WorldWideScience

Sample records for claus-frenz claussen eiji

  1. 75 FR 63533 - Gulf & Ohio Railways Holding Co., Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C. Claussen-Continuance in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35414] Gulf & Ohio Railways Holding Co., Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C. Claussen--Continuance in Control Exemption--Lancaster & Chester Railroad, LLC Gulf & Ohio Railways Holding Co., Inc. (G&O), H. Peter Claussen and Linda...

  2. 76 FR 13271 - Gulf & Ohio Railways, Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C. Claussen-Continuance in Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35414] Gulf & Ohio Railways, Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C. Claussen--Continuance in Control Exemption--Lancaster & Chester Railroad, LLC AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Correction to notice of exemption...

  3. Facile Fabrication of 3D Layer-by-layer Graphene-gold Nanorod Hybrid Architecture for Hydrogen Peroxide Based Electrochemical Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    measurement techniques such as radioisotope tracing, NMR spectroscopy, and microfluorometry assay [12,25,18]. In recent years, electrochemical biosensors...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Facile Fabrication of 3D...Claussen, S. Jedlicka, J.L. Rickus, D.M. Porterfield, J. Neurosci. Methods 189 (2010) 14–22. [17] E.S. McLamore, J. Shi, D. Jaroch, J.C. Claussen, A

  4. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima,Taro; Nakamura,Yosikazu; Nagasaka,Shoichiro; Kamesaki,Toyomi; Oki,Hiroshi; Kajii,Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Masaoki Wada,1,2 Taro Takeshima,1 Yosikazu Nakamura,3 Shoichiro Nagasaka,4 Toyomi Kamesaki,1 Hiroshi Oki,2 Eiji Kajii1 1Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 2Oki Clinic, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Public Health, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan Objective: Dizziness and vertigo are highl...

  5. Lost in Translation: The Importance of Retaining Army Sociocultural Capabilities in an Era of Persistent Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Operations Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. ― George Santayana, The Life of Reason History provides more than enough...York: Dodd, Mead , 1980), 13. 79Takamae Eiji, Inside GHQ: The Allied Occupation of Japan and Its Legacy (New York: Continuum International, 2002), 93...response to the need to assess and unify the operations of the opinion agencies in Japan. 100 According to POSRs first director, Dr. Herbert Passin

  6. Escitalopram for the management of major depressive disorder: a review of its efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability

    OpenAIRE

    Kirino, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Eiji Kirino1,21Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Escitalopram (escitalopram oxalate; Cipralex®, Lexapro®) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) used for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorder. This drug exerts a highly selective, potent, and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the human serotonin tr...

  7. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  8. Giant metal sputtering yields induced by 20-5000 keV/atom gold clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, H.H.; Brunelle, A.; Della-Negra, S.; Depauw, J.; Jacquet, D.; Le Beyec, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Very large non-linear effects have been found in cluster-induced metal sputtering over a broad projectile energy interval for the first time. Recently available cluster beams from tandem accelerators have allowed sputtering yield measurements to be made with Au 1 to Au 5 from 20 keV/atom to 5 MeV/atom. The cluster-sputtering yield maxima were found at the same total energy but not at the same energy/atom as expected. For Au 5 a yield as high as 3000 was reached at 150 keV/atom while the Au 1 yield was only 55 at the same velocity. The Sigmund-Claussen thermal spike theory, which fits published data at low energy, cannot reproduce our extended new data set. (author)

  9. In vitro inhibitory activity of essential oil vapors against Ascosphaera apis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Pavel; Smid, Jakub; Flesar, Jaroslav; Havlik, Jaroslav; Titera, Dalibor; Rada, Vojtech; Drabek, Ondrej; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2012-02-01

    This work evaluates the in vitro inhibitory activity of 70 essential oils (EOs) in the vapor phase for the control of Chalkbrood disease caused by Ascosphaera apis Maassen ex Claussen (Olive et Spiltoir). Two wild strains isolated from infected honey bee colonies together with one standard collection strain were tested by the microatmosphere method. From 70 EOs, 39 exhibited an antifungal effect against A. apis standard and wild strains. The greatest antifungal action was observed for EO vapors from Armoracia rusticana, followed by Thymus vulgaris, Cymbopogon flexosus, Origanum vulgare and Allium sativum. An investigation of chemical composition by GC-MS revealed, that the most active EOs contained allyl isothiocyanate, citral, carvacrol and diallyl sulfides as the main constituents. The chemical composition plays a key role, as activities of different EOs from the same botanical species were different according to their composition.

  10. Quantum Nanobiology and Biophysical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An introduction was provided in the first issue by way of an Editorial to this special two issue volume of Current Physical Chemistry – “Quantum Nanobiology and Biophysical Chemistry” [1]. The Guest Editors would like to thank all the authors and referees who have contributed to this second issue....... Wu et al. use density functional theory to explore the use of Ni/Fe bimetallic nanotechnology in the bioremediation of decabromo-diphenyl esters. Araújo-Chaves et al. explore the binding and reactivity of Mn(III) porphyrins in the membrane mimetic setting of model liposomal systems. Claussen et al....... demonstrate extremely low detection performance of acyl-homoserine lactone in a biologically relevant system using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Sugihara and Bondar evaluate the influence of methyl-groups and the protein environment on retinal geometries in rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin, two...

  11. VLBA Scientists Study Birth of Sunlike Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Three teams of scientists have used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to learn tantalizing new details about how Sun-like stars are formed. Young stars, still growing by drawing in nearby gas, also spew some of that material back into their surroundings, like impatient infants that eat too quickly. The VLBA observations are giving astronomers new insights on both processes -- the accretion of material by the new stars and the outflows of material from them. "For the first time, we're actually seeing what happens right down next to the star in these young systems," said Mark Claussen, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Claussen and other researchers announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. Material attracted by a young star's gravitational pull forms a flat, orbiting disk, called an accretion disk, in which the material circles closer and closer to the star until finally drawn into it. At the same time, material is ejected in "jets" speeding from the poles of the accretion disk. "The VLBA is showing us the first images of the region close to the star where the material in these jets is accelerated and formed into the `beams' of the jet," Claussen said. "We don't understand the details of these processes well," Claussen said. "These VLBA research projects are beginning to help unravel the mysteries of how stars like the Sun form." The teams are observing clumps of water vapor that naturally amplify radio emissions to see details smaller than the orbit of Mercury in young stellar systems as well as track gas motions. The clumps of gas are called masers, and amplify radio emission in much the same way that a laser amplifies light emission. "These images are just fantastic," said Al Wootten of NRAO in Charlottesville, VA. The maser clumps or "spots," emitting radio waves at a specific wavelength, can be tracked as they move over time. In addition

  12. COPD is frequent in conditions of comorbidity in patients treated with various diseases in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yamasaki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Akira Yamasaki, Kiyoshi Hashimoto, Yasuyuki Hasegawa, Ryota Okazaki, Miki Yamamura, Tomoya Harada, Shizuka Ito, Soichiro Ishikawa, Hiroki Takami, Masanari Watanabe, Tadashi Igishi, Yuji Kawasaki, Eiji ShimizuDivision of Medical Oncology and Molecular Respirology, Department of Multidisciplinary Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, JapanBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the leading causes of death and loss of disability-adjusted life-years. However, many COPD patients are not diagnosed because of underrecognition or underdiagnosis of this disease among many patients and physicians. One possible reason is underrecognition of spirometry. In this study, we examined the prevalence of airflow limitation and underlying disease in patients with airflow limitation.Methodology: From April 2006 to March 2008, patients who had spirometry performed were examined. The original disease of patients, pulmonary function tests, smoking status, and respiratory symptoms were surveyed from their medical records.Results: Of all patients who had spirometry performed, 15.8% showed airflow limitation (FEV1/FVC < 0.7. A variety of diseases were observed in patients with airflow limitation. Among all diseases, cardiovascular disease was the highest and gastrointestinal malignant disease had the second highest prevalence in patients with airflow limitation.Conclusion: COPD might be frequent in conditions of comorbidity in patients treated for various diseases. Attention should be paid to the possibility of co-existence of COPD and the influence of COPD on these patients.Keywords: airflow limitation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, comorbidity, spirometry, prevalence

  13. High plasma concentration of beta-D-glucan after administration of sizofiran for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Tokuyasu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirokazu Tokuyasu1, Kenichi Takeda1, Yuji Kawasaki1, Yasuto Sakaguchi2, Noritaka Isowa2, Eiji Shimizu3, Yasuto Ueda31Divisions of Respiratory Medicine, 2Thoracic Surgery, Matsue Red Cross Hospital, 200 Horomachi, Matsue, Shimane; 3Division of Medical Oncology and Molecular Respirology, Department of Multidisciplinary Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago, JapanAbstract: A 69-year-old woman with a history of cervical cancer was admitted to our hospital for further investigation of abnormal shadows on her chest roentgenogram. Histologic examination of transbronchial lung biopsy specimens revealed epithelioid cell granuloma, and Mycobacterium intracellulare was detected in the bronchial lavage fluid. The plasma level of (1→3-beta-D-glucan was very high, and this elevated level was attributed to administration of sizofiran for treatment of cervical cancer 18 years previously. Therefore, in patients with cervical cancer, it is important to confirm whether or not sizofiran has been administered before measuring (1→3-beta-D-glucan levels.Keywords: (1→3-beta-D-glucan, cervical cancer, Mycobacterium intracellulare, sizofiran

  14. Depressive disorders in relation to neurootological complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Elemér; Claussen, Claus-Frenz; Bencze, Gábor; Heid, Lóránt; Bencsik, Beáta; Kersebaum, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Depression is a state of depressed mood characterized by feelings of sadness, despair, and discouragement. Depression ranges from normal feelings of "the blues" through dysthymia to major depression. Endogenous depression has been identified with a specific symptom complex: psychomotor retardation, early morning awakening, weight loss, excessive guilt, and lack of reactivity to the environment. Reactive depression is precipitated by a stressful life event. In the field of depression, we found an overlapping activity between psychiatry and neurootology. Our sample comprises 134 patients (53 [39.55%] male, 81 [60.45%] female) who were classified either by psychiatrists or by neurologists as suffering from depression. By evaluating our neurootological history data bank (Neurootological Data Evaluation-Claussen [NODEC]) as regards 6 important vertigo symptoms, we found that patients presented with a frequency of 2.10 signs per patient. When we extended the list to 11 vertigo and nausea signs, we found 2.93 signs per patients. All patients underwent an objective and quantitative neurootometric analysis. The following rates of abnormal findings were observed: butterfly calorigram of polygraphic electronystagmography, 69.40%; stepping craniocorpograms, 69.40%; and bone-conduction pure-tone audiometry of the right ear, 28.36%, and of the left ear, 36.57%.

  15. Bose-Einstein condensate collapse and dynamical squeezing of vacuum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzetta, E.A.; Hu, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the phenomena of condensate collapse, as described by Donley et al. [Nature 412, 295 (2001)] and N. Claussen [Ph. D thesis, University of Colorado, 2003 (unpublished)] by focusing on the behavior of excitations or fluctuations above the condensate, as driven by the dynamics of the condensate, rather than the dynamics of the condensate alone or the kinetics of the atoms. The dynamics of the condensate squeezes and amplifies the quantum excitations, mixing the positive and negative frequency components of their wave functions thereby creating particles that appear as bursts and jets. By analyzing the changing amplitude and particle content of these excitations, our simple physical picture explains well the overall features of the collapse phenomena and provides excellent quantitative fits with experimental data on several aspects, such as the scaling behavior of the collapse time and the number of particles in the jet. The prediction of the bursts at this level of approximation is less than satisfactory but may be improved by including the backreaction of the excitations on the condensate. The mechanism behind the dominant effect--parametric amplification of vacuum fluctuations and freezing of modes outside of horizon--is similar to that of cosmological particle creation and structure formation in a rapid quench (which is fundamentally different from Hawking radiation in black holes). This shows that Bose-Einstein condensate dynamics is a promising venue for doing 'laboratory cosmology'

  16. Profile of aripiprazole in the treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirino E

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Kirino1–3 1Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, 3Juntendo Institute of Mental Health, Shizuoka, Japan Abstract: Bipolar disorder is a pernicious illness. Compared with the later-onset form, early onset bipolar disorder is associated with worse psychosocial outcomes, and is characterized by rapid cycling and increased risks of substance abuse and suicide attempts. Controlling mood episodes and preventing relapse in this group of pediatric patients requires careful treatment. Here, we review the effectiveness of aripiprazole for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, with discussion of this drug's unique pharmacological profile and various clinical study outcomes. Aripiprazole acts as a serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, as well as a partial agonist of the serotonin 5-HT1A and dopamine D2 receptors. It can be safely used in children and adolescents, as it is highly tolerated and shows lower rates of the side effects typically observed with other antipsychotic drugs, including sedation, weight gain, hyperprolactinemia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. The presently reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-RCTs generally reported aripiprazole to be effective and well-tolerated in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. However, due to the limited number of RCTs, the present conclusions must be evaluated cautiously. Furthermore, aripiprazole cannot yet be considered a preferred treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, as there is not yet evidence that aripiprazole shows greater efficacy compared to other second-generation antipsychotics. Additional data are needed from future head-to-head comparison studies. Keywords: child, mania, mixed state

  17. Feasibility of cognitive remediation therapy for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a single-group pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuda T

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tomoko Okuda,1,2 Kenichi Asano,1,3 Noriko Numata,4 Yoshiyuki Hirano,1,3 Tetsuya Yamamoto,5 Mari Tanaka,4 Daisuke Matsuzawa,4 Eiji Shimizu,1,3,4 Masaomi Iyo,5,6 Michiko Nakazato1,3,6 1Division of Cognitive Behavioral Science, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui, Chiba-shi, Chiba, 2Department of Psychiatry, Chibaken Saiseikai Narashino Hospital, Narashino, 3Research Center for Child Mental Development, Chiba University, 4Department of Cognitive Behavioral Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 5Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba University, 6Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan Background: Set-shifting (SS difficulties and weak central coherence (CC are commonly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT aims to improve such cognitive processing; however, there are no reports on CRT for patients with ASD. This pilot study aimed to provide preliminary evidence to support the use of CRT for individuals with ASD and provide data to inform future studies.Participants and methods: Nineteen individuals with ASD were recruited and administered a series of neuropsychological and questionnaire measures to examine cognitive function and clinical outcomes such as anxiety and depression. Participants received CRT, and cognitive function and clinical variables were re-evaluated at postintervention and after 3 months.Results: The participants demonstrated significant improvement in CC and anxiety at postintervention, which was maintained at 3-month follow-up. Although SS scores had improved with a large effect size, this was not statistically significant.Conclusion: CRT improved CC and anxiety scores for individuals with ASD, suggesting that CRT is an effective treatment for individuals with ASD. Keywords: autism

  18. Level of 8-OHdG in drained dialysate appears to be a marker of peritoneal damage in peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishita Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiyuki Morishita, Minami Watanabe, Ichiro Hirahara, Tetsu Akimoto, Shigeaki Muto, Eiji KusanoDivision of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, JapanPurpose: Peritoneal dialysis (PD is a successful renal replacement therapy; however, long-term PD leads to structural and functional peritoneal damage. Therefore, the monitoring and estimation of peritoneal function are important in PD patients. Oxidative stress has been implicated as one possible mechanism of peritoneal membrane damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, and peritoneal damage in PD patients.Methods: The authors evaluated 8-OHdG in drained dialysate by enzyme immunoassay to investigate the association between 8-OHdG and solute transport rate estimated by peritoneal equilibration test and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 level in 45 samples from 28 PD patients.Results: The 8-OHdG level was significantly correlated with dialysate:plasma creatine ratio (r = 0.463, P < 0.05 and significantly inversely correlated with D/D0 glucose (where D is the glucose level of peritoneal effluents obtained 4 hours after the injection and D0 is the glucose level obtained immediately after the injection (r = -0.474, P < 0.05. The 8-OHdG level was also significantly correlated with MMP-2 level (r = 0.551, P < 0.05, but it was not correlated with the age of subjects, the duration of PD, or blood pressure.Conclusion: The level of 8-OHdG in drained dialysate may be a useful novel marker of peritoneal damage in PD.Keywords: oxidative stress, solute transport rate, MMP-2, peritoneal equilibration test

  19. Escitalopram for the management of major depressive disorder: a review of its efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirino E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Kirino1,21Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Escitalopram (escitalopram oxalate; Cipralex®, Lexapro® is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI used for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD and anxiety disorder. This drug exerts a highly selective, potent, and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the human serotonin transport. By inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin into presynaptic nerve endings, this drug enhances the activity of serotonin in the central nervous system. Escitalopram also has allosteric activity. Moreover, the possibility of interacting with other drugs is considered low. This review covers randomized, controlled studies that enrolled adult patients with MDD to evaluate the efficacy of escitalopram based on the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The results showed that escitalopram was superior to placebo, and nearly equal or superior to other SSRIs (eg, citalopram, paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (eg, duloxetine, sustained-release venlafaxine. In addition, with long-term administration, escitalopram has shown a preventive effect on MDD relapse and recurrence. Escitalopram also showed favorable tolerability, and associated adverse events were generally mild and temporary. Discontinuation symptoms were milder with escitalopram than with paroxetine. In view of the patient acceptability of escitalopram, based on both a meta-analysis and a pooled analysis, this drug was more favorable than other new antidepressants. The findings indicate that escitalopram achieved high continuity in antidepressant drug therapy.Keywords: escitalopram, MDD, SSRI, allosteric action, discontinuation symptoms

  20. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway are not involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold induced by plantar incision in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtani N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Norimasa Ohtani, Eiji Masaki Division of Dento-oral Anesthesiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan Background: Approximately half of all patients who undergo surgery develop postoperative pain, the mechanisms of which are not well understood by anesthesiologists. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway play an important role in regulation of pain transmission in the spinal cord. Impairment of inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord is suggested as part of the mechanism for neuropathic pain, which is one component of postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether impairment of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold in rats.Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g were anesthetized with sevoflurane and an intrathecal (IT catheter was implanted. Six days later, a plantar incision was made. On the following day, saline, a D2-like receptor agonist (quinpirole, or a D2-like receptor antagonist (sulpiride was administered intrathecally. Thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were assessed by exposure to infrared radiant heat and the von Frey filament test before and after plantar incision.Results: Plantar incision decreased both thermal latency and the mechanical nociceptive threshold. IT administration of quinpirole inhibited the nociceptive responses induced by plantar incision, but sulpiride had no effect.Conclusion: A D2-like receptor agonist had antinociceptive effects on the hypersensitivity response triggered by a surgical incision, but a D2-like receptor antagonist had no effect on this response. These results suggest that impairment and/or modification of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is not involved in the postoperative decrease in nociceptive threshold. Keywords: postoperative pain, descending pathway

  1. Rapid improvement of depressive symptoms in suicide attempters following treatment with milnacipran and tricyclic antidepressants – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirino E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Kirino, Masao GitohDepartment of Psychiatry, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Shizuoka, JapanAbstract: Suicide is a serious social problem in many countries, including Japan. The majority of people who commit suicide suffer from depression. Suicide attempt patients suffering from serious physical injuries are initially treated in hospital emergency departments. The present post hoc analysis examined data from patients admitted to an emergency hospital for treatment of physical injuries, resulting from a suicide attempt, and initial psychiatric treatment for depression and prevention of future suicide attempts. The effects on depressive symptoms were studied in two groups of patients using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAMD. One group (n = 6 had received intravenous tricyclic antidepressants (TCA (amitriptyline or clomipramine while the other group (n = 7 had been treated orally with milnacipran, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant. Prior to treatment the four highest scoring items on the HAMD scale were the same in both groups namely, item 1 (depressed mood, item 3 (suicidality, item 7 (interest in work and activities, and item 10 (psychic anxiety. After 1 week of treatment, mean global HAMD scores were significantly reduced in both groups. Treatment resulted in a significant reduction of five HAMD items in the TCA group, whereas in the milnacipran group 12 HAMD items were significantly reduced. Suicidality (item 3 was significantly improved by 1 week treatment with milnacipran, but not by TCAs. Milnacipran rapidly improved a wide range of depressive symptoms, including suicidality within the first week. The improvement with milnacipran would appear to be, at least, equivalent to that achieved with TCAs, possibly affecting a wider range of symptoms. Since milnacipran has been shown in comparative studies to be better tolerated than TCAs, this antidepressant offers an interesting option for the

  2. Astronomers See First Stages of Planet-Building Around Nearby Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Interstellar travelers might want to detour around the star system TW Hydrae to avoid a messy planetary construction site. Astronomer David Wilner of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and his colleagues have discovered that the gaseous protoplanetary disk surrounding TW Hydrae holds vast swaths of pebbles extending outward for at least 1 billion miles. These rocky chunks should continue to grow in size as they collide and stick together until they eventually form planets. Dust Disk Graphic Artist's Conception of Dusty Disk Around Young Star TW Hydrae CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version 1.8 MB) "We're seeing planet building happening right before our eyes," said Wilner. "The foundation has been laid and now the building materials are coming together to make a new solar system." Wilner used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array to measure radio emissions from TW Hydrae. He detected radiation from a cold, extended dust disk suffused with centimeter-sized pebbles. Such pebbles are a prerequisite for planet formation, created as dust collects together into larger and larger clumps. Over millions of years, those clumps grow into planets. "We're seeing an important step on the path from interstellar dust particles to planets," said Mark Claussen (NRAO), a co-author on the paper announcing the discovery. "No one has seen this before." A dusty disk like that in TW Hydrae tends to emit radio waves with wavelengths similar to the size of the particles in the disk. Other effects can mask this, however. In TW Hydrae, the astronomers explained, both the relatively close distance of the system and the stage of the young star's evolution are just right to allow the relationship of particle size and wavelength to prevail. The scientists observed the young star's disk with the VLA at several centimeter-range wavelengths. "The strong emission at wavelengths of a few centimeters is convincing evidence that particles of

  3. Critical theory and holocaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Predrag

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author is attempting to establish the relationship - or the lack of it - of the Critical Theory to the "Jewish question" and justification of perceiving signs of Jewish religious heritage in the thought of the representatives of this movement. The holocaust marked out by the name of "Auschwitz", is here tested as a point where the nature of this relationship has been decided. In this encounter with the cardinal challenge for the contemporary social theory, the particularity of the Frankfurt School reaction is here revealed through Adorno installing Auschwitz as unexpected but lawful emblem of the ending of the course that modern history has assumed. The critique of this "fascination" with Auschwitz, as well as certain theoretical pacification and measured positioning of the holocaust into discontinued plane of "unfinished" and continuation and closure of the valued project, are given through communicative-theoretical pre-orientation of Jürgen Habermas’s Critical Theory and of his followers. Finally, through the work of Detlev Claussen, it is suggested that in the youngest generation of Adorno’s students there are signs of revision to once already revised Critical Theory and a kind of defractured and differentiated return to the initial understanding of the decisiveness of the holocaust experience. This shift in the attitude of the Critical Theory thinkers to the provocation of holocaust is not, however, particularly reflected towards the status of Jews and their tradition, but more to the age old questioning and explanatory patterns for which they served as a "model". The question of validity of the enlightenment project, the nature of occidental rationalism, (nonexistence of historical theology and understanding of the identity and emancipation - describe the circle of problems around which the disagreement is concentrated in the social critical theory.

  4. First detection of the larval chalkbrood disease pathogen Ascosphaera apis (Ascomycota: Eurotiomycetes: Ascosphaerales) in adult bumble bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxfield-Taylor, Sarah A; Mujic, Alija B; Rao, Sujaya

    2015-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Ascosphaera (Ascomycota: Eurotiomycetes: Ascosphaerales) cause chalkbrood disease in larvae of bees. Here, we report the first-ever detection of the fungus in adult bumble bees that were raised in captivity for studies on colony development. Wild queens of Bombus griseocollis, B. nevadensis and B. vosnesenskii were collected and maintained for establishment of nests. Queens that died during rearing or that did not lay eggs within one month of capture were dissected, and tissues were examined microscopically for the presence of pathogens. Filamentous fungi that were detected were plated on artificial media containing broad spectrum antibiotics for isolation and identification. Based on morphological characters, the fungus was identified as Ascosphaera apis (Maasen ex Claussen) Olive and Spiltoir, a species that has been reported earlier only from larvae of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, the Asian honey bee, Apis cerana, and the carpenter bee Xylocopa californica arizonensis. The identity of the fungus was confirmed using molecular markers and phylogenetic analysis. Ascosphaera apis was detected in queens of all three bumble bee species examined. Of 150 queens dissected, 12 (8%) contained vegetative and reproductive stages of the fungus. Both fungal stages were also detected in two workers collected from colonies with Ascosphaera-infected B. nevadensis queens. In this study, wild bees could have been infected prior to capture for rearing, or, the A. apis infection could have originated via contaminated European honey bee pollen fed to the bumble bees in captivity. Thus, the discovery of A. apis in adult bumble bees in the current study has important implications for commercial production of bumble bee colonies and highlights potential risks to native bees via pathogen spillover from infected bees and infected pollen.

  5. First detection of the larval chalkbrood disease pathogen Ascosphaera apis (Ascomycota: Eurotiomycetes: Ascosphaerales in adult bumble bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Maxfield-Taylor

    Full Text Available Fungi in the genus Ascosphaera (Ascomycota: Eurotiomycetes: Ascosphaerales cause chalkbrood disease in larvae of bees. Here, we report the first-ever detection of the fungus in adult bumble bees that were raised in captivity for studies on colony development. Wild queens of Bombus griseocollis, B. nevadensis and B. vosnesenskii were collected and maintained for establishment of nests. Queens that died during rearing or that did not lay eggs within one month of capture were dissected, and tissues were examined microscopically for the presence of pathogens. Filamentous fungi that were detected were plated on artificial media containing broad spectrum antibiotics for isolation and identification. Based on morphological characters, the fungus was identified as Ascosphaera apis (Maasen ex Claussen Olive and Spiltoir, a species that has been reported earlier only from larvae of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, the Asian honey bee, Apis cerana, and the carpenter bee Xylocopa californica arizonensis. The identity of the fungus was confirmed using molecular markers and phylogenetic analysis. Ascosphaera apis was detected in queens of all three bumble bee species examined. Of 150 queens dissected, 12 (8% contained vegetative and reproductive stages of the fungus. Both fungal stages were also detected in two workers collected from colonies with Ascosphaera-infected B. nevadensis queens. In this study, wild bees could have been infected prior to capture for rearing, or, the A. apis infection could have originated via contaminated European honey bee pollen fed to the bumble bees in captivity. Thus, the discovery of A. apis in adult bumble bees in the current study has important implications for commercial production of bumble bee colonies and highlights potential risks to native bees via pathogen spillover from infected bees and infected pollen.

  6. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Masaoki Wada,1,2 Taro Takeshima,1 Yosikazu Nakamura,3 Shoichiro Nagasaka,4 Toyomi Kamesaki,1 Hiroshi Oki,2 Eiji Kajii1 1Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 2Oki Clinic, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Public Health, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan Objective: Dizziness and vertigo are highly prevalent symptoms among patients presenting at primary care clinics, and peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD is their most frequent cause. However, the incidence of PVD has not been well documented. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD among patients presenting at a primary care clinic. Design: This was an observational study. Setting and participants: Between November 2011 and March 2013, we observed 393 patients, all at least 20 years old, who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months at a primary clinic (Oki Clinic in Japan. Outcome: The main outcome of interest was new incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD events. During the 1-year follow-up period, the otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported new PVD events. Results: The mean age of the 393 participants at entry was 65.5 years. Of the study participants, 12.7%, 82.4%, and 92.6% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. We followed up all the participants (100%. During the 662.5 person-years of follow-up, 121 cases of dizziness or vertigo (dizziness/vertigo and 76 cases of PVD were observed. The incidence of dizziness/vertigo and PVD was 194.7 (95% confidence interval: 161.6–232.6 per 1,000 person-years and 115.7 (95% confidence interval: 92.2–142.6 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. There were 61 cases of acute peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 of

  7. The effects of continuous application of sunscreen on photoaged skin in Japanese elderly people – the relationship with the usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuno M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Mizuno,1,2 Kayo Kunimoto,1 Eiji Naru,2 Koichi Kameyama,2 Fukumi Furukawa,1 Yuki Yamamoto1,3 1Department of Dermatology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan; 2Fundamental Research Laboratories, KOSÉ Corporation, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Cosmetic Dermatology and Photomedicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan Abstract: Since photoaging of skin is caused by chronic sun exposure, it is well-recognized that regular sunscreen use can help prevent photoaging of skin in fair-skinned people. Therefore, application of sunscreen is recommended for the prevention of photoaging in many countries. However, the relationship between UV exposure and photoaging has rarely been investigated in clinical studies in Japan. In addition, there have been almost no long-term interventional studies in Japanese people. We have previously conducted a study where Japanese actinic keratosis patients were instructed to continuously apply sunscreen. The results indicated that long-term application of sunscreen is effective in suppressing actinic keratosis progression and generation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sunscreen on photoaged skin in 14 elderly Japanese people. Skin conditions such as water content, transepidermal water loss, the number of spots, wrinkles, and skin color tone uniformity were measured and compared before and after the study. A statistically significant difference was observed only in skin surface hydration. There were large inter-individual differences in amount of sunscreen used throughout the study. The changes in the number of spots and skin color tone uniformity during the 18 months showed good correlation with amount of sunscreen being used. These results suggest an increase in the number of spots and deterioration in skin color tone uniformity in the 18-month non-sunscreen application period, and that such skin conditions improved with increasing use of sunscreen. In this study, we suggested

  8. Use of a semiquantitative procalcitonin kit for evaluating severity and predicting mortality in patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenzaka T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tsuneaki Kenzaka,1 Masanobu Okayama,2 Shigehiro Kuroki,1 Miho Fukui,3 Shinsuke Yahata,3 Hiroki Hayashi,3 Akihito Kitao,3 Eiji Kajii,2 Masayoshi Hashimoto41Division of General Medicine, 2Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke; 3Department of General Medicine, Toyooka Public Hospital, Toyooka; 4Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, JapanBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of a semiquantitative procalcitonin kit for assessing severity of sepsis and early determination of mortality in affected patients.Methods: This was a prospective, observational study including 206 septic patients enrolled between June 2008 and August 2009. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores were measured, along with semiquantitative procalcitonin concentrations. Patients were divided into three groups based on their semiquantitative procalcitonin concentrations (group A, <2 ng/mL; group B ≥ 2 ng/mL < 10 ng/mL; group C ≥ 10 ng/mL.Results: A significant difference in DIC, SOFA, and APACHE II scores was found between group A and group C and between group B and group C (P < 0.01. Patients with severe sepsis and septic shock had significantly higher procalcitonin concentrations than did patients with less severe disease. The rate of patients with septic shock with high procalcitonin concentrations showed an upward trend. There was a significant (P < 0.01 difference between the three groups with regard to numbers of patients and rates of severe sepsis, septic shock, DIC, and mortality.Conclusion: Semiquantitative procalcitonin concentration testing can be helpful for early assessment of disease severity in patients with sepsis. Furthermore, it may also help in predicting early

  9. Associations between deepness of response and clinical outcomes among Japanese patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with second-line FOLFIRI plus cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osumi H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hiroki Osumi, Satoshi Matsusaka, Mitsukuni Suenaga, Eiji Shinozaki, Nobuyuki Mizunuma Department of Gastroenterology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan Background: In the FIRE-3 trial, overall survival (OS was significantly longer in patients treated with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab (C-mab than in those treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab (Bev, but progression-free survival (PFS was not significantly different. This may be associated with the deepness of response (DpR in patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between clinical outcome and DpR in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients treated with second-line FOLFIRI plus C-mab.Methods: A total of 112 patients with histopathologically confirmed mCRC treated with second-line FOLFIRI in combination with C-mab (N=42 or Bev (N=70 were retrospectively enrolled between October 2008 and June 2013. The relationship between DpR and clinical outcome in patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab or Bev was determined.Results: Forty-two patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab had a mean DpR of 6.1% (interquartile range: -13.7%, 20.8% and a minimum DpR of -62.7%. On the other hand, 70 patients treated with FOLFIRI plus Bev had a mean DpR of 0% (interquartile range: -16%, 10% and a minimum DpR of -111%. DpR ≥30% was associated with significantly longer OS and PFS when compared with DpR ≤30% in patients given FOLFIRI plus C-mab. DpR (≥30% was independently associated with prolongation of OS and PFS. In patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab, there was a moderate positive correlation between DpR and clinical outcomes (OS: r=0.51, P<0.001; PFS: r=0.54, P<0.001.Conclusion: FOLFIRI plus C-mab yielded a stronger correlation between DpR and clinical outcomes. These results indicate the potential of DpR as a new measure of efficacy in mCRC patients treated with second-line chemotherapy plus C-mab. Keywords: deepness of

  10. Anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism detected by Doppler ultrasound in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenaga M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitsukuni Suenaga, Nobuyuki Mizunuma, Eiji Shinozaki, Satoshi Matsusaka, Masato Ozaka, Mariko Ogura, Keisho Chin, Toshiharu Yamaguchi Department of Gastroenterology, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan Background: Doppler ultrasound imaging is useful for management of venous thromboembolism associated with a subclavicular implantable central venous access system in patients receiving bevacizumab (Bev. We investigated the efficacy and safety of our anticoagulant regimen based on Doppler findings.Methods: Patients aged ≤75 years with metastatic colorectal cancer, no history of thromboembolism, and no prior use of Bev received chemotherapy plus Bev. Doppler ultrasound imaging of the deep venous system to detect thrombosis was performed after the first course of Bev and repeated after the third course in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis. Indications for anticoagulant therapy in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis were as follows: enlarging thrombus (E, thrombus >40 mm in diameter (S, thrombus involving the superior vena cava (C, and decreased blood flow (V.Results: Among 79 patients enrolled in this study, asymptomatic thrombosis was detected in 56 patients (70.9% by Doppler ultrasound imaging after the first course of Bev and there was no thrombus in 23 patients (29.1%. Of these 56 patients, 11 (19.6% received anticoagulant therapy with warfarin, including eight after the first course and three after follow-up imaging. S + V was observed in four of 11 patients (36.4%, as well as V in two (18.2%, S + V + C in one (9.1%, E + S + V in one (9.1%, E + C in one (9.1%, E in one (9.1%, and C in one (9.1%. All patients resumed chemotherapy, including seven who resumed Bev. Improvement or stabilization of thrombi was achieved in ten patients (90.9%. Only one patient had symptomatic thromboembolism. Mild bleeding due to anticoagulant therapy occurred in six patients (54.5%, but there were no treatment

  11. Perceptions and impact of bipolar disorder in Japan: results of an Internet survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe K

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Koichiro Watanabe,1 Eiji Harada,2 Takeshi Inoue,3 Yuka Tanji,2 Toshiaki Kikuchi1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyorin University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, 2Medical Science, Medicines Development Unit-Japan, Eli Lilly Japan KK, Hyogo, 3Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Bipolar disorder is a recurrent and episodic illness. This survey study assessed experiences and identified clinical insights of individuals with bipolar disorder. An Internet-based monitor system database was screened for patients with bipolar disorder in Japan (February and March 2013. Of 1,050 patients, 457 completed surveys, and results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Approximately one-fourth of respondents were diagnosed with bipolar disorder on their first visit to medical institutions, although the most common initial diagnosis was depression/depressive state (65%. Mean time lag between first-time visit to a medical institution and receipt of correct diagnosis of bipolar disorder was 4 years; one-third of patients experienced more than 5 years of lag time. Three perceived reasons for lapsed time before correct diagnosis were “(patients Did not consider manic symptoms as illness, and did not tell the doctor about them,” “I (patient did not know of bipolar disorder,” and “Lack of communication between my doctor and myself (patient.” Among participants who believed that they were initially incorrectly diagnosed and improperly treated, most experienced socioeconomic problems, such as having long-term inability to work or to study (65%. Sources of encouragement for participants included “To have someone to consult with” (41% followed by having “People around me treat me the same as before” (40%. Individuals with bipolar disorder reported a time lag of many years before accurate diagnosis, and substantial burden imposed by the illness. Encouragement should be provided for individuals to live positively

  12. An in vivo mechanism for the reduced peripheral neurotoxicity of NK105: a paclitaxel-incorporating polymeric micellar nanoparticle formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Iwao Nakamura, Eiji Ichimura, Rika Goda, Hitomi Hayashi, Hiroko Mashiba, Daichi Nagai, Hirofumi Yokoyama, Takeshi Onda, Akira Masuda Nanomedicine Group, Pharmaceutical Research Laboratories, Nippon Kayaku Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan Abstract: In our previous rodent studies, the paclitaxel (PTX-incorporating polymeric micellar nanoparticle formulation NK105 had showed significantly stronger antitumor effects and reduced peripheral neurotoxicity than PTX dissolved in Cremophor® EL and ethanol (PTX/CRE. Thus, to elucidate the mechanisms underlying reduced peripheral neurotoxicity due to NK105, we performed pharmacokinetic analyses of NK105 and PTX/CRE in rats. Among neural tissues, the highest PTX concentrations were found in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG. Moreover, exposure of DRG to PTX (Cmax_PTX and AUC0-inf._PTX in the NK105 group was almost half that in the PTX/CRE group, whereas exposure of sciatic and sural nerves was greater in the NK105 group than in the PTX/CRE group. In histopathological analyses, damage to DRG and both peripheral nerves was less in the NK105 group than in the PTX/CRE group. The consistency of these pharmacokinetic and histopathological data suggests that high levels of PTX in the DRG play an important role in the induction of peripheral neurotoxicity, and reduced distribution of PTX to the DRG of NK105-treated rats limits the ensuing peripheral neurotoxicity. In further analyses of PTX distribution to the DRG, Evans blue (Eb was injected with BODIPY®-labeled NK105 into rats, and Eb fluorescence was observed only in the DRG. Following injection, most Eb dye bound to albumin particles of ~8 nm and had penetrated the DRG. In contrast, BODIPY®–NK105 particles of ~90 nm were not found in the DRG, suggesting differential penetration based on particle size. Because PTX also circulates as PTX–albumin particles of ~8 nm following injection of PTX/CRE, reduced peripheral neurotoxicity of NK105 may reflect exclusion from the

  13. Association of code status discussion with invasive procedures among advanced-stage cancer and noncancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Akinori Sasaki,1 Eiji Hiraoka,1 Yosuke Homma,2 Osamu Takahashi,3 Yasuhiro Norisue,4 Koji Kawai,5 Shigeki Fujitani4 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center, Urayasu City, Chiba, 3Department of Internal Medicine, St. Luke’s International Hospital, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 4Department of Critical Care Medicine, Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center, Urayasu City, Chiba, 5Department of Gastroenterology, Ito Municipal Hospital, Ito City, Shizuoka, Japan Background: Code status discussion is associated with a decrease in invasive procedures among terminally ill cancer patients. We investigated the association between code status discussion on admission and incidence of invasive procedures, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, and opioid use among inpatients with advanced stages of cancer and noncancer diseases. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study in a single center, Ito Municipal Hospital, Japan. Participants were patients who were admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine between October 1, 2013 and August 30, 2015, with advanced-stage cancer and noncancer. We collected demographic data and inquired the presence or absence of code status discussion within 24 hours of admission and whether invasive procedures, including central venous catheter placement, intubation with mechanical ventilation, and CPR for cardiac arrest, and opioid treatment were performed. We investigated the factors associated with CPR events by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Among the total 232 patients, code status was discussed with 115 patients on admission, of which 114 (99.1% patients had do-not-resuscitate (DNR orders. The code status was not discussed with the remaining 117 patients on admission, of which 69 (59% patients had subsequent code status discussion with resultant DNR orders. Code status discussion on admission decreased the incidence of central venous

  14. Associations among depression severity, painful physical symptoms, and social and occupational functioning impairment in patients with major depressive disorder: a 3-month, prospective, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Harada,1 Yoichi Satoi,2 Atsushi Kuga,1 Hirofumi Tokuoka,1 Toshiaki Kikuchi,3 Koichiro Watanabe,4 Levent Alev,1 Masaru Mimura3 1Biomedicine, Medicines Development Unit Japan, Eli Lilly Japan K.K, Kobe, Japan; 2Statistical Science, Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, Japan; 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: To investigate associations among depression severity, painful physical symptoms (PPS, and social and occupational functioning impairment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD who had achieved complete remission (CR or partial remission (PR after acute treatment.Patients and methods: This was a 12-week, multicenter, prospective, observational study. Patients with MDD treated with an antidepressant medication for the previous 12 weeks (±3 weeks who had achieved CR (defined as a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HAM-D17] score ≤7 or PR (HAM-D17 score ≥8 and ≤8 were enrolled. Depression severity, PPS, and impairment in social and occupational functioning were assessed using the HAM-D17, the Brief Pain Inventory (Short Form (BPI-SF, and the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS, respectively, at enrollment (Week 12 and after 12 weeks (Week 24.Results: Overall, 323 Japanese patients with MDD were enrolled (CR n=158, PR n=165 and 288 patients completed the study (CR n=139, PR n=149. HAM-D17 and SOFAS scores were strongly and negatively correlated at enrollment (Week 12; P<0.0001 and Week 24 (P<0.0001. A weak negative correlation between the BPI-SF and SOFAS was observed at Week 24 (P=0.0011, but not at enrollment (P=0.164. Remission status at enrollment (CR or PR was associated with achieving normal social and occupational functioning (SOFAS score ≥80 at Week 24 in patients who had not achieved normal social and occupational functioning (SOFAS score <80 at

  15. Residual symptoms in patients with partial versus complete remission of a major depressive disorder episode: patterns of painful physical symptoms in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Harada,1 Yoichi Satoi,2 Toshiaki Kikuchi,3 Koichiro Watanabe,3 Levent Alev,1 Masaru Mimura4 1Medical Science, Medicines Development Unit-Japan, 2Statistical Science, Medicines Development Unit-Japan, Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, Hyogo, 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Objective: The patterns of residual painful physical symptoms (PPS and emotional symptoms among patients with partial remission (PR or complete remission (CR of a major depressive disorder (MDD episode were compared. Methods: This is a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study. Patients who had originally been diagnosed with MDD, were treated with an antidepressant for 12 weeks for that episode, and achieved either PR or CR at study entry were enrolled in the study. Using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17, PR was defined as a score of ≥8 and ≤18 and CR as a score of ≤7. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF and the HAM-D17.Results: A total of 323 patients (CR =158, PR =165 were included in the study. Patients in the PR group had a higher mean (standard deviation score in the HAM-D17 than those in the CR group (11.8 [3.1] and 4.4 [2.0], respectively. BPI-SF results showed that “at least moderate PPS” (score ≥3 on BPI-SF question 5 was significantly more prevalent among patients with PR than those with CR (37.0% vs 16.5%, respectively; odds ratio =3.04; P<0.001. Presence of pain (any severity was also more prevalent among patients with PR than those with CR (54.5% vs 35.4%, respectively. The HAM-D17 results for individual items indicated that impaired work and activities, depressed mood, psychological and somatic anxiety, and general somatic symptoms were observed in at least 75% of patients with PR.Conclusion: PR was associated with a higher prevalence of at least moderate PPS

  16. Association between pain severity, depression severity, and use of health care services in Japan: results of a nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vietri J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Vietri,1 Tempei Otsubo,2 William Montgomery,3 Toshinaga Tsuji,4 Eiji Harada5 1Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, Milan, Italy; 2Tokyo Shinjuku Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan; 3Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd., West Ryde, Australia; 4Medical Affairs, Shionogi & Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan; 5Eli Lilly Japan KK, Kobe, Japan Background: Depression is often associated with painful physical symptoms. Previous research has seldom assessed the relationship between the severity of physical symptoms and the severity of mental and emotional symptoms of depression or other health outcomes, and no such studies have been conducted previously among individuals with depression in Japan. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the severity of physical pain and depression and other outcomes among individuals in Japan diagnosed with depression.Methods: Data for individuals aged 18 and older in Japan who reported being diagnosed with depression and also reported physical pain were obtained from the Japan National Health and Wellness Survey. These respondents were characterized on sociodemographics and health characteristics, and the relationship between ratings of severity on pain in the last week and health outcomes were assessed using bivariate correlations and generalized linear models. Measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire for depression severity, Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short Form Survey Instrument for health-related quality of life, the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment for work and activity impairment, and 6-month report of health care use.Results: More severe physical pain in the past week was correlated with more severe depression, worse health-related quality of life, lower health utility, greater impairment at work, and more health care provider visits. These relationships remained significant after incorporating sociodemographics and health characteristics in the statistical models

  17. What is the true definition of a "Do-Not-Resuscitate" order? A Japanese perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraoka E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Hiraoka,1 Yosuke Homma,2 Yasuhiro Norisue,3 Takaki Naito,1 Yuko Kataoka,1 Osamu Hamada,1 Yo Den,1 Osamu Takahashi,4 Shigeki Fujitani3 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, 3Department of Critical Care Medicine, Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center, Chiba, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, St Luke’s International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan Background: Japan has no official guidelines for do-not-resuscitate (DNR orders. Therefore, we investigated the effect of DNR orders on physician decision making in relation to performing noncardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and CPR procedures.Methods: A case-scenario-based questionnaire that included a case of advanced cancer, a case of advanced dementia, and a case of nonadvanced heart failure was administered to physicians. The questions determined whether physicians would perform different non-CPR procedures and CPR procedures in the presence or absence of DNR orders. The number of non-CPR procedures each physician would perform and the number of physicians who would perform each non-CPR and CPR procedure in the absence and presence of DNR ocrders were compared. Physicians from three Japanese municipal acute care hospitals participated.Results: We analyzed 111 of 161 (69% questionnaires. Physicians would perform significantly fewer non-CPR procedures in the presence of DNR orders than in the absence of DNR orders for all three case scenarios (median [interquartile range] percentages: Case 1: 72% [45%–90%] vs 100% [90%–100%]; Case 2: 55% [36%–72%] vs 91% [63%–100%]; Case 3: 78% [55%–88%] vs 100% [88%–100%]. Fewer physicians would perform non-CPR and CPR procedures in the presence of DNR orders than in the absence of DNR orders. However, considerable numbers of physicians would perform electric shock treatment for ventricular fibrillation in the presence of DNR orders (Case 1: 26%; Case 2: 16%; Case 3: 20%.Conclusion: DNR orders affect physician

  18. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  19. Vegetation and land carbon feedbacks in the high-resolution transient Holocene simulations using the MPI Earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkin, Victor; Lorenz, Stephan; Raddatz, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Plants influence climate through changes in the land surface biophysics (albedo, transpiration) and concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases. One of the interesting periods to investigate a climatic role of terrestrial biosphere is the Holocene, when, despite of the relatively steady global climate, the atmospheric CO2 grew by about 20 ppm from 7 kyr BP to pre-industrial. We use a new setup of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model MPI-ESM1 consisting of the latest version of the atmospheric model ECHAM6, including the land surface model JSBACH3 with carbon cycle and vegetation dynamics, coupled to the ocean circulation model MPI-OM, which includes the HAMOCC model of ocean biogeochemistry. The model has been run for several simulations over the Holocene period of the last 8000 years under the forcing data sets of orbital insolation, atmospheric greenhouse gases, volcanic aerosols, solar irradiance and stratospheric ozone, as well as land-use changes. In response to this forcing, the land carbon storage increased by about 60 PgC between 8 and 4 kyr BP, stayed relatively constant until 2 kyr BP, and decreased by about 90 PgC by 1850 AD due to land use changes. Vegetation and soil carbon changes significantly affected atmospheric CO2 during the periods of strong volcanic eruptions. In response to the eruption-caused cooling, the land initially stores more carbon as respiration decreases, but then it releases even more carbon due to productivity decrease. This decadal- scale variability helps to quantify the vegetation and land carbon feedbacks during the past periods when the temporal resolution of the ice-core CO2 record is not sufficient to capture fast CO2 variations. From a set of Holocene simulations with prescribed or interactive atmospheric CO2, we get estimates of climate-carbon feedback useful for future climate studies. Members of the Hamburg Holocene Team: Jürgen Bader1, Sebastian Bathiany2, Victor Brovkin1, Martin Claussen1,3, Traute Cr

  20. Holocene climate change in North Africa and the end of the African humid period - results of new high-resolution transient simulations with the MPI-ESM 1.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmeyer, Anne; Claussen, Martin; Lorenz, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    The Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology has recently undertaken high-resolution transient Holocene simulations using the fully-coupled Earth System Model MPI-ESM 1.3. The simulations cover the last 8000 years and are forced not only by reconstructed Holocene orbital variations and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, but also by recent compilations of Holocene volcanic aerosol distributions, variations in spectral solar irradiance, stratospheric ozone and land-use change. The simulations reveal the ubiquitous "Holocene conundrum": simulated global mean temperatures increase during the mid-Holocene and stay constant during the late Holocene. Simulated mid-Holocene near-surface temperatures are too cold in large parts of the world. Simulated precipitation, however, agrees much better with reconstruction than temperatures do. Likewise simulated global biome pattern fit reconstructions nicely, except for North Western America. First results of these simulations are presented with the main focus on the North African monsoon region. The amplitude of the mid-Holocene African Humid Period (AHP) is well captured in terms of precipitation and vegetation cover, so is the south-ward transgression of the termination of the AHP seen in reconstructions. The Holocene weakening and southward retreat of the North African monsoon as well as changes in the monsoon dynamic including shifts in the seasonal cycle and their relation to the locally varying termination of the AHP are discussed in detail. Members of the Hamburg Holocene Team: Jürgen Bader (1), Sebastian Bathiany (2), Victor Brovkin (1), Martin Claussen (1,3), Traute Crüger (1), Roberta D'agostino (1), Anne Dallmeyer (1), Sabine Egerer (1), Vivienne Groner (1), Matthias Heinze (1), Tatiana Ilyina (1), Johann Jungclaus (1), Thomas Kleinen (1), Alexander Lemburg (1), Stephan Lorenz (1), Thomas Raddatz (1), Hauke Schmidt (1), Gerhard Schmiedl (3), Bjorn Stevens (1), Claudia Timmreck (1), Matthew Toohey (4) (1) Max

  1. Climate Variability In The Euro-atlantic Sector As Simulated By Echam4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, I.; Corte-Real, J.; Ramos, A.; Conde, F.

    The atmosphere is a fundamental component of the climate system and its influence in local and global climates results from its composition, structure and motion. The best available tools to simulate future climates are coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs), ECHAM4 (T42 L19)[1] being a very relevant exam- ple of such a model due to its elaborated parametrizations of physical processes. The purpose of this work is twofold : (1) to assess the ability of ECHAM4 in reproducing the reference climate of 1961-1990, over the Euro-Atlantic sector (29N-71N; 67W- 59E) in terms of mean sea level pressure, surface temperature and total precipitation; (2) to evaluate the expected changes of the same climate elements in a warmer world. To attain the first goal the ECHAMSs control run output is compared with observed data obtained from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU data set)[2-5]; to achieve the second objective, the modelSs control run is compared with its transient run forced by greenhouse gases. In both cases, comparisons are made in terms of mean values, variability in space and time and extremes. References [1] E. Roeckner, K. Arpe, L. Bengtsson, M. Christoph, M. Claussen, L. Dümenil, M. Esch, M. Giorgetta, U. Schlese, and U. Schulzweida, 1996: The atmospheric gen- eral circulation model ECHAM4: Model description and simulation of present-day climate. Max Planck Institut für Meteorologie, Report No. 218, Hamburg, Germany, 90 pp. [2] M. Hulme, D. Conway, P.D. Jones, T. Jiang, E.M. Barrow, and C. Turney (1995), Construction of a 1961-90 European climatology for climate change impacts and mod- elling applications, Int. J. Climatol., 15, 1333-1363. [3] M. Hulme (1994), The cost of climate data U a European experience, Weather, 49, 168-175. [4] M. Hulme, and M.G. New (1997), Dependence of large-scale precipitation clima- tologies on temporal and spatial sampling, J. Climate, 10, 1099-1113. 1 [5] C.J. Willmot, S.M. Robeson and M.J. Janis (1996

  2. Does a medical history of hypertension influence disclosing genetic testing results of the risk for salt-sensitive hypertension, in primary care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okayama M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masanobu Okayama,1,2 Taro Takeshima,2 Masanori Harada,3 Ryusuke Ae,4 Eiji Kajii2 1Division of Community Medicine and Medical Education, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo, 2Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, 3Department of Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Hofu, Yamaguchi, 4Division of Public Health, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan Objective: Disclosing genetic testing results may contribute to the prevention and management of many common diseases. However, whether the presence of a disease influences these effects is unclear. This study aimed to clarify the difference in the effects of disclosing genetic testing results of the risk for developing salt-sensitive hypertension on the behavioral modifications with respect to salt intake in hypertensive and nonhypertensive patients.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted for outpatients aged >20 years (N=2,237 at six primary care clinics and hospitals in Japan. The main factors assessed were medical histories of hypertension, salt preferences, reduced salt intakes, and behavior modifications for reducing salt intake. Behavioral modifications of participants were assessed using their behavior stages before and after disclosure of the hypothetical genetic testing results. Results: Of the 2,237 participants, 1,644 (73.5% responded to the survey. Of these respondents, 558 (33.9% patients were hypertensive and 1,086 (66.1% were nonhypertensive. After being notified of the result “If with genetic risk”, the nonhypertensive participants were more likely to make positive behavioral modifications compared to the hypertensive patients among all participants and in those aged <65 years (adjusted relative ratio [ad-RR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.12−2.76 and ad-RR, 1

  3. Evaluation of effects of various drugs on platelet functions using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced megakaryocytic human erythroid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomoki Tada,1 Kensaku Aki,2 Wataru Oboshi,1,3 Kazuyoshi Kawazoe,4 Toshiyuki Yasui,5 Eiji Hosoi2 1Subdivision of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Tokushima University, 2Department of Cells and Immunity Analytics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, 3Department of Medical Technology, Kagawa Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Kagawa, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy Practice Pedagogy, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, 5Department of Reproductive and Menopausal Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan Background: The hyperfunction and activation of platelets have been strongly implicated in the development and recurrence of arterial occlusive disease, and various antiplatelet drugs are used to treat and prevent such diseases. New antiplatelet drugs and many other drugs have been developed, but some drugs may have adverse effects on platelet functions. Objective: The aim of this study was to establish an evaluation method for evaluating the effect and adverse effect of various drugs on platelet functions. Materials and methods: Human erythroid leukemia (HEL cells were used after megakaryocytic differentiation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as an alternative to platelets. Drugs were evaluated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i mobilization in Fura2-loaded phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced HEL cells. Aspirin and cilostazol were selected as antiplatelet drugs and ibuprofen and sodium valproate as other drugs. Results: There was a positive correlation between [Ca2+]i and platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. Aspirin (5.6–560 µM and cilostazol (5–10 µM significantly inhibited thrombin-induced increases in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, ibuprofen (8–200 µM and sodium valproate (50–1,000 µg/mL also significantly inhibited

  4. A phase I/II study of biweekly capecitabine and irinotecan plus bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenaga M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitsukuni Suenaga,1 Nobuyuki Mizunuma,1 Satoshi Matsusaka,1 Eiji Shinozaki,1 Masato Ozaka,1 Mariko Ogura,1 Keisho Chin,1 Toshiharu Yamaguchi2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, Japan Background: Triweekly capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI is not completely regarded as a valid substitute for fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC because of the potential for greater toxicity. We conducted a phase I/II study to assess the efficacy and safety of biweekly XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV as second-line chemotherapy for mCRC.Methods: Patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and BV and had a UGT1A1 genotype of wild-type or heterozygous for UGT1A1*6 or *28 were eligible for this study. Treatment comprised capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily from the evening of day 1 to the morning of day 8, intravenous irinotecan on day 1, and BV 5 mg/kg on day 1 every 2 weeks. The phase I study consisted of two steps (irinotecan 150 and 180 mg/m2, and dose-limiting toxicity was assessed during the first treatment cycle. The primary endpoint of the phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS.  Results: The recommended dose of irinotecan was determined to be 180 mg/m2 in the phase I study. Between November 2010 and August 2013, 44 patients were enrolled in phase II. The patients’ characteristics were as follows (N=44: median age, 60 years (range 32–80; male/female, 21/23; and UGT1A1 wild-type/heterozygous, 29/15. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3–8.2 months, and the primary endpoint was met. Median overall survival was 18.3 months. The response rate was 22.7%. There was no significant difference in PFS or overall survival according to UGT1A1 status. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were mainly neutropenia in six

  5. Blog Posting After Lung Cancer Notification: Content Analysis of Blogs Written by Patients or Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akira; Aramaki, Eiji; Shimamoto, Yumiko; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-05-18

    anxiety in 495 sentences. Our results showed that there were substantially more posts concerning "Way of living, reasons for living, set of values" and "Relationships with medical staff (own hospital)" than in previous studies (Analysis B). This study provides insight into the feelings of dissatisfaction and anxieties held by lung cancer patients and their families, including those regarding the "Way of living, reasons for living, set of values" and "Relationship with medical staff (own hospital)," which were inaccessible in previous survey analyses. When comparing information obtained from patients' voluntary records and those from previous surveys conducted by health care institutions, it is likely that the former would be more indicative of patients' actual opinions and feelings. Therefore, it is important to utilize such records as an information resource. ©Akira Sato, Eiji Aramaki, Yumiko Shimamoto, Shiro Tanaka, Koji Kawakami. , 18.05.2015.

  6. Efficacy comparison of duloxetine and SSRIs at doses approved in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada E

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Harada,1 Alexander Schacht,2 Tsukasa Koyama,3 Lauren Marangell,4,5 Toshinaga Tsuji,6 Rodrigo Escobar41Medical Science, Eli Lilly Japan K.K, Kobe, Japan; 2Global Statistical Sciences, Eli Lilly and Company, Bad Homburg, Germany; 3Clinical Research Center, Ohyachi Hospital, Sapporo, Japan; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, 5The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA; 6Medical Affairs, Shionogi & Co Ltd, Osaka, JapanBackground: Approved doses of antidepressants in Japan are usually lower than those in the USA and European Union, but to date meta-analyses comparing antidepressants have all used the higher doses approved in the USA and European Union and often have used indirect comparisons. The purpose of this study was to conduct an integrated database analysis of patient level data to compare the effects of duloxetine with those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs at the doses approved in Japan.Methods: Pooled data were analyzed from four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies that compared duloxetine at the dose range approved in Japan (40–60 mg/day with other SSRIs (paroxetine 20 mg/day or escitalopram 10 mg/day and placebo in patients with major depressive disorder. In total, 1,694 patients were included in the analysis (duloxetine, n=688; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, n=690; placebo, n=316. The primary outcome measure was the mean change from baseline at week 8 in 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17 total and subscale scores.Results: Duloxetine and both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were superior to placebo in HAMD17 total score at week 8 in both the all-randomized group and the more severe subgroup (HAMD17 total scores ≥19. Duloxetine was superior to SSRIs in improving the HAMD17 Retardation subscale score (least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]: all-randomized group, −0.33 [−0.60, −0.07], P=0.015; severe subgroup,

  7. Aliskiren suppresses the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and reduces blood pressure and albuminuria in elderly chronic kidney disease patients with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishita Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiyuki Morishita,1 Toshihiro Yasui,2 Akihiko Numata,1 Akira Onishi,1 Kenichi Ishibashi,3 Eiji Kusano11Department of Internal Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Japan; 2National Health Insurance Yukawa Clinic, Niimi, Japan; 3Department of Medical Physiology, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, JapanBackground: We investigated the effects of aliskiren in terms of its inhibition of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS as well as that on blood pressure (BP, and renal and cardiac protection in elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD patients with hypertension.Methods: Nineteen elderly CKD patients (nine males, ten females, aged 74.6 ± 5.8 years were assigned to receive 150 mg/day of aliskiren added to existing antihypertensives for 6 months. Changes in plasma renin activity (PRA, angiotensin I (Ang I, angiotensin II (Ang II, aldosterone (Ald, BP, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, interventricular septum thickness (IVST, left ventricular posterior wall thickness (LVPWT, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP levels were evaluated.Results: Aliskiren suppressed the RAAS as follows: PRA 1.3 ± 1.0 to 0.3 ± 0.3 ng/mL/hour, P < 0.05; Ang I 59.5 ± 32.1 to 26.0 ± 17.3 pg/mL, P < 0.05; Ang II 58.4 ± 62.1 to 14.3 ± 9.0 pg/mL, P < 0.05; and Ald 86.1 ± 38.3 to 80.1 ± 52.6 pg/mL, not significant (NS. Aliskiren reduced BP (153.6/77.2 ± 14.9/10.4 to 130.9/72.2 ± 15.6/9.9 mmHg, P < 0.05. It also reduced UACR (747.1 ± 1121.4 to 409.6 ± 636.8 mg/g, P < 0.05, whereas it did not change eGFR (52.1 ± 29.2 to 51.2 ± 29.3 mL/min/1.73 m2, NS, LVEF (66.8 ± 7.9 to 66.5% ± 6.8%, NS, IVST (10.1 ± 1.8 to 9.9 ± 1.8 mm, NS, LVPWT (10.0 ± 1.6 mm to 10.0 ± 1.4 mm, NS, or BNP (48.2 ± 46.0 to 54.9 ± 41.1 pg/mL, NS.Conclusion: Aliskiren was effective for BP control and reduced UACR while maintaining eGFR and heart function in elderly CKD

  8. Influence of salty food preference on daily salt intake in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamura K

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kazuhiro Takamura,1 Masanobu Okayama,2 Taro Takeshima,2 Shinji Fujiwara,3 Masanori Harada,4 Junichi Murakami,5 Masahiko Eto,6 Eiji Kajii21Department of Community Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Miyazaki Prefectural Miyazaki Hospital, Miyazaki, Japan; 2Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan; 3Mima City National Health Insurance Koyadaira Clinic, Mima, Tokushima, Japan; 4Department of Support of Rural Health Care, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Hofu, Yamaguchi, Japan; 5Division of Chest Surgery, Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Wakuya Medical and Welfare Center, Wakuya, Miyagi, JapanPurpose: A salt preference questionnaire may be a convenient and cost-effective method for predicting salt intake; however, the influence of salt preference on daily salt intake is unclear. This study aimed at revealing the effectiveness of the salt preference question in determining the daily salt intake in primary care outpatients.Patients and methods: This cross-sectional study included 1,075 outpatients (men, n=436, 40.6% at six primary care institutions in Japan. Primary outcomes included a salty food preference assessed by using one question and a daily salt intake, assessed using early morning second urine samples. Multivariate analyses determined the relationships between the salt intake and the two salt preference levels.Results: The mean age was 67.6±14.6 years, and 594 (55.3% preferred salty foods. The daily salt intake was 12.3±4.0 g per day and 11.4±3.7 g per day in the salt preference and nonsalt preference groups, respectively (P<0.001. A salt intake <10 g per day was consumed by 169 (28.5% and 181 (37.6% patients (P=0.001, respectively, and <6 g salt per day was consumed by 28 (4.7% and 26 (5.4% patients (P=0.606, respectively. The patients

  9. A Modern History of 'Imperial Medicine' Surrounding Hansen's Disease: Strategies to Manage Public Opinion in Modern Japanese Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gijae

    2017-12-01

    was controlled by the director of the sanatorium. Consequently, the research tends to perceive the problem within the frame of antagonism between the agent of imperialism and the victims of exploitation by the hands of imperialism. Hence, it has limitations in that it has not fully addressed the problem of the people who were not Hansen's disease patients and as such, existed somewhere in between the two extremes in the process of administering medicine under the imperial rule. The purpose of this study is to identify the direction of imperial medicine in the history of Hansen's disease in Japan and to comprehend the characteristics of policy on Hansen's disease developed by Mitsuda Kensuke, who was behind the policy of imperial medicine, and examine the process of imperial medicine reaching out to the people (of Japan and its colonies). To achieve the goal, this study explores how the agent of imperial medicine gain the favor the public, who are not Hansen's disease patients, by means of the mass media. Specifically, this paper examines data in the Japanese language related to Korean patients of Hansen's disease including the mass media data on Hansen's disease in the source book titled The Collection of Data on Hansen's Disease in Joseon under the Colonial Rule(8 volumes) compiled by Takio Eiji, which has not been studied until now. It also reviews the cultural and popular magazines published in Japan and Joseon at that time.

  10. Land-atmosphere interactions and climate change: Recent results and new perspectives (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, S. I.; Davin, E. L.; Greve, P.; Gudmundsson, L.; Guillod, B.; Hirschi, M.; Mittelbach, H.; Mueller, B.; Mystakidis, S.; Orlowsky, B.; Orth, R.; Wilhelm, M.

    2013-12-01

    simulations. Manuscript in preparation. Seneviratne, S.I., D. Lüthi, M. Litschi, and C. Schär, 2006: Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443, 205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., T. Corti, E.L. Davin, M. Hirschi, E.B. Jaeger, I. Lehner, B. Orlowsky, and A.J. Teuling, 2010: Investigating soil moisture-climate interactions in a changing climate: A review. Earth-Science Reviews, 99, 3-4, 125-161, doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2010.02.004. Seneviratne, S.I., M. Wilhelm, T. Stanelle, B.J.J.M. van den Hurk, S. Hagemann, A. Berg, F. Cheruy, M.E. Higgins, A. Meier, V. Brovkin, M. Claussen, A. Ducharne, J.-L. Dufresne, K.L. Findell, J. Ghattas, D.M. Lawrence, S. Malyshev, M. Rumukainen, and B. Smith, 2013: Impact of soil moisture-climate feedbacks on CMIP5 projections: First results from the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment. Submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett.

  11. Avslag på uførepensjon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders M. Galaasen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduksjon: Mens mye er skrevet om hvem som får uførepensjon, foreligger det få vitenskapelige artikler om avslag på søknad om uførepensjon.Mål: Vi har gjennomført en undersøkelse over hvem som får avslag på søknad om uførepensjon og hvorledes det går med dem i en 6-7 års oppfølging.Metoder: Data fra FD-trygd, koplet med Statistisk sentralbyrås demografiske data er brukt for å sammenlikne dem som får avslag med dem som blir innvilget uførepensjon 1993 ut fra alder, kjønn, utdanning, etnisitet og inntekt. Trygdestatus for dem med avslag er så fulgt til 2000.Resultater: Vi har funnet at kvinner oftere får avslag enn menn, at de eldste og yngste sjeldnere får avslag og at de med minst inntekt og ikke-vestlig bakgrunn oftere får avslag, mens avslagsprosenten er omtrent den samme på alle utdanningsnivåer. I en oppfølging frem til 2000 viser det seg at de fleste ender opp med trygdeytelser, og at kjønnsforskjellene ytterligere forsterkes. De få av de yngste som får avslag, er relativt hyppig fortsatt uten ytelser.Konklusjon: Selv om noen av dem som får avslag, klarer å komme tilbake til normalt lønnsarbeid, og derigjennom bidra til økt produktivitet, resulterer avslag oftere kun i en utsettelse av overgang til permanente trygdeytelser. Hva den eventuelle samfunnsøkonomiske gevinsten av en slik utsettelse er, når man også tar i betraktning økt saksbehandling fra NAV, samt utgifter til attføring og rehabilitering, er et spørsmål for videre forskning. Galaasen AM, Bruusgaard D, Claussen B. Denial of disability pension. Nor J Epidemiol 2009; 19 (2: 203-208. ENGLISH SUMMARYIntroduction: While much is written about who gets disability pensions, there are few scientific articles on the denial of disability pension.Objective: We conducted a survey of who is rejected disability pension and how their life situation evolves in a 6- 7-year follow-up.Methods: Data from FD-trygd, coupled with Statistics Norway

  12. Upper Middle Pleistocene climate and landscape development of Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, B.

    2009-04-01

    and the margin of a 286 m deep channel, subglacially eroded during the Elsterian, have recently been investigated by 9 counter flash or cored drillings (Stephan et al., in press). Studies focussed on the uppermost 50 m, made up of a series of approximately 9 m thick fluviatile sediments ("Leck-Folge") with intercalations of organic sand layers and a gyttja band, up to 1.5 m thick. This sequence is overlain by several metres of mainly decalcified groundmoraine, that, itself, is overlain by glaciofluvial and periglacial sediments. The palynological investigations of the gyttja reveal a floral development of interglacial character ("Leck-Thermomer"). Compared to other Middle Pleistocene warm periods in North Germany, correlations of the Leck-Thermomer with the Holsteinian and with the warm periods of the Reinsdorf and Wacken (Dömnitz) interglacials are precluded or appear rather implausible. The Leck-Thermomer is most likely a correlative of the marine oxigen isotope stage 7 c (MIS 7). Stephan, H.-J., Urban, B., Lüttig, G., Menke, B. und M. Sierralta: Palynologische, petrographische und geochronologische Untersuchungen der Leck-Warmzeit (spätes Mittelpleistozän) und ihrer begleitenden Sedimente.- [Palynological, petrographical, and geochronological investigations of deposits of the "Leck-Thermomer" and accompanying sediments].- Geologisches Jahrbuch, in press. Thieme, H., 1997. Lower Paleolithic hunting spears from Germany. Nature 385, 807-810. Urban, B. 1995. Palynological evidence of younger Middle Pleistocene Interglacials (Holsteinian, Reinsdorf, Schöningen) in the Schöningen open cast lignite mine (eastern Lower Saxony/Germany). Mededelingen Rijks Geologische Dienst 52, 175-186. Urban, B. 2006. Interglacial pollen records from Schöningen, north Germany.- In: THE CLIMATE OF PAST INTERGLACIALS. Sirocko, F., Litt, T., Claussen, M., Sanchez-Goni, M.F. (eds.), Springer Verlag; in press.

  13. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from ISAMMA 2010 (Sendai, Japan, 12-16 July 2010) Invited papers from ISAMMA 2010 (Sendai, Japan, 12-16 July 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; Saito, H.

    2011-02-01

    Yanagihara, Yuta Toyoda and Eiji Kita Monte Carlo simulations of the magnetocaloric effect in magnetic Ni-Mn-X (X = Ga, In) Heusler alloys V D Buchelnikov, V V Sokolovskiy, S V Taskaev, V V Khovaylo, A A Aliev, L N Khanov, A B Batdalov, P Entel, H Miki and T Takagi Changes in electronic states and magnetic free energy in La1-zCez(FexSi1-x)13 magnetic refrigerants A Fujita, S Fujieda and K Fukamichi Garnet composite films with Au particles fabricated by repetitive formation for enhancement of Faraday effect H Uchida, Y Mizutani, Y Nakai, A A Fedyanin and M Inoue Control of magnetic domain wall displacement using spin current in small in-plane magnetic field in Permalloy nanowires Yoshihiko Togawa, Takashi Kimura, Ken Harada, Akira Tonomura and Yoshichika Otani Magnetic-field tunable transmittance in a ferrofluid-filled silicon nitride photonic crystal slab H M Lee, L Horng and J C Wu Evaluation of a miniature magnetostrictive actuator using Galfenol under tensile stress Toshiyuki Ueno, Hidemitsu Miura and Sotoshi Yamada Sub-nm resolution depth profiling of the magnetic structure of thin films by the depth-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique K Amemiya and M Sakamaki

  14. Downwind changes in grain size of aeolian dust; examples from marine and terrestrial archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Prins, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    ., Troelstra, S., Bacon, P., Kamerling, I., Wester, W., Konert, M., Huang, X., Ke, W., Vandenberghe, J., 2009. Dust supply from river floodplains: The case of the lower Huang He (Yellow River) recorded in a loess-palaeosol sequence from the Mangshan Plateau. Journal of Quaternary Science 24, 75-84. Stuut, J.-B.W., Prins, M.A., Schneider, R.R., Weltje, G.J., Jansen, J.H.F., Postma, G., 2002. A 300-kyr record of aridity and wind strength in southwestern Africa: inferences from grain-size distributions of sediments on Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic. Marine Geology 180, 221-233. Stuut, J.-B.W., Zabel, M., Ratmeyer, V., Helmke, P., Schefuß, E., Lavik, G., Schneider, R.R., 2005. Provenance of present-day eolian dust collected off NW Africa. Journal of Geophysical Research 110. Stuut, J.-B.W., Kasten, S., Lamy, F., Hebbeln, D., 2007. Sources and modes of terrigenous sediment input to the Chilean continental slope. Quaternary International 161, 67-76. Tjallingii, R., Claussen, M., Stuut, J.-B.W., Fohlmeister, J., Jahn, A., Bickert, T., Lamy, F., Rohl, U., 2008. Coherent high- and low-latitude control of the northwest African hydrological balance. Nature Geoscience 1, 670-675. Torres-Padrón, M.E., Gelado-Caballero, M.D., Collado-Sánchez, C., Siruela-Matos, V.F., Cardona-Castellano, P.J., Hernández-Brito, J.J., 2002. Variability of dust inputs to the CANIGO zone. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography 49, 3455-3464. Weltje, G.J., Prins, M.A., 2003. Muddled or mixed? Inferring palaeoclimate from size distributions of deep-sea clastics. Sedimentary Geology 162, 39-62.

  15. Orbiting Water Molecules Dance to Tune Of Galaxy's "Central Engine," Astronomers Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A disk of water molecules orbiting a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy 60 million light-years away is "reverberating" in response to variations in the energy output from the galaxy's powerful "central engine" close to the black hole, astronomers say. The team of astronomers used the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico and the 100-meter-diameter radio telescope of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy at Effelsberg, Germany, to observe the galaxy NGC 1068 in the constellation Cetus. They announced their findings today at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Atlanta. The water molecules, in a disk some 5 light-years in diameter, are acting as a set of giant cosmic radio-wave amplifiers, called masers. Using energy radiated by the galaxy's "central engine," the molecules strengthen, or brighten, radio emission at a particular frequency as seen from Earth. "We have seen variations in the radio 'brightness' of these cosmic amplifiers that we believe were caused by variations in the energy output of the central engine," said Jack Gallimore, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, VA. "This could provide us with a valuable new tool for learning about the central engine itself," he added. Gallimore worked with Stefi Baum of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD; Christian Henkel of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany; Ian Glass of the South African Astronomical Observatory; Mark Claussen of the NRAO in Socorro, NM; and Almudena Prieto of the European Southern Observatory in Munich, Germany. "Our observations show that NGC 1068 is the second-known case of a giant disk of water molecules orbiting a supermassive black hole at a galaxy's core," Gallimore said. The first case was the galaxy NGC 4258 (Messier 106), whose disk of radio-amplifying water molecules was measured by the NSF's Very Long Baseline

  16. Scientists Discover Sugar in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    used to detect the sugar molecule has been a pioneer instrument in the detection of molecules in space. Built in 1967, it made the first detections of dozens of the molecules now known to exist in space, including the important first discovery of carbon monoxide, now widely used by astronomers as a signpost showing regions where stars are being formed. The 12 Meter Telescope is scheduled to be closed at the end of July, in preparation for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, an advanced system of 64 radio-telescope antennas in northern Chile now being developed by an international partnership. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Giant Molecular Cloud Near Milky Way's Center The giant molecular cloud, known as Sagittarius B2 (North), as seen by the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. This is the cloud in which scientists using the 12 Meter Telescope detected the simple sugar molecule glycolaldehyde. This VLA image shows hydrogen gas in a region nearly 3 light-years across. In this image, red indicates stronger radio emission; blue weaker. The 12 Meter Telescope studied this region at much shorter wavelengths, which revealed the evidence of sugar molecules. CREDIT: R. Gaume, M. Claussen, C. De Pree, W.M. Goss, D. Mehringer, NRAO/AUI/NSF.

  17. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals (APERIODIC'09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Uwe; McGrath, Rónán; Degtyareva, Olga; Sharma, Hem Raj

    2010-04-01

    on quasicrystals (Eiji Abe), complex metal alloys (Alessandra Beni) and incommensurately modulated structures (Gervais Chapuis). While these were mainly aimed at younger researchers in the field, the lectures were very well attended and appreciated by the participants. The main programme ran from Monday morning until Friday lunchtime. It comprised 13 invited and 40 contributed plenary talks, and more than 40 posters, which were presented at two afternoon/evening poster sessions. The topics covered in the programme range from mathematical foundations, mathematical models, new materials, sample preparation, structure determination, physical properties and surface properties to industrial applications. Every presenter was invited to submit an article for this proceedings volume, and the 36 peer-reviewed papers in this volume present a cross-section of the range of presentations at the conference. They have been arranged into four categories, (i) quasicrystals, (ii) modulated structures, (iii) mathematical and theoretical aspects of aperiodic order, and (iv) approximants and complex phases. Prizes for best student presentations were awarded to Heinrich Orsini-Rosenberg (ETH Zurich) for his poster Tailor-made sevenfold approximants: ab-initio investigations on formation and stability and to Holger Euchner (Universität Stuttgart) for his contributed talk on Lattice dynamics in complex metallic alloys - vibrational properties of Zn11Mg2. In addition to a cash prize, Heinrich Orsini-Rosenberg received an icosahedral teapot, which was manufactured and donated by David Warrington, and Holger Euchner received a book prize. The meeting started with a welcome reception in the University's recently refurbished Victoria Gallery and Museum. A public lecture Simple sets of shapes that tile the plane but cannot ever repeat by Professor Sir Roger Penrose FRS attracted a wide audience and gave a fascinating insight into the discovery of the Penrose tiling, which is still the paradigm

  18. EDITORIAL: Focus on Attosecond Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Krausz, Ferenc; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    future involve using overdense plasmas. Electronic processes on sub-atomic spatio-temporal scales are the basis of chemical physics, atomic, molecular, and optical physics, materials science, and even some life science processes. Research in these areas using the new attosecond tools will advance together with the ability to control electrons themselves. Indeed, we expect that developments will advance in a way that is similar to advances that have occurred on the femtosecond time scale, in which much previous experimental and theoretical work on the interaction of coherent light sources has led to the development of means for 'coherent control' of nuclear motion in molecules. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is centered on experimental and theoretical advances in the development of new methodologies and tools for electron control on the attosecond time scale. Topics such as the efficient generation of harmonics; the generation of attosecond pulses, including those having only a few cycles and those produced from overdense plasmas; the description of various nonlinear, nonperturbative laser-matter interactions, including many-electron effects and few-cycle pulse effects; the analysis of ultrashort propagation effects in atomic and molecular media; and the development of inversion methods for electron tomography, as well as many other topics, are addressed in the current focus issue dedicated to the new field of 'Attosecond Physics'. Focus on Attosecond Physics Contents Observing the attosecond dynamics of nuclear wavepackets in molecules by using high harmonic generation in mixed gases Tsuneto Kanai, Eiji J Takahashi, Yasuo Nabekawa and Katsumi Midorikawa Core-polarization effects in molecular high harmonic generation G Jordan and A Scrinzi Interferometric autocorrelation of an attosecond pulse train calculated using feasible formulae Y Nabekawa and K Midorikawa Attosecond pulse generation from aligned molecules—dynamics and propagation in H2+ E Lorin, S

  19. Preface: Introductory Remarks: Linear Scaling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, D. R.; Fattebert, J.-L.; Gillan, M. J.; Haynes, P. D.; Skylaris, C.-K.

    2008-07-01

    Haynes, Chris-Kriton Skylaris, Arash Mostofi and Mike Payne A miscellaneous overview of SIESTA algorithms Jose M Soler Wavelets as a basis set for electronic structure calculations and electrostatic problems Stefan Goedecker Wavelets as a basis set for linear scaling electronic structure calculationsMark Rayson O(N) Krylov subspace method for large-scale ab initio electronic structure calculations Taisuke Ozaki Linear scaling calculations with the divide-and-conquer approach and with non-orthogonal localized orbitals Weitao Yang Toward efficient wavefunction based linear scaling energy minimization Valery Weber Accurate O(N) first-principles DFT calculations using finite differences and confined orbitals Jean-Luc Fattebert Linear-scaling methods in dynamics simulations or beyond DFT and ground state properties An O(N) time-domain algorithm for TDDFT Guan Hua Chen Local correlation theory and electronic delocalization Joseph Subotnik Ab initio molecular dynamics with linear scaling: foundations and applications Eiji Tsuchida Towards a linear scaling Car-Parrinello-like approach to Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics Thomas Kühne, Michele Ceriotti, Matthias Krack and Michele Parrinello Partial linear scaling for quantum Monte Carlo calculations on condensed matter Mike Gillan Exact embedding of local defects in crystals using maximally localized Wannier functions Eric Cancès Faster GW calculations in larger model structures using ultralocalized nonorthogonal Wannier functions Paolo Umari Other approaches for linear-scaling, including methods formetals Partition-of-unity finite element method for large, accurate electronic-structure calculations of metals John E Pask and Natarajan Sukumar Semiclassical approach to density functional theory Kieron Burke Ab initio transport calculations in defected carbon nanotubes using O(N) techniques Blanca Biel, F J Garcia-Vidal, A Rubio and F Flores Large-scale calculations with the tight-binding (screened) KKR method Rudolf Zeller

  20. PREFACE: The IARU International Scientific Congress on Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions (10-12 March, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    revitalization of ecosystem services Key Message 6: Meeting the Challenge To achieve the societal transformation required to meet the climate change challenge, we must overcome a number of significant constraints and seize critical opportunities These include reducing inertia in social and economic systems; building on a growing public desire for governments to act on climate change; removing implicit and explicit subsidies; reducing the influence of vested interests that increase emissions and reduce resilience; enabling the shifts from ineffective governance and weak institutions to innovative leadership in government, the private sector and civil society; and engaging society in the transition to norms and practices that foster sustainability The editors of the volume are all the session chairs: Professor Agus Sari Dr Aled Jones Science Manager Anders Viksø-Nielsen Dr Andreas Barkman Professor Anette Reenberg Professor Ann Henderson-Sellers Professor Anthony J McMichael Dr Anthony Patt Dr Bette Otto-Bliesner Dr Cameron Hepburn Dr Carlos Nobre Dr Carol Turley Dr Chris Hope Professor Chris Turney Professor Claus Felby Professor Coleen Vogel Professor Dale Jamieson Professor Daniel M Kammen Senior Scientist Detlef F Sprinz Professor Diana Ürge-Vorsatz Professor Dorthe Dahl-Jensen PhD Fatima Denton Director Generel Frances Seymour Dr Frank Jotzo Professor Harold Mooney Director Henrik Bindslev Mr Jamie Pittock Professor Jacquie Burgess Dr James E Hansen Professor Jiahua Pan Dr Jill Jäger Professor Jim Skea Professor Johan Rockström Dr John Christensen Professor John Mitchell Professor John R Porter Professor Joyeeta Gupta Professor Jørgen E Olesen Professor Karen O'Brien Dr Kazuhiko Takeuchi Dr Katrine Krogh Andersen Professor Keith Paustian Professor Ken Caldeira Professor Kevin Anderson Dr Koko Warner Professor Konrad Steffen Professor Liping Zhou Professor Louise Fresco Professor Maria Carmen Lemos Professor Mark Ashton Dr Mark Stafford-Smith Dr Martin Claussen Dr Martin