 20 meters of solid waste (15 kN/m3. The needle-punched GCL was tested for both sides, woven and non-woven. Results showed that the residual soil, classified as CL according to the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS with a hydraulic conductivity of 7.05 to 5.54 x 10-9 m/s, was suitable to be used as compacted clay liner (CCL. Test results on the interface shear strength of woven and non-woven GCL with residual soil in terms of internal friction angle were 33° and 37°, respectively.

  16. Clay mineralogical evidence of a bioclimatically-affected soil, Rouge River basin, South-Central Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Holocene soils in drainage basins of South-Central Ontario, Canada, are generally Fluvisols (Entisols) in floodplains transitioning to Brunisols (Inceptisols), Luvisols (Alfisols) and Podzols (Spodosols) in older terraces and in the glaciated tableland. A single landslide sourced from the highest fluvial terrace in the Rouge basin, with a rubble drop of ~ 12 m emplaced a lobe-shaped mass of reworked stream gravel, glaciolacustrine sediment and till, emplaced approximately 6 m above mean water level at a height roughly equivalent to previously dated mid-Holocene terraces and soils. Clay mineralogy of the soil formed in this transported regolith produced the usual semi-detrital/pedogenic distribution of 1:1 (Si:Al = 1:1), 2:1 and 2:1:1 clay minerals as well as primary minerals consisting of plagioclase feldspar, quartz, mica and calcite. Unexpectedly, the presence of moderate amounts of Ca-smectite in the Bk and Ck horizons, relative to a clay-mineral depleted parent material (Cuk), argues for a soil hydrological change affecting the wetting depth in the deposit. The presence of the uncommon 'maidenhair fern' (Adiantum pedantum) in the mass wasted deposit, a plant capable of high evapotranspiration, is interpreted as producing a bioclimatic disruption limiting soil water penetration to near root depth (wetting depth), thus producing a clay mineral anomaly.

  17. Light-assisted decomposition of dyes over iron-bearing soil clays in the presence of H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ma, Wanhong; Chen, Chuncheng; Zhao, Jincai

    2009-09-15

    Four types of soil clays from different sites in China have been chosen to simulate chemical remediation of soils contaminated with dyes by light-assisted Fenton-like method. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements indicated that these soil clays contain iron oxides such as magnetite and hematite, where nondistorted iron active sites (ESR spectra, g=2.3) predominate. Upon visible or UV irradiation, the soil clays were very effective for the degradation of nonbiodegradable cationic dyes such as Rhodamine B (RhB) by activating H(2)O(2) at neutral pH. The photodegradation rates of RhB were closely related to total Fe content in clays and H(2)O(2) dosage, indicating the mineral-catalyzed Fenton-like reactions operated. Soil organic matters (SOM) would remarkably inhibit the photodecomposition of RhB dye. The reaction products were some low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids and their derivatives, all of which are easily biodegradable. A possible mechanism was proposed based on the results obtained by spin-trapping ESR technique.

  18. Effects of changes in land use on soil physical properties and soil organic carbon content in a wheat-corn-sunflower crop sequence, in a loam soil of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, V.; Costa, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Argentinean Humid Pampas extend over about 60 million hectares, 90% of which are agricultural lands. The Southeast of the Buenos Aires Province is part of the Humid Pampas, it covers over 1,206,162 hectares, the mean annual temperature is 13.3 °C and the climate is sub-humid. At the present only 6% of the lands are used for pasture. The main activities are agriculture and cattle production. The main crops are wheat, sunflower, corn and soybean. The tillage systems used in the area are: moldboard plow (MP), chisel plow (CP) and no-till (NT). Excessive soil cultivation under MP generates decreases in the levels of soil organic carbon (SOC). The magnitude of such decrease depends on the intensity of the tillage system, the tillage timeliness and the amount and quality of the residues. Adopting NT may reduce the effects of intensive agriculture, through the maintenance and accumulation of SOC. However, there are evidences that, under NT, the bulk density (ρb) in the superficial layers of the soil increases. The soil compaction causes degradation of the soil structure, reduces the soil water availability and reduces the soil hydraulic conductivity. With this scenario and the tendency to increase the surface under NT in the Southeast Humid Pampas, we evaluated the evolution of some soil physical properties and the SOC in a 10-year experiment with a wheat-corn-sunflower rotation. The experiment was carried out in four localities at farmerś fields under three different tillage systems: MP, CP and NT in a randomized complete block design, considering each locality as a block. Each plot had 50 m in width by 100 m length and the treatments were: NT, MP and CP. The results of this experiment have allowed us to verify that: i) the wheat-corn-sunflower crop sequence showed a tendency to reduce the values of bulk density (ρb) but NT increased ρb in the superficial soil layers; ii) the more intensive the tillage system, the higher the change in the mean weight diameter

  19. Study on Soil Mobility of Two Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Mörtl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement of two neonicotinoid insecticide active ingredients, clothianidin (CLO and thiamethoxam (TMX, was investigated in different soil types (sand, clay, or loam and in pumice. Elution profiles were determined to explore differences in binding capacity. Soil characterized by high organic matter content retained the ingredients, whereas high clay content resulted in long release of compounds. Decrease in concentration was strongly influenced by soil types: both CLO and TMX were retained in loam and clay soils and showed ready elution through sandy soil and pumice. Elution capability of the active ingredients in sandy soil correlated with their water solubility, indicating approximately 30% higher rapidity for TMX than for CLO. Soil organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc determined were in good agreement with literature values with somewhat lower value for CLO in sandy soil and substantially higher values for TMX in clay soil. High mobility of these neonicotinoid active ingredients in given soil types urges stronger precautionary approach taken during their application.

  20. Impact of Long-Term Alfalfa Cropping on Soil Potassium Content and Clay Minerals in a Semi-Arid Loess Soil in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-Cheng; B. VELDE; LI Feng-Min; ZHANG Gan-Lin; ZHAO Ming-Song; HUANG Lai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa cropping has been considered an efficient method of increasing soil fertility.Usually nitrogen increase in root nodules is considered to be the major beneficial effect.A 21-year time series (five sampling periods) of alfalfa cultivation plots on a loess soil,initially containing illite and chlorite,in Lanzhou of northwestern China was selected to investigate the relationships among alfalfa cropping,soil potassium (K) content and soil clay minerals.The results indicated that soil K significantly accumulated after cropping,with a peak value at about 15 years,and decreased afterwards.The accumulated K was associated with the K increase in the well-crystallized illite,which was not extracted by the traditional laboratory K extraction methods in assessing bioavailability.The steep decline in soil K content after 15-year cropping was in accord with the observed fertility loss in the alfalfa soil.Plant biomass productivity peaked at near 9 years of culture,whereas soil K and clay minerals continued to increase until cropping for 15 years.This suggested that K increased in the topsoil came from the deep root zone.Thus alfalfa continued to store K in clays even after peak production occurred.Nitrogen did not follow these trends,showing a general decline compared with the native prairie soils that had not been cropped.Therefore,the traditional alfalfa cropping can increase K content in the topsoil.

  1. THE EFFECT OF P-NITROCHLOROBENZENE ON HOMEOSTASIS QUANTITATIVE PARAMETERS OF KARST CAVE CLAYS AND ECUADOR SOILS MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashyrev, O B; Suslova, O S; Rokitko, P V

    2015-01-01

    In this paper it was given the effect of p-nitrochlorobenzene (NCB) on the homeostasis quantitative parameters of cave clays microbial communities from Western Ukraine and Abkhazia (Mushkarova Yama, Kuybushevskaya) and soils of Ecuador tropical ecosystems. For these microbial communities were determined maximum permissible concentrations and types of responses on xenobiotic. Microbial communities of Mushkarova Yama cave clays and rainforest soils of Ecuador were characterized by the first type of response. Microbial communities of Kuybushevskaya clays and mountain jungles of Ecuador were characterized by the second type of response. Maximum permissible concentration of NCB for Mushkarova Yama was 200 mg/l, for the other studied microbial communities--300 mg/l. It was shown, that microbial communities were not only highly resistant to NCB but also interacted with it by destroying this xenobiotic and decreasing its concentration in 4 times.

  2. Effect of land-use changes and site variables on surface soil organic carbon pool at Mediterranean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-hashim, Mohamed; Elsayed, Mohamed; Belal, Abd-ElAziz

    2016-02-01

    Soil organic carbon pool (SOCP) is affected by several factors particularly soil type, climate, topography, crop management, and anthropogenic factors. The study was carried out to clarify relationships between SOCP under different soil types and land-use changes in the Mediterranean region. Data of 26 pedons were investigated in Tanta catchment, middle Nile Delta, Egypt (30°45 N, 30°55 E), that the collected soil samples covered different soil types and land-uses. There were significant differences of SOCP among soils: loam and clay loams were rather similar. Clay soils were the most extensive and have mean SOCP of 4.08 ± 1.41 kg C m-2. The highest SOCP of 7.07 kg C m-2 was in clay loam soil associated with bare soil, while the lowest of 2.57 kg C m-2 in sandy clay loam soil associated with bare soil. Losing cropland showed highest increase from 1990 to 2015 with increasing urban encroachment by 15.3%. The overall average results of SOCP in cropland area showed 53.85 Mg C ha-1 under different soils. Losing the arable lands to urbanization resulted in a decrease of 285.421 Gg C of SOCP. With the decrease in SOCP sequestrated within the soil surface, carbon dioxide would be emitted to the atmosphere. The emitted CO2 resulted from losing the cropland equal to 1047.5 Gg CO2. Land-use changes have marked impact on surface SOCP and C sequestration.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF A CALCULATION METHOD FOR PILEWORK PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES "STREAMLINED" BY LANDSLIDE CLAY SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyer D. V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Expansion and increasing of the Krasnodar region transport infrastructure during the construction of the Olympic facilities together with the new land development created a necessity for construction in the remote areas of landslide slopes with the complex engineering-geological conditions. Constructions of bored piles, jammed by in nondisplaceable soil are often used as one of the measures for the protection of surface rocks landslide movement and tightening the slope weak sections. Such constructive solution is often being considered the best, and sometimes the only acceptable solution. When designing engineering protection it is recommended to consider the use of a number of active protection activities, aimed at the landslide processes stabilization. However, in case of construction production impossibility due to terms of organization, it is necessary to provide passive protection which would secure that the landslide streamlines the construction. Currently, the mechanism of the soil landslides interaction with constructions of detached objects spot protection isn’t studied enough. Known methods adopt simplifications and assumptions which lead to definite significant errors in the design of slope protection structures. Security and reliability of such structures can only be achieved with the adoption of high factor of safety values. This leads to increased material consumption and labor input for the erection of defensive structures also reduces the economic efficiency of these structures. In addition the process of designing protective structures in the Krasnodar region is further complicated by fact that the landslide of construction area is mainly folded by flowing clay soils

  4. Survival of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium in slurry applied to clay soil on a Danish swine farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boes, J.; Alban, L.; Bagger, J.;

    2005-01-01

    the survival times of E. coli and Salmonella in the soil surface following deposition of naturally contaminated pig slurry; and (3) simulate survival of Salmonella in different infection levels using E. coli data as input estimates. Slurry was deposited by four different methods: (1) hose applicator on black...... amended with contaminated pig slurry was an effective means to reduce environmental exposure to E. coli and Salmonella on this clay-soil farm....

  5. Distribution, fate and formation of non-extractable residues of a nonylphenol isomer in soil with special emphasis on soil derived organo-clay complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riefer, Patrick; Klausmeyer, Timm; Schäffer, Andreas; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic contaminants like nonylphenols (NP) are added to soil, for instance if sewage-sludge is used as fertilizer in agriculture. A commercial mixture of NP consists of more than 20 isomers. For our study, we used one of the predominate isomers of NP mixtures, 4-(3,5-dimethylhept-3-yl)phenol, as a representative compound. The aim was to investigate the fate and distribution of the isomer within soil and soil derived organo-clay complexes. Therefore, (14)C- and (13)C-labeled NP was added to soil samples and incubated up to 180 days. Mineralization was measured and soil samples were fractionated into sand, silt and clay; the clay fraction was further separated in humic acids, fulvic acids and humin. The organo-clay complexes pre-incubated for 90 or 180 days were re-incubated with fresh soil for 180 days, to study the potential of re-mobilization of incorporated residues. The predominate incorporation sites of the nonylphenol isomer in soil were the organo-clay complexes. After 180 days of incubation, 22 % of the applied (14)C was mineralized. The bioavailable, water extractable portion was low (9 % of applied (14)C) and remained constant during the entire incubation period, which could be explained by an incorporation/release equilibrium. Separation of organo-clay complexes, after extraction with solvents to release weakly incorporated, bioaccessible portions, showed that non-extractable residues (NER) were preferentially located in the humic acid fraction, which was regarded as an effect of the chemical composition of this fraction. Generally, 27 % of applied (14)C was incorporated into organo-clay complexes as NER, whereas 9 % of applied (14)C was bioaccessible after 180 days of incubation. The re-mobilization experiments showed on the one hand, a decrease of the bioavailability of the nonylphenol residues due to stronger incorporation, when the pre-incubation period was increased from 90 to 180 days. On the other hand, a shift of these residues from the

  6. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongzhen; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Huang, Panming; Jilani, Ghulam

    2008-03-01

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe2O3 content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that Koc would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface.

  7. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Ploughing in good soil moisture conditions in soil structure protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Dell'Abate

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been carried out within the framework on the EFFICOND Project, focused at evaluating the effectiveness of the standards of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs established for Cross Compliance implementation under EC Regulation 1782/2003. In particular the standard 3.1b deals with soil structure protection through appropriate machinery use, with particular reference to ploughing in good soil moisture conditions. The study deals with the evaluation of soil structure after tillage in tilth and no-tilth conditions at soil moisture contents other than the optimum water content for tillage. The Mean Weight Diameter (MWD of water stable aggregates was used as an indicator of tillage effectiveness. The study was carried out in the period 2008-2009 at six experimental farms belonging to Research Centres and Units of the Italian Agricultural Research Council (CRA with different pedo-climatic and cropping conditions. Farm management and data collection in the different sites were carried out by the local CRA researchers and technicians. The comparison of MWD values in tilth and no tilth theses showed statistically significant differences in most cases, depending on topsoil texture. On clay, clay loam, silty clay, and silty clay loam topsoils a general and significant increase of MWD values under no tilth conditions were observed. No significant differences were observed in silt loam and sandy loam textures, probably due to the weak soil structure of the topsoils. Moreover, ploughing in good soil moisture condition determined higher crop production and less weed development than ploughing in high soil moisture conditions.

  8. Swelling clays and salt-affected soils : demixing of Na / Ca clays as the rationale for discouraging the use of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilhem Bourrie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium adsorption ratio SAR defined as SAR = (Na / V w(Ca+Mg/2 here concentrations of cations in solution are expressed in meq/L has long been considered as correlated to exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP on clay minerals or soil exchange complex, and as the key concept to explain swelling of clay minerals and the difficulties of reclaiming salt-affected soils. Though its basis is empirical, it was alleged to be theoretically justified on the basis of ion exchange, derived from the Gapon convention. However, it has long been challenged on the basis of both field observations and experimental evidence : it fails to account for the fact that calcium and magnesium do not play the same role, while potassium is absent from the formula ; calcium concentration must be “corrected “when calcite is present etc. There exist specific ion effects. Experimental measurements of the decrease of permeability when solutions are diluted led Quirk and Schofield (1955 to define the concept of critical threshold, and to show that potassium and magnesium play an intermediate role between sodium and calcium. This threshold is simply determined by the concentration of calcium, irrespective of the value of SAR or ESP. Indeed, demixing of Ca-Na clay minerals during ion exchange, a phenomenon well known since Glaeser and Mering (1954, implies that there exists an interaction between adjacent sites. This undermines the theoretical basis of SAR : the derivation of SAR from ion exchange equilibria implies to use an equilibrium constant. This parameter is no more constant if demixing occurs. The results obtained are positive : demixing leads to expulsion of sodium from inner exchange surfaces and its replacement by calcium, according to the “three crystals pore”proposed by Quirk (2003b. Sodium can then be more easily leached, as permeability is maintained by clusters of Ca-sites. Calcium concentration in solution appears thus as the simpler parameter to guide

  9. Clay mineralogy in agrochernozems of western Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papish, I. Ya.; Chizhikova, N. P.; Poznyak, S. P.; Varlamov, E. B.

    2016-10-01

    The mineralogy of clay fractions separated from deep low-humus deep-gleyic loamy typical agrochernozems on loess-like loams of the Upper Bug and Dniester uplands in the Central Russian loess province of Ukraine consists of complex disordered interstratifications with the segregation of mica- and smectite-type layers (hereafter, smectite phase), tri- and dioctahedral hydromicas, kaolinite, and chlorite. The distribution of the clay fraction is uniform. The proportions of the layered silicates vary significantly within the profile: a decrease in the content of the smectite phase and a relative increase in the content of hydromicas up the soil profile are recorded. In the upper horizons, the contents of kaolinite and chlorite increase, and some amounts of fine quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases are observed. This tendency is observed in agrochernozems developed on the both Upper Bug and Dniester uplands. The differences include the larger amounts of quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases in the clay material of the Upper Bug Upland, while the contents of the smectite phase in the soil profiles of the areas considered are similar. An analogous mineral association is noted in podzolized agrochernozems on loess-like deposits in the Cis-Carpathian region of the Southern Russian loess province developed on the Prut-Dniester and Syan-Dniester uplands. The distribution of particle-size fractions and the mineralogy of the clay fraction indicate the lithogenic heterogeneity of the soil-forming substrate. When the drifts change, the mineral association of the soils developed within the loess-like deposits gives place to minerals dominated by individual smectite with some mica-smectite inter stratifications, hydromicas, and chlorite.

  10. Soil microbial and faunal responses to herbicide tolerant maize and herbicide in two soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, Bryan; Caul, Sandra; Thompson, J.

    2008-01-01

    ), Orient (non HT near isogenic control for T25) and Monumental (a conventional, non HT variety) were grown in contrasting sandy loam and clay loam soils, half were sprayed with the appropriate herbicide as used in the field and soil samples were taken at the five-leaf and flowering plant growth stage....... The main effects on all measured parameters were those of soil type and plant growth stage, with four categories of subsequent interaction: (1) there were no effects of herbicide on plant growth or soil microarthropods: (2) the maize cultivar (but not the GM HT trait) had effects on the decomposition...... of cotton strips and the nematode community; (3) herbicide application in general altered the community level physiological profile of the microbial community and reduced both soil basal respiration and the abundance of protozoa; and (4) the specific application of glufosinate-ammonium to T25 maize altered...

  11. An Improved Description of the Seismic Response of Sites with High Plasticity Soils, Organic Clays, and Deep Soft Soil Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Brian

    Near surface soils can greatly influence the amplitude, duration, and frequency content of ground motions. The amount of their influence depends on many factors, such as the geometry and engineering properties of the soils and underlying bedrock, as well as the earthquake source mechanism and travel path. Building codes such as the 2012 International Building Code (IBC) define six site categories for seismic design of structures, which are based on the sites defined by the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). Site categories A, B, C, D, and E are defined by the time averaged shear wave velocity over the top 30 meters of the soil deposit. Site category F is defined as sites that include liquefiable or sensitive soils, as well as sites with more than 3 meters (10 ft) of peat or highly organic clays, more than 7.5 meters (25 ft) of soil with PI > 75, and more than 37 meters (120 ft) of soft to medium stiff clays. The IBC specifies simplified procedures to calculate design spectra for NEHRP sites A through E, and requires a site specific investigation for NEHRP F sites. However, established procedures for performing the required site specific investigations for NEHRP F sites are limited. The objective of this research is to develop a simplified procedure to estimate design spectra for non-liquefiable NEHRP F sites, specifically sites with organic soils, highly plastic soils, and deep soft soil deposits. The results from this research will directly affect US practice by developing much needed guidelines in this area. There is little empirical data on the seismic response of non-liquefiable NEHRP F sites. As a result, this study focused on generating data from site response analyses. To capture the variability of ground motions, this study selected five base case scenarios according to tectonic environments and representative cases encountered in common US practice. Suites of ground motions for each scenario were created by collecting ground motions

  12. Mineralization of 14C-ring Labelled 2,4-D in Egyptian Soils Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Obiectives To study the mineralization of 2,4-D in clay and clay loam Egyptian soils under subtropical conditions over a period of 90 d. Methods Using 14C-ring labelled pesticide, laboratory studies under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were conducted. 14C-activity in solutions was directly determined by liquid scintillation counting. Unextractable soil residues were determined by combustion.The nature of methanolic 14C-residues was determined by thin layer and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Results Under aerobic conditions 10%-14% of applied dose was mineralized during 90 d irrespective of soil type. The soil extractable pesticide residues decreased with time and the bound residues gradually increased. The highest binding capacity of about 26%-29% was observed in clay soil under aerobic conditions after 90 d. A good balance sheet was obtained and the percentage recovery was generally between 91% and 100%. Conclusion The mineralization of 2,4-D in clay soil was higher than that in clay loam soil under anaerobic conditions.Under aerobic conditions, the soil type had no influence on mineralizaion capacity of 2,4-D during 90 d. The soil binding increased with time whereby the extractable 14C-residues simultaneously decreased.Chromatographic analysis of the methanol extractable 14C-residues of soils revealed the presence of 2,4-D as a main product together with 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  13. Influence of Accompanying Anions on Potassium Retention and Leaching in Potato Growing Alluvial Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.SHARMA; K.N.SHARMA

    2013-01-01

    A column study was carried out to assess the influence of accompanying anions on potassium (K) leaching at potato growing sites with different soil textures (sandy loam and clay loam) in northwestern India.Potassium was applied in the top 15 cm layer of soil column at 30 and 60 mg K kg-1 through different sources having different accompanying anions (Cl-,SO42-,NO3-and H2PO4-).Maximum K was retained in the top 0-15 cm layer with a sharp decrease in K content occurring in 15-30 cm layer of the soil column.The trend was similar for both levels of applied K as well as frequency of leaching and soil type.The decrease of K content in soil column after four leaching events was maximum in case of Khanaura sandy loam,while only minor decrease was observed in Hundowal clay loam when K was applied at 60 mg K kg-1,indicating higher potential of clay rich soil to adsorb K.In general,the K leaching in presence of the accompanying anions followed the order of SO42-≤ H2PO42-< NO3-=Cl-.Highest 1 mol L-1 CH3COONH4-extractable K was retained when K was applied along with SO42-and H2PO4-anions,and the least was retained when accompanying anion was Cl-.The influence of anions was more pronounced in the light textured soil and at high amounts of K application.Higher levels of K application resulted in higher losses of K,especially in sandy loam soil as observed from the leachate concentration.Among the different K sources,the maximum amount of K leaching was noticed in the soil column amended with KCl.After four leachings,the maximum amount of K leached out was 6.40 mg L-1 in Hundowal clay loam and 9.29 mg L-1 in Khanaura sandy loam at 60 mg K kg-1 of soil application through KCl.These concentrations were lower than the recommended guideline of the World Health Organisation (12.00 mg L-1).

  14. Spatially Explicit Estimation of Clay and Organic Carbon Content in Agricultural Soils Using Multi-Annual Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Gerighausen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on soil clay and organic carbon content on a regional to local scale is vital for a multitude of reasons such as soil conservation, precision agriculture, and possibly also in the context of global environmental change. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of multi-annual hyperspectral images acquired with the HyMap sensor (450–2480 nm during three flight campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2008 for the prediction of clay and organic carbon content on croplands by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR. Supplementary, laboratory reflectance measurements were acquired under standardized conditions. Laboratory spectroscopy yielded prediction errors between 19.48 and 35.55 g kg−1 for clay and 1.92 and 2.46 g kg−1 for organic carbon. Estimation errors with HyMap image spectra ranged from 15.99 to 23.39 g kg−1 for clay and 1.61 to 2.13 g kg−1 for organic carbon. A comparison of parameter predictions from different years confirmed the predictive ability of the models. BRDF effects increased model errors in the overlap of neighboring flight strips up to 3 times, but an appropriated preprocessing method can mitigate these negative influences. Using multi-annual image data, soil parameter maps could be successively complemented. They are exemplarily shown providing field specific information on prediction accuracy and image data source.

  15. [Mineralogy and genesis of mixed-layer clay minerals in the Jiujiang net-like red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Li, Rong-Biao; Han, Wen; Wu, Yu; Gao, Wen-Peng; Jia, Jin-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Mineralogy and genesis were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to understand the mineralogy and its genesis significance of mixed-layer clay minerals in Jiujiang red soil section. XRD and FTIR results show that the net-like red soil sediments are composed of illite, kaolinite, minor smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite and minor mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite. HRTEM observation indicates that some smectite layers have transformed into kaolinite layers in net-like red soil. Mixed-layer illite-smectite is a transition phase of illite transforming into smectite, and mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite is a transitional product relative to kaolinite and smectite. The occurrence of two mixed-layer clay species suggests that the weathering sequence of clay minerals in net-like red soil traversed from illite to mixed-layer illite-smectite to smectite to mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite to kaolinite, which indicates that net-like red soil formed under a warm and humid climate with strengthening of weathering.

  16. A lysimeter experiment to investigate the leaching of veterinary antibiotics through a clay soil and comparison with field data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Paul [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: paul.kay@adas.co.uk; Blackwell, Paul A. [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom); Boxall, Alistair B.A. [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    Pharmaceuticals used in livestock production may be present in manure and slurry as the parent compound and/or metabolites. The environment may therefore be exposed to these substances due to the application of organic fertilisers to agricultural land or deposition by grazing livestock. For other groups of substances that are applied to land (e.g. pesticides), preferential flow in clay soils has been identified as an extremely important mechanism by which surface water pollution can occur. This lysimeter study was therefore performed to investigate the fate of three antibiotics from the sulphonamide, tetracycline and macrolide groups in a clay soil. Only sulphachloropyridazine was detected in leachate and soil analysis at the end of the experiment showed that almost no antibiotic residues remained. These data were analysed alongside field data for the same compounds to show that soil tillage which breaks the connectivity of macropores formed over the summer months, prior to slurry application, significantly reduces chemical mobility. - This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the fate of veterinary medicines in cracking clay soils.

  17. Carbon sequestration in clay and silt fractions of Brazilian soils under conventional and no-tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Estima Sacramento dos Reis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of soils to sequestrate carbon (C is mainly related to the formation of organo-mineral complexes. In this study, we investigated the influence of soil management systems on the C retention capacity of soil with an emphasis on the silt and clay fractions of two subtropical soils with different mineralogy and climate. Samples from a Humic Hapludox and a Rhodic Hapludox, clayey soils cultivated for approximately 30 years under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT were collected from six layers distributed within 100-cm soil depth from each site and from an adjacent native forest. After the removal of particulate organic matter (POM, the suspension (<53 µm was sonicated, the silt and clay fractions were separated in accordance with Stokes' law and the carbon content of whole soil and physical fractions was determined. In the Humic Hapludox, the clay and silt fractions under NT showed a higher maximum C retention (72 and 52 g kg-1, respectively in comparison to those under CT (54 and 38 g kg-1, respectively. Moreover, the C concentration increase in both fractions under NT occurred mainly in the topsoil (up to 5 cm. The C retention in physical fractions of Rhodic Hapludox varied from 25 to 32 g kg-1, and no difference was observed whether under an NT or a CT management system. The predominance of goethite and gibbsite in the Humic Hapludox, as well as its exposure to a colder climate, may have contributed to its greater C retention capacity. In addition to the organo-mineral interaction, a mechanism of organic matter self-assemblage, enhanced by longer periods of soil non-disturbance, seems to have contributed to the carbon stabilization in both soils.

  18. Production of CO2 in crude oil bioremediation in clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro José Baptista

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to evaluate the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in clay soil a 45-days experiment. The experiment was conducted using an aerobic fixed bed reactor, containing 300g of contaminated soil at room temperature with an air rate of 6 L/h. The growth medium was supplemented with 2.5% (w/w (NH42SO4 and 0.035% (w/w KH2PO4. Biodegradation of the crude oil in the contaminated clay soil was monitored by measuring CO2 production and removal of organic matter (OM, oil and grease (OandG, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH, measured before and after the 45-days experiment, together with total heterotrophic and hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial count. The best removals of OM (50%, OandG (37% and TPH (45% were obtained in the bioreactors in which the highest CO2 production was achieved.O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a biodegradação de petróleo em solo argiloso durante 45 dias de ensaios. Os ensaios de biodegradação foram conduzidos em biorreatores aeróbios de leito fixo, com 300 g de solo contaminado, à temperatura ambiente e com uma vazão de ar de 6 L/h. As deficiências nutricionais foram corrigidas com 2,5% (p/p (NH42SO4 e com 0,035% (p/p KH2PO4. O monitoramento foi realizado em função da produção de CO2, da remoção de matéria orgânica (OM, de óleos e graxas (OandG e de hidrocarbonetos totais de petróleo (TPH, além bactérias heterotróficas totais (BHT e hidrocarbonoclásticas (BHc, no início e após 45 dias. Nos biorreatores onde houve maior crescimento de bactérias hidrocarbonoclásticas e maior produção de CO2, obteve-se os melhores percentuais de remoções de MO (50%, OandG (37% e TPH (45%.

  19. Comparative assessment of water infiltration of soils under different tillage systems in eastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroke, T. S.; Dikinya, O.; Patrick, C.

    Water infiltration is an important component of water balance for improving crop production potential in dryland soil tillage systems in Botswana, particularly in the eastern region. Hardsetting soils common in arable lands of Botswana, often require some kind of tillage such as mouldboard ploughing, chiselling and ripping to improve waterharvesting and crop growth conditions. The objective of this study was to compare ponded cumulative infiltration, steady state infiltration rate and sorptivity of soils cultivated using deep ripping, single and double mouldboard ploughing. This study was conducted on Chromic Luvisols (sandy loam), Haplic Luvisols (sandy clay loam), Ferric Luvisols (clay loam), and Ferric Arenosols (sand). Infiltration was measured using double ring infiltrometer method for 4 h. Although infiltration was smaller on traffic line of deep ripping system at all sites, it was only significantly ( P 0.05) different under deep ripped. Cumulative and steady state infiltration rate was greater under sandy than loamy soils, smaller under double ploughing compared with single ploughed and deep ripped soils. Sorptivity was not significantly ( P > 0.05) different among tillage systems but was greater under sandy than sandy loam soils. Information on tillage and infiltration can improve implementation of waterharvesting technologies and crop production in Botswana.

  20. Field corrosion characterization of soil corrosion of X70 pipeline steel in a red clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengrong Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of X70 pipeline steel buried in red soil environment has been studied. The surface morphology and elemental distribution were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM,energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The corrosion kinetics was evaluated by weight loss measurement. The results show that in red soil, the corrosion rate of X70 steel decreases with time, and follows the exponential decay law. General corrosion with non-uniform and localized pitting occurred on the steel surface. α-FeOOH was the dominate products during corrosion in whole buried periods, and the corrosion products exhibited well protective properties. The potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that icorr decreased with time, indicating the improvement of corrosion resistance. The results of Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS are consistent with potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  1. Field corrosion characterization of soil corrosion of X70 pipeline steel in a red clay soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengrong Wang; Cuiwei Dun; Xiaogang Li; Zhiyong Liunn; Min Zhu; Dawei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of X70 pipeline steel buried in red soil environment has been studied. The surface morphology and elemental distribution were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion kinetics was evaluated by weight loss measurement. The results show that in red soil, the corrosion rate of X70 steel decreases with time, and follows the exponential decay law. General corrosion with non-uniform and localized pitting occurred on the steel surface.α-FeOOH was the dominate products during corrosion in whole buried periods, and the corrosion products exhibited well protective properties. The potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that icorr decreased with time, indicating the improvement of corrosion resistance. The results of Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS) are consistent with potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  2. Comparative research on tillable properties of diatomite-improved soils in the Yangtze River Delta region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ji-Li; Zhao, Dong-Xue

    2016-10-15

    To improve soil texture and structure, techniques associated with physical, biological or chemical aspects are generally adopted, among which diatomite is an important soil conditioner. However, few studies have been conducted to investigate the physical, hydraulic and tillage performance of diatomite-improved soils. Consistency limits and compaction properties were investigated in this study, and several performance indicators were compared, such as the liquid limit, plastic limit and compactability, of silt, silt loam and silty-clay loam soils to which diatomite was added at volumetric ratios of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%. The results showed that diatomite significantly (pOMC) was increased overall. The trend was consistent with the proportion of diatomite, and MBD decreased by 8.7%, 10.3%, and 13.2% in the silt, silt loam and silty-clay loam soils when 30% diatomite was mixed, whereas OMC increased by 28.7%, 22.4%, and 25.3%, respectively. Additionally, aggregate stability was negatively correlated with MBD but positively correlated with OMC. Diatomite exerts positive effects on soil mechanical strength, suggesting that soils from sludge farms are more tillable with a larger stabilized and workable matrix.

  3. Influence of the insecticides acetamiprid and carbofuran on arylamidase and myrosinase activities in the tropical black and red clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiddin, G Jaffer; Srinivasulu, M; Maddela, N R; Manjunatha, B; Rangaswamy, V; Koch Kaiser, Alma Rosel; Maisincho Asqui, Jessica Cristina; Darwin Rueda, O

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of two insecticides, namely, acetamiprid and carbofuran on the enzymatic activities of arylamidase (as glucose formed from sinigrin) and myrosinase (as β-naphthylamine formed from L-leucine β-naphthylamide) in the black and red clay soils collected from a fallow groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) fields in the Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India. The study was realized within the framework of the laboratory experiments in which the acetamiprid and carbofuran were applied to the soils at different doses (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 kg ha(-1)). Initially, the physicochechemical properties of the soil samples were analyzed. After 10 days of pesticide application, the soil samples were analyzed for the enzyme activities. Acetamiprid and carbofuran stimulated the arylamidase and myrosinase activities at lower concentrations after 10 days incubation. Striking stimulation in soil enzyme activities was noticed at 2.5 kg ha(-1), persists for 20 days in both the soils. Overall, higher concentrations (5.0-10.0 kg ha(-1)) of acetamiprid and carbofuran were toxic or innocuous to the arylamidase and myrosinase activities. Nevertheless, the outcomes of the present study clearly indicate that the use of these insecticides (at field application rates) in the groundnut fields (black and red clay soils) stimulated the enzyme (arylamidase and myrosinase) activities.

  4. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhongzhen; He Yan [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Xu Jianming [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)], E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn; Huang Panming [Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Jilani Ghulam [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that K{sub oc} would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface. - The relative importance of organic matter and clay in butachlor adsorption in soil will depend on the ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content.

  5. Microbial assimilation of 14C of ground and unground plant materials decomposing in a loamy sand and a clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Ladd, J.N.; Amato, M.

    1996-01-01

    . More C-14 and N were mineralized and less microbial biomass C-14 accumulated in soils amended with unground than with ground subclover leaves. Differences in the amounts of (CO2)-C-14 and biomass C-14 were established during the initial 7 days of decomposition. At this time, biomass C-14 in the two...... of particle sizes >50 mu m accounted fro 5-6% input C-14 in the loamy sand; the proportions were little affected by grinding of the clover leaf amendment. In contrast, the amounts of biomass C-14 in the fraction of particle sizes soils. Thus......, the increased amounts of biomass C-14 in soils amended with ground leaves were mainly associated with clay plus silt size particles and microaggregates. After 7 d of decomposition, non-biomass C-14 in the two soil fractions accounted for about 40% of input C-14, irrespective of soil type and particle size...

  6. An automated microinfiltrometer to measure small-scale soil water infiltration properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Dennis C.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed an automated miniature constant-head tension infiltrometer that measures very small infiltration rates at millimetre resolution with minimal demands on the operator. The infiltrometer is made of 2.9 mm internal radius glass tube, with an integrated bubbling tower to maintain constant negative head and a porous mesh tip to avoid air-entry. In the bubbling tower, bubble formation and release changes the electrical resistance between two electrodes at the air-inlet. Tests were conducted on repacked sieved sands, sandy loam soil and clay loam soil, packed to a soil bulk density ρd of 1200 kg m-3 or 1400 kg m-3 and tested either air-dried or at a water potential ψ of -50 kPa. The change in water volume in the infiltrometer had a linear relationship with the number of bubbles, allowing bubble rate to be converted to infiltration rate. Sorptivity measured with the infiltrometer was similar between replicates and showed expected differences from soil texture and ρd, varying from 0.15 ± 0.01 (s.e. mm s-1/2 for 1400 kg m-3 clay loam at ψ = -50 kPa to 0.65 ± 0.06 mm s-1/2 for 1200 kg m-3 air dry sandy loam soil. An array of infiltrometers is currently being developed so many measurements can be taken simultaneously.

  7. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  8. Removal of a mixture of pesticides by a Streptomyces consortium: Influence of different soil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María S; Raimondo, Enzo E; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2017-04-01

    Although the use of organochlorine pesticides (OPs) is restricted or banned in most countries, they continue posing environmental and health concerns, so it is imperative to develop methods for removing them from the environment. This work is aimed to investigate the simultaneous removal of three OPs (lindane, chlordane and methoxychlor) from diverse types of systems by employing a native Streptomyces consortium. In liquid systems, a satisfactory microbial growth was observed accompanied by removal of lindane (40.4%), methoxychlor (99.5%) and chlordane (99.8%). In sterile soil microcosms, the consortium was able to grow without significant differences in the different textured soils (clay silty loam, sandy and loam), both contaminated or not contaminated with the OPs-mixture. The Streptomyces consortium was able to remove all the OPs in sterile soil microcosm (removal order: clay silty loam > loam > sandy). So, clay silty loam soil (CSLS) was selected for next assays. In non-sterile CSLS microcosms, chlordane removal was only about 5%, nonetheless, higher rates was observed for lindane (11%) and methoxychlor (20%). In CSLS slurries, the consortium exhibited similar growth levels, in the presence of or in the absence of the OPs-mixture. Not all pesticides were removed in the same way; the order of pesticide dissipation was: methoxychlor (26%)>lindane (12.5%)>chlordane (10%). The outlines of microbial growth and pesticides removal provide information about using actinobacteria consortium as strategies for bioremediation of OPs-mixture in diverse soil systems. Texture of soils and assay conditions (sterility, slurry formulation) were determining factors influencing the removal of each pesticide of the mixture.

  9. Leaching of Nutrient Elements in a Red Soil Derived from Quaternary Red Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENRENFANG; ZHAOQIGUO

    1998-01-01

    A red soil derived from Quaternary red clay was employed to study nutrient leaching with woil columns repacked in laboratory,The objective was to identify the effects of fertilization practices on leaching patterns and magnitudes of Ca2+,Mg2+,K+,NH4+,and NO3-,The treatments were CK (as a control),CaCO3, CaSO4,MgCO3,Ca(H2PO4)2,urea,KCl,and multiple (a mixture of the above-mentioned fertilizers),The fertilizers were added to the bare surface of the soil columns,and then the columns were leached with 120 mL deionized water daily through peristaltic pumps over a period of 92 days.Leaching processes of NH4+,and NO3- wer e only measured in CK,ured,and multiple treatments which were directly related to N leaching, Results showed that sole application of CaSO4,and Ca(H2PO4)2 scarcely hd any effect on the leching losses of Ca2+,Mg2+,and K+; the application of MgCO3 sthimulated the leaching of Mg2+;the application of CaCO3 promoted the leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+ and K+; urea treatment also promoted the leaching of K+ and NH4+,and NO3- leaching mainly occurred at late stage of leaching process in particular;under KCl treatment,leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+,and K+ was promoted to a large extent;under multiple treatment, leaching of Ca2+,Mg2+,K+,NH4+,and NO3- was all increased and NO3- was mainly leached at the end of leaching process and still had a trend of increase.

  10. Predicting Soil Moisture in the Field from Amplitude Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kayssi, A. W.

    2009-04-01

    Measurements of amplitude temperature and soil moisture content of sandy loam and silty clay loam soils were conducted in Al-Mada'in Research Station south of Baghdad during the period from the 1st of February to the 30th of April, 2004. Exponential regression relations were developed between amplitude temperature and volumetric moisture content for soil depths of 0.5, 3.0, 7.5 and 15cm below surface, which was highly significant (R2>0.96). A good linear regression between measured and predicted soil moisture contents was deduced for each depth (r>0.97). Soil moisture content was successfully predicted from the regression line when amplitude temperature was known.

  11. Changes in labile soil organic matter fractions following land use change from monocropping to poplar-based agroforestry systems in a semiarid region of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Rong; Zeng, De-Hui; Li, Lu-Jun; Hu, Ya-Lin

    2012-11-01

    Labile fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) respond rapidly to land management practices and can be used as a sensitive indicator of changes in SOM. However, there is little information about the effect of agroforestry practices on labile SOM fractions in semiarid regions of China. In order to test the effects of land use change from monocropping to agroforestry systems on labile SOM fractions, we investigated soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N, particulate organic matter C (POMC) and N (POMN), as well as total organic C (TOC) and total N (TN) in the 0- to 15-cm and the 15- to 30-cm layers in 4-year-old poplar-based agroforestry systems and adjoining monocropping systems with two different soil textures (sandy loam and sandy clay loam) in a semiarid region of Northeast China. Our results showed that poplar-based agroforestry practices affected soil MBC, POMC, and POMN, albeit there was no significant difference in TOC and TN. Agroforestry practices increased MBC, POMC, and POMN in sandy clay loam soils. However, in sandy loam soils, agroforestry practices only increased MBC and even decreased POMC and POMN at the 0- to 15-cm layer. Our results suggest that labile SOM fractions respond sensitively to poplar-based agroforestry practices and can provide early information about the changes in SOM in semiarid regions of Northeast China and highlight that the effects of agroforestry practices on labile SOM fractions vary with soil texture.

  12. The effect of motor vehicle emission towards lead (Pb content of rice field soil with different clay content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.Wati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor vehicle gas emission contains lead (Pb which is a hazardous and toxic substance. Agricultural land, especially rice field, which is located nearby roads passed by many motor vehicle, are susceptible to the accumulation of Pb. If Pb is permeated by plants cultivated in the rice field, it will be very hazardous for humans as they are the final consumers. Hence, it is essential to identify Pb content of rice-field soil initiated by motor vehicle gas emission. This study was aimed to identify the effects of motor vehicle density, the distance between rice-field and road, and the clay content of soil towards Pb content of soils in Blitar and Ngawi Regencies of East Java. The method used for the study was survey method managed by using three-factor nested design with three replicates. The results of this study showed that motor vehicle density and the distance of rice field to road provide significant affected the total of Pb content of soil. However, the dissemination pattern of Pb in the soil was irregular due to the factors of climate and environment. Before Pb reached soil surface, Pb was spread out in the air due to the effect of temperature, wind velocity, vehicle velocity, size of vehicle, and road density. Consequently, the location with low motor vehicle density and positioned faraway to the road had higher total rate of Pb than the location with high motor vehicle density and positioned nearby the road. Clay content affected the total rate of Pb content as much as 37%, every 1% increase of clay content increased the total rate of Pb as much as 0.08 mg/kg.

  13. Clay mineralogy of soils located on islands in the upper Paraná River, PR/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Marques de Castro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mutum and Porto Rico islands are part of the archipelago Mutum-Porto Rico, located in the upper Paraná River between the cities Porto Rico, PR and Taquaruçu, MS. The soils are formed by constituents inherited from parent materials, organic compounds, and various minerals with varying degrees of complexity and stages of weathering. Among the constituents inherited of the parent materials, the most active are called clay minerals, derived from the weathering or transformation of primary minerals. The clay minerals has a key role in behavior morphological, chemical, physical and hydraulic of soil. They comprise a large family of minerals that can be classified into several groups according to their crystalline structure, like the kaolinites, smectite and ilitas. The aim of this study was to conduct mineralogical analyzes by X-ray in eight soils from the Mutum and Porto Rico islands. The mineralogical data were generated from the Panalytical X-ray diffractometer and X’pert Highscore Plus software. The results show that all soils showed a pattern of peaks comprising illite, kaolinite and gibbsite. Some soils also had characteristic peaks of iron oxyhydroxide.

  14. Surface soil factors and soil characteristics in geo-physical milieu of Kebbi State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Usman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erodibility (K factor is the most important tool for estimation the erosion. The aim of this study Soil factors and surface soil characteristics are important components of agricultural environment. They support surface and subsurface soils to perform many functions to agriculture and economic human developments. Understanding these factors would aid to the recognition of the values that our soil and land offered to humanity. It is therefore, aim of this study to visualise and examine the soil factors and surface soil characteristics in Kebbi State Nigeria. An Integrated Surface Soil Approach (ISSA was used in the classification and description of soil environment in the study region. The factors constituted in the ISSA are important components of soil science that theories and practice(s noted to provide ideas on how soil environment functioned. The results indicate that the surface soil environments around Arewa, Argungu, Augie, Birnin Kebbi and Dandi are physically familiar with the following surface soil characteristics: bad-lands, blown-out-lands, cirque-lands, fertile-lands, gullied-lands, miscellaneous and rock-outcrops.The major soil factors observed hat played an important role in surface soil manipulations and soil formation are alluvial, colluvial, fluvial and lacustrine; ant, earthworms and termite; and various forms of surface relief supported by temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and wind. Overall, the surface soil environment of the region was describe according to their physical appearance into fadama clay soils, fadama clay-loam soils, dryland sandy soils, dryland sandy-loam soils, dryland stony soils and organic-mineral soils.

  15. Redistribution of contaminants from pig slurry after direct injection into soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Mostofa; Bech, T B; Forslund, A;

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of pig manure-borne contaminants after direct injection to soil was investigated in a field study. The spatial distribution of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium Bacteriophage 28B and other slurry components in and around the injection slit was measured on day 0.15, 1, 6......, 18, and 46/49 at Silstrup (sandy clay loam) and Estrup (sandy loam), Denmark. Transport of the slurry components away from the slit was slower at Silstrup in comparison to Estrup, probably because of a higher slurry dry matter content and soil clay content. Slurry NH4-N dissipated and....../or was nitrified gradually at Silstrup and more rapidly at Estrup, but had disappeared completely at both sites within 49 days. The rate of disappearance of E. coli at Estrup was lower than at Silstrup. Survival of E. coli was high in the upper soil layer at both sites. The overall persistence of the bacteriophage...

  16. Effect of Soil Texture on Starch Accumulation and Activities of Key Enzymes of Starch Synthesis in the Kernel of ZM 9023

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-jing; ZHAN Hai-hong

    2008-01-01

    Three kinds of soil texture (clay-loam, mid-loam, and sand-loam soil) were used to study the effects of soil texture on starch accumulating rate and the changes in activities of the key enzymes of starch synthesis in the kernel during grain filling in high gluten content wheat ZM 9023, under conditions of pond culture. The content of starch and its components were measured according to the method of double-wave length described by Bao (1996). ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPP) activity was tested according to the method described by Doehlert et al. (1988). Soluble starch synthase (SSS) and starch branching enzyme (SBE) activities were tested according to the method described by Nakamura et al. (1989). The amylose, amylopectin, and total starch accumulating rate in the kernel of ZM 9023 were found to be a single-peak curve in three different soil textures during grain filling, and peaked 20, 15, and 15 d after anthesis, respectively. The activities of the enzymes, AGPP, SSS, and SBE, in the kernel of ZM 9023 had a single-peaked curve, which peaked 20, 15, and 15 d after anthesis, respectively. The activities of the above three enzymes of ZM 9023 were higher in the sand-loam soil. The accumulating peak of amylose formed later compared to that of amylopectin. The sand-loam soil could help high gluten content cultivars to synthesize starch.

  17. Multitracer and filter-separated half-cell method for measuring solute diffusion in undisturbed soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægdsmand, Mette; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2010-01-01

    Solute diffusion controls important processes in soils: plant uptake of nutrients, sorption-desorption processes, degradation of organic matter, and leaching of radionuclides through clay barriers. We developed a new method for measuring the solute diffusivity (solute diffusion coefficient...... in the soil relative to water) in intact soil samples (the Multiple Tracer, Filter Separated half-cell method using a Dynamic Model for parameter estimation [MT-FS-DM]). The MT-FS-DM method consists of half-cell diffusion of two pairs of counterdiffusing anionic tracers and a parameter estimation scheme...... that the MT-FS-DM method provided reliable results. We compared diffusivities measured on a sandy loam soil using the MT-FS-DM method with diffusivities from six sandy loam test soils from the literature. The new method can be used to estimate solute diffusivity in intact structured soil and provides a more...

  18. {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} soil-gas geochemical characterization of thermally altered clays at Orciatico (Tuscany, Central Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voltattorni, N., E-mail: nunzia.voltattorni@ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Rome (Italy); Lombardi, S. [Earth Science Department, University ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Rizzo, S. [Via Tito, 1/A, 00061 Anguillara Sabazia, Rome (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Soil-gas technique is applied to study gas permeability of Orciatico clay units. {yields} Clay permeability depends on thermal and mechanical alteration degree. {yields} Soil-gas distributions are due to shallow fracturing of clays. {yields} Rn and CO{sub 2} soil-gas anomalies highlight secondary permeability in clay sequence. {yields} Soil-gas results are supported by detailed geoelectrical surveys. - Abstract: The physical properties of clay allow argillaceous formations to be considered geological barriers to radionuclide migration in high-level radioactive-waste isolation systems. As laboratory simulations are short term and numerical models always involve assumptions and simplifications of the natural system, natural analogues are extremely attractive surrogates for the study of long-term isolation. The clays of the Orciatico area (Tuscany, Central Italy), which were thermally altered via the intrusion of an alkali-trachyte laccolith, represent an interesting natural model of a heat source which acted on argillaceous materials. The study of this natural analogue was performed through detailed geoelectrical and soil-gas surveys to define both the geometry of the intrusive body and the gas permeability of a clay unit characterized by different degrees of thermal alteration. The results of this study show that gas permeability is increased in the clay sequences subjected to greater heat input from the emplacement of the Orciatico intrusion, despite the lack of apparent mineral and geotechnical variations. These results, which take into consideration long time periods in a natural, large-scale geological system, may have important implications for the long-term safety of underground storage of nuclear waste in clay formations.

  19. Effect of Cadmium Stress on Wheat Rhizosphere Environment in Three Soil Textures during Filling Stage%不同质地土壤中Cd胁迫对灌浆期小麦根际环境的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵云; 王钰亮; 姜丽娜; 张黛静; 刘会娟; 赵院利; 李春喜

    2012-01-01

    concentration of cadmium was more than 60 mg/kg. Considering the soil texture, the growth of wheat root and the enzyme activities of soil in loam were better than in sandy soil and clay soil. Besides, total cadmium in three textures of soil was listed as loam>clay> sandy soil, available cadmium as sandy soil>clay>loam, cadmium in wheat root as sandy soil>loam >clay, and cadmium in wheat grain as sandy soil>loam>clay, which indicated that clay and loam had stronger adsorption ability to cadmium than sandy soil. And so, cadmium stress to wheat plantswas more alleviated in clay and loam for less transport of cadmium than in sandy soil. In conclusion, cadmium pollution for grown wheat was less in loam and clay than in sandy soil.

  20. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, O.

    2016-01-18

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e. silt and clay), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between Corg and mud (i.e. silt and clay, particle sizes <63 μm) contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relative high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (i.e. mud-Corg saturation) together with significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter could overall disrupt the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud (i.e. silt and clay content) is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass

  1. Improved retention of imidacloprid (Confidor) in soils by adding vermicompost from spent grape marc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bayo, Jesús D; Nogales, Rogelio; Romero, Esperanza

    2007-05-25

    Batch sorption experiments of the insecticide imidacloprid by ten widely different Spanish soils were carried out. The sorption was studied for the active ingredient and its registered formulation Confidor. The temperature effect was studied at 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The addition of a vermicompost from spent grape marc (natural and ground), containing 344 g kg(-1) organic carbon, on the sorption of imidacloprid by two selected soils, a sandy loam and a silty clay loam, having organic carbon content of 3.6 g kg(-1) and 9.3 g kg(-1), respectively, was evaluated. Prior to the addition of this vermicompost, desorption isotherms with both selected soils, were also performed. The apparent hysteresis index (AHI) parameter was used to quantify sorption-desorption hysteresis. Sorption coefficients, K(d) and K(f), for the active ingredient and Confidor(R) in the different soils were similar. Sorption decreased with increasing temperature, this fact has special interest in greenhouse systems. A significant correlation (R(2)=0.965; Pvermicompost was an effective sorbent of this insecticide (K(f)=149). The sorption of imidacloprid increased significantly in soils amended with this vermicompost. The most pronounced effect was found in the sandy loam soil with low OC content, where the addition of 5% and 10% of vermicompost increased K(f) values by 8- and 15-fold, respectively. Soil desorption of imidacloprid was slower for the soil with the higher OC and clay content.

  2. Some Fertility Characteristics and Fertilizer Requirements of a Newly Reclaimed Upland Red Soil Derived from Quaternary Red Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of field experiments from 1990 to 1994 in Yingtan, Jiangxi Province, were conducted on an upland red soil derived from Quaternary red clay which had been reclaimed three years before the experiments, in order to study the fertility characteristics and fertilizer requirements of the newly reclaimed soil. The field experiments included that on nutrient characteristics and fertilizer effect, that on K-supplying potential and K-Mg relationship, that on fertilization rates of K and N, etc. The newly reclaimed upland soil was low in both N and P, and its responses to nitrogen and phosphate application were very significant. The K-supplying potential was also low, so the soil was highly responsive to K fertilizer. The effect of Ca and Mg fertilizers was not so great for the reason that certain amounts of Ca and Mg were incorporated into the soil through application of calcium magnesium phosphate during land leveling before the experiments. Among the four micronutrients, B, Mo, Zn and Cu, B had the greatest effect on the soil. The fertilizer requirements of the soil were in an order of P and N > K > lime and B > Mg > Mo, Zn and Cu. Eight crops tested had different fertilizer-requiring characteristics. Rapeseed was very sensitive to P and B fertilizers. Barely was especially sensitive to P and lime and it also responded to B, Mo, Zn and Cu. And sweet potato was especially sensitive to K.

  3. Xiphinema americanum as Affected by Soil Organic Matter and Porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchillia, P E

    1972-07-01

    The effects of four soil types, soil porosity, particle size, and organic matter were tested on survival and migration of Xiphinema americanum. Survival and migration were significantly greater in silt loam than in clay loam and silty clay soils. Nematode numbers were significantly greater in softs planted with soybeans than in fallow softs. Nematode survival was greatest at the higher of two pore space levels in four softs. Migration of X. americanum through soft particle size fractions of 75-150, 150-250, 250-500, 500-700, and 700-1,000 mu was significantly greater in the middle three fractions, with the least occurring in the smallest fraction. Additions of muck to silt loam and loamy sand soils resulted in reductions in survival and migration of the nematode. The fulvic acid fraction of muck, extracted with sodium hydroxide, had a deleterious effect on nematode activity. I conclude that soils with small amounts of air-filled pore space, extremes in pore size, or high organic matter content are deleterious to the migration and survival of X. americanum, and that a naturally occurring toxin affecting this species may be present in native soft organic matter.

  4. Selectivity sequences and sorption capacities of phosphatic clay and humus rich soil towards the heavy metals present in zinc mine tailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Pranav Kumar; Seth, Chandra Shekhar; Misra, Virendra

    2007-08-25

    Sorption efficacy of phosphatic clay and humus rich soil alone and on combination were tested towards heavy metals present in zinc mine tailing (Zawar Zinc Mine), Udaipur (India). Characterization of the zinc mine tailing sample indicated the presence of Pb, Cu, Zn and Mn in the concentration of 637, 186, 720 and 577microg(-1), respectively. For sorption efficacy, the zinc mine tailing soil were properly amended with phosphatic clay and humus rich soil separately and in combination and leachability study was performed by batch experiment at different pH range from 3 to 9. The data showed that the percent leachability of heavy metal in non-amended soil was 75-90%. After amendment with phosphatic clay percent leachability of heavy metals became 35-45%. Further, the addition of humus soil to phosphatic clay decreased the percent leachability up to 5-15% at all tested pH. Column leachability experiment was performed to evaluate the rate of leachability. The shape of cumulative curves of Pb, Cu, Zn and Mn showed an increase in its concavity in following order: PbCu>Zn>Mn. Further, Langmuir isotherms applied for the sorption studies indicated that phosphatic clay in the presence of humus soil had high affinity for Pb followed by Cu, Zn and Mn, with sorption capacities (b) 139.94, 97.02, 83.32 and 67.58microgg(-1), respectively.

  5. Effects of different fertilizers on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in a yellow clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huaiying; Huang, Sha; Qiu, Qiongfen; Li, Yaying; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Dai, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Yellow clay paddy soil (Oxisols) is a typical soil with low productivity in southern China. Nitrification inhibitors and slow release fertilizers have been used to improve nitrogen fertilizer utilization and reduce environmental impaction of the paddy soil. However, their effects on ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in paddy soil have rarely been investigated. In the present work, we compared the influences of several slow release fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors on the community structure and activities of the ammonia oxidizers in yellow clay soil. The abundances and community compositions of AOA and AOB were determined with qPCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and clone library approaches. Our results indicated that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) of the soil was significantly related to the abundances of both AOA and AOB. Nitrogen fertilizer application stimulated the growth of AOA and AOB, and the combinations of nitrapyrin with urea (NPU) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) inhibited the growth of AOA and AOB, respectively. Compared with other treatments, the applications of NPU and UF also led to significant shifts in the community compositions of AOA and AOB, respectively. NPU showed an inhibitory effect on AOA T-RF 166 bp that belonged to Nitrosotalea. UF had a negative effect on AOB T-RF 62 bp that was assigned to Nitrosospira. These results suggested that NPU inhibited PNR and increased nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by inhibiting the growth of AOA and altering AOA community. UF showed no effect on NUE but decreased AOB abundance and shifted AOB community.

  6. Soil Property Influences on Xiphinema americanum Populations as Related to Maturity of Loess-Derived Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D P

    1973-10-01

    Field populations of Xiphinerna americanum around roots of Syringa vulgaris 'President Lincoln' were larger in Marshall silty clay loam, a medially developed loess soil, than in Monona silt loam, a minimally developed loess soil. Most X. amerieanum occurred in the top 15 cm of soil, with few below 30 cm. Maximum numbers occurred in August of both years in the Marshall soil, and in August 1969 and June 1970 in the Monona soil. Population fluctuations during the growing season were coincident with changes in soil moisture content. Although the population fluctuation pattern was the same at each depth tested, the adult-to-juvenile ratio increased in one soil while it decreased in the other. Numbers of X. americanum decreased as root weights decreased within a soil profile, but they were not correlated with root weights over all soils and depths. More X. americanum were recovered from the Marshall than from the Monona soil, but fibrous root weights were greater in the Monona soil. Survival of X. americanum in soil columns in growth chamber experiments was better in the Marshall than in the Monona soil. Movement and survival were different in identically textured Monona A and B horizon soils. Factors related to the ion exchange sites may affect X. americanum.

  7. Properties of a clay soil from 1.5 to 3.5 years after biochar application and the impact on rice yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, M.T.M.; Madari, B.E.; Bastiaans, L.; Oort, van P.A.J.; Leal, W.G.O.; Heinemann, A.B.; Silva, da M.A.S.; Maia, A.H.N.; Parsons, D.; Meinke, H.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the impact of a single application of wood biochar on soil chemical and physical properties and aerobic rice grain yield on an irrigated kaolinitic clay Ferralsol in a tropical Savannah. We used linear mixed models to analyse the response of soil and plant variables to application rat

  8. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tombul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h and hydraulic conductivity K(q or K(h, may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3 and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5 have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future. Keywords: soil hydraulic properties, soil characteristic curves, PTFs

  9. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, Paul H.; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-Corg saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil Corg content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e., Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91 % of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78 % of the variability). The results obtained could enable robust scaling up exercises at a low cost as part of blue carbon

  10. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:I.Salt—Water Dynamics in Unsaturated Soils Under Stable Evaporation Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA; 等

    1992-01-01

    A long term simulation test on salt-water dynamics in unsaturated soils with different groundwater depths and soil texture profiles under stable evaporation condition was conducted.Salinity sensors and tensiometers were used to monitor salt and water variation in soils.The experiment revealed that in the process of fresh groundwater moving upwards by capillary rise in the column,the salts in subsoil were brought upwards and accumulated in the surface soil,and consequently the salinization of surface soil took place.The rate of salt accumulation is determined mainly by the volume of capillary water flow and the conditions of salts contained in the soil profile.Water flux in soils decreased obviously when groundwater depths fell below 1.5m.When there was an interbedded clay layer 30cm in thickness in the silty loam soil profile or a clay layer 100cm in thickness at the top layer,the water flux was 3-5 times less than in the soil profile of homogeneous silty loam soil.Therefore,the rate of salt accumulation was decreased and the effect of variation of groundwater depth on the water flux in soils was weakened comparatively.If there was precipitation or irrigation supplying water to the soil,the groundwater could rarely take a direct part in the process of salt accumulation in surface soil,especially,in soil profiles with an interbedded stratum or a clayey surface soil layer.

  11. Mapping of Total Carbon and Clay Contents in Glacial Till Soil Using On-the-Go Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy and Partial Least Squares Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhang-Quan; SHAN Ying-Jie; PENG Li; JIANG Yu-Gen

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing spatial variability of soil attributes,using traditional soil sampling and laboratory analysis,is cost prohibitive.The potential benefit of managing soils on a site-specific basis is well established.High variations in glacial till soil render detailed soil mapping difficult with limited number of soil samples.To overcome this problem,this paper demonstrates the feasibility of soil carbon and clay mapping using the newly developed on-the-go near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS).Compared with the geostatistics method,the partial least squares regression (PLSR),with NIRS measurements,could yield a more detailed map for both soil carbon and clay.Further,by using independent validation dataset,the accuracy of predicting could be improved significantly for soil clay content and only slightly for soil carbon content.Owing to the complexity of field conditions,more work on data processing and calibration modeling might be necessary for using on-the-go NIRS measurements.

  12. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (Pconservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  13. Prediction of Nitrogen Responses of Corn by Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Simard

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen mineralization potential (Nmin has to be spatially quantified to enable farmers to vary N fertilizer rates, optimize crop yields, and minimize N transfer from soils to the environment. The study objectives were to assess the spatial variability in soil Nmin potential based on clay and organic matter (OM contents and the impact of grouping soils using these criteria on corn grain (Zea mays L. yield, N uptake response curves to N fertilizer, and soil residual N. Four indicators were used: OM content and three equations involving OM and clay content. The study was conducted on a 15-ha field near Montreal, Quebec, Canada. In the spring 2000, soil samples (n = 150 were collected on a 30- x 30-m grid and six rates of N fertilizer (0 to 250 kg N ha-1 were applied. Kriged maps of particle size showed areas of clay, clay loam, and fine sandy loam soils. The Nmin indicators were spatially structured but soil nitrate (NO3– was not. The N fertilizer rate to reach maximum grain yield (Nmax, as estimated by a quadratic model, varied among textural classes and Nmin indicators, and ranged from 159 to 250 kg N ha-1. The proportion of variability (R2 and the standard error of the estimate (SE varied among textural groups and Nmin indicators. The R2 ranged from 0.53 to 0.91 and the SE from 0.13 to 1.62. Corn grain N uptake was significantly affected by N fertilizer and the pattern of response differed with soil texture. For the 50 kg N ha-1 rate, the apparent Nmin potential (ANM was significantly larger in the clay loam (122 kg ha-1 than in the fine sandy loam (80 kg ha-1 or clay (64 kg ha-1 soils. The fall soil residual N was not affected by N fertlizer inputs. Textural classes can be used to predict Nmax. The Nmin indicators may also assist the variable rate N fertilizer inputs for corn production.

  14. Effects of Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Interaction on the Stability of a Clay Slope: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedone Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep and slow landslide processes are frequently observed in clay slopes located along the Southern Apennines (Italy. A case study representative of these processes, named Pisciolo case study, is discussed in the paper. The geo-hydro-mechanical characteristics of the materials involved in the instability phenomena are initially discussed. Pluviometric, piezometric, inclinometric and GPS monitoring data are subsequently presented, suggesting that rainfall infiltration constitutes the main factor inducing slope movements. The connection between formation of landslide bodies and slope-atmosphere interaction has been demonstrated through a hydro-mechanical finite element analysis, whose results are finally reported in the work. This analysis has been conducted employing a constitutive model that is capable of simulating both saturated and unsaturated soil behaviour, as well as a boundary condition able to simulate the effects of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interaction.

  15. Pupal development of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) at different moisture values in four soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, F de M M; Marques, R N; Costa, M L Z; Walder, J M M; Silva, A P; Parra, J R P

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate adult emergence and duration of the pupal stage of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), and emergence of the fruit fly parasitoid, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead), under different moisture conditions in four soil types, using soil water matric potential. Pupal stage duration in C. capitata was influenced differently for males and females. In females, only soil type affected pupal stage duration, which was longer in a clay soil. In males, pupal stage duration was individually influenced by moisture and soil type, with a reduction in pupal stage duration in a heavy clay soil and in a sandy clay, with longer duration in the clay soil. As matric potential decreased, duration of the pupal stage of C. capitata males increased, regardless of soil type. C. capitata emergence was affected by moisture, regardless of soil type, and was higher in drier soils. The emergence of D. longicaudata adults was individually influenced by soil type and moisture factors, and the number of emerged D. longicaudata adults was three times higher in sandy loam and lower in a heavy clay soil. Always, the number of emerged adults was higher at higher moisture conditions. C. capitata and D. longicaudata pupal development was affected by moisture and soil type, which may facilitate pest sampling and allow release areas for the parasitoid to be defined under field conditions.

  16. Effects of different soil textures on wine quality of Cabernet Gernischt%土壤质地对蛇龙珠葡萄酿酒品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏安; 李记明; 姜文广; 高敏; 梁海忠

    2013-01-01

    With Cabernet Gernischt from Yantai region as the materials, the effects of four different soil textures, including sand, loam, clay loam and clay, on the wine quality were investigated. The physical-chemical parameters, color, phenols content, and sensory quality were evaluated and systematically compared. The results showed that the soil texture had significant effect on the berry and wine quality, and the grape in sandy loam had the better wine-making quality. Compared with clay loam and clay soils, the grape in vineyard of sand and loam soils had smaller berry size, looser cluster and its corresponding wine presented better color and sensory quality.%  以蛇龙珠葡萄为试材,分别选定了烟台地区砂土、壤土、粘壤土和粘土4种典型土壤质地进行研究,分析比较了4种土壤质地所产蛇龙珠葡萄的酿酒品质的差异。结果表明,土壤质地对蛇龙珠葡萄果实和葡萄酒品质影响较大,含砂石的壤土条件下葡萄酿酒品质较佳。砂土、壤土与粘壤土、粘土相比,生产出的蛇龙珠葡萄果实小,果穗疏松,酿出的葡萄酒酚类物质含量高,颜色深,感官品质较好。

  17. Pore Structure Characteristics after 2 Years of Biochar Application to a Sandy Loam Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen;

    2015-01-01

    Soil pore structure comprises the size and shape of soil pores and has a major impact on water retention and gas movement. The porous nature of biochar suggests that its application to soil can potentially alter soil pore structure characteristics, and the purpose of this study was to evaluate...... the effects of birch wood biochar (20, 40, and 100 Mg ha-1) applied to a sandy loam on soil total porosity and pore structure indices. Bulk and intact soil samples were collected for physicochemical analyses and water retention and gas diffusivity measurements between pF 1.0 and pF 3.0. Biochar application......, biochar increased soil air-filled porosity by up to 25%. However, there was no difference in gas diffusivities between biochar-amended soil and the reference soil. At pF 3.0, the soil pore system became more tortuous after biochar application, with a trend that pore tortuosity increased with increasing...

  18. Characteristics of Soil and Organic Carbon Loss Induced by Water Erosion on the Loess Plateau in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongwu; Nie, Xiaodong; Chang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Lin; Sun, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion has been a common environmental problem in the Loess Plateau in China. This study aims to better understand the losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) induced by water erosion. Laboratory-simulated rainfall experiments were conducted to investigate the characteristics of SOC loss induced by water erosion. The applied treatments included two rainfall intensities (90 and 120 mm h-1), four slope gradients (10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°), and two typical soil types- silty clay loam and silty loam. Results showed that the sediment OC enrichment ratios (ERoc) in all the events were relative stable with values ranged from 0.85 to1.21 and 0.64 to 1.52 and mean values of 0.98 and 1.01 for silty clay loam and silty loam, respectively. Similar to the ERoc, the proportions of different sized particles in sediment showed tiny variations during erosion processes. No significant correlation was observed between ERoc values and the proportions of sediment particles. Slope, rainfall intensity and soil type almost had no impact on ERoc. These results indicate that the transportation of SOC during erosion processes was nonselective. While the mean SOC loss rates for the events of silty clay loam and silty loam were 0.30 and 0.08 g m-2 min-1, respectively. Greater differences in SOC loss rates were found in events among different soil types. Meanwhile, significant correlations between SOC loss and soil loss for all the events were observed. These results indicated that the amount of SOC loss was influenced primarily by soil loss and the SOC content of the original soil. Erosion pattern and original SOC content are two main factors by which different soils can influence SOC loss. It seems that soil type has a greater impact on SOC loss than rainfall characteristics on the Loess Plateau of China. However, more kinds of soils should be further studied due to the special formation processes in the Loess Plateau.

  19. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus;

    2011-01-01

    with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water...... dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were...

  20. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10(-10), 2.08 × 10(-9) and 6.8 × 10(-10)m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH=2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  1. Liquefaction Susceptibility of Soils With Clay Particles from Earthquake-induced Landslides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-sheng; JIANG Xin; ZHANG Xu

    2007-01-01

    The main reason for earthquake-induced landslides is liquefaction of soil, a process considered to occur mostly in sandy soils. Liquefaction can occur in clayey soils has also been reported and proven in the recent literature, but liquefaction in clayey soils still remains unclear and there are many questions that need to be addressed. In order to address these questions, an depth study on the liquefaction potential of clayey soils was conducted on the basis of field investigation and a series of laboratory tests on the samples collected from the sliding surface of the landslides. The liquefaction potential of the soils was studied by means of undrained cyclic ring-shear tests. Research results show that the liquefaction potential of sandy soils is higher than that of clayey soils given the same void ratio;the soil resistance to liquefaction rises with an increase in plasticity for clayey soils; relation between plasticity index and the liquefaction potential of soil can be used in practical application to estimate the liquefaction potential of soil.

  2. Hydraulic conductivity of organomodified soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, R.B.; Grant, J.M.; Voice, T.C.; Rakhshandehroo, G.; Xu, S.; Boyd, S.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The effects of organomodification on soil hydraulic conductivity were investigated. Hydraulic conductivity and porosity of treated and untreated samples of a sandy loam were measured as a function of effective stress. Batch treatment with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA) and dry packing produced organomodified samples that were 79% less conducive than untreated samples prior to loading. Treated samples lost less hydraulic conductivity as a result of loading than untreated samples so that treated samples had higher conductivity at high loads. Observed differences in conductivity are explained in terms of the role of the treated and untreated clay in controlling initial effective pore size and its change during consolidation.

  3. Degradation kinetics of forchlorfenuron in typical grapevine soils of India and its influence on specific soil enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Dasgupta, Soma; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Patil, Sangram H; Adsule, Pandurang G

    2008-05-01

    The rate of degradation of forchlorfenuron, a cytokinin-based plant growth regulator (PGR) was explored in typical grapevine soils of India with simultaneous evaluation of its effect on biochemical attributes of the test soils in terms of the activities of specific soil microbial enzymes. In all the test soils, namely clay, sandy-loam and silty-clay, the dissipation rate was faster at the beginning, which slowed down with time, indicating a non-linear pattern of degradation. Degradation in soils could best be explained by two-compartment 1st+1st order kinetics with half-life ranging between 4-10 days. The results suggest that organic matter might be playing a major role in influencing the rate of degradation of forchlorfenuron in soil. The rate of degradation in sandy-loam soil was fastest followed by clay and silty-clay soils, respectively. Comparison of the rate of degradation in natural against sterilized soils suggests that microbial degradation might be the major pathway of residue dissipation. Changes in soil enzyme activities as a consequence of forchlorfenuron treatment were studied for extra-cellular enzymes namely acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and beta -glucosidase and intracellular enzyme-dehydrogenase. Although small changes in enzyme activities were observed, forchlorfenuron did not have any significant deleterious effect on the enzymatic activity of the test soils. Simple correlation studies between degradation percentage and individual enzyme activities did not establish any significant relationships. The pattern and change of enzyme activity was primarily the effect of the incubation period rather than the effect of forchlorfenuron itself.

  4. Coastal soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy%反射光谱估算滨海土壤黏粒含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦彩霞; 郑光辉; 赏刚; 孙东敏

    2016-01-01

    Clay content is an important soil property that affects the structure, nutrient supply and other characteristics of soils. Variations in clay content can indicate the degree of soil development or soil age. In traditional chemical analyses of soil properties, the extractant interacts in the solution and at the solution-particle interface, thus altering the equilibrium between the soil solid and solution phases. Soil reflectance spectroscopy has been developed as an effective alternative method of measuring soil properties primarily because it requires minimal sample preparation and it is fast, cost-effective, non-destructive and non-hazardous to the soil. In recent decades, research on the use of reflectance spectroscopy in soil science has achieved rapid advances. Reflectance spectroscopy can be successfully applied to estimate the soil clay content. However, the mechanisms of soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy are not very clear. The goals of this study were to identify the bands within the range of 360-2490 nm that can be used to estimate the clay content and explore the mechanisms of the clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy. A total of 150 coastal soil samples were collected. The soil reflectance spectra were measured in a dark room using a FieldSpec 3 portable spectrometer. Raw spectral data were pre-processed by smoothing (R) and then by first derivative (FD), continuum removal (CR) or reciprocal transformation (DS). Calibration (75 soil samples) and validation datasets (75 soil samples) were obtained from 1,000 random selections of the data. Stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were performed to estimate the soil clay content and to further identify the bands useful for modeling this parameter. The results indicated that the SMLR analysis of CR and R spectra and the PLSR analysis of R and FD spectra were characterized by good calibration and validation accuracies

  5. Effect of soil texture on phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, C. E.; Matzen, S. L.; Olson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil arsenic (As) contamination is a global problem, resulting in part from anthropogenic activities, including the use of arsenical pesticides and treated wood, mining, and irrigated agriculture. Phytoextraction using the hyperaccumulating fern Pteris vittata is a promising new technology to remediate soils with shallow arsenic contamination with minimal site disturbance. However, many challenges still lie ahead for a global application of phytoremediation. For example, remediation times using P. vittata are on the order of decades. In addition, most research on As phytoextraction with P. vittata has examined As removal from sandy soils, where As is more available, with little research focusing on As removal from clayey soils, where As is less available. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of soil texture and soil fertilization on As extraction by P. vittata, to optimize remediation efficiency and decrease remediation time under complex field conditions. A field study was established 2.5 years ago in an abandoned railroad grade contaminated with As (average 85.5 mg kg-1) with texture varying from sandy loam to silty clay loam. Organic N, inorganic N, organic P, inorganic P, and compost were applied to separate sub-plots; control ferns were grown in untreated soil. In a parallel greenhouse experiment, ferns were grown in sandy loam soil extracted from the field (180 mg As kg-1), with similar treatments as those used at the field site, plus a high phosphate treatment and treatments with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In the field study, fern mortality was 24% higher in clayey soil than in sandy soil due to waterlogging, while As was primarily associated with sandy soil. Results from the sandy loam soil indicate that soil treatments did not significantly increase As phytoextraction, which was lower in phosphate-treated ferns than in control ferns, both in the field and greenhouse study. Under greenhouse conditions, ferns treated with organic N were

  6. Determination of water content in clay and organic soil using microwave oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarenko, V. V.; Nikitenkov, A. N.; Matveenko, I. A.; Molokov, V. Yu; Vasilenko, Ye S.

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with the techniques of soil water content determination using microwave radiation. Its practical application would allow solving the problems of resource efficiency in geotechnical survey due to reduction of energy and resource intensity of laboratory analysis as well as its acceleration by means of decreasing labour intensity and, as a result, cost reduction. The article presents a detail analysis of approaches to soil water content determination and soil drying, considers its features and application. The study in soil of different composition, typical for Western Siberia including organic and organic-mineral ones, is a peculiarity of the given article, which makes it rather topical. The article compares and analyzes the results of the investigation into soil water content, which are obtained via conventional techniques and the original one developed by the authors, consisting in microwave drying. The authors also give recommendation on microwave technique application to dry soil.

  7. In Situ Characterization of Soils for Prediction of Stress Strain Relationship of Soft Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-10

    measurements (the electrical ones) and hence be able to perform analysis of earth structures on the basis of the calibrated bounding surface soil plasticity model...of Mechanics, 31, 5, pp. 723-739, Warszawa, 1979. 13. Dafalias, Y.F. and Herrmann, L.R., "A Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model," Int. Symp. on...Surface Formulation of Soil Plasticity ," Chapter 10 in Soil Mechanics-Transient and Cyclic Loads, G.N. Pande and O.C. Zienkicwicz eds, 3. Wiley and Sons

  8. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2016-09-07

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (C-org) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes <63 mu m), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between C-org and mud contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil C-org content. We also combined these data with the delta C-13 signatures of the soil C-org to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil C-org content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil C-org content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil C-org contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-C-org saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil C-org and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil C-org content for

  9. Butachlor degradation in tropical soils: effect of application rate, biotic-abiotic interactions and soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, R; Das, P; Chakrabarti, K; Chakraborty, A; Chowdhury, A

    2006-01-01

    The degradative characteristics of butachlor (N-Butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyla- cetanilide) were studied under controlled laboratory conditions in clay loam alluvial (AL) soil (Typic udifluvent) and coastal saline (CS) soil (Typic endoaquept) from rice cultivated fields. The application rates included field rate (FR), 2-times FR (2FR) and 10-times FR (10FR). The incubation study was carried out at 30 degrees C with and without decomposed cow manure (DCM) at 60% of maximum water holding capacity (WHC) and waterlogged soil condition. The half-life values depended on the soil types and initial concentrations of butachlor. Butachlor degraded faster in AL soil and in soil amended with DCM under waterlogged condition. Microbial degradation is the major avenue of butachlor degradation from soils.

  10. The effect of kauri (Agathis australis) on grain size distribution and clay mineralogy of andesitic soils in the Waitakere Ranges, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongkind, A.G.; Buurman, P.

    2006-01-01

    Kauri (Agathis australis) is generally associated with intense podzolisation, but little research has been carried out to substantiate this. We studied soil profiles, grain size distribution patterns and clay mineralogy under kauri and broadleaf/tree fern vegetation in the Waitakere Ranges, North Is

  11. Sorption of VX to Clay Minerals and Soils: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    diisopropylaminoethyl O-ethyl methylthioate in Soil: Phosphorus Containing Products. Pestic . Sci. 1976, 7(4), 355–362. 17. Kaaijk, J.; Frijlink, C...Degradation of S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl O-ethyl methylthioate in Soil. Sulphur Containing Products. Pestic . Sci. 1977, 8(5), 510–514. 18. Love, A.H

  12. Pyromorphite Formation And Stability After Quick Lime Neutralisation In The Presence Of Soil And Clay Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluble Pb is immobilised in pure systems as pyromorphite by adding sources of P, but doubts remain about the efectiveness of this approach in natural soil systems, particularly given the ability of soil humic substances to interfere with Pb-mineral formation. In addition, recen...

  13. Removal of Pah from clay soil contaminated with diesel oil by bioremediation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changas-spinelli, A. C. O.; Kato, M. T.; Lima, E. S.; Gavazza, S.

    2009-07-01

    Diesel oil is one of the most common soil organic pollutants, as a consequence of spilling of storage tank spills and accidental leaks. In Pernambuco State, Northeast part of Brazil, there are several evidences of soil contamination by petroleum derivates due to gas station leaking. (Author)

  14. Phenanthrene Sorption on Biochar-Amended Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumari, K. G I D; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    on their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants. In a field-based study at two experimental sites in Denmark, we investigated the effect of birch wood-derived biochar (Skogans kol) on the sorption of phenanthrene in soils with different properties. The soil sorption coefficient, Kd (L kg-1......), of phenanthrene was measured on sandy loam and loamy sand soils which have received from zero up to 100 t ha-1 of biochar. Results show that birch wood biochar had a higher Kd compared to soils. Furthermore, the application of birch wood biochar enhanced the sorption of phenanthrene in agricultural soils...... carbon, while it negatively correlated with clay content. The results also revealed that biochar-mineral interactions play an important role in the sorption of phenanthrene in biochar-amended soil....

  15. Effects of soil moisture content and tractor wheeling intensity on traffic-induced soil compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman AHMADI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil compaction causes deleterious effects on physical and mechanical proprieties of agricultural soils. In order to investigate the effect of soil moisture content and tractor wheeling intensity on traffic-induced soil compaction, this study was carried out on a field with clay loam soil. Soil dry bulk density and hydraulic conductivity as well as emergence percentage of corn seedlings and dry mass of the sampled mature plants were considered the dependent variables of the experiment. Independent variables consisted of soil moisture content with five levels (12, 15, 17, 19, and 21%, traffic intensity with three levels (four, two, and zero passes of tractor wheel (tractor model: John Deere 3350 from the entire area of the plot, and soil sampling depth with three levels (0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm. According to the results of this study, gradual increase in soil water content generally resulted in an increase in soil bulk density; moreover, increasing the tractor wheeling intensity from 0 to 4 passes increased bulk density by 13%. Furthermore, the driest soil water content had the highest and the wettest soil water content had the lowest emergence percentage of corn seedlings among the treatments; moreover, traffic intensity treatment inversely affected the emergence percentage of corn seedlings and the dry mass of mature plants. To sum up, these results indicate that, for improving water permeability and reducing dry bulk density of the examined clay loam soil, as well as better emergence of corn seedlings and ultimately increasing crop yield, it is recommended to avoid wheeling when soil moisture content is high, reduce the number of machinery wheel passes from the farm as low as possible, and restrict the wheel passes to fixed strips along the field, whenever possible.

  16. Two years of gaseous emissions from contrasting soils amended with organic and synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelster, D. E.; Chantigny, M. H.; Rochette, P.; Angers, D. A.; Rieux, C.; Vanasse, A.

    2012-04-01

    Animal manures are often used as a source of nitrogen (N) for agriculture; however impacts of amendment type on N2O production may vary. In this study, N2O emissions from two soil types with contrasting texture and carbon (C) content (a silty clay mixed frigid dystric eutrudept and a sandy loam mixed frigid typic dystrudept) were measured for two years under a cool, humid climate. Treatments consisted of a no N control (CTL), calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN), poultry manure (PM), liquid cattle manure (LCM), or liquid swine manure (LSM). The N sources were surface applied and immediately incorporated at 90 kg N ha-1 before seeding of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Leaching losses of N were also measured using zero-tension lysimeters located at approximately 0.35 m depth. Cumulative growing season N2O-N emissions from the silty clay ranged from 2.2 to 8.3 kg ha-1 yr-1 and were slightly lower in CTL plots than in the fertilized plots (P = 0.067). The mean N2O emission factors ranged from 2.0 to 4.4% of added N with no difference among treatments. Emissions of N2O from the sandy loam soil ranged from 0.3 to 2.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, with greatest emissions following PM application (P < 0.001). The N2O emission factor from sandy loam plots amended with PM was 1.7%, more than double that of the other treatments (0.3 to 0.9%), likely because of the high C content of the PM. On the silty clay the yield-based N2O emissions (g N2O-N kg-1 grain yield N) were similar between treatments; while on the sandy loam, they were greatest when amended with PM. Annual N leaching losses averaged 28.7 kg ha-1 for the silty clay and 19.6 kg ha-1 for the sandy loam and were similar for all amendment types suggesting that off-site N2O emissions will also be similar amongst treatments. Preliminary data indicate that overwinter N2O emissions from sandy loam plots were consistently greater when amended with pig slurry compared with unamended soils, and that these overwinter losses may exceed

  17. Root-Zone Redox Dynamics - In Search for the Cause of Damage to Treated-Wastewater Irrigated Orchards in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, David; Shenker, Moshe; Schwartz, Amnon; Assouline, Shmuel; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Treated wastewater (TW) has become a common source of water for agriculture. However recent findings raise concern regarding its use: a marked decrease (up to 40%) in yield appeared in orchards irrigated with TW compared with fresh water (FW) irrigated orchards. These detrimental effects appeared predominantly in orchards cultivated in clay soils. The association of the damage with clay soils rather than sandy soils led us to hypothesize that the damage is linked to soil aeration problems. We suspected that in clay soils, high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and high levels of organic material, both typical of TW, may jointly lead to an extreme decrease in soil oxygen levels, so as to shift soil reduction-oxidation (redox) state down to levels that are known to damage plants. Two-year continuous measurement of redox potential, pH, water tension, and oxygen were conducted in the root-zone (20-35 cm depth) of avocado trees planted in clay soil and irrigated with either TW or FW. Soil solution composition was sampled periodically in-situ and mineral composition was sampled in tree leaves and woody organs biannually. In dry periods the pe+pH values indicated oxic conditions (pe+pH>14), and the fluctuations in redox values were small in both TW and FW plots. Decreases in soil water tension following irrigation or rain were followed by drops in soil oxygen and pe+pH values. TW irrigated plots had significantly lower minimum pe+pH values compared with FW-irrigated plots, the most significant differences occurred during the irrigation season rather than the rain season. A linear correlation appeared between irrigation volume and reduction severity in TW-irrigated plots, but not in the FW plots, indicating a direct link to the irrigation regime in TW-irrigated plots. The minimum pe+pH values measured in the TW plots are indicative of suboxic conditions (9soil solution and in

  18. Land Use Effects on Soil Quality Indicators: A Case Study of Abo-Wonsho Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awdenegest Moges

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil quality assessment is valuable for evaluating agroecosystem sustainability, soil degradation, and identifying sustainable land management practices. This study compared soil quality within culturally protected forest areas and adjacent grassland, grazing land, and farmland in Abo-Wonsho, Southern Ethiopia. A total of 40 soil samples (4 land uses × 5 replications × 2 soil depth layers: 0 to 10 cm and 10 to 20 cm were collected for analysis. Soil textural fractions (i.e., sand, silt, and clay percentage varied with land use and soil depths even though the textural class across all land use types was sandy loam. Bulk density, soil organic carbon (SOC, and available potassium (K varied significantly: , , and , respectively, with land use and soil depth, but other indicators showed no significant difference. We conclude soil quality can be protected and maintained by improving existing land use practices within both agricultural and modern forest management areas.

  19. Clay:organic-carbon and organic carbon as determinants of the soil physical properties: reassessment of the Complexed Organic Carbon concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Adrien; Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is well known to largely determine the soil physical properties and fertility. Total porosity, structural porosity, aeration, structural stability among others are reported to increase linearly with increasing SOC in most studies. Is there an optimal SOC content as target in soil management, or is there no limit in physical fertility improvement with SOC? Dexter et al. (2008) investigated the relation between clay:SOC ratio and the physical properties of soils from different databases. They observed that the R2 of the relation between SOC and the physical properties were maximized when considering the SOC fraction limited to a clay:SOC ratio of 10. They concluded that this fraction of the SOC was complexed, and that the additional SOC was not influencing the physical properties as strongly as the complexed one. In this study, we reassessed this approach, on a database of 180 undisturbed soil samples collected from cambiluvisols of the Swiss Plateau, on an area of 2400 km2, and from different soil uses. The physical properties were obtained with Shrinkage Analysis, which involved the parameters used in Dexter et al., 2008. We used the same method, but detected biases in the statistical approach, which was, therefore, adapted. We showed that the relation between the bulk density and SOC was changing with the score of visual evaluation of the structure (VESS) (Ball et al., 2007). Therefore, we also worked only on the "good" structures according to VESS. All shrinkage parameters were linearly correlated to SOC regardless of the clay:SOC ratio, with R2 ranging from 0.45 to 0.8. Contrarily to Dexter et al. (2008), we did not observed an optimum in the R2 of the relation when considering a SOC fraction based on the clay:SOC ratio. R2 was increasing until a Clay:SOC of about 7, where it reached, and kept, its maximum value. The land use factor was not significant. The major difference with the former study is that we worked on the same soil group

  20. Dynamic model for the transfer of CS-137 through the soil-grass-lamb foodchain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic radioecological model for the transfer of radiocaesium through the soil-grass-lamb foodchain was constructed on the basis of field data collected in 1990–1993 from the Nordic countries: Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The model assumes an initial soil...... contamination of one kilobecquerel of 137Cs per square metre and simulates the transfer to grass through root uptake in addition to direct contamination from resuspended activity. The model covers two different soil types: clay-loam and organic, with significantly different transfers of radiocaesium to grass...

  1. The effect of EDTA on Helianthus annuus uptake, selectivity, and translocation of heavy metals when grown in Ohio, New Mexico and Colombia soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Cafer; Pepe, M Katie; Cutright, Teresa J

    2005-02-01

    The use of two EDTA concentrations for enhancing the bioavailability of cadmium, chromium, and nickel in three natural soils (Ohio, New Mexico and Colombia) was investigated. The resulting uptake, translocation and selectivity with Helianthus annuus after mobilization were also examined. In general, plants grown in the sandy-loam Ohio soil had a higher uptake that resulted in a selectivity and total metal content of Cd>Cr>Ni and 0.73 mg and Cr>Cd>Ni and 0.32 mg for 0.1 and 0.3 g kg-1 EDTA, respectively. With the silty-loam New Mexico soil, although the total metal uptake was not statistically different the EDTA level did alter the selectivity; Cd>Cr>Ni (0.1 g kg-1 EDTA) and Cd>Cr>Ni (0.3 g kg-1 EDTA). Conversely, with the Colombian (sandy clay loam) soil increasing the EDTA level resulted in a higher total metal uptake (0.62 mg) than the 0.1 g kg-1 (0.59 mg) treatment. For all three soils, the translocation of Cd was limited. Evaluating the mobile metal fraction with and without EDTA determined that the chelator was capable of overcoming mass transfer limitations associated with the expandable clay fraction in the soils. Root wash results and root biomass concentrations indicated that Cd sorption was occurring. Therefore limited Cd translocation was attributed to insufficient phytochelatin levels.

  2. Source zone remediation by ZVI-clay soil-mixing: Reduction of tetrachloroethene mass and mass discharge at a Danish DNAPL site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Binning, Philip John;

    2012-01-01

    and mass discharge is obtained. The technology was tested at a Danish DNAPL site, where the secondary aquifer was heavily contaminated by tetrachloroethene (PCE). ZVI-Clay soil-mixing was tested at a small source zone (~200 m3) with soil concentrations ranging up to 12,000 mg/kg. The objective of the field...... test was to document in situ destruction of the contaminant mass and the down-gradient response in contaminant mass discharge. The field sampling consisted of baseline measurements and a 19-month monitoring program (7 sampling campaigns) subsequent to the implementation of ZVI-Clay soil mixing...... in magnitude) with ethene as the main degradation product. The down-gradient reduction of contaminant mass discharge occurred more slowly; after 19 months a mass discharge reduction of 76 % was obtained for PCE. However, due to a temporary increase in cis-DCE, the overall down-gradient reduction of all...

  3. A geophysical and biochemical investigation of buried remains in contrasting soil textures in southern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Amanda C.

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a non-invasive, geophysical tool used for the detection of clandestine graves. GPR operates by detecting density differences in soil by the transmission of high frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves from an antenna. A 500 Megahertz (MHz) frequency antenna is typically used for forensic investigations, as it provides a suitable compromise between depth of penetration and sub-surface resolution. Domestic pig (Sus scrofa) carcasses were clothed in 100% cotton t-shirts and 50% cotton/50% polyester briefs, and buried at a consistent depth at three field sites of contrasting soil texture (silty clay loam, fine sand and fine sandy loam) in southern Ontario. GPR was used to detect and monitor the graves for a period of 14 months post burial. Analysis of collected data revealed that GPR had applicability in the detection of clandestine graves containing remains in silty clay loam and fine sandy loam soils, but was not suitable for detection in fine sandy soil. Specifically, within a fine sandy loam soil, there is the potential to estimate the post burial interval (PBI), as hyperbolic grave response was well defined at the beginning of the 14 month burial duration, but became less distinctive near the completion of the study. Following the detection of a clandestine grave containing a carcass, collection of gravesoil, tissue and textile samples is important for the estimation of the stage of decomposition and the post burial interval (PBI) of the remains. Throughout the decomposition process of a carcass, adipose tissue is subjected to hydrolytic enzymes that convert triglycerides to their corresponding unsaturated, saturated and salts of fatty acids. The composition of fatty acids in the decomposed tissue will vary with the post mortem period, but it is unknown what affect the soil texture has on lipid degradation. As decomposition proceeds, fatty acids can leach from the tissues into the surrounding burial environment. Fatty acid analysis

  4. Preferential flow of bromide, bentazon, and imidacloprid in a Dutch clay soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.; Smelt, J.H.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Leaching to ground water and tile drains are important parts of the environmental assessment of pesticides. The aims of the present study were to (i) assess the significance of preferential flow for pesticide leaching under realistic worst-case conditions for Dutch agriculture (soil profile with thi

  5. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolan, N.S., E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Kunhikrishnan, A. [Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro-Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Naidu, R. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts > biosolids > biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2–2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha{sup −1} yr{sup −1} Mg{sup −1} biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C

  6. Improvement of Soil Moisture Retrieval from Hyperspectral VNIR-SWIR Data Using Clay Content Information: From Laboratory to Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Oltra-Carrió

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the constraints and performance of SMC retrieval methodologies in the VNIR (Visible-Near InfraRed and SWIR (ShortWave InfraRed regions (from 0.4 to 2.5 µm when passing from controlled laboratory conditions to field conditions. Five different approaches of signal processing found in literature were considered. Four local criteria are spectral indices (WISOIL, NSMI, NINSOL and NINSON. These indices are the ratios between the spectral reflectances acquired at two specific wavelengths to characterize moisture content in soil. The last criterion is based in the convex hull concept and it is a global method, which is based on the analysis of the full spectral signature of the soil. The database was composed of 464 and 9 spectra, respectively, measured over bare soils in laboratory and in-situ. For each measurement, SMC and texture were well-known and the database was divided in two parts dedicated to calibration and validation steps. The calibration part was used to define the empirical relation between SMC and SMC retrieval approaches, with coefficients of determination (R2 between 0.72 and 0.92. A clay content (CC dependence was detected for the NINSOL and NINSON indices. Consequently, two new criteria were proposed taking into account the CC contribution (NINSOLCC and NINSONCC. The well-marked regression between SMC and global/local indices, and the interest of using the CC, were confirmed during the validation step using laboratory data (R² superior to 0.76 and Root mean square errors inferior to 8.3% m3∙m−3 in all cases and using in-situ data, where WISOIL, NINSOLCC and NINSONCC criteria stand out among the NSMI and CH.

  7. Size and Persistence of the Microbial Biomass Formed during the Humification of Glucose Hemicellulose Cellulose, and Straw in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1983-01-01

    as CO2, compared with only 23% of the barley-C.The humified matter that remained in the soils after 3 months decayed at almost the same rate whether the origin of the matter was glucose, hemicellulose, cellulose or straw; this rate was, on the whole, independent of the caly content of the soils. Half...... straw. The half-life of labelled C in biomass during the second year of incubation ranged from 2 to 3 years.Native C in biomass ranged from 0.5 to 1.4% of the total C in native soil organic matter, the highest values occurring in the clay-rich soils. The half-life of native soil C, estimated from CO2......14C-labelled substrates were incubated at 20°C in 4 soils with clay contents ranging from 6 to 34%. Glucose was most readily decomposed, followed in order by hemicellulose, cellulose, maize straw, and barley straw. After the first 10 days of incubation, about 60% of the glucose-C had left the soils...

  8. Introducing Fractal Dimension to Estimation of Soil Sensitivity to Preferential Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Food dye Brilliant Blue was introduced as the tracer in a dye-tracing experiment to obtain dye profile patterns of sandy loam soil, aeolian sandy soil, percolating paddy soil and permeable paddy soil. The dyed soil profiles were then photographed and the photos were scanned into a computer. Edited with certain software, only the dyed areas were left on the profile photos, which indicted the preferential flow paths for water and solute transport. Fractal dimensions of the dye patterns were calculated according to Arnold's function. Soil particle size distribution was analyzed by pipette method. The regression analysis showed that there was significant relationship between soil clay content and fractal dimension D of the dye pattern of soil profile. Based on the experiment results, the possibility of introducing fractal dimension to estimation of soil sensitivity to preferential flow is discussed.

  9. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  10. Using GPR early-time amplitude analysis to monitor variations in soil water content at a clay-rich agricultural site in response to irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeo, Jonathan; Van Dam, Remke; Slater, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical methods are increasingly used to analyze spatial variation in soil water content (SWC). Electrical resistivity (ER), ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and time-domain reflectometry (TDR) have all been applied to this problem. However, TDR is limited in terms of its ability to provide good spatial coverage over large areas, ER can be very time consuming depending on the survey, and GPR direct wave and reflection methods are ineffective in clay-rich environments. We employed a relatively new GPR methodology, early-time amplitude analysis, during an infiltration experiment conducted in a clay-rich agricultural field. The research took place at the Samford Ecological Research Facility, Queensland, Australia, with the goal of monitoring changes in SWC in response to irrigation. We hypothesize that early-time analysis can be used to detect and monitor infiltration in clay-rich soils where direct wave and reflection GPR fails, thus opening new avenues of hydrogeophysical research in the increasingly important field of water resource management. Initial field work showed that traditional methods of using GPR reflection surveys and ground wave velocity analysis were ineffective due to the excessive signal attenuation caused by the clay-rich soil at the site. GPR and TDR datasets were collected over a 20 meter by 15 meter section of the field. GPR datasets were collected once daily, at 10 am, and TDR measurements were collected once daily at 11 am from Thursday, August 28th, 2014 until Monday, September 1st, 2014. A sprinkler irrigation was carried out on the evening of Thursday, August 28th. The results suggest that the early-time GPR method is capable of monitoring the resulting changes in SWC due to infiltration in clayey soils despite the failure of reflection and ground wave velocity analysis. The early time GPR results are consistent with moisture content estimates from TDR and gravimetric analysis of soil cores taken in the field.

  11. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  12. Water and nutrient productivity in melon crop by fertigation under subsurface drip irrigation and mulching in contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Câmara Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cropping intensification and technical, economic and environmental issues require efficient application of production factors to maintain the soil productive capacity and produce good quality fruits and vegetables. The production factors, water and NPK nutrients, are the most frequent limiting factors to higher melon yields. The objective of the present study was to identify the influence of subsurface drip irrigation and mulching in a protected environment on the water and NPK nutrients productivity in melon cropped in two soil types: sandy loam and clay. The melon crop cultivated under environmental conditions with underground drip irrigation at 0.20m depth, with mulching on sandy loam soil increased water and N, P2O5 and K use efficiency.

  13. Chlortetracycline and tylosin runoff from soils treated with antimicrobial containing manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoese, A; Clay, S A; Clay, D E; Oswald, J; Trooien, T; Thaler, R; Carlson, C G

    2009-05-01

    This study assessed the runoff potential of tylosin and chlortetracycline (CTC) from soils treated with manure from swine fed rations containing the highest labeled rate of each chemical. Slurry manures from the swine contained either CTC at 108 microg/g or tylosin at 0.3 microg/g. These manures were surface applied to clay loam, silty clay loam, and silt loam soils at a rate of 0.22 Mg/ha. In one trial, tylosin was applied directly to the soil surface to examine runoff potential of water and chemical when manure was not present. Water was applied using a sprinkler infiltrometer 24-hr after manure application with runoff collected incrementally every 5 min for about 45 min. A biofilm crust formed on all manure-treated surfaces and infiltration was impeded with > 70% of the applied water collected as runoff. The total amount of CTC collected ranged from 0.9 to 3.5% of the amount applied whereas tylosin ranged from 8.4 to 12%. These data indicate that if surface-applied manure contains antimicrobials, runoff could lead to offsite contamination.

  14. Determination of the Effects of Hazelnut Husk and Tea Waste Treatments on Urease Enzyme Activity and Its Kinetics in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Rıdvan KIZILKAYA; EKBERLİ, İmanverdi

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the effects of 5% treatment of hazelnut husk (HH) and tea production waste (TEW) to clay loam soil on urease enzyme activity and its kinetics were determined in a 30-day soil incubation experiment. For this purpose, kinetic parameters (Vmax, Km, and Vmax/Km,) were calculated by determining urease activity in organic wastes treated soils in different substrate concentrations (0%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12%), incubation periods (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h), and incubation ...

  15. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos;

    2016-01-01

    . All experiments were carried out under the same initial and boundary conditions using tritium as a conservative tracer. The breakthrough characteristics ranged from being normally distributed to having more preferential characteristics along with an increase in the content of the mineral fines...... (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curve (BTC), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability...

  16. In-situ studies on the performance of landfill caps (compacted soil liners, geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners, capillary barriers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, S. [IGB - Ingenieurbuero fuer Grundbau, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Since 1986 different types of landfill covers have been studied in-situ on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg, Germany. Water balance data are available for eight years. The performance of different carriers has been measured by collecting the leakage on areas ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to 500 m{sup 2}. Composite liners with geomembranes performed best, showing no leakage. An extended capillary barrier also performed well. The performance of compacted soil liners, however, decreased severely within five years due to desiccation, shrinkage and plant root penetration (liner leakage now ranging from 150 mm/a to 200 mm/a). About 50 % of the water that reaches the surface of the liner is leaking through it. The maximum leakage rates have increased from 2 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} to 4 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Two types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) have been tested for two years now with disappointing results. The GCL desiccated during the first dry summer of the study. High percolation rates through the GCL were measured during the following winter (45 mm resp. 63 mm in four months). Wetting of the GCL did not significantly reduce the percolation rates.

  17. Effects of Organic Anions on Phosphate Adsorption and Desorption from Variable—Charge Clay Minerals and Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEZHEN-LI; YUANKE-NENG; 等

    1992-01-01

    Effects of citrate and tartrate on phosphate adsorption and desorption from kaolinite,goethite,amorphous Al-oxide and Ultisol were studied.P adsorption was significantly decreased as the concentration of the organic anions increased from 10-5 to 10-1 M.At 0.1 M and pH 7.0,tartrate decreased P adsorption by 27.6%-50.6% and citrate by 37.9-80.4%,depending on the kinds of adsorbent.Little Al and/or Fe were detected in the equilibrium solutions,even at the highest concentration of the organic anions.Effects of the organic anions on phosphate adsorption follow essentially the competitive adsorption mechanism.The selectivity coefficients for competitive adsorption can be used to compare the effectiveness of different organic anions in reducing P adsorption under given gonditions. Phosphate desorption was increased by 3 to 100 times in the presence of 0.001 M citrate or tartrate compared to that in 0.02 M KCl solution alone.However,for all the soil and clay minerals studied the amount of P desorbed by citrate or tartrate was generally lower than or close to that of isotopically exchangeable P.The effect of organic anions on phosphate desorption arises primarily from ligand exchange.

  18. Sedimentos arcillosos en un suelo del valle inferior del río Colorado (Argentina Clay sediments in a soil of the lower Colorado river valley (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Peinemann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la presencia de capas sedimentarias ricas en minerales de arcilla en un subsuelo del valle inferior del río Colorado por su importancia para el régimen hídrico de suelos bajo riego. Difractogramas de rayos X efectuados sobre la fracción arcilla fina de estos sedimentos revelaron que está compuesta por smectitas con muy buena cristalización. La caracterización fisicoquímica del perfil de suelo mostró que el fuerte incremento de minerales de arcilla en el subsuelo estuvo vinculado con un aumento de pH y PSI y en consecuencia una marcada disminución en la conductividad hidráulica, motivo por el cual la eventual presencia de estas capas sedimentarias debe ser muy tenida en cuenta en la programación de las prácticas de riego para evitar el posible deterioro de los suelos.The presence of sedimentary clay layers in subsoils of the lower Colorado river valley are described due to their impact on the water balance of soils under irrigation. X-ray difractograms of the fine clay fraction of these sediments show that they are composed of smectites with a very good crystallization. The physicochemical characterization of the soil profile indicates that the abrupt increase of clay minerals was associated with high pH and ESP values as well as a sharp decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, the presence of sedimentary clay layers in soils has to be considered when planning irrigation practices to avoid soil degradation.

  19. Replication efficiency of soil-bound prions varies with soil type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Samuel E; Shikiya, Ronald A; Langenfeld, Katie; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Bartz, Jason C

    2011-06-01

    Prion sorption to soil is thought to play an important role in the transmission of scrapie and chronic wasting disease (CWD) via the environment. Sorption of PrP to soil and soil minerals is influenced by the strain and species of PrP(Sc) and by soil characteristics. However, the ability of soil-bound prions to convert PrP(c) to PrP(Sc) under these wide-ranging conditions remains poorly understood. We developed a semiquantitative protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) protocol to evaluate replication efficiency of soil-bound prions. Binding of the hyper (HY) strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) (hamster) prions to a silty clay loam soil yielded a greater-than-1-log decrease in PMCA replication efficiency with a corresponding 1.3-log reduction in titer. The increased binding of PrP(Sc) to soil over time corresponded with a decrease in PMCA replication efficiency. The PMCA efficiency of bound prions varied with soil type, where prions bound to clay and organic surfaces exhibited significantly lower replication efficiencies while prions bound to sand exhibited no apparent difference in replication efficiency compared to unbound controls. PMCA results from hamster and CWD agent-infected elk prions yielded similar findings. Given that PrP(Sc) adsorption affinity varies with soil type, the overall balance between prion adsorption affinity and replication efficiency for the dominant soil types of an area may be a significant determinant in the environmental transmission of prion diseases.

  20. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier-Lamy, C. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: colette.munier@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Deneux-Mustin, S. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Mustin, C. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: christian.mustin@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Merlet, D. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: denis.merlet@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Berthelin, J. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: jacques.berthelin@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Leyval, C. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: corinne.leyval@limos.uhp-nancy.fr

    2007-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil.

  1. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier-Lamy, C; Deneux-Mustin, S; Mustin, C; Merlet, D; Berthelin, J; Leyval, C

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil.

  2. Boron and Zinc Transport Through Intact Columns of Calcareous Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. MAHMOOD-UL-HASSAN; M. S. AKHTAR; G. NABI

    2008-01-01

    Leaching of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) can be significant in some pedomorphic conditions, which can cause contamination of shallow groundwater and economic losses. Boron and Zn adsorption and transport was studied using 8.4 cm diameter ×28 cm long intact columns from two calcareous soil series with differing clay contents and vadose zone structures:Lyallpur soil series, clay loam (fine-silty, mixed, hyperthermic Ustalfic Haplargid), and Sultanpur soil series, sandy loam (coarse-silty, mixed, hyperthermic Ustollic Camborthid). The adsorption isotherms were developed by equilibrating soil with 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 aqueous solution containing varying amounts of B and Zn and were fitted to the Langmuir equation. The B and Zn breakthrough curves were fitted to the two-domain convective-dispersive equation. At the end of the leaching experiment, 0.11 L 10 g L-1 blue dye solution was also applied to each column to mark the flow paths.The Lyallpur soil columns had a slightly greater adsorption partition coefficient both for B and Zn than the Sultanpur soil columns. In the Lyallpur soil columns, B arrival was immediate but the peak concentration ratio (the concentration in solution at equilibrium/concentration applied) was lower than that in the Sultanpur soil columns. The breakthrough of B in the Sultanpur soil columns occurred after about 10 cm of cumulative drainage in both the columns; the rise in effluent concentration was fast and the peak concentration ratio was almost 1. Zinc leaching through the soil columns was very limited as only one column from the Lyallpur soil series showed Zn breakthrough in the effluent where the peak concentration ratio was only 0.05. This study demonstrates the effect of soil structure on B transport and has implications for the nutrient management in field soils.

  3. Hydrocarbon contamination increases the liquid water content of frozen Antarctic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Steven D; Schafer, Alexis N; Forgeron, Michelle A M; Snape, Ian

    2008-11-15

    We do not yet understand why fuel spills can cause greater damage in polar soils than in temperate soils. The role of water in the freezing environment may partly be responsible for why polar soils are more sensitive to pollution. We hypothesized that hydrocarbons alter the liquid water in frozen soil, and we evaluated this hypothesis by conducting laboratory and field experiments at Casey Station, Antarctica. Liquid water content in frozen soils (theta(liquid)) was estimated by time domain reflectometry in laboratory, field collected soils, and in situ field measurements. Our results demonstrate an increase in liquid water associated with hydrocarbon contamination in frozen soils. The dependence of theta(liquid) on aged fuel and spiked fuel were almost identical,with a slope of 2.6 x 10(-6) mg TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbons) kg(-1) for aged fuel and 3.1 x 10(-6) mg TPH kg(-1) for spiked fuel. In situ measurements found theta(liquid) depends, r2 = 0.75, on fuel for silt loam soils (theta(liquid) = 0.094 + 7.8 x 10(-6) mg TPH kg(-1)) but not on fuel for silt clay loam soils. In our study, theta(liquid) doubled in field soils and quadrupled in laboratory soils contaminated with diesel which may have profound implications on frost heave models in contaminated soils.

  4. The Characteristic and Activation of Mixed Andisol Soil/Bayat Clays/Rice Husk Ash as Adsorbent of Heavy Metal Chromium (Cr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranoto; Sajidan; Suprapto, A.

    2017-02-01

    Chromium (Cr) concentration in water can be reduced by adsorption. This study aimed to determine the effect of Andisol soil composition/Bayat clay/husk ash, activation temperature and contact time of the adsorption capacity of Cr in the model solution; the optimum adsorption conditions and the effectiveness of ceramic filters and purifiers to reduce contaminant of Cr in the water. The mixture of Andisol soil, Bayat clay, and husk ash is used as adsorbent of metal ion of Cr(III) using batch method. The identification and characterisation of adsorbent was done with NaF test, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD). Cr metal concentrations were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Sorption isotherms determined by Freundlich equation and Langmuir. The optimum conditions of sorption were achieved at 150°C activation temperature, contact time of 30 minutes and a composition Andisol soil / Bayat clay / husk ash by comparison 80/10/10. The results show a ceramic filter effectively reduces total dissolved solids (TDS) and Chromium in the water with the percentage decrease respectively by 75.91% and 9.44%.

  5. Hierarchical set of models to estimate soil thermal diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhangelskaya, Tatiana; Lukyashchenko, Ksenia

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties significantly affect the land-atmosphere heat exchange rates. Intra-soil heat fluxes depend both on temperature gradients and soil thermal conductivity. Soil temperature changes due to energy fluxes are determined by soil specific heat. Thermal diffusivity is equal to thermal conductivity divided by volumetric specific heat and reflects both the soil ability to transfer heat and its ability to change temperature when heat is supplied or withdrawn. The higher soil thermal diffusivity is, the thicker is the soil/ground layer in which diurnal and seasonal temperature fluctuations are registered and the smaller are the temperature fluctuations at the soil surface. Thermal diffusivity vs. moisture dependencies for loams, sands and clays of the East European Plain were obtained using the unsteady-state method. Thermal diffusivity of different soils differed greatly, and for a given soil it could vary by 2, 3 or even 5 times depending on soil moisture. The shapes of thermal diffusivity vs. moisture dependencies were different: peak curves were typical for sandy soils and sigmoid curves were typical for loamy and especially for compacted soils. The lowest thermal diffusivities and the smallest range of their variability with soil moisture were obtained for clays with high humus content. Hierarchical set of models will be presented, allowing an estimate of soil thermal diffusivity from available data on soil texture, moisture, bulk density and organic carbon. When developing these models the first step was to parameterize the experimental thermal diffusivity vs. moisture dependencies with a 4-parameter function; the next step was to obtain regression formulas to estimate the function parameters from available data on basic soil properties; the last step was to evaluate the accuracy of suggested models using independent data on soil thermal diffusivity. The simplest models were based on soil bulk density and organic carbon data and provided different

  6. Effects of shrub encroachment on soil organic carbon in global grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Shen, Haihua; Chen, Leiyi; Liu, Taoyu; Hu, Huifeng; Zhao, Xia; Zhou, Luhong; Zhang, Pujin; Fang, Jingyun

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of shrub encroachment on soil organic carbon (SOC) content at broad scales and its controls. We conducted a meta-analysis using paired control data of shrub-encroached grassland (SEG) vs. non-SEG collected from 142 studies worldwide. SOC contents (0–50 cm) were altered by shrub encroachment, with changes ranging from ‑50% to + 300%, with an effect size of 0.15 (p legumes. The SOC content decreased in silty and clay soils but increased in sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam. The SOC content increment was significantly positively correlated with precipitation and temperature as well as with soil bulk density but significantly negatively correlated with soil total nitrogen. We conclude the main effects of shrub encroachment would be to increase topsoil organic carbon content. As structural equation model revealed, soils properties seem to be the primary factors responsible for the extent of the changes, coarse textured soils having a greater capacity than fine textured soils to increase the SOC content. This increased effect appears to be secondarily enhanced by climate and plant elements.

  7. Testing Some Pedo-Transfer Functions (PTFs in Apulia Region. Evaluation on the Basis of Soil Particle Size Distribution and Organic Matter Content for Estimating Field Capacity and Wilting Point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriano Buccigrossi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of soil water retention vs. soil water matric potential is applied to study irrigation and drainage scheduling, soil water storage capacity (plant available water, solute movement, plant growth and water stress. To measure field capacity and wilting point is expensive, laborious and is time consuming, so, frequently, matemathic models, called pedo-transfer functions (PTFs are utilized to estimate field capacity and wilting point through physical-chemical soil characteristics. Six PTFs have been evaluated (Gupta and Larson, 1979; Rawls et al., 1982; De Jong et al., 1983; Rawls and Brakensiek, 1985; Saxton et al., 1986; Vereecken et al., 1989 by comparing measured soil moisture values with estimated ones at soil water matric potential of -33 and -1500 kPa. Soil samples were collected (361 from 185 pedons of Apulian Region (Southern Italy. Accuracy of the soil moisture predictions is quantified with Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD between estimated and measured water retention values. In Apulia Region the tested PTFs give different results on soils grouped on the basis of textural composition and organic matter (O.M. content both at the Field Capacity (FC and Wilting Point (WP. At the FC, Gupta and Larson model has given the best performance in Clayey (C, Sandy clay loam (SaCL, Sandy loam (SaL and Silty (Si soil, in loamy and tendency silty soils with O.M. content less than 1.9% and in tendency sandy soils with O.M. content less than 1.5% and greater than 2%; the Rawls model in Silty clay (SiC and Silty loam (SiL soils, in tendency clayey soils with O.M. less than 2.3% and in loamy and tendency silty soils with O.M. greater than 1.9%; the Rawls and Brakensiek model in tendency sandy soils with O.M. content between 1.5 and 2%; the Saxton model in Silty clay loam (SiCL, Loamy sand (LSa soils and in tendency clayey soils with O.M. content greater than 2.3% and the Vereecken model in Sandy clay (SaC, Loamy (L, Clay loam (CL and Sandy (Sa

  8. Point of zero salt effect: Relationships with clay mineralogy of representative soils of the S(a)o Paulo State, Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. E. ALVES; A. LAVORENTI

    2005-01-01

    The point of zero salt effect (PZSE) is the soil pH value at which the magnitude of the variable surface charges is not changed due to variations in the ionic concentration of the soil solution. This property influences not only electrochemical phenomena occurring at the solid-solution interface but also the flocculation degree of the soil particles. In this study we investigated the relationships between the clay mineralogy and the PZSE values of representative soils of the Sao Paulo State, Brazil. The results confirmed the usefulness of the difference between the soil pH values measured in 1 mol L-1 KCl (pHKC1) and in water (pHH2O) (2 pHKC1 - pHH2O) for estimating the PZSE of tropical soils, except for the ones rich in exchangeable Al; furthermore, the △pH index (pHKCI - pHH2O) was highly correlated with the difference between the PZSE and pHH2O values, reiterating the △pH utility for estimating both the signal and the magnitude of the net surface charge of tropical soils. Finally, correlation and multiple regression analyses showed that the PZSE value of weathered non-allophanic tropical soils tends to increase and to equal the soil pH due to the weathering-induced kaolinite destabilization and concomitant Fe- and Al-oxide accumulation.

  9. Metal oxides, clay minerals and charcoal determine the composition of microbial communities in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Doreen; Ding, Guo-Chun; Pronk, Geertje Johanna; Heister, Katja; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Smalla, Kornelia

    2013-10-01

    Microbial communities in soil reside in a highly heterogeneous habitat where diverse mineral surfaces, complex organic matter and microorganisms interact with each other. This study aimed to elucidate the long-term effect of the soil mineral composition and charcoal on the microbial community composition established in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene. One year after adding sterile manure to different artificial soils and inoculating microorganisms from a Cambisol, the matured soils were spiked with phenanthrene or not and incubated for another 70 days. 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer fragments amplified from total community DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Metal oxides and clay minerals and to a lesser extent charcoal influenced the microbial community composition. Changes in the bacterial community composition in response to phenanthrene differed depending on the mineral composition and presence of charcoal, while no shifts in the fungal community composition were observed. The abundance of ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes was increased in phenanthrene-spiked soils except for charcoal-containing soils. Here we show that the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil is an ongoing process and that different properties present in artificial soils influenced the bacterial response to the phenanthrene spike.

  10. Study on soil water characteristics of tobacco fields based on canonical correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hou SHAO; Yu WANG; Li-dong BI; You-bo YUAN; Xian-kun SU; Jian-guo MO

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify the principal factors influencing soil water characteristics (SWC) and evaluate SWC effectively, the multivariate-statistical canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method was used to study and analyze the correlation between SWC and soil physical and chemical properties. Twenty-two soil samples were taken from 11 main tobacco-growing areas in Guizhou Province in China and the soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) and basic physical and chemical properties of the soil samples were determined. The results show that: (1) The soil bulk density, soil total porosity and soil capillary porosity have significant effects on SWC of tobacco fiels. Bulk density and total porosity are positively correlated with soil water retention characteristics (SWRC), and soil capillary porosity is positively correlated with soil water supply characteristics (SWSC). (2) Soil samples from different soil layers at the same soil sampling point show similarity or consistency in SWC. Inadequate soil water supply capability and imbalance between SWRC and SWSC are problems of tobacco soil. (3) The SWC of loamy clay are generally superior to those of silty clay loam.

  11. Study on soil water characteristics of tobacco fields based on canonical correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hou SHAO

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the principal factors influencing soil water characteristics (SWC and evaluate SWC effectively, the multivariate-statistical canonical correlation analysis (CCA method was used to study and analyze the correlation between SWC and soil physical and chemical properties. Twenty-two soil samples were taken from 11 main tobacco-growing areas in Guizhou Province in China and the soil water characteristic curves (SWCC and basic physical and chemical properties of the soil samples were determined. The results show that: (1 The soil bulk density, soil total porosity and soil capillary porosity have significant effects on SWC of tobacco fiels. Bulk density and total porosity are positively correlated with soil water retention characteristics (SWRC, and soil capillary porosity is positively correlated with soil water supply characteristics (SWSC. (2 Soil samples from different soil layers at the same soil sampling point show similarity or consistency in SWC. Inadequate soil water supply capability and imbalance between SWRC and SWSC are problems of tobacco soil. (3 The SWC of loamy clay are generally superior to those of silty clay loam.

  12. Rapid Changes in Soil Carbon and Structural Properties Due to Stover Removal from No-Till Corn Plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-06-01

    Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover for producing ethanol may be beneficial to palliate the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, but stover harvesting may deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) and degrade soil structure. We investigated the impacts of variable rates of stover removal from no-till (NT) continuous corn systems on SOC and soil structural properties after 1 year of stover removal in three soils in Ohio: Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. This study also assessed relationships between SOC and soil structural properties as affected by stover management. Six stover treatments that consisted of removing 100, 75, 50, 25, and 0, and adding 100% of corn stover corresponding to 0 (T0), 1.25 (T1.25), 2.50 (T2.5), 3.75 (T3.75), 5.00 (T5), and 10.00 (T10) Mg haj1 of stover, respectively, were studied for their total SOC concentration, bulk density (>b), aggregate stability, and tensile strength (TS) of aggregates. Effects of stover removal on soil properties were rapid and significant in the 0- to 5-cm depth, although the magnitude of changes differed among soils after only 1 year of stover removal. The SOC concentration declined with increase in removal rates in silt loams but not in clay loam soils. It decreased by 39% at Coshocton and 30% at Charleston within 1 year of complete stover removal. At the same sites, macroaggregates contained 10% to 45% more SOC than microaggregates. Stover removal reduced 94.75-mm macroaggregates and increased microaggregates (P G 0.01). Mean weight diameter (MWD) and TS of aggregates in soils without stover (T0) were 1.7 and 3.3 times lower than those in soils with normal stover treatments (T5) across sites. The SOC concentration was negatively correlated with >b and positively with MWD and

  13. Effect of metal oxide nanoparticles on microbial community structure and function in two different soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, Sammy; Ben-Moshe, Tal; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian; Minz, Dror

    2013-01-01

    Increased availability of nanoparticle-based products will, inevitably, expose the environment to these materials. Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) may thus find their way into the soil environment via wastewater, dumpsters and other anthropogenic sources; metallic oxide nanoparticles comprise one group of ENPs that could potentially be hazardous for the environment. Because the soil bacterial community is a major service provider for the ecosystem and humankind, it is critical to study the effects of ENP exposure on soil bacteria. These effects were evaluated by measuring bacterial community activity, composition and size following exposure to copper oxide (CuO) and magnetite (Fe3O4) nanosized (soil types were examined: a sandy loam (Bet-Dagan) and a sandy clay loam (Yatir), under two ENP concentrations (1%, 0.1%). Results indicate that the bacterial community in Bet-Dagan soil was more susceptible to change due to exposure to these ENPs, relative to Yatir soil. More specifically, CuO had a strong effect on bacterial hydrolytic activity, oxidative potential, community composition and size in Bet-Dagan soil. Few effects were noted in the Yatir soil, although 1% CuO exposure did cause a significant decreased oxidative potential and changes to community composition. Fe3O4 changed the hydrolytic activity and bacterial community composition in Bet-Dagan soil but did not affect the Yatir soil bacterial community. Furthermore, in Bet-Dagan soil, abundance of bacteria annotated to OTUs from the Bacilli class decreased after addition of 0.1% CuO but increased with 1% CuO, while in Yatir soil their abundance was reduced with 1% CuO. Other important soil bacterial groups, including Rhizobiales and Sphingobacteriaceae, were negatively affected by CuO addition to soil. These results indicate that both ENPs are potentially harmful to soil environments. Furthermore, it is suggested that the clay fraction and organic matter in different soils interact with the ENPs and reduce

  14. Mechanical impedance of soil crusts and water content in loamy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa March, Ramon; Verdú, Antoni M. C.; Mas, Maria Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Soil crust development affects soil water dynamics and soil aeration. Soil crusts act as mechanical barriers to fluid flow and, as their mechanical impedance increases with drying, they also become obstacles to seedling emergence. As a consequence, the emergence of seedling cohorts (sensitive seeds) might be reduced. However, this may be of interest to be used as an effective system of weed control. Soil crusting is determined by several factors: soil texture, rain intensity, sedimentation processes, etc. There are different ways to characterize the crusts. One of them is to measure their mechanical impedance (MI), which is linked to their moisture level. In this study, we measured the evolution of the mechanical impedance of crusts formed by three loamy soil types (clay loam, loam and sandy clay loam, USDA) with different soil water contents. The aim of this communication was to establish a mathematical relationship between the crust water content and its MI. A saturated soil paste was prepared and placed in PVC cylinders (50 mm diameter and 10 mm height) arranged on a plastic tray. Previously the plastic tray was sprayed with a hydrophobic liquid to prevent the adherence of samples. The samples on the plastic tray were left to air-dry under laboratory conditions until their IM was measured. To measure IM, a food texture analyzer was used. The equipment incorporates a mobile arm, a load cell to apply force and a probe. The arm moves down vertically at a constant rate and the cylindrical steel probe (4 mm diameter) penetrates the soil sample vertically at a constant rate. The equipment is provided with software to store data (time, vertical distance and force values) at a rate of up to 500 points per second. Water content in crust soil samples was determined as the loss of weight after oven-drying (105°C). From the results, an exponential regression between MI and the water content was obtained (determination coefficient very close to 1). This methodology allows

  15. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  16. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    OpenAIRE

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO; Samuel Akinlabi OLA; Olumide Oluwapelumi OJURI

    2016-01-01

    The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-...

  17. Water consumption and soil moisture distribution in melon crop with mulching and in a protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Câmara Monteiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mulching has become an important technique for land cover, but there are some technical procedures which should be adjusted for these new modified conditions to establish optimum total water depth. It is also important to observe the soil-water relations as soil water distribution and wetted volume dimensions. The objective of the present study was to estimate melon evapotranspiration under mulching in a protected environment and to verify the water spatial distribution around the melon root system in two soil classes. Mulching provided 27 mm water saving by reducing water evaporation. In terms of volume each plant received, on average, the amount of 175.2 L of water in 84 days of cultivation without mulching, while when was used mulching the water requirement was 160.2 L per plant. The use of mulching reduced the soil moisture variability throughout the crop cycle and allowed a greater distribution of soil water that was more intense in the clay soil. The clayey soil provided on average 43 mm more water depth retention in 0.50 m soil deep relative to the sandy loam soil, and reduced 5.6 mm the crop cycle soil moisture variation compared to sandy loam soil.

  18. Effects of dissolved organic matter from sewage sludge on sorption of tetrabromobisphenol A by soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhaohai; MAO Li; XIAN Qiming; YU Yijun; LI Hui; YU Hongxia

    2008-01-01

    Sorption of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) by soil influences its fate and transport in the environment. The presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may complicate the sorption process in soil. The effects of DOM from sewage sludge on TBBPA sorption by three soils were investigated using batch equilibration experiments in the study. DOM was observed to be sorbed on the soils and the isotherms could be fitted by the Langmuir model. The effects of DOM on TBBPA sorption were dependent on the characteristics of soils and the concentrations of DOM present. TBBPA sorption by Henan (HN) soil (sandy loam) and Liaoning (LN) soil (loamy clay) was promoted in the presence of DOM at low concentration (≤ 90 mg organic carbon (OC)/L), and the sorption was promoted by HN soil and inhibited by LN soil at DOM added concentration of 180 mg OC/L. TBBPA sorption by Guangxi (GX) soil (silt loam) was always inhibited in the presence of DOM. It was also found that the amount of TBBPA sorbed decreased with the increase in the solution pH value in the absence of DOM. The influencing mechanisms of DOM on the sorption of TBBPA by soils were also discussed.

  19. Transport of contaminants from energy-process-waste leachates through subsurface soils and soil components: laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangen, L.E.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.

    1982-08-01

    The subsurface transport and attenuation of inorganic contaminants common to a variety of energy process waste leachates are being studied using laboratory column methods. Anionic species currently being emphasized are As, B, Mo, and Se. Transport of the cations Cd and Ni is also being studied. The solid adsorbents consist of three soil mineral components (silica sand, kaolinite, and goethite), and four subsurface soils (a dunal sand, an oxidic sandy clay loam, an acidic clay loam, and an alkaline clay loam). Breakthrough patterns of these species from packed soil columns are followed by monitoring eluent concentrations vs time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. This report describes the experimental methods being used, the results of preliminary batch adsorption studies, and the results of column experiments completed through calendar year 1981. Using column influent concentrations of about 10 mg/l, adsorption (mmoles/100 g) has been determined from the eluent volume corresponding to 50% breakthrough. On silica sand, kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, these are 2.0 x 10/sup -4/, 0.020, 0.013, and 0.31 for cadmium, 4.4 x 10/sup -4/, 0.039, 0.020, and 0.98 for nickel. On kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, adsorption values (mmoles/100 g) are As (0.24, 0.019, and 20.5), B (0.041, 0.0019, and 1.77), Mo (0.048, 0.0010, and 5.93), and Se (0.029, 0.00048, and 1.30). Arsenic is the most highly adsorbed contaminant species and goethite has the largest adsorption capacity of the adsorbents.

  20. Micromorphology and stable-isotope geochemistry of historical pedogenic siderite formed in PAH-contaminated alluvial clay soils, Tennessee, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, J.A.; Fowle, D.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, J.J.; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400-450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (FeCO3) was present and whether siderite occurrence was related to organic contaminant distribution. Samples from shallow depths were generally more heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than those at greater depth. The upper 1 m in most boreholes consisted of mixtures of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth) consisted of highly structured clays exhibiting fine subangular blocky ped structures, as well as redox-related features. Pedogenic siderite was abundant in the upper 2 m of most cores and in demonstrably historical (< 100 years old) soil matrices. Two morphologies were identified: (1) sphaerosiderite crystal spherulites ranging from 10 to 200 um in diameter, and (2) coccoid siderite comprising grape-like "clusters" of crystals 5-20 ??n in diameter. The siderite, formed in both macropores and within fine-grained clay matrices, indicates development of localized anaerobic, low-Eh conditions, possibly due to microbial degradation of organic contaminants. Stable-isotope compositions of the siderite have ??13C values spanning over 25%o (+7 to - 18%o VPDB) indicating fractionation of DIC by multiple microbial metabolic pathways, but with relatively constant ??18O values from (-4.8 ?? 0.66%o VPDB) defining a meteoric sphaerosiderite line (MSL). Calculated isotope equilibrium water ??18O values from pedogenic siderites at the CCP site are from 1 to 5 per mil lighter than the groundwater ??18O values that we estimate for the site. If confirmed by field studies in progress, this observation might call for a reevaluation of

  1. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    Science.gov (United States)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  2. Soil-Water and Deformation Characteristics of Unsaturated Shanghai Soft Clays%非饱和上海软土的土-水和变形特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振新; 孙德安

    2012-01-01

    使用压力板法和滤纸法测量非饱和上海软土的吸力,得到第②,③,④层上海原状土和第②,③层上海重塑土的土·水特征曲线,以及土体脱水干燥过程中吸力和孔隙比之间的关系.土-水特性试验结果表明:第②,③,④层上海原状土和第②,③层上海重塑土的进气值分别为150 ~180,220~250,650 ~ 800,260 ~310,550 ~ 600 kPa.干燥收缩试验结果表明:上海黏土的收缩过程可分为3个阶段,即弹性阶段、弹塑性阶段和缩限阶段.当基质吸力较小时,收缩变形较小,土体处于弹性阶段;当基质吸力增大到一定值时,收缩变形明显,土体处于弹塑性阶段;当土体变形基本不随基质吸力变化时,土体处于缩限阶段.%Using the methods of pressure plate and filter paper to measure soil suction, the soil-water characteristic curves and shrinkage deformation curves of undisturbed Shanghai soft clays (layers (2), (3) and (4)) and reconstituted Shanghai soft clays (layers (2) and (3)) are obtained from drying tests. It is found from the soil-water characteristic tests that the air-entering values of undisturbed Shanghai soft clays (layers (2),(3) and (4)) and reconstituted Shanghai soft clays (layers (2) and (3)) are 150-180, 220 ~ 250, 650 -800, 260 -310, and 550 -600 kPa, respectively. The process of soil shrinkage can be divided into three stages: elastic stage, elastoplastic stage and stage of shrinkage limit. When the imposed matric suction is small, the soil is at the elastic stage. When the large suction is applied, the shrinkage deformation becomes noticeable, and the soil is at the elastoplastic stage. At the stage of shrinkage limit, almost no deformation occurs during the increase of matric suction.

  3. Use of arsenic contaminated irrigation water for lettuce cropping: effects on soil, groundwater, and vegetal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beni, Claudio; Marconi, Simona; Boccia, Priscilla; Ciampa, Alessandra; Diana, Giampietro; Aromolo, Rita; Sturchio, Elena; Neri, Ulderico; Sequi, Paolo; Valentini, Massimiliano

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of using arsenic (As) contaminated irrigation water in Lactuca sativa L. cropping. Two different arsenic concentrations, i.e., 25 and 85 μg L(-1) and two different soils, i.e., sandy and clay loam, were taken into account. We determined the arsenic mobility in the different soil fractions, its amount in groundwater, and the phytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were used to assess the lettuce metabolic profile changes and the arsenic uptake by the plant, respectively, as a function of the various conditions studied, i.e., As content and type of soil. Data indicated that at both concentrations in sandy soil, arsenic is in part quickly leached and thus present in groundwater and in part absorbed by the vegetable, being therefore readily available for assimilation by consumption. NMR results reported a large modification of the metabolic pattern, which was depending on the pollutant amount. In clay loam soil, the groundwater had a low As content with respect to sandy soil, and NMR and ICP performed on the lettuce did not reveal severe changes related to As, most likely because the metalloid is bound to the colloidal fraction.

  4. Invasion Potential of Two Tropical Physalis Species in Arid and Semi-Arid Climates: Effect of Water-Salinity Stress and Soil Types on Growth and Fecundity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaslan, Cumali; Bukun, Bekir; Ozcan, Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Invasive plants are recognized for their impressive abilities to withstand adverse environmental conditions however, all invaders do not express the similar abilities. Therefore, survival, growth, nutrient uptake and fecundity of two co-occurring, invasive Physalis species were tested under water and salinity stresses, and different soil textures in the current study. Five different water stress levels (100, 75, 50, 25, and 12.5% pot water contents), four different soil salinity levels (0, 3, 6, and 12 dSm-1) and four different soil textures (67% clay, 50% clay, silt clay loam and sandy loam) were included in three different pot experiments. Both weeds survived under all levels of water stress except 12.5% water contents and on all soil types however, behaved differently under increasing salinity. The weeds responded similarly to salinity up till 3 dSm-1 whereas, P. philadelphica survived for longer time than P. angulata under remaining salinity regimes. Water and salinity stress hampered the growth and fecundity of both weeds while, soil textures had slight effect. Both weeds preferred clay textured soils for better growth and nutrient uptake however, interactive effect of weeds and soil textures was non-significant. P. angulata accumulated higher K and Na while P. philadelphica accrued more Ca and Mg as well as maintained better K/Na ratio. P. angulata accumulated more Na and P under salinity stress while, P. philadelphica accrued higher K and Mg, and maintained higher K/Na ratio. Collectively, highest nutrient accumulation was observed under stress free conditions and on clay textured soils. P. philadelphica exhibited higher reproductive output under all experimental conditions than P. angulata. It is predicted that P. philadelphica will be more problematic under optimal water supply and high salinity while P. angulata can better adapt water limited environments. The results indicate that both weeds have considerable potential to further expand their ranges in

  5. Clay-to-carbon ratio controls the effect of herbicide application on soil bacterial richness and diversity in a loamy field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herath, Lasantha; Møldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2017-01-01

    application and increasing after glyphosate application. This indicated that the specific chemical nature of individual herbicides affected bacterial communities. This study reinforced the importance of including soil physical and chemical characteristics to explain the influence of pesticides....... Glyphosate and bentazon were used to evaluate the herbicidal effect on bacterial community under different conditions created by clay and OC gradients in a loamy field. Metabarcoding by highthroughput sequencing of bacterial rDNA was used to estimate bacterial richness and diversity using OTUs, abundance......-based coverage (ACE), Shannon diversity index, and phylogenetic diversity. In general, bacterial richness and diversity increased after bentazon application and decreased after glyphosate application. There was no significant effect for field locations with Dexter n (the ratio between clay and OC) values below 4...

  6. Organic Control of Dioctahedral and Trioctahedral Clay Formation in an Alkaline Soil System in the Pantanal Wetland of Nhecolândia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Jean-François; Martins-Silva, Elisângela R.; Furian, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on the formation of authigenic clays in an alkaline soil system surrounding lakes of the Nhecolândia region, Pantanal wetland. The presence of trioctahedral Mg-smectites (stevensite and saponite types), which requires low Al and Fe contents in the soil solution for its formation, contrasts with the neoformation of dioctahedral Fe-mica (glauconite, and Fe-illite), which instead requires solutions relatively enriched in Al and Fe. This study aims to understand the conditions of co-existence of both, Mg-smectite and Fe-mica a common clay association in former or modern alkaline soil systems and sediments. The study was carried out along an alkaline soil catena representative of the region. The soil organization revealed that Mg-smectite occur in top soil close to the lake, whereas Fe-mica dominate in the clay fraction of deeper greenish horizons a few meters apart. We propose here that this spatial distribution is controlled by the lateral transfer of Fe and Al with organic ligands. Alkaline organic rich solutions (DOC up to 738 mg L-1) collected in the watertable were centrifuged and filtered through membranes of decreasing pore size (0.45 μm, 0.2 μm, 30 KDa, 10 KDa, 3 KDa) to separate colloidal and dissolved fractions. Fe, Al, Si, Mg and K were analysed for each fraction. Although the filtration had no influence on Si and K contents, almost 90% of Fe (up to 2.3 mg L-1) and Al (up to 7 mg L-1) are retained at the first cutoff threshold of 0.45μm. The treatment of the same solutions by oxygen peroxide before filtration shows that a large proportion of Fe and Al were bonded to organic colloids in alkaline soil solution at the immediate lake border, allowing Mg-smectite precipitation. The fast mineralization of the organic matter a few meters apart from the lake favors the release of Fe and Al necessary for Fe-mica neoformation. In comparison with chemical and mineralogical characteristics of alkaline environments described in the

  7. Organic Control of Dioctahedral and Trioctahedral Clay Formation in an Alkaline Soil System in the Pantanal Wetland of Nhecolândia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiero, Laurent; Berger, Gilles; Rezende Filho, Ary T; Meunier, Jean-François; Martins-Silva, Elisângela R; Furian, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on the formation of authigenic clays in an alkaline soil system surrounding lakes of the Nhecolândia region, Pantanal wetland. The presence of trioctahedral Mg-smectites (stevensite and saponite types), which requires low Al and Fe contents in the soil solution for its formation, contrasts with the neoformation of dioctahedral Fe-mica (glauconite, and Fe-illite), which instead requires solutions relatively enriched in Al and Fe. This study aims to understand the conditions of co-existence of both, Mg-smectite and Fe-mica a common clay association in former or modern alkaline soil systems and sediments. The study was carried out along an alkaline soil catena representative of the region. The soil organization revealed that Mg-smectite occur in top soil close to the lake, whereas Fe-mica dominate in the clay fraction of deeper greenish horizons a few meters apart. We propose here that this spatial distribution is controlled by the lateral transfer of Fe and Al with organic ligands. Alkaline organic rich solutions (DOC up to 738 mg L-1) collected in the watertable were centrifuged and filtered through membranes of decreasing pore size (0.45 μm, 0.2 μm, 30 KDa, 10 KDa, 3 KDa) to separate colloidal and dissolved fractions. Fe, Al, Si, Mg and K were analysed for each fraction. Although the filtration had no influence on Si and K contents, almost 90% of Fe (up to 2.3 mg L-1) and Al (up to 7 mg L-1) are retained at the first cutoff threshold of 0.45μm. The treatment of the same solutions by oxygen peroxide before filtration shows that a large proportion of Fe and Al were bonded to organic colloids in alkaline soil solution at the immediate lake border, allowing Mg-smectite precipitation. The fast mineralization of the organic matter a few meters apart from the lake favors the release of Fe and Al necessary for Fe-mica neoformation. In comparison with chemical and mineralogical characteristics of alkaline environments described in the

  8. Rapid prediction of total petroleum hydrocarbons in soil using a hand-held mid-infrared field instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Grant T; Soriano-Disla, José M; Kirk, Joel; Janik, Leslie J; Forrester, Sean T; McLaughlin, Mike J; Stewart, Richard J

    2016-11-01

    This manuscript reports on the performance of a hand-held diffuse reflectance (mid)-infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectrometer for the prediction of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in three different diesel-contaminated soils. These soils include: a carbonate dominated clay, a kaolinite dominated clay and a loam from Padova Italy, north Western Australia and southern Nigeria, respectively. Soils were analysed for TPH concentration using a standard laboratory methods and scanned in DRIFT mode with the hand-held spectrometer to determine TPH calibration models. Successful partial least square regression (PLSR) predictions, with coefficient of determination (R(2)) ~0.99 and root mean square error (RMSE) held mid-infrared instrument can accurately detect TPH across different soil types and concentrations, which paves the way for a variety of applications in the field.

  9. Effect of Soil texture on Photosynthetic traits and the deposition of Dry matter accumulation of peanut%土壤质地对花生光合特性及干物质积累分配的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾立华; 王月福; 陈安余; 冯锴

    2013-01-01

    The paper explored the effect of soil texture on photosynthetic traits and detribution of dry matter accumulation of peanut,in order to explicit the suitable soil texture appropriated for high-yielding peanut cultivation.The soil texture including Sandy soil,Clay and Loam,and the experiment were implemented in box plant method.The results showed that the early period of peanut growth and development is Sandy soil>Loam>Clay and the later period is Loam>Sandy soil>Clay on Leaf area per plant,Functional leaf chlorophyll content,Net photosynthetic rate and Distribution of dry matter accumulation of peanut.Sandy soil is in favor of early period of photosynthetic matter accumulation,Loam is in favor of whole period,and Clay is not conductive to the whole period.Loam is more suitable than Clay and Sandy soil on distribution ratio of peanut organ dry matter accumulation.Loam has a higher pod yield than Sandy soil and Clay.%为了明确适合花生生长获得高产的土壤类型,采用箱栽的方法,研究了不同质地土壤(砂土、壤土、粘土)对花生光合特性及干物质积累分配的影响.结果表明,花生单株叶面积、功能叶叶绿素SPAD值、净光合速率和植株总干物质重在生育前期表现为砂土>壤土>粘土,在生育后期则表现为壤土>砂土>粘土.砂土有利于花生前期光合物质积累,壤土则在整个生育期内均有利于花生光合物质积累,而粘土则在整个生育期内均不利于花生光合物质积累.壤土花生各器官干物质分配比例较粘土和砂土合理.壤土的荚果产量显著高于砂土和粘土.

  10. Use of different organic wastes in reducing the potential leaching of propanil, isoxaben, cadusafos and pencycuron through the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, José; Garrido, Isabel; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Vela, Nuria; Navarro, Simón

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of four different organic wastes (OW)-composted sheep manure (CSM), spent coffee grounds (SCG), composted pine bark (CPB) and coir (CR)-on the potential groundwater pollution of propanil and isoxaben (herbicides), cadusafos (insecticide) and pencycuron (fungicide) under laboratory conditions. For this purpose, leaching studies were conducted using disturbed soil columns filled with a clay loam soil (Hipercalcic calcisol). The addition of organic matter (OM) drastically reduced the movement of the studied pesticides. The results obtained point to the interest in the use of agro-industrial and composted OW in reducing the groundwater pollution by pesticide drainage.

  11. 柠檬酸对铬污染不同质地土壤萃取与淋洗的研究%Study of Citric Acid on Extraction and Washing from Different Soil Polluted by Cr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜晓琪; 李旭霖; 张娇; 吕姜宁; 昌晶; 崔德杰

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore extraction conditions and soil column washing about the citric acid to extract chromium (Cr) from different textures soils, the author took different concentrations, the liquid-solid ratios and the times and washing tests. The results showed that the analytical ability of the citric acid on 3 soils were sand soil>loam>clay. Sandy soil and loam needed big extraction conditions, clay needed smaller extraction conditions. Different concentrations effected extraction, when the concentration of citric acid was 0.05 mol/L, it was good to all the soils. The best liquid-solid ratio and time to soils were clay 1/14, 32 h; sandy soil 1/6, 16 h; loam 1/10, 28 h. The heavy metals contents of clay between 10 cm and 20 cm layer were bigger than other soil layers. The heavy metals contents of sand soil and loam between 30 cm and 40 cm layer were bigger than other soil layers. This research provided the technical support for removing chrome from soil.%为了探索柠檬酸对不同质地铬(Cr)污染土壤的萃取条件及淋洗效率,进行了不同浓度、固液比、时间的萃取和土柱淋洗试验.结果表明:柠檬酸对铬污染不同质地土壤修复效果为:砂土>壤土>粘土;砂土、壤土所需萃取条件较小,粘土较大.不同萃取条件对铬污染土壤萃取效果影响较大:柠檬酸浓度为0.05 mol/L时,3种土壤萃取效果较好.3种质地土壤最佳固液比和时间分别为:粘土1/14,32 h;砂土1/6,16h;壤土1/10,28 h.通过柠檬酸淋洗,粘土在10~20 cm土层发生再吸附,砂土与壤土在30~40 cm土层发生再吸附.本研究为铬污染土壤修复了提供技术支持.

  12. Evaluation of Turf-Grass and Prairie-Vegetated Rain Gardens in a Clay and Sand Soil, Madison, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Balster, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with a consortium of 19 cities, towns, and villages in Dane County, Wis., undertook a study to compare the capability of rain gardens with different vegetative species and soil types to infiltrate stormwater runoff from the roof of an adjacent structure. Two rain gardens, one planted with turf grass and the other with native prairie species, were constructed side-by-side in 2003 at two locations with different dominant soil types, either sand or clay. Each rain garden was sized to a ratio of approximately 5:1 contributing area to receiving area and to a depth of 0.5 foot. Each rain garden, regardless of vegetation or soil type, was capable of storing and infiltrating most of the runoff over the 5-year study period. Both rain gardens in sand, as well as the prairie rain garden in clay, retained and infiltrated 100 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during water years 2004-07. The turf rain garden in clay occasionally had runoff exceed its confining boundaries, but was still able to retain 96 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during the same time period. Precipitation intensity and number of antecedent dry days were important variables that influenced when the storage capacity of underlying soils would become saturated, which resulted in pooled water in the rain gardens. Because the rooftop area that drained runoff to each rain garden was approximately five times larger than the area of the rain garden itself, evapotranspiration was a small percentage of the annual water budget. For example, during water year 2005, the maximum evapotranspiration of total influent volume ranged from 21 percent for the turf rain garden in clay to 25 percent for the turf rain garden in sand, and the minimum ranged from 12 percent for the prairie rain garden in clay to 19 percent for the prairie rain garden in sand. Little to no runoff left each rain garden as effluent and a small percentage of runoff returned to the

  13. Distribution of Soil Organic Carbon and the Influencing Factors in An Oasis Farmland Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Ze

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil organic carbon(SOC of a typical oasis farmland in middle part of Manasi county of Xinjiang was used as the research ob原 ject. Using remote sensing and lab analysis techniques, influences of soil texture, terrain, land uses, and crop types on SOC content of farmland were studied. Results showed that the SOC distribution in farmland of Manasi was mainly determined by comprehensive natural environmental factors. The SOC content decreased along with the increasing soil depth. For soil textures, the SOC content from high to low was clay loam>powder loam>silty loam. Slope direction had significantly positive correlations with SOC contents at 0~30 cm and 30~60 cm, while altitude and SOC content at 60~100 cm were significantly positive correlation. The SOC content of orchard was the highest, and the uncultivated land was the lowest under different land-use patterns. For different crop planting systems, the order of SOC content was corn field >wine grapes field>cotton field, and the difference was significant.

  14. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  15. One-dimensional Markov chain simulation of vertical change of soil texture in middle reaches of Heihe river, northwest China%一维马尔可夫链模拟黑河中游流域土壤质地垂向变异

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹凤; 邵明安

    2013-01-01

    taken into a laboratory and having been wind-dried, the soil mechanical composition was measured using a Malvern Laser particle size analyzer. Then the vertical change of soil textural layers was analyzed, and a MC-LN (Markov chain-lognormal distribution) model was constructed to simulate the soil textural profiles. Results showed that there were seven soil textural types occurring in the study area, namely, sand, loamy sand, sandy loam, loam, clay loam, silty clay loam and silt clay, respectively. Compared with the non-occurrence of silty clay layers in the surface soil, another six types of textural layers all occurred in the surface soil of the study area, while sand layers occurred with a much higher probability than the others. The layer thickness of each textural type in the study area was characterized as a lognormal distribution, with relatively thick sand and silty clay loam layers, and relatively thin sandy loam, loam and clay layers. For a certain textural type, layers occurred beneath it were mainly the two types which adjoined it, especially the one which contained more fine particles. The uncertainty analysis of soil textural layer transitions indicated that the formation of loamy sand layers was much strongly dependent on the lower layers, whereas the clay loam layers had a key effect on the formation of the upper layers. Loamy sand and loam layers had a relative high probability to have sandy loam layers as upper layers, while silty clay loam layers had relative high probability to occur as upper layers of both clay loam and silty clay layers. None of the seven textural layers had the same combinations of upper and lower layers simultaneously. Markov characteristics and the stability of the vertical change of textural layers were verified byχ2 test using the TPMs of the entire samples, the subintervals and the sub-regions. A one-dimensional MC-LN model could quantitatively describe the vertical change of textural layers. The simulated TPM approached to

  16. Radionuclides in milk of dairy heifers raised on forages harvested from phosphatic clay soils on reclaimed mined land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, C.R.; Umana, R.; Hayen, M.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    Alfalfa (AR; Medicago sativa L.) and corn (CSR; Zea mays L.) were grown in phosphatic clay soils on phosphate-mined reclaimed land in central Florida. Corn (CSC) also was grown on unmined land and served as a control forage. Upon harvesting, plants were chopped and ensiled. Concentrations of {sup 226}Ra averaged 2.44, 0.26 and 0.15; {sup 210}Pb averaged 1.04, 0.63, and 0.52; and {sup 210}Po averaged 1.59, 0.59, and 1.26 Bq kg{sup -1} DM for AR, CSR, and CSC, respectively. These forages were fed separately to Holstein dairy replacement heifers (Bos taurus) (n=15 per forage) from approximately 9 to 25 mo of age. Heifers gave birth to calves at approximately 24 mo of age. Samples of milk were collected on d 1, 15, and 30 of lactation and analyzed for radionuclides. Averaged across sampling days, heifers fed AR had greater milk concentrations of {sup 226}Ra compared with those fed CSR (0.27 vs. 0.22 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.10), which, in turn, had greater milk concentrations compared with heifers fed CSC (0.22 vs. 0.13 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.05). Heifers fed AR also had greater milk concentrations of {sup 210}Po compared with heifers fed CSR (0.58 vs. 0.30 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.10), but values of CSR-fed heifers were not different from CSC-fed heifers (0.45 Bq kg{sup -1} DM). Lead-210 was greater in milk from heifers fed CSR compared with those fed AR or CSC (1.38 vs. 0.94 and 0.92 Bq kg{sup -1} DM; P < 0.13), respectively. Plasma S and Cu concentrations suggested subclinical molybdenosis in heifers fed AR. However, all heifers grew at an acceptable rate, conceived normally, had normal gestation periods, gave high quality colostrum at calving, and produced similar amounts of milk. 17 refs., 9 tabs.

  17. Soil and Waste Matrix Affects Spatial Heterogeneity of Bacteria Filtration during Unsaturated Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Unc

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous flows resulting from discrete natural rain events induce temporal and spatial variability in the transport of bacteria from organic waste through soils in which the degree of saturation varies. Transport and continuity of associated pathways are dependent on structure and stability of the soil under conditions of variable moisture and ionic strength of the soil solution. Lysimeters containing undisturbed monoliths of clay, clay loam or sandy loam soils were used to investigate transport and pathway continuity for bacteria and hydrophobic fluorescent microspheres. Biosolids, to which the microspheres were added, were surface applied and followed by serial irrigation events. Microspheres, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Salmonella spp. and Clostridium perfringens were enumerated in drainage collected from 64 distinct collection areas through funnels installed in a grid pattern at the lower boundary of the monoliths. Bacteria-dependent filtration coefficients along pathways of increasing water flux were independent of flow volume, suggesting: (1 tracer or colloid dependent retention; and (2 transport depended on the total volume of contiguous pores accessible for bacteria transport. Management decisions, in this case resulting from the form of organic waste, induced changes in tortuosity and continuity of pores and modified the effective capacity of soil to retain bacteria. Surface application of liquid municipal biosolids had a negative impact on transport pathway continuity, relative to the solid municipal biosolids, enhancing retention under less favourable electrostatic conditions consistent with an initial increase in straining within inactive pores and subsequent by limited re-suspension from reactivated pores.

  18. Source Zone Remediation by ZVI-Clay Soil-Mixing: Reduction of Tetrachloroethene Mass and Mass Discharge at a Danish DNAPL Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Binning, Philip John;

    2012-01-01

    contaminant mass and contaminant mass discharge can be reduced. The technology was tested at a Danish tetrachloroethene (PCE) site. The field sampling consisted of baseline measurements and a 19-month monitoring program (7 sampling campaigns) subsequent to the implementation of ZVI-Clay soil...... degradation product. The down-gradient reduction of contaminant mass discharge was slower; after 19 months a mass discharge reduction of 76 % was obtained for the parent compound PCE, while the overall mass discharge reduction of chlorinated ethenes was 21 %....

  19. Persistence and dissipation pathways of the antidepressant sertraline in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxia; Sumarah, Mark W; Topp, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Sertraline is a widely-used antidepressant that is one of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. It has been detected in biosolids and effluents from sewage treatment plants. Since sertraline can reach agriculture land through the application of municipal biosolids or reclaimed water, the persistence and dissipation pathways of (3)H-sertraline were determined in laboratory incubations using three agriculture soils varying in textures and properties. The total solvent extractable radioactivity decreased in all three soils with times to dissipate 50% of material (DT50) ranging from 48.1±3.5 (loam soil) to 84.5±13.8 (clay soil) days. Two hydroxylated sertraline transformation products were identified in all three soils by high performance liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOF-MS), but the accumulation did not exceed 10% of the initial parent concentration. The addition of liquid municipal biosolids to the loam soil had no effect on the rate of sertraline dissipation, or production of transformation products. In summary, sertraline was persistent in agricultural soils with major dissipation pathways including the production of non-extractable soil-bound residues, and accumulation of hydroxylated transformation products. The biologically active sertraline transformation product norsertraline was not detected in soil.

  20. The impact of atrazine on several biochemical properties of chernozem soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJ. RADIVOJEVIC

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the pesticide atrazine on biochemical processes in soil was investigated. Atrazine loadings of 8.0, 40.0 and 80.0 mg/kg soil were laboratory tested in an experiment set up on a clay loam soil. Dehydrogenase activity, change in biomass carbon, soil respiration and metabolic coefficient were examined. The samples were collected for analysis 1, 7, 14, 21, 30 and 60 days after atrazine application. The acquired data indicated that the effect of atrazine on the biochemical activity of the soil depended on its application rate and duration of activity, and the effect was either stimulating or inhibiting. However, the detected changes were found to be transient, indicating that there is no real risk of the compound disrupting the balance of biochemical processes in soil.

  1. Microbial biomass and carbon mineralization in agricultural soils as affected by pesticide addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anjani; Nayak, A K; Shukla, Arvind K; Panda, B B; Raja, R; Shahid, Mohammad; Tripathi, Rahul; Mohanty, Sangita; Rath, P C

    2012-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with four pesticides, viz. a fungicide (carbendazim), two insecticides (chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride) and an herbicide (pretilachlor) applied to a sandy clay loam soil at a field rate to determine their effect on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and carbon mineralization (C(min)). The MBC content of soil increased with time up to 30 days in cartap hydrochloride as well as chlorpyrifos treated soil. Thereafter, it decreased and reached close to the initial level by 90th day. However, in carbendazim treated soil, the MBC showed a decreasing trend up to 45 days and subsequently increased up to 90 days. In pretilachlor treated soil, MBC increased through the first 15 days, and thereafter decreased to the initial level. Application of carbendazim, chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride decreased C(min) for the first 30 days and then increased afterwards, while pretilachlor treated soil showed an increasing trend.

  2. Adsorption-Desorption Characteristics of Chlorimuron-Ethyl in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption-desorption characteristics of chlorimuron-ethyl in soils were investigated to provide the basic data for evaluating the safety in field and the risk to water resource. The adsorption-desorption experiment was conducted by the batch equilibration and HPLC techniques; furthermore, data were analyzed with 5 mathematic models to describe the characteristics and mechanism of adsorption-desorption and translocation of the herbicide in soils. The results showed that the adsorption-desorption isotherms of chlorimuron-ethyl fitted for the Freundlich model well, and the physical reaction presents the main contribution during the adsorption-desorption process. The adsorption values (Kads-f) of chlorimuron-ethyl in 8 types of soil ranged from 0.798 to 6.891. The isotherms of 2# (Jiangxi clay) and 3# (Jiangxi sand loam)soils belong to the S-type curve, while the isotherms of another 6 type soils belong to the L-type isotherm. The results of desorption indicated that the hysteresis phenomena appeared during the desorption process, and the hysteresis coefficients(H) of the herbicides in 8 soils varied from 0.259-0.980. Furthermore, Kads-f and desorption values (Kdes-f) increased with the OM (%) and the clay content increasing, while the values decreased with the soils pH increasing. The H values decreased with the OM and the clay content increasing, and increased with the soils pH increasing. It can be concluded that the low adsorption abilities of chlorimuron-ethyl in test soils and un-reversible adsorption existed in the process, which will induce the great translocation of the herbicide after application in field. It can be transported to ground or groundwater causing risk to environments. The physical and chemical properties of soils, including the OM, the clay content, and the pH of soil were the dominating factors during the adsorption-desorption.

  3. Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Bongoua-Devisme, Jeanne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Parisot, Nicolas; Peyret, Pierre; Leyval, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the

  4. Studies on amendment of different biopolymers in sandy loam and their effect on germination, seedling growth of Gossypium herbaceum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Satish Vitthalrao; Salunke, B K; Patil, C D; Salunkhe, R B

    2011-03-01

    Different biopolymers, agar, cellulose, alginate, psyllium gaur gum, and bacterial exopolysaccharide (EPS) powders were amended to check their efficacy in enhancing maximum water holding capacity (MWHC), permanent wilting point (PWP), and germination and seedling growth of the Gossypium herbaceum in a laboratory scale. The efficacy of all biopolymers for enhancement of MWHC, PWP, and growth was also analyzed by measuring organic carbon, organic matter, total nitrogen, respiration rate, and microflora in amended and control sandy loams. The range of concentrations (0.2-2%) of all biopolymers was incorporated in sandy loam containing pots. The soil without polymer was considered as control. The psyllium (0.6%) and bacterial EPS (1%) amended soil has 242 and 233% increase in MWHC and thus delaying in the permanent wilting point by 108 and 84 h at 37 °C, respectively, as compared to control. All biopolymers found to increase more or less MWHC, organic matter, total nitrogen, microflora, and PWP as compared to control. The psyllium and bacterial EPS show the highest increase organic matter, biomass, and microflora. The highest reduction in MWHC after 12 weeks were observed in cellulose, gaur gum, and alginate; besides, psyllium, bacterial EPS, and agar showed comparatively less reduction MWHC, i.e., 24% and 14.5%, respectively. The toxicity studies of biopolymer were carried out on earthworm (Eisenia foetida). It revealed their nontoxic nature. The biopolymer amendment in sandy loam can be an effective strategy to improved soil texture, fertility, and thereby crop yield.

  5. 鹰咀界天然次生林自然保护区林地土壤特性研究%The Characteristics of Soil in Natural Secondary Forest Conservation Area of Yingzui Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建平; 袁正科; 梁文斌

    2001-01-01

    According to the studies on 22 samples of soil profile from the natural forest conservation area at Yingzui mountain,the characteristics of soil were described.Research results indicated that the type of soil profile structure was A-B-C-D,and the soil development was successive.The average contents of organic matter in the soil was 54.30g*kg-1,the ratio of C/N was 10.93 and the bulk density was 1.25g*cm-3.the soil texture was heavy loam or light clay.The soil fertility was higher compared with the soil from natural forest conservation of ZhangJiajie mountain,which developed from the same parent material of silicon rocks as Yingzui area.The forest soil of the area is typical in the subtropical natural forest.So it is valuable to be protected.

  6. Fuel consumption of tractor for different soil types in semi-arid regions; Consumo de combustivel de um trator agricola para diferentes tipos de solo em regioes semi-aridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanha, Gustavo K. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FAC/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], E-mail: gmontanha@fca.unesp.br; Guerra, Saulo P.S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Gestao e Tecnologia Agroindustrial; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John [The University of Arizona, Maricopa, AZ (United States); Monteiro, Leonardo A. [The University of Arizona (MAC/UA), Maricopa, AZ (United States). Maricopa Agricultural Center

    2010-07-01

    The appropriate use of agricultural machinery enables greater operational efficiency and higher productivity for the farmer. Some factors such as soil type can influence the fuel consumption, one of the biggest costs. This study aimed to compare the fuel consumption of a tractor operating in two different conditions of soil in semi-arid regions. The area used for testing is located in the city of Maricopa, in Arizona, belonging to 'The University of Arizona'. The area 1 is classified as sandy clay loam soil (52% sand, 35% clay, 13% silt). The area 2 is classified as a sandy loam soil (71% sand, 12% clay and 17% silt). The tractor 4 x 2 TDA, with 88 kw (120 hp) engine power equipped with auto pilot system and an implement for tillage were used in the experiment. A data acquisition system was installed in the tractor to collect the data generated by the GPS and fuel consumption sensor. The results showed significant statistical difference in fuel consumption between soil textures. (author)

  7. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    ), and moldboard plowing (MP) with and without a cover crop were evaluated in a long-term experiment on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Chemical, physical, and biological soil properties were measured in the spring of 2012. The field measurements included mean weight diameter (MWD) after the drop-shatter test......, penetration resistance, and visual evaluation of soil structure (VESS). In the laboratory, aggregate strength, water-stable aggregates (WSA), and clay dispersibility were measured. The analyzed chemical and biological properties included soil organic C (SOC), total N, microbial biomass C, labile P and K...... in terms of greater MWD, VESS, WSA, aggregate tensile strength, and rupture energy. Five years of using a cover crop alleviated plow pan compaction at the 20- to 40-cm depth by reducing penetration resistance. A significant interaction between tillage and cover crop treatments indicated the potential...

  8. Influence factors research of typical soil salinization and alkalization under brackish water drip irrigation in arid areas%干旱区微咸水滴灌条件下典型土壤盐碱化影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵建荣; 张凤华; 董艳; 李乐佳; 赵宇; 张敬远; 胡治强; 徐秀

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the change of soil salinity,soil alkalinity and main cations under long time drip irriga-tion with different concentration of brackish water in alluvial fan of the edge and the dry delta area in Manas River Basin, taking the representative sandy loam and clay loam soil in cotton field as the research object,using the high and low saline water for 5 years irrigation,has set up four treatments as clay loam-low salinity,clay loam-high salinity,sandy loam-low salinity and sandy loam-high salinity,measured the soil total salt,pH,Na +,K+,Ca2 +,Mg2 +,SAR,ESP, etc.in 0 ~100 cm soil layers,discussed the ions that have produced the main impact to soil salinization and alkaliza-tion,to provide the theoretical reference of ecological security for brackish water irrigation in arid area.The results indi-cated that:The soil salinization and alkalization in clay loam of alluvial fan of the edge and sandy loam of the dry delta area was together occurred,also was mainly affected by irrigation water salinity.The ion of main influence for soil salin-ization and soil alkalization was Na +and for soil salinization was Na +and Ca2 +.It indicated that amelioration of the soil salinization in Manas River Basin should be started with reducing irrigation water Na +,and combined control of total salt content in irrigation water with reducng the proportion of Na + to achieve the purpose of reducing salt and preventing and controlling soil alkalization.%以代表性的沙壤和黏壤棉田土壤为研究对象,分别利用高、低矿化度水进行5年灌溉,即黏壤-低矿化度,黏壤-高矿化度,沙壤-低矿化度,沙壤-高矿化度共四个处理,测定0~100 cm 分层土样总盐、pH、Na +、K+、Ca2+、Mg2+、SAR、ESP 等指标,以研究玛纳斯河流域冲积扇扇缘和干三角洲区不同浓度微咸水长期滴灌条件下土壤盐分、土壤碱度、主要阳离子的变化,探讨对土壤盐化和碱化产生主要影响

  9. Net sulfur mineralization potential in Swedish arable soils in relation to long-term treatment history and soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Kristin; Nilsson, S Ingvar; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    The long-term treatment effect (since 1957-1966) of farmyard manure (FYM) application compared with crop residue incorporation was investigated in five soils (sandy loam to silty clay) with regards to the net sulfur (S) mineralization potential. An open incubation technique was used to determine...... accumulated net S mineralization (SAccMin) and a number of soil physical and chemical properties were determined. Treatments and soil differences in SAccMin, as well as correlations with soil variables, were tested with single and multivariate analyses. Long-term FYM application resulted in a significantly (p...... = 0.012) higher net S mineralization potential, although total amounts of C, N, and S were not significantly (p mineralization differed significantly (p 

  10. Investigation of Cyclodextrin-Enhanced Electrokinetic Soil Remediation. Fate and Transport of Nitroaromatic Contaminants and Cyclodextrin Amendments in Expansive Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    solubilized by the uncharged cyclo- dextrins : α, β, and γ. These molecules are functionally identical in shape with the exception of interior cavity size, as...Biotechnology. V. 75, 2000, 657-664. 22. Melton, L. D.; Slessor, K. N. Carbohydr . Res. 1971, 18, 29. 23. Mortland, M. M. “Clay-Organic Complexes

  11. Nutrient Availability in the Surface Horizons of Four Tropical Agricultural Soils in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verloo, MG.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of nutrient availability are important for the understanding and the estimation of soil fertility in areas like West Africa, where low nutrient availability is still one of the major constraints for food production. Physico-chemical soil analyses were used to assess the fertility status of the surface horizon samples of four Malian agricultural soils, (Bougouni, Kangaba, Baguinéda and Gao abbreviated as Bgni, Kgba, Bgda and Gao. Soil texture was sandy loam for Bgni and Kgba, sandy clay loam for Bgda and loamy sand for Gao. Soil pH values varied from moderately acid for Bgda to neutral for the other sites. Organic carbon ranged from very low (for Gao or low (for Bgni and Bgda to medium (for Kgba. Total N, P and CEC were low for the four soils. Available contents of Fe and Mn in all soils, except Gao, were higher than the critical levels while available Cu and Zn contents (except in Kgba were below or close to it. Results indicated that Kgba soil had a better macronutrient status for plant growth than the other sites.

  12. Impact of paper mill wastewater on soil properties and crop yield through lysimeter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P K; Ladwani, K; Ladwani, K; Deshbhratar, P B; Ramteke, D S

    2013-01-01

    Paper and pulp industries produce large quantities of wastewater which can have adverse effects on the receiving water systems. In the present study lysimeters were used and filled with different soils replicating natural soil horizons and provided with a leachate collection system. The physico-chemical characteristics of the soil in each lysimeter and the quality of wastewater before leaching were assessed. Treated wastewater was evaluated for crop irrigation, and was categorized according to the irrigation water class 'Increasing Problem to Severe Problem' with respect to salinity and specific ion toxicity. Sandy loam soils showed 96% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal while clay loam soils removed 99% of COD, and the colour removal in both the cases was found to be 100%. Application of wastewater resulted in an increase of pH value, ranging from 6.2-7.6; the electrical conductivity (ECe) of saturated extracts was found to be 0.6-1.7 dS m(-1), and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) ranged from 7.8-11.1% in soils. Similarly, an increase in the organic carbon, available nitrogen, phosphorus and potash content of soils was observed when irrigated with wastewater. Wastewater irrigation showed increased grain and straw yield of jowar, wheat and moong. These results permit successful utilization of pulp and paper mill wastewater for crop production without damaging the soils.

  13. Abundance of plankton population densities in relation to bottom soil textural types in aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siddika

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is an important food item of fishes and indicator for the productivity of a water body. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural conditions on abundance of plankton in aquaculture pond. The experiment was carried out using three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (T2 and with clay loam (T3. The ranges of water quality parameters analyzed were suitable for the growth of plankton during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed higher ranges in T2. A total 20 genera of phytoplankton were recorded belonged to Chlorophyceae (7, Cyanophyceae (5, Bacillariophyceae (5, Euglenophyceae (2 and Dinophyceae (1. On the other hand, total 13 genera of zooplankton were recorded belonged to Crustacea (7 and Rotifera (6. The highest ranges of phytoplankton and zooplankton densities were found in T2 where low to medium-type bloom was observed during the study period. Consequently, the mean abundance of plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton density was significantly highest in T2. The highest abundance of plankton in the T2 indicated that pond bottom with loamy soil is suitable for the growth and production of plankton in aquaculture ponds.

  14. Abundance of macrozoobenthos in relation to bottom soil textural types and water depth In aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nupur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural classes and different water depths on abundance of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds. Three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (TS2 and with clay loam (T3 were considered in this experiment. Samples were collected from three different depths (60.96 cm, 106.68 cm and 152.40 cm with three replications. The ranges of water quality parameters were suitable for the growth of macrozoobenthos during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed comparatively higher ranges in T2. Eight genera were recorded belonging to major groups of Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, Mollusca and Ceratoponogonidae. The highest population densities of Oligochaeta (1200±4.25 per m2, Chironomidae (1422±4.88 per m2, Ceratopogonidae (399±1.56 per m2 and Mollusca (977±2.24 per m2 were found in T2. The population densities of macrozoobenthos showed fortnightly variations in all the treatments. Among the three depths, significantly highest densities of macrozoobenthos were recorded in 106.68 cm in every treatment. The mean abundance of macrozoobenthos was significantly highest in T2. The present study indicates that loamy soil pond bottom along with water depth 106.68 cm is suitable for the growth and production of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds.

  15. Leaching and Transformation of Nitrogen Fertilizers in Soil After Application of N with Irrigation: A Soil Column Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A soil column method was used to compare the effect of drip fertigation (the application of fertilizer through drip irrigation systems, DFI) on the leaching loss and transformation of urea-N in soil with that of surface fertilization combined with flood irrigation (SFI), and to study the leaching loss and transformation of three kinds of nitrogen fertilizers (nitrate fertilizer, ammonium fertilizer, and urea fertilizer) in two contrasting soils after the fertigation. In comparison to SFI,DFI decreased leaching loss of urea-N from the soil and increased the mineral N (NH4+-N + NO3--N) in the soil. The N leached from a clay loam soil ranged from 5.7% to 9.6% of the total N added as fertilizer, whereas for a sandy loam soil they ranged between 16.2% and 30.4%. Leaching losses of mineral N were higher when nitrate fertilizer was used compared to urea or ammonium fertilizer. Compared to the control (without urea addition), on the first day when soils were fertigated with urea, there were increases in NH4+-N in the soils. This confirmed the rapid hydrolysis of urea in soil during fertigation. NH4+-N in soils reached a peak about 5 days after fertigation, and due to nitrification it began to decrease at day 10. After applying NH4+-N fertilizer and urea and during the incubation period, the mineral nitrogen in the soil decreased. This may be related to the occurrence of NH4+-N fixation or volatilization in the soil during the fertigation process.

  16. Multidecadal persistence of organic matter in soils: insights from spatially resolved investigations at the submicrometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Barré, Pierre; Bernard, Sylvain; Le Guillou, Corentin; Alléon, Julien; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Better understanding the mechanisms responsible for the pluri-decadal persistence of carbon in soils requires well constraining the dynamics, the distribution and the chemical nature of both the soil organic carbon (SOC) and the associated mineral phases. The question we address in this work is whether different mineral species lead to different organo-mineral interactions and stabilize different quantities of SOM and different types of SOC. Here, benefiting from the unique opportunity offered by an INRA long term bare fallow (LTBF) experiment having started in 1928 in Versailles (France), we report the in-situ characterization of SOC dynamics in four clay fractions of this silty loam soil (total clays [TC, minerals while the CC fraction also contains illite and kaolinite. In the absence of any carbon input, the plant-free LTBF clay fractions from Versailles progressively lost SOC during the first 50 years of the experiment, until they reached a seemingly stable concentration. Of note, the investigated clay fractions did not lose the same amount of SOC and do not exhibit the same final carbon concentrations. The decrease of the organic C:N ratios with LTBF duration corresponds to a progressive enrichment in N-rich SOC for all fractions which can be attributed to microbial material. Even though the speciation of SOC appears to only slightly evolve with LTBF duration, an enrichment in carboxyl and carbonyl groups is revealed by bulk-scale C-NEXAFS data for SOC from all clay fractions. In addition, STXM-based NEXAFS investigations at the submicrometer scale reveal three types of SOC-clay assemblages in addition to clay-free SOC and organic-free clays. While SOC appears mostly adsorbed onto clay surfaces within the IC and FC fractions, other protection mechanisms occur within the CC fraction. Altogether, the present study suggests that smectite have more efficient protection capabilities than those of illite and kaolinite.

  17. Controllability of runoff and soil loss from small plots treated by vinasse-produced biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Hazbavi, Zeinab; Harchegani, Mahboobeh Kiani

    2016-01-15

    Many different amendments, stabilizers, and conditioners are usually applied for soil and water conservation. Biochar is a carbon-enriched substance produced by thermal decomposition of organic material in the absence of oxygen with the goal to be used as a soil amendment. Biochar can be produced from a wide range of biomass sources including straw, wood, manure, and other organic wastes. Biochar has been demonstrated to restore soil fertility and crop production under many conditions, but less is known about the effects of its application on soil erosion and runoff control. Therefore, a rainfall simulation study, as a pioneer research, was conducted to evaluate the performance of the application of vinasse-produced biochar on the soil erosion control of a sandy clay loam soil packed in small-sized runoff 0.25-m(2) plots with 3 replicates. The treatments were (i) no biochar (control), (ii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 24h before the rainfall simulation and (iii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 48 h before the rainfall simulation. Rainfall was applied at 50 mm h(-1) for 15 min. The mean change of effectiveness in time to runoff could be found in biochar application at 24 and 48 h before simulation treatment with rate of +55.10% and +71.73%, respectively. In addition, the mean runoff volume 24 and 48 h before simulation treatments decreased by 98.46% and 46.39%, respectively. The least soil loss (1.12 ± 0.57 g) and sediment concentration (1.44 ± 0.48 gl(-1)) occurred in the biochar-amended soil treated 48 h before the rainfall simulation. In conclusion, the application of vinasse-produced biochar could effectively control runoff and soil loss. This study provided a new insight into the effects of biochar on runoff, soil loss, and sediment control due to water erosion in sandy clay loam soils.

  18. Effect of chitosan on the available contents and vertical distribution of Cu2+ and Cd2+ in different textural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Hu, Xiang; Ao, Yansong

    2009-08-15

    Chitosan, an environment-friendly biopolymer, has been adopted to remedy contaminated soils by heavy metals of Cu(2+) and Cd(2+). Experimental results demonstrated that, within the first 7d, available Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) contents in three textural soils (clay, loam, and sandy soil) decreased significantly after chitosan application. Moreover, the available Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) contents in soil layers of 14-16 cm and 24-26 cm were significantly reduced than that in 4-6 cm after 7d of chitosan application. Our investigation suggested that application of 0.9 g chitosan kg(-1) DW soil for 7d could be perfect for the remediation of the soil contaminated by Cu(2+) and Cd(2+).

  19. 不同质地土壤主要养分动态变化及其对烤烟的影响分析%Analysis on Effect of Dynamic Changes of Main Nutrients in Different Texture Soils on Flue-cured Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈懿; 潘文杰; 陈伟; 张纪利

    2011-01-01

    Flue-cured tobacco was planted in silty loam collected from Weining and loam clay collected from Kaiyang under the same cultivated pattern in Kaiyang county to study the effect of dynamic changes of main nutrients in different texture yellow soils from Cuizhou on the yield and qualities of tobacco leaves in the growth and development cycle. The results showed that silty loam in the middle fertility level mineralized more, as the contents of inorganic nitrogen and available phosphorus were higher, which was beneficial to the storage of applied ammonia nitrogen; the density of nitrogen and potassium, potassium-chlorine ratio and the yield of tobacco leaves were higher compared with loam clay in the high fertility level. Loam clay had higher content of active potassium, which was beneficial to the storage of applied nitrate nitrogen, the sugar-nicotine ratio was more coordinate.%研究不同质地贵州黄壤主要养分在烤烟生长发育周期内的动态变化及其对烟叶产量、品质的影响.将威宁粉壤土、开阳壤粘土同置于开阳气候下,采用统一栽培措施种植烤烟.研究发现,与高等肥力的壤粘土比较,中等肥力的粉壤土矿化率更高,无机氮、有效磷含量更高,利于保存施入的铵态氮,烟叶氮素、钾素浓度更大,烟叶钾氯比更大,烟叶产量更高.而高等肥力的壤粘土速效钾含量更高,利于保存施入的硝态氮,烟叶糖碱比更协调.

  20. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossadeghi-Björklund, M; Arvidsson, J.; Keller, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Soil compaction by vehicular traffic modifies the pore structure and soil hydraulic properties. These changes potentially influence the occurrence of preferential flow, which so far has been little studied. Our aim was to study the effect of compaction on soil hydraulic and transport properties in su...

  1. Disturbance of water-extractable phosphorus determination by colloidal particles in a heavy clay soil from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.F.; Chardon, W.J.; Salm, van der C.

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication January 25, 2005. Water extraction methods are widely used to extract phosphorus (P) from soils for both agronomic and environmental purposes. Both the presence of soil colloids in soil water filtrates, and the contribution of colloidal P to the molybdate-reactive phosphorus

  2. Major and Trace Element Variations in Impact Crater Clay from Chicxulub, Lonar, and Mistastin, Implications for the Martian Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Gakin, R.; Lee, K.

    2004-01-01

    The catastrophic Chicxulub event should have generated a large hydrothermal system with volatile element mobilization, producing interesting alteration materials and clays. The Yaxcopoil-1 (YAX) drill hole is located in the annular trough, about 70 km southwest of the crater center, in an area where the impactite layers are relatively thin (approx. 100 m thick). We have analyzed samples from the YAX drill core and from other impact craters including Mistastin and Lonar to determine the nature of alteration and trace element mobilization.

  3. Influence of Dimensions of UHMW-PE Protuberances on Sliding Resistance and Normal Adhesion of Bangkok Clay Soil to Biomimetic Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. Soni; V. M. Salokhe

    2006-01-01

    A number of investigations into application of polymers for macro-morphological modification of tool surface have been carried out. These researches, with extensive stress on convex or domed protuberations as one of the widely used construction units, have tried to harness benefits from using polymers in agriculture. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE)has proved an emerging polymer in its application to reduce soil adhesion. This research was conducted to study the effect of shape (flat, semi-spherical, semi-oblate, semi short-prolate and semi long-prolate) and dimensions (base diameter and dome height) on sliding resistance and normal adhesion of biomimetic plates. To incorporate both shape and size, a dimensionless ratio of height to diameter (HDR) was introduced to characterize the effect of construction unit's physique. Experiments were conducted in Bangkok clay soil with dry (19.8% d.b.), sticky (36.9% d.b.) and flooded (60.1% d.b.) soil conditions respectively. Soil at sticky limit exhibited the highest sliding resistance (77.8 N) and normal adhesion (3 kPa to 7 kPa), whereas these values were 61.7 N and <0.2 kPa in dry, and 53.7 N and 0.5 kPa to 1.5 kPa in flooded soil conditions. Protuberances with HDR ≤ 0.5 lowered sliding resistance by 10% - 30% and the same reduced normal adhesion by 10% - 60%. The amount of reduction in both sliding resistance and normal adhesion was higher in flooded soil. Lighter normal loads obviously produced lesser resistance and adhesion.

  4. Soil transference patterns on bras: Image processing and laboratory dragging experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kathleen R; Fitzpatrick, Robert W; Bottrill, Ralph S; Berry, Ron; Kobus, Hilton

    2016-01-01

    soil moisture content that would not have been possible otherwise. Soil type (e.g. Anthropogenic, gravelly sandy loam soil or Natural, organic-rich soil), clay mineralogy (smectite) and soil moisture content were the greatest influencing factors in all the dragging soil transference tests (both naked eye and measured properties) to explain the eight categories of soil transference patterns recorded. This study was intended to develop a method for dragging soil transference laboratory experiments and create a baseline of preliminary soil type/property knowledge. Results confirm the need to better understand soil behaviour and properties of clothing fabrics by further testing of a wider range of soil types and clay mineral properties.

  5. Spatial variability in the soil water content of a Mediterranean agroforestry system with high soil heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Antonio Jaime; Llorens, Pilar; Aranda, Xavier; Savé, Robert; Biel, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Variability of soil water content is known to increase with the size of spatial domain in which measurements are taken. At field scale, heterogeneity in soil, vegetation, topography, water input volume and management affects, among other factors, hydrologic plot behaviour under different mean soil water contents. The present work studies how the spatial variability of soil water content (SWC) is affected by soil type (texture, percentage of stones and the combination of them) in a timber-orientated plantation of cherry tree (Prunus avium) under Mediterranean climatic conditions. The experimental design is a randomized block one with 3 blocks * 4 treatments, based on two factors: irrigation (6 plots irrigated versus 6 plots not irrigated) and soil management (6 plots tillaged versus 6 plots not tillaged). SWC is continuously measured at 25, 50 and 100 cm depth with FDR sensors, located at two positions in each treatment: under tree influence and 2.5 m apart. This study presents the results of the monitoring during 2012 of the 24 sensors located at the 25 cm depth. In each of the measurement point, texture and percentage of stones were measured. Sandy-loam, sandy-clay-loam and loam textures were found together with a percentage of stones ranging from 20 to 70 %. The results indicated that the relationship between the daily mean SWC and its standard deviation, a common procedure used to study spatial variability, changed with texture, percentage of stones and the estimation of field capacity from the combination of both. Temporal stability analysis of SWC showed a clear pattern related to field capacity, with the measurement points of the sandy-loam texture and the high percentage of stones showing the maximun negative diference with the global mean. The high range in the mean relative difference observed (± 75 %), could indicate that the studied plot may be considered as a good field-laboratory to extrapolate results at higher spatial scales. Furthermore, the

  6. Lixiviação e inativação do metribuzin em dois tipos de solos Leaching and inactivation of metribuzin in two soil types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ferreira da Silva

    1981-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a lixiviação e a inativação do herbicida metribuzin (4-amino-6-tertbutil-3-(metiltio-as-triazina-5-(4Hona em materiais de um solo franco-argiloso e de outro solo franco-argilo-arenoso de duas regiões de Minas Gerais, um em laboratório e outro em casa de vegetação. O solo franco-argiloso era um Latossolo Roxo, com 2,8% de matéria orgãnica e o solo franco-argilo-arenoso era um Podzólico Vermelho-Amarelo; fase terraço, em 2,17% de matéria orgânica. Em laboratório estudou-se a lixiviação do metribuzin em colunas de 5, 10 e 15 cm de altura, com 7,5 cm de diâmetro, enchidas com materiais dos solos franco-argiloso e do solo franco-argiloarenoso. Usou-se o ensaio biológico de discos de cotilédones de melancia para detectar o metribuzin no lixiviado. Em casa de vegetação, estudou-se a inativação do metribuzin com materiais dos mesmos solos utilizados para o estudo de lixiviação. Para este ensaio foram utilizadas as doses de 0, 50, 80, 110, 140, 170 e 200g do i.a./ha do produto, e em areia lavada, as doses foram de 0, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 e 16 g do i.a./ha do metribuzin, usando o pepino como planta teste, que foi cortado rente ao solo e pesado aos 14 dias após o plantio. Informações adicionais são necessárias para explicar porque o solo franco -argiloso inativa mais o metribuzin que o solo franco-argilo-arenoso.Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were made to evaluate the leaching and the inactivation of the metribuzin in clay loam and sand clay loam soils. The clay loam soil was a dark, red latosol with 2,8% organic matter and the sand clay loam soil was a reddish-yellow podzol with 2,17% organic matter. Leaching of metribuzin was studied in the laboratory in colums of 5, 10 and 15 cm high, 7.5 cm diameter, filled with soil. Watermelon cotiledon discs were used to measure the metribuzin leached. The inactivation of metribuzin was estudied in a greenhouse using doses of 0, 50, 80, 110, 140, 170 and 200

  7. Clay minerals in pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateo, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Argille, Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Clay minerals are fundamental constituents of life, not only as possible actors in the development of life on the Earth (Cairns-Smith and Hartman, 1986), but mainly because they are essential constituents of soils, the interface between the solid planet and the continental biosphere. Many, many authors have devoted themselves to the study of clays and clay minerals since the publication of the early modern studies by Grim (1953, 1962) and Millot (1964). In those years two very important associations were established in Europe (Association Internationale pour l'Etude des Argiles, AIPEA) and in the USA (Clay Mineral Society, CMS). The importance of these societies is to put together people that work in very different fields (agronomy, geology, geochemistry, industry, etc.), but with a common language (clays), very useful in scientific work. Currently excellent texts are being published, but introductory notes are also available on the web (Schroeder, 1998).

  8. Effects of Nitrogen Application Patterns on Ammonia Volatilization, Summer Maize Yield and Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Sandy Loam Fluvo-aquic Soil%施氮模式对砂质潮土氨挥发、夏玉米产量及氮肥利用率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢迎新; 刘园; 靳海洋; 王晨阳; 朱云集; 郭天财; 贺德先

    2015-01-01

    采用连续多年田间小区定位试验,在氮肥施用量200 kg/hm2下,观测夏玉米季不同施氮模式对夏玉米季土壤氨挥发、子粒产量及氮肥利用率的影响。结果表明,夏玉米季不同施氮处理土壤氨挥发损失量不同,当地常规施氮处理损失量最高,改变氮肥基追比处理次之,控释复合肥处理损失量最低。与不施肥对照相比,各施氮模式处理均能提高夏玉米产量,控释复合肥、改变氮肥基追比处理较当地常规施氮处理分别增产9.89%和7.14%。不同施氮模式下夏玉米季氮肥利用率以控释复合肥利用率最高,改变氮肥基追比处理次之,常规施氮最低。综合考虑,控释复合肥、改变氮肥基追比均可作为砂质潮土区推广的适宜氮肥施用模式。%Under the field experiment condition, the effects of different nitrogen application patterns on ammo⁃nia volatilization, yield of summer maize and nitrogen use efficiency were studied at the same amount of nitrogen(N) application with 200 kg/ha in summer maize season in each fertilizer treatment. There were four treatments includ⁃ing no fertilizer(CK), convention fertilizer(F1), changing basic fertilizer and topdressing regimes(F2) and controlled-release fertilizer(F3). The result showed that the amount of ammonia loss from summer maize field was different in all treatments, F1 was the highest, followed by F2, and F3 was the lowest. Compared to CK, each nitrogen applica⁃tion patterns treatment all can improve the yield of summer maize, of which F3 was best, followed by F2, compared with F1, the yield increased by 9.89%and 7.14%, respectively. In addition, the study also showed that the nitrogen use efficiency was different in all treatments, of which F3 was the highest, followed by F2, F1 was the lowest. In con⁃clusion, F3 and F2 could be taken as nitrogen application patterns by spread and application for summer maize in the sandy loam fluvo

  9. Soil Nitrogen-Cycling Responses to Conversion of Lowland Forests to Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kara; Corre, Marife D; Tjoa, Aiyen; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-01-01

    Rapid deforestation in Sumatra, Indonesia is presently occurring due to the expansion of palm oil and rubber production, fueled by an increasing global demand. Our study aimed to assess changes in soil-N cycling rates with conversion of forest to oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations. In Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, we selected two soil landscapes - loam and clay Acrisol soils - each with four land-use types: lowland forest and forest with regenerating rubber (hereafter, "jungle rubber") as reference land uses, and rubber and oil palm as converted land uses. Gross soil-N cycling rates were measured using the 15N pool dilution technique with in-situ incubation of soil cores. In the loam Acrisol soil, where fertility was low, microbial biomass, gross N mineralization and NH4+ immobilization were also low and no significant changes were detected with land-use conversion. The clay Acrisol soil which had higher initial fertility based on the reference land uses (i.e. higher pH, organic C, total N, effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC) and base saturation) (P≤0.05-0.09) had larger microbial biomass and NH4+ transformation rates (P≤0.05) compared to the loam Acrisol soil. Conversion of forest and jungle rubber to rubber and oil palm in the clay Acrisol soil decreased soil fertility which, in turn, reduced microbial biomass and consequently decreased NH4+ transformation rates (P≤0.05-0.09). This was further attested by the correlation of gross N mineralization and microbial biomass N with ECEC, organic C, total N (R=0.51-0. 76; P≤0.05) and C:N ratio (R=-0.71 - -0.75, P≤0.05). Our findings suggest that the larger the initial soil fertility and N availability, the larger the reductions upon land-use conversion. Because soil N availability was dependent on microbial biomass, management practices in converted oil palm and rubber plantations should focus on enriching microbial biomass.

  10. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  11. Statistical analyses of soil properties on a quaternary terrace sequence in the upper sava river valley, Slovenia, Yugoslavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, N.; Pavich, M.; Lobnik, F.

    1991-01-01

    Alpine glaciations, climatic changes and tectonic movements have created a Quaternary sequence of gravely carbonate sediments in the upper Sava River Valley, Slovenia, Yugoslavia. The names for terraces, assigned in this model, Gu??nz, Mindel, Riss and Wu??rm in order of decreasing age, are used as morphostratigraphic terms. Soil chronosequence on the terraces was examined to evaluate which soil properties are time dependent and can be used to help constrain the ages of glaciofluvial sedimentation. Soil thickness, thickness of Bt horizons, amount and continuity of clay coatings and amount of Fe and Me concretions increase with soil age. The main source of variability consists of solutions of carbonate, leaching of basic cations and acidification of soils, which are time dependent and increase with the age of soils. The second source of variability is the content of organic matter, which is less time dependent, but varies more within soil profiles. Textural changes are significant, presented by solution of carbonate pebbles and sand, and formation is silt loam matrix, which with age becomes finer, with clay loam or clayey texture. The oldest, Gu??nz, terrace shows slight deviation from general progressive trends of changes of soil properties with time. The hypothesis of single versus multiple depositional periods of deposition was tested with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on a staggered, nested hierarchical sampling design on a terrace of largest extent and greatest gravel volume, the Wu??rm terrace. The variability of soil properties is generally higher within subareas than between areas of the terrace, except for the soil thickness. Observed differences in soil thickness between the areas of the terrace could be due to multiple periods of gravel deposition, or to the initial differences of texture of the deposits. ?? 1991.

  12. Previous Crop and Cultivar Effects on Methane Emissions from Drill-Seeded, Delayed-Flood Rice Grown on a Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alden D. Smartt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to anaerobic conditions that develop in soils under flooded-rice (Oryza sativa L. production, along with the global extent of rice production, it is estimated that rice cultivation is responsible for 11% of global anthropogenic methane (CH4 emissions. In order to adequately estimate CH4 emissions, it is important to include data representing the range of environmental, climatic, and cultural factors occurring in rice production, particularly from Arkansas, the leading rice-producing state in the US, and from clay soils. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of previous crop (i.e., rice or soybean (Glycine max L. and cultivar (i.e., Cheniere (pure-line, semidwarf, CLXL745 (hybrid, and Taggart (pure-line, standard-stature on CH4 fluxes and emissions from rice grown on a Sharkey clay (very-fine, smectitic, thermic Chromic Epiaquerts in eastern Arkansas. Rice following rice as a previous crop generally had greater (p<0.01 fluxes than rice following soybean, resulting in growing season emissions (p<0.01 of 19.6 and 7.0 kg CH4-C ha−1, respectively. The resulting emissions from CLXL745 (10.2 kg CH4-C ha−1 were less (p=0.03 than those from Cheniere or Taggart (15.5 and 14.2 kg CH4-C ha−1, resp., which did not differ. Results of this study indicate that common Arkansas practices, such as growing rice in rotation with soybean and planting hybrid cultivars, may result in reduced CH4 emissions relative to continuous rice rotations and pure-line cultivars, respectively.

  13. Resistance of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    Full Text Available Before prion uptake and infection can occur in the lower gastrointestinal system, ingested prions are subjected to anaerobic digestion in the rumen of cervids and bovids. The susceptibility of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion has not been evaluated previously. In this study, prions from infectious brain homogenates as well as prions bound to a range of soils and soil minerals were subjected to in vitro rumen digestion, and changes in PrP levels were measured via western blot. Binding to clay appeared to protect noninfectious hamster PrP(c from complete digestion, while both unbound and soil-bound infectious PrP(Sc proved highly resistant to rumen digestion. In addition, no change in intracerebral incubation period was observed following active rumen digestion of unbound hamster HY TME prions and HY TME prions bound to a silty clay loam soil. These results demonstrate that both unbound and soil-bound prions readily survive rumen digestion without a reduction in infectivity, further supporting the potential for soil-mediated transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie in the environment.

  14. Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-11-01

    Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling

  15. Capacities of Clay Fraction of a Latosol to Retain Cations and Anions as Inferred from the Wien Effect in Soil Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI CHENGBAO; S. P. FRIEDMAN; ZHAO ANZHEN

    2003-01-01

    Suspensions of a latosol with a clay concentration of 30 g kg-1 were prepared from electrodialyzed clay fractions, less than 2 μm in diameter, five nitrate solutions with a concentration of 1 × 10-4/z mol L-1,where z is the valence, and five sodium salt solutions with a concentration of 3.3 × 10-5/z mol L-1. The direct current (DC) electrical conductivities (ECs) of the colloidal suspensions were measured at a constant temperature of 25 ℃, using a newly established method of measuring the Wien effect in soil suspensions at field strengths ranging from 13.5 to 150 kV cm-1, to determine their electrical conductivity-field strength relationships and to infer the order of the bonding strength (retaining force) between soil particles and various ions. The measurements with the latosol suspensions in NaNO3, KNO3, Ca(NO3)2, Mg(NO3)2 and Zn(NO3)2 solutions resulted in increments of the suspension ECs, △ECs, of 7.9, 5.0, 7.1, 7.0 and 5.8μS cm-1,respectively, when the applied field strength increased from 14.5 to 142 kV cm-1. As for the suspensions in NaNO3, NaCl, Na2SO4, Na3PO4 and Na3AsO4 solutions, the △ECs were 6.2, 5.3, 4.1, 4.0 and 3.7μS cm-1,respectively, when the applied field strength increased from 13.5 to 90 kV cm-1. Thus, it can be deduced that the retaining forces of the clay fraction of the latosol for the cations were in the descending order K+ >Zn2+ > Mg2+ ≥ Ca2+ > Na+, and for the anions in the descending order H2AsO-4 > H2PO-4 ≥ SO42- > Gl- > NO-3.

  16. Amplification of plasmid DNA bound on soil colloidal particles and clay minerals by the polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify a 600-base pair (bp) sequence of plasmid pGEX-2T DNA bound on soil colloidal particles from Brown soil (Alfisol) and Red soil (Ultisol), and three different minerals (goethite, kaolinite, montmorillonite). DNA bound on soil colloids, kaolinite, and montmorillonite was not amplified when the complexes were used directly but amplification occurred when the soil colloid or kaolinite-DNA complex was diluted, 10- and 20-fold. The montmorillonite-DNA complex required at least 100-fold dilution before amplification could be detected. DNA bound on goethite was amplified irrespective of whether the complex was used directly, or diluted 10- and 20-fold. The amplification of mineral-bound plasmid DNA by PCR is, therefore, markedly influenced by the type and concentration of minerals used. This information is of fundamental importance to soil molecular microbial ecology with particular reference to monitoring the fate of genetically engineered microorganisms and their recombinant DNA in soil environments.

  17. Evaluation of Soil Manipulation to Prepare Engineered Earthen Waste Covers for Revegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, W Joseph; Benson, Craig H; Albright, William H; Smith, Gregory M; Bush, Richard P

    2015-11-01

    Seven ripping treatments designed to improve soil physical conditions for revegetation were compared on a test pad simulating an earthen cover for a waste disposal cell. The field test was part of study of methods to convert compacted-soil waste covers into evapotranspiration covers. The test pad consisted of a compacted layer of fine-textured soil simulating a barrier protection layer overlain by a gravelly sand bedding layer and a cobble armor layer. Treatments included combinations of soil-ripping implements (conventional shank [CS], wing-tipped shank [WTS], and parabolic oscillating shank with wings [POS]), ripping depths, and number of passes. Dimensions, dry density, moisture content, and particle size distribution of disturbance zones were determined in two trenches excavated across rip rows. The goal was to create a root-zone dry density between 1.2 and 1.6 Mg m and a seedbed soil texture ranging from clay loam to sandy loam with low rock content. All treatments created V-shaped disturbance zones as measured on trench faces. Disturbance zone size was most influenced by ripping depth. Winged implements created larger disturbance zones. All treatments lifted fines into the bedding layer, moved gravel and cobble down into the fine-textured protection layer, and thereby disrupted the capillary barrier at the interface. Changes in dry density within disturbance zones were comparable for the CS and WTS treatments but were highly variable among POS treatments. Water content increased in the bedding layer and decreased in the protection layer after ripping. The POS at 1.2-m depth and two passes created the largest zone with a low dry density (1.24 Mg m) and the most favorable seedbed soil texture (gravely silt loam). However, ripping also created large soil aggregates and voids in the protection layer that may produce preferential flow paths and reduce water storage capacity.

  18. Shifts in soil biodiversity-A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanye, Ayodeji O; Thompson, Tim; Ralebitso-Senior, T Komang

    2015-12-01

    In a forensic context, microbial-mediated cadaver decomposition and nutrient recycling cannot be overlooked. As a result, forensic ecogenomics research has intensified to gain a better understanding of cadaver/soil ecology interactions as a powerful potential tool for forensic practitioners. For this study, domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) (4g) and grass (Agrostis/Festuca spp) cuttings (4g) were buried (July 2013 to July 2014) in sandy clay loam (80 g) triplicates in sealed microcosms (127 ml; 50 × 70 cm) with parallel soil only controls. The effects of the two carbon sources were determined by monitoring key environmental factors and changes in soil bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (18S rRNA gene) biodiversity. Soil pH changes showed statistically significant differences (pscrofa domesticus and grass trimming decomposition, respectively. In contrast, no statistically significant difference in evenness (p>0.05) was observed between the treatments.

  19. Conceptual Model for Flow and Transport through Unsaturated Silty Loams and Sands in North Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, S. H.; Corley, D. S.; van Volkenburg, G. J.; Wildman, J. C.; Holt, R. M.

    2008-05-01

    We conducted a five-day ponded infiltration test at the University of Mississippi (UM) Soil Moisture Observatory (SMO). The 5 acre SMO is located in a former agricultural field at the UM Field Station, a 740 acre tract of land with restricted access located 11 miles from the UM campus in Oxford, Mississippi. At the infiltration site, the near surface soils consist of about infiltration test, the soil surface was leveled and a 2.0 m diameter infiltration ring was installed. Six neutron access tubes were installed to a depth of 2.5 m around the infiltration ring. A constant ponding depth of 13 cm was maintained throughout the duration of the experiment. Blue dye was added to the water to enable mapping of infiltration paths. During the experiment, moisture content profiles were periodically measured at each neutron access tube. Neutron probe data suggested that infiltration was dominated by capillary forces. However, later mapping of a trench through the infiltration site revealed that infiltration in the upper silt loam was dominated by macropore flow along roots and microfractures in the soil. In the sand, gravity driven fingers formed below the root-zone, where deep roots focused flow.

  20. Mineralization of soil organic matter in biochar amended agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintala, R.; Clay, D. E.; Schumacher, T. E.; Kumar, S.; Malo, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Pyrogenic biochar materials have been identified as a promising soil amendment to enhance climate resilience, increase soil carbon recalcitrance and achieve sustainable crop production. A three year field study was initiated in 2013 to study the impact of biochar on soil carbon and nitrogen storage on an eroded Maddock soil series - Sandy, Mixed, Frigid Entic Hapludolls) and deposition Brookings clay loam (Fine-Silty, Mixed, Superactive, Frigid Pachic Hapludolls) landscape positions. Three biochars produced from corn stover (Zea mays L.), Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson and C. Lawson) wood residue, and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) were incorporated at 9.75 Mg ha-1 rate (≈7.5 cm soil depth and 1.3 g/cm3 soil bulk density) with a rototiller. The changes in chemical fractionation of soil carbon (soluble C, acid hydrolyzable C, total C, and δ13 C) and nitrogen (soluble N, acid hydrolyzable N, total N, and δ14 N) were monitored for two soil depths (0-7.5 and 7.5 - 15 cm). Soluble and acid hydrolyzable fractions of soil C and N were influenced by soil series and were not significantly affected by incorporation of biochars. Based on soil and plant samples to be collected in the fall of 2015, C and N budgets are being developed using isotopic and non-isotopic techniques. Laboratory studies showed that the mean residence time for biochars used in this study ranged from 400 to 666 years. Laboratory and field studies will be compared in the presentation.

  1. Basic Oxygen Furnace Slag as a Liming Agent for Paddy and Upland Field Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong Il [Pohang Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang(Korea)

    1998-03-31

    Basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag, a by-product of the iron and steelmaking industry produced in large quantities in Korea, poses a substantial disposal challenge. The BOF slag used in this study was 1/3 CaCO{sub 3} in total neutralizing power and application of 7-8 Mgha{sup -1} was needed to bring soil pH to 6.5 from pH 5.0-5.5 in silty clay or clay loam soil contained about 10% organic matter. A field assay was conducted to study whether BOF slag could be used as a dolomitic liming agent for agricultural soils. Four slag rates (0, 4, 8, 12 Mgha{sup -1})were investigated for their effect on soil properties, mineral concentrations in leaf tissues of rice and soybean, and yield of the crops. Slag application at 8 Mgha{sup -1} rate in paddy field increased pH, Ca, Mg, P, Si and Fe content in soil and rice yield by 4.3-14.2% depending on the soil type. In upland field the 8 Mgha{sup -1} rate increased pH, Ca and Fe content in soil and soybean yield by 36.6%. Thus, BOF slag appears to be a useful liming material for correcting soil acidity on both paddy and upland field soils and for increasing Ca, Mg, P, Si, and Fe concentration in plants. (author). 27 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. Physical and water properties of selected Polish heavy soils of various origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of selected physical, chemical, and water properties of four mineral arable soils characterized with heavy and very heavy texture. Soil samples from genetic horizons of black earths from areas near Kętrzyn, Gniew and Kujawy, and alluvial soils from Żuławy were used. The following properties were determined in the samples of undisturbed and disturbed structure: texture, particle density, bulk density, porosity, natural and hygroscopic moistures, maximal hygroscopic capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, potential of water bonding in soil, total and readily available water, total retention in the horizon of 0–50 cm, drainage porosity, content of organic carbon and total nitrogen Parent rocks of these soils were clays, silts and loams of various origin. High content of clay fraction strongly influenced the values of all the analyzed properties. All the examined soils had high content of organic carbon and total nitrogen and reaction close to neutral or alkaline. High content of mineral and organic colloids and, what follows, beneficial state of top horizons’ structure, determined – apart from heavy texture – low soil bulk density and high porosity. The investigated soils were characterized by high field water capacity and wide scopes of total and readily available water. The saturated hydraulic conductivity was low and characteristic to heavy mineral arable soils. The parameter which influenced the variability of analyzed parameters most was texture.

  3. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  4. Assessment of some soil thermal conductivity models via variations in temperature and bulk density at low moisture range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohamad; Neyshabouri, Mohammad Reza; Fujimaki, Haruyuki

    2016-08-01

    Simulation of heat transfer in soil under steady and unsteady situations requires reliable estimate of soil thermal conductivity (λ) at varying environmental conditions. In the current work several soil thermal conductivity predicting models including I) de Vries, II) Campbell, III) combined de Vries and Campbell and IV) de Vries-Nobre were evaluated for the four soils of coarse sand, sandy loam, loam and clay loam textured at varying in temperature and bulk density at low moisture range. Thermal conductivities measured by the cylindrical probe method served as the reference for models assessment. Results showed that approximately same thermal conductivities obtained by the five methods at low moisture range (θ ≤ 0.05 m3/m3). Also the de Vries and de Vries-Campbell models produced accurate than Campbell and de vries-Nobre models. The accuracy of the two models increased with soil compaction but decreased with temperature rise. Campbell model showed more reliability at higher (311.16 and 321.16 K) temperatures; but its accuracy declined with soil compaction in current work. It seems that assuming needle shape for the soil particles is far away from the reality whereas assuming spherical shapes may be more realistic and produced more satisfactory prediction of thermal conductivity. The compaction would alter particle arrangement and may increase the contact area of particles; and then make them behave more or less spherical shape.it seems thermal conductivity in solid particles increase via increasing in temperature. Since a modified mineral shape factor, g m , was developed as a combination between sphere and needle according to geometric mean particle diameter as well as bulk density and temperature as modifying factors. This factor increased the accuracy of de Vries-Nobre model up to 10.37%. Regarding nonlinear regression model, moisture content, bulk density, temperature and quartz content demonstrated significant effect on soil thermal conductivity in our

  5. Organic Ligand, Competing Cation, and pH Effects on Dissolution of Zinc in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine the interactive effects of an organic ligand,a competing cation,and pH on the dissolution of zinc(Zn)from three California soils,Maymen sandy loam,Merced clay,and Yolo clay loam.The concentrations of soluble Zn of the three soils were low in a background solution of Ca(NO3)2.Citric acid,a common organic ligand found in the rhizosphere,was effective in mobilizing Zn in these soils; its presence enhanced the concentration of Zn in soil solution by citrate forming a complex with Zn.The ability of Zn to form a complex with citric acid in the soil solution was dependent on the concentration of citric acid,pH,and the concentration of the competing cation Ca2+.The pH of the soil solution determined the extent of desorption of Zn in solid phase in the presence of citric acid.The amounts of Zn released from the solid phase were proportional to the concentration of citric acid and inversely proportional to the concentration of Ca(NO3)2 background solution,which supplied the competing cation Ca2+ for the formation of a complex with citrate.When the soil suspension was spiked with Zn,the adsorption of Zn by the soils was retarded by citric acid via the formation of the soluble Zn-citrate complex.The dissolution of Zn in the presence of citric acid was pH dependent in both adsorption and desorption processes.

  6. Toxicity of 2,4-dinitrotoluene to terrestrial plants in natural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Kuperman, Roman G; Simini, Mike; Hawari, Jalal; Checkai, Ronald T; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2010-07-15

    The presence of energetic materials (used as explosives and propellants) at contaminated sites is a growing international issue, particularly with respect to military base closures and demilitarization policies. Improved understanding of the ecotoxicological effects of these materials is needed in order to accurately assess the potential exposure risks and impacts on the environment and its ecosystems. We studied the toxicity of the nitroaromatic energetic material 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli L. Beauv.), and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) using four natural soils varying in properties (organic matter, clay content, and pH) that were hypothesized to affect chemical bioavailability and toxicity. Amended soils were subjected to natural light conditions, and wetting and drying cycles in a greenhouse for 13 weeks prior to toxicity testing to approximate field exposure conditions in terms of bioavailability, transformation, and degradation of 2,4-DNT. Definitive toxicity tests were performed according to standard protocols. The median effective concentration (EC(50)) values for shoot dry mass ranged from 8 to 229 mg kg(-1), depending on the plant species and soil type. Data indicated that 2,4-DNT was most toxic in the Sassafras (SSL) and Teller (TSL) sandy loam soils, with EC(50) values for shoot dry mass ranging between 8 to 44 mg kg(-1), and least toxic in the Webster clay loam soil, with EC(50) values for shoot dry mass ranging between 40 to 229 mg kg(-1). The toxicity of 2,4-DNT for each of the plant species was significantly (p < or = 0.05) and inversely correlated with the soil organic matter content. Toxicity benchmark values determined in the present studies for 2,4-DNT weathered-and-aged in SSL or TSL soils will contribute to development of an Ecological Soil Screening Level for terrestrial plants that can be used for ecological risk assessment at contaminated sites.

  7. Biodegradation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in three tropical soils using radio labelled PEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, A.L. [Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Centre for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of Sao Paulo (CENA/USP), Piracicaba SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: abdalla@cena.usp.br; Regitano, J.B.; Tornisielo, V.L.; Marchese, L. [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Piracicaba SP (Brazil); Pecanha, M.R.S.R.; Vitti, D.M.S.S. [Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Centre for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of Sao Paulo (CENA/USP), Piracicaba SP (Brazil); Smith, T. [School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-19

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) may be added to forage based diets rich in tannins for ruminant feeding because it binds to tannins and thus prevent the formation of potentially indigestible tannin-protein complexes. The objective of this work was to determine the in vitro biodegradation (mineralization, i.e., complete breakdown of PEG to CO{sub 2}) rate of PEG. {sup 14}C-Polyethylene glycol ({sup 14}C-PEG) was added to three different tropical soils (a sandy clay loam soil, SaCL; a sandy clay soil, SaC; and a sandy loam soil, SaL) and was incubated in Bartha flasks. Free PEG and PEG bound to tannins from a tannin rich local shrub were incubated under aerobic conditions for up to 70 days. The biodegradation assay monitored the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved after degradation of the labelled PEG in the soils. After incubation, the amount of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the {sup 14}C-PEG application was low. Higher PEG mineralization values were found for the soils with higher organic matter contents (20.1 and 18.6 g organic matter/kg for SaCL and SaC, respectively) than for the SaL soil (11.9 g organic matter/kg) (P < 0.05). The extent of mineralization of PEG after 70 days of incubation in the soil was significantly lower (P < 0.05) when it was added as bound to the browse tannin than in the free form (0.040 and 0.079, respectively). (author)

  8. The role of climate and vegetation in weathering and clay mineral formation in late Quaternary soils of the Swiss and Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Markus; Mirabella, Aldo; Sartori, Giacomo

    2008-12-01

    Interactions between climate and soil remain ambiguous, particularly when silicate weathering and clay mineral formation and transformation rates are considered in relation to global climate changes. Recent studies suggest that climate affects weathering rates much less than previously thought. Here we show that the climate in the central European Alps has a significant, but indirect, influence on the weathering of soils through vegetation. The pattern of element leaching and mineral transformations is not only due to precipitation and temperature. Element leaching was greatest in subalpine forests near the timberline; weathering is lessened at higher and lower altitudes. Vegetation, therefore, contributes significantly to weathering processes. The highest accumulation of organic matter was found in climatically cooler sites (subalpine range) where the production of organic ligands, which enhance weathering, is greatest. Patterns of smectite formation and distribution had strong similarities to that of the elemental losses of Fe and Al ( R = 0.69; P climate, element leaching (Fe, Al, Ca, Mg, K, Na), and smectite formation is strongly nonlinear and driven by the podzolisation process, which is more pronounced near the timberline because of the bioclimatic constellation. Climate warming will probably, in the future, lead to a decrease in SOM stocks in the subalpine to alpine range because of more favourable conditions for biodegradation that would also affect weathering processes.

  9. Toxicity of Nitrification Inhibitors on Dehydrogenase Activity in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferisman Tindaon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the effects of nitrification inhibitors (NIs such as 3,4-dimethylpyrazolephosphate=DMPP, 4-Chlor-methylpyrazole phosphate=ClMPP and dicyandiamide,DCD which might be expected to inhibit microbial activity, on dehydrogenase activity (DRA,in three different soils in laboratory conditions. Dehydrogenase activity were assessed via reduction of 2-p-Iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyltetrazoliumchloride (INT. The toxicity and dose response curve of three NIs were quantified under laboratory conditions using a loamy clay, a sandy loam and a sandy soil. The quantitative determination of DHA was carried out spectrophotometrically. In all experiments, the influence of 5-1000 times the base concentration were examined. To evaluate the rate of inhibition with the increasing NI concentrations, dose reponse curves were presented and no observable effect level =NOEL, as well as effective dose ED10 and ED 50(10% and 50% inhibition were calculated. The NOEL for common microbial activity such as DHA was about 30–70 times higher than base concentration in all investigated soils. ClMPP exhibited the strongest influence on the non target microbial processes in the three soils if it compare to DMPP and DCD. The NOEL,ED10 and ED50 values higher in clay than in loamy or sandy soil. The NIs were generally most effective in sandy soils. The three NIs considered at the present state of knowledge as environmentally safe in use.

  10. Soil biological activity at European scale - two calculation concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Janine; Rühlmann, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The CATCH-C project aims to identify and improve the farm-compatibility of Soil Management Practices including to promote productivity, climate change mitigation and soil quality. The focus of this work concentrates on turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM). SOM is fundamental for the maintenance of quality and functions of soils while SOM storage is attributed a great importance in terms of climate change mitigation. The turnover conditions depend on soil biological activity characterized by climate and soil properties. To assess the turnover conditions two model concepts are applied: (I) Biological active time (BAT) regression approach derived from CANDY model (Franko & Oelschlägel 1995) expresses the variation of air temperature, precipitation and soil texture as a timescale and an indicator of biological activity for soil organic matter (SOM) turnover. (II) Re_clim parameter within the Introductory Carbon Balance Model (Andrén & Kätterer 1997) states the soil temperature and soil water to estimate soil biological activity. The modelling includes two strategies to cover the European scale and conditions. BAT was calculated on a 20x20 km grid basis. The European data sets of precipitation and air temperature (time period 1901-2000, monthly resolution), (Mitchell et al. 2004) were used to derive long-term averages. As we focus on agricultural areas we included CORINE data (2006) to extract arable land. The resulting BATs under co-consideration of the main soil textures (clay, silt, sand and loam) were investigated per environmental zone (ENZs, Metzger et al. 2005) that represents similar conditions for precipitation, temperature and relief to identify BAT ranges and hence turnover conditions for each ENZ. Re_clim was quantified by climatic time series of more than 250 weather stations across Europe presented by Klein Tank et al. (2002). Daily temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (maximal thermal extent) were used to calculate

  11. Mineralization of carbon and nitrogen from fresh and anaerobically stored sheep manure in soils of different texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    was insignificant or slightly negative in the three soil-sand mixtures (100% soil+0% quartz sand; 50% soil+50% quartz sand; 25% soil+75% quartz sand). After 84 days, the cumulative CO2 evolution and the net mineralization of N from the fresh manure were highest in the soil-sand mixutre with the lowest clay content......-sand mixture with the lowest clay content was probably caused by a higher remineralization of immobilized N in this soil-sand mixture. Anaerobic storage of the manure reduced the CO2 evolution rates from the manure C in the three soil-sand mixtures during the initial weeks of decomposition. However......A sandy loam soil was mixed with three different amounts of quartz sand and incubated with ((NH4)-N-15)(2)SO4 (60 mu g N g(-1) soil) and fresh or anaerobically stored sheep manure (60 mu g g(-1) soil). The mineralization-immobilization of N and the mineralization of C were studied during 84 days...

  12. 金厂沟梁地区土壤含水粘土矿物含量短波红外光谱反演%Inversion of Hydrated Clay Mineral Content in Soil of Jinchanggouliang Area Based on SWIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹会; 邢立新; 潘军; 刘立文; 杨东旭; 王莹

    2013-01-01

    Based on the physical mechanism that clay mineral can produce characteristic spectrum at shortwave infrared ray ( SWIR) , we chose the characteristic wave band of clay mineral, used the actual analysis results and test data of the mineral components, and adopted multivariate linear regression analysis to build model for inversing the soil clay mineral content of Jinchanggouliang area of Inner Mongolia. The study results demonstrated that applying soil spectral reflectance which was corresponding with the characteristic wave band to establish forecast model could carry out the inversion of hydrated clay mineral content in the soil of this area. The clay mineral content influenced the discretion of the soil spectral reflectance.%基于粘土矿物在短波红外线处产生特征光谱的机理,选出其特征波段,利用矿物组分的实际分析结果和测试数据,采用多元线性回归方法建立模型,对内蒙古金厂沟梁地区的土壤粘土矿物含量进行了反演.研究结果表明:应用特征波段对应的土壤光谱反射率建立预测模型可以用于该地区土壤粘土矿物含量的反演;粘土矿物含量的多少影响光谱反射率的高低.

  13. The role of dissolved organic matter and its adsorption for the fate of heavy metals in clay-rich soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaey, Yasser B.; Jansen, Boris; El-Shater, Abdel-Hamid; El-Haddad, Abdel-Aziz; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Heavy metals (HMs), due to their toxic and hazardous nature, are possibly the most widespread contaminants imposing a serious threat to human health. To find out the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and soil constituents on the uptake of Cu, Ni, and Zn, batch adsorption experiments were conducted using five soils sampled from Egypt. Sorption data were interpreted in terms of the initial mass (IM) isotherm model. In all soils, for all metals and in all experiments, the majority of the HMs were immobilized on the solid phase. The addition of DOM and timing thereof was found to play a pivotal role in determining the affinity of the HMs for the solid phase. When DOM and HMs were added simultaneously, Cu affinity decreased in Fe-(hydr)oxide rich soils (by 7%) and increased in soils poor in Fe-(hydr)oxide (by 6-10%). When DOM was added first, followed by HMs in a later stage affinity of Cu strongly increased in most soils. In contrast, for both Ni and Zn the affinity to the solid phase was enhanced (3-18%) in presence of DOM regardless of whether the DOM was added simultaneously with or prior to HMs addition. The difference is explained by Cu binding to the solid phase and to DOM through strong inner-sphere complexes, whereas Ni and Zn interacted predominantly through weaker electrostatic interactions. As a result Cu was able to bind more strongly to previously adsorbed DOM on the solid phase in case of smectite, while this effect was counteracted by the coating of available specific binding sites on Fe-(hydr)oxides.

  14. Soil Water Repellency of Sands and Clay as Affected by Particle Size%砂土和黏土的颗粒差异对土壤斥水性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨松; 吴珺华; 董红艳; 张燕明

    2016-01-01

    斥水性土壤广泛存在于自然界中,并且对土壤环境和作物生长等有重要影响。建立理想化的土壤颗粒模型对砂土和黏土的斥水特性进行计算分析。结果表明:当接触角很小时,砂土中不存在斥水现象。随着接触角的增大,砂土斥水性与含水率密切相关,砂土的密实度对其斥水性也有重要影响,当砂土比较密实时,土壤的“亲水”与“斥水”特性对含水率特别敏感,随着含水率的变化,砂土可能由亲水性较好的土壤转变为斥水性土壤;当砂土比较松散时,土壤颗粒的斥水性对含水率并不敏感。当黏土接触角略小于90°且湿润半径b也较小时,黏土也存在斥水