WorldWideScience

Sample records for classifying erosion risks

  1. Soil Erosion Risk Assessment and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Heckrath, Goswin

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is a phenomenon with relevance for many research topics in the geosciences. Consequently, PhD students with many different backgrounds are exposed to soil erosion related questions during their research. These students require a compact, but detailed introduction to erosion processes, the risks associated with erosion, but also tools to assess and study erosion related questions ranging from a simple risk assessment to effects of climate change on erosion-related effects on geochemistry on various scales. The PhD course on Soil Erosion Risk Assessment and Modelling offered by the University of Aarhus and conducted jointly with the University of Basel is aimed at graduate students with degrees in the geosciences and a PhD research topic with a link to soil erosion. The course offers a unique introduction to erosion processes, conventional risk assessment and field-truthing of results. This is achieved by combing lectures, mapping, erosion experiments, and GIS-based erosion modelling. A particular mark of the course design is the direct link between the results of each part of the course activities. This ensures the achievement of a holistic understanding of erosion in the environment as a key learning outcome.

  2. COMBINING CLASSIFIERS FOR CREDIT RISK PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bhekisipho TWALA

    2009-01-01

    Credit risk prediction models seek to predict quality factors such as whether an individual will default (bad applicant) on a loan or not (good applicant). This can be treated as a kind of machine learning (ML) problem. Recently, the use of ML algorithms has proven to be of great practical value in solving a variety of risk problems including credit risk prediction. One of the most active areas of recent research in ML has been the use of ensemble (combining) classifiers. Research indicates that ensemble individual classifiers lead to a significant improvement in classification performance by having them vote for the most popular class. This paper explores the predicted behaviour of five classifiers for different types of noise in terms of credit risk prediction accuracy, and how could such accuracy be improved by using pairs of classifier ensembles. Benchmarking results on five credit datasets and comparison with the performance of each individual classifier on predictive accuracy at various attribute noise levels are presented. The experimental evaluation shows that the ensemble of classifiers technique has the potential to improve prediction accuracy.

  3. Development of erosion risk map using fuzzy logic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi Manyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion-hazard assessment is an important aspect in the management of a river basin such as Siak River Basin, Riau Province, Indonesia. This study presents an application of fuzzy logic approach to develop erosion risk map based on geographic information system. Fuzzy logic is a computing approach based on “degrees of truth” rather than the usual “true or false” (1 or 0 Boolean logic on which the modern computer is based. The results of the erosion risk map were verified by using field measurements. The verification result shows that the parameter of soil-erodibility (K indicates a good agreement with field measurement data. The classification of soil-erodibility (K as the result of validation were: very low (0.0–0.1, medium (0.21-0.32, high (0.44-0.55 and very high (0.56-0.64. The results obtained from this study show that the erosion risk map of Siak River Basin were dominantly classified as medium level which cover about 68.54%. The other classifications were high and very low erosion level which cover about 28.84% and 2.61% respectively.

  4. Adapting the RUSLE and GIS to model soil erosion risk in a mountains karst watershed, Guizhou Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue-Qing, Xu; Xiao-Mei, Shao; Xiang-Bin, Kong; Jian, Peng; Yun-Long, Cai

    2008-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem in Guizhou Province, which is located in the centre of the karst areas of southwestern China. Unfortunately, Guizhou Province suffers from a lack of financial resources to research, monitor and model soil erosion at large watershed. In order to assess the soil erosion risk, soil erosion modeling at the watershed scale are urgently needed to be undertaken. This study integrated the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a Geographic Information System (GIS) to estimate soil loss and identify the risk erosion areas in the Maotiao River watershed, which is a typical rural watershed in Guizhou Province. All factors used in the RUSLE were calculated for the watershed using local data. It was classified into five categories ranging from minimal risk to extreme erosion risk depending on the calculated soil erosion amount. The soil erosion map was linked to land use, elevation and slope maps to explore the relationship between soil erosion and environmental factors and identify the areas of soil erosion risk. The results can be used to advice the local government in prioritizing the areas of immediate erosion mitigation. The integrated approach allows for relatively easy, fast, and cost-effective estimation of spatially distributed soil erosion. It thus indicates that RUSLE-GIS model is a useful and efficient tool for evaluating and mapping soil erosion risk at a large watershed scale in Guizhou Province.

  5. Probabilistic soil erosion modeling using the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMIT) after wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; W. J. Elliot; J. W. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    The decision of whether or not to apply post-fire hillslope erosion mitigation treatments, and if so, where these treatments are most needed, is a multi-step process. Land managers must assess the risk of damaging runoff and sediment delivery events occurring on the unrecovered burned hillslope. We developed the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) to address this need...

  6. RISK LEVEL ANALYSIS ON THE PREVENTIVE EROSION CAPACITY OF BRIDGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Deficiency of the Preventive Erosion Capacity (PEC) of a bridge pier is the main factor leading to bridge failures. In this paper, the PEC of bridge piers was analyzed using the stochastic analysis method. The definitions of the reliability and risk level of a bridge pier subjected to water erosion were proposed and a computational model for erosion depth and risk level in was suggested.

  7. DSM for soil erosion risk in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro; McLeaod, Jim; Castellazzi, Marie; Baggio Compagnucci, Andrea; Irvine, Justin

    2017-04-01

    Soils play a crucial role in ecosystem functioning, and modelling its risk of degradation is fundamental, especially in the context of climate change. In this work we used continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping (DSM) approaches to map sediment erosion and deposition patterns due to rainfall. The test area covers the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Soil profiles data were interpolated using a geo-statistical hybrid Generalised Additive Models method for a range of soil properties such as organic matter, texture, soil depth and peat presence. The same method was used to interpolate climatic data and management information. Remote sensing data were integrated in the process and land use data included. Information on grazing (sheep and deer) pressure was taken into account in the modelling. The uncertainty was accounted and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils with an assessment adapted to each of them. The results and intermediate steps were compared with available continental scale results. The results show the importance of the use of DSM approaches for modeling soils and ecosystem functions and assessing uncertainty propagation.

  8. Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud

    2008-01-01

    Federal land management agencies have spent tens of millions of dollars on post-fire emergency watershed stabilization measures intended to minimize flood runoff, peakflows, onsite erosion, offsite sedimentation, and other hydrologic damage to natural habitats, roads, bridges, reservoirs, and irrigation systems (General Accounting Office 2003). The decision to apply...

  9. Risk behaviors related to eating disorders in adolescents and its association with dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Fagundes SOUTO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The overvaluation of thinness as a standard of beauty has contributed to the development of eating disorders and has mainly affected adolescents and young adults. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of risk behaviors for eating disorders and their association with dental erosion in adolescents. Material and method This is a cross-sectional observational epidemiological study. The sample consisted of 278 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years, enrolled in a State School in Campinas - SP. Two questionnaires were used for the data collection on eating disorders: Bulimic Investigatory Test of Edinburgh and Eating Attitudes Test -26. The presence of erosion was evaluated by calibrated examiners. Result The mean age of the sample was 14.8 years. The prevalence of mean risk for bulimia in the sample was 43.2% (95% CI: 37.3%-49.0% and the prevalence of adolescents with a probability of developing bulimia was 53.2% (95% CI: 47.4%-59.1%. Of the total, 11.9% (95% CI: 8.1%-15.7% showed results suggestive of anorexia. Among women, 66.9% were classified as probability developing bulimia, whereas in men the prevalence was 39.0%. As for dental erosion, only 1.1% of the sample presented erosion. Conclusion The study pointed to large number of adolescents with risk behaviors for eating disorders but no association was found with dental erosion due to low prevalence.

  10. Incorporating Uncertainty into Backward Erosion Piping Risk Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins Bryant A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Backward erosion piping (BEP is a type of internal erosion that typically involves the erosion of foundation materials beneath an embankment. BEP has been shown, historically, to be the cause of approximately one third of all internal erosion related failures. As such, the probability of BEP is commonly evaluated as part of routine risk assessments for dams and levees in the United States. Currently, average gradient methods are predominantly used to perform these assessments, supported by mean trends of critical gradient observed in laboratory flume tests. Significant uncertainty exists surrounding the mean trends of critical gradient used in practice. To quantify this uncertainty, over 100 laboratory-piping tests were compiled and analysed to assess the variability of laboratory measurements of horizontal critical gradient. Results of these analyses indicate a large amount of uncertainty surrounding critical gradient measurements for all soils, with increasing uncertainty as soils become less uniform.

  11. Assessment of soil erosion risk in Komering watershed, South Sumatera, using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsabilla, A.; Kusratmoko, E.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in land use watershed led to environmental degradation. Estimated loss of soil erosion is often difficult due to some factors such as topography, land use, climate and human activities. This study aims to predict soil erosion hazard and sediment yield using the Soil and Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) hydrological model. The SWAT was chosen because it can simulate the model with limited data. The study area is Komering watershed (806,001 Ha) in South Sumatera Province. There are two factors land management intervention: 1) land with agriculture, and 2) land with cultivation. These factors selected in accordance with the regulations of spatial plan area. Application of the SWAT demonstrated that the model can predict surface runoff, soil erosion loss and sediment yield. The erosion risk for each watershed can be classified and predicted its changes based on the scenarios which arranged. In this paper, we also discussed the relationship between the distribution of erosion risk and watershed's characteristics in a spatial perspective.

  12. Extent of Cropland and Related Soil Erosion Risk in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidele Karamage

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land conversion to cropland is one of the major causes of severe soil erosion in Africa. This study assesses the current cropland extent and the related soil erosion risk in Rwanda, a country that experienced the most rapid population growth and cropland expansion in Africa over the last decade. The land cover land use (LCLU map of Rwanda in 2015 was developed using Landsat-8 imagery. Based on the obtained LCLU map and the spatial datasets of precipitation, soil properties and elevation, the soil erosion rate of Rwanda was assessed at 30-m spatial resolution, using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE model. According to the results, the mean soil erosion rate was 250 t·ha−1·a−1 over the entire country, with a total soil loss rate of approximately 595 million tons per year. The mean soil erosion rate over cropland, which occupied 56% of the national land area, was estimated at 421 t·ha−1·a−1 and was responsible for about 95% of the national soil loss. About 24% of the croplands in Rwanda had a soil erosion rate larger than 300 t·ha−1·a−1, indicating their unsuitability for cultivation. With a mean soil erosion rate of 1642 t·ha−1·a−1, these unsuitable croplands were responsible for 90% of the national soil loss. Most of the unsuitable croplands are distributed in the Congo Nile Ridge, Volcanic Range mountain areas in the west and the Buberuka highlands in the north, regions characterized by steep slopes (>30% and strong rainfall. Soil conservation practices, such as the terracing cultivation method, are paramount to preserve the soil. According to our assessment, terracing alone could reduce the mean cropland soil erosion rate and the national soil loss by 79% and 75%, respectively. After terracing, only a small proportion of 7.6% of the current croplands would still be exposed to extreme soil erosion with a rate >300 t·ha−1·a−1. These irremediable cropland areas should be returned to mountain forest to

  13. Integration of transport concepts for risk assessment of pesticide erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaomei; Van Der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M; Gai, Lingtong; Wesseling, Jan G; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2016-05-01

    Environmental contamination by agrochemicals has been a large problem for decades. Pesticides are transported in runoff and remain attached to eroded soil particles, posing a risk to water and soil quality and human health. We have developed a parsimonious integrative model of pesticide displacement by runoff and erosion that explicitly accounts for water infiltration, erosion, runoff, and pesticide transport and degradation in soil. The conceptual framework was based on broadly accepted assumptions such as the convection-dispersion equation and lognormal distributions of soil properties associated with transport, sorption, degradation, and erosion. To illustrate the concept, a few assumptions are made with regard to runoff in relatively flat agricultural fields: dispersion is ignored and erosion is modelled by a functional relationship. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the total mass of pesticide associated with soil eroded by water scouring increased with slope, rain intensity, and water field capacity of the soil. The mass of transported pesticide decreased as the micro-topography of the soil surface became more distinct. The timing of pesticide spraying and rate of degradation before erosion negatively affected the total amount of transported pesticide. The mechanisms involved in pesticide displacement, such as runoff, infiltration, soil erosion, and pesticide transport and decay in the topsoil, were all explicitly accounted for, so the mathematical complexity of their description can be high, depending on the situation.

  14. Integrated spatial assessment of wind erosion risk in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Négyesi, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Kovács, Tamás; László, Elemér; Bihari, Zita

    2016-11-01

    Wind erosion susceptibility of Hungarian soils was mapped on the national level integrating three factors of the complex phenomenon of deflation (physical soil features, wind characteristics, and land use and land cover). Results of wind tunnel experiments on erodibility of representative soil samples were used for the parametrization of a countrywide map of soil texture compiled for the upper 5 cm layer of soil, which resulted in a map representing threshold wind velocity exceedance. Average wind velocity was spatially estimated with 0.5' resolution using the Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenised Data Basis (MISH) method elaborated for the spatial interpolation of surface meteorological elements. The probability of threshold wind velocity exceedance was determined based on values predicted by the soil texture map at the grid locations. Ratio values were further interpolated to a finer 1 ha resolution using sand and silt content of the uppermost (0-5 cm) layer of soil as spatial co-variables. Land cover was also taken into account, excluding areas that are not relevant to wind erosion (forests, water bodies, settlements, etc.), to spatially assess the risk of wind erosion. According to the resulting map of wind erosion susceptibility, about 10 % of the total area of Hungary can be identified as susceptible to wind erosion. The map gives more detailed insight into the spatial distribution of wind-affected areas in Hungary compared to previous studies.

  15. Estimation of soil erosion risk within an important agricultural sub-watershed in Bursa, Turkey, in relation to rapid urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Gokhan; Aksoy, Ertugrul

    2015-07-01

    This paper integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a GIS model to investigate the spatial distribution of annual soil loss and identify areas of soil erosion risk in the Uluabat sub-watershed, an important agricultural site in Bursa Province, Turkey. The total soil loss from water erosion was 473,274 Mg year(-1). Accordingly, 60.3% of the surveyed area was classified into a very low erosion risk class while 25.7% was found to be in high and severe erosion risk classes. Soil loss had a close relationship with land use and topography. The most severe erosion risk typically occurs on ridges and steep slopes where agriculture, degraded forest, and shrubs are the main land uses and cover types. Another goal of this study was to use GIS to reveal the multi-year urbanization status caused by rapid urbanization that constitutes another soil erosion risk in this area. Urbanization has increased by 57.7% and the most areal change was determined in class I lands at a rate of 80% over 25 years. Urbanization was identified as one of the causes of excessive soil loss in the study area.

  16. Preventing erosive risks after wildfire in Spain: advances and gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Filgueira, Cristina; Vega Hidalgo, José A.; Fontúrbel Lliteras, Teresa

    2017-04-01

    Galicia (NW Spain) is one of the most wildfire-affected areas in Western Europe and where the highest soil losses following fire are recorded in the Iberian Peninsula. During the last decade, mitigation of hydrological and erosive risk has been an important objective for researchers and forest managers. For this reason, research carried out has focused on three main issues: i) the development of operational tools to prioritize post-fire soil stabilization actions, based on soil burn severity indicators and remote sensed information, and testing of their ability to reflect degradation risk in relevant soil properties and subsequent soil erosion, ii) the development and testing of different soil stabilization treatments and their effectiveness for reducing erosion, following their application at broad scale, under the specific environmental conditions of Galicia and iii) the assessment of the performance of current erosion models as well as the development of empirical models to predict post-fire soil losses. On the other hand, the use of forest resources is an essential component of the regional incomes in NW Spain and consequently there is a pressing necessity for investigation on techniques suitable for reconciling soil conservation and sustainable use of those resources. In the framework of wildfire impacts this involve many and complex challenges. This scenario contrast with most of the Iberian Peninsula under Mediterranean influence where salvage logging is not a priority. As in other regions, post-fire hydrologic and erosive risk modeling, including threatened resources vulnerability evaluation is also a capital research need, particularly in a climate change context where dramatic changes in drivers such as precipitation, evapotranspiration and fire regime are expected. The study was funded by the National Institute of Agricultural Research of Spain (INIA) through project RTA2014-00011-C06-02, cofunded by FEDER and the Plan de Mejora e Innovación Forestal de

  17. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki; Cordier, Stephane; Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás; Centeri, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  18. Communicating and Visualizing Erosion-associated Risks to Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Caspar; Simpson, Carolyn; Wainwright, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is a major problem worldwide, affecting agriculture, the natural environment and urban areas through its impact on flood risk, water quality, loss of nutrient-rich upper soil layers, eutrophication of water bodies, sedimentation of waterways and sediment-related damage to roads, buildings and infrastructure such as water, gas and electricity supply networks. This study focuses on risks to infrastructure associated with erosion and the interventions needed to reduce those risks. Deciding on what interventions to make means understanding better which parts of the landscape are most susceptible to erosion and which measures are most effective in reducing it. Effective ways of communicating mitigation strategies to stakeholders such as farmers, land managers and policy-makers are then essential if interventions are to be implemented. Drawing on the Decision-Support Matrix (DSM) approach which combines a set of hydrological principles with Participatory Action Research (PAR), a decision-support tool for Communicating and Visualizing Erosion-Associated Risks to Infrastructure (CAVERTI) was developed. The participatory component was developed with the Wear Rivers Trust, focusing on a case-study area in the North East of England. The CAVERTI tool brings together process understanding gained from modelling with knowledge and experience of a variety of stakeholders to address directly the problem of sediment transport. Development of the tool was a collaborative venture, ensuring that the problems and solutions presented are easily recognised by practitioners and decision-makers. This recognition, and ease of access via a web-based interface, in turn help to ensure that the tools get used. The web-based tool developed helps to assess, manage and improve understanding of risk from a multi-stakeholder perspective and proposes solutions to problems. We argue that visualization and communication tools co-developed by researchers and stakeholders are the best means

  19. Erosion risk assessment along coastlines, rivers, and lakes

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    Eidsvig, Unni; Harbitz, Carl B.; Issler, Dieter; Forsberg, Carl Fredrik; Høydal, Øyvind A.; Glimsdal, Sylfest; Frauenfelder, Regula

    2017-04-01

    An effect of the expected climate changes is that densely populated areas will be more exposed to natural hazards. There is a rising concern about geotechnical challenges associated with the transition zone between water and land, in particular with regard to erosion. This needs to be considered as part of the climate adaptation strategies in the society and applies to both coastal settlements and to settlements along rivers. Climate change, as reported by the IPCC, includes global warming, sea level rise as well as more precipitation, both with respect to intensity and frequency. A larger number of cities are expected to be affected by floods and with higher frequency. With large floods, the current speed in rivers and hence their erosion potential increases, leading to scouring along riverbanks, where important transport routes and other infrastructure are often located. The frequency and intensity of storm surges are expected to increase, as well as the risk of coastal erosion. In steep terrain, the likelihood of debris flows increases. The project "Multi-scale Erosion Risk under Climate Change" was initiated to prepare for such challenges as well as local climate adaptation. The project is an internal NGI strategic project funded by the Research Council of Norway for the period 2017 - 2019. The project aims to investigate relevant erosive and mass-flow processes in the coastal zone, along rivers, and in lakes. Further, the knowledge and tools to be developed within the project aim to reduce the risk associated with these processes, through appropriate land-use planning and innovative mitigation measures. The project is thematically subdivided into the following five work packages: WP1: Modelling of erosion processes in rivers, at the coast and in mass movements WP2: Floods, debris flows and sediment mobility in complex topography WP3: Coastal hydrodynamic processes WP4: Monitoring, warning and non-physical mitigation measures WP5: Dissemination and knowledge

  20. Erosion risk assessment of active coastal cliffs in temperate environments

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    Del Río, Laura; Gracia, F. Javier

    2009-11-01

    The potentially negative consequences resulting from cliff recession are a matter of serious concern in many coastal areas worldwide. The assessment of such processes has traditionally been performed by calculating average cliff recession rates and projecting them into the future, without taking into consideration the diverse factors affecting cliff dynamics and stability. In this work a new, practical method is presented to evaluate cliff erosion risk in temperate environments, by analysing the main factors responsible for both the physical and the socioeconomic aspects of erosion, representing cliff loss potential and damage potential, respectively. For this purpose an integration of 11 physical variables (such as cliff lithology, beach characteristics or rainfall regime) and 6 socioeconomic variables (such as land use type or population density) is proposed. These variables are weighted and combined into a Hazard Index and an Impact Index, which in turn are merged into a composite Risk Index where the resulting values are normalized and expressed as a percentage of the maximum theoretical risk. The method is tested and validated by using data about cliff retreat rates and mass movement processes in the coast of Cádiz province (SW Spain). The proposed approach allows the zoning of coastal cliffs according to the risk, hazard and/or impact levels, including the recognition of critical areas where specific intervention strategies should be adopted. The method presented in this work is deemed both practical and scientifically valid, without requiring extensive and detailed surveys of the area where it is to be applied. This way, it constitutes an easy to use, valuable tool for decision-making regarding land use planning and management strategies for active coastal cliffs.

  1. Identification of soil erosion risk areas for conservation planning in different states of India.

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    Sharda, V N; Mandal, Debashis; Ojasvi, P R

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of soil erosion risks, especially in the developing countries, is a challenging task mainly due to non-availability or insufficiency of relevant data. In this paper, the soil erosion risks have been estimated by integrating the spatial data on potential erosion rates and soil loss tolerance limits for conservation planning at state level in India. The erosion risk classes have been prioritized based upon the difference between the prevailing erosion rates and the permissible erosion limits. The analysis revealed that about 50% of total geographical area (TGA) of India, falling in five priority erosion risk classes, requires different intensity of conservation measures though about 91% area suffers from potential erosion rates varying from 40 t ha(-1) yr(-1). Statewise analysis indicated that Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Rajasthan share about 75% of total area under priority Class 1 (6.4 M ha) though they account for only 19.4% of the total area (36.2 M ha) under very severe potential erosion rate category (> 40 t ha(-1)yr(-1)). It was observed that about 75% of total geographical area (TGA) in the states of Bihar, Gujarat, Haryana, Kerala and Punjab does not require any specific soil conservation measure as the potential erosion rates are well within the tolerance limits. The developed methodology can be successfully employed for prioritization of erosion risk areas at watershed, region or country level.

  2. Risk factors and management of vaginal mesh erosion after pelvic organ prolapse surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Wen; Su, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Hsuan; Huang, Wen-Chu; Lau, Hui-Hsuan

    2017-04-01

    Mesh erosion is a serious and not uncommon complication in women undergoing vaginal mesh repair. We hypothesized that mesh erosion is associated with the patient's comorbidities, surgical procedures, and mesh material. The aims of this study were to identify the risk factors and optimal management for mesh erosion. All women who underwent vaginal mesh repair from 2004 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Data on patients' characteristics, presenting symptoms, treatment and outcomes were collected from their medical records. A total of 741 women underwent vaginal mesh repairs, of whom 47 had mesh erosion. The median follow-up period was 13 months (range 3-84 months). Another nine patients with mesh erosion were referred form other hospitals. Multivariate analysis revealed that concomitant hysterectomy (odds ratio 27.02, 95% confidence interval 12.35-58.82; p erosion. Of these 56 women, 20 (36%) were successfully treated by conservative management, while 36 (64%) required subsequent surgical revision. Compared with surgery, conservative treatment was successful if the size of the erosion was smaller than 0.5 cm (p erosions after primary revision, but all successfully healed after the second surgery. Concomitant hysterectomy and hypertension were associated with mesh erosion. In the management of mesh erosion, conservative treatment can be tried as the first-line treatment for smaller erosions, while surgical repair for larger erosions. Recurrent erosions could happen and requires repairs several times. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Reduction of livelihood risk for river bank erosion affected villagers

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    Majumder, S. Sen; Fox, D. M.; Chakrabari, S.; Bhandari, G.

    2014-12-01

    Bank erosion process of the Ganga River created a serious livelihood risk for the villagers situated on left bank of the river in Malda district of the State of West Bengal, India since last four decades. Due to the erosion of agriculture land by the river, most of the villagers having agriculture as their only means of livelihood became jobless suddenly. Presently they are living in a miserable condition. One of the main objectives of this paper is to find out an alternative means of livelihood for the victims to improve their miserable socio-economic condition. It has been found from field survey that some erosion affected villagers have started to live and practice agriculture temporarily on the riverine islands (large and stable since thirteen years) as these islands have very fertile soil. If the re-emerged land plots can again be demarcated on the newly formed islands and distributed among the landless people to practice agriculture over there, then it will be a useful alternative livelihood strategy for the victims. The demarcation of re-emerged plots can be achieved by georeferencing the cadastral maps and then overlaying the plots on the present river course. In the present study area geo-referencing process of the cadastral maps became a serious issue as the study area has been very dynamic in terms of land cover and land use. Most of the villages were lost into the river course. Thus the common permanent features, required for geo-referencing, shown in the cadastral maps (surveyed during 1954-1962) were not found in the present satellite images. The second important objective of the present study is to develop a proper methodology for geo-referencing the cadastral maps of this area. The Spatial Adjustment Transformation and Automatic Digitization tools of Arc GIS were used to prepare geo-referenced plot maps. In Projective Transformation method the geometrically corrected block maps having village boundaries were used as source file. Then the

  4. An empirical approach to estimate soil erosion risk in Spain.

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    Martín-Fernández, Luis; Martínez-Núñez, Margarita

    2011-08-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most important factors in land degradation and influences desertification worldwide. In 2001, the Spanish Ministry of the Environment launched the 'National Inventory of Soil Erosion (INES) 2002-2012' to study the process of soil erosion in Spain. The aim of the current article is to assess the usefulness of this National Inventory as an instrument of control, measurement and monitoring of soil erosion in Spain. The methodology and main features of this National Inventory are described in detail. The results achieved as of the end of May 2010 are presented, together with an explanation of the utility of the Inventory as a tool for planning forest hydrologic restoration, soil protection, erosion control, and protection against desertification. Finally, the authors make a comparative analysis of similar initiatives for assessing soil erosion in other countries at the national and European levels.

  5. Mapping of monthly soil erosion risk of mainland Mauritius and its aggregation with delineated basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigel, Rody; Rughooputh, Soonil

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the mapping of monthly soil erosion risk on Mauritius which was carried out using GIS, decision rules and readily available data namely, monthly rainfall depth, soil types, slope and land cover. Slope and soil were first combined to produce soil erosion susceptibility followed by land cover to produce erosion sensitivity, and then rainfall to produce erosion risk. The high erosion areas of the Island have been extracted from the soil erosion risk maps, whereby these areas can face land degradation problems and can be responsible for sediment discharge into wetlands located at the outlet of drainage basins. As such, drainage basins have been delineated using automatic catchment delineation tools and their percentage of high erosion areas computed. Basins with the greatest percentage of high erosion areas and particularly those that directly have a wetland at the outlet can be given priority for soil and water conservation efforts. The mapping reported in this paper can be adapted to other countries which need an erosion assessment for the identification of high erosion areas and priority action areas.

  6. How well does the Post-fire Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) really work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Peter; Elliot, William; Lewis, Sarah; Miller, Mary Ellen

    2016-04-01

    The decision of where, when, and how to apply the most effective postfire erosion mitigation treatments requires land managers to assess the risk of damaging runoff and erosion events occurring after a fire. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) was developed to assist post fire assessment teams identify high erosion risk areas and effectiveness of various mitigation treatments to reduce that risk. ERMiT is a web-based application that uses the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) technology to estimate erosion, in probabilistic terms, on burned and recovering forest, range, and chaparral lands with and without the application of mitigation treatments. User inputs are processed by ERMiT to combine rain event variability with spatial and temporal variabilities of hillslope burn severity and soil properties which are then used as WEPP inputs. Since 2007, the model has been used in making hundreds of land management decisions in the US and elsewhere. We use eight published field study sites in the Western US to compare ERMiT predictions to observed hillslope erosion rates. Most sites experience only a few rainfall events that produced runoff and sediment except for a California site with a Mediterranean climate. When hillslope erosion occurred, significant correlations occurred between the observed hillslope erosion and those predicted by ERMiT. Significant correlation occurred for most mitigation treatments as well as the five recovery years. These model validation results suggest reasonable estimates of probabilistic post-fire hillslope sediment delivery when compared to observation.

  7. Multivariate return periods of sea storms for coastal erosion risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Corbella

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The erosion of a beach depends on various storm characteristics. Ideally, the risk associated with a storm would be described by a single multivariate return period that is also representative of the erosion risk, i.e. a 100 yr multivariate storm return period would cause a 100 yr erosion return period. Unfortunately, a specific probability level may be associated with numerous combinations of storm characteristics. These combinations, despite having the same multivariate probability, may cause very different erosion outcomes. This paper explores this ambiguity problem in the context of copula based multivariate return periods and using a case study at Durban on the east coast of South Africa. Simulations were used to correlate multivariate return periods of historical events to return periods of estimated storm induced erosion volumes. In addition, the relationship of the most-likely design event (Salvadori et al., 2011 to coastal erosion was investigated. It was found that the multivariate return periods for wave height and duration had the highest correlation to erosion return periods. The most-likely design event was found to be an inadequate design method in its current form. We explore the inclusion of conditions based on the physical realizability of wave events and the use of multivariate linear regression to relate storm parameters to erosion computed from a process based model. Establishing a link between storm statistics and erosion consequences can resolve the ambiguity between multivariate storm return periods and associated erosion return periods.

  8. Using the Remote Sensing and GIS Technology for Erosion Risk Mapping of Kartalkaya Dam Watershed in Kahramanmaras, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The soil erosion is the most serious environmental problem in watershed areas in Turkey. The main factors affecting the amount of soil erosion include vegetation cover, topography, soil, and climate. In order to describe the areas with high soil erosion risks and to develop adequate erosion prevention measures in the watersheds of dams, erosion risk maps should be generated considering these factors. Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies were used for erosio...

  9. The Entire Quantile Path of a Risk-Agnostic SVM Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    A quantile binary classifier uses the rule: Classify x as +1 if P(Y = 1|X = x) >= t, and as -1 otherwise, for a fixed quantile parameter t {[0, 1]. It has been shown that Support Vector Machines (SVMs) in the limit are quantile classifiers with t = 1/2 . In this paper, we show that by using asymmetric cost of misclassification SVMs can be appropriately extended to recover, in the limit, the quantile binary classifier for any t. We then present a principled algorithm to solve the extended SVM classifier for all values of t simultaneously. This has two implications: First, one can recover the entire conditional distribution P(Y = 1|X = x) = t for t {[0, 1]. Second, we can build a risk-agnostic SVM classifier where the cost of misclassification need not be known apriori. Preliminary numerical experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Global peat erosion risk assessment for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Irvine, Brian; Holden, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Many peatlands across the world are suffering from degradation and erosion exacerbated by human influences. Blanket peat erosion has adverse impacts on terrestrial and aquatic habitats, reservoir capacity and water quality, and also leads to accelerated carbon release. Bioclimatic modelling suggests that some areas, which are currently suitable for active peat growth, may be no longer under a climate supporting the accumulation of peat by the end of the century. Peat erosion in these marginal regions is thus more likely. A recently developed blanket peat erosion model, PESERA-PEAT, was established through significantly modifying the grid version of the Pan-European Soil Erosion Assessment model (PESERA-GRID) to explicitly include the freeze-thaw and desiccation processes, which appear to be the crucial drivers of peat erosion, and typical land management practices in blanket peatlands such as artificial drainage, grazing and managed burning. Freeze-thaw and desiccation are estimated based on climate (i.e. temperature) and soil moisture conditions. Land management practices interact with hydrology, erosion and vegetation growth via their influence on vegetation cover, biomass and soil moisture condition. The model has been demonstrated to be robust for blanket peat erosion modelling with riverine sediment flux data in the UK. In this paper, the PESERA-PEAT model is applied to investigate the impact of environmental change on the blanket peat erosion at a global scale. Climatic scenarios to the end of 21st Century were derived, as part of the QUEST-GSI initiative, from the outputs of seven global climate models: CGCM3 and CCCMA (Canada); CSIRO Mark III (Australia); IPSL (France); ECHAM5 (Germany); CCSM (US National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)); HadCM3 and HadGEM1 (UK). Land management practice such as artificial drainage is considered to examine if it is possible to buffer the impact of climate change on erosion through managing blanket peatlands in

  11. Global weights of coastal erosion risk factors using AHP method: A case study of Setiu Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Azzah; Ghani, Ahmad Termimi Ab; Abdullah, Lazim; Ahmad, Muhammad Fadhli

    2017-08-01

    Coastal erosion is one of the global problems which also one of the national's environmental major concerns. The coastal erosion can be easily happened if the sea level rises along with the frequent and huge storms. There are various risk factors that can be related with coastal erosion such as tidal range, storm surge, wave height and etc. However, the relative weights for these risk factors are still inconclusive. Thus, this paper aims to determine the relative global weights of risk factors that contribute to coastal erosion using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Three decision makers were invited to provide judgments for pair-wise comparison matrices of the method. The global weights were obtained using the concept of group decision making environment. The result shows that the most influencing risk factor is shoreline evolution with the highest weightage (20.74%) compared to the other factors.

  12. Mapping Erosion and Salinity Risk Categories Using GIS and the Rangeland Hydrology Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Up to fifteen percent of rangelands in the state of Utah in the United States are classified as being in severely eroding condition. Some of these degraded lands are located on saline, erodible soils of the Mancos Shale formation. This results in a disproportionate contribution of sediment, salinity...

  13. Assessing soil erosion risk using RUSLE through a GIS open source desktop and web application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, L; Teodoro, A C; Gonçalves, J A; Soares, D; Cunha, M

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem. An estimation of the expected soil loss by water-caused erosion can be calculated considering the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Geographical Information Systems (GIS) provide different tools to create categorical maps of soil erosion risk which help to study the risk assessment of soil loss. The objective of this study was to develop a GIS open source application (in QGIS), using the RUSLE methodology for estimating erosion rate at the watershed scale (desktop application) and provide the same application via web access (web application). The applications developed allow one to generate all the maps necessary to evaluate the soil erosion risk. Several libraries and algorithms from SEXTANTE were used to develop these applications. These applications were tested in Montalegre municipality (Portugal). The maps involved in RUSLE method-soil erosivity factor, soil erodibility factor, topographic factor, cover management factor, and support practices-were created. The estimated mean value of the soil loss obtained was 220 ton km(-2) year(-1) ranged from 0.27 to 1283 ton km(-2) year(-1). The results indicated that most of the study area (80 %) is characterized by very low soil erosion level (web and the desktop application are freely available.

  14. Probabilistic estimation of dune erosion and coastal zone risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal erosion has gained global attention and has been studied for many decades. As a soft sea defence structure, coastal sandy dunes protect coastal zones all over the world, which usually are densely populated areas with tremendous economic value. The coastal zone of the Netherlands, one of the

  15. Risk indicators for dental erosive wear among 18-yr-old subjects in Oslo, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulic, Aida; Skudutyte-Rysstad, Rasa; Tveit, Anne B; Skaare, Anne B

    2012-12-01

    The aim was to investigate risk indicators associated with dental erosive wear among 18-yr-old subjects in Oslo, Norway. Of 3,206 adolescents invited to participate in a screening examination for erosive wear, 1,456 were examined (giving a response rate of 45%). As part of the examination all participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. Associations between the presence of erosive lesions and the possible risk indicators were assessed by logistic regression analyses, taking into account the hierarchical relationships between the independent variables. Of all 18-yr-old subjects examined, 38% had at least one tooth with erosive lesions. Multivariate analyses showed significant associations between the presence of erosive wear and being male, brushing teeth once per day or less, episodes of vomiting, daily/weekly episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux, consumption of fruit juice and sugary soft drinks several times per day, as well as consumption of sugary soft drinks daily to once per week. In conclusion, in addition to gender, dietary habits such as frequent consumption of fruit juice and sugary soft drinks, and the occurrence of reflux and vomiting, appear to be risk indicators for erosive wear. When counselling adolescents at risk, the gender-specific risk indicators should be taken into account.

  16. Risk factors for glenoid erosion in patients with shoulder hemiarthroplasty: an analysis of 118 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschel, Ramin; Wieser, Karl; Morrey, Mark E; Ramos, Carlos H; Gerber, Christian; Meyer, Dominik C

    2017-02-01

    Glenoid erosion is one of the main concerns in shoulder hemiarthroplasty. The goal of this study was to quantify glenoid erosion and to identify risk factors in patients with humeral hemiarthroplasty. There were 118 shoulders in 113 patients available for a standardized retrospective review. Erosion was graded as follows: grade 1, none; grade 2, mild (erosion into subchondral bone); grade 3, moderate (medialization of subchondral bone with hemispheric deformation); or grade 4, severe. The findings were then analyzed for confounding factors using a multivariate analysis. Mean follow-up was 31 months (range, 5-86 months). Negative predisposing factors for erosion were glenoid cysts (odds ratio, 5.4; P 50°) appeared to lead to local destruction of the cartilage. The degree of erosion did not correlate with age and glenoid or humeral head size. Only 1 patient (of 30) with a fracture-type prosthesis developed progressive glenoid erosion. In this series, favorable conditions for resistance to erosion after hemiarthroplasty were lack of glenoid cysts, intact glenoid cartilage, intact rotator cuff musculature, and a fracture situation. Age, the version of the glenoid, and the size of the prosthetic head showed no importance. The use of hemiarthroplasty seems to be associated with glenoid destruction in female patients with impending osteoarthritis, with rheumatoid arthritis, and if the head is implanted in a valgus position. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. It is possible to classify non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients into endoscopically normal groups and minimal change groups by subjective symptoms and responsiveness to rabeprazole -- a report from a study with Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Shirai, Naohito; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Hongo, Michio; Chiba, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2008-12-01

    The hypothesis that non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients comprise various subgroups is gaining popularity. This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of categorizing NERD patients according to symptom types and response to acid-suppressive drug rabeprazole (RPZ) 10 mg/day. NERD patients were classified as grade N (endoscopically normal), M (minimal change), or erosive GERD, and answered a 51-item, yes-or-no questionnaire pre and post-treatment. Compared to erosive GERD, clear differences existed in pretreatment prevalence of symptoms and responsiveness to RPZ in grades N and M; the results suggested stomachaches (especially at night) were significant symptoms in grade N and dysmotility-like symptoms like bloated stomach were significant in grade M while gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were significant in erosive GERD. Clinical significance of classifying NERD was indicated from different symptoms and responsiveness to PPI.

  18. Local Community Verification of Coastal Erosion Risks in the Arctic: Insights from Alaska's North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, M.

    2016-12-01

    During his historic trip to Alaska in 2015, U.S. President Barack Obama announced a collaborative effort to update maps of the Arctic region in anticipation of increased maritime access and resource development and to support climate resilience. Included in this effort is development of an Arctic-wide satellite-based digital elevation model (DEM) to provide a baseline to monitor landscape change such as coastal erosion. Focusing in Alaska's North Slope, an objective of this study is to transform emerging Arctic environment spatial data products including the new DEM into information that can support local level planning and decision-making in the face of extreme coastal erosion and related environmental threats. In pursuit of this, in 2016, 4 workshops were held in three North Slope villages highly exposed to coastal erosion. The first workshop with approximately 10 managers in Barrow solicited feedback on an erosion risk database developed in a previous research stage and installed onto the North Slope's planning Web portal. The database includes a physical risk indicator based on factors such as historical erosion and effects of sea ice loss summarized at asset locations. After a demonstration of the database, participants discussed usability aspects such as data reliability. The focus of the mapping workshops in Barrow and two smaller villages Wainwright and Kaktovik was to verify and expand the risk database by interactively mapping erosion observations and community asset impacts. Using coded stickers and paper maps of the shoreline showing USGS erosion rates, a total of 50 participants provided feedback on erosion data accuracy. Approximately 25 of the total 50 participants were elders and hunters who also provided in-depth community risk information. The workshop with managers confirmed physical risk factors used in the risk database, and revealed that the information may be relied upon to support some development decisions and better engage developers about

  19. The risk of persistent trophoblastic disease after hydatidiform mole classified by morphology and ploidy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Isa; Hansen, Estrid S; Sunde, Lone

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hydatidiform mole can be classified by histopathologic characteristics and by genetic constitutions and most complete moles are diploid, whereas most partial moles are triploid. We investigated the concordance between these two classifications, characterized moles with conflicting...... classifications, and compared the ability of the two classifications to discriminate between patients with and without a substantial risk of persistent trophoblastic disease. METHODS: 294 cases of consecutively collected hydropic placentas clinically suspected of hydatidiform mole made the basis...... of this retrospective study. We determined the ploidy and reviewed the original histopathologic material in all cases. Data on possible chemotherapy were collected for each patient. RESULTS: 270 of the conceptuses were histopathologically classified as hydatidiform mole. Among the 24 conceptuses classified as non...

  20. Ensemble of One-Class Classifiers for Personal Risk Detection Based on Wearable Sensor Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jorge; Barrera-Animas, Ari Y; Trejo, Luis A; Medina-Pérez, Miguel Angel; Monroy, Raúl

    2016-09-29

    This study introduces the One-Class K-means with Randomly-projected features Algorithm (OCKRA). OCKRA is an ensemble of one-class classifiers built over multiple projections of a dataset according to random feature subsets. Algorithms found in the literature spread over a wide range of applications where ensembles of one-class classifiers have been satisfactorily applied; however, none is oriented to the area under our study: personal risk detection. OCKRA has been designed with the aim of improving the detection performance in the problem posed by the Personal RIsk DEtection(PRIDE) dataset. PRIDE was built based on 23 test subjects, where the data for each user were captured using a set of sensors embedded in a wearable band. The performance of OCKRA was compared against support vector machine and three versions of the Parzen window classifier. On average, experimental results show that OCKRA outperformed the other classifiers for at least 0.53% of the area under the curve (AUC). In addition, OCKRA achieved an AUC above 90% for more than 57% of the users.

  1. Ensemble of One-Class Classifiers for Personal Risk Detection Based on Wearable Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Rodríguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the One-Class K-means with Randomly-projected features Algorithm (OCKRA. OCKRA is an ensemble of one-class classifiers built over multiple projections of a dataset according to random feature subsets. Algorithms found in the literature spread over a wide range of applications where ensembles of one-class classifiers have been satisfactorily applied; however, none is oriented to the area under our study: personal risk detection. OCKRA has been designed with the aim of improving the detection performance in the problem posed by the Personal RIsk DEtection(PRIDE dataset. PRIDE was built based on 23 test subjects, where the data for each user were captured using a set of sensors embedded in a wearable band. The performance of OCKRA was compared against support vector machine and three versions of the Parzen window classifier. On average, experimental results show that OCKRA outperformed the other classifiers for at least 0.53% of the area under the curve (AUC. In addition, OCKRA achieved an AUC above 90% for more than 57% of the users.

  2. Spatial distribution of water erosion risk in a watershed with eucalyptus and Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior Cesar Avanzi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The process of water erosion occurs in watersheds throughout the world and it is strongly affected by anthropogenic influences. Thus, the knowledge of these processes is extremely necessary for planning of conservation efforts. This study was performed in an experimental forested watershed in order to predict the average potential annual soil loss by water erosion using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE and a Geographic Information System (GIS, and then compared with soil loss tolerance. All the USLE factors were generated in a distributed approach employing a GIS tool. The layers were multiplied in the GIS framework in order to predict soil erosion rates. Results showed that the average soil loss was 6.2 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Relative to soil loss tolerance, 83% of the area had an erosion rate lesser than the tolerable value. According to soil loss classes, 49% of the watershed had erosion less than 2.5 Mg ha-1 yr-1. However, about 8.7% of the watershed had erosion rates greater than 15 Mg ha-1 yr-1, being mainly related to Plinthosol soil class and roads, thus requiring special attention for the improvement of sustainable management practices for such areas. Eucalyptus cultivation was found to have soil loss greater than Atlantic Forest. Thus, an effort should be made to bring the erosion rates closer to the native forest. Implementation of the USLE model in a GIS framework was found to be a simple and useful tool for predicting the spatial variation of soil erosion risk and identifying critical areas for conservation efforts.

  3. Impact of Land Use and Vegetation Cover on Risks of Erosion in the Ourika Watershed (Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meliho Modeste

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ourika watershed is located in mid-western Morocco, in the northwest of the High Atlas. This watershed, characterized by dramatic topography, sparse vegetative cover and friable substrates, is under increasing human pressure amplified by a variable and changing climate. The objective of this work was to map the risks of water erosion in the watershed using the RUSLE and GIS, and highlight, by mapping land uses, the role of land use and vegetation cover in the regulation of risks of erosion. The findings showed that the Ourika watershed was subject to strong climatic aggressiveness ranging from 55 to 101 MJ.mm/ha.h. Soil erodibility value ranged from 0.15 to 0.48 t.ha.h/ha.MJ.mm. Topographic factor ranged from 0 to 95. The vegetation cover factor was greater than 0.5 for 73% of the watershed area. The average soil loss obtained in the watershed was 380 t/ha/year. The results indicated that 48% of the watershed area is subject to soil loss between 50-400 t/ha/year, and 30% of the watershed area between 400 and 1000 t/ha/year. Soil loss below the tolerance level (<7 t/ha/year represented only 4% of the area. These results demonstrated the significance of erosion in the Ourika watershed. Croplands, clear forests, shrubland and nonforest empty spaces were subject to very high risk of erosion. By contrast, dense forests, moderately dense forests and arboriculture not mixed with cereal growing, protected the soil against erosion, improved physical and chemical soil characteristics, facilitated the infiltration of water into the soil and limited runoff and the risk of erosion

  4. Using the Remote Sensing and GIS Technology for Erosion Risk Mapping of Kartalkaya Dam Watershed in Kahramanmaras, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah E. Akay

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil erosion is the most serious environmental problem in watershed areas in Turkey. The main factors affecting the amount of soil erosion include vegetation cover, topography, soil, and climate. In order to describe the areas with high soil erosion risks and to develop adequate erosion prevention measures in the watersheds of dams, erosion risk maps should be generated considering these factors. Remote Sensing (RS and Geographic Information System (GIS technologies were used for erosion risk mapping in Kartalkaya Dam Watershed of Kahramanmaras, Turkey, based on the methodology implemented in COoRdination of INformation on the Environment (CORINE model. ASTER imagery was used to generate a land use/cover classification in ERDAS Imagine. The digital maps of the other factors (topography, soil types, and climate were generated in ArcGIS v9.2, and were then integrated as CORINE input files to produce erosion risk maps. The results indicate that 33.82%, 35.44%, and 30.74% of the study area were under low, moderate, and high actual erosion risks, respectively. The CORINE model integrated with RS and GIS technologies has great potential for producing accurate and inexpensive erosion risk maps in Turkey.

  5. Spatio-temporal analysis of soil erosion risk and runoff using AnnAGNPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshaneh, Eleni; Wagner, Wolfgang; Blöschl, Günter

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion is one form of land degradation in Ethiopia deteriorating the fertility and productivity of the land. This fact indicates the need to delineate high erosion risk areas for appropriate soil and conservation measures. Land use/cover change is one of the important factors in soil erosion. This study attempts test and implement AnnAGNPS model to estimate the spatio-temporal patterns of soil erosion and runoff associated with land use changes in the past 50 years in the 9900 ha upstream part of the Koga catchment. High erosion risk areas will then be delineated for simulation of the appropriate soil and water conservation measures that would reduce the soil loss. The study is based on two years high temporal resolution data on discharge, sediment, and rain fall accompanied by historical land use/cover data generated from satellite imagery. In addition, it uses several documented physical parameters of the study area. The Koga catchment is one of the agriculture dominated typical catchments in the North Western Ethiopian highlands with high population density that lead to increased pressure on natural resources.

  6. A universal meteorological method to identify potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Středová Hana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The climate of Central Europe, mainly winter seasons with no snow cover at lower altitudes and a spring drought as well, might cause erosion events on heavy-textured soils. The aim of this paper is to define a universal method to identify the potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils. The categorization of potential wind erosion risk due to meteorological conditions is based on: (i an evaluation of the number of freeze-thaw episodes forming bare soil surfaces during the cold period of year; and (ii, an evaluation of the number of days with wet soil surfaces during the cold period of year. In the period 2001–2012 (from November to March, episodes with temperature changes from positive to negative and vice versa (thaw-freeze and freeze-thaw cycles and the effects of wet soil surfaces in connection with aggregate disintegration, are identified. The data are spatially interpolated by GIS tools for areas in the Czech Republic with heavy-textured soils. Blending critical categories is used to locate potential risks. The level of risk is divided into six classes. Those areas identified as potentially most vulnerable are the same localities where the highest number of erosive episodes on heavy-textured soils was documented.

  7. Spatial evaluation of soil erosion risk in the West Usambara mountains, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Vrieling, A.; Vigiak, O.

    2006-01-01

    Effective soil and water conservation programmes require the concentration of resources on limited areas. For that purpose regional-scale assessments of erosion risk are required. However, availability of good-quality spatial data for such assessments is often poor, especially in regions like sub-Sa

  8. Establishing a risk scoring system for predicting erosive esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Hsu Hung

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This simple noninvasive risk scoring system, including factors of age, gender, body mass index, waist circumference, triglyceride, and high-density lipid cholesterol, effectively predicted EE and stratified its incidence.

  9. An Improvement of Empirical Risk Functional in Neuro-Fuzzy Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zamani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a new method to improve of Empirical Risk Functional . Empirical Risk Functional acts as cost function for training neuro-fuzzy classifiers. Empirical risk minimization seeks the function that best fits the training data and it is equivalent to maximum likelihood estimation. The name of this cost function is Approximate Differentiable Empirical Risk Functional (ADERF.This function enables us to use a differentiable approximation of the misclassification rate so that the Empirical Risk Minimization Principle formulated in Statistical Learning Theory can be applied. Also there is a learning algorithm based on ADERF. With our new method,more component of output vector of fuzzy classifier map to 1.By evaluating the effects of the proposed method, we can see the convergence speed of the learning algorithm and the classification accuracy are improved,and causes improved ADERF. The effects of improved ADERF, was illustrated. Experimental results on a number of benchmark classification tasks and comparison between approaches are provided

  10. Application of linear graph embedding as a dimensionality reduction technique and sparse representation classifier as a post classifier for the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Sunil Kumar; Rajaguru, Harikumar

    2015-12-01

    The most common and frequently occurring neurological disorder is epilepsy and the main method useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy is electroencephalogram (EEG) signal analysis. Due to the length of EEG recordings, EEG signal analysis method is quite time-consuming when it is processed manually by an expert. This paper proposes the application of Linear Graph Embedding (LGE) concept as a dimensionality reduction technique for processing the epileptic encephalographic signals and then it is classified using Sparse Representation Classifiers (SRC). SRC is used to analyze the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals and the parameters such as Sensitivity, Specificity, Time Delay, Quality Value, Performance Index and Accuracy are analyzed.

  11. The communication of the risk of coastal erosion in Portugal: a global problem, a local trouble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo BASTO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades a set of instruments has been devised by the Portuguese authorities to handle the issue of coastal erosion. We argue that this legal apparatus not only lacks the internal integration necessary for its effectiveness, but it also fails to recognise the ways in which the problem materialises in the everyday life of coastal areas. Through a case study in the village of Furadouro in Western Portugal, we demonstrate how this top-down implementation of policies does not promote a true communication of risks, in the sense that the problem of coastal erosion is not “put in common” across levels of governance.

  12. Erosion risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico - the effects of climate and weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Thomas; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2016-04-01

    Oceanographic variables such as mean sea level, tides, storm surges, and waves are drivers of erosion, and they act on different time scales ranging from hours (associated with weather) to seasonal and decadal variations and trends (associated with climate). Here we explore how the related sea-state conditions affect the erosion risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico for past and future climate scenarios. From the climate perspective we find that long-term trends in the relevant variables have caused an increase of ~30% in the erosion risk since the 1980s; at least half of this increase was due to changes in the wave climate. In the next decades, sea level rise will likely become the dominating driver and may, in combination with ongoing changes in the wave climate (and depending on the emission scenario), escalate the erosion risk by up to 300% over the next 30 years. We also find significant changes in the seasonal cycles of sea level and significant wave height, which have in combination caused a considerable increase of the erosion risk in summer and decrease in winter (superimposed onto the long-term trends). The influence of weather is assessed with a copula-based multivariate sea storm model in a Monte-Carlo framework; i.e. we simulate hundreds of thousands of artificial but physically consistent sea-state conditions to quantify how different our understanding of the present day erosion risk would be if we had seen more or less extreme combinations of the different sea-state parameters over the last three decades. We find, for example, that total water levels (tide + surge + wave run-up) associated with 100-year return periods may be underestimated by up to 30% and that the average number of impact hours - when total water levels exceeded the height of the dune toe (collision) or dune crest (overwash) - could have been up to 50% higher than what we inferred based on the actually observed oceanographic conditions. Assessing erosion risk in such a probabilistic

  13. How climate and weather affect the erosion risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, T.; Plant, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Oceanographic variables such as mean sea level, tides, storm surges, and waves are drivers of erosion, and they act on different time scales ranging from hours (associated with weather) to seasonal and decadal variations and trends (associated with climate). Here we explore how the related sea-state conditions affect the erosion risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico for past and future climate scenarios. From the climate perspective we find that long-term trends in the relevant variables have caused an increase of ~30% in the erosion risk since the 1980s; at least half of this increase was due to changes in the wave climate. In the next decades, sea level rise will likely become the dominating driver and may, in combination with ongoing changes in the wave climate (and depending on the emission scenario), escalate the erosion risk by up to 300% over the next 30 years. We also find significant changes in the seasonal cycles of sea level and significant wave height, which have in combination caused a considerable increase of the erosion risk in summer and decrease in winter (superimposed onto the long-term trends). The influence of weather is assessed with a copula-based multivariate sea storm model in a Monte-Carlo framework; i.e. we simulate hundreds of thousands of artificial but physically consistent sea-state conditions to quantify how different our understanding of the present day erosion risk would be if we had seen more or less extreme combinations of the different sea-state parameters over the last three decades. We find, for example, that total water levels (tide + surge + wave run-up) associated with 100-year return periods may be underestimated by up to 30% and that the average number of impact hours - when total water levels exceeded the height of the dune toe (collision) or dune crest (overwash) - could have been up to 50% higher than what we inferred based on the actually observed oceanographic conditions. Assessing erosion risk in such a probabilistic

  14. Silicone sealers, acetic acid vapours and dental erosion: a work-related risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Johansson, Anders; Stan, Vlaicu; Ohlson, Carl-Göran

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the acetic acid released by some silicone sealers during the curing process poses an increased risk for dental erosion, thus constituting an occupational hazard to exposed individuals. The material comprised 13 individuals (x=30 years, 10 men and 3 women) who had been exposed to an average of 4.2 years' (range 0.6-10 years) of working with silicone. Each had comprehensive medical and dental examinations carried out. A sex- and aged-matched group of 20 healthy, unexposed workers from the same company served as controls for the medical examination, while study models from randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals were used as controls for assessing the severity of erosion. Using a questionnaire, an assessment of the role of various possible factors related to oral and general health, and to dental erosion in particular, was made for each participant in the exposed group. Clinical examination included recordings of severity of dental erosion, presence of "cuppings", DMFT, salivary secretion rate and buffer capacity, visible plaque index and gingival bleeding index. In addition, bitewing radiographs, study casts and intraoral colour transparencies were obtained for each individual. The severity of dental erosion was significantly higher in those exposed to silicone compared to controls. There was also a significant correlation between the period of exposure to silicone in the workplace and severity of erosion. Medical problems, especially with regard to upper respiratory tract symptoms, were significantly more common among exposed individuals than controls. In conclusion, a relationship between occupational exposure to acetic acid vapours from silicone sealers and development of dental erosion would appear to exist.

  15. Multivariate erosion risk assessment of lateritic badlands of Birbhum (West Bengal, India): A case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandipan Ghosh; Kamala Bhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Each geomorphic hazard involves a degree of risk which incorporates quantification of the probability that a hazard will be harmful. At present, the categorization of sub-watersheds into erosion risk is considered as the fundamental step to conserve the soil loss. Development of badlands over the laterites of Birbhum district is an indicative of excessive soil loss in the monsoonal wet-dry type of climate. Slope erosion and channel erosion have generated huge amount of sediment from the small watersheds during intense monsoonal rainfall (June–September). The adjoining areas of Rampurhat I Block, Birbhum (West Bengal) and Shikaripara Block, Dumka (Jharkhand) have lost the lateritic soil cover at a rate of 20–40 ton/ha/year (Sarkar et al. 2005). In order to estimate the progressive removal of soil particles from the gully-catchments of the above-mentioned area, different morphometric parameters, soil parameters, hydrologic parameters and empirical models are employed. Side by side, the study is carried out to categorize the gully-catchments into different magnitude of erosion risk using several multivariate statistical techniques.

  16. Integration of transport concepts for risk assessment of pesticide erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaomei; Zee, van der Sjoerd E.A.T.M.; Gai, Lingtong; Wesseling, Jan G.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-01-01

    Environmental contamination by agrochemicals has been a large problem for decades. Pesticides are transported in runoff and remain attached to eroded soil particles, posing a risk to water and soil quality and human health. We have developed a parsimonious integrative model of pesticide

  17. Soil erosion risk evaluation using GIS in the Yuanmou County,a dry-hot valley of Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major threat to sustainable agriculture. Evaluating regional erosion risk is increasingly needed by national and in-ternational environmental agencies. This study elaborates a model (using spatial principal component analysis [SPCA]) method for the evaluation of soil erosion risk in a representative area of dry-hot valley (Yuanmou County) at a scale of 1:100,000 using a spatial database and GIS. The model contains seven factors: elevation, slope, annual precipitation, land use, vegetation, soil, and population density. The evaluation results show that five grades of soil erosion risk: very low, low, medium, high, and very high. These are divided in the study area, and a soil erosion risk evaluation map is created. The model may be applicable to other areas of China because it utilizes spatial data that are generally available.

  18. Erosion risk assessment in the southern Amazon - Data Preprocessing, data base application and process based modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Herrmann, Marie-Kristin; Herrmann, Anne-Katrin; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    The study region along the BR 16 highway belongs to the "Deforestation Arc" at the southern border of the Amazon rainforest. At the same time, it incorporates a land use gradient as colonization started in the 1975-1990 in Central Mato Grosso in 1990 in northern Mato Grosso and most recently in 2004-2005 in southern Pará. Based on present knowledge soil erosion is one of the key driver of soil degradation. Hence, there is a strong need to implement soil erosion control measures in eroding landscapes. Planning and dimensioning of such measures require reliable and detailed information on the temporal and spatial distribution of soil loss, sediment transport and deposition. Soil erosion models are increasingly used, in order to simulate the physical processes involved and to predict the effects of soil erosion control measures. The process based EROSION 3D simulation model is used for surveying soil erosion and deposition on regional catchments. Although EROSION 3D is a widespread, extensively validated model, the application of the model on regional scale remains challenging due to the enormous data requirements and complex data processing operations. In this context the study includes the compilation, validation and generalisation of existing land use and soil data in order to generate a consistent EROSION 3D input datasets. As a part of this process a GIS-linked data base application allows to transfer the original soil and land use data into model specific parameter files. This combined methodology provides different risk assessment maps for certain demands on regional scale. Besides soil loss and sediment transport, sediment pass over points into surface water bodies and particle enrichment can be simulated using the EROSION 3D model. Thus the estimation of particle bound nutrient and pollutant inputs into surface water bodies becomes possible. The study ended up in a user-friendly, timesaving and improved software package for the simulation of soil loss and

  19. Dynamic Assessment of Soil Erosion Risk Using Landsat TM and HJ Satellite Data in Danjiangkou Reservoir Area, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Han

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Danjiangkou reservoir area is the main water source and the submerged area of the Middle Route South-to-North Water Transfer Project of China. Soil erosion is a factor that significantly influences the quality and transfer of water from the Danjiangkou reservoir. The objective of this study is to assess the water erosion (rill and sheet erosion risk and dynamic change trend of spatial distribution in erosion status and intensity between 2004 and 2010 in the Danjiangkou reservoir area using a multicriteria evaluation method.The multicriteria evaluation method synthesizes the vegetation fraction cover, slope gradient, and land use. Based on the rules and erosion risk assessment results of the study area in 2004 and 2010, the research obtained the conservation priority map. This study result shows an improvement in erosion status of the study area, the eroded area decreased from 32.1% in 2004 to 25.43% in 2010. The unchanged regions dominated the study area and that the total area of improvement grade erosion was larger than that of deterioration grade erosion. The severe, more severe, and extremely severe areas decreased by 4.71%, 2.28%, and 0.61% of the total study area, respectively. The percentages of regions where erosion grade transformed from extremely severe to slight, light and moderate were 0.18%, 0.02%, and 0.30%, respectively. However, a deteriorated region with a 2,897.60 km2 area was still observed. This area cannot be ignored in the determination of a general governance scheme. The top two conservation priority levels cover almost all regions with severe erosion and prominent increase in erosion risk, accounting for 7.31% of the study area. The study results can assist government agencies in decision making for determining erosion control areas, starting regulation projects, and making soil conservation measures.

  20. Environmental risks associated to wind erosion in a metal mining area from SE Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Fernandez, G.; Romero Diaz, A.

    2009-07-01

    Soils and mining wastes from the Mediterranean mining area placed in the Sierra Minera Mountains are highly enriched in heavy metals such as lead and zinc, but also other metals such as cadmium and arsenic. Wind erosion in this area could be considered extremely high and hazards associated to this eroded sediments seems to be high because the huge amount of metals present in this wastes. Therefore, combination of high erosion rates and high metal concentration in this mining waste, make those environmental risks can be considered high for the surrounding ecosystems, but also for public health of the nearby villages and towns. In order, to study these wind erosion processes over these mining materials, some experiments for the evaluation of the transportation of soil particles were carried out. Erosion rates in this realm is particularly important during spring months, when increased activity of the eastern winds brings intense soil dragging, with strong effects on the metals dispersion, including the massive removal of sediments. (Author) 16 refs.

  1. Evaluation of soil erosion risk using Analytic Network Process and GIS: a case study from Spanish mountain olive plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhay, Olexandr; Arriaza, Manuel; Boerboom, Luc

    2009-07-01

    The study presents an approach that combined objective information such as sampling or experimental data with subjective information such as expert opinions. This combined approach was based on the Analytic Network Process method. It was applied to evaluate soil erosion risk and overcomes one of the drawbacks of USLE/RUSLE soil erosion models, namely that they do not consider interactions among soil erosion factors. Another advantage of this method is that it can be used if there are insufficient experimental data. The lack of experimental data can be compensated for through the use of expert evaluations. As an example of the proposed approach, the risk of soil erosion was evaluated in olive groves in Southern Spain, showing the potential of the ANP method for modelling a complex physical process like soil erosion.

  2. A Model for Predicting the Future Risk of Incident Erosive Esophagitis in an Asymptomatic Population Undergoing Regular Check-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soo Hoon; Lim, Yaeji; Lee, Hyuk; Kim, Joungyoun; Chi, Sangah; Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Son, Hee Jung; Ryu, Seungho; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J

    2016-01-01

    Erosive esophagitis is a major risk factor for Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Information regarding the putative risk factors for developing erosive esophagitis is considerably heterogeneous; thus, a risk model is required to clinically predict the incidence of erosive esophagitis. This study was to derive and validate a predictive model for the incidence of developing erosive esophagitis after negative index endoscopy in a population subjected to routine health check-ups. This retrospective cohort study of health check-ups included 11,535 patients who underwent repeated screening endoscopy after >3 years from a negative index endoscopy. We used logistic regression analysis to predict the incidence of erosive esophagitis, and a Simple Prediction of Erosive Esophagitis Development score for risk assessment was developed and internally validated using the split-sample approach. The development and validation cohorts included 5765 patients (675 with erosive esophagitis [11.7%]) and 5770 patients (670 with erosive esophagitis [11.6%]), respectively. The final model included sex, smoking behavior, body mass index, hypertension, and the triglyceride level as variables. This model predicted 667 cases of erosive esophagitis, yielding an expected-to-observed ratio of 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-1.07). A simplified 5-item risk scoring system based on coefficients was developed, with a risk of erosive esophagitis of 6.2% (95% CI, 5.2-7.1) for the low-risk group (score ≤2), 15.1% (95% CI, 13.5-16.6) for the intermediate-risk group (score ≤3, 4), and 18.2% (95% CI, 15.2-21.3) for the high-risk group (score ≥5). The discriminative performance of the risk-prediction score was consistent in the derivation cohort and validation cohort (c-statistics 0.68 and 0.64, respectively); the calibration was good (Brier score 0.099 and 0.1, respectively). In conclusion, a simple risk-scoring model using putative risk factors can predict the future

  3. Risk factors and management of vaginal mesh erosion after pelvic organ prolapse surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Wen Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Concomitant hysterectomy and hypertension were associated with mesh erosion. In the management of mesh erosion, conservative treatment can be tried as the first-line treatment for smaller erosions, while surgical repair for larger erosions. Recurrent erosions could happen and requires repairs several times.

  4. Post-fire erosion risk mapping using Landsat TM: results from the case of 2007 fire in Mt. Parnitha Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakakis, G.; Petropoulos, G. P.; Papanikolaou, I.; Kairis, O.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfires have significant geomorphological and hydrological impacts, such as the increasing of soil erosion and instability phenomena to fire-affected environment. In comparison to traditional methods, such as field inventories, remote sensing provides a cost-effective and rapid option in mapping the spatial and temporal variability of wildfires. The influence of the wildfires to soil erosion / sediment transport and their impact to the erosional and depositional environment and equilibrium and overall to the longer-term geological framework is often neglected in these studies. In this study, we examine whether the absence of vegetation due to the wildfires is indeed the main triggering mechanism for high erosional rates and try to quantify these parameters. In particular, the objective of the present study has been to assess the changes in soil erosion risk in Mediterranean setting as a result of a wildfire using remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). As a case study is selected an area located close to the capital of Greece, in which a destructive wildland fire occurred in the summer of 2007, a year of the most catastrophic fires occurred in Greece in recent times. Landsat TM satellite imagery available before and shortly after the firebreak was utilised. Erosion risk maps before and after the fire event were estimated on the basis of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model. Ancillary data used in RUSLE implementation included the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model, a geology map and field inventory conducted in the studied region. A soil erosion risk map with five classes (very low, low, medium, high) before and after the fire event was eventually developed from RUSLE within a GIS environment. In overall, areas having a minimal soil erosion risk before the fire showed a considerable increase in erosion risk after the fire, as a result of natural environment destruction occurred from the fire outbreak. Soil erosion risk

  5. A comparison between riverbank erosion models with an evaluation of the risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, L.; Campo, L.

    2012-04-01

    The riverbank erosion constitutes one of the main morphological phenomena that shape natural channels with particular reference to the river planform. The quantification of the riverbank retreat requires the knowledge of both local hydrodynamic and erodibility characteristics. Several models exist in literature that allow the estimation of the riverbank shear stress, that is the fundamental parameter in evaluating the retreat given the discharge flow and the geometry of the river channel. In this study two hydrodynamic models were selected, specifically the 1-D model HEC-RAS and the 2-D model River-2D. Both models were then combined with three shear stress models (Simon and Senturk, 1977, Steffler and Blackburn, 2002 and Kean and Smith, 2006) in order to obtain an estimation of the retreat on a study case on the Cecina river in Tuscany, Central Italy. A calibration of the models was performed basing on observations from aerial photos of the region over a period of ten years (1994-2004) and on observed discharge flows time series in the same period. The results of the different combinations of the models were discussed and compared. A framework was also developed for the risk analysis of land loss due to bank erosion, and an application to the study case was provided by using the results of the fluvial erosion modelling.

  6. Probabilistic assessment of erosion and flooding risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Wahl, Thomas; Long, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    We assess erosion and flooding risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico by identifying interdependencies among oceanographic drivers and probabilistically modeling the resulting potential for coastal change. Wave and water level observations are used to determine relationships between six hydrodynamic parameters that influence total water level and therefore erosion and flooding, through consideration of a wide range of univariate distribution functions and multivariate elliptical copulas. Using these relationships, we explore how different our interpretation of the present-day erosion/flooding risk could be if we had seen more or fewer extreme realizations of individual and combinations of parameters in the past by simulating 10,000 physically and statistically consistent sea-storm time series. We find that seasonal total water levels associated with the 100 year return period could be up to 3 m higher in summer and 0.6 m higher in winter relative to our best estimate based on the observational records. Impact hours of collision and overwash—where total water levels exceed the dune toe or dune crest elevations—could be on average 70% (collision) and 100% (overwash) larger than inferred from the observations. Our model accounts for non-stationarity in a straightforward, non-parametric way that can be applied (with little adjustments) to many other coastlines. The probabilistic model presented here, which accounts for observational uncertainty, can be applied to other coastlines where short record lengths limit the ability to identify the full range of possible wave and water level conditions that coastal mangers and planners must consider to develop sustainable management strategies.

  7. Probabilistic assessment of erosion and flooding risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Thomas; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2016-05-01

    We assess erosion and flooding risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico by identifying interdependencies among oceanographic drivers and probabilistically modeling the resulting potential for coastal change. Wave and water level observations are used to determine relationships between six hydrodynamic parameters that influence total water level and therefore erosion and flooding, through consideration of a wide range of univariate distribution functions and multivariate elliptical copulas. Using these relationships, we explore how different our interpretation of the present-day erosion/flooding risk could be if we had seen more or fewer extreme realizations of individual and combinations of parameters in the past by simulating 10,000 physically and statistically consistent sea-storm time series. We find that seasonal total water levels associated with the 100 year return period could be up to 3 m higher in summer and 0.6 m higher in winter relative to our best estimate based on the observational records. Impact hours of collision and overwash—where total water levels exceed the dune toe or dune crest elevations—could be on average 70% (collision) and 100% (overwash) larger than inferred from the observations. Our model accounts for non-stationarity in a straightforward, non-parametric way that can be applied (with little adjustments) to many other coastlines. The probabilistic model presented here, which accounts for observational uncertainty, can be applied to other coastlines where short record lengths limit the ability to identify the full range of possible wave and water level conditions that coastal mangers and planners must consider to develop sustainable management strategies.

  8. Plasma proteomics classifiers improve risk prediction for renal disease in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; Jankowski, Joachim; Heinze, Georg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro and macroalbuminuria are strong risk factors for progression of nephropathy in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes. Early detection of progression to micro and macroalbuminuria may facilitate prevention and treatment of renal diseases. We aimed to develop plasma...... proteomics classifiers to predict the development of micro or macroalbuminuria in hypertension or type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Patients with hypertension (n = 125) and type 2 diabetes (n = 82) were selected for this case-control study from the Prevention of REnal and Vascular ENd-stage Disease cohort....... RESULTS: In hypertensive patients, the classifier improved risk prediction for transition in albuminuria stage on top of the reference model (C-index from 0.69 to 0.78; P diabetes, the classifier improved risk prediction for transition from micro to macroalbuminuria (C-index from 0...

  9. Coastal erosion risk assessment using natural and human factors in different scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, George; Kampanis, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    Climate change, including sea-level rise and increasing storms, raise the threats of coastal erosion. Mitigating and adapting to coastal erosion risks in areas of human interest, like urban areas, culture heritage sites, and areas of economic interest, present a major challenge for society. In this context, decision making needs to be based in reliable risk assessment that includes environmental, social and economic factors. By integrating coastal hazard and risk assessments maps into coastal management plans, risks in areas of interest can be reduced. To address this, the vulnerability of the coast to sea level rise and associated erosion, in terms of expected land loss and socioeconomic importance need to be identified. A holistic risk assessment based in environmental, socioeconomic and economics approach can provide managers information how to mitigate the impact of coastal erosion and plan protection measures. Such an approach needs to consider social, economic and environmental factors, which interactions can be better assessed when distributed and analysed along the geographical space. In this work, estimations of climate change impact to coastline are based on a combination of environmental and economic data analysed in a GIS database. The risk assessment is implemented through the estimation of the vulnerability and exposure variables of the coast in two scales. The larger scale estimates the vulnerability in a regional level, with the use environmental factors with the use of CVI. The exposure variable is estimated by the use of socioeconomic factors. Subsequently, a smaller scale focuses on highly vulnerable beaches with high social and economic value. The vulnerability assessment of the natural processes to the environmental characteristics of the beach is estimated with the use of the Beach Vulnerability Index. As exposure variable, the value of beach width that is capitalized in revenues is implemented through a hedonic pricing model. In this

  10. Development and validation of a method to estimate the potential wind erosion risk in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Roger; Deumlich, Detlef; Völker, Lidia

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of the Cross Compliance (CC) regulations for soil protection resulted in the demand for the classification of the the wind erosion risk on agricultural areas in Germany nationwide. A spatial highly resolved method was needed based on uniform data sets and validation principles, which provides a fair and equivalent procedure for all affected farmers. A GIS-procedure was developed, which derives the site specific wind erosion risk from the main influencing factors: soil texture, wind velocity, wind direction and landscape structure following the German standard DIN 19706. The procedure enables different approaches in the Federal States and comparable classification results. Here, we present the approach of the Federal State of Brandenburg. In the first step a complete soil data map was composed in a grid size of 10 x 10 m. Data were taken from 1.) the Soil quality Appraisal (scale 1:10.000), 2.) the Medium-scale Soil Mapping (MMK, 1:25.000), 3.) extrapolating the MMK, 4.) new Soil quality Appraisal (new areas after coal-mining). Based on the texture and carbon content the wind erosion susceptibility was divided in 6 classes. This map was combined with data of the annual average wind velocity resulting in an increase of the risk classes for wind velocities > 5 ms-1 and a decrease for < 3 ms-1. The sheltering effect of landscape structure is regarded by allocating a height to each landscape element, corresponding to the described features in the digital "Biotope and Land Use Map". The "hill shade" procedure of ArcGIS was used to set virtual shadows behind the landscape elements for eight directions. The relative frequency of wind from each direction was used as a weighting factor and multiplied with the numerical values of the shadowed cells. Depending on the distance to the landscape element the shadowing effect was combined with the risk classes. The results show that the wind erosion risk is obviously reduced by integrating landscape structures into

  11. Coastal erosion vulnerability and risk assessment focusing in tourism beach use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, George

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the global market for tourism services is a key source of economic growth. Especially among Mediterranean countries, the tourism sector is one of the principal sectors driving national economies. With the majority of the mass tourism activities concentrated around coastal areas, coastal erosion, inter alia, poses a significant threat to coastal economies that depend heavily on revenues from tourism. The economic implications of beach erosion were mainly focused in the cost of coastal protection measures, instead of the revenue losses from tourism. For this, the vulnerability of the coast to sea level rise and associated erosion, in terms of expected land loss and economic activity need to be identified. To achieve this, a joint environmental and economic evaluation approach of the problem can provide a managerial tool to mitigate the impact of beach erosion in tourism, through realistic cost-benefit scenarios for planning alternative protection measures. Such a multipurpose tool needs to consider social, economic and environmental factors, which relationships can be better understood when distributed and analyzed along the geographical space. The risk assessment is implemented through the estimation of the vulnerability and exposure variables of the coast in two scales. The larger scale estimates the vulnerability in a regional level, with the use environmental factors with the use of CVI. The exposure variable is estimated by the use of socioeconomic factors. Subsequently, a smaller scale focuses on highly vulnerable beaches with high social and economic value. The assessment of the natural processes to the environmental characteristics of the beach is estimated with the use of the Beach Vulnerability Index (BVI) method. As exposure variable, the value of beach width that is capitalized in revenues is implemented through a hedonic pricing model. In this econometric modelling, Beach Value is related with economic and environmental

  12. Separation of dry and wet periods from regular weather station data for the analysis of wind erosion risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeini, Mohammadali Saremi; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    ), climate (e.g. air temperature, solar radiation, evaporation) and soil (e.g. infiltration rate, adhesion). The purpose of this study is to overcome the lack of soil moisture data for wind erosion risk assessment by developing a method to estimate the soil wetness based on easy available weather data......, such as daily precipitation, hourly/sub hourly ambient air temperature and hourly/sub hourly relative humidity. This new method was used to identify periods of wet and dry soil moisture conditions of a time series from 20 weather stations in Denmark. The length of the time series varied between 8 to 37 years...... that using wind data without the influence of soil moisture most likely lead to an overestimation of the wind erosion risk. It is, therefore, strongly recommended for wind erosion risk assessments to associate more importance to winds that occur during dry times of the year, by including soil moisture...

  13. A hierachical method for soil erosion assessment and spatial risk modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okoth, P.F.

    2003-01-01

      Though a lot has been done and achieved in erosion research and control in Kenya, most of the erosion research methods have in the past put emphasis more on quantifying soil loss or measuring soil erosion, rather than pinpointing to

  14. Timing of erosion and satellite data: a multi-resolution approach to soil risk mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Jong, de S.M.; Sterk, G.; Rodrigues, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Erosion reduces soil productivity and causes negative downstream impacts. Erosion processes occur on areas with erodible soils and sloping terrain when high-intensity rainfall coincides with limited vegetation cover. Timing of erosion events has implications on the selection of satellite imagery, us

  15. A hierachical method for soil erosion assessment and spatial risk modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okoth, P.F.

    2003-01-01

      Though a lot has been done and achieved in erosion research and control in Kenya, most of the erosion research methods have in the past put emphasis more on quantifying soil loss or measuring soil erosion, rather than pinpointing to area

  16. Soil Erosion Risk Map based on irregularity of the vegetative activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Tarquis, Ana Maria; Martín-Sotoca, Juan J.; Valencia, Jose L.; Gobin, Anne; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor

    2016-04-01

    Fournier Index on NDVI values seems to synthesize the different parameters of the USLE, referring to rainfall, soil, geomorphology and vegetation cover. Acknowledgements Authors are grateful to TALE project (CICYT PCIN-2014-080) and DURERO project (Env.C1.3913442) for their financial support. References Fournier, F. (1960), Climat et erosion. P.U.F. Paris. Jensen, J.R. (2000). Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perpective, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. Martínez Sotoca, J. J. (2014) estructura espacial de la sequía en pastos y sus aplicaciones en el seguro agrario indexado. (In Spanish) Master Thesis, UPM. Shamshad, A., Azhari M.N., Isaac, M.H., wan Hussin, W.M.A., Parida, B.P.. (2008). Development of an appropriate procedure for estimation of RUSLE EI30 index and preparation of erosivity maps for Pulau Penang in Peninsular Malaysia. Catena, 72, 423-432. van der Knijff, J.M., Jones, R.J.A., Montanarella, L. (1999). Soil Erosion Risk Assessment Italy Soil Erosion Risk Assessment in Italy. European Commission Soil Bureau Joint Research Centre European Commission. EUR 19022EN.

  17. The extreme risk of personal data breaches and the erosion of privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Spencer; Maillart, Thomas; Sornette, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Personal data breaches from organisations, enabling mass identity fraud, constitute an extreme risk. This risk worsens daily as an ever-growing amount of personal data are stored by organisations and on-line, and the attack surface surrounding this data becomes larger and harder to secure. Further, breached information is distributed and accumulates in the hands of cyber criminals, thus driving a cumulative erosion of privacy. Statistical modeling of breach data from 2000 through 2015 provides insights into this risk: A current maximum breach size of about 200 million is detected, and is expected to grow by fifty percent over the next five years. The breach sizes are found to be well modeled by an extremely heavy tailed truncated Pareto distribution, with tail exponent parameter decreasing linearly from 0.57 in 2007 to 0.37 in 2015. With this current model, given a breach contains above fifty thousand items, there is a ten percent probability of exceeding ten million. A size effect is unearthed where both the frequency and severity of breaches scale with organisation size like s0.6. Projections indicate that the total amount of breached information is expected to double from two to four billion items within the next five years, eclipsing the population of users of the Internet. This massive and uncontrolled dissemination of personal identities raises fundamental concerns about privacy.

  18. Mapping Erosion Risk in California's Rangelands Using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salls, W. B.; O'Geen, T. T.

    2015-12-01

    Soil loss constitutes a multi-faceted problem for agriculture: in addition to reducing soil fertility and crop yield, it compromises downstream water quality. Sediment itself is a major issue for aquatic ecosystems, but also serves as a vector for transporting nutrients, pesticides, and pathogens. Rangelands are thought to be a contributor to water quality degradation in California, particularly in the northern Coast Range. Though total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) have been imposed in some watersheds, and countless rangeland water quality outreach activities have been conducted, the connection between grazing intensity recommendations and changes in water quality is poorly understood at the state level. This disconnect gives rise to poorly informed regulations and discourages adoption of best management practices by ranchers. By applying the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) at a statewide scale, we highlighted areas most prone to erosion. We also investigated how two different grazing intensity scenarios affect modeled soil loss. Geospatial data layers representing the USLE parameters—rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, and cover—were overlaid to model annual soil loss. Monitored suspended sediment data from a small North Coast watershed with grazing as the predominant land use was used to validate the model. Modeled soil loss values were nearly one order of magnitude higher than monitored values; average soil loss feeding the downstream-most site was modeled at 0.329 t ha-1 yr-1, whereas storm-derived sediment passing the site over two years was calculated to be 0.037 t ha-1 yr-1. This discrepancy may stem from the fact that the USLE models detached sediment, whereas stream monitoring reflects sediment detached and subsequently transported to the waterway. Preliminary findings from the statewide map support the concern that the North Coast is particularly at risk given its combination of intense rain, erodible soils, and

  19. Integrating Terrain and Vegetation Indices for Identifying Potential Soil Erosion Risk Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arabinda Sharma

    2010-01-01

    The present paper offers an innovative method to monitor the change in soil erosion potential by integrating terrain and vegetation indices derived from remote sensing data. Three terrain indices namely, topographic wetness index (TWI), stream power index (SPI) and slope length factor (LS), were derived from the digital elevation model. Normalized vegetation index (NDVI) was derived for the year 1988 and 2004 using remote sensing images. K-mean clustering was performed on staked indices to categorize the study area into four soil erosion potential classes. The validation of derived erosion potential map using USLE model showed a good agreement. Results indicated that there was a significant change in the erosion potential of the watershed and a gradual shifting of lower erosion potential class to next higher erosion potential class over the study period.

  20. Wildfires and post-fire erosion risk in a coastal area under severe anthropic pressure associated with the touristic fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Annalisa; Arca, Bachisio; Pellizzaro, Grazia; Valeriano Pintus, Gian; Ferrara, Roberto; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades a rapid and intense development of the tourism industry led to an increasing of anthropic pressure on several coastal areas of Sardinia. This fact not only modified the coastal aesthetics, but has also generated an increase of risk for the environment. This phenomenon affected also the ancient structure of the landscape with a negative impact mainly caused by the following factors: land abandonment, wildfire occurrence, post-fire erosion, urbanization. These regional changes can be analyzed in detail by considering the geo-diachronic dynamics. The main objectives of this work were i) to perform a diachronic analysis of land use and land cover dynamics, ii) to analyse the recent dynamics of wildfires, and iii) to predict the soil erosion risk in relation to land use change occurred between the 1950s and the 2000s. The study was realized in a coastal area located in North-East Sardinia where the geo-historical processes were summarized and organized in a geographic information system that has been employed to examine the landscape variations at three different time steps: 1954, 1977 and 2000. In addition, different scenarios of wildfire propagation were simulated by FlamMap in order to estimate the spatial pattern of fire danger factors in the study area. Afterwards, maps of post-fire soil erosion were produced to identify the temporal and spatial variations of the erosion risk. The results show how the changes in land use and the significant and rapid increase of the residential areas affect the risk of both wildfires and post-fire soil erosion. The study reveals the capabilities of this type of approach and can be used by management agencies and policy makers e in sustainable landscape management planning. This approach can be extended to other regions of the Mediterranean basin characterized by complex interactions among landscape and anthropic factors affecting the environmental risk.

  1. Risk Determination, Prioritization, and Classifying in Construction Project Case Study: Gharb Tehran Commercial-Administrative Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Sohrabinejad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction projects play an important role in infrastructure projects in developing countries. According to type, size, and complexity of the project, the number and importance of each risk could be different and many projects cannot reach the project goals due to exposure to multiple risks. Many papers have been published on the subject of risk management in construction projects; unfortunately most of them have not been implemented in practical conditions. The aim of this study is to identify and prioritize risks in construction projects. The classical approach used probability and impact for risk assessment, but these criteria do not sufficiently address all aspects of projects risks and there might be a relationship between different criteria. This study proposes the hierarchical dependencies between criteria. A case study of construction project is presented to illustrate performance and usage of the proposed model. Utilizing library studies and interview with experts, managers, and specialists, decision criteria were identified through brain storming. Risks were categorized by the experts into eleven risks. Important risks were evaluated based on the fuzzy ANP, fuzzy DEMATEL, and fuzzy TOPSIS methods. The proposed model is more suitable than the traditional decision-making methods in prioritizing risk concerning cost, time, and quality.

  2. Soil coverage evolution and wind erosion risk on summer crops under contrasting tillage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mariano J.; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2015-03-01

    The effectiveness of wind erosion control by soil surface conditions and crop and weed canopy has been well studied in wind tunnel experiments. The aim of this study is to assess the combined effects of these variables under field conditions. Soil surface conditions, crop and weed coverage, plant residue, and non-erodible aggregates (NEA) were measured in the field between the fallow start and the growth period of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and corn (Zea mays). Both crops were planted on a sandy-loam Entic Haplustoll with conventional-(CT), vertical-(VT) and no-till (NT) tillage systems. Wind erosion was estimated by means of the spreadsheet version the Revised Wind Erosion Equation and the soil coverage was measured each 15 days. Results indicated that wind erosion was mostly negligible in NT, exceeding the tolerable levels (estimated between 300 and 1400 kg ha-1 year-1 by Verheijen et al. (2009)) only in an year with high climatic erosivity. Wind erosion exceeded the tolerable levels in most cases in CT and VT, reaching values of 17,400 kg ha-1. Wind erosion was 2-10 times higher after planting of both crops than during fallows. During the fallows, the soil was mostly well covered with plant residues and NEA in CT and VT and with residues and weeds in NT. High wind erosion amounts occurring 30 days after planting in all tillage systems were produced by the destruction of coarse aggregates and the burying of plant residues during planting operations and rains. Differences in soil protection after planting were given by residues of previous crops and growing weeds. The growth of weeds 2-4 weeks after crop planting contributed to reduce wind erosion without impacting in crops yields. An accurate weeds management in semiarid lands can contribute significantly to control wind erosion. More field studies are needed in order to develop management strategies to reduce wind erosion.

  3. Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantel, S.; Kirby, M.; Daroussin, J.; Jones, R.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Soil is a vital resource with multiple functions and with high regional and internal variability. Accelerated soil erosion is a cause for decline in soil quality and is increasingly being recognized as a serious environmental problem. Soil erosion is a function of factors such as: land use and

  4. Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantel, S.; Kirby, M.; Daroussin, J.; Jones, R.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Soil is a vital resource with multiple functions and with high regional and internal variability. Accelerated soil erosion is a cause for decline in soil quality and is increasingly being recognized as a serious environmental problem. Soil erosion is a function of factors such as: land use and manag

  5. Assessing and monitoring the risk of desertification in Dobrogea, Romania, using Landsat data and decision tree classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorovencii, Iosif

    2015-04-01

    The risk of the desertification of a part of Romania is increasingly evident, constituting a serious problem for the environment and the society. This article attempts to assess and monitor the risk of desertification in Dobrogea using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite images acquired in 1987, 1994, 2000, 2007 and 2011. In order to assess the risk of desertification, we used as indicators the Modified Soil Adjustment Vegetation Index 1 (MSAVI1), the Moving Standard Deviation Index (MSDI) and the albedo, indices relating to the vegetation conditions, the landscape pattern and micrometeorology. The decision tree classifier (DTC) was also used on the basis of pre-established rules, and maps displaying six grades of desertification risk were obtained: non, very low, low, medium, high and severe. Land surface temperature (LST) was also used for the analysis. The results indicate that, according to pre-established rules for the period of 1987-2011, there are two grades of desertification risk that have an ascending trend in Dobrogea, namely very low and medium desertification. An investigation into the causes of the desertification risk revealed that high temperature is the main factor, accompanied by the destruction of forest shelterbelts and of the irrigation system and, to a smaller extent, by the fragmentation of agricultural land and the deforestation in the study area.

  6. Development of a Bayesian Classifier for Breast Cancer Risk Stratification: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    preceding 3 months, had breast fine needle aspiration within the preceding 1 month, were pregnant, had electrically powered implanted devices (eg, pacemaker...EIS), breast imaging, and biopsy data) from a prospective pilot screening trial in younger women (N = 591). Receiver operating characteristic curve...a cross-validation exercise could provide in terms of risk stratification in a larger population. Results: Independent predictors of biopsy outcome

  7. Modelling soil erosion risk based on RUSLE-3D using GIS in a Shivalik sub-watershed

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suresh Kumar; S P S Kushwaha

    2013-04-01

    The RUSLE-3D (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation-3D) model was implemented in geographic information system (GIS) for predicting the soil loss and the spatial patterns of soil erosion risk required for soil conservation planning. High resolution remote sensing data (IKONOS and IRS LISS-IV) were used to prepare land use/land cover and soil maps to derive the vegetation cover and the soil erodibility factor whereas Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was used to generate spatial topographic factor. Soil erodibility (K) factor in the sub-watershed ranged from 0.30 to 0.48. The sub-watershed is dominated by natural forest in the hilly landform and agricultural land in the piedmont and alluvial plains. Average soil loss was predicted to be lowest in very dense forest and highest in the open forest in the hilly landform. Agricultural land-1 and agriculture land-2 to have moderately high and low soil erosion risk, respectively. The study predicted that 15% area has ‘moderate’ to ‘moderately high’ and 26% area has high to very high risk of soil erosion in the sub-watershed.

  8. A real-time heat strain risk classifier using heart rate and skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Mark J; Latzka, William A; Yokota, Miyo; Tharion, William J; Moran, Daniel S

    2008-12-01

    Heat injury is a real concern to workers engaged in physically demanding tasks in high heat strain environments. Several real-time physiological monitoring systems exist that can provide indices of heat strain, e.g. physiological strain index (PSI), and provide alerts to medical personnel. However, these systems depend on core temperature measurement using expensive, ingestible thermometer pills. Seeking a better solution, we suggest the use of a model which can identify the probability that individuals are 'at risk' from heat injury using non-invasive measures. The intent is for the system to identify individuals who need monitoring more closely or who should apply heat strain mitigation strategies. We generated a model that can identify 'at risk' (PSI 7.5) workers from measures of heart rate and chest skin temperature. The model was built using data from six previously published exercise studies in which some subjects wore chemical protective equipment. The model has an overall classification error rate of 10% with one false negative error (2.7%), and outperforms an earlier model and a least squares regression model with classification errors of 21% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, the model allows the classification criteria to be adjusted based on the task and acceptable level of risk. We conclude that the model could be a valuable part of a multi-faceted heat strain management system.

  9. Livestock grazing impact on soil wettability and erosion risk in post-fire agricultural lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavi, Ilan; Barkai, Daniel; Knoll, Yaakov M; Zaady, Eli

    2016-12-15

    Fires in agricultural areas are common, modifying the functioning of agro-ecosystems. Such fires have been extensively studied, and reported to considerably affect soil properties. Yet, understanding of the impact of livestock grazing, or more precisely, trampling, in fire-affected lands is limited. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of low- to moderate-fire severity and livestock trampling (hoof action) on the solid soil's wettability and related properties, and on soil detachment, in burnt vs. non-burnt croplands. The study was implemented by allowing livestock to access plots under high, medium, and low stocking rates in (unintentionally) burnt and non-burnt lands. Also, livestock exclusion plots were assigned as a control treatment. Results showed that fire slightly decreased the soil wettability. At the same time, water drop penetration time (WDPT) was negatively related to the stocking rate, and critical surface tension (CST) was ~13% smaller in the control plots than in the livestock-presence treatments. Also, the results showed that following burning, the resistance of soil to shear decreased by ~70%. Mass of detached material was similar in the control plots of the burnt and non-burnt plots. At the same time, it was three-, eight-, and nine-fold greater in the plots of the burnt×low, burnt×medium, and burnt×high stocking rates, respectively, than in the corresponding non-burnt ones. This study shows that livestock trampling in low- to moderate-intensity fire-affected lands increased the shearing of the ground surface layer. On the one hand, this slightly increased soil wettability. On the other hand, this impact considerably increased risks of soil erosion and land degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  11. Risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Liao, Banghua; Luo, Deyi; Shen, Hong; Wang, Kunjie

    2016-02-01

    To explore the risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery based on published literature. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Literature (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Chinese Science and Technology Periodical (VIP) databases was performed to identify studies related to the risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstruction published before December 2014. Summary unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of associations between the factors and mesh erosion. In all, 25 studies containing 7,084 patients were included in our systematic review and meta-analysis. Statistically significant differences in mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstruction were found in older vs younger patients (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98), more parities vs less parities (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07-1.51), the presence of premenopausal/oestrogen replacement therapy (ERT) (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03-1.79), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.35-2.57), smoking (OR 2.35, 95% CI 1.80-3.08), concomitant pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.16-0.84), concomitant hysterectomy (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.03-2.07), preservation of the uterus at surgery (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.63), and surgery performed by senior vs junior surgeons (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.30-0.58). Our study indicates that younger age, more parities, premenopausal/ERT, diabetes mellitus, smoking, concomitant hysterectomy, and surgery performed by a junior surgeon were significant risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery. Moreover, concomitant POP surgery and preservation of the uterus may be the potential protective factors for mesh erosion. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Soil Erosion Risk in Małopolska (Poland), Supported by an Object-Based Analysis of High-Resolution Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecki, Wojciech; Wężyk, Piotr; Pierzchalski, Marcin; Szafrańska, Beata

    2014-06-01

    In 2011 the Marshal Office of Małopolska Voivodeship decided to evaluate the vulnerability of soils to water erosion for the entire region. The quantitative and qualitative assessment of the erosion risk for the soils of the Małopolska region was done based on the USLE approach. The special work-flow of geoinformation technologies was used to fulfil this goal. A high-resolution soil map, together with rainfall data, a detailed digital elevation model and statistical information about areas sown with particular crops created the input information for erosion modelling in GIS environment. The satellite remote sensing technology and the object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach gave valuable support to this study. RapidEye satellite images were used to obtain the essential up-to-date data about land use and vegetation cover for the entire region (15,000 km2). The application of OBIA also led to defining the direction of field cultivation and the mapping of contour tillage areas. As a result, the spatially differentiated values of erosion control practice factor were used. Both, the potential and the actual soil erosion risk were assessed quantificatively and qualitatively. The results of the erosion assessment in the Małopolska Voivodeship reveal the fact that a majority of its agricultural lands is characterized by moderate or low erosion risk levels. However, high-resolution erosion risk maps show its substantial spatial diversity. According to our study, average or higher actual erosion intensity levels occur for 10.6 % of agricultural land, i.e. 3.6 % of the entire voivodeship area. In 20 % of the municipalities there is a very urgent demand for erosion control. In the next 23 % an urgent erosion control is needed. Our study showed that even a slight improvement of P-factor estimation may have an influence on modeling results. In our case, despite a marginal change of erosion assessment figures on a regional scale, the influence on the final prioritization of

  13. Quantification of risks to coastal areas and development: wave run-up and erosion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the Coelho et al. (2006) method is to assess the degree of exposure and vulnerability to coastal processes using the following nine indicators as the basis: foreshore elevation; distance (e.g. infrastructure) to shore; tidal range; wave.... However, flooding/inundation vulnerability is already accounted for in the elevation and distance to shore. Thus, only the Bruun erosion potential needs to be assessed: for a specific amount of sea level rise, the erosion is directly related to inshore...

  14. Quantification and site-specification of the support practice factor when mapping soil erosion risk associated with olive plantations in the Mediterranean island of Crete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karydas, Christos G; Sekuloska, Tijana; Silleos, Georgios N

    2009-02-01

    Due to inappropriate agricultural management practices, soil erosion is becoming one of the most dangerous forms of soil degradation in many olive farming areas in the Mediterranean region, leading to significant decrease of soil fertility and yield. In order to prevent further soil degradation, proper measures are necessary to be locally implemented. In this perspective, an increase in the spatial accuracy of remote sensing datasets and advanced image analysis are significant tools necessary and efficient for mapping soil erosion risk on a fine scale. In this study, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was implemented in the spatial domain using GIS, while a very high resolution satellite image, namely a QuickBird image, was used for deriving cover management (C) and support practice (P) factors, in order to map the risk of soil erosion in Kolymvari, a typical olive farming area in the island of Crete, Greece. The results comprised a risk map of soil erosion when P factor was taken uniform (conventional approach) and a risk map when P factor was quantified site-specifically using object-oriented image analysis. The results showed that the QuickBird image was necessary in order to achieve site-specificity of the P factor and therefore to support fine scale mapping of soil erosion risk in an olive cultivation area, such as the one of Kolymvari in Crete. Increasing the accuracy of the QB image classification will further improve the resulted soil erosion mapping.

  15. Estimating soil erosion risk and evaluating erosion control measures for soil conservation planning at Koga watershed in the highlands of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Tegegne; Sisheber, Biniam

    2017-01-01

    Soil erosion is one of the major factors affecting sustainability of agricultural production in Ethiopia. The objective of this paper is to estimate soil erosion using the universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) model and to evaluate soil conservation practices in a data-scarce watershed region. For this purpose, soil data, rainfall, erosion control practices, satellite images and topographic maps were collected to determine the RUSLE factors. In addition, measurements of randomly selected soil and water conservation structures were done at three sub-watersheds (Asanat, Debreyakob and Rim). This study was conducted in Koga watershed at upper part of the Blue Nile basin which is affected by high soil erosion rates. The area is characterized by undulating topography caused by intensive agricultural practices with poor soil conservation practices. The soil loss rates were determined and conservation strategies have been evaluated under different slope classes and land uses. The results showed that the watershed is affected by high soil erosion rates (on average 42 t ha-1 yr-1), greater than the maximum tolerable soil loss (18 t ha-1 yr-1). The highest soil loss (456 t ha-1 yr-1) estimated from the upper watershed occurred on cultivated lands of steep slopes. As a result, soil erosion is mainly aggravated by land-use conflicts and topographic factors and the rugged topographic land forms of the area. The study also demonstrated that the contribution of existing soil conservation structures to erosion control is very small due to incorrect design and poor management. About 35 % out of the existing structures can reduce soil loss significantly since they were constructed correctly. Most of the existing structures were demolished due to the sediment overload, vulnerability to livestock damage and intense rainfall. Therefore, appropriate and standardized soil and water conservation measures for different erosion-prone land uses and land forms need to be implemented in Koga

  16. A discussion of the risks and benefits of using rock terracing to limit soil erosion in Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The construction of stone terraces to minimise soil erosion is common throughout Guizhou. This technique, however, has high inherent risk. Stone terraces are usually much higher than those with earth risers. While they trap a greater thickness of soil on the slope they increase the risk of slope failures, reduce moisture and nutrient availability to plants, and thin more soil up slope. The stone risers also threaten long-term productivity. When a riser collapses debris is deposited over the terrace below making farming difficult. These breaches in the terrace focus surface runoff leading to gully formation and increased sediment transport down slope. Artificial drainage systems, often used in conjunction with terracing, compound the risk. These channels prevent precipitation from soaking into the soil. This limits groundwater and soil moisture recharge which reduces the availability of water for crops and the length of the growing season. The rapid drainage of water from the slope reduces the time of concentration of the catchment resulting in an increase in flood activity. Floods are caused by smaller rainstorm events. They arrive faster and peak quicker and higher than before the channels were constructed. Engineering solutions to soil erosion must therefore be used in conjunction with, and are not as a substitute for, good land management strategies. Furthermore, despite changes in land use practices, and the application of new technologies, there is a maximum amount of production that can be obtained from this land on a sustainable basis.

  17. Can human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping classify non-16/18 high-risk HPV infection by risk stratification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yeoun Eun; Ki, Eun Young; Lee, Youn Soo; Hur, Soo Young; Lee, Ahwon; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-11-01

    Infection with high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the major cause of invasive cervical cancers. HPV-16 and HPV-18 are known to be responsible for two-thirds of all invasive cervical carcinomas, followed by HPV-45, -31, and -33. Current guidelines only differentiate HPV-16/18 (+) by recommending direct colposcopy for treatment. We tried to evaluate whether there are differences in risk among 12 non-16/18 HR-HPV genotypes in this study. The pathology archive database records of 1,102 consecutive gynecologic patients, who had results for cervical cytology and histology and for HPV testing, as determined by HPV 9G DNA chip, were reviewed. Among the 1,102 patients, 346 were non-16/18 HR-HPV (+) and 231 were HPV-16/18 (+). We calculated the odds ratios for ≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 (CIN 2) of 14 groups of each HR-HPV genotype compared with a group of HR-HPV (-) patients. Based on the odds ratio of each genotype, we divided patients with non-16/18 HR-HPV genotypes (+) into two groups: HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 (+) and HPV-39/51/56/59/66/68 (+). The age-adjusted odds ratios for ≥CIN 2 of the HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 (+) and HPV-39/51/56/59/66/68 (+) groups compared with a HR-HPV (-) group were 11.9 (95% CI, 7.6 to 18.8; p<0.001) and 2.4 (95% CI, 1.4 to 4.3; p<0.001), respectively, while that of the HPV-16/18 (+) group was 18.1 (95% CI, 11.6 to 28.3; p=0.003). The 12 non-16/18 HR-HPV genotypes can be further categorized (HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 vs. HPV-39/51/56/59/66/68) by risk stratification. The HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 genotypes might need more aggressive action. Large scale clinical trials or cohort studies are necessary to confirm our suggestion.

  18. Classifying Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the coexistence of two systems for classifying organisms and species: a dominant genetic system and an older naturalist system. The former classifies species and traces their evolution on the basis of genetic characteristics, while the latter employs physiological characteris......This paper describes the coexistence of two systems for classifying organisms and species: a dominant genetic system and an older naturalist system. The former classifies species and traces their evolution on the basis of genetic characteristics, while the latter employs physiological...... and integration possible, the field of molecular biology seems to be overwhelmingly homogeneous, and in need of heterogeneity and conflict to add drive and momentum to the work being carried out. The paper is based on observations of daily life in a molecular microbiology laboratory at the Technical University...

  19. Classifying Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzen, Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of activities that utilizes a leveling device to classify constant and accelerated motion. Applies this classification system to uniform circular motion and motion produced by gravitational force. (MDH)

  20. Combining Field and Laboratory Measurements to Determine the Erosion Risk of Cohesive Sediments Best

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Noack

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to non-cohesive sediments, the incipient motion of cohesive sediments is characterized by much more complex interactions between several sedimentary, biological, and chemical parameters. Thus, site-specific investigations are required to obtain information about the erosion stability of cohesive materials. This becomes even more relevant for contaminated sediments, stored in riverine sediments as a “burden of the past”, because of their remobilization potential during flood events. This article represents a twofold measuring strategy for the detection of erosion thresholds: an in situ device for determination of critical shear stresses in the field, and a laboratory approach where sediment cores are withdrawn and subsequently analyzed over depth. The combined measuring strategy was applied in the River Elbe and at selected sites of the catchment of the River Saale. The results show a great variety of erosion thresholds over depth, demonstrating the need to conduct vertical analyses, especially when addressing buried layers with contaminations. The latter is only possible in the laboratory but the in situ device revealed clear benefits in capturing the loose flocculent layer on top of the sediment that might be easily lost during sediment retrieval and transport. Consequently, it is ideal to combine both approaches for a comprehensive insight into sediment stability.

  1. Modeling runoff and erosion risk in a~small steep cultivated watershed using different data sources: from on-site measurements to farmers' perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvet, B.; Lidon, B.; Kartiwa, B.; Le Bissonnais, Y.; Poussin, J.-C.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an approach to model runoff and erosion risk in a context of data scarcity, whereas the majority of available models require large quantities of physical data that are frequently not accessible. To overcome this problem, our approach uses different sources of data, particularly on agricultural practices (tillage and land cover) and farmers' perceptions of runoff and erosion. The model was developed on a small (5 ha) cultivated watershed characterized by extreme conditions (slopes of up to 55 %, extreme rainfall events) on the Merapi volcano in Indonesia. Runoff was modelled using two versions of STREAM. First, a lumped version was used to determine the global parameters of the watershed. Second, a distributed version used three parameters for the production of runoff (slope, land cover and roughness), a precise DEM, and the position of waterways for runoff distribution. This information was derived from field observations and interviews with farmers. Both surface runoff models accurately reproduced runoff at the outlet. However, the distributed model (Nash-Sutcliffe = 0.94) was more accurate than the adjusted lumped model (N-S = 0.85), especially for the smallest and biggest runoff events, and produced accurate spatial distribution of runoff production and concentration. Different types of erosion processes (landslides, linear inter-ridge erosion, linear erosion in main waterways) were modelled as a combination of a hazard map (the spatial distribution of runoff/infiltration volume provided by the distributed model), and a susceptibility map combining slope, land cover and tillage, derived from in situ observations and interviews with farmers. Each erosion risk map gives a spatial representation of the different erosion processes including risk intensities and frequencies that were validated by the farmers and by in situ observations. Maps of erosion risk confirmed the impact of the concentration of runoff, the high susceptibility of long steep

  2. Soil erosion and risk-assessment for on- and off-farm impacts: a test case using the Midhurst area, West Sussex, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, John; Shepheard, Mark L; Walker, Edward; Foster, Ian D L

    2009-06-01

    Soil erosion on agricultural land is a growing problem in Western Europe and constitutes a threat to soil quality and to the ability of soils to provide environmental services. The off-site impacts of runoff and eroded soil, principally eutrophication of water bodies, sedimentation of gravel-bedded rivers, loss of reservoir capacity, muddy flooding of roads and communities, are increasingly recognised and costed. The shift of funding in the European Union (EU) from production-related to avoidance of pollution and landscape protection, raises issues of cross-compliance: public support for agriculture has to be seen to give value-for-money. In this context risk-assessment procedures have been introduced to help farmers recognise sites where either certain crops should not be grown or anti-erosion measures are required. In England, Defra [Defra, 2005a. Controlling Soil Erosion: a Manual for the Assessment and Management of Agricultural Land at Risk of Water Erosion in Lowland England. Revised September 2005. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, London] sets out a system of risk-assessment, including ranking of crops susceptible to erosion and anti-erosion measures, that may be selected. We assess this system using field data for an area of erodible soils in the Rother valley, Sussex. The Defra approach correctly identifies most at-risk fields and, taken together with land-use maps, allows non-compliance with advice to be highlighted. We suggest a simple extension to the system which would further identify at-risk fields in terms of possible damage to roads and rivers from muddy runoff. The increased risk of erosion in the study area is associated with certain crops: potatoes, winter cereals, maize and grazed turnips and seems unlikely to be the result of changes in rainfall which over the last 130 years are minimal. We have not evaluated proposed anti-erosion measures in the area because few have been put into practice. The European Water Framework

  3. Spatio-temporal assessment of soil erosion risk in different agricultural zones of the Inle Lake region, southern Shan State, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htwe, Thin Nwe; Brinkmann, Katja; Buerkert, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Myanmar is one of Southeast Asia's climatically most diverse countries, where sheet, rill, and gully erosion affect crop yields and subsequently livelihood strategies of many people. In the unique wetland ecosystem of Inle Lake, soil erosion in surrounding uplands lead to sedimentation and pollution of the water body. The current study uses the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to identify soil erosion risks of the Inle Lake region in space and time and to assess the relationship between soil erosion and degradation for different agricultural zones and cropping systems. Altogether, 85% of soil losses occurred on barren land along the steep slopes. The hotspot of soil erosion risk is situated in the western uplands characterized by unsustainable land use practices combined with a steep topography. The estimated average soil losses amounted to 19.9, 10.1, and 26.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in 1989, 2000, and 2009, respectively. These fluctuations were mainly the results of changes in precipitation and land cover (deforestation (-19%) and expansion of annual cropland (+35%) from 1989 to 2009). Most farmers in the study area have not yet adopted effective soil protection measures to mitigate the effects of soil erosion such as land degradation and water pollution of the lake reservoir. This urgently needs to be addressed by policy makers and extension services.

  4. Wind characteristics and the associated risk of erosion in Seribu Islands patch reef complexes, Java Sea, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poerbandono

    2016-05-01

    This paper explores design event and entrainment of cay beach sands due to wave shear stresses from winds. Univariate frequency analysis is used to predict recurrence intervals of extreme winds from 30-year (1984-2013) global assimilated data set. Two primary clusters of wind directions representing East and West monsoons are examined. This identifies the equivalence of characteristics of regime among the two clusters. Taking into account the threshold of bottom shear stress of cay beach sands, conceptual relationship between height of wind-generated waves (forecasted from predefined fetch length and wind speed) and erosion of cay beach sand is prescribed. The results indicate that East monsoon is the predominant occurrence of wind and facilitates persistent north-westward shift of cay beach sands, while West monsoon provides extreme events in shorter time span. It is suspiciously thought that due to these, net north-westward drift of sand is indicated. These imply that many of cays in the domain being investigated is at risk of erosion due to unequal balance forcing of winds.

  5. Comprehensive assessment of soil erosion risk for better land use planning in river basins: Case study of the Upper Blue Nile River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haregeweyn, Nigussie; Tsunekawa, Atsushi; Poesen, Jean; Tsubo, Mitsuru; Meshesha, Derege Tsegaye; Fenta, Ayele Almaw; Nyssen, Jan; Adgo, Enyew

    2017-01-01

    In the drought-prone Upper Blue Nile River (UBNR) basin of Ethiopia, soil erosion by water results in significant consequences that also affect downstream countries. However, there have been limited comprehensive studies of this and other basins with diverse agroecologies. We analyzed the variability of gross soil loss and sediment yield rates under present and expected future conditions using a newly devised methodological framework. The results showed that the basin generates an average soil loss rate of 27.5tha(-1)yr(-1) and a gross soil loss of ca. 473Mtyr(-1), of which, at least 10% comes from gully erosion and 26.7% leaves Ethiopia. In a factor analysis, variation in agroecology (average factor score=1.32) and slope (1.28) were the two factors most responsible for this high spatial variability. About 39% of the basin area is experiencing severe to very severe (>30tha(-1)yr(-1)) soil erosion risk, which is strongly linked to population density. Severe or very severe soil erosion affects the largest proportion of land in three subbasins of the UBNR basin: Blue Nile 4 (53.9%), Blue Nile 3 (45.1%), and Jema Shet (42.5%). If appropriate soil and water conservation practices targeted ca. 77.3% of the area with moderate to severe erosion (>15tha(-1)yr(-1)), the total soil loss from the basin could be reduced by ca. 52%. Our methodological framework identified the potential risk for soil erosion in large-scale zones, and with a more sophisticated model and input data of higher spatial and temporal resolution, results could be specified locally within these risk zones. Accurate assessment of soil erosion in the UBNR basin would support sustainable use of the basin's land resources and possibly open up prospects for cooperation in the Eastern Nile region.

  6. Dental erosion among South Brazilian adolescents: A 2.5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusius, C D; Alves, L S; Susin, C; Maltz, M

    2017-07-20

    This population-based longitudinal study investigated the incidence, progression and risk factors for dental erosion among South Brazilian adolescents. Eight hundred and one schoolchildren attending 42 public and private schools were clinically examined at 12 years of age; clinical examinations were repeated after 2.5 years (SD=0.3). After tooth cleaning and drying, permanent incisors and first molars were classified using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) scoring criteria. Questionnaires were used to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics, dietary habits, toothbrushing frequency and general health. Poisson regression analysis was used to assess the association between dental erosion incidence and explanatory variables, with adjusted incidence risk ratios (IRR) and 95% CI estimated. Among those who did not have dental erosion at baseline, 49 of 680 schoolchildren (7.1%; 95% CI=5.2-9.1) developed erosive lesions over the follow-up period. Among schoolchildren who had dental erosion at baseline, 31 of 121 (25.4%; 95% CI=17.6-33.3) had new or more severe lesions. Boys were more likely to develop dental erosion than girls (IRR=1.88; 95% CI=1.06-3.32). A moderate incidence of dental erosion was observed among South Brazilian adolescents, with boys being at higher risk. The high progression rate of 25% observed here is very concerning, and it should be taken in consideration when designing preventive strategies for dental erosion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Risk and prognostic factors for non-specific musculoskeletal pain: A synthesis of evidence from systematic reviews classified into ICF dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of risk factors for the occurrence and prognostic factors for persistence of non-specific musculoskeletal pain (MSP) are mentioned in the literature. A systematic review of all these factors is not available. Thus a systematic review was conducted to evaluate MSP risk factors and prognostic factors, classified according to the dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Candidate systematic reviews were identified in electronic medical ...

  8. Quantifying the erosion processes and land-uses which dominate fine sediment supply to Moreton Bay, Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbrink, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the contributions from the three major erosion sources in the catchments of Moreton Bay are quantified, specifically for the erosion sources are classified as (i) sheet erosion from cultivated land, (ii) sheet erosion from uncultivated land, and (iii) subsoil erosion from gullies and channels. The catchments were the Brisbane and Logan rivers as well as the coastal catchments. A GIS based analysis of erosion risk was used to define areas of high erosion potential in each of the erosion source types. Radionuclide concentrations of 137Cs and 226Ra were measured on the soils from these areas and then compared to concentrations on the same size fraction on deposited sediments within the rivers. A mixing model was then used to calculate the contributions from the different sources to the sediments. The contributions in the Brisbane and Logan catchments were found to be subsoil erosion (approximately 66 +/- 10%); sheet erosion from cultivated lands 33 +/- 10% and sheet erosion of uncultivated land 1 +/- 10%. Surface and subsoil erosion contributions from the coastal catchments were found to be variable.

  9. A tool for rapid assessment of erosion risk to support decision-making and policy development at the Ngenge watershed in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutekanga, F.P.; Visser, S.M.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tests a rapid, user-friendly method for assessing changes in erosion risk, which yields information to aid policy development and decision-making for sustainable natural resources management. There is currently a lack of timely, up-to-date and current information to support policy develop

  10. Risk assessment of coastal erosion in the Fujian Province%福建海岸侵蚀风险评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗时龙; 蔡锋; 刘建辉; 雷刚; 王厚杰

    2014-01-01

    海岸侵蚀和淤积一直存在于海岸带系统内并塑造着现在的海岸线,近年来不当的人类活动以及全球气候变化加剧了海岸侵蚀,导致沿海土地流失,威胁人类生命财产安全。本文构建了海岸侵蚀风险评价理论体系,阐述了海岸侵蚀风险评价的方法,为海岸侵蚀风险管理提供有效指导。运用层析分析法确定评价指标权重;根据模糊集理论合成海岸侵蚀风险等级。以福建省海岸带为例,进行了海岸侵蚀风险评价,编绘了风险评价图,评价结果与客观情况比较吻合,验证了文中理论方法的适用性。本文构建的海岸侵蚀风险评价理论体系可以推广到其他区域,但应根据实际情况适当调整指标个数以及指标权重。%Coastal erosion and accretion has always existed in the coastal zone systems,and sculptured the present coastlines.However,with increasing human activities and ongoing global climate change,the coasts have been suf-fering more and more erosion,leading to severe land loss and aggravating financial burden.This study presented an integrated methodology for risk assessment of coastal erosion,and described the methods for coastal erosion risk as-sessment,and provided some helpful guidances for coastal erosion risk management.The analytic hierarchy process and the fuzzy set theory were adopted in the study to establish the methodology.Taking the Fujian coast as an ex-ample,this study assessed its coastal erosion risk and compiled the risk map,and the results obtained were consist-ent with the actual situation and confirmed the applicability of the method mentioned above.The system estab-lished for coastal erosion risk assessment in this study can be applied to other regions after slightly adjusting the values of the assessment indicators.

  11. Engineering Biochar Hydrophobicity to Mitigate Risk of Top-Soil Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, T. J.; Dean, M. R.; Hockaday, W. C.; Masiello, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    The pyrolysis of biomass is a net carbon negative method of sequestering atmospheric carbon as recalcitrant black carbon. The resulting solid product, called biochar, is likely to improve agricultural soils when used as a soil conditioner in sustainable land management practice. Biochar has been shown to improve crop yields, improve water-holding capacity in sandy soils, increase cation exchange capacity (CEC), and retain nutrients from fertilization longer than soils unamended with biochar. Biochar undoubtedly has high potential as both a carbon management tool and a tool to increase global food production. However, little is understood about possible side effects of biochar in agricultural soils such as ecosystem toxicity, interactions with biota, and modification of soil hydrologic properties, such as permeability. The hydrophobicity of a soil determines how easily precipitation can permeate soil pores. Water that fails to permeate is redirected as runoff, responsible for the detachment and transport of nutrient-rich topsoil particles. Mitigating top-soil erosion is an important aspect of sustainable land management. Biochar, primarily composed of condensed aromatic structures, is a hydrophobic material and incorporating it into agricultural soils may act to alter soil hydrology through multiple avenues. These include a likely increase in soil water-holding capacity (a positive outcome) and a potential increase in soil hydrophobicity (a negative outcome). In an effort to understand how to engineer reduced biochar hydrophobicity, we investigated the hydrophobicity of biochars as a function of biomass feedstock, pyrolysis temperatures, and post-pyrolysis chemical treatments. We used Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) and Molarity of an Ethanol Drop (MED) tests to measure hydrophobicity, and FTIR, CPMAS-NMR, and N2-BET to probe the surface chemistry, bulk chemistry, and surface area of various biochars, respectively. We used post-pyrolysis chemical treatments of

  12. Utility of combined high-resolution bone SPECT and MRI for the identification of rheumatoid arthritis patients with high-risk for erosive progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Sewerin, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.sewerin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Mattes-György, Katalin, E-mail: katalin.mattes@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk, E-mail: falk.miese@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Wittsack, Hans-Joerg, E-mail: hans-joerg.wittsack@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Specker, Christof, E-mail: c.specker@kliniken-essen-sued.de [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Kliniken Essen-Sud, Propsteistrasse 2, D-45239 Essen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Müller, Hans-Wilhelm, E-mail: HansW.Mueller@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Schneider, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schneider@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Scherer, Axel, E-mail: scherer@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Ostendorf, Benedikt, E-mail: ostendorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of sequentially acquired, post hoc fused, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) with technetium-99m-labeled disphosphonates (Tc99m-DPD) for the identification of finger joints with later erosive progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients. Methods: Ten consecutive ERA patients prospectively underwent MPH-SPECT and MRI of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints prior to and after 6 months methotrexate therapy. Tc99m-DPD uptake was measured at proximal and distal MCP sites using regional analysis. The course of joint pathologies was scored according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Score (RAMRIS) criteria. Results: The frequency of increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, synovitis and bone marrow edemadecreased under MTX therapy; but the number of bone erosions increased. Joints with progressive and new erosions on follow-up had a higher baseline Tc99m-DPD uptake (2.64 ± 1.23 vs. 1.43 ± 0.91) (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Joints with erosive progression are characterized by an early increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, even in absence of MRI bone pathologies. Tc99m-DPD MPH-SPECT might thus be of additional value to morphological MRI for the identification of RA patients with a high risk for erosive progression.

  13. Risk Assessment of Coastal Erosion in the Haizhou Bay%海州湾海岸侵蚀风险评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许祝华; 李妍; 张铁军

    2016-01-01

    文章构建海州湾海岸侵蚀风险评价指标体系,运用层次分析法确定指标权重,并运用ArcGIS进行风险等级划分。研究结果表明:灌南区的燕尾港海岸侵蚀风险最大,属于风险等级中的侵蚀段;赣榆区的青口镇以及青口盐场地区、连云区的猴嘴镇属于风险等级中的微侵蚀段;灌云区的台北盐场和徐圩镇沿岸属于风险等级中的稳定段;赣榆区的马站、柘汪、海头镇、九里乡和连云区的墟沟镇海岸侵蚀风险最小,但淤积现象严重。该研究可为海洋管理部门治理海岸侵蚀提供参考。%Coastal erosion and coastal deposits are currently occurring in the coastline.It has some negative impacts on coastal environment and habitat.This paper constructed the risk assessment system of coastal erosion in Haizhou Bay,and computed the weight of each indicator and made ef-fective assessment of coastal erosion in Haizhou Bay by using ArcGIS.The research results indi-cated that there was the greatest coastal erosion risk in Yanwei harbor area,there was slight coastal erosion risk in Qingkou of Ganyu district,Qingkou salt area,and monkey mouth town in Lianyun District,there was no coastal erosion risk at Taibei salt area and Xuwei coast,while there was serious deposit risk at Mazhan,Zhewang,Haitou and Jiulixiang of Ganyu district,and Xugou coast of Lianyun district.It has important significance for relative marine management depart-ments to harness coastal erosion.

  14. Risk factors for interdigital dermatitis and heel erosion in dairy cows kept in cubicle houses in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, J G C J; Frankena, K; Noordhuizen-Stassen, E N; Metz, J H M

    2005-09-30

    Risk factors concerning both the pasture and housing seasons for interdigital dermatitis and heel-horn erosion (IDHE) were studied in dairy cows in a cross-sectional study in The Netherlands. The study population included 2,326 cows (41 herds) and 2,751 cows (46 herds) for the pasture and housing seasons, respectively. Of these animals, 545 (23%) showed serious lesions of IDHE (stages 2 and 3) at the end of the pasture season and 1,269 (46%) during housing. Logistic regression of the pasture study indicated that increased parity, solid concrete floor, restricted grazing time, and herd trimming at long intervals were associated with an increased odds of IDHE, while dry cows and lactating cows within 30 days after calving as well as cows on a slatted floor with manure scraper, and grassland with mixed type of soil were associated with lower odds. In the housing study, odds of IDHE increased with parity, administering low- or medium-energy roughage, and introduction of dry cows into the lactating herd at >2 weeks before calving. The presence of long cubicles, knee-bumpers installed in cubicles as well as rearing calves and heifers within the dairy cows' accommodation decreased the odds of IDHE.

  15. Genetic variation of a global germplasm collection of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) including Italian accessions at risk of genetic erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giovanni, C; Pavan, S; Taranto, F; Di Rienzo, V; Miazzi, M M; Marcotrigiano, A R; Mangini, G; Montemurro, C; Ricciardi, L; Lotti, C

    2017-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is one of the most important legumes worldwide. We addressed this study to the genetic characterization of a germplasm collection from main chickpea growing countries. Several Italian traditional landraces at risk of genetic erosion were included in the analysis. Twenty-two simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, widely used to explore genetic variation in plants, were selected and yielded 218 different alleles. Structure analysis and hierarchical clustering indicated that a model with three distinct subpopulations best fits the data. The composition of two subpopulations, named K1 and K2, broadly reflects the commercial classification of chickpea in the two types desi and kabuli, respectively. The third subpopulation (K3) is composed by both desi and kabuli genotypes. Italian accessions group both in K2 and K3. Interestingly, this study highlights genetic distance between desi genotypes cultivated in Asia and Ethiopia, which respectively represent the chickpea primary and the secondary centres of diversity. Moreover, European desi are closer to the Ethiopian gene pool. Overall, this study will be of importance for chickpea conservation genetics and breeding, which is limited by the poor characterization of germplasm collection.

  16. Comparing post-concussive neurocognitive test data to normative data presents risks for under-classifying "above average" athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Philip; Robertshaw, Stacey

    2014-11-01

    We compared classification accuracy of post-concussion test data against baseline and normative data, accounting for baseline level of performance. Athletes (N = 250) completed baseline and post-concussion ImPACT assessments, within 7 days of concussion (verified by sports medicine professionals and self-reported symptoms). Athletes were classified as "below average," "average," or "above average" at baseline. Change from baseline was calculated using reliable change indices (RCIs) and regression-based measures (RBz), and comparison to normative data was achieved using z-scores. Normative comparisons identified fewer symptomatic, concussed athletes than RCIs and RBz. Both RCIs and RBz consistently identified "impairment" at 1 and 1.5 SD, regardless of baseline level, whereas normative comparisons identified 46-48% fewer athletes performing "above average" at baseline using a cut-off of 1 SD and 36-38% fewer using a cut-off of 1.5 SD. The use of normative comparisons may differentially classify concussed, symptomatic athletes who are outside the "average" range at baseline.

  17. Determination of soil erosion risk in the Mustafakemalpasa River Basin, Turkey, using the revised universal soil loss equation, geographic information system, and remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Gokhan; Aksoy, Ertugrul; Dirim, M Sabri; Tumsavas, Zeynal

    2012-10-01

    -geographic information system (GIS) combination and the measured values from the Dolluk sediment gauge station shows that the potential soil erosion risk of the MKP River Basin can be estimated correctly and reliably using the RUSLE function generated in a GIS environment.

  18. Determination of Soil Erosion Risk in the Mustafakemalpasa River Basin, Turkey, Using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, Geographic Information System, and Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Gokhan; Aksoy, Ertugrul; Dirim, M. Sabri; Tumsavas, Zeynal

    2012-10-01

    and the measured values from the Dolluk sediment gauge station shows that the potential soil erosion risk of the MKP River Basin can be estimated correctly and reliably using the RUSLE function generated in a GIS environment.

  19. Classifying Academically At-Risk First Graders into Engagement Types: Association with Long-Term Achievement Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Hughes, Jan N.; Liew, Jeffrey; Kwok, Oiman

    2009-01-01

    Based on a sample of 480 academically at-risk first graders, we used a cluster analysis involving multimethod assessment (i.e., teacher-report, peer-evaluation, and self-report) of behavioral and psychological engagement to identify subtypes of academic engagement. Four theoretically and practically meaningful clusters were identified and labeled…

  20. Plasma proteomics classifiers improve risk prediction for renal disease in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, Michelle J.; Jankowski, Joachim; Heinze, Georg; Kohl, Maria; Heinzel, Andreas; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Rossing, Peter; de Zeeuw, Dick; Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; Jankowski, Vera

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro and macroalbuminuria are strong risk factors for progression of nephropathy in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes. Early detection of progression to micro and macroalbuminuria may facilitate prevention and treatment of renal diseases. We aimed to develop plasma proteomics

  1. Characteristics of men classified at high-risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus using the AUSDRISK screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Elroy J; Morgan, Philip J; Collins, Clare E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Callister, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) tool. Secondary aims were to determine the prevalence of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome in these men. Men (n=209) completed the AUSDRISK tool, with 165 identified as high-risk for T2DM (score ≥ 12, maximum 38). Demographic, anthropometric, physiological and behavioural outcomes were assessed for 101 men. Comparisons (one-way ANOVA) among three AUSDRISK score groups (12-15, 16-19, ≥ 20) were performed (significance level, Prisk factors (percentages) among high-risk men were waist circumference (>90 cm; 93%), age (>44 years; 79%), physical activity level (diabetes (39%) and previously high blood glucose levels (32%). Men with AUSDRISK scores ≥ 20 had higher (mean ± SD) HbA1C (6.0 ± 0.4% [42 ± 4.4 mmol.mol(-1)], Pdiabetes prevalence was 70% and metabolic syndrome prevalence was 62%. The AUSDRISK tool identified men who were mostly older than 44, and had large waist circumferences and elevated HbA1C. These findings provide evidence supporting the usefulness of the AUSDRISK screening tool for T2DM screening in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Endoscopic findings in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding clinically classified into three risk groups prior to endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonardo Tammaro; Maria Carla Di Paolo; Angelo Zullo; Cesare Hassan; Sergio Morini; Sebastiano Caliendo; Lorella Pallotta

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate in a prospective study whether a simplified clinical score prior to endoscopy in upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) patients was able to predict endoscopic findings at urgent endoscopy.METHODS: All consecutive UGIB patients referred to a single endoscopic center during a 16 mo period were enrolled. Before endoscopy patients were stratified according to a simple clinical score (T-score),including T1 (high-risk), T2 (intermediate-risk) and T3 (low-risk). Endoscopy was performed in all cases within 2 h, and high-risk stigmata were considered for further analysis.RESULTS: Out of the 436 patients included into the study, 126 (29%) resulted to be T1, 135 (31%) T2,and 175 (40%) T3. Overall, stigmata of recent haernorrhage (SRH) were detected in 118 cases (27%). SRH occurred more frequently in Tt patients than in T2/T3 cases (85% vs 3.2%; x2 = 304.5309, P < 0.001). Older age (t = 3.311; P <0.01) and presence of comorbidities (x2 = 14.7458; P < 0.01) were more frequently detected in T1 than in T2/T3 patients.CONCLUSION: Our simplified clinical score appeared to be associated with the detection of endoscopic findings which may deserve urgent endoscopy. A further,randomised study is needed to assess its accuracy in safely scheduling endoscopy in UGIB patients.

  3. Plasma proteomics classifiers improve risk prediction for renal disease in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, Michelle J.; Jankowski, Joachim; Heinze, Georg; Kohl, Maria; Heinzel, Andreas; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Rossing, Peter; de Zeeuw, Dick; Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; Jankowski, Vera

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro and macroalbuminuria are strong risk factors for progression of nephropathy in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes. Early detection of progression to micro and macroalbuminuria may facilitate prevention and treatment of renal diseases. We aimed to develop plasma proteomics

  4. Risk Evaluation of Sandy Coast Erosion Disaster in Hebei Province%河北省砂质海岸侵蚀灾害危险性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴丽娜; 刘松涛; 孙娟

    2016-01-01

    The coast erosion is a common phenomenon of marine geological disasters in the world. This article conducted the study of sandy coast erosion disaster by field surveys in Heibei province. According to the historical documents, six evaluation indexes were selected to evaluate the risk of erosion on the sandy coast, including the coast landform, shoreline curvature, erosion rate, beach development zone, sediment supplement and embankment project. As a consequence, the length of shoreline in high risk areas was 46.11 km, 102.54 km in the middle, and 59.95 km in the low areas, the proportion of shoreline accounts for 22.1%, 149.16%, 28.73%respectively.%海岸侵蚀是当今全球海岸普遍存在的海洋地质灾害现象,通过实地勘查对河北省砂质海岸侵蚀灾害进行研究,借助历史资料,选取了海岸地貌类型、岸线曲度、侵蚀速率、海滩发育空间、泥沙补给和堤防设施六个评价指标,对河北省砂质海岸侵蚀灾害进行了危险性评价。评价结果表明:高危区岸线长度46.11 km,中危区102.54 km,低危区59.95 km,所占岸线比例依次为22.11%、49.16%及28.73%。

  5. Influence of Feature Encoding and Choice of Classifier on Disease Risk Prediction in Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mittag

    Full Text Available Various attempts have been made to predict the individual disease risk based on genotype data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, most studies only investigated one or two classification algorithms and feature encoding schemes. In this study, we applied seven different classification algorithms on GWAS case-control data sets for seven different diseases to create models for disease risk prediction. Further, we used three different encoding schemes for the genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and investigated their influence on the predictive performance of these models. Our study suggests that an additive encoding of the SNP data should be the preferred encoding scheme, as it proved to yield the best predictive performances for all algorithms and data sets. Furthermore, our results showed that the differences between most state-of-the-art classification algorithms are not statistically significant. Consequently, we recommend to prefer algorithms with simple models like the linear support vector machine (SVM as they allow for better subsequent interpretation without significant loss of accuracy.

  6. Risk and prognostic factors for non-specific musculoskeletal pain: a synthesis of evidence from systematic reviews classified into ICF dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakke, Sandra E; Soer, Remko; Takken, Tim; Reneman, Michiel F

    2009-12-15

    A wide variety of risk factors for the occurrence and prognostic factors for persistence of non-specific musculoskeletal pain (MSP) are mentioned in the literature. A systematic review of all these factors is not available. Thus a systematic review was conducted to evaluate MSP risk factors and prognostic factors, classified according to the dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Candidate systematic reviews were identified in electronic medical journal databases, including the articles published between January 2000 and January 2008 that employed longitudinal cohort designs. The GRADE Working Group's criteria for assessing the overall level of evidence were used to evaluate the reviews. Nine systematic reviews were included, addressing a total of 67 factors. High evidence supported increased mobility of the lumbar spine and poor job satisfaction as risk factors for low back pain. There was also high evidence for intense pain during the onset of shoulder and neck pain and being middle aged as risk factors for shoulder pain. High evidence was also found for several factors that were not prognostic factors. For whiplash-associated disorders these factors were older age, being female, having angular deformity of the neck, and having an acute psychological response. Similarly, for persistence of low back pain, high evidence was found for having fear-avoidance beliefs and meagre social support at work. For low back pain, high evidence was found for meagre social support and poor job content at work as not being risk factors.

  7. Risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease, reflux esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease among Chinese patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the spectrum and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) based on presenting symptoms and endoscopic findings. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey in a cluster random sample was conducted from November 2004 to June 2005 using a validated Chinese version Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) and other items recording the demographic characteristics and potential risk factors for GERD. Subjects were defined as having GERD symptoms according to the RDQ score (>12). All subjects were endoscopied and the definition and severity of erosive esephagitis were evaluated by Los Angeles classification.The statistical analysis was performed with SPSS13.0 programs. RESULTS: Of 2231 recruited participants, 701 (31.40%) patients were diagnosed as having GFRD while 464 (20.80%) patients had objective findings of reflux esophagitis (RE). Of those 464 patients, only 291 (13.00%) were reported as subjects with GERD symptoms. A total of 528 (23.70%) patients were found to have GERD symptoms, including 19.50% patients with grade A or B reflux esophagitis, 0.90% with grade C and 0.40% with grade D. On multivariate analysis, old age,male, moderate working burden, divorced/widowed and strong tea drinking remained as significant independent risk factors for erosive esophagitis. Meanwhile, routine usage of greasy food and constipation were considered as significant independent risk factors for non-erosive reflux disease (NERD).CONCLUSION: GERD is one of the common GI diseases with a high occurrence rate in China and its main associated factors include sex, anthropometrical variables and sociopsychological characteristics.

  8. 大理河流域土壤侵蚀风险及其空间格局分析%Analysis of soil erosion risk and its spatial pattern in Dali river basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琳; 张喜旺; 刘剑锋; 周建郑

    2013-01-01

    本文利用遥感影像提取大理河流域相关信息,采用水利部部颁标准评价土壤侵蚀风险等级,并与地形特征进行叠加分析.结果显示:研究区侵蚀风险以中度和轻度为主;坡度是主要影响因素,坡度越大侵蚀风险区越集中,尤其是强度及以上区域,集中程度达到90%以上;侵蚀主要分布在1000m-1400m的两个高程带内.研究结果可以辅助管理部门进行侵蚀治理决策.%This paper extracted the spatial information of Dali river basin from RS imagery,and assessed the soil erosion risk according to the National Professional Standard for classification and gradation of soil erosion.Subsequently the topographical features of the study area were used in overlay analysis with erosion risk.The results showed that the dominant soil erosion risk is moderate and slight in the basin area; the slope is the main influencing factors,the greater the slope gradient is,the more concentrated the erosion risk areas are,especially in erosion risk areas where greater than more severe erosion,the concentration is more than 90%.Erosion is mainly distributed in the two elevation zones of 1000m-1400m.These results could be used to assist the management for decision-making department.

  9. Identification of active erosion areas and areas at risk by remote sensing: an example in the Esera Isabena watershed, Central Spanish Pyrenees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alatorre, L. C.; Begueria, S.; Vicente Serrano, S. M.

    2009-07-01

    The identification of eroded areas at basin scale can be very useful for environmental planning and can help to reduce land degradation and sediments yield. In this paper remote sensing technique are used to discriminate eroded areas and areas at risk in a badlands landscape developed on Eocene marls. In the Esera Isabena watershed (Spanish Pyrenees). The spatial distribution, the scarce vegetal cover and the high level of erosion let a good visual and digital discrimination of badlands, as opposed to other land covers and surfaces. A maximum likelihood supervised method was used to discriminate heavily eroded areas (badlands) from scarce or densely vegetated lands. the classification distance was used to obtain thresholds for eroded areas and areas at risk. Two error statistics (sensitivity and specificity), where used to determine the most adequate threshold values. The resulting map shows that most areas at risk are located surrounding the badlands areas. (Author) 8 refs.

  10. Erosion sculptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, M. N. J.; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves the striking landscapes imprinted on the Earth and on the surfaces of our neighboring worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of clay bodies immersed in fast flowing water. Although commonly viewed as a smoothing process, we discover that erosion sculpts surprisingly sharp points and corners that persist as the body shrinks. These features result from a natural tendency to form surfaces that erode uniformly, and we argue that this principle may also apply to the more complex scenarios that occur in nature.

  11. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasm in Chinese patients with high-risk coronary artery disease classified by the Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Bo; Xu, Qing Ling; Xu, Chen Ying; Wu, Chao; Yu, Li Fen

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients coronary artery disease (CAD) with or without a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this cross-sectional study, individuals with suspected CAD in the absence of cancer-related symptoms underwent coronary angiography for the first time, and were divided into CAD and non-CAD groups. Colonoscopy was performed in individuals at high-risk tier based on their Asia-Pacific colorectal screening (APCS) score. Their waist circumference (WC), height and body weight were measured. There were 634 of 1157 individuals at a high risk of developing advanced colorectal neoplasms, 91.0% (577/634) of whom were male smokers. The proportion of CAD patients in the high-risk tier was 81.5% (517/634), while the prevalences of adenomas (32.1% vs 22.2%, P prevalence of adenomas was still significantly higher in the CAD group than in the non-CAD group (25.5% vs 16.0%, P colorectal neoplasms classified by the APCS score still showed a remarkably high prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Moreover, the association between the occurrence of adenomas and CAD was stronger in overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) individuals. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of the use of electronic health data to classify four-year mortality risk for older adults undergoing screening colonoscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnestvedt, Marie B; Weiner, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Current cancer screening recommendations often apply coarse age cutoffs for screening requirements without regard to predicted life expectancy. Using these cutoffs, healthier older patients may be under-screened, and sicker younger patients may be screened too often. Mortality risk classification using EHR data could be used to tailor screening reminders to physicians in ways that better align screening recommendations with patients who are more likely to live long enough to benefit from early detection. We have evaluated the performance of an existing prognostic index for 4-year mortality using data readily available in the electronic health record (EHR), and investigated the effect of the index in retrospective cohorts of adults age 65 and older undergoing screening colonoscopy. Risk scores in this adaptation of a four-year prognostic index were found to be associated with actual death rates and consistent with mortality rates from a national sample. Our results demonstrate that data extracted from electronic health records can be used to classify mortality risk. With improvements, including extension to a 5-year mortality model with inclusion of additional variables and extension of variable definitions, informatics methods to implement mortality models may prove to be clinically useful in tailoring screening guidelines.

  13. Applying the Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network for mapping erosive status in the Ria Formosa catchment (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja Martins, F. M.; Neto Paixão, H. M.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.; Bellinfante, N.

    2012-04-01

    The study of the soil erosion risk is the starting point for development and sustainable land management. The intensity of soil erosion risk is conditioned by soil erodibility, slope, land use and vegetation cover. The objective of this work is mapping the erosive status of the Ria Formosa catchment using "Fuzzy ARTMAP" neural network. The study area is the catchment of Ria Formosa, which includes a shallow coastal lagoon with an area of about 16000 ha located in Algarve (southern Portugal). It is protected by EU and national laws, and is classified as a wetland of international importance under the RAMSAR convention. Previously to the construction of the artificial neuronal network model, it was necessary to establish the training areas (proposed by the Priority Action Plan/Regional Activity Centre (PAP/RAC, 1997). The differences between both methods were about 1% of the total area. Both maps were validated with field observations and analysis of aerial photographs.

  14. Farmers' identification of erosion indicators and related erosion damage in the Central Highlands of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Okoba, B.O.

    2006-01-01

    Most soil and water conservation planning approaches rely on empirical assessment methods and hardly consider farmers' knowledge of soil erosion processes. Farmers' knowledge of on-site erosion indicators could be useful in assessing the site-specific erosion risk before planning any conservation me

  15. Sparse representation of multi parametric DCE-MRI features using K-SVD for classifying gene expression based breast cancer recurrence risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Ashraf, Ahmed B.; Daye, Dania; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark; Feldman, Michael; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the prognostic value of sparse representation-based features by applying the K-SVD algorithm on multiparametric kinetic, textural, and morphologic features in breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). K-SVD is an iterative dimensionality reduction method that optimally reduces the initial feature space by updating the dictionary columns jointly with the sparse representation coefficients. Therefore, by using K-SVD, we not only provide sparse representation of the features and condense the information in a few coefficients but also we reduce the dimensionality. The extracted K-SVD features are evaluated by a machine learning algorithm including a logistic regression classifier for the task of classifying high versus low breast cancer recurrence risk as determined by a validated gene expression assay. The features are evaluated using ROC curve analysis and leave one-out cross validation for different sparse representation and dimensionality reduction numbers. Optimal sparse representation is obtained when the number of dictionary elements is 4 (K=4) and maximum non-zero coefficients is 2 (L=2). We compare K-SVD with ANOVA based feature selection for the same prognostic features. The ROC results show that the AUC of the K-SVD based (K=4, L=2), the ANOVA based, and the original features (i.e., no dimensionality reduction) are 0.78, 0.71. and 0.68, respectively. From the results, it can be inferred that by using sparse representation of the originally extracted multi-parametric, high-dimensional data, we can condense the information on a few coefficients with the highest predictive value. In addition, the dimensionality reduction introduced by K-SVD can prevent models from over-fitting.

  16. Do investments in wildfire risk reduction lead to downstream watershed service outcomes? An integrated wildfire-erosion-economic analysis of return on investment from fuel treatments in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.; Jones, K.; Addington, R.; Cannon, J.; Cheng, T.; Gannon, B.; Kampf, S. K.; Saavedra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wolk, B.

    2016-12-01

    Large, severe wildfires negatively impact forested watersheds in the Western United States and jeopardize critical ecosystem services. Specifically, severe wildfires increase overland flow and runoff that contains sediment and debris, and cause other natural hazards such as floods. High erosion from burned watersheds can fill water supply reservoirs and clog water filtration systems, which has direct costs to water utilities in the form of increased water treatment costs and damage to infrastructure. With increasing wildfire risk due to global climate change and other factors, municipal water providers and users have been investing in management practices to reduce high-severity wildfire risk and increase source water security. In this research we integrate wildfire and erosion prediction models to estimate the return on investment from wildfire fuel treatments in the Upper South Platte watershed, southwest of Denver, Colorado. Denver Water and the U.S. Forest Service created the Forest-To-Faucets Partnership, one of the first payments for watershed services (PWS) programs in the United States. To date they have spent more than $30 million in the Upper South Platte to restore forests and conduct fuel reduction work across landownerships. However, due to the lack of appropriate analytical tools, it is still unclear what returns are being achieved with these investments, aside from the total number of acres treated. In this analysis we consider three treatment scenarios - current fuel treatment investments, a series of investments based on prioritization criteria, and investments based on accessibility - and model potential burn probability, fire severity and erosion. We then estimate the economic benefits of avoiding runoff using past expenditures by Denver Water and compare these to treatment costs. This research directly informs management practices in the Upper South Platte watershed and provides a framework that can inform decisions to optimize location, size

  17. Prediction of the soil erosion in a forest and sediment yield from road network through GIS and SEDMODL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aidin PARSAKHOO; Majid LOTFALIAN; Ataollah KAVIAN; Seyed Ataollah HOSSEINI

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to classify water erosion risk for a deciduous forest and to predict the amount of sediment yield from forest road network. GIS in combination with AHP was used for determining the soil erosion risk degrees of forest. Beside, sediment yield from forest roads with gravel and asphalted surfacing was estimated using SEDMODL. Rainfall simulator was used in calibration and validation process of model. Results showed that 47.9% of forest soil is classified from moderate to very high vulnerability. 32.3% of roads were located in soil erosion risk class of very high. This class is generally found in the eastern region of forest, while areas with very low risk are found in the south western part. 14.6%of the forest roads were ranked as having very low sediment yield. Only 61 segments out of 339 segments of forest road network delivered sediment to the ravine network. The estimated annual sediment yield for all of road sections by SEDMODL and rainfall simulator were 10,935.45 and 10,509.29 g m-2, respectively. Results of the calibration and validation process showed that the variation accounted for in the predicted values by SEDMODL with the observed values under rainfall simulation was 3.90%. Best management practices (BMP) must be considered for the areas with high degrees of erosion risk.

  18. DENTAL EROSION IN PRIMARY DENTITION- A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi Shaik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The pattern of oral diseases has been influenced by ever changing human lifestyle. Tooth wear especially dental erosion has drawn increasing attention as risk factor for tooth damage or loss in recent years. It is a common condition in primary dentition compared to permanent dentition due to thinner and less mineralised enamel. However, it is more worrying, when this condition is being found in an alarming proportion among children. The presence of dental erosion in children is likely to be associated with a number of general health and dietary factors, but it is also aggravated by the relatively more rapid progression of erosion in the deciduous teeth. An understanding of the aetiologies and risk factors for erosion is important for early recognition of dental erosion to prevent serious irreversible damage to the dentition. This paper discusses the erosion in children with regard to its epidemiology, prevalence, clinical features, measurement and prevention.

  19. Frequency and risk factors of gastric and duodenal ulcers or erosions in children: a prospective 1-month European multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Koletzko, Sibylle;

    2010-01-01

    There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors.......There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors....

  20. Frequency and risk factors of gastric and duodenal ulcers or erosions in children: a prospective 1-month European multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2010-01-01

    There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors.......There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors....

  1. The Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Correlates of Erosive Esophagitis and Barrett’s Esophagus in Iranian Patients with Reflux Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Sharifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Erosive esophagitis (EE and Barrett’s esophagus (BE are the two important complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of and the risk factors for EE and BE in an Iranian group of patients with reflux symptoms. We also examined the relationship between reflux symptoms and endoscopic findings. Methods. A total of 736 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD symptoms were enrolled and all underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus was confirmed by pathologic examination and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection was demonstrated by rapid urease test. Results. Two hundred eighty-three and 34 patients were found to have EE and BE, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that hiatal hernia (P<0.001 and H. pylori infection (P<0.002 were the two significantly related risk factors for esophagitis. Only age was related to BE, with BE patients being more likely to be older (P<0.001 than others. Conclusions. Prevalence of EE and BE in Iranian reflux patients is similar to that seen in western countries. H. pylori infection and the presence of hiatal hernia may be strong risk factors for esophagitis as does older age for Barrett’s esophagus. Finally, reflux symptoms have no significant relationship with endoscopic findings.

  2. Optimal weighted nearest neighbour classifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Samworth, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    We derive an asymptotic expansion for the excess risk (regret) of a weighted nearest-neighbour classifier. This allows us to find the asymptotically optimal vector of non-negative weights, which has a rather simple form. We show that the ratio of the regret of this classifier to that of an unweighted $k$-nearest neighbour classifier depends asymptotically only on the dimension $d$ of the feature vectors, and not on the underlying population densities. The improvement is greatest when $d=4$, but thereafter decreases as $d \\rightarrow \\infty$. The popular bagged nearest neighbour classifier can also be regarded as a weighted nearest neighbour classifier, and we show that its corresponding weights are somewhat suboptimal when $d$ is small (in particular, worse than those of the unweighted $k$-nearest neighbour classifier when $d=1$), but are close to optimal when $d$ is large. Finally, we argue that improvements in the rate of convergence are possible under stronger smoothness assumptions, provided we allow nega...

  3. Geographical information systems and bootstrap aggregation (bagging) of tree-based classifiers for Lyme disease risk prediction in Trentino, Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, Annapaola; Merler, Stefano; Furlanello, Cesare; Genchi, Claudio

    2002-05-01

    The risk of exposure to Lyme disease in the province of Trento, Italian Alps, was predicted through the analysis of the distribution of Ixodes ricinus (L.) nymphs infected with Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. with a model based on bootstrap aggregation (bagging) of tree-based classifiers within a geographical information system (GIS). Data on L ricinus density assessed by dragging the vegetation in 438 sites during 1996 were cross-correlated with the digital cartography of a GIS, which included the variables altitude, exposure and slope, substratum, vegetation type and roe deer density. Ticks were more abundant at altitudes below 1,300 m a.s.l., in the presence of limestone and vegetation cover with thermophile deciduous forests and high densities of roe deer. A bootstrap aggregation procedure (bagging) was used to produce a model for the prediction of tick occurrence, the accuracy of which was tested on actual tick counts assessed by a further dragging campaign carried out during 1997 to determine infection prevalence and resulted in average 77%. Other tests of the model were made on additional and independent data sets. The prevalence of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi s.l, determined by polymerase chain reaction on 2,208 nymphs collected by random dragging in 245 transects selected within eight areas where the model predicted the occurrence of I. ricinus during 1997, was 17.5% and was positively correlated to tick abundance and roe deer density. These findings were used to relate the output of the bagged model (probability of tick occurrence) to the density of infected nymphs through a stepwise model selection procedure and thus to produce a GIS digital map of the probability distribution of infected nymphs in the Province of Trento at high resolution scale (50 by 50-m cell resolution). The application of the bagging procedure increased the accuracy of the prediction made by a single classification tree, a well-known classification method for the analysis of

  4. Aplicação dos modelos PESERA e MEDALUS para avaliação dos riscos de erosão do solo e de desertificação da bacia hidrográfica do Vale do Gaio Use of PESERA and MEDALUS models to assess soil erosion risks and land desertification in Vale do Gaio watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho testaram-se duas metodo­logias de avaliação dos riscos de erosão do solo e de desertificação na bacia hidrográfi­ca de Vale do Gaio (513 km², localizada no Alentejo. Os solos dominantes na bacia são os Cambissolos, Luvissolos e Regossolos. Os sistemas de Montado de Azinho e Sobro e os sistemas agrícolas de sequeiro domi­nam, por sua vez, a ocupação dos solos. O risco de erosão foi avaliado por estimativas das perdas do solo por erosão hídrica, atra­vés do modelo PESERA. As áreas em risco de desertificação foram determinadas com base na metodologia MEDALUS. As três classes mais representativas de perdas do solo por erosão hídrica, com base nos dados meteorológicos de 2001-2006, foram: In this study two methodologies were tested to assess soil erosion and land deserti­fication risks in Vale do Gaio watershed (513 km², located in the Alentejo region. Cambisols, Luvisols, and Regosols are the dominant soils in the watershed. Oak tree Mediterranean woodland, Agricultural crops and pastures are the major land uses. Soil erosion risks were assessed by estimating soil loss by water erosion with the PESERA model. Land area at risk of desertification was determined based on the MEDALUS methodology. Based on meteorological data from the period 2001-2006, the three most representative classes of soil loss by water erosion were: <0.5 t/ha/year in 32.1% of the area; 5-10 t/ha/year in 23.3% of the area; and 10-20 t/ha/year in 16.9% of the area. Considering the same time period, the land area at risk of desertification was classified: 1.8% as none threatened; 3.9% as potential; 68.4% as fragile; and 25.9% as critical to desertification.

  5. A clinical index for evaluating and monitoring dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, I B; Westergaard, J; Stoltze, K

    2000-01-01

    This study describes a new fine-scaled system for classifying initial and advanced dental erosions. The system includes the use of study casts of the teeth in an epoxy resin with an accurate surface reproduction. The severity of erosion on each tooth surface is scored according to six grades...... of severity. In addition, the presence of a Class V restoration and dental erosion on the same surface increases the erosion score, as it is assumed that the need for restorative treatment can be caused by the erosion. A high inter-examiner agreement was found when the present scoring system was used by two...

  6. Brut: Automatic bubble classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Christopher; Goodman, Alyssa; Williams, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Simpson, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Brut, written in Python, identifies bubbles in infrared images of the Galactic midplane; it uses a database of known bubbles from the Milky Way Project and Spitzer images to build an automatic bubble classifier. The classifier is based on the Random Forest algorithm, and uses the WiseRF implementation of this algorithm.

  7. Mapping Soil Erosion in a Quaternary Catchment in Eastern Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temp

    2017-04-06

    Apr 6, 2017 ... Using Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing ... Raster calculator in ArcMap10.2 was used to classify soil erosion features based on ..... in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa', Physics and Chemistry of the.

  8. Etiology and pathogenesis of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzow, Philipp; Wegehaupt, Florian J; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette

    2016-04-01

    The condition of dental erosion is defined as acid-related loss of tooth structure which does not involve microorganisms. Depending on the origin of the acid, extrinsic (usually caused by acids in food) and intrinsic (caused by endogenous acid) erosion can be distinguished. The presence and severity of erosive defects depend on various parameters such as nutrition, saliva, general diseases, and mechanical stress by abrasion and attrition. As an example, dietary habits which involve frequent intake of acidic food and beverages, occupational acid exposure, as well as certain drugs or diseases that affect saliva flow rate are accompanied by an increased risk of erosive dental hard tissue defects. By a thorough clinical examination and an accurate anamnesis, various erosion-related risk factors can be identified and strategies to reduce or eliminate these factors be identified.

  9. Dynamic system classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω (t ) and damping factor γ (t ) . Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  10. Emergency wind erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  11. Erosion and Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Heeres, Glenn; Os, van Bertil; Derickx, Willem; Schoorl, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Slope soil erosion is one of the main threats to archaeological sites. Several methods were applied to establish the erosion rates at archaeological sites. Digital elevation models (DEMs) from three different dates were used. We compared the elevations from these three models to estimate erosion. We

  12. Dynamic system classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Pumpe, Daniel; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of DSC to oscillation processes with a time dependent frequency {\\omega}(t) and damping factor {\\gamma}(t). Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The {\\omega} and {\\gamma} timelines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiment...

  13. Risk and prognostic factors for non-specific musculoskeletal pain : A synthesis of evidence from systematic reviews classified into ICF dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakke, Sandra E.; Soer, Remko; Takken, Tim; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of risk factors for the occurrence and prognostic factors for persistence of non-specific musculoskeletal pain (MSP) are mentioned in the literature. A systematic review of all these factors is not available. Thus a systematic review was conducted to evaluate MSP risk factors and prog

  14. A six months' prospective follow-up of 65+-y-old patients from general practice classified according to nutritional risk by the Mini Nutritional Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Ovesen, Lars; Schroll, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of old people at risk of undernutrition according to the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), characterise the at risk group with regard to nutritional state, energy intake, and physical and mental functioning, and to assess the consequences of the MNA score over...

  15. Comparing Post-Concussive Neurocognitive Test Data to Normative Data Presents Risks for Under-Classifying “Above Average” Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Philip; Robertshaw, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    We compared classification accuracy of post-concussion test data against baseline and normative data, accounting for baseline level of performance. Athletes (N = 250) completed baseline and post-concussion ImPACT assessments, within 7 days of concussion (verified by sports medicine professionals and self-reported symptoms). Athletes were classified as “below average,” “average,” or “above average” at baseline. Change from baseline was calculated using reliable change indices (RCIs) and regression-based measures (RBz), and comparison to normative data was achieved using z-scores. Normative comparisons identified fewer symptomatic, concussed athletes than RCIs and RBz. Both RCIs and RBz consistently identified “impairment” at 1 and 1.5 SD, regardless of baseline level, whereas normative comparisons identified 46–48% fewer athletes performing “above average” at baseline using a cut-off of 1 SD and 36-38% fewer using a cut-off of 1.5 SD. The use of normative comparisons may differentially classify concussed, symptomatic athletes who are outside the “average” range at baseline. PMID:25178629

  16. Approximation of Rainfall Erosivity Factors in North Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.I.ELTAIF; M.A.GHARAIBEH; F.AL-ZAITAWI; M.N.ALHAMAD

    2010-01-01

    Despite being in arid and semi-arid areas, erosion is largely a result of infrequent but heavy rainfall events; therefore,rainfall erosivity data can be used as an indicator of potential erosion risks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the spatial distribution of annual rainfall erosivity in North Jordan. A simplified procedure was used to correlate erosivity factor R values in both the universal soil loss equation (USLE) and the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) with annual rainfall amount or modified Fournier index (Fmod). Pluviometric data recorded at 18 weather stations covering North Jordan were used to predict R values. The annual values of erosivity ranged between 86-779 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 year-1. The northwest regions of Jordan showed the highest annual erosivity values, while the northeastern regions showed the lowest annual erosivity values.

  17. Classifying Returns as Extreme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I consider extreme returns for the stock and bond markets of 14 EU countries using two classification schemes: One, the univariate classification scheme from the previous literature that classifies extreme returns for each market separately, and two, a novel multivariate classification scheme tha...

  18. LCC: Light Curves Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Light Curves Classifier uses data mining and machine learning to obtain and classify desired objects. This task can be accomplished by attributes of light curves or any time series, including shapes, histograms, or variograms, or by other available information about the inspected objects, such as color indices, temperatures, and abundances. After specifying features which describe the objects to be searched, the software trains on a given training sample, and can then be used for unsupervised clustering for visualizing the natural separation of the sample. The package can be also used for automatic tuning parameters of used methods (for example, number of hidden neurons or binning ratio). Trained classifiers can be used for filtering outputs from astronomical databases or data stored locally. The Light Curve Classifier can also be used for simple downloading of light curves and all available information of queried stars. It natively can connect to OgleII, OgleIII, ASAS, CoRoT, Kepler, Catalina and MACHO, and new connectors or descriptors can be implemented. In addition to direct usage of the package and command line UI, the program can be used through a web interface. Users can create jobs for ”training” methods on given objects, querying databases and filtering outputs by trained filters. Preimplemented descriptors, classifier and connectors can be picked by simple clicks and their parameters can be tuned by giving ranges of these values. All combinations are then calculated and the best one is used for creating the filter. Natural separation of the data can be visualized by unsupervised clustering.

  19. Classifying Pacific islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Patrick D.; Kumar, Lalit; Eliot, Ian; McLean, Roger F.

    2016-12-01

    An earth-science-based classification of islands within the Pacific Basin resulted from the preparation of a database describing the location, area, and type of 1779 islands, where island type is determined as a function of the prevailing lithology and maximum elevation of each island, with an island defined as a discrete landmass composed of a contiguous land area ≥1 ha (0.01 km2) above mean high-water level. Reefs lacking islands and short-lived (ocean setting as well as the biological attributes of Pacific islands. It may also be used in spatial assessments of second-order phenomena associated with the islands, such as their vulnerability to various disasters, coastal erosion, or ocean pollution as well as human populations, built infrastructure and natural resources.

  20. Classifier in Age classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Santhi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Face is the important feature of the human beings. We can derive various properties of a human by analyzing the face. The objective of the study is to design a classifier for age using facial images. Age classification is essential in many applications like crime detection, employment and face detection. The proposed algorithm contains four phases: preprocessing, feature extraction, feature selection and classification. The classification employs two class labels namely child and Old. This study addresses the limitations in the existing classifiers, as it uses the Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM for feature extraction and Support Vector Machine (SVM for classification. This improves the accuracy of the classification as it outperforms the existing methods.

  1. Classifying Linear Canonical Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Lorand, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    In this Master's thesis, we consider the problem of classifying, up to conjugation by linear symplectomorphisms, linear canonical relations (lagrangian correspondences) from a finite-dimensional symplectic vector space to itself. We give an elementary introduction to the theory of linear canonical relations and present partial results toward the classification problem. This exposition should be accessible to undergraduate students with a basic familiarity with linear algebra.

  2. Intelligent Garbage Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Rodríguez Novelle

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available IGC (Intelligent Garbage Classifier is a system for visual classification and separation of solid waste products. Currently, an important part of the separation effort is based on manual work, from household separation to industrial waste management. Taking advantage of the technologies currently available, a system has been built that can analyze images from a camera and control a robot arm and conveyor belt to automatically separate different kinds of waste.

  3. DENTAL EROSION IN PRIMARY DENTITION- A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Rafi Shaik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The pattern of oral diseases has been influenced by ever changing human lifestyle. Tooth wear especially dental erosion has drawn increasing attention as risk factor for tooth damage or loss in recent years. It is a common condition in primary dentition compared to permanent dentition due to thinner and less mineralised enamel. However, it is more worrying, when this condition is being found in an alarming proportion among children. The presence of dental erosion in c...

  4. Erosion-corrosion; Erosionkorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghili, B

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment 32 refs, 16 figs, tabs

  5. Generalized classifier neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyildirim, Buse Melis; Avci, Mutlu

    2013-03-01

    In this work a new radial basis function based classification neural network named as generalized classifier neural network, is proposed. The proposed generalized classifier neural network has five layers, unlike other radial basis function based neural networks such as generalized regression neural network and probabilistic neural network. They are input, pattern, summation, normalization and output layers. In addition to topological difference, the proposed neural network has gradient descent based optimization of smoothing parameter approach and diverge effect term added calculation improvements. Diverge effect term is an improvement on summation layer calculation to supply additional separation ability and flexibility. Performance of generalized classifier neural network is compared with that of the probabilistic neural network, multilayer perceptron algorithm and radial basis function neural network on 9 different data sets and with that of generalized regression neural network on 3 different data sets include only two classes in MATLAB environment. Better classification performance up to %89 is observed. Improved classification performances proved the effectivity of the proposed neural network.

  6. Metabolic syndrome is associated with erosive esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung Ho Park; Dong IL Park; Hong Joo Kim; Yong Kyun Cho; Chong IL Sohn; Woo Kyu Jeon; Byung Ik Kim

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To clarify whether insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome are risk factors for erosive esophagitis.METHODS: A case-control study was performed using the database of the Kangbuk Semsung Hospital Medical Screening Center.RESULTS: A total of 1679 cases of erosive esophagitis and 3358 randomly selected controls were included.Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 21% of the cases and 12% of the controls (P<0.001).Multiple logistic regressions confirmed the association between erosive esophagitis and metabolic syndrome (Odds ratio,1.25; 95% CI,1.04-1.49).Among the components of metabolic syndrome,increased waist circumference,elevated serum triglyceride levels and hypertension were significant risk factors for erosive esophagitis (allP<0.01).Furthermore,increased insulin resistance (Odds ratio,0.91; 95% CI,0.85-0.98)and fatty liver,as diagnosed by ultrasonography (odds ratio,1.39; 95% CI,1.20-1.60),were also related to erosive esophagitis even after adjustment for a series of confounding factors.CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome and increased insulin resistance are associated with an increased risk of developing erosive esophagitis.

  7. Erosion Negril Beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Ham, D.; Henrotte, J.; Kraaijeveld, R.; Milosevic, M.; Smit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing erosion of the Negril Beach has become worse the past decade. In most places along the coast line, the beach will be gone in approximately 10 years. This will result in a major decrease of incomes that are made by the local tourist sector. To prevent the erosion this study has been perfo

  8. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  9. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  10. Splash erosion. A bibliometric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Ellison (1944) developed the splash board as a system for measuring splash erosion that was both cheap and reliable. Bollinne (1975), Morgan (1978, 1981). Mutchler (1967) described another different type of splash detectors according to whether they were passive or could register data. In the study mentioned above these authors included bottles, funnels, glasses, photography, markers. After that several devices has been made up like the splash sampler (Leguedois et al., 2005), soil tray (Van Dijk et al., 2002), splash funnel (Terry, 1989) and several rain cups (Fernandez-Raga et al., 2010; Molina and Llinares, 1996; Torri et al., 1987). Splash erosion research has materialized in the form of a number of papers published in international journals. The database of bibliographic references employed has been one of the most prestigious ones: theWeb of Science (ISI). The search was carried out on January 27th 2012. Among the 3x10^8 scholarly documents included in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) 1899 to present , the searching engine located 439 containing the word "splash erosion*", where the asterisk acts as a wildcard for any letter or group of letters. Of these, 383 were classified as articles, 87 as proceeding papers, 5 as editorial material, 2 as notes and 1 as correction. These documents have been published in 163 different journals, although four are particularly recurrent: Earth surface processes and Landforms, Catena, Soil Science Society of America Journal and Hydrological processes, with 41, 35, 35 and 26 published documents respectively. A geographic analysis of these articles has been carried out in an attempt to determine in what parts of the world research projects were making use of splash erosion. The results are that anglo-saxon countries, as USA, England and Australia dominate, particularly USA, with 130 articles. China and Japan are large communities of researches too, and some Central European countries as Belgium, France Germany

  11. High Performance Medical Classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoukis, S. G.; Bekakos, M. P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, parallelism methodologies for the mapping of machine learning algorithms derived rules on both software and hardware are investigated. Feeding the input of these algorithms with patient diseases data, medical diagnostic decision trees and their corresponding rules are outputted. These rules can be mapped on multithreaded object oriented programs and hardware chips. The programs can simulate the working of the chips and can exhibit the inherent parallelism of the chips design. The circuit of a chip can consist of many blocks, which are operating concurrently for various parts of the whole circuit. Threads and inter-thread communication can be used to simulate the blocks of the chips and the combination of block output signals. The chips and the corresponding parallel programs constitute medical classifiers, which can classify new patient instances. Measures taken from the patients can be fed both into chips and parallel programs and can be recognized according to the classification rules incorporated in the chips and the programs design. The chips and the programs constitute medical decision support systems and can be incorporated into portable micro devices, assisting physicians in their everyday diagnostic practice.

  12. Classifying Facial Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  13. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Spinoni, Jonathan; Meusburger, Katrin; Michaelides, Silas; Beguería, Santiago; Klik, Andreas; Petan, Sašo; Janeček, Miloslav; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Diodato, Nazzareno; Kostalova, Julia; Rousseva, Svetla; Banasik, Kazimierz; Alewell, Christine; Panagos, Panos

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part of Britain and Ireland) in May and the highest values are registered during summer months. Starting from September, R-factor has a decreasing trend. The mean rainfall erosivity in summer is almost 4 times higher (315MJmmha(-1)h(-1)) compared to winter (87MJmmha(-1)h(-1)). The Cubist model has been selected among various statistical models to perform the spatial interpolation due to its excellent performance, ability to model non-linearity and interpretability. The monthly prediction is an order more difficult than the annual one as it is limited by the number of covariates and, for consistency, the sum of all months has to be close to annual erosivity. The performance of the Cubist models proved to be generally high, resulting in R(2) values between 0.40 and 0.64 in cross-validation. The obtained months show an increasing trend of erosivity occurring from winter to summer starting from western to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be

  14. Classifiers and Plurality: evidence from a deictic classifier language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Sandalo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the semantic contribution of plural morphology and its interaction with classifiers in Kadiwéu. We show that Kadiwéu, a Waikurúan language spoken in South America, is a classifier language similar to Chinese but classifiers are an obligatory ingredient of all determiner-like elements, such as quantifiers, numerals, and wh-words for arguments. What all elements with classifiers have in common is that they contribute an atomized/individualized interpretation of the NP. Furthermore, this paper revisits the relationship between classifiers and number marking and challenges the common assumption that classifiers and plurals are mutually exclusive.

  15. Stack filter classifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  16. Classifying TDSS Stellar Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Rachael Christina; Green, Paul J.; TDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), a subprogram of SDSS-IV eBOSS, obtains classification/discovery spectra of point-source photometric variables selected from PanSTARRS and SDSS multi-color light curves regardless of object color or lightcurve shape. Tens of thousands of TDSS spectra are already available and have been spectroscopically classified both via pipeline and by visual inspection. About half of these spectra are quasars, half are stars. Our goal is to classify the stars with their correct variability types. We do this by acquiring public multi-epoch light curves for brighter stars (rSky Survey (CSS). We then run a number of light curve analyses from VARTOOLS, a program for analyzing astronomical time-series data, to constrain variable type both for broad statistics relevant to future surveys like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and to find the inevitable exotic oddballs that warrant further follow-up. Specifically, the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram and the Box-Least Squares Method are being implemented and tested against their known variable classifications and parameters in the Catalina Surveys Periodic Variable Star Catalog. Variable star classifications include RR Lyr, close eclipsing binaries, CVs, pulsating white dwarfs, and other exotic systems. The key difference between our catalog and others is that along with the light curves, we will be using TDSS spectra to help in the classification of variable type, as spectra are rich with information allowing estimation of physical parameters like temperature, metallicity, gravity, etc. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  17. Polyanhydride degradation and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpferich, A; Tessmar, J

    2002-10-16

    It was the intention of this paper to give a survey on the degradation and erosion of polyanhydrides. Due to the multitude of polymers that have been synthesized in this class of material in recent years, it was not possible to discuss all polyanhydrides that have gained in significance based on their application. It was rather the intention to provide a broad picture on polyanhydride degradation and erosion based on the knowledge that we have from those polymers that have been intensively investigated. To reach this goal this review contains several sections. First, the foundation for an understanding of the nomenclature are laid by defining degradation and erosion which was deemed necessary because many different definitions exist in the current literature. Next, the properties of major classes of anhydrides are reviewed and the impact of geometry on degradation and erosion is discussed. A complicated issue is the control of drug release from degradable polymers. Therefore, the aspect of erosion-controlled release and drug stability inside polyanhydrides are discussed. Towards the end of the paper models are briefly reviewed that describe the erosion of polyanhydrides. Empirical models as well as Monte-Carlo-based approaches are described. Finally it is outlined how theoretical models can help to answer the question why polyanhydrides are surface eroding. A look at the microstructure and the results from these models lead to the conclusion that polyanhydrides are surface eroding due to their fast degradation. However they switch to bulk erosion once the device dimensions drop below a critical limit.

  18. Sets resilient to erosion

    CERN Document Server

    Pegden, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    The erosion of a set in Euclidean space by a radius r>0 is the subset of X consisting of points at distance >/-r from the complement of X. A set is resilient to erosion if it is similar to its erosion by some positive radius. We give a somewhat surprising characterization of resilient sets, consisting in one part of simple geometric constraints on convex resilient sets, and, in another, a correspondence between nonconvex resilient sets and scale-invariant (e.g., 'exact fractal') sets.

  19. Preliminary Research on Risk Evaluation of Gully Erosion in Typical Black Soil Area of Northeast China%东北典型黑土区沟蚀发生风险评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文娟; 邓荣鑫; 张树文

    2014-01-01

    选择黑龙江省乌裕尔河和讷谟尔河两流域所涉及的东北典型黑土区作为研究区,以SPOT 5影像为基础数据源,获取了研究区2005年的侵蚀沟分布数据,并且利用该数据对研究区沟蚀现状进行了评估.同时基于1:50 000地形图数据插值求取的DEM,提取了与沟蚀形成相关的11个地形因子.最后基于沟蚀数据和无共线性的8个地形因子构建了Logistic模型,据此模型对研究区沟蚀发生风险进行了评价,进而进行了沟蚀发生风险分级评价研究.结果表明研究区当前侵蚀沟共有14 184条,密度为322.11m/km2,吞噬耕地约100.36 km2;基于Logistic模型获取的沟蚀发生风险空间分布图与研究区沟蚀分布现状较为吻合,以0.4分界时,研究区73%的侵蚀沟都发生在具有高危发生风险地区,评价结果能够反映研究区的沟蚀发生风险分布状况;通过风险分级图表可以评估研究区不同发生风险等级的沟蚀分布面积、分布特征和空间分布格局,便于管理者找出较为严重的侵蚀区,为有针对性地进行沟蚀防治提供依据.%Black soil area of Northeast China is one of the most important marketable grain bases in China,but serious soil loss resulted in crucial challenge to the marketable grain production.This paper,supported by Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System,chose typical black soil area of Northeast China which is located in the scope of Wuyuer and Nemoer river basins as a study case and took SPOT 5 as data source,obtained gully distribution data in 2005.Based on the gully distribution data,the gully erosion status of the study area was evaluated.Using 1:50000 relief maps as data source,DEM was obtained by interpolation and then 11 topographic factors related with the gully formation were extracted.Based on gully data and eight no multi-colinearity topographic factors,the Logistic regression model was built.With the model,the risk of the gully erosion was evaluated

  20. Predicting dietary intake among children classified as overweight or at risk for overweight: Independent and interactive effects of parenting practices and styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Shelby L; Seburg, Elisabeth; JaKa, Meghan M; Sherwood, Nancy E; Levy, Rona L

    2017-03-01

    Using baseline data from a randomized controlled pediatric obesity prevention trial, this study sought to examine general parenting style as a potential moderator of the association between feeding-specific parenting practices and child dietary intake. Four hundred and twenty-one parent-child dyads served as participants (49% girls and 93% mothers). Children were, on average, 6.6 years old and either overweight or at-risk for overweight (mean BMI percentile = 84.9). Data were collected in participants' homes. Study staff measured children's height and weight. Parents completed questionnaires designed to assess general parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian and permissive) and child feeding practices (restriction and monitoring). Child dietary intake was assessed using a 24-h recall system. Outcomes were daily servings of fruits and vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), and unhealthy snacks. Results were as follows: Permissive parenting was inversely associated with fruit and vegetable consumption, and parental monitoring was inversely associated with SSB consumption. There were no other main effects of parenting style or feeding practice on child dietary consumption. Authoritarian parenting moderated the association between restriction and SSB intake (a marginally significant effect after correcting for multiple comparisons). Restriction was inversely associated with SSB consumption when authoritarianism was high but unassociated with SSB consumption when authoritarianism was low. Findings indicate that the parenting practice of monitoring child dietary intake was associated with more healthful consumption regardless of parenting style; interventions may thus benefit from encouraging parental monitoring. The parenting strategy of restricting child dietary intake, in contrast, was associated with lower SSB intake in the context of higher parental authoritarianism but inconsequential in the context of lower parental authoritarianism. This exploratory

  1. Classifying IS Project Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The literature contains many lists of IS project problems, often in the form of risk factors. The problems sometimes appear unordered and overlapping, which reduces their usefulness to practitioners as well as theoreticians. This paper proposes a list of criteria for formulating project problems...

  2. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Fifield L. K.; Tims S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace...

  3. Botnet analysis using ensemble classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchit Bijalwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the botnet traffic using Ensemble of classifier algorithm to find out bot evidence. We used ISCX dataset for training and testing purpose. We extracted the features of both training and testing datasets. After extracting the features of this dataset, we bifurcated these features into two classes, normal traffic and botnet traffic and provide labelling. Thereafter using modern data mining tool, we have applied ensemble of classifier algorithm. Our experimental results show that the performance for finding bot evidence using ensemble of classifiers is better than single classifier. Ensemble based classifiers perform better than single classifier by either combining powers of multiple algorithms or introducing diversification to the same classifier by varying input in bot analysis. Our results are showing that by using voting method of ensemble based classifier accuracy is increased up to 96.41% from 93.37%.

  4. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation

  5. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation re

  6. Soil Wind Erosion Risk Assessment in Yulin City Using T-S Fuzzy Neural Network Model%基于T-S模糊神经网络模型的榆林市土壤风蚀危险度评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新颜; 曹晓仪; 董治宝

    2013-01-01

    Soli wind erosion,one of the major causes of environmental problems such as farmland degradation and desertification,producing large scale of sandstorm,polluting the environment and harming human beings' health in arid and semi-arid regions,is the detachment,entrainment,transport deposition of soil particles caused by wind.It is also a serious socio-economic issue which limits the development in those ecologically fragile areas.In the previous studies,methods for accessing wind erosion are based on land use information.In this article,however,another approach that uses GIS and T-S fuzzy neural network model to access soil wind erosion risk is presented.The approach is applied to a case study of the Yulin City located on the wind-sand transition regions of Mu Us sandy land,Inner Mongolian plateau and loess plateau,northwest China,where most serious expansion of desertification is proceeding.Environmental elements of soil wind erosion were selected and their spatial distribution data were extracted using GIS technology and T-S fuzzy neural network model was constructed after training the sample data of different wind erosion risk level.The model was applied to mapping wind erosion risk after inputting the extracted date.The entire jobs were based on the software of ArcGIS9.3 and MATLAB.The results show that:Firstly,the comparison of the risk assessment with land use information in Yulin City demonstrates that the result is in conformity with actual conditions.T-S fuzzy neural network model can reveal the relationship between risk of soil wind erosion and its environment effectively,and provide the basis for predicting wind erosion.Secondly,environmental elements such as wind energy,vegetation coverage,temperature,precipitation,topography control the distribution properties of wind erosion risk in Yulin City.Thirdly,there are 4 divisions of wind erosion risk in Yulin City:the severe risk level,the intense risk level,the moderate risk level and the slight risk level

  7. High-risk plaque features can be detected in non-stenotic carotid plaques of patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic using combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyafil, Fabien [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Bichat University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Schindler, Andreas; Obenhuber, Tilman; Saam, Tobias [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Sepp, Dominik; Hoehn, Sabine; Poppert, Holger [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Bayer-Karpinska, Anna [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Munich (Germany); Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Nekolla, Stephan G. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Munich (Germany); Rominger, Axel [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Dichgans, Martin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Munich Cluster of Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich (Germany); Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate in 18 patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic and presenting non-stenotic carotid atherosclerotic plaques the morphological and biological aspects of these plaques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) imaging. Carotid arteries were imaged 150 min after injection of {sup 18}F-FDG with a combined PET/MRI system. American Heart Association (AHA) lesion type and plaque composition were determined on consecutive MRI axial sections (n = 460) in both carotid arteries. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in carotid arteries was quantified using tissue to background ratio (TBR) on corresponding PET sections. The prevalence of complicated atherosclerotic plaques (AHA lesion type VI) detected with high-resolution MRI was significantly higher in the carotid artery ipsilateral to the ischaemic stroke as compared to the contralateral side (39 vs 0 %; p = 0.001). For all other AHA lesion types, no significant differences were found between ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In addition, atherosclerotic plaques classified as high-risk lesions with MRI (AHA lesion type VI) were associated with higher {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in comparison with other AHA lesions (TBR = 3.43 ± 1.13 vs 2.41 ± 0.84, respectively; p < 0.001). Furthermore, patients presenting at least one complicated lesion (AHA lesion type VI) with MRI showed significantly higher {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in both carotid arteries (ipsilateral and contralateral to the stroke) in comparison with carotid arteries of patients showing no complicated lesion with MRI (mean TBR = 3.18 ± 1.26 and 2.80 ± 0.94 vs 2.19 ± 0.57, respectively; p < 0.05) in favour of a diffuse inflammatory process along both carotid arteries associated with complicated plaques. Morphological and biological features of high-risk plaques can be detected with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI in non-stenotic atherosclerotic plaques ipsilateral

  8. Work of soil and risks of agricultural erosion: Case of the itinerary technical cereal on tray of Mostaganem-Northwest Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Larid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With a semi-arid Mediterranean climate and viticulture vocation, the tray of Mostaganem (North-West of Algeria has become a region of great crops. Subject to increase mechanization and inappropriate tillage practices, farm lands are exposed to erosion that seriously weighs the physical and socio-economic contexts. An itinerary technique (cereal is chosen to study along the slope, surface and deep structural changes of soil, humidity and the fine particles (<2 μm. Thus, consideration of the surface shows a strong soil erodibility partly linked to the action of implements and a rain erosivity accentuated by lack of vegetation in the rainy season.Culural profiles observations show the small depth of tillage affecting mostly superior horizon. Average horizon, wet, rich in fine particles and barely reached by tools impedes any move to lower horizon which is very compact without variability. With this kind of technical itinerary, fine elements losses estimated to (3 t/ha/year result closely from the characteristics of the physical environment but also the conditions of its exploitation. In case of more important spatial-temporal unit’s extrapolation, the consequences will be even more harmful if improvement actions are not undertaken.

  9. Soil erosion evolution and spatial correlation analysis in a typical karst geomorphology using RUSLE with GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Wang, Shijie; Bai, Xiaoyong; Li, Yangbing; Tian, Yichao; Li, Yue; Wu, Luhua; Luo, Guangjie

    2017-07-01

    Although some scholars have studied soil erosion in karst landforms, analyses of the spatial and temporal evolution of soil erosion and correlation analyses with spatial elements have been insufficient. The lack of research has led to an inaccurate assessment of environmental effects, especially in the mountainous area of Wuling in China. Soil erosion and rocky desertification in this area influence the survival and sustainability of a population of 0.22 billion people. This paper analyzes the spatiotemporal evolution of soil erosion and explores its relationship with rocky desertification using GIS technology and the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE). Furthermore, this paper analyzes the relationship between soil erosion and major natural elements in southern China. The results are as follows: (1) from 2000 to 2013, the proportion of the area experiencing micro-erosion and mild erosion was at increasing risk in contrast to areas where moderate and high erosion are decreasing. The area changes in this time sequence reflect moderate to high levels of erosion tending to convert into micro-erosion and mild erosion. (2) The soil erosion area on the slope, at 15-35°, accounted for 60.59 % of the total erosion area, and the corresponding soil erosion accounted for 40.44 %. (3) The annual erosion rate in the karst region decreased much faster than in the non-karst region. Soil erosion in all of the rock outcrop areas indicates an improving trend, and dynamic changes in soil erosion significantly differ among the various lithological distribution belts. (4) The soil erosion rate decreased in the rocky desertification regions, to below moderate levels, but increased in the severe rocky desertification areas. The temporal and spatial variations in soil erosion gradually decreased in the study area. Differences in the spatial distribution between lithology and rocky desertification induced extensive soil loss. As rocky desertification became worse, the erosion

  10. SOTER-Based Soil Water Erosion Simulation in Hainan Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YUGUO; ZHANG GANLIN; GONG ZITONG

    2003-01-01

    The actual and potential water erosion rates of soils with different land covers in Hainan Island, China,were estimated based on the universal soil loss equation (USLE) and a 1:200 000 Soils and Terrain Digital Database (SOTER) database, from which soil water erosion factors could be extracted. 92.8% of the whole island had a current erosion rate of lower than 500 t km-2 a-1. Soil erosion risk was considered to be high because of its abundant rainfall. Without vegetation cover, the potential soil erosion rate would be extremely high and 90.8% of the island would have a soil erosion rate higher than 2 500 t km-2 a-1. Relative erosion vulnerability of different soil zones, landform types, and lithological regions of the island was compared by introducing a relative erosion hazard parameter α. Cambosols developed from siltstone and mudstone in low hill regions were pinpointed as soils with the highest erosion risk in the island.

  11. Coastal Erosion Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal erosion is bad because the ecosystem there will be washed away and the animals could drown or be displaced and have to adapt to a new ecosystem that they are not prepared for. I'm interested in this problem because if there aren't beaches when I grow up I won't be able to do the things I would really like to do. I would like to be a marine biologist. Secondly, I don't want to see beach houses washed away. I would like to see people live in harmony with their environment. So, to study ways in which to preserve beaches I will make and use models that test different erosion controls. Two different ideas for erosion control I tested are using seaweed or a rock berm. I think the rock berm will work better than the model of seaweed because the seaweed is under water and the waves can carry the sand over the seaweed, and the rock berm will work better because the rocks will help break the waves up before they reach the shore and the waves can not carry the sand over the rocks that are above the water. To investigate this I got a container to use to model the Gulf of Mexico coastline. I performed several test runs using sand and water in the container to mimic the beach and waves from the Gulf of Mexico hitting the shoreline. I did three trials for the control (no erosion control), seaweed and a rock berm. Rock berms are a border of a raised area of rock. The model for seaweed that I used was plastic shopping bags cut into strips and glued to the bottom of my container to mimic seaweed. My results were that the control had the most erosion which ranged from 2.75 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The seaweed was a little better than the control but was very variable and ranged from 1.5 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The rock berm worked the best out of all at controlling erosion with erosion ranging from 1.5 - 2 inches. My hypothesis was correct because the rock berm did best to control erosion compared to the control which had no erosion control and the model with seaweed.

  12. Erosivity, surface runoff, and soil erosion estimation using GIS-coupled runoff-erosion model in the Mamuaba catchment, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, Richarde; Guimarães Santos, Celso Augusto; Carneiro de Lima Silva, Valeriano; Pereira e Silva, Leonardo

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluates erosivity, surface runoff generation, and soil erosion rates for Mamuaba catchment, sub-catchment of Gramame River basin (Brazil) by using the ArcView Soil and Water Assessment Tool (AvSWAT) model. Calibration and validation of the model was performed on monthly basis, and it could simulate surface runoff and soil erosion to a good level of accuracy. Daily rainfall data between 1969 and 1989 from six rain gauges were used, and the monthly rainfall erosivity of each station was computed for all the studied years. In order to evaluate the calibration and validation of the model, monthly runoff data between January 1978 and April 1982 from one runoff gauge were used as well. The estimated soil loss rates were also realistic when compared to what can be observed in the field and to results from previous studies around of catchment. The long-term average soil loss was estimated at 9.4 t ha(-1) year(-1); most of the area of the catchment (60%) was predicted to suffer from a low- to moderate-erosion risk (catchment, the soil erosion was estimated to exceed > 12 t ha(-1) year(-1). Expectedly, estimated soil loss was significantly correlated with measured rainfall and simulated surface runoff. Based on the estimated soil loss rates, the catchment was divided into four priority categories (low, moderate, high and very high) for conservation intervention. The study demonstrates that the AvSWAT model provides a useful tool for soil erosion assessment from catchments and facilitates the planning for a sustainable land management in northeastern Brazil.

  13. Smartphone imagery to analyze animal-induced erosion in riverbanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofia, Giulia; Masin, Roberta; Tarolli, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Among the most invasive species, the Coypu (Myocastor coypus) best exemplifies the widespread damage caused by alien species to ecosystems, with effects on crops, riverine systems, and hydraulic structures. The extent of the latter impact is still rarely quantified, despite the increasing economic and social importance. In northern Italy, Coypu damages to the drainage network have multiple aspects. One main issue is related to the weakening of earthen structures: burrows significantly reduce the integrity of the banks, and potentially contribute to the bank failure. A second concern is related to the agricultural activities nearby the channels. When burrows are present, soil may collapse when subjected to the weight of heavy objects on the surface (such as vehicles and farm machinery). A third issue is connected on the impact of burrowing activities on riparian buffer zones. Coypu burrows create specific flowing paths for the water, delivering water and sediment from the fields directly to the drainage system, thus possibly reducing the efficiency of these zones, and improving the risk of surface water contamination. The purpose of this research is to provide a new perspective, from a geoscience point of view, on Coypu damages to riverbanks, showing the effectiveness of a low-cost approach to model surface burrowing damages and to quantify the related erosion. The work is based on the Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetric method. To quantify the damages, high-resolution 3D models of the riverbanks were reconstructed from imagery acquired with a smartphone (Prosdocimi et al. 2015). From these models, it was possible to determine the volume of the animal-induced erosion. Proven its effectiveness, the proposed method could allow the creation of a database of damages. Researchers could test the flexibility of the approach to determine the distribution of erosion along the whole drainage system as an index of damage region wide, and to determine the severity of

  14. Emergent behaviors of classifier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, S.; Miller, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses some examples of emergent behavior in classifier systems, describes some recently developed methods for studying them based on dynamical systems theory, and presents some initial results produced by the methodology. The goal of this work is to find techniques for noticing when interesting emergent behaviors of classifier systems emerge, to study how such behaviors might emerge over time, and make suggestions for designing classifier systems that exhibit preferred behaviors. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Clinical studies of dental erosion and erosive wear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M; Chew, H.P; Ellwood, R.P

    2011-01-01

    We define erosion as a partial demineralisation of enamel or dentine by intrinsic or extrinsic acids and erosive tooth wear as the accelerated loss of dental hard tissue through the combined effect...

  16. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  17. SEDIMENTATION AND EROSION STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ The river systems observed today is the cumulative result of surface, rill, and gully erosion, and sediment transport, scour, and deposition. The divisions of approach between these two related areas are man-made, and are not based on sound science. Most of the erosion studies are done by geologists and agricultural engineers who are concerned of the surface, rill, and gully erosion and the loss of agricultural land productivity. Hydraulic engineers are more interested in the study of sediment transport, scour, and deposition, and their impacts on river engineering and hydraulic structures in rivers and reservoirs. Erosion studies are often based on empirical relationships or field data to determinate the annual sediment yield from a watershed. On the other hand, hydraulic engineers focus their attention on solving equations based on assumed initial and boundary conditions with a time scale of days, hours, or seconds. Both approaches have their complementary strengths and weaknesses. It is important to provide a forum for specialists in both areas to communicate, exchange ideas, and learn from each other.

  18. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  19. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  20. Feature Selection and Effective Classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogun, Jitender S.; Choubey, Suresh K.; Raghavan, Vijay V.; Sever, Hayri

    1998-01-01

    Develops and analyzes four algorithms for feature selection in the context of rough set methodology. Experimental results confirm the expected relationship between the time complexity of these algorithms and the classification accuracy of the resulting upper classifiers. When compared, results of upper classifiers perform better than lower…

  1. Erosion by an Alpine glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Frédéric; Beyssac, Olivier; Brughelli, Mattia; Lane, Stuart N; Leprince, Sébastien; Adatte, Thierry; Lin, Jiao Y Y; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Cox, Simon C

    2015-10-09

    Assessing the impact of glaciation on Earth's surface requires understanding glacial erosion processes. Developing erosion theories is challenging because of the complex nature of the erosion processes and the difficulty of examining the ice/bedrock interface of contemporary glaciers. We demonstrate that the glacial erosion rate is proportional to the ice-sliding velocity squared, by quantifying spatial variations in ice-sliding velocity and the erosion rate of a fast-flowing Alpine glacier. The nonlinear behavior implies a high erosion sensitivity to small variations in topographic slope and precipitation. A nonlinear rate law suggests that abrasion may dominate over other erosion processes in fast-flowing glaciers. It may also explain the wide range of observed glacial erosion rates and, in part, the impact of glaciation on mountainous landscapes during the past few million years. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Severe Environmental Corrosion Erosion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany, OR, allows researchers to safely examine the performance of materials in highly corrosive or erosive...

  3. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to

  4. Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall erosivity factor for Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Steel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall erosivity, considering rainfall amount and intensity, is an important parameter for soil erosion risk assessment under future land use and climate change. Despite its importance, rainfall erosivity is usually implemented in models with a low spatial and temporal resolution. The purpose of this study is to assess the temporal- and spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity (R-factor in Switzerland. Time series of 22 yr for rainfall (10 min resolution and temperature (1 h resolution data were analysed for 71 automatic gauging stations distributed throughout Switzerland. Multiple regression was used to interpolate the erosivity values of single stations and to generate a map for Switzerland. Latitude, longitude, average annual precipitation, biogeographic units (Jura, Midland, etc., aspect and elevation were used as covariates, of which average annual precipitation, elevation and the biographic unit (Western Alps were significant predictors. The mean value of long-term rainfall erosivity is 1323 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 with a range of lowest values of 124 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 at an elevated station in Grisons to highest values of 5611 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 in Ticino. All stations have highest erosivity values from July to August and lowest values in the winter month. Swiss-wide the month May to October show significantly increasing trends of erosivity (p<0.005. Only in February a significantly decreasing trend of rainfall erosivity is found (p<0.01. The increasing trends of erosivity in May, September and October when vegetation cover is susceptible are likely to enhance soil erosion risk for certain agricultural crops and alpine grasslands in Switzerland.

  5. Where and how can policy encourage afforestation to avoid soil erosion?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the economic value of avoided soil erosion in New Zealand is an important factor in policy decision making enabling the acknowledgement of the costs of erosion to the economy. This paper focuses on potential for afforestation to mitigate erosion risks on marginal agricultural hill country lands. Spatial economic modelling is undertaken to determine the net private and public benefit due to the avoided soil erosion from afforesting these areas. The study indicates that in some ca...

  6. Modelling Soil Erosion in the Densu River Basin Using RUSLE and GIS Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiagbori, G; Forkuo, E K; Laari, P; Aabeyir, R

    2014-07-01

    Soil erosion involves detachment and transport of soil particles from top soil layers, degrading soil quality and reducing the productivity of affected lands. Soil eroded from the upland catchment causes depletion of fertile agricultural land and the resulting sediment deposited at the river networks creates river morphological change and reservoir sedimentation problems. However, land managers and policy makers are more interested in the spatial distribution of soil erosion risk than in absolute values of soil erosion loss. The aim of this paper is to model the spatial distribution of soil erosion in Densu River Basin of Ghana using RUSLE and GIS tools and to use the model to explore the relationship between erosion susceptibility, slope and land use/land cover (LULC) in the Basin. The rainfall map, digital elevation model, soil type map, and land cover map, were input data in the soil erosion model developed. This model was then categorized into four different erosion risk classes. The developed soil erosion map was then overlaid with the slope and LULC maps of the study area to explore their effects on erosion susceptibility of the soil in the Densu River Basin. The Model, predicted 88% of the basin as low erosion risk and 6% as moderate erosion risk, 3% as high erosion risk and 3% as severe risk. The high and severe erosion areas were distributed mainly within the areas of high slope gradient and also sections of the moderate forest LULC class. Also, the areas within the moderate forest LULC class found to have high erosion risk, had an intersecting high erodibility soil group.

  7. Sampling Based Average Classifier Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hou

    2014-01-01

    fusion algorithms have been proposed in literature, average fusion is almost always selected as the baseline for comparison. Little is done on exploring the potential of average fusion and proposing a better baseline. In this paper we empirically investigate the behavior of soft labels and classifiers in average fusion. As a result, we find that; by proper sampling of soft labels and classifiers, the average fusion performance can be evidently improved. This result presents sampling based average fusion as a better baseline; that is, a newly proposed classifier fusion algorithm should at least perform better than this baseline in order to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  8. Classified

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2011-01-01

    In the last issue of the Bulletin, we have discussed recent implications for privacy on the Internet. But privacy of personal data is just one facet of data protection. Confidentiality is another one. However, confidentiality and data protection are often perceived as not relevant in the academic environment of CERN.   But think twice! At CERN, your personal data, e-mails, medical records, financial and contractual documents, MARS forms, group meeting minutes (and of course your password!) are all considered to be sensitive, restricted or even confidential. And this is not all. Physics results, in particular when being preliminary and pending scrutiny, are sensitive, too. Just recently, an ATLAS collaborator copy/pasted the abstract of an ATLAS note onto an external public blog, despite the fact that this document was clearly marked as an "Internal Note". Such an act was not only embarrassing to the ATLAS collaboration, and had negative impact on CERN’s reputation --- i...

  9. Optimally Training a Cascade Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chunhua; Hengel, Anton van den

    2010-01-01

    Cascade classifiers are widely used in real-time object detection. Different from conventional classifiers that are designed for a low overall classification error rate, a classifier in each node of the cascade is required to achieve an extremely high detection rate and moderate false positive rate. Although there are a few reported methods addressing this requirement in the context of object detection, there is no a principled feature selection method that explicitly takes into account this asymmetric node learning objective. We provide such an algorithm here. We show a special case of the biased minimax probability machine has the same formulation as the linear asymmetric classifier (LAC) of \\cite{wu2005linear}. We then design a new boosting algorithm that directly optimizes the cost function of LAC. The resulting totally-corrective boosting algorithm is implemented by the column generation technique in convex optimization. Experimental results on object detection verify the effectiveness of the proposed bo...

  10. Particle erosion of infrared materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Erosion test of some infrared (IR) optical crystals (Ge,ZnS,MgF2,and quartz) was conducted with a number of different erodents (glass bead,and angular SiC,SiO2,Al2O3 by a homemade gas-blasting erosion tester.The influence of impact angle,impact velocity,erodent,and erosion time on the erosion rate and the effect of erosion on their IR transmittance were studied.The damaged surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy,and the erosion mechanism was explored.All of the materials show the maximum in wear versus impact angle at 90°,confirming their brittle failure behavior.It is found that the erosion rate is dependent on the erodent velocity by a power law,and it is highly correlated to the hardness of the erodent.The erosion rate-time curves do not show an incubation state,but an accelerated erosion period followed a maximum erosion (steady state).The decrease of IR transmittance is direct proportion to the erosion rate.Although the material loss occurs primarily by brittle process,ductile behavior is clearly an important feature,especially for MgF2 and ZnS.

  11. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, S. G.; Fifield, L. K.

    2012-10-01

    Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium), and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  12. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield L.K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium, and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  13. Combining different types of classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Gatnar, Eugeniusz

    2008-01-01

    Model fusion has proved to be a very successful strategy for obtaining accurate models in classification and regression. The key issue, however, is the diversity of the component classifiers because classification error of an ensemble depends on the correlation between its members. The majority of existing ensemble methods combine the same type of models, e.g. trees. In order to promote the diversity of the ensemble members, we propose to aggregate classifiers of different t...

  14. Hybrid classifiers methods of data, knowledge, and classifier combination

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book delivers a definite and compact knowledge on how hybridization can help improving the quality of computer classification systems. In order to make readers clearly realize the knowledge of hybridization, this book primarily focuses on introducing the different levels of hybridization and illuminating what problems we will face with as dealing with such projects. In the first instance the data and knowledge incorporated in hybridization were the action points, and then a still growing up area of classifier systems known as combined classifiers was considered. This book comprises the aforementioned state-of-the-art topics and the latest research results of the author and his team from Department of Systems and Computer Networks, Wroclaw University of Technology, including as classifier based on feature space splitting, one-class classification, imbalance data, and data stream classification.

  15. Coastal erosion in China under the condition of global climate change and measures for its prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Cai; Xianze Su; Jianhui Liu; Bing Li; Gang Lei

    2009-01-01

    The general characteristics of coastal erosion in China are described in terms of the regional geography,the form of erosion,the causes of erosion,and the challenges we are facing.The paper highlights the relationship between coastal erosion and sea level rises,storm waves and tides,and the influence of global climate changes on coastal erosion along the coastal zone of China.The response of the risk of coastal erosion in China to climate changes has obvious regional diversity.Research into and the forecasting of the effects of climate changes on coastal erosion are systemic work involving the natural environment,social economy,and alongshore engineering projects in the global system.Facing global warming and continual enhancement of coastal erosion,suggestions for basic theoretical study,prevention technology,management system assurance,and strengthening the legal system are presented here.

  16. Application of Remote Sensing and Participatory Soil Erosion Assessment Approach for Soil Erosion Mapping in a Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Prasad BHANDARI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research addresses the problem of soil erosion in the Phewa watershed, Pokhara, Nepal, through remote sensing application of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE model, and Participatory Geographic Information System (PGIS based Erosion Damage Assessment (EDA. Acceleration of soil erosion is due to anthropogenic factors, such as construction of roads without conservation, intensive agriculture, and socio-economic activities. The aim of the study is to identify the major causes of soil erosion by application of remote sensing; RUSLE and PGIS based EDA for soil erosion reduction management. The methodologies employed include structured questionnaires, focus groups, stakeholders’ sketches, and application of remote sensing and GIS on RUSLE model. The RUSLE model results indicate that the rate of soil erosion in the Phewa watershed varies from 0 to 206.78 t/ha/yr, and the mean annual rate of soil loss was 14.71 t/ha/yr in 2010. The PGIS based EDA resulted in different classes of severity (stable, slight, moderate, severe, very severe which were similar to the quantified results of RUSLE, except for the dense forest class in Land Use and Land Cover (LULC. Erosion-prone maps were developed through PGIS based EDA by stakeholders and use of the RUSLE model. Maps showed that the soil erosion risk areas were similar on both maps. The stakeholders’ sketched map, with knowledge gained from PGIS based EDA, RS and GIS technology for their conservation practices, could help to reduce soil erosion. The study identifies that the major issues are soil and agriculture management practices, and concludes that there is a link between RS and GIS and the estimated erosion by the RUSLE model. Thus, the RS and GIS techniques and PGIS based EDA approach can benefit stakeholders in applying better measures for soil erosion management.

  17. Design of Robust Neural Network Classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Hintz-Madsen, Mads

    1998-01-01

    a modified likelihood function which incorporates the potential risk of outliers in the data. This leads to the introduction of a new parameter, the outlier probability. Designing the neural classifier involves optimization of network weights as well as outlier probability and regularization parameters. We...... suggest to adapt the outlier probability and regularisation parameters by minimizing the error on a validation set, and a simple gradient descent scheme is derived. In addition, the framework allows for constructing a simple outlier detector. Experiments with artificial data demonstrate the potential......This paper addresses a new framework for designing robust neural network classifiers. The network is optimized using the maximum a posteriori technique, i.e., the cost function is the sum of the log-likelihood and a regularization term (prior). In order to perform robust classification, we present...

  18. A terminological matter: paragenesis, antigravitative erosion or antigravitational erosion ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasini G.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the speleological literature three terms are utilized to designate the “ascending erosion”: paragenesis (= paragénésis, coined in1968, antigravitative erosion (= erosione antigravitativa, coined in 1966 and antigravitational erosion (wrong English translation ofthe Italian term erosione antigravitativa, utilized later on. The term paragenesis should be abandoned because of the priority of theterm erosione antigravitativa - on the ground of the “law of priority” – and because of its ambiguous etimology. On the other hand,the term antigravitational erosion should be forsaken in favour of the term antigravitative erosion, given the meaning that the termsgravitation and gravity have in Physics. Therefore, to designate the phenomenon of the “ascending erosion” there would be nothingleft but the term antigravitative erosion.The antigravitative erosion process and its recognizability are illustrated.Examples of caves with evident antigravitative erosion phenomena, developed in different karstifiable rocks and in several partsof the world, are given.It is recalled that the antigravitative erosion is a phenomenon well-known since 1942 and widely proven and supported, and that it isrelatively easy – in many cases - to recognize the antigravitative origin of karstic passages.It is stressed that the antigravitative erosion is an important phenomenon, exclusive of the karstic caves and unique in nature.

  19. Integrative Analysis of DCE-MRI and Gene Expression Profiles in Construction of a Gene Classifier for Assessment of Hypoxia-Related Risk of Chemoradiotherapy Failure in Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldbo, Christina S; Julin, Cathinka H; Lando, Malin

    2016-01-01

    classification threshold that separated cervical cancer patients into a more and less hypoxic group with different outcome to chemoradiotherapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A training cohort of 42 patients and two independent cohorts of 108 and 131 patients were included. Gene expression data were generated from tumor...... biopsies by two Illumina array generations (WG-6, HT-12). Technical transfer of the classifier to a reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) platform was performed for 74 patients. The amplitude ABrix in the Brix pharmacokinetic model was extracted from DCE-MR images of 64 patients and used......-gene classifier was identified. The classifier separated the patients into two groups with different progression-free survival probability. The robustness of the classifier was demonstrated by successful validation of hypoxia association and prognostic value across cohorts, array generations, and assay...

  20. [Unhealthy weight loss. Erosion by apple cider vinegar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambon, D L; Brand, H S; Veerman, E C I

    2012-12-01

    Erosive tooth wear was diagnosed in the dentition of a 15-year-old girl with a Moroccan background. After an anamnesis, extensive analysis of possible risk factors and a study of the pattern of erosion, it was concluded that the erosive tooth wear was induced by daily consumption of a glass of apple cider vinegar Further investigation revealed that in North-African culture, women have used apple cider vinegar to achieve weight loss for generations. Bodybuilders are also known to make use of this method of weight reduction.

  1. 3D Bayesian contextual classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours.......We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours....

  2. Physical erosion modelling of complex morphodynamics in the upper Val d'Orcia: a combination of EROSION 3D, UAV, SFM and CANUPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Arno; Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Throughout the Mediterranean Basin soil erosion is both a widely spread and a landscape shaping process. In order to increase the understanding of morphodynamics inside large Italian badland areas, so called Calanchi, the process based erosion model EROSION 3D was parameterized by artificial rainfall simulations, soil sampling and an UAV based high resolution digital elevation model. Vegetation structures were removed with the CANUPO-classifier in CloudCompare. The rainfall experiments proved to be a convenient but costly tool for deriving the model input parameters. While building up the model, different composition of the inhomogeneous soil surface was considered. A diverse behavior against erosion by water was observed. The results showed that the deposition surfaces of rotational or translational slides, besides calanco depth contour, tend to degrade. Although these deposits present a comparatively low bulk density, they reduce the infiltration due to soil surface clogging and cause less erosion resistances. The differential consideration of erosion sub-processes turns out as particularly challenging. The simulation of a reference year showed an annual soil export from the catchment of 43 t/ha, which corresponds to an average surface lowering of 3 mm. Sheet erosion represents an amount of about 5% of the total erosion of badlands. Furthermore, infiltration depth, amount of runoff, sediment concentration, and grain size composition of the deposits were calculated. This study makes a contribution to the understanding of denudation processes in Calanchi badlands. The presented process-based modeling of badlands is contributing a new aspect to erosion research.

  3. Maximum margin Bayesian network classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael; Tschiatschek, Sebastian

    2012-03-01

    We present a maximum margin parameter learning algorithm for Bayesian network classifiers using a conjugate gradient (CG) method for optimization. In contrast to previous approaches, we maintain the normalization constraints on the parameters of the Bayesian network during optimization, i.e., the probabilistic interpretation of the model is not lost. This enables us to handle missing features in discriminatively optimized Bayesian networks. In experiments, we compare the classification performance of maximum margin parameter learning to conditional likelihood and maximum likelihood learning approaches. Discriminative parameter learning significantly outperforms generative maximum likelihood estimation for naive Bayes and tree augmented naive Bayes structures on all considered data sets. Furthermore, maximizing the margin dominates the conditional likelihood approach in terms of classification performance in most cases. We provide results for a recently proposed maximum margin optimization approach based on convex relaxation. While the classification results are highly similar, our CG-based optimization is computationally up to orders of magnitude faster. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve classification performance comparable to support vector machines (SVMs) using fewer parameters. Moreover, we show that unanticipated missing feature values during classification can be easily processed by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first.

  4. Classifying Cereal Data (Earlier Methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DSQ includes questions about cereal intake and allows respondents up to two responses on which cereals they consume. We classified each cereal reported first by hot or cold, and then along four dimensions: density of added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium.

  5. Estimation model of soil freeze-thaw erosion in Silingco watershed wetland of Northern Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Yu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The freeze-thaw (FT) erosion is a type of soil erosion like water erosion and wind erosion. Limited by many factors, the grading evaluation of soil FT erosion quantities is not well studied. Based on the comprehensive analysis of the evaluation indices of soil FT erosion, we for the first time utilized the sensitivity of microwave remote sensing technology to soil moisture for identification of FT state. We established an estimation model suitable to evaluate the soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland of Northern Tibet using weighted summation method of six impact factors including the annual FT cycle days, average diurnal FT phase-changed water content, average annual precipitation, slope, aspect, and vegetation coverage. Finally, with the support of GIS, we classified soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland. The results showed that soil FT erosion are distributed in broad areas of Silingco watershed wetland. Different soil FT erosions with different intensities have evidently different spatial and geographical distributions.

  6. Evaluating the Impacts of Climate Change on Soil Erosion Rates in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Martínez-Santiago

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although water-eroded soil (WES resulting from human activities has been recognized as the leading global cause of land degradation, the soil erosion risks from climate change are not clear. Studies have reported that WES is the second most significant cause of soil loss in Mexico, and its future trajectory has not been sufficiently evaluated. The aims of this study are to 1 determine the impacts of climate change on WES and its distribution for the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico, and to 2 compare the present and future soil loss rates for the study unit (SU. The State of Aguascalientes is located in the “Region del Bajio.” The impact of climate change on WES was evaluated using the near-future divided world scenario (A2 presented in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report. Daily temperature and precipitation data from 18 weather stations were downscaled to model historic laminar water erosion (HLWE and changes therein in the A2 near-future scenario for 2010–2039 (LWEScA2. Due to future changes in mean annual rainfall (MAR levels, a change in the LWEScA2 of between 1.6 and 8.9% could result in average soil losses up to 475.4 t ha-1 yr-1, representing a loss of slightly more than a 30-mm layer of mountain soil per year. The risk zones, classified as class 4 for LWE, are located to western of the State in part of municipalities of Calvillo, Jesus María, San José de Gracia y Cosio, where there are typical hills and falls with soil very sensitive to rain erosion.

  7. Rill erosion rates in burned forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Peter R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wildfires often produce large increases in runoff and erosion rates (e.g., Moody and Martin, 2009), and land managers need to predict the frequency and magnitude of postfire erosion to determine the needs for hazard response and possible erosion mitigation to reduce the impacts of increased erosion on public safety and valued resources. The Water Erosion...

  8. Erosion--Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, B.

    1978-01-01

    The deterioration of materials by corrosion or erosion by itself presents a formidable problem and for this reason investigators have studied these two phenomena independently. In fact, there are very few systematic studies on E-C and the majority of references mention it only in passing. In most real systems, however, the two destructive processes take place simultaneously, hence the purpose of this review is to present the various interactions between the chemical and mechanical agents leading to accelerated degradation of the material. The papers cited in the review are those that lead to a better understanding of the process involved in the accelerated rate of material loss under E-C conditions.

  9. Dune erosion under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, R.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341476935

    2014-01-01

    This PhD-thesis investigated the effect of future climate change on dune erosion in the Netherlands. At present, dune erosion occurs under a combination of large storm surge and high waves, which are both generated by a storm event. Therefore to investigate the affect of future climate change on dun

  10. Nocturnal lagophthalmos and recurrent erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, G. D.

    1976-01-01

    The symptoms and corneal changes caused by sleeping with one or both eyes open are described in 102 patients. The clinical picture is identical to that of the microform recurrent erosion. The close relationship between the micro- and macro-forms of recurrent corneal erosion suggests that the latter condition is also precipitated by nocturnal lagophthalmos. Images PMID:1268178

  11. Dune erosion under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    This PhD-thesis investigated the effect of future climate change on dune erosion in the Netherlands. At present, dune erosion occurs under a combination of large storm surge and high waves, which are both generated by a storm event. Therefore to investigate the affect of future climate change on dun

  12. Dune erosion during storm surges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Large parts of The Netherlands are protected from flooding by a narrow strip of sandy beaches and dunes. The aim of this thesis is to extend the existing knowledge of dune erosion during storm surges as it occurs along the Dutch coast. The thesis discusses: • A large scale dune erosion experiment to

  13. The erosive potential of lollipops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Gambon, D.L.; Paap, A.; Bulthuis, M.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the erosive potential of several commercially available lollipops and the protective effect of saliva. Methods: The erosive potential of lollipops was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. Subsequently, 10 healthy volunteers tested different types of lo

  14. Classifying self-gravitating radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    We study static systems of self-gravitating radiations confined in a sphere by using numerical and analytic calculations. We classify and analyze the solutions systematically. Due to the scaling symmetry, any solution can be represented as a segment of a solution curve on a plane of two-dimensional scale invariant variables. We find that a system can be conveniently parametrized by three parameters representing the solution curve, the scaling, and the system size, instead of the parameters defined at the outer boundary. The solution curves are classified to three types representing regular solutions, conically singular solutions with, and without an object which resembles an event horizon up to causal disconnectedness. For the last type, the behavior of a self-gravitating system is simple enough to allow analytic calculations.

  15. 76 FR 34761 - Classified National Security Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... Classified National Security Information AGENCY: Marine Mammal Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... information, as directed by Information Security Oversight Office regulations. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT..., ``Classified National Security Information,'' and 32 CFR part 2001, ``Classified National Security......

  16. Energy-Efficient Neuromorphic Classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Daniel; Rigotti, Mattia; Seok, Mingoo; Fusi, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Neuromorphic engineering combines the architectural and computational principles of systems neuroscience with semiconductor electronics, with the aim of building efficient and compact devices that mimic the synaptic and neural machinery of the brain. The energy consumptions promised by neuromorphic engineering are extremely low, comparable to those of the nervous system. Until now, however, the neuromorphic approach has been restricted to relatively simple circuits and specialized functions, thereby obfuscating a direct comparison of their energy consumption to that used by conventional von Neumann digital machines solving real-world tasks. Here we show that a recent technology developed by IBM can be leveraged to realize neuromorphic circuits that operate as classifiers of complex real-world stimuli. Specifically, we provide a set of general prescriptions to enable the practical implementation of neural architectures that compete with state-of-the-art classifiers. We also show that the energy consumption of these architectures, realized on the IBM chip, is typically two or more orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional digital machines implementing classifiers with comparable performance. Moreover, the spike-based dynamics display a trade-off between integration time and accuracy, which naturally translates into algorithms that can be flexibly deployed for either fast and approximate classifications, or more accurate classifications at the mere expense of longer running times and higher energy costs. This work finally proves that the neuromorphic approach can be efficiently used in real-world applications and has significant advantages over conventional digital devices when energy consumption is considered.

  17. ANALYSIS OF BAYESIAN CLASSIFIER ACCURACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Schneider Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The naïve Bayes classifier is considered one of the most effective classification algorithms today, competing with more modern and sophisticated classifiers. Despite being based on unrealistic (naïve assumption that all variables are independent, given the output class, the classifier provides proper results. However, depending on the scenario utilized (network structure, number of samples or training cases, number of variables, the network may not provide appropriate results. This study uses a process variable selection, using the chi-squared test to verify the existence of dependence between variables in the data model in order to identify the reasons which prevent a Bayesian network to provide good performance. A detailed analysis of the data is also proposed, unlike other existing work, as well as adjustments in case of limit values between two adjacent classes. Furthermore, variable weights are used in the calculation of a posteriori probabilities, calculated with mutual information function. Tests were applied in both a naïve Bayesian network and a hierarchical Bayesian network. After testing, a significant reduction in error rate has been observed. The naïve Bayesian network presented a drop in error rates from twenty five percent to five percent, considering the initial results of the classification process. In the hierarchical network, there was not only a drop in fifteen percent error rate, but also the final result came to zero.

  18. Aggregation Operator Based Fuzzy Pattern Classifier Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mönks, Uwe; Larsen, Henrik Legind

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel modular fuzzy pattern classifier design framework for intelligent automation systems, developed on the base of the established Modified Fuzzy Pattern Classifier (MFPC) and allows designing novel classifier models which are hardware-efficiently implementable. The perfor......This paper presents a novel modular fuzzy pattern classifier design framework for intelligent automation systems, developed on the base of the established Modified Fuzzy Pattern Classifier (MFPC) and allows designing novel classifier models which are hardware-efficiently implementable...

  19. Heel erosion and other interdigital disorders in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Gröhn, Y.T.; Thysen, Iver

    1991-01-01

    Epidemiologic associations between variables obtainable from dairy cow records and the occurrence of heel erosion, interdigital dermatitis, and interdigital hyperplasia at claw trimmings were estimated with multivariable logistic regression analysis on data from 1170 and 542 cows in lactation 1...... and lactations 2 to 9, respectively. In the 17 herds, heel erosion, interdigital dermatitis, and hyperplasia occurred among 43.8, 4.5, and .9% of cows in lactation 1 and among 69.1, 7.6 and 5.9% of cows in lactations 2 to 9, respectively. Severity of heel erosion increased with parity, and risk increased...... with stage of lactation. Strong seasonal effects were present. Various combinations of veterinary treatments were associated with heel erosion and hyperplasia depending on parity, stage of lactation, and the presence of other claw disorders. In contrast, veterinary treatment had a protective effect...

  20. Using REE Tracers to Measure Sheet Erosion Changing to Rill Erosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋炜; 刘普灵; 杨明义; 薛亚洲

    2003-01-01

    Rare earth element(REE) tracer method was used to study sheet erosion changing to rill erosion on slope land. By placing different REE on different soil depth across a slope in an indoor plot, two simulated rainfalls were applied to study the change of erosion type and the rill erosion process. The results indicate that the main erosion type is sheet erosion at the beginning of the rainfalls, and serious erosion happens after rill erosion appears. Accumulated sheet and rill erosion amount increases with the rainfalls time. The percentage of sheet erosion amount decreases and rill erosion percentage increases with time. At the end of the rainfalls, the total rill erosion amounts are 4.3 and 5 times more than sheet erosion. In this paper, a new REE tracer method was used to quantitatively distinguish sheet and rill erosion amount. The new REE tracer method should be useful to future studying of erosion processes on slope lands.

  1. Low Serum Testosterone Level Predisposes to Artificial Urinary Sphincter Cuff Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Matthias D; Morey, Allen F; Sheth, Kunj; Tausch, Timothy J; Siegel, Jordan; Cordon, Billy H; Bury, Matthew I; Cheng, Earl Y; Sharma, Arun K; Gonzalez, Chris M; Kaplan, William E; Kavoussi, Nicholas L; Klein, Alexandra; Roehrborn, Claus G

    2016-11-01

    To examine the association between decreased serum testosterone levels and artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) cuff erosion. We evaluated serum testosterone levels in 53 consecutive patients. Low testosterone was defined as erosions had low serum testosterone (18/20, 90.0%) compared to those without erosions (12/33, 36.4%, P erosion was 1.70 years (0.83-6.86); mean follow-up was 2.76 years (0.34-7.92). Low testosterone had a hazard ratio of 7.15 for erosion in a Cox regression analysis (95% confidence interval 1.64-31.17, P = .009) and Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated decreased erosion-free follow-up (log-rank P = .002). Low testosterone was the sole independent risk factor for erosion in a multivariable model including coronary artery disease and radiation (odds ratio 15.78; 95% confidence interval 2.77-89.92, P = .002). Notably, history of prior AUS, radiation, androgen ablation therapy, or concomitant penile implant did not confound risk of cuff erosion in men with low testosterone levels. Men with low testosterone levels are at a significantly higher risk to experience AUS cuff erosion. Appropriate counseling before AUS implantation is warranted and it is unclear whether testosterone resupplementation will mitigate this risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of soil erosion of land subsided by coal mining using RUSLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Lei; Feng Qiyan; Wu Kan; Meng Qingjun

    2012-01-01

    Based on a RUSLE model,we identified the key factors of the impact on soil erosion induced by coal mining subsidence.We designed a method for predicting LS factors of a mining subsidence basin,using analytical GIS spatial technology.Using the Huainan mining area as an example,we calculated the modulus of erosion,its volume and classified the grade of soil erosion for both the original area and the subsidence basin.The results show that the maximum modulus of erosion and the volume of erosion of the subsidence basin without water logging would increase by 78% and 23% respectively compared with the original situation.The edge of the subsidence basin,where the land subsidence was uneven,is subject to the greatest acceleration in soil erosion.In the situation of water logging after subsidence,the maximum modulus of erosion would decrease if the accumulated slope length were reduced.This maximum modulus around the water logged area within the subsidence basin is equal to that without water logging,while the total volume of erosion decreases.Therefore,mining subsidence aggravates soil erosion especially at the edge of basins where water and soil conservation measures should be taken.

  3. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam;

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged...... in large-N studies is therefore to define the concept of an interest group and to determine which classification scheme to use for different group types. After reviewing the existing literature, this article sets out to compare different approaches to defining and classifying interest groups with a sample...

  4. Fingerprint prediction using classifier ensembles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molale, P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available -based learning algorithms. Machine Learning, 6: pp: 37-66. Amit, Y., D. Geman, and K. Wilder, 1997. Joint Induction of Shape Features and Tree Classifiers. IEEE Transc. on Pattern Anal. and machine Intell., 19 (11), pp: 1300- 1305. Breiman, L., 1996. Bagging.... NIST Technical Report NISTIR 5163. Cappelli, R., A. Lumini, D. Maio., and D. Maltoni, 1999. Fingerprint Classification by Direct image Partitioning. IEEE Transc. On Pattern Anal. and Machine Intell., 21 (5), pp: 402-421. Cox, D.R., 1966. Some...

  5. Bank Erosion in a Peatland Forest Ditch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Leena; Finér, Leena; Nieminen, Mika; Sarkkola, Sakari; Koivusalo, Harri

    2013-04-01

    Peatlands have been drained for forestry extensively in Finland since 1950's, but nowadays the drainage is shifted from the initial ditching to the ditch network maintenance, which refers to the cleaning of existing ditches and to the digging of complementary ditches in the drained areas. Ditch maintenance operations lead to sediment load that is considered to be among the most harmful environmental effects of forestry. Excess sediment loads cause adverse effects to the receiving waters and their ecosystems in terms of increased turbidity, which reduces primary production, and siltation, which ruins the spawning grounds of fish. To understand the underlying mechanisms behind the sediment load at the source areas, a field experiment was conducted for studying the bank erosion of a newly cleaned ditch. That was done on a shallow peated area with fine textured mineral subsoil (sandy loam) since such areas are assessed to have the greatest risk for sediment load generation. Bank erosion was quantified by using a pin meter, and its suitability for detecting microtopographic changes of ditch side wall in drained peatland conditions was evaluated. Artificial irrigation was applied in the vicinity of a ditch to generate a seepage face that speeds up the erosion process. The ditch bank microtopography was measured five times for a four meter long section of the ditch by using a large set of pin meter measurements. The measurements from the different times were spatially interpolated over 2 x 2 cm grid using ordinary kriging and erosion and deposition were estimated as the difference in the grid surface between the measurement times. The results revealed that bank erosion occurred soon after the ditch was cleaned, but the eroded material was deposited on the lower bank areas and at the bottom of the ditch where it is potentially transported further during peak discharge events. Pin meter proved to be suitable for measuring bank erosion of peatland forest ditch, although the

  6. Relationship between food habits and tooth erosion occurrence in Malaysian University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Lee, Mei Tee; Ali, Nor Hazirah Muhammad; Samynathan, Selvamary; Jie, Ying Phor; Ismail, Noor Hasnani; Bibiana Hui Ying, Yong; Wei Seng, Yeo; Yahya, Nurul Asyikin

    2012-04-01

    Tooth erosion is a growing dental problem; however, the role of diet in the aetiology of tooth erosion is unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the association between tooth erosion occurrence and the consumption of acidic foods and drinks among undergraduate university students. A total of 150 undergraduate students (33 males and 117 females) aged 19 to 24 years at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia participated in this study. The Basic Erosive Wear Examination was used to assess the occurrence of tooth erosion. Information regarding dental hygiene practices, usual dietary habits, and consumption of acidic foods and drinks was obtained through a structured questionnaire. In all, 68% of subjects had tooth erosion. Subjects who reported having received information about healthy eating were less likely to have tooth erosion (χ(2) [1, N = 150] = 7.328, P = 0.007). The frequencies of milk (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.13-0.67) and tea/coffee (adjusted OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.19-0.95) consumption were negatively associated with tooth erosion. Dental hygiene practice, the frequency and amount of acidic food and drink intake, and body mass index classification were not significantly associated with the risk of tooth erosion (P > 0.05). A high prevalence of tooth erosion was observed among this group of students. Preventive measures, such as dietary advice and increased consumption of milk at a younger age, may reduce the occurrence of tooth erosion among this age group.

  7. Coastal erosion and accretion in Pak Phanang, Thailand by GIS analysis of maps and satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayedur Rahman Chowdhury

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal erosion and accretion in Pak Phanang of southern Thailand between 1973 and 2003 was measured using multi-temporal topographic maps and Landsat satellite imageries. Within a GIS environment landward and seaward movements of shoreline was estimated by a transect-based analysis, and amounts of land accretion and erosion were estimated by a parcel-based geoprocessing. The whole longitudinal extent of the 58 kilometer coast was classified based on the erosion and accretion trends during this period using agglomerative hierarchical clustering approach. Erosion and accretion were found variable over time and space, and periodic reversal of status was also noticed in many places. Estimates of erosion were evaluated against field-survey based data, and found reasonably accurate where the rates were relatively great. Smoothing of shoreline datasets was found desirable as its impacts on the estimates remained within tolerable limits.

  8. Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall erosivity factor for Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Meusburger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall erosivity, considering rainfall amount and intensity, is an important parameter for soil erosion risk assessment under future land use and climate change. Despite its importance, rainfall erosivity is usually implemented in models with a low spatial and temporal resolution. The purpose of this study is to assess the temporal- and spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity in form of the (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation R-factor for Switzerland. Time series of 22 yr for rainfall (10 min resolution and temperature (1 h resolution data were analysed for 71 automatic gauging stations distributed throughout Switzerland. Regression-kriging was used to interpolate the rainfall erosivity values of single stations and to generate a map for Switzerland. Latitude, longitude, average annual precipitation, biogeographic units (Jura, Midland, etc., aspect and elevation were used as covariates, of which average annual precipitation, elevation and the biographic unit (Western Central Alps were significant (p<0.01 predictors. The mean value of long-term rainfall erosivity is 1330 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 with a range of lowest values of 124 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 at an elevated station in Grisons to highest values of 5611 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 in Ticino. All stations have highest erosivity values from July to August and lowest values in the winter months. Swiss-wide the month May to October show significantly increasing trends of rainfall erosivity for the observed period (p<0.005. Only in February a significantly decreasing trend of rainfall erosivity is found (p<0.01. The increasing trends of rainfall erosivity in May, September and October when vegetation cover is scarce are likely to enhance soil erosion risk for certain agricultural crops and alpine grasslands in Switzerland.

  9. Quantifying soil erosion with GIS-based RUSLE under different forest management options in Jianchang Forest Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Hengming; WANG; Qingli; DAI; Limin; Guofan; Shao; TANG; Lina; WANG; Shunzhong; GU; Huiyan

    2006-01-01

    Quantitatively estimating soil erosion with an integration of geographic information system (GIS) and the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) under four different exposed soil proportion scenarios caused by forest management practices was studied at Jianchang Forest Farm. The GIS provided means of input data generation required by RUSLE model and allowed a spatial assessment of the erosion hazard over the study area. Four exposed soil proportion scenarios of 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% were tested with the GIS-based RUSLE model to evaluate soil erosion hazard. The predicted soil erosion potentials were classified into five categories in order to provide valuable aids for management planning.

  10. Assessment of mercury erosion by surface water in Wanshan mercury mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, ZhiHui; Feng, Xinbin; Zhang, Chao; Shang, Lihai; Qiu, Guangle

    2013-08-01

    Soil erosion is a main cause of land degradation, and in its accelerated form is also one of the most serious ecological environmental problems. Moreover, there are few studies on migration of mercury (Hg) induced by soil erosion in seriously Hg-polluted districts. This paper selected Wanshan Hg mining area, SW China as the study area. Revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) and Geographic information system (GIS) methods were applied to calculate soil and Hg erosion and to classify soil erosion intensity. Our results show that the soil erosion rate can reach up to 600,884tkm(-2)yr(-1). Surfaces associated with very slight and extremely severe erosion include 76.6% of the entire land in Wanshan. Furthermore, the cumulative erosion rates in the area impacted by extremely severe erosion make up 90.5% of the total. On an annual basis, Hg surface erosion load was predicted to be 505kgyr(-1) and the corresponding mean migration flux of Hg was estimated to be 3.02kgkm(-2)yr(-1). The erosion loads of Hg resulting from farmland and meadow soil were 175 and 319kgyr(-1) respectively, which were enhanced compared to other landscape types due to the fact that they are generally located in the steep zones associated with significant reclamation. Contributing to establish a mass balance of Hg in Wanshan Hg mining area, this study supplies a dependable scientific basis for controlling soil and water erosion in the local ecosystems. Land use change is the most effective way for reducing Hg erosion load in Wanshan mining area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Multidirectional Wind Erosion Model for Western Saxony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simon; Meusburger, Katrin; de Figueiredo, Tomás; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion can trigger a non-visible loss of fine soil up to 40 t ha-1 per single event and is as such a major soil threat and environmental concern in areas susceptible to wind erosion. Western Saxony was assessed to be among the most susceptible landscapes not only within Germany but even within Europe (Borelli et al., 2015; Borelli et al., 2014). Moreover, wind erosion events in eastern Germany cause very severe off-site effects with impacts on road traffic. So far the wind erosion model that is normally applied in Germany is based on the norm DIN standard 19706. The DIN standard 19706 was revised by new controlling factors and fuzzy logic to consider the multi-directionality of wind and make it more realistic to wind erosion processes. The new factors are based on different datasets like (i) wind and temperature data (1hr resolution) for 9 gauging stations and interpolated long-term wind speed (1981-2000, 200m resolution) provided by the German Weather Service, (ii) soil erodibility extracted from the digital soil map 1:50,000, (iii) landscape components from different data sources (ATKIS, OpenStreetMap and others), and (iv) a DEM (20m resolution) for local orographic modeling. For a risky sub-region, local wind speeds and directions were modelled based on the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Programs (WAsP) orography-model to assess road bodies for priority actions. Major improvements of the proposed model are the consideration of changing wind directions and the implementation of factors on soil cover and field length. An estimation of the long-term spatiotemporal variability under changing climate is possible with the model conception. The revised model assesses 3.6% of western Saxonies agricultural fields under very high risk to wind erosion. Larger fields (greater than 116 ha) are connected to a higher frequency (51.7%) of very high risk. Only a small proportion (5.2%) of the high risk class was found in small fields (smaller than 21 ha). Fields under

  12. Soil Erosion Estimation Using Remote Sensing Techniques in Wadi Yalamlam Basin, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarbou A. Bahrawi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is one of the major environmental problems in terms of soil degradation in Saudi Arabia. Soil erosion leads to significant on- and off-site impacts such as significant decrease in the productive capacity of the land and sedimentation. The key aspects influencing the quantity of soil erosion mainly rely on the vegetation cover, topography, soil type, and climate. This research studies the quantification of soil erosion under different levels of data availability in Wadi Yalamlam. Remote Sensing (RS and Geographic Information Systems (GIS techniques have been implemented for the assessment of the data, applying the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE for the calculation of the risk of erosion. Thirty-four soil samples were randomly selected for the calculation of the erodibility factor, based on calculating the K-factor values derived from soil property surfaces after interpolating soil sampling points. Soil erosion risk map was reclassified into five erosion risk classes and 19.3% of the Wadi Yalamlam is under very severe risk (37,740 ha. GIS and RS proved to be powerful instruments for mapping soil erosion risk, providing sufficient tools for the analytical part of this research. The mapping results certified the role of RUSLE as a decision support tool.

  13. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  14. Classifying anatomical subtypes of subjective memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Na-Yeon; Seo, Sang Won; Yoo, Heejin; Yang, Jin-Ju; Park, Seongbeom; Kim, Yeo Jin; Lee, Juyoun; Lee, Jin San; Jang, Young Kyoung; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Seonwoo; Kim, Eun-Joo; Na, Duk L; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to categorize subjective memory impairment (SMI) individuals based on their patterns of cortical thickness and to propose simple models that can classify each subtype. We recruited 613 SMI individuals and 613 age- and gender-matched normal controls. Using hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis, SMI individuals were divided into 3 subtypes: temporal atrophy (12.9%), minimal atrophy (52.4%), and diffuse atrophy (34.6%). Individuals in the temporal atrophy (Alzheimer's disease-like atrophy) subtype were older, had more vascular risk factors, and scored the lowest on neuropsychological tests. Combination of these factors classified the temporal atrophy subtype with 73.2% accuracy. On the other hand, individuals with the minimal atrophy (non-neurodegenerative) subtype were younger, were more likely to be female, and had depression. Combination of these factors discriminated the minimal atrophy subtype with 76.0% accuracy. We suggest that SMI can be largely categorized into 3 anatomical subtypes that have distinct clinical features. Our models may help physicians decide next steps when encountering SMI patients and may also be used in clinical trials.

  15. Fractal Tectonics and Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    Tectonic processes build landforms that are subsequently destroyed by erosional processes. Landforms exhibit fractal statistics in a variety of ways; examples include (1) lengths of coast lines; (2) number-size statistics of lakes and islands; (3) spectral behavior of topography and bathymetry both globally and locally; and (4) branching statistics of drainage networks. Erosional processes are dominant in the development of many landforms on this planet, but similar fractal statistics are also applicable to the surface of Venus where minimal erosion has occurred. A number of dynamical systems models for landforms have been proposed, including (1) cellular automata; (2) diffusion limited aggregation; (3) self-avoiding percolation; and (4) advective-diffusion equations. The fractal statistics and validity of these models will be discussed. Earthquakes also exhibit fractal statistics. The frequency-magnitude statistics of earthquakes satisfy the fractal Gutenberg-Richter relation both globally and locally. Earthquakes are believed to be a classic example of self-organized criticality. One model for earthquakes utilizes interacting slider-blocks. These slider block models have been shown to behave chaotically and to exhibit self-organized criticality. The applicability of these models will be discussed and alternative approaches will be presented. Fragmentation has been demonstrated to produce fractal statistics in many cases. Comminution is one model for fragmentation that yields fractal statistics. It has been proposed that comminution is also responsible for much of the deformation in the earth's crust. The brittle disruption of the crust and the resulting earthquakes present an integrated problem with many fractal aspects.

  16. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  17. On the geoethical implications of wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károly, Tatárvári

    2016-04-01

    Human activities exerts an ever growing impact on our environment, and this is undeniably the responsibility of mankind. In spite of this fact there is almost no process in our environment that can be described exactly with complete exactness, and the working of which is known in full extent. Wind erosion is such a process. Although water erosion is mentioned ever more often in scientific circles as a from of erosion, its effect is restrained to a certain region, although it may cause perceptibly damage of a greater extent in short time. Wind erosion, apart from the fact that it may have global impact, may play an important role in the warming of our climate according to recent studies. First of all, wind erosion may cause damage far from its origin in human health, nutrition, or in the environment in general. Today several surveys have proved, that erosion caused by wind significantly contributes to the air pollution of cities, the fine dust carried as drift by the wind may cause severe environmental damage in accumulation zones. Microbes, toxic material may attach themselves to the dust carried this way and carried on and by the wings of the wind they may cause health issues in humans animals and plants as well. In spite of these facts there are almost no measures against wind erosion employed in arable land, although our ever doughtier climate and changes would make these necessary. Reduction of organic matter content presents a great problem in a large part of cultivated land, so the risk of the production of high quality food raises questions of more and more ethical nature. Who is responsible? The fact, that the chemicals used in a growing extent by agriculture may reach many people causing considerable damage to the environment also raises serious ethical questions. More and more periods with extreme weather conditions are experienced in Hungary and Europe as the effect of climate change. Drought periods are longer and more frequent as the intensity of

  18. Soil Erosion as a stochastic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Markus C.

    2015-04-01

    The main tools to provide estimations concerning risk and amount of erosion are different types of soil erosion models: on the one hand, there are empirically based model concepts on the other hand there are more physically based or process based models. However, both types of models have substantial weak points. All empirical model concepts are only capable of providing rough estimates over larger temporal and spatial scales, they do not account for many driving factors that are in the scope of scenario related analysis. In addition, the physically based models contain important empirical parts and hence, the demand for universality and transferability is not given. As a common feature, we find, that all models rely on parameters and input variables, which are to certain, extend spatially and temporally averaged. A central question is whether the apparent heterogeneity of soil properties or the random nature of driving forces needs to be better considered in our modelling concepts. Traditionally, researchers have attempted to remove spatial and temporal variability through homogenization. However, homogenization has been achieved through physical manipulation of the system, or by statistical averaging procedures. The price for obtaining this homogenized (average) model concepts of soils and soil related processes has often been a failure to recognize the profound importance of heterogeneity in many of the properties and processes that we study. Especially soil infiltrability and the resistance (also called "critical shear stress" or "critical stream power") are the most important empirical factors of physically based erosion models. The erosion resistance is theoretically a substrate specific parameter, but in reality, the threshold where soil erosion begins is determined experimentally. The soil infiltrability is often calculated with empirical relationships (e.g. based on grain size distribution). Consequently, to better fit reality, this value needs to be

  19. ERMiT: Estimating Post-Fire Erosion in Probabilistic Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, F. B.; Robichaud, P. R.; Elliot, W. J.; Hall, D. E.; Moffet, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    Mitigating the impact of post-wildfire runoff and erosion on life, property, and natural resources have cost the United States government tens of millions of dollars over the past decade. The decision of where, when, and how to apply the most effective mitigation treatments requires land managers to assess the risk of damaging runoff and erosion events occurring after a fire. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) is a web-based application that estimates erosion in probabilistic terms on burned and recovering forest, range, and chaparral lands. Unlike most erosion prediction models, ERMiT does not provide `average annual erosion rates;' rather, it provides a distribution of erosion rates with the likelihood of their occurrence. ERMiT combines rain event variability with spatial and temporal variabilities of hillslope burn severity, soil properties, and ground cover to estimate Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model input parameter values. Based on 20 to 40 individual WEPP runs, ERMiT produces a distribution of rain event erosion rates with a probability of occurrence for each of five post-fire years. Over the 5 years of modeled recovery, the occurrence probability of the less erodible soil parameters is increased and the occurrence probability of the more erodible soil parameters is decreased. In addition, the occurrence probabilities and the four spatial arrangements of burn severity (arrangements of overland flow elements (OFE's)), are shifted toward lower burn severity with each year of recovery. These yearly adjustments are based on field measurements made through post-fire recovery periods. ERMiT also provides rain event erosion rate distributions for hillslopes that have been treated with seeding, straw mulch, straw wattles and contour-felled log erosion barriers. Such output can help managers make erosion mitigation treatment decisions based on the probability of high sediment yields occurring, the value of resources at risk for damage, cost, and

  20. Tooth erosion and eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Hermont

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eating disorders are associated with the highest rates of morbidity and mortality of any mental disorders among adolescents. The failure to recognize their early signs can compromise a patient's recovery and long-term prognosis. Tooth erosion has been reported as an oral manifestation that might help in the early detection of eating disorders. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to search for scientific evidence regarding the following clinical question: Do eating disorders increase the risk of tooth erosion? METHODS: An electronic search addressing eating disorders and tooth erosion was conducted in eight databases. Two independent reviewers selected studies, abstracted information and assessed its quality. Data were abstracted for meta-analysis comparing tooth erosion in control patients (without eating disorders vs. patients with eating disorders; and patients with eating disorder risk behavior vs. patients without such risk behavior. Combined odds ratios (ORs and a 95% confidence interval (CI were obtained. RESULTS: Twenty-three papers were included in the qualitative synthesis and assessed by a modified version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Fourteen papers were included in the meta-analysis. Patients with eating disorders had more risk of tooth erosion (OR = 12.4, 95%CI = 4.1-37.5. Patients with eating disorders who self-induced vomiting had more risk of tooth erosion than those patients who did not self-induce vomiting (OR = 19.6, 95%CI = 5.6-68.8. Patients with risk behavior of eating disorder had more risk of tooth erosion than patients without such risk behavior (Summary OR = 11.6, 95%CI = 3.2-41.7. CONCLUSION: The scientific evidence suggests a causal relationship between tooth erosion and eating disorders and purging practices. Nevertheless, there is a lack of scientific evidence to fulfill the basic criteria of causation between the risk behavior for eating disorders and tooth erosion.

  1. Integrating geomorphic and habitat assessments to classify streams using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fytilis, N.; Mathon, B. R.; Rizzo, D. M.; Stevens, L.; Morrissey, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Environmental managers are increasingly required to forecast long-term effects and/or the resilience and vulnerability of biophysical systems to human-generated stresses. We research and develop a classification tool to be used by decision-makers to identify how channel, floodplain and watershed scale stressors affect hydrological processes and in doing so, alter the physical structure and habitat values of streams. In the development of this work, we are using the rapid geomorphic assessment protocols (RGA), as well as, the rapid habitat assessment protocols (RHA) from over 800 Vermont stream reaches assessed by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (VTANR). We extend previous work focused on RGA to include RHA because natural communities are directly and/or indirectly affected by land use history, stream geomorphology and disturbance regime history. Our approach integrates spatial statistics with artificial neural networks (ANNs) visualized in GIS to examine the effect of land use and geomorphology on biodiversity. A specific data-driven ANN, known as a counterpropagation neural network originally developed by Hecht-Nielsen [1987] will be used to: (1) provide a standardized, expert-trained approach for classifying the sensitivity of river networks in various contexts (erosion hazard mitigation, habitat restoration and conservation) and (2) document the weights experts place on various parameters when classifying stream geomorphic condition, inherent vulnerability, and overall sensitivity at the reach-scale. The procedure is data-driven, and therefore does not require the development of site-specific, process-based stream models, or sets of if-then-else rules associated with expert systems. The ANN architecture is sufficiently flexible to allow for its continual update and refinement in light of new and expanded understandings of fluvial geomorphology. This has potential to save time and resources, while enabling a truly adaptive management approach using expert

  2. Soil erosion and land degradation in the Highlands of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khresat, Saeb

    2013-04-01

    The Highlands of Jordan has a Mediterranean type of climate characterized by hot dry summers and cold wet winters. Unsustainable land use practices, recurrent droughts and climate change are the main causes of land degradation in the Highlands area of Jordan. Unsustainable land use practices include improper plowing, inappropriate rotations, inadequate or inexistent management of plant residues, overgrazing of natural vegetation, forest cutting, land fragmentation and over-pumping of groundwater. In addition, Jordan's rapid population growth (2.8% per year) is exerting considerable pressure upon its limited arable land through uncontrolled and random urbanization activities. Water erosion is the most widespread Land degradation type in the country. It greatly increases on slopes where the vegetation cover is (seasonally) reduced. It is further aggravated by a loss of soil structure and reduced infiltration rates. Wind erosion occurs most frequently in the arid and semi-arid portions of the southern Highlands, especially in areas with sandy or loamy soils. Rangeland degradation is the second most widespread land degradation type that is driven by overgrazing. The impact of overgrazing on the vegetation is evident from the excessive uprooting of the green matter (grass and bushes), leading to reduced seeding, reduced regeneration, and the consequent loss of plant cover which make the soil more susceptible to water and wind erosion. It is estimated that about 41 percent of Jordan's total land area is characterized as degraded of which 22 percent of the total land mass is classified as moderately degraded and agricultural productivity is greatly reduced. Observed aspects of land degradation include the recession of forest areas, high rate of erosion by water (formation of rills and gullies), expansion of urbanized area, reduction in soil organic matter and soil structure deterioration. Implementation of soil erosion control measures such as contour cultivation

  3. Soil conservation policy measures to control wind erosion in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Brouwer, F.M.; Graaff, de J.

    2003-01-01

    Wind erosion is not as significant or a widespread problem in Europe as in dryer parts of the world, but it can cause major damage in small areas. The hazard is greatest in the lowlands of northwestern Europe with more than 3 million ha at high-potential wind erosion risk. Crop damage and off-site d

  4. Tolerable soil erosion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, Frank; Jones, Bob; Rickson, Jane; Smith, Celina

    2010-05-01

    Soil loss by erosion has been identified as an important threat to soils in Europe* and is recognised as a contributing process to soil degradation and associated deterioration, or loss, of soil functioning. From a policy perspective, it is imperative to establish well-defined baseline values to evaluate soil erosion monitoring data against. For this purpose, accurate baseline values - i.e. tolerable soil loss - need to be differentiated at appropriate scales for monitoring and, ideally, should take soil functions and even changing environmental conditions into account. The concept of tolerable soil erosion has been interpreted in the scientific literature in two ways: i) maintaining the dynamic equilibrium of soil quantity, and ii) maintaining biomass production, at a location. The first interpretation ignores soil quality by focusing only on soil quantity. The second approach ignores many soil functions by focusing only on the biomass (particularly crop) production function of soil. Considering recognised soil functions, tolerable soil erosion may be defined as 'any mean annual cumulative (all erosion types combined) soil erosion rate at which a deterioration or loss of one or more soil functions does not occur'. Assumptions and problems of this definition will be discussed. Soil functions can generally be judged not to deteriorate as long as soil erosion does not exceed soil formation. At present, this assumption remains largely untested, but applying the precautionary principle appears to be a reasonable starting point. Considering soil formation rates by both weathering and dust deposition, it is estimated that for the majority of soil forming factors in most European situations, soil formation rates probably range from ca. 0.3 - 1.4 t ha-1 yr-1. Although the current agreement on these values seems relatively strong, how the variation within the range is spatially distributed across Europe and how this may be affected by climate, land use and land management

  5. Hybrid k -Nearest Neighbor Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Chen, Hantao; Liuxs, Jiming; You, Jane; Leung, Hareton; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Conventional k -nearest neighbor (KNN) classification approaches have several limitations when dealing with some problems caused by the special datasets, such as the sparse problem, the imbalance problem, and the noise problem. In this paper, we first perform a brief survey on the recent progress of the KNN classification approaches. Then, the hybrid KNN (HBKNN) classification approach, which takes into account the local and global information of the query sample, is designed to address the problems raised from the special datasets. In the following, the random subspace ensemble framework based on HBKNN (RS-HBKNN) classifier is proposed to perform classification on the datasets with noisy attributes in the high-dimensional space. Finally, the nonparametric tests are proposed to be adopted to compare the proposed method with other classification approaches over multiple datasets. The experiments on the real-world datasets from the Knowledge Extraction based on Evolutionary Learning dataset repository demonstrate that RS-HBKNN works well on real datasets, and outperforms most of the state-of-the-art classification approaches.

  6. Identificación de suelos susceptibles a riesgos de erosión y con mayor capacidad de almacenamiento de agua Identification of soils susceptible to risk erosion and with hight capacity of water storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velásquez Valencia Henry

    Full Text Available La investigación se basó en el desarrollo de siete etapas metodológicas con criterios de integralidad, análisis holístico, secuencia lógica, participación y sencillez, destacándose los siguientes aspectos: Conceptualización y contextualización, muestreo de suelos, procesamiento de la información, espacialización de la información, identificación de zonas susceptibles a riesgos de erosión y con mayor capacidad de almacenamiento de agua, recomendaciones de manejo y socialización de la investigación. La propuesta metodológica se validó y ajustó mediante un caso de estudio en la vereda Chicoral, subcuenca del río Bitaco, municipio de La Cumbre, Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Mediante procesos de participación y concertación con los actores socioeconómicos del área de estudio se lograron diagnosticar las causas y consecuencias que intervienen en procesos de degradación física del suelo y a la vez se localizaron los sitios con mayor potencialidad de almacenamiento de agua, factores importantes para la planificación y uso racional de los recursos naturales en una cuenca hidrográfica.The investigation was carried out in seven methodological steps under integral approaches, holistic analysis, logical sequence, participation and simplicity. The following aspects were highlighted: Conceptualization and contextualizacion, soil sampling , data processing, data spacializatión of the information, identification of susceptible areas to risk erosion with higher capacity of water storage, management norms and socialization of the investigation. The methodological proposal was validated and adjusted by a case of study in the rural areas of Chicoral, watershed of the Bitaco river, Municipality of La Cumbre, Cauca Valley, Colombia. Using participation processes and agreement with the communities of the study area, the diagnostic of the causes and consequences that intervene in processes of physical soil degradation were reached. At the same

  7. Identification of soils susceptible to risk erosion and with hight capacity of water storage Identificación de suelos susceptibles a riesgos de erosión y con mayor capacidad de almacenamiento de agua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escobar Chalarca Carlos Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out in seven methodological steps under integral approaches, holistic analysis, logical sequence, participation and simplicity. The following aspects were highlighted: Conceptualization and contextualizacion, soil sampling , data processing, data spacializatión of the information, identification of susceptible areas to risk erosion with higher capacity of water storage, management norms and socialization of the investigation. The methodological proposal was validated and adjusted by a case of study in the rural areas of Chicoral, watershed of the Bitaco river, Municipality of La Cumbre, Cauca Valley , Colombia. Using participation processes and agreement with the communities of the study area, the diagnostic of the causes and consequences that intervene in processes of physical soil degradation were reached. At the same time, the places with higher potentiality of water storage were localized. All of these factors are important for planning and rational use of the natural resources in a watershed.La investigación se basó en el desarrollo de siete etapas metodológicas con criterios de integralidad, análisis holístico, secuencia lógica, participación y sencillez, destacándose los siguientes aspectos: Conceptualización y contextualización, muestreo de suelos, procesamiento de la información, espacialización de la información, identificación de zonas susceptibles a riesgos de erosión y con mayor capacidad de almacenamiento de agua, recomendaciones de manejo y socialización de la investigación. La propuesta metodológica se validó y ajustó mediante un caso de estudio en la vereda Chicoral, subcuenca del río Bitaco, municipio de La Cumbre, Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Mediante procesos de participación y concertación con los actores socioeconómicos del área de estudio se lograron diagnosticar las causas

  8. Effect of endurance training on dental erosion, caries, and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, C; Frese, F; Kuhlmann, S; Saure, D; Reljic, D; Staehle, H J; Wolff, D

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to give insights into the impact of endurance training on oral health, with regard to tooth erosion, caries, and salivary parameters. The study included 35 triathletes and 35 non-exercising controls. The clinical investigation comprised oral examination, assessment of oral status with special regard to caries and erosion, saliva testing during inactivity, and a self-administered questionnaire about eating, drinking, and oral hygiene behavior. In addition, athletes were asked about their training habits and intake of beverages and sports nutrition. For saliva assessment during exercise, a subsample of n = 15 athletes volunteered in an incremental running field test (IRFT). Athletes showed an increased risk for dental erosion (P = 0.001). No differences were observed with regard to caries prevalence and salivary parameters measured during inactivity between athletes and controls. Among athletes, a significant correlation was found between caries prevalence and the cumulative weekly training time (r = 0.347, P = 0.04). In athletes after IRFT and at maximum workload, saliva flow rates decreased (P = 0.001 stimulated; P = 0.01 unstimulated) and saliva pH increased significantly (P = 0.003). Higher risk for dental erosions, exercise-dependent caries risk, and load-dependent changes in saliva parameters point out the need for risk-adapted preventive dental concepts in the field of sports dentistry.

  9. 75 FR 707 - Classified National Security Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... National Security Information Memorandum of December 29, 2009--Implementation of the Executive Order ``Classified National Security Information'' Order of December 29, 2009--Original Classification Authority #0... 13526 of December 29, 2009 Classified National Security Information This order prescribes a...

  10. Classifier Assignment by Corpus-based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sornlertlamvanich, V; Meknavin, S; Sornlertlamvanich, Virach; Pantachat, Wantanee; Meknavin, Surapant

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for selecting an appropriate classifier word for a noun. In Thai language, it frequently happens that there is fluctuation in the choice of classifier for a given concrete noun, both from the point of view of the whole spe ech community and individual speakers. Basically, there is no exect rule for classifier selection. As far as we can do in the rule-based approach is to give a default rule to pick up a corresponding classifier of each noun. Registration of classifier for each noun is limited to the type of unit classifier because other types are open due to the meaning of representation. We propose a corpus-based method (Biber, 1993; Nagao, 1993; Smadja, 1993) which generates Noun Classifier Associations (NCA) to overcome the problems in classifier assignment and semantic construction of noun phrase. The NCA is created statistically from a large corpus and recomposed under concept hierarchy constraints and frequency of occurrences.

  11. Aggregation Operator Based Fuzzy Pattern Classifier Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mönks, Uwe; Larsen, Henrik Legind

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel modular fuzzy pattern classifier design framework for intelligent automation systems, developed on the base of the established Modified Fuzzy Pattern Classifier (MFPC) and allows designing novel classifier models which are hardware-efficiently implementable. The perfor....... The performances of novel classifiers using substitutes of MFPC's geometric mean aggregator are benchmarked in the scope of an image processing application against the MFPC to reveal classification improvement potentials for obtaining higher classification rates....

  12. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  13. Behavior of farmers in regard to erosion by water as reflected by their farming practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerswald, Karl; Fischer, Franziska K; Kistler, Michael; Treisch, Melanie; Maier, Harald; Brandhuber, Robert

    2017-09-08

    The interplay between natural site conditions and farming raises erosion by water above geological background levels. We examined the hypothesis that farmers take erosion into account in their farming decisions and switch to farming practices with lower erosion risk the higher the site-specific hazard becomes. Erosion since the last tillage was observed from aerial orthorectified photographs for 8100 fields belonging to 1879 farmers distributed across Bavaria (South Germany) and it was modeled by the Universal Soil Loss Equation using highly detailed input data (e.g., digital terrain model with 5×5m(2) resolution, rain data with 1×1km(2) and 5min resolution, crop and cropping method from annual field-specific data from incentive schemes). Observed and predicted soil loss correlated closely, demonstrating the accuracy of this method. The close correlation also indicted that the farmers could easily observe the degree of recent erosion on their fields, even without modelling. Farmers clearly did not consider erosion in their decisions. When natural risk increased, e.g. due to steeper slopes, they neither grew crops with lower erosion potential, nor reduced field size, nor used contouring. In addition, they did not compensate for the cultivation of crops with higher erosion potential by using conservation techniques like mulch tillage or contouring, or by reducing field size. Only subsidized measures, like mulch tillage or organic farming, were applied but only at the absolute minimum that was necessary to obtain subsidies. However, this did not achieve the reduction in erosion that would be possible if these measures had been fully applied. We conclude that subsidies may be an appropriate method of reducing erosion but the present weak supervision, which assumes that farmers themselves will take erosion into account and that subsidies are only needed to compensate for any disadvantages caused by erosion-reducing measures, is clearly not justified. Copyright © 2017

  14. Prevalence of dental erosion among people with gastroesophageal reflux disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Liu, Jingming; Chen, Su; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Zhenting

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is typically diagnosed based on symptoms of regurgitation and heartburn, although it may also manifest as asthma-like symptoms, laryngitis, or dental erosion. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of dental erosion in people with GERD and to evaluate the association between GERD and dental erosion. The presence, severity, and pattern of dental erosion was assessed in 51 participants with GERD and 50 participants without GERD using the Smith and Knight tooth wear index. Medical, dietary, and dental histories were collected by questionnaire. Factors potentially related to dental erosion, including GERD, were evaluated by logistic regression. Dental erosion was observed in 31 (60.8%) participants with GERD and 14 (28%) participants without GERD. Bivariate analysis revealed that participants with GERD were more likely to experience dental erosion (crude odds ratio [cOR]: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.19, 6.32) than participants without GERD. Multivariate analysis also revealed that participants with GERD had a higher risk of dental erosion (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97; 95% CI: 1.45, 10.89). Consumption of grains and legumes, the most frequently consumed foods in China, did not correlate with dental erosion. However, carbonated beverage consumption was significantly associated with GERD and dental erosion (aOR: 3.34; 95% CI: 1.01, 11.04; P=.04). GERD was positively correlated with dental erosion. Carbonated beverage consumption can increase the risk of both GERD and dental erosion. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of Soil Erosion Rates in Japan where Heavily Forested Landscape with Unstable Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanko, K.; Oguro, M.; Miura, S.; Masaki, T.

    2016-12-01

    Soil is fundamental for plant growth, water conservation, and sustainable forest management. Multidisciplinary interest in the role of the soil in areas such as biodiversity, ecosystem services, land degradation, and water security has been growing (Miura et al., 2015). Forest is usually protective land use from soil erosion because vegetation buffers rainfall power and erosivity. However, some types of forest in Japan show high susceptibility to soil erosion due to little ground cover and steep slopes exceeding thirty degree, especially young Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) plantations (Miura et al., 2002). This is a critical issue for sustainable forest management because C. obtusaplantations account for 10% of the total forest coverage in Japan (Forestry Agency, 2009). Prediction of soil erosion rates on nationwide scale is necessary to make decision for future forest management plan. To predict and map soil erosion rates across Japan, we applied three soil erosion models, RUSLE (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, Wischmeier and Smith, 1978), PESERA (Pan-European Soil Erosion Risk Assessment, Kirkby et al., 2003), and RMMF (Revised Morgan-Morgan-Finney, Morgan, 2001). The grid scale is 1-km. RUSLE and PESERA are most widely used erosion models today. RMMF includes interactions between rainfall and vegetation, such as canopy interception and ratio of canopy drainage in throughfall. Evaporated rainwater by canopy interception, generally accounts for 15-20% in annual rainfall, does not contribute soil erosion. Whereas, larger raindrops generated by canopy drainage produced higher splash erosion rates than gross rainfall (Nanko et al., 2008). Therefore, rainfall redistribution process in canopy should be considered to predict soil erosion rates in forested landscape. We compared the results from three erosion models and analyze the importance of environmental factors for the prediction of soil erosion rates. This research was supported by the Environment

  16. 15 CFR 4.8 - Classified Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classified Information. 4.8 Section 4... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 4.8 Classified Information. In processing a request for information..., the information shall be reviewed to determine whether it should remain classified. Ordinarily...

  17. Exploring the relationship between gully erosion and rainfall erosivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Miguel; Casalí, Javier; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall erosivity plays and important role in gully erosion. However, there are few studies that explore this relationship. The main purpose of this work is to analyse the link between observed gully erosion rates and rainfall erosivity. However, in order to get a suitable and comparable set of daily rainfall erosivity data, we firstly evaluate the performance of several daily rainfall erosivity models to estimate the daily accumulated RUSLE EI30 index. One 300 ha watershed (El Cantalar) located in Navarre (Spain) was selected to carry out field studies. A meteorological station located 10 km appart from the experimental site provided daily precipitation records since 1930 to 2009 and also 10min records since 1991 to 2009. In this watershed a total of 35 gully headcuts developed in cohesive soil were monitored. Aerial photographic stereo-pairs covering the study area were used for the survey. These were taken in five different years and at different spatial scales each time: 1956 (1: 34,000), 1967 (1:17,500), 1982 (1:13,500), 2003 (1:20,000) and 2006 (1:2000). Manual restitution of photographs was carried out. 1m resolution DEMs were obtained by triangular interpolation (Triangular Irregular Network) and then used to characterize gully headcuts. Moreover, from the aerial photos and the DEMs, ortho-photographs with a final resolution of 0.40 m were created. The geocoding of the scenes had a Root Mean Square error of less than 0.5 m both in planimetry and altimetry. Furthermore, using the DEMs and the ortho-photographs, volumetric headcut retreat rates for each period were calculated as the product of the lineal retreat and a representative section of the headcut. Daily accumulated RUSLE EI30 index was calculated in a conventional way from records of precipitation every 10 minutes for the period 1991-2009; these results were used as reference data. In addition, for the same period, this index was estimated with daily precipitation records through several models

  18. Gene-expression Classifier in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Londero, Stefano Christian; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Krogdahl, Annelise;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No reliable biomarker for metastatic potential in the risk stratification of papillary thyroid carcinoma exists. We aimed to develop a gene-expression classifier for metastatic potential. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genome-wide expression analyses were used. Development cohort: freshly...

  19. DISPERSION OF GLYPHOSATE IN SOILS UNDERGOING EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorana Todorovic Rampazzo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Different physical, chemical and biological processes influence the behaviour of organic contaminants in soils. A better understanding of the organic pollutant behaviour in soils would improve the environmental protection. One possible way for better attenuation of the risk of pollution in agriculture can be achieved through ta better-specified pesticide management based on the adaptation of the pesticide type and application rates to the specific environmental characteristics of the area of application. Nowadays, one of the actually most applied herbicide world wide is glyphosate. Glyphosate is highly water soluble and traces have been found in surface and groundwater systems. For a better understanding of the natural influence of erosion processes on glyphosate behaviour and dispersion under heavy rain conditions after application in the field, two erosion simulation experiments were conducted on two different locations in Austria with completely different soil types in September 2008. The results of the experiments showed that under normal practical conditions (e.g. no rainfall is expected immediatly after application, the potential adsorption capacity of the Kirchberg soil (Stagnic Cambisol, with about 16.000 ppm Fe-oxides is confirmed compared to the low adsorption Chernosem soil (about 8.000 ppm pedogenic Fe-oxides.  Considering the enormous difference in the run-off amounts between the two sites Pixendorf and Kirchberg soils it can be concluded how important the soil structural conditions and vegetation type and cover are for the risks of erosion and, as a consequence, pollution of neighbouring waters. In the rainfall experiments under comparable simulation conditions, the amount of run-off was about 10 times higher at Kirchberg, owing to its better infiltration rate, than at the Pixendorf site. Moreover, the total loss of glyphosate (NT+CT through run-off at the Kirchberg site was more than double that at Pixendorf, which confirms the

  20. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-12

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results.

  1. Soil erosion in Slovene Istria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Mikoš

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From the end of nineties of the 20th century, intense hydrologic and geomorphologic research is taking place in the Slovene Istria. As a part of this research also studies on soil erosion were undertaken in the period from 2005 to 2008. The field measurements were under taken onclosed 1m2 large erosion plots under three different land uses (on bare soils in an olive grove, on an overgrown meadow, in a forest, placed south of the Marezige village in the Rokava River basin.We show weekly measurements of surface erosion (interrill erosion for the period of 13 months (the end of March 2005 – the end of April 2006, as well as monthly and seasonal averages together with selected linear statistical correlations between soil erosion and weather parameters.From May 2005 to April 2006 the interrill erosion on bare soils in an olive grove with an inclination of 5.5° amounted to 9013 g/m2 (90 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 8.5 mm/yr; on an overgrown meadow with an inclination of 9.4° it amounted to 168 g/m2 (1,68 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.16 mm//yr; and in a forest with an inclination of 7.8° it amounted to 391 g/m2 (3,91 t/ha and in a forest with an inclination of 21.4° it amounted to 415 g/m2 (4,15 t/ha, respectively, that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.4 mm/yr.

  2. Carbon Erosion in the Great Karoo Region of South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenz, Juliane; Greenwood, Philip; Kuhn, Brigitte; Foster, Ian; Boardman, John; Meadows, Mike; Kuhn, Nikolaus

    2015-04-01

    Work undertaken in the seasonally arid upland areas of the Great Karoo region of South Africa has established a link between land degradation and overgrazing which began in the second half of the 18th century when European farmers first settled the area. Ongoing land use change and shifting rainfall patterns resulted in the development of badlands on foot slopes of upland areas, and gully systems on valley bottoms. As a consequence of agricultural intensification and overgrazing, accompanied by a higher water demand, many small reservoirs were constructed, most of which are now in-filled with sediment. The deposited material serves as an environmental archive by which land use change over the last 100 years can be analysed, but with a particular focus on erosion and deposition of soil-associated carbon (C). It is assumed that erosion caused an initial flush of carbon rich soil which was subsequently buried and stored off-site. Despite this assumption, however the net-effect of erosion on carbon dioxide emissions is still unknown. In this project, preliminary results are presented from an investigation to determine whether land degradation in the Karoo has resulted in a shift from a net sink of C to a net source of C. Firstly, a high resolution digital elevation model was generated and erosion modelling was then employed to create an erosion risk map showing areas most prone to erosion. Information from the model output then served as the basis for ground-truthing and on-site erosion mapping. Secondly, sediment deposits from silted reservoirs were analysed for varying physicochemical parameters, in order to reconstruct spatial patterns of erosion and deposition. Analysis of total carbon (TC) content revealed a sharp decrease with decreasing depth. This provisionally suggests that land degradation during and after post-European settlement probably led to accelerated erosion of the relatively fertile surface soils. This presumably resulted in the rapid in-filling of

  3. Data characteristics that determine classifier performance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Walt, Christiaan M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available classifiers. 10-fold cross-validation is used to evaluate and compare the performance of the classifiers on the different data sets. 3.1. Artificial data generation Multivariate Gaussian distributions are used to generate artificial data sets. We use d...NN) classifier [8], the multi- layer perceptron (MLP) and support vector machines (SVMs) [9]. The NB, DT, kNN, MLP and SVM classifiers are all implementations of the machine learning package Weka [10]. The Gaussian classifier is a Matlab implementation...

  4. Assessing spatial distribution of soil erosion in a karst region in southwestern China: A case study in Jinfo Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H. Y.; Pan, X. Y.; Zhou, W. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Soil erosion is serious with rocky desertification areas appearing in mountainous Karst regions in southwest China due to a conspicuous contradiction between man and the land resource. Land use and land cover play significant roles in regional soil erosion by water. This paper aimed to quantify regional soil erosion and to explore relationships between soil erosion and land use/land cover in order to locate high risk areas requiring soil conservation. Based on GIS, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was employed for erosion assessment for a typical Karst region, Jinfo Mountain region in southwest China, using local parameters. Spatial distribution of topsoil erosion was analyzed and relationships between soil erosion and land use/land cover changes (LULC) were statistically explored and discussed for regional erosion control. The overall values were under 25 t.ha.a, with the medium erosion areas accounting for 12.7% and the intense and very intense erosion areas totalled about 6%. The relations between soil erosion and LULC are complicated in this Karst mountainous region. Generally, the amount of ground cover, soil conservation measures, and cultivation disturbance have played critical roles in topsoil loss in the Jinfo mountain region. The reduced ground cover levels accompanying greater cultivation disturbance lead to higher erosion intensity in each landscape, and vice versa.

  5. Seasonal variation and climate change impact in Rainfall Erosivity across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Alewell, Christine; Ballabio, Cristiano

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall erosivity quantifies the climatic effect on water erosion and is of high importance for soil scientists, land use planners, agronomists, hydrologists and environmental scientists in general. The rainfall erosivity combines the influence of rainfall duration, magnitude, frequency and intensity. Rainfall erosivity is calculated from a series of single storm events by multiplying the total storm kinetic energy with the measured maximum 30-minute rainfall intensity. This estimation requests high temporal resolution (e.g. 30 minutes) rainfall data for sufficiently long time periods (i.e. 20 years). The European Commission's Joint Research Centr(JRC) in collaboration with national/regional meteorological services and Environmental Institutions made an extensive data collection of high resolution rainfall data in the 28 Member States of the European Union plus Switzerland to estimate rainfall erosivity in Europe. This resulted in the Rainfall Erosivity Database on the European Scale (REDES) which included 1,675 stations. The interpolation of those point erosivity values with a Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) model has resulted in the first Rainfall Erosivity map of Europe (Science of the Total Environment, 511: 801-815). In 2016, REDES extended with a monthly component, which allowed developing monthly and seasonal erosivity maps and assessing rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally for European Union and Switzerland. The monthly erosivity maps have been used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive events (Science of the Total Environment, 579: 1298-1315). Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be applied in different seasons of the year. Finally, the identification of the most erosive month allows recommending certain agricultural management practices (crop

  6. Rainfall erosivity in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, Andreas; Haas, Kathrin; Dvorackova, Anna; Fuller, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall and its kinetic energy expressed by the rainfall erosivity is the main driver of soil erosion processes by water. The Rainfall-Runoff Erosivity Factor (R) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation is one oft he most widely used parameters describing rainfall erosivity. This factor includes the cumulative effects of the many moderate-sized storms as well as the effects oft he occasional severe ones: R quantifies the effect of raindrop impact and reflects the amopunt and rate of runoff associated with the rain. New Zealand is geologically young and not comparable with any other country in the world. Inordinately high rainfall and strong prevailing winds are New Zealand's dominant climatic features. Annual rainfall up to 15000 mm, steep slopes, small catchments and earthquakes are the perfect basis for a high rate of natural and accelerated erosion. Due to the multifacted landscape of New Zealand its location as island between the Pacific and the Tasmanian Sea there is a high gradient in precipitation between North and South Island as well as between West and East Coast. The objective of this study was to determine the R-factor for the different climatic regions in New Zealand, in order to create a rainfall erosivity map. We used rainfall data (breakpoint data in 10-min intervals) from 34 gauging stations for the calcuation of the rainfall erosivity. 15 stations were located on the North Island and 19 stations on the South Island. From these stations, a total of 397 station years with 12710 rainstorms were analyzed. The kinetic energy for each rainfall event was calculated based on the equation by Brown and Foster (1987), using the breakpoint precipitation data for each storm. On average, a mean annual precipitation of 1357 mm was obtained from the 15 observed stations on the North Island. Rainfall distribution throughout the year is relatively even with 22-24% of annual rainfall occurring in spring , fall and winter and 31% in summer. On the South Island

  7. RECURRENT CORNEAL EROSION SYNDROME (a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Trufanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent corneal erosion (RCE syndrome is characterized by episodes of recurrent spontaneous epithelial defects. Main clinical symptoms (pain, redness, photophobia, lacrimation occurred at night. Corneal lesions revealed by slit lamp exam vary depending on the presence of corneal epithelium raise, epithelial microcysts or epithelial erosions, stromal infiltrates and opacities. Microtraumas, anterior corneal dystrophies, and herpesvirus give rise to RCE. Other causes or factors which increase the risk of RCE syndrome include meibomian gland dysfunction, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, diabetes, and post-LASIK conditions. Basal membrane abnormalities and instability of epithelial adhesion to stroma play a key role in RCE pathogenesis. Ultrastructural changes in RCE include abnormalities of basal epithelial cells and epithelial basal membrane, absence or deficiency of semi-desmosomes, loss of anchor fibrils. Increase in matrix metalloproteinases and collagenases which contribute to basal membrane destruction results in recurrent erosions and further development of abnormal basal membrane. The goals of RCE therapy are to reduce pain (in acute stage, to stimulate re-epithelization, and to restore «adhesion complex» of basal membrane. In most cases, RCE responds to simple conservative treatment that includes lubricants, healing agents, and eye patches. RCEs that are resistant to simple treatment, require complex approach. Non-invasive methods include long-term contact lens use, instillations of autologous serum (eye drops, injections of botulinum toxin (induces ptosis, antiviral agent use or oral intake of metalloproteinase inhibitors. Cell membrane stabilizers, i.e., antioxidants, should be included into treatment approaches as well. Antioxidant effect of Emoxipine promotes tissue reparation due to the prevention of cell membrane lipid peroxidation as well as due to its anti-hypoxic, angioprotective, and antiplatelet effects. If conservative therapy

  8. The influence of cover crops and tillage on actual and potential soil erosion in an olive grove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Blanca; Bienes, Ramón; García-Díaz, Andrés; Panagopoulos, Thomas; José Marqués, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The study was carried out in an olive grove in central Spain (South of Madrid; Tagus River Basin). In this semi-arid zone, the annual mean temperature is 13.8 ºC and the annual precipitation is 395 mm. Olive groves are planted in an erosion prone area due to steep slopes up to 15%. Soil is classified as Typic Haploxerept with clay loam texture. The land studied was formerly a vineyard, but it was replaced by the studied olive grove in 2004. It covers approximately 3 ha and olive trees are planted every 6 x 7 metres. They were usually managed by tillage to decrease weed competition. This conventional practice results in a wide surface of bare soil prone to erosion processes. In the long term soil degradation may lead to increase the desertification risk in the area. Storms have important consequences in this shallow and vulnerable soil, as more than 90 Mg ha-1 have been measured after one day with 40 mm of rainfall. In order to avoid this situation, cover crops between the olive trees were planted three years ago: sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and purple false brome (Brachypodium distachyon), and they were compared with annual spontaneous vegetation after a minimum tillage treatment (ASV). The results regarding erosion control were positive. We observed (Oct. 2012/Sept. 2013) annual soil loss up to 11 Mg ha-1 in ASV, but this figure was reduced in the sown covers, being 8 Mg ha-1 in sainfoin treatment, 3,7 Mg ha-1 in barley treatment, and only 1,5 Mg ha-1 in false brome treatment. Those results are used to predict the risk of erosion in long term. Moreover, soil organic carbon (SOC) increased with treatments, this is significant as it reduces soil erodibility. The increases were found both in topsoil (up to 5 cm) and more in depth, in the root zone (from 5 to 10 cm depth). From higher to lower SOC values we found the false brome (1.05%), barley (0.92%), ASV (0.79%) and sainfoin (0.71%) regarding topsoil. In the root zone (5-10 cm depth

  9. Recognising and responding to care erosion: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan Martinus Anne; Timmins, Fiona

    2017-08-16

    This article is the first in a two-part series discussing declining standards of care. Many healthcare organisations, particularly hospitals, are under increased pressure to maintain standards of care while experiencing funding and staff shortages, and increasing patient numbers and demand for services. One of the main risks associated with these competing demands is a gradual decline in care standards, described as 'care erosion' in this article. Understanding the psychosocial mechanisms that can lead to care erosion is important in preventing its occurrence. This article uses the theory of cognitive dissonance to explain how nurses reflect on, and maintain, quality of care. If practice is suboptimal or substandard and inconsistent with nursing values, standards or regulations, nurses are likely to experience inner conflict or 'dissonance discomfort' and will usually attempt to reduce this feeling by enhancing the quality of care they provide. Conversely, nurses may defend, deny, trivialise or ignore substandard care. The authors suggest that this is the mechanism that leads to care erosion. This article uses three scenarios to explore the nurse's role in care erosion. Part two of this article discusses the wider involvement of individuals, organisations and nurse education in preventing care erosion.

  10. On the degradation of granular materials due to internal erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Jiachun

    2015-10-01

    A new state-based elasto-plastic constitutive relationship along with the discrete element model is established to estimate the degradation of granular materials due to internal erosion. Four essential effects of internal erosion such as the force network damage and relaxation are proposed and then incorporated into the constitutive relationship to formulate internal erosion impacts on the mechanical behavior of granular materials. Most manifestations in the degradation of granular materials, such as reduction of peak strength and dilatancy are predicted by the modified constitutive relationship in good agreement with the discrete element method (DEM) simulation. In particular, the sudden reduction of stress for conspicuous mass erosion in a high stress state is captured by force network damage and the relaxation mechanism. It is concluded that the new modified constitutive relationship is a potential theory to describe the degradation of granular materials due to internal erosion and would be very useful, for instance, in the prediction and assessment of piping disaster risk during the flood season.

  11. [Assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on water environment based on the integration of soil erosion process and landscape pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Bing-Fang; Zeng, Yuan; Zhang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The integration of the effects of landscape pattern to the assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on eco-environmental is of practical significance in methodological prospect, being able to provide an approach for identifying water body's sediment source area, assessing the potential risks of sediment export of on-site soil erosion to the target water body, and evaluating the capacity of regional landscape pattern in preventing soil loss. In this paper, the RUSLE model was applied to simulate the on-site soil erosion rate. With the consideration of the soil retention potential of vegetation cover and topography, a quantitative assessment was conducted on the impacts of soil erosion in the water source region of the middle route for South-to-North Water Transfer Project on rivers and reservoirs by delineating landscape pattern at point (or cell) scale and sub-watershed level. At point (or grid cell) scale, the index of soil erosion impact intensity (I) was developed as an indicator of the potential risk of sediment export to the water bodies. At sub-watershed level, the landscape leakiness index (LI) was employed to indicate the sediment retention capacity of a given landscape pattern. The results revealed that integrating the information of landscape pattern and the indices of soil erosion process could spatially effectively reflect the impact intensity of in situ soil erosion on water bodies. The LI was significantly exponentially correlated to the mean sediment retention capacity of landscape and the mean vegetation coverage of watershed, and the sediment yield at sub-watershed scale was significantly correlated to the LI in an exponential regression. It could be concluded that the approach of delineating landscape pattern based on soil erosion process and the integration of the information of landscape pattern with its soil retention potential could provide a new approach for the risk evaluation of soil erosion.

  12. Biogeochemistry: The soil carbon erosion paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw

    2017-04-01

    Erosion is typically thought to degrade soil resources. However, the redistribution of soil carbon across the landscape, caused by erosion, can actually lead to a substantial sink for atmospheric CO2.

  13. Tube erosion in bubbling fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.K. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center; Stallings, J.W. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    This paper reports on experimental and theoretical studies that were preformed of the interaction between bubbles and tubes and tube erosion in fluidized beds. The results are applicable to the erosion of horizontal tubes in the bottom row of a tube bundle in a bubbling bed. Cold model experimental data show that erosion is caused by the impact of bubble wakes on the tubes, with the rate of erosion increasing with the velocity of wake impact with the particle size. Wake impacts resulting from the vertical coalescence of pairs of bubbles directly beneath the tube result in particularly high rates of erosion damage. Theoretical results from a computer simulation of bubbling and erosion show very strong effects of the bed geometry and bubbling conditions on computed rates of erosion. These results show, for example, that the rate of erosion can be very sensitive to the vertical location of the bottom row of tubes with respect to the distributor.

  14. 22 CFR 125.3 - Exports of classified technical data and classified defense articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exports of classified technical data and... IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF TECHNICAL DATA AND CLASSIFIED DEFENSE ARTICLES § 125.3 Exports of classified technical data and classified defense articles. (a) A request for authority...

  15. Soil erosion vulnerability in the verde river basin, southern minas gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Augusto de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is one of the most significant environmental degradation processes. Mapping and assessment of soil erosion vulnerability is an important tool for planning and management of the natural resources. The objective of the present study was to apply the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE using GIS tools to the Verde River Basin (VRB, southern Minas Gerais, in order to assess soil erosion vulnerability. A annual rainfall erosivity map was derived from the geographical model adjusted for Southeastern Brazil, calculating an annual value for each pixel. The maps of soil erodibility (K, topographic factor (LS, and use and management of soils (C were developed from soils and their uses map and the digital elevation model (DEM developed for the basin. In a GIS environment, the layers of the factors were combined to create the soil erosion vulnerability map according to RUSLE. The results showed that, in general, the soils of the VRB present a very high vulnerability to water erosion, with 58.68% of soil losses classified as "High" and "Extremely High" classes. In the headwater region of VRB, the predominant classes were "Very High" and "Extremely High" where there is predominance of Cambisols associated with extensive pastures. Furthermore, the integration of RUSLE/GIS showed an efficient tool for spatial characterization of soil erosion vulnerability in this important basin of the Minas Gerais state.

  16. Prediction of cardiac arrest recurrence using ensemble classifiers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NACHIKET TAPAS; TUSHAR LONE; DAMODAR REDDY; VENKATANARESH KUPPILI

    2017-07-01

    Inability of a heart to contract effectually or its failure to contract prevents blood from circulating efficiently, causing circulatory arrest or cardiac arrest or cardiopulmonary arrest. The unexpected cardiac arrest is medically referred to as sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Poor survival rate of patients with SCA is one of themost ubiquitous health care problems today. Recent studies show that heart-rate-derived features can act as early predictors of SCA. Addition of angiographic and electrophysiological features can increase the robustness of the prediction system. Early warning has the capability of saving many lives. Risk of recurrent terminal cardiac arrest is high for out-of-hospital survivors. Foregoing studies indicate that recurrent cardiac events are time dependent and, while in clinical follow-up, are highly probable, predominantly in early phase. In this paper, we observe the changing risk of and changing influence of various clinical, angiographic and electrophysiological parameters on subsequent cardiac arrest recurrence with time. Various medical and synthetic datasets such as ECG dataset from PhysioNet, Pima Indian Diabetes dataset from UCI Machine Learning Repository and gene expression dataset from GEO are used, which are unique as compared with related works. Various classifiers such as LogitBoost with simple regression function, random forest and multilayer perceptron are used for recurrence risk prediction. Collection of these classifiers together forms the ensemble classifiers. Classifiers are compared based on various measures like accuracy and precision. Based on the classification, risk scores are calculated using logistic regression with backward elimination. The proposed method is used for final risk estimation. The same datasets are used for risk score calculation model development. Experimental results are found to be encouraging.

  17. Pavement Crack Classifiers: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Siddharth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non Destructive Testing (NDT is an analysis technique used to inspect metal sheets and components without harming the product. NDT do not cause any change after inspection; this technique saves money and time in product evaluation, research and troubleshooting. In this study the objective is to perform NDT using soft computing techniques. Digital images are taken; Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM extracts features from these images. Extracted features are then fed into the classifiers which classifies them into images with and without cracks. Three major classifiers: Neural networks, Support Vector Machine (SVM and Linear classifiers are taken for the classification purpose. Performances of these classifiers are assessed and the best classifier for the given data is chosen.

  18. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Skidmore, Andrew K; Hao, Fanghua; Wang, Tiejun

    2010-02-15

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate assessment, from 1977 to 2006, of erosion in the upper watershed of the Yellow River. At same time, the impacts of land use and landscape service features on soil erosion load were assessed. A series of supervised land use classifications of Landsat images characterized variations in land use and landscape patterns over three decades. The SWAT database was constructed with soil properties, climate and elevation data. Using water flow and sand density data as parameters, regional soil erosion load was simulated. A numerical statistical model was used to relate soil erosion to land use and landscape. The results indicated that decadal decrease of grassland areas did not pose a significant threat to soil erosion, while the continual increase of bare land, water area and farmland increased soil erosion. Regional landscape variation also had a strong relationship with erosion. Patch level landscape analyses demonstrated that larger water area led to more soil erosion. The patch correlation indicated that contagious grassland patches reduced soil erosion yield. The increased grassland patches led to more patch edges, in turn increasing the sediment transportation from the patch edges. The findings increase understanding of the temporal variation in soil erosion processes, which is the basis for preventing local pollution.

  19. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  20. Cropping system effects on wind erosion potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion of soil is a destructive process impacting crop productivity and human health and safety. The mechanics of wind erosion and soil properties that influence erosion are well understood. Less well-studied are the effects that cropping intensity has upon those soil properties. We collected ...

  1. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabio, C; Meusburger, K; Klik, A

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and...

  2. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush abras

  3. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natur...

  4. Soil erosion in humid regions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion has significant implications for land productivity and surface water quality, as sediment is the leading water pollutant worldwide. Here, erosion processes are defined. The dominant factors influencing soil erosion in humid areas are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of precipitation, soil moisture, soil porosity, slope steepness and length,...

  5. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush

  6. Comparing different classifiers for automatic age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanitis, Andreas; Draganova, Chrisina; Christodoulou, Chris

    2004-02-01

    We describe a quantitative evaluation of the performance of different classifiers in the task of automatic age estimation. In this context, we generate a statistical model of facial appearance, which is subsequently used as the basis for obtaining a compact parametric description of face images. The aim of our work is to design classifiers that accept the model-based representation of unseen images and produce an estimate of the age of the person in the corresponding face image. For this application, we have tested different classifiers: a classifier based on the use of quadratic functions for modeling the relationship between face model parameters and age, a shortest distance classifier, and artificial neural network based classifiers. We also describe variations to the basic method where we use age-specific and/or appearance specific age estimation methods. In this context, we use age estimation classifiers for each age group and/or classifiers for different clusters of subjects within our training set. In those cases, part of the classification procedure is devoted to choosing the most appropriate classifier for the subject/age range in question, so that more accurate age estimates can be obtained. We also present comparative results concerning the performance of humans and computers in the task of age estimation. Our results indicate that machines can estimate the age of a person almost as reliably as humans.

  7. Local agriculture traditional knowledge to avoid erosion in a changing climate: Ensuring agricultural livelihoods and food security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe Rivera Ferré, Marta; Di Masso, Marina; Vara, Isabel; Mailhost, Mara; Bhatta, Goppal; Cuellar, Mamem; López-i-Gelats, Feliu; Gallar, Donald

    2015-04-01

    In the regions that experience substantial climatic risks, considerable traditional expertise exists that is underutilized and that could be valuable as a starting point to build more effective strategies for adapting to climate change and ensure food availability. Some of these are agronomic strategies for soil conservation targeting erosion avoidance as a form to ensure soil fertility and thus, crop production and food availability. Following an extensive literature review in the Indogangetic Plans, we have identified many different practices derived from local traditional knowledge that can be classified as i) Reshaping the landscape (terracing, bunding, efficient distribution of land uses); ii) Stream diversion to reduce flood impact (channels along the edges of the fields, embankments, dams, network of ponds, outlets, walls and fencing); and iii) Others (agroforesty, use of specific trees as indicators of soil erosion, crop-fallow rotation, preservation of patches of forests, reforestation, collective management of forests). These endogenous-based practices have a great potential for adaptation since they are more easily adopted by communities, they require of minimum or not external expertise and aid, and usually, are cheaper than other strategies. A combination of local knowledge with other scientific knowledge may be the most effective way to face climate change. This work was performed as part of the CCAFS-Program of the CGIAR in South Asia.

  8. THE WATER FROM NATURE AND THE EROSION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. PANDI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The water from nature and the erosion process. Studying earth's surface erosion process is necessary for practical reasons. The theoretical approach requires knowledge of the alluvial system’s structure and operation as the cascade sequence of fluvial system’s mass and energy. Geosystem research methodology requires that the water energy and the role of adjacent surface must be expressed. The expression of water power can be grouped according to the shape of movement and action in the basin. A particular, important case is the energy variation in a basin-slope. An important role in energy expressions is considering the existence in nature of biphasic fluid - water as dispersion phase and solid particles as dispersed phase. The role of the adjacent surface is taken into account by using the erosion resistance indicator, which is calculated using the indicator of geological resistance and the indicator of plant protection. The evolution of natural systems, therefore of river basins too, leads to energy diminishing, thus affecting their dynamic balance. This can be expressed using the concept of entropy. Although erosion processes are usual natural phenomena for the evolution of river basins, they induce significant risks in certain circumstances. Depending on the circulated water energies, water basins can be ranked in terms of potential risks.

  9. Modeling the fluid/soil interface erosion in the Hole Erosion Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissi B.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon which yields at its final stage to insidious fluid leakages under the hydraulic infrastructures known as piping and which are the main cause of their rupture. The Hole Erosion Test is commonly used to quantify the rate of piping erosion. In this work, The Hole Erosion Test is modelled by using Fluent software package. The aim is to predict the erosion rate of soil during the hole erosion test. The renormalization group theory – based k–ε turbulence model equations are used. This modelling makes it possible describing the effect of the clay concentration in flowing water on erosion. Unlike the usual one dimensional models, the proposed modelling shows that erosion is not uniform erosion along the hole length. In particular, the concentration of clay is found to increase noticeably the erosion rate.

  10. Soil Erosion Protection Potential of Young Paulownia Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchich, Avgusta; Djodjov, Christo

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion is removal of soil and rock particles by water, wind, ice and gravity. It is widely recognized as a global soil threat. Soils impacted by different forms of erosion cover large areas around the world. While landscape, soil and climate conditions trigger soil erosion processes, the vegetation cover reduces the soil erosion risk. About 60 % of the area of agricultural land in Bulgaria is under erosion risk, which necessitates implementation of series of measures for soil erosion control. The aim of this study is to determine the erosion protection potential and the loss of soil nutrients of young Paulownia plantation. Field experiments have been set up under unirrigated conditions at the experimental field for soil erosion studies of the N. Poushkarov Institute of Soil Science, Agrotechnology and Plant Protection near Suhodol. The local soils are Chromic Luvisols, moderately eroded. The altitude is 750 m and the slope gradient is 80. The experiment consists of four field plots for soil erosion studies, three of which planted with Paulownia Bellissima and a reference one with bare soil. The plants have been planted at a distance of 2 m between adjacent rows and 1 m between each two plants within the row. The size of each field plot is 32 m2 (4 m width and 8 m length). The plots are equipped with containers for collecting the surface runoff caused by erosive rainfall events. Biometrics, including the root-striking of the plants, their growth in height, foliage cover (projection) and stem diameter, was studied from May 13th to October 21st. The data reported cover the results from the studies during the first vegetation period after planting in the Spring of 2013. During the year four erosive rainfalls were observed with a total amount of 79.2 mm, resulting to a total amount of soil loss of 772 kg/ha from a planted plot and 551 kg/ha from bear soil. The total surface runoff is 156.7 m3/ha from planted plot and 153.1 m3/ha from bare soil. The total losses of

  11. Prevalence of dental erosion in adolescent competitive swimmers exposed to gas-chlorinated swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowska-Radlińska, J; Łagocka, R; Kaczmarek, W; Górski, M; Nowicka, A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of dental erosion among competitive swimmers of the local swimming club in Szczecin, Poland, who train in closely monitored gas-chlorinated swimming pool water. The population for this survey consisted of a group of junior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 7 years, a group of senior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 10 years, and a group of recreational swimmers. All subjects underwent a clinical dental examination and responded to a questionnaire regarding aspects of dental erosion. In pool water samples, the concentration of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, sodium, and potassium ions and pH were determined. The degree of hydroxyapatite saturation was also calculated. Dental erosion was found in more than 26 % of the competitive swimmers and 10 % of the recreational swimmers. The lesions in competitive swimmers were on both the labial and palatal surfaces of the anterior teeth, whereas erosions in recreational swimmers developed exclusively on the palatal surfaces. Although the pH of the pool water was neutral, it was undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. The factors that increase the risk of dental erosion include the duration of swimming and the amount of training. An increased risk of erosion may be related to undersaturation of pool water with hydroxyapatite components. To decrease the risk of erosion in competitive swimmers, the degree of dental hydroxyapatite saturation should be a controlled parameter in pool water.

  12. Soil Erosion Threatens Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burgess

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since humans worldwide obtain more than 99.7% of their food (calories from the land and less than 0.3% from the oceans and aquatic ecosystems, preserving cropland and maintaining soil fertility should be of the highest importance to human welfare. Soil erosion is one of the most serious threats facing world food production. Each year about 10 million ha of cropland are lost due to soil erosion, thus reducing the cropland available for world food production. The loss of cropland is a serious problem because the World Health Organization and the Food and Agricultural Organization report that two-thirds of the world population is malnourished. Overall, soil is being lost from agricultural areas 10 to 40 times faster than the rate of soil formation imperiling humanity’s food security.

  13. Assessment of Soil Water Erosion Risk Using RS and GIS in Northern Part of Shaanxi Province, China%基于RS和GIS技术对中国陕西省北部地区土壤水蚀风险评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆斯塔克·达力伯·贾巴; 冯健; 孙冬英

    2005-01-01

    运用遥感(RS)和地理信息系统(GIS)技术来进行中国陕西省北部地区的土壤水蚀风险评估.综合运用RS和GIS技术以及修订的通用土壤流失方程式(简称RUSLE)来定量化地评估土壤侵蚀.建立了一个关于土壤侵蚀、斜坡长度/坡度、降雨侵蚀和人类活动的评估系统.评估值输入修订的世界土壤亏损方程式中,用来计算土壤退化进程的风险,土壤退化又叫土壤侵蚀.利用榆林和靖边两地区的1987年和1999年的陆地卫星TM传感图像来制作研究区土地使用/覆盖情况的地图,然后用这些地图产生RUSLE方程中的人类活动因子.使用ER mapper/Info两个软件来管理和处理主要数据,及处理卫星图像和表格数据源.根据统计分析,3 985.9 km2(33.12%)的土地面积有轻微到中度的土壤侵蚀,2 941.4 km2(24.44%)的土地面积有高的土壤侵蚀,总土地面积中3 522.1 km2(29.27%)正面临着很高的土壤侵蚀风险,总体上来说,研究区处于高的土壤水蚀风险中.%The remote sensing and GIS are applied to evaluate the soil water erosion risk in the northern part of Shaanxi Province, China. This research integrates the revised universal soil loss equation(RUSLE) with RS and GIS techniques to quantify erosion risk. A system is established for rating soil erodibility, slope length/gradient,rainfall erosivity and conservation practices. The rating values serve as inputs into a modified universal soil loss equation(USLE) to calculate the risk for soil degradation processes, namely soil water erosion. Two Landsat TM senses from 1987 and 1999 for each location in Yulin and Jinbian County were utilized to produce land use/cove maps of the study area based on the maximum likelihood classification method. These maps were then, used to generate the conservation practice factor in the RUSLE. ER mapper and Arc/Info software's were used to manage and manipulate thematic data, to process satellite images, and to tabulate data

  14. Definition for Rheumatoid Arthritis Erosions Imaged with High Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography and Interreader Reliability for Detection and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabe, Cheryl; Toepfer, Dominique; Marotte, Hubert; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Scharmga, Andrea; Kocijan, Roland; Kraus, Sebastian; Boutroy, Stephanie; Schett, Georg; Keller, Kresten Krarup; de Jong, Joost; Stok, Kathryn S; Finzel, Stephanie

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) sensitively detects erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, nonpathological cortical bone disruptions are potentially misclassified as erosive. Our objectives were to set and test a definition for pathologic cortical bone disruptions in RA and to standardize reference landmarks for measuring erosion size. HR-pQCT images of metacarpophalangeal joints of RA and control subjects were used in an iterative process to achieve consensus on the definition and reference landmarks. Independent readers (n = 11) applied the definition to score 58 joints and measure pathologic erosions in 2 perpendicular multiplanar reformations for their maximum width and depth. Interreader reliability for erosion detection and variability in measurements between readers [root mean square coefficient of variation (RMSCV), intraclass correlation (ICC)] were calculated. Pathologic erosions were defined as cortical breaks extending over a minimum of 2 consecutive slices in perpendicular planes, with underlying trabecular bone loss and a nonlinear shape. Interreader agreement for classifying pathologic erosions was 90.2%, whereas variability for width and depth erosion assessment was observed (RMSCV perpendicular width 12.3%, axial width 20.6%, perpendicular depth 24.0%, axial depth 22.2%; ICC perpendicular width 0.206, axial width 0.665, axial depth 0.871, perpendicular depth 0.783). Mean erosion width was 1.84 mm (range 0.16-8.90) and mean depth was 1.86 mm (range 0.30-8.00). We propose a new definition for erosions visualized with HR-pQCT imaging. Interreader reliability for erosion detection is good, but further refinement of selection of landmarks for erosion size measurement, or automated volumetric methods, will be pursued.

  15. A review of learning vector quantization classifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Nova, David

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a review of the state of the art of Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) classifiers. A taxonomy is proposed which integrates the most relevant LVQ approaches to date. The main concepts associated with modern LVQ approaches are defined. A comparison is made among eleven LVQ classifiers using one real-world and two artificial datasets.

  16. [Diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of acute ulcero-erosive gastroduodenal bleedings at cardiosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazymov, I L; Kirilenko, A S; Faĭbushevic h, A G; Kurbanov, F S; Tarichko, Iu V

    2007-01-01

    Results of treatment of 495 patients who has undergone various cardiac operations with artificial circulation are analyzed. The complex program "Blood-free surgery" was used at 388 (78.4%) of them. Among the patients treated traditionally the acute gastroduodenal erosions and ulcers were diagnosed at 25.7% patients, the rate of gastroduodenal bleedings was 3.0%. Complex of prophylactic measures permits to reduce the rate of acute erosions and ulcers in 1.5 times (18.4%) and the rate of postoperative gastroduodenal bleedings--to 0.7%. Control of risk factors, timely diagnosis, complex prophylaxis and treatment of acute gastroduodenal erosions and ulcers are effective way to improvement of operations results at cardiosurgical patients. "Blood-free" program doesn't lead to increase of acute postoperative gastroduodenal erosions and ulcers rate. Endoscopic (including repeated) hemostasis at acute ulcero-erosive gastroduodenal bleedings is available method and permits to achieve the stable hemostasis.

  17. Erosive burning of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Merrill K.

    1993-01-01

    Presented here is a review of the experimental and modeling work concerning erosive burning of solid propellants (augmentation of burning rate by flow of product gases across a burning surface). A brief introduction describes the motor design problems caused by this phenomenon, particularly for low port/throat area ratio motors and nozzleless motors. Various experimental techniques for measuring crossflow sensitivity of solid propellant burning rates are described, with the conclusion that accurate simulation of the flow, including upstream flow development, in actual motors is important since the degree of erosive burning depends not only on local mean crossflow velocity and propellant nature, but also upon this upstream development. In the modeling area, a brief review of simplified models and correlating equations is presented, followed by a description of more complex numerical analysis models. Both composite and double-base propellant models are reviewed. A second generation composite model is shown to give good agreement with data obtained in a series of tests in which composite propellant composition and heterogeneity (particle size distribution) were systematically varied. Finally, the use of numerical models for the development of erosive burning correlations is described, and a brief discussion of scaling is presented.

  18. Deconvolution When Classifying Noisy Data Involving Transformations

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, Raymond

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, we consider the problem of classifying spatial data distorted by a linear transformation or convolution and contaminated by additive random noise. In this setting, we show that classifier performance can be improved if we carefully invert the data before the classifier is applied. However, the inverse transformation is not constructed so as to recover the original signal, and in fact, we show that taking the latter approach is generally inadvisable. We introduce a fully data-driven procedure based on cross-validation, and use several classifiers to illustrate numerical properties of our approach. Theoretical arguments are given in support of our claims. Our procedure is applied to data generated by light detection and ranging (Lidar) technology, where we improve on earlier approaches to classifying aerosols. This article has supplementary materials online.

  19. MR imaging of erosions in interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis: is all osteoarthritis erosive?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grainger, A.J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Musculoskeletal Centre, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Farrant, J.M.; O' Connor, P.J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Tan, A.L.; Emery, P. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals and Leeds University, Department of Rheumatology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Tanner, S. [Leeds University, Department of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); McGonagle, D. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals and Leeds University, Department of Rheumatology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Calderdale Royal Hospital, Halifax (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Erosive osteoarthritis is usually considered as an inflammatory subset of osteoarthritis (OA). However, an inflammatory component is now recognised in all subsets of OA, so this subgroup of erosive or inflammatory OA is more difficult to conceptualise. The aim of this study was to compare routine CR and MRI to investigate erosion numbers and morphology to determine whether hand OA in general is a more erosive disease than previously recognised. Fifteen patients with clinical (OA) of the small joints of the hand underwent MRI of one of the affected proximal interphalangeal (PIP) or distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints. Conventional radiographs (CR) of the hand were also obtained. The MR images were reviewed by two observers for the presence of central and marginal erosions. The site and morphology of any erosions was recorded. CR images of the same hand joint were scored independently for central and marginal erosions by the same observers. There was 100% agreement between the observers for scoring erosions on CR. Agreement for the MRI scores was also excellent (kappa = 0.84). MRI detected 37 erosions, of which only 9 were seen on CR. The increase in sensitivity using MRI was much greater for marginal erosions (1 detected on CR, 19 on MRI) than for central erosions (8 on CR, 18 on MRI). Using MRI 80% of joints examined showed 1 or more erosions compared with 40% using CR. If only marginal erosions were considered 80% of joints were still considered erosive by MRI criteria, but only 1 showed evidence of erosion on CR. Morphologically central erosions appeared to represent areas of subchondral collapse and pressure atrophy. In contrast, marginal erosions resembled those seen in inflammatory arthritides. Erosions, and particularly marginal erosions typical of those seen in inflammatory arthritis, are a more common feature of small joint OA than conventional radiographs have previously indicated. (orig.)

  20. Predicting Postfire Hillslope Erosion with a Web-based Probabilistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, P. R.; Elliot, W. J.; Pierson, F. B.; Hall, D. E.; Moffet, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    Modeling erosion after major disturbances, such as wildfire, has major challenges that need to be overcome. Fire-induced changes include increased erosion due to loss of the protective litter and duff, loss of soil water storage, and in some cases, creation of water repellent soil conditions. These conditions increase the potential for flooding, and sedimentation, which are of special concern to people who live and mange resources in the areas adjacent to burned areas. A web-based Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT), has been developed to predict surface erosion from postfire hillslopes and to evaluate the potential effectiveness of various erosion mitigation practices. The model uses a probabilistic approach that incorporates variability in weather, soil properties, and burn severity for forests, rangeland, and chaparral hillslopes. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is the erosion prediction engine used in a Monte Carlo simulation mode to provide event-based erosion rate probabilities. The one-page custom interface is targeted for hydrologists and soil scientists. The interface allows users to select climate, soil texture, burn severity, and hillslope topography. For a given hillslope, the model uses a single 100-year run to obtain weather variability and then twenty 5- to 10-year runs to incorporate soil property, cover, and spatial burn severity variability. The output, in both tabular and graphical form, relates the probability of soil erosion exceeding a given amount in each of the first five years following the fire. Event statistics are provided to show the magnitude and rainfall intensity of the storms used to predict erosion rates. ERMiT also allows users to compare the effects of various mitigation treatments (mulches, seeding, and barrier treatments such as contour-felled logs or straw wattles) on the erosion rate probability. Data from rainfall simulation and concentrated flow (rill) techniques were used to parameterize ERMiT for these varied

  1. When erosion ruins the chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Steffen; Enters, Dirk; Blume, Katharina; Lücke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Human land-use has considerably shaped the landscape of north-western Germany over the past millennia. Deforestation and agriculture created a predominantly open scenery preserved until today with only a few remnants of former landscape elements such as woodlands, peat bogs, heath lands and lakes. Here we present a multi-proxy approach including sedimentological and geochemical parameters (e. g. element concentrations and stable isotopes) as well as biological proxies (pollen, macro fossils and diatoms) combined with an archaeological site analysis to investigate the effects of prehistoric land-use on lake systems and their catchment areas with a special focus on changes of the water quality, e. g. eutrophication and acidification and its natural regeneration during phases of weaker land-use impact. The study reveals a millenia-long history of erosion processes caused by successive selective woodland clearances starting in Neolithic Times. The geochemical evidence of soil erosion is recorded by distinct peaks of the terrigenic elements K and Ti. However, due to (1) the low sensitivy of the XRF scanner for Si and (2) the prevalence of diatom related biogenic silicon XRF-scanning of highly organic lake sediments fails to reflect the actual sand input caused by erosion. Particularly single quartz grains are not detected in the organic sediment matrix. Therefore we make successful use of mineral grain analysis which previously has only been applied to record aeolian input in bogs. K and Ti concentrations are not correlated with the content of mineral grains which suggest two different erosion processes. Our efforts to construct robust age-depth relationships based on AMS 14C-dates of terrestrial plant macrofossils reveal a specific dating issue of northwest German lakes. Especially in younger sediments we observe 14C-dates which are on the one hand too old and on the other hand among themselves roughly contemporaneous. We explain this feature with the extensive bog

  2. Conventional and anti-erosion fluoride toothpastes: effect on enamel erosion and erosion-abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganss, C; Lussi, A; Grunau, O; Klimek, J; Schlueter, N

    2011-01-01

    New toothpastes with anti-erosion claims are marketed, but little is known about their effectiveness. This study investigates these products in comparison with various conventional NaF toothpastes and tin-containing products with respect to their erosion protection/abrasion prevention properties. In experiment 1, samples were demineralised (10 days, 6 × 2 min/day; citric acid, pH 2.4), exposed to toothpaste slurries (2 × 2 min/day) and intermittently stored in a mineral salt solution. In experiment 2, samples were additionally brushed for 15 s during the slurry immersion time. Study products were 8 conventional NaF toothpastes (1,400-1,490 ppm F), 4 formulations with anti-erosion claims (2 F toothpastes: NaF + KNO(3) and NaF + hydroxyapatite; and 2 F-free toothpastes: zinc-carbonate-hydroxyapatite, and chitosan) and 2 Sn-containing products (toothpaste: 3,436 ppm Sn, 1,450 ppm F as SnF(2)/NaF; gel: 970 ppm F, 3,030 ppm Sn as SnF(2)). A mouth rinse (500 ppm F as AmF/NaF, 800 ppm Sn as SnCl(2)) was the positive control. Tissue loss was quantified profilometrically. In experiment 1, most NaF toothpastes and 1 F-free formulation reduced tissue loss significantly (between 19 and 42%); the Sn-containing formulations were the most effective (toothpaste and gel 55 and 78% reduction, respectively). In experiment 2, only 4 NaF toothpastes revealed significant effects compared to the F-free control (reduction between 29 and 37%); the F-free special preparations and the Sn toothpaste had no significant effect. The Sn gel (reduction 75%) revealed the best result. Conventional NaF toothpastes reduced the erosive tissue loss, but had limited efficacy regarding the prevention of brushing abrasion. The special formulations were not superior, or were even less effective.

  3. SOIL EROSION PROCESS RESEARCH AND ITS POTENTIAL IMPACT ON EROSION PREDICTION MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-hua HUANG; Fenli ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    This paper highlights past efforts in developing erosion process concepts that lead to the development of the current process-based erosion prediction model, i.e., WEPP. Recent progress includes the development of a multiple-box system that can simulate hillslope hydrologic conditions. Laboratory procedures enable the quantification of near-surface hydrologic effects, i.e.,artesian seepage vs. drainage, on the soil erosion process and sediment regime, flow hydraulics, and sediment transport and deposition processes. These recent findings improve soil erosion science and provide new erosion control strategies that may have additional environmental benefits relative to the traditional erosion control practices. The paper also discusses the potential impacts of the erosion process on erosion model development and future research directions of soil erosion process research and model development.

  4. Dental erosion in 12-year-old school children living in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septalita, A.; Bahar, A.; Agustanti, A.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Rosalien, R.

    2017-08-01

    This study assesses the dental erosion status of 12-year-old Indonesian children and studies the determinants of dental erosion of these children. The survey was performed in 2016 with ethics approval. A multistage cluster proportional to size random sampling method was adopted to select 12-year-old children in 24 primary schools in Jakarta. The parents were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire concerning their children’s diet and oral health habits. The children were examined by a single calibrated examiner. Detection of dental erosion followed basic erosive wear examination (BEWE) criteria. A total of 487 children participated in the survey. Most children (88%) had at least some signs of erosion (BEWE > 0), with dentin being involved in 50% of the cases (BEWE = 2). Dental erosion was significantly related to gender, the frequencies of citric tea consumption, parent’s dental knowledge, father’s education, and dental caries (OR = 3.148). The 12-year-old Indonesian school children who lived in Jakarta had signs of erosion, although severe erosion was not found. Screening programs should be provided to identify risk groups so early preventive measures can be taken.

  5. Main issues for preserving Mediterranean soil resources from water erosion under global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raclot, Damien; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Annabi, Mohamed; Sabir, Mohamed; Smetanova, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Soil resources are important for the socio-economic development of the Mediterranean area, and their durability is sometimes threatened because of intense erosion processes that result in severe degradation in the field (on-site effects) and downstream degradation (off-site effects). Based on the literature and results obtained during several research projects, this paper aims to present the main lessons and challenges dealing with Mediterranean soil resources under global change. After a review of the main drivers of Mediterranean soil erosion and the main impacts of water erosion processes, the paper highlights that the nature and intensity of active erosion processes are as diverse as the mosaic of the Mediterranean landscape. It then discusses the expected evolution of Mediterranean soil resources under global change and illustrates the prevalent influences of land use (partly depending on climatic constraints) on the evolution of erosion risk and soil vulnerability. Finally it details some main challenges for the future of Mediterranean soil resources dealing with a better knowledge of factors and processes involved in soil erosion; a better evaluation of soil vulnerability through a combined quantitative and qualitative soil erosion approach; and the need for a site-specific conservation strategy for Mediterranean soil resources. KEYWORDS : Mediterranean, soil resources, global change, erosion, preservation.

  6. Logarithmic learning for generalized classifier neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyildirim, Buse Melis; Avci, Mutlu

    2014-12-01

    Generalized classifier neural network is introduced as an efficient classifier among the others. Unless the initial smoothing parameter value is close to the optimal one, generalized classifier neural network suffers from convergence problem and requires quite a long time to converge. In this work, to overcome this problem, a logarithmic learning approach is proposed. The proposed method uses logarithmic cost function instead of squared error. Minimization of this cost function reduces the number of iterations used for reaching the minima. The proposed method is tested on 15 different data sets and performance of logarithmic learning generalized classifier neural network is compared with that of standard one. Thanks to operation range of radial basis function included by generalized classifier neural network, proposed logarithmic approach and its derivative has continuous values. This makes it possible to adopt the advantage of logarithmic fast convergence by the proposed learning method. Due to fast convergence ability of logarithmic cost function, training time is maximally decreased to 99.2%. In addition to decrease in training time, classification performance may also be improved till 60%. According to the test results, while the proposed method provides a solution for time requirement problem of generalized classifier neural network, it may also improve the classification accuracy. The proposed method can be considered as an efficient way for reducing the time requirement problem of generalized classifier neural network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Sequential Algorithm for Training Text Classifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, D D; Lewis, David D.; Gale, William A.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to cheaply train text classifiers is critical to their use in information retrieval, content analysis, natural language processing, and other tasks involving data which is partly or fully textual. An algorithm for sequential sampling during machine learning of statistical classifiers was developed and tested on a newswire text categorization task. This method, which we call uncertainty sampling, reduced by as much as 500-fold the amount of training data that would have to be manually classified to achieve a given level of effectiveness.

  8. A CLASSIFIER SYSTEM USING SMOOTH GRAPH COLORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE FLORES CRUZ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsupervised classifiers allow clustering methods with less or no human intervention. Therefore it is desirable to group the set of items with less data processing. This paper proposes an unsupervised classifier system using the model of soft graph coloring. This method was tested with some classic instances in the literature and the results obtained were compared with classifications made with human intervention, yielding as good or better results than supervised classifiers, sometimes providing alternative classifications that considers additional information that humans did not considered.

  9. Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Slotte, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Rosenlunds sandbankar är ett naturskyddsområde mellan Jönköping och Huskvarna som rasar med ungefär 30 cm per år. Platsen tillåts att årligen krympa men inte att användas. Det görs inga större ansatser för att dokumentera den för framtida generationer eller synliggöra den för nu levande generationer. I detta examensarbete undersöks ett naturligt fenomen som kommer att påverka civilisationer i tusentals år. Examensarbetet syftar i första hand till att återintroducera en bortglömd plats och bes...

  10. Validating and Improving Interrill Erosion Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Bao; Wang, Zhan-Li; Yang, Ming-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plot experiments have largely ignored the effects of slope length and plot size on interrill erosion rate. This paper describes a series of simulated rainfall experiments which were conducted according to a randomized factorial design for five slope lengths (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m) at a width of 0.4 m, five slope gradients (17%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%), and five rainfall intensities (48, 62.4, 102, 149, and 170 mm h−1) to perform a systematic validation of existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plots. The results indicated that the existing interrill erosion equations do not adequately describe the relationships between interrill erosion rate and its influencing factors with increasing slope length and rainfall intensity. Univariate analysis of variance showed that runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length had significant effects on interrill erosion rate and that their interactions were significant at p = 0.01. An improved interrill erosion equation was constructed by analyzing the relationships of sediment concentration with rainfall intensity, slope length, and slope gradient. In the improved interrill erosion equation, the runoff rate and slope factor are the same as in the interrill erosion equation in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), with the weight of rainfall intensity adjusted by an exponent of 0.22 and a slope length term added with an exponent of −0.25. Using experimental data from WEPP cropland soil field interrill erodibility experiments, it has been shown that the improved interrill erosion equation describes the relationship between interrill erosion rate and runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length reasonably well and better than existing interrill erosion equations. PMID:24516624

  11. A Study of Damage on the Pipe Flow Materials Caused by Solid Particle Erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Hoon; Choi, Duk-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Joon [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Wall thinning can be classified into three types: flow-accelerated corrosion, cavitation erosion and solid particle erosion. This article presents a study of solid particle erosion, which frequently causes damages to power plants' pipe system. Unlike previous studies, this study uses a mechanism to make solid particles in a fluid flow collide with pipe materials in underwater condition. Experiment is conducted in three cases of velocity according to solid-water ratio using the three types of the materials of A106B, SS400, and A6061. The experiments were performed for 30 days, and the surface morphology and hardness of the materials were examined for every 7 days. Based on the velocity change of the solid particles in a fluid flow, the surface changes, the change in the amount of erosion, the erosion rate and the variation in the hardness of carbon steel and aluminum family pipe materials can all be determined. In addition, factor based erosion rates are verified and a wall-thinning relation function is suggested for the pipe materials.

  12. Soil Erosion of Various Farming Systems in Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGBIN; ZHANGTAOLIN; 等

    1996-01-01

    In order to optimise land use systems,to prevent erosion-induced degradation and to restore the degraded red soils in subtropical China,five cropping systems and four agrforestry systems were conducted in red soils with a slope of 7° from 1993 to 1995,The results showed that erosion risk period occurred from Aproil to June,and the annual runoff and and the losses of soil and nutrients with sediment were alarming for two conventional farming systems,whereas they were negligible for the farming systems with ridge tillage.Enrichment ratios of the lost soils from erosion erer more than 1.20 for all nutrients with much higher values for hydrolysable N and organic matter.Compared with the control,the alley cropping systems also distinctly decreased runoff by 30% or 50%.However,the coverage of soil surface varied with alley cropping systems for the competition of nutrients and soil water,which made a profound difference in runoff.The cropping systems of sweet potato intercropped with soybean,the alley cropping systems and the measures of mulching and ridge tillage were the alternatives for red soil reclamation so as to prevent erosion-induced degradation.

  13. Genetic fuzzy classifier for sleep stage identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Han G; Park, Jin Y; Lee, Chung K; An, Suk K; Yoo, Sun K

    2010-07-01

    Soft-computing techniques are commonly used to detect medical phenomena and help with clinical diagnoses and treatment. In this work, we propose a design for a computerized sleep scoring method, which is based on a fuzzy classifier and a genetic algorithm (GA). We design the fuzzy classifier based on the GA using a single electroencephalogram (EEG) signal that detects differences in spectral features. Polysomnography was performed on four healthy young adults (males with a mean age of 27.5 years). The sleep classifier was designed using a sleep record and tested on the sleep records of the subjects. Our results show that the genetic fuzzy classifier (GFC) agreed with visual sleep staging approximately 84.6% of the time in detection of wakefulness (WA), shallow sleep (SS), deep sleep (DS), and rapid eye movement (REM) stages.

  14. Local Component Analysis for Nonparametric Bayes Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Khademi, Mahmoud; safayani, Meharn

    2010-01-01

    The decision boundaries of Bayes classifier are optimal because they lead to maximum probability of correct decision. It means if we knew the prior probabilities and the class-conditional densities, we could design a classifier which gives the lowest probability of error. However, in classification based on nonparametric density estimation methods such as Parzen windows, the decision regions depend on the choice of parameters such as window width. Moreover, these methods suffer from curse of dimensionality of the feature space and small sample size problem which severely restricts their practical applications. In this paper, we address these problems by introducing a novel dimension reduction and classification method based on local component analysis. In this method, by adopting an iterative cross-validation algorithm, we simultaneously estimate the optimal transformation matrices (for dimension reduction) and classifier parameters based on local information. The proposed method can classify the data with co...

  15. An Efficient and Effective Immune Based Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Golzari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS is most popular and effective immune inspired classifier. Resource competition is one stage of AIRS. Resource competition is done based on the number of allocated resources. AIRS uses a linear method to allocate resources. The linear resource allocation increases the training time of classifier. Approach: In this study, a new nonlinear resource allocation method is proposed to make AIRS more efficient. New algorithm, AIRS with proposed nonlinear method, is tested on benchmark datasets from UCI machine learning repository. Results: Based on the results of experiments, using proposed nonlinear resource allocation method decreases the training time and number of memory cells and doesn't reduce the accuracy of AIRS. Conclusion: The proposed classifier is an efficient and effective classifier.

  16. Combining multiple classifiers for age classification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, C

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors compare several different classifier combination methods on a single task, namely speaker age classification. This task is well suited to combination strategies, since significantly different feature classes are employed. Support vector...

  17. Classifiers based on optimal decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Talha

    2013-11-25

    Based on dynamic programming approach we design algorithms for sequential optimization of exact and approximate decision rules relative to the length and coverage [3, 4]. In this paper, we use optimal rules to construct classifiers, and study two questions: (i) which rules are better from the point of view of classification-exact or approximate; and (ii) which order of optimization gives better results of classifier work: length, length+coverage, coverage, or coverage+length. Experimental results show that, on average, classifiers based on exact rules are better than classifiers based on approximate rules, and sequential optimization (length+coverage or coverage+length) is better than the ordinary optimization (length or coverage).

  18. Pragmatics of classifier use in Chinese discourse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KATEVG

    complex noun phrases (CNPs), and investigates the occurrence and ... classifier phrase from its head noun while a post-nominal RC in English does not ...... The present study takes a cognitive-functional approach to the analysis of a syntactic.

  19. Erosion Resistance Index (ERI) to Assess Surface Stability in Desert Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Yuki [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grippo, Mark A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A new spectral index—erosion resistance index (ERI)—was developed to assess erosion risks in desert landscapes. The index was developed by applying trigonometry to the combination of the green/red band-ratio and the red/near infrared band-ratio from very high spatial resolution imagery. The resultant ERI maps showed spatially cohesive distributions of high and low index values across the study areas. High index values were observed over areas that were resistant to erosion (such as desert pavement and dense vegetation), while low index values overlapped with areas likely dominated by loose sandy soils, such as stream beds and access roads. Although further investigation is warranted, this new index, ERI, shows promise for the assessment of erosion risks in desert regions.

  20. Water erosion susceptibility mapping by applying Stochastic Gradient Treeboost to the Imera Meridionale River Basin (Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angileri, Silvia Eleonora; Conoscenti, Christian; Hochschild, Volker; Märker, Michael; Rotigliano, Edoardo; Agnesi, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water constitutes a serious problem affecting various countries. In the last few years, a number of studies have adopted statistical approaches for erosion susceptibility zonation. In this study, the Stochastic Gradient Treeboost (SGT) was tested as a multivariate statistical tool for exploring, analyzing and predicting the spatial occurrence of rill-interrill erosion and gully erosion. This technique implements the stochastic gradient boosting algorithm with a tree-based method. The study area is a 9.5 km2 river catchment located in central-northern Sicily (Italy), where water erosion processes are prevalent, and affect the agricultural productivity of local communities. In order to model soil erosion by water, the spatial distribution of landforms due to rill-interrill and gully erosion was mapped and 12 environmental variables were selected as predictors. Four calibration and four validation subsets were obtained by randomly extracting sets of negative cases, both for rill-interrill erosion and gully erosion models. The results of validation, based on receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curves, showed excellent to outstanding accuracies of the models, and thus a high prediction skill. Moreover, SGT allowed us to explore the relationships between erosion landforms and predictors. A different suite of predictor variables was found to be important for the two models. Elevation, aspect, landform classification and land-use are the main controlling factors for rill-interrill erosion, whilst the stream power index, plan curvature and the topographic wetness index were the most important independent variables for gullies. Finally, an ROC plot analysis made it possible to define a threshold value to classify cells according to the presence/absence of the two erosion processes. Hence, by heuristically combining the resulting rill-interrill erosion and gully erosion susceptibility maps, an integrated water erosion susceptibility map was created. The

  1. Classifying the Quantum Phases of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    2013), arXiv:1305.2176. [10] J. Haah, Lattice quantum codes and exotic topological phases of matter , arXiv:1305.6973. [11[ M. Hastings and S...CLASSIFYING THE QUANTUM PHASES OF MATTER CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY JANUARY 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JAN 2012 – AUG 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLASSIFYING THE QUANTUM PHASES OF MATTER 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-12-2

  2. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  3. Searching and Classifying non-textual information

    OpenAIRE

    Arentz, Will Archer

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation contains a set of contributions that deal with search or classification of non-textual information. Each contribution can be considered a solution to a specific problem, in an attempt to map out a common ground. The problems cover a wide range of research fields, including search in music, classifying digitally sampled music, visualization and navigation in search results, and classifying images and Internet sites.On classification of digitally sample music, as method for ex...

  4. A multi-class large margin classifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang TANG; Qi XUAN; Rong XIONG; Tie-jun WU; Jian CHU

    2009-01-01

    Currently there are two approaches for a multi-class support vector classifier (SVC). One is to construct and combine several binary classifiers while the other is to directly consider all classes of data in one optimization formulation. For a K-class problem (K>2), the first approach has to construct at least K classifiers, and the second approach has to solve a much larger op-timization problem proportional to K by the algorithms developed so far. In this paper, following the second approach, we present a novel multi-class large margin classifier (MLMC). This new machine can solve K-class problems in one optimization formula-tion without increasing the size of the quadratic programming (QP) problem proportional to K. This property allows us to construct just one classifier with as few variables in the QP problem as possible to classify multi-class data, and we can gain the advantage of speed from it especially when K is large. Our experiments indicate that MLMC almost works as well as (sometimes better than) many other multi-class SVCs for some benchmark data classification problems, and obtains a reasonable performance in face recognition application on the AR face database.

  5. Physics of soil erosion at the microscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Pierre; Cuéllar, Pablo; Brunier-Coulin, Florian; Luu, Li-Hua; Benahmed, Nadia; Bonelli, Stéphane; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    We focus here on the major and always topical issue of soil erosion by fluid flows, and more specifically on the determination of both a critical threshold for erosion occurrence and a kinetics that specifies the rate of eroded matter entrainment. A synthetic state-of-the-art is first proposed with a critical view on the most commonly used methods and erosion models. It is then discussed an alternative strategy, promoting the use of model materials that allow systematic parametric investigations with the purpose of first identifying more precisely the local mechanisms responsible for soil particle erosion and second ultimately quantifying both critical onsets and kinetics, possibly through existing or novel empirical erosion laws. Finally, we present and discuss several examples following this methodology, implemented either by means of experiments or numerical simulations, and coupling erosion tests in several particular hydrodynamical configurations with wisely selected mechanical tests.

  6. What are the Differences between Bayesian Classifiers and Mutual-Information Classifiers?

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Bao-Gang

    2011-01-01

    In this study, both Bayesian classifiers and mutual information classifiers are examined for binary classifications with or without a reject option. The general decision rules in terms of distinctions on error types and reject types are derived for Bayesian classifiers. A formal analysis is conducted to reveal the parameter redundancy of cost terms when abstaining classifications are enforced. The redundancy implies an intrinsic problem of "non-consistency" for interpreting cost terms. If no data is given to the cost terms, we demonstrate the weakness of Bayesian classifiers in class-imbalanced classifications. On the contrary, mutual-information classifiers are able to provide an objective solution from the given data, which shows a reasonable balance among error types and reject types. Numerical examples of using two types of classifiers are given for confirming the theoretical differences, including the extremely-class-imbalanced cases. Finally, we briefly summarize the Bayesian classifiers and mutual-info...

  7. Erosion rills offset the efficacy of vegetated buffer strips to mitigate pesticide exposure in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Sebastian; Dabrowski, James Michael; Bangert, Uli; Schulz, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory risk assessment considers vegetated buffer strips as effective risk mitigation measures for the reduction of runoff-related pesticide exposure of surface waters. However, apart from buffer strip widths, further characteristics such as vegetation density or the presence of erosion rills are generally neglected in the determination of buffer strip mitigation efficacies. This study conducted a field survey of fruit orchards (average slope 3.1-12.2%) of the Lourens River catchment, South Africa, which specifically focused on the characteristics and attributes of buffer strips separating orchard areas from tributary streams. In addition, in-stream and erosion rill water samples were collected during three runoff events and GIS-based modeling was employed to predict losses of pesticides associated with runoff. The results show that erosion rills are common in buffer strips (on average 13 to 24 m wide) of the tributaries (up to 6.5 erosion rills per km flow length) and that erosion rills represent concentrated entry pathways of pesticide runoff into the tributaries during rainfall events. Exposure modeling shows that measured pesticide surface water concentrations correlated significantly (R(2)=0.626; pmodeling approach in which buffer strip width was set to zero at sites with erosion rills; in contrast, no relationship between predicted runoff losses and in-stream pesticide concentrations were detected in the modeling approach that neglected erosion rills and thus assumed efficient buffer strips. Overall, the results of our study show that erosion rills may substantially reduce buffer strip pesticide retention efficacies during runoff events and suggest that the capability of buffer strips as a risk mitigation tool for runoff is largely overestimated in current regulatory risk assessment procedures conducted for pesticide authorization.

  8. Erosive lichen planus: a therapeutic challenge*

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Williams; Giesen,Laura; Navajas-Galimany, Lucas; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Erosive lichen planus is an uncommon variant of lichen planus. Chronic erosions of the soles, accompanied by intense and disabling pain, are some of its most characteristic manifestations. We present the case of a woman who developed oral and plantar erosive lichen planus associated with lichen planus pigmentosus and ungueal lichen planus that were diagnosed after several years. The patient failed to respond to multiple therapies requiring longstanding medication but remained refract...

  9. Soil erosion by water - model concepts and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated surface runoff events, whose erosional effects are determined by numerous temporally and spatially varying variables. Thus the monitoring of soil loss by direct observation is extremely limited with respect to space and time. Usually observation plots cover an area of less than 100 m2 and the observation period is less than 10 years. In order to estimate soil losses by water erosion for others than empirically observable conditions, mathematical models are needed, which are able to describe the interaction of the different physical mechanisms involved either statistically or on the basis of physical algorithms. Such models are absolutely essential for risk prognoses on catchment and regional scale. Besides the aspect of soil conservation the delivery of sediments and sediment bound pollutants into surface water bodies are of increasing relevance in this context. Based on an exemplary selection of existing water erosion models this contribution aims to give an overview over different mathematical approaches used for the description of particle detachment, transport and deposition of soil particles. According to the chronology in the development of soil erosion models empirical algorithms will be presented first based on the USLE approach. However, since purely empirical models like USLE are limited to the estimation of annual soil loss further attempts in soil erosion modelling are focussed on event based estimations considering the fact that soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated runoff events. One of the first models of this type was CREAMS using physically based algorithms in combination with empirical ones in order to describe the basic erosion processes. Today there are diverse soil erosion models available following in principle the CREAMS concept but using different algorithms in detail. Concerning particle detachment, transport and deposition alternative

  10. Halimeter ppb Levels as the Predictor of Erosive Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Gon; Kim, Yoon Jae; Yoo, Seung Hee; Lee, So Jung; Chung, Jun Won; Kim, Min Ho; Park, Dong Kyun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2010-09-01

    In a previous issue published in Gut and Liver, we found that erosive changes in the esophagogastroduodenal mucosa were strongly correlated with increased levels of volatile sulfur-containing compounds (VSC), suggesting that halitosis could be a symptom reflecting the erosive status of the upper gut mucosa. Together with other studies showing a possible association between halitosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), under the premise that halitosis could be one of extraesophageal manifestations of erosive GERD (ERD), we investigated the significance of Halimeter ppb levels on ERD compared to non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). Subjects were assigned to the NERD group if there was no evidence of esophageal erosive changes on endoscopy, despite reflux symptoms, and to the ERD group if they had GERD A, B, C, or D (according to the Los Angeles classification). The VSC levels were measured in all patients with either a Halimeter (before endoscopy) or by gas chromatography of the gastric juices aspirated during endoscopy. The VSC level differed significantly between the NERD and ERD groups (p24 kg/m(2) was significantly associated with ERD, there was no correlation with Halimeter ppb levels. Minimal-change lesions exhibited the highest VSC levels, signifying that minimal change lesions can be classified as ERD based on our finding that halimeter ppb levels were descrimitive of erosive change. Erosive changes in the esophageal mucosa were strongly associated with VSC levels, supporting the hypothesis that halitosis can be a potential biomarker for the discrimination between ERD and NERD, reflecting the presence of erosive change in the lower esophagogastric junction.

  11. Relationship of runoff, erosion and sediment yield to weather types in the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal-Romero, E.; González-Hidalgo, J. C.; Cortesi, N.; Desir, G.; Gómez, J. A.; Lasanta, T.; Lucía, A.; Marín, C.; Martínez-Murillo, J. F.; Pacheco, E.; Rodríguez-Blanco, M. L.; Romero Díaz, A.; Ruiz-Sinoga, J. D.; Taguas, E. V.; Taboada-Castro, M. M.; Taboada-Castro, M. T.; Úbeda, X.; Zabaleta, A.

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation has been recognized as one of the main factors driving soil erosion and sediment yield (SY), and its spatial and temporal variability is recognized as one of the main reasons for spatial and temporal analyses of soil erosion variability. The weather types (WTs) approach classifies the continuum of atmospheric circulation into a small number of categories or types and has been proven a good indicator of the spatial and temporal variability of precipitation. Thus, the main objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between WTs, runoff, soil erosion (measured in plots), and sediment yield (measured in catchments) in different areas of the Iberian Peninsula (IP) with the aim of detecting spatial variations in these relationships. To this end, hydrological and sediment information covering the IP from several Spanish research teams has been combined, and related with daily WTs estimated by using the NMC/NCAR 40-Year Reanalysis Project. The results show that, in general, a few WTs (particularly westerly, southwesterly and cyclonic) provide the largest amounts of precipitation; and southwesterly, northwesterly and westerly WTs play an important role in runoff generation, erosion and sediment yield as they coincide with the wettest WTs. However, this study highlights the spatial variability of erosion and sediment yield in the IP according to WT, differentiating (1) areas under the influence of north and/or north-westerly flows (the north coast of Cantabria and inland central areas), (2) areas under the influence of westerly, southwesterly and cyclonic WTs (western and southwestern IP), (3) areas in which erosion and sediment yield are controlled by easterly flows (Mediterranean coastland), and (4) lastly, a transitional zone in the inland northeast Ebro catchment, where we detected a high variability in the effects of WTs on erosion. Overall results suggest that the use of WTs derived from observed atmospheric pressure patterns could be a useful

  12. Erosive lichen planus: a therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Williams; Giesen, Laura; Navajas-Galimany, Lucas; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Erosive lichen planus is an uncommon variant of lichen planus. Chronic erosions of the soles, accompanied by intense and disabling pain, are some of its most characteristic manifestations. We present the case of a woman who developed oral and plantar erosive lichen planus associated with lichen planus pigmentosus and ungueal lichen planus that were diagnosed after several years. The patient failed to respond to multiple therapies requiring longstanding medication but remained refractory. Knowledge of the treatment options for erosive lichen planus is insufficient. Further research is required to clarify their effectiveness, ideally adopting an evidence-based methodology.

  13. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB's.

  14. Erosion behavior and mechanism of boronised steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立; 凌国平; 刘涛; 郦剑

    2002-01-01

    Boronising of steels is a hardening process to get high surface hardness. The erosion resistance of boronised steels was researched with the use of four kinds of erodent, i.e. glass, alumina, quartz and silicon carbide. The erosion rate increases rapidly with erodent hardness and severe erosion occurs with high impacting angle range of hard particles. SEM analysis indicated that chipping is caused by repetitive impacting of glass and quartz, whereas by alumina and silicon carbide impacting, chipping, and that plastic flow take place simultaneously and the erosion rate reaches the peak value when the impacting angle is above 60°.

  15. Erosion behavior and mechanism of boronised steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立; 凌国平; 刘涛; 郦剑

    2002-01-01

    Boronising of steels is a hardening process to get high surfaoe hardness. The erosion resis-tance of boronised steels was researched with the use of four kinds of erodent, i.e. glass, alumina,quartz and silicon carbide. The erosion rate increases rapidly with erodent hardness and severe erosion occurs with high impacting angle range of hard particles. SEM analysis indicated that chipping is caused by repetitive impacting of glass and quartz, whereas b.y alumina and silicon carbide impacting, chipping,and that plastic flow .take place simultaneously and the erosion rate reaches the peak value when the impacting angle is above 60°.

  16. INFLUENCES OF SLOPE GRADIENT ON SOIL EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青泉; 陈力; 李家春

    2001-01-01

    The main factors influencing soil erosion include the net rain excess, the water depth, the velocity, the shear stress of overland flows , and the erosion-resisting capacity of soil. The laws of these factors varying with the slope gradient were investigated by using the kinematic wave theory. Furthermore, the critical slope gradient of erosion was driven. The analysis shows that the critical slope gradient of soil erosion is dependent on grain size , soil bulk density , surface roughness, runoff length, net rain excess, and the friction coefficient of soil, etc. The critical slope gradient has been estimated theoretically with its range between 41. 5 °~ 50°.

  17. Supervised Classification of Benthic Reflectance in Shallow Subtropical Waters Using a Generalized Pixel-Based Classifier across a Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Blakey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We tested a supervised classification approach with Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM data for time-series mapping of seagrass in a subtropical lagoon. Seagrass meadows are an integral link between marine and inland ecosystems and are at risk from upstream processes such as runoff and erosion. Despite the prevalence of image-specific approaches, the classification accuracies we achieved show that pixel-based spectral classes may be generalized and applied to a time series of images that were not included in the classifier training. We employed in-situ data on seagrass abundance from 2007 to 2011 to train and validate a classification model. We created depth-invariant bands from TM bands 1, 2, and 3 to correct for variations in water column depth prior to building the classification model. In-situ data showed mean total seagrass cover remained relatively stable over the study area and period, with seagrass cover generally denser in the west than the east. Our approach achieved mapping accuracies (67% and 76% for two validation years comparable with those attained using spectral libraries, but was simpler to implement. We produced a series of annual maps illustrating inter-annual variability in seagrass occurrence. Accuracies may be improved in future work by better addressing the spatial mismatch between pixel size of remotely sensed data and footprint of field data and by employing atmospheric correction techniques that normalize reflectances across images.

  18. Role of erosions typical of rheumatoid arthritis in the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria: results from a very early arthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Gina Hetland; Norli, Ellen S; Bøyesen, Pernille; van der Heijde, Désirée; Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Bjørneboe, Olav; Thunem, Cathrine; Kvien, Tore K; Mjaavatten, Maria D; Lie, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    To determine how the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) definition of erosive disease (erosion criterion) contributes to the number of patients classified as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/EULAR RA classification criteria (2010 RA criteria) in an early arthritis cohort. Patients from the observational study Norwegian Very Early Arthritis Clinic with joint swelling ≤16 weeks, a clinical diagnosis of RA or undifferentiated arthritis, and radiographs of hands and feet were included. Erosive disease was defined according to the EULAR definition accompanying the 2010 RA criteria. We calculated the additional number of patients being classified as RA based on the erosion criteria at baseline and during follow-up. Of the 289 included patients, 120 (41.5%) fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria, whereas 15 (5.2%) fulfilled only the erosion criterion at baseline. 118 patients had radiographic follow-up at 2 years, of whom 6.8% fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria and only one patient fulfilled solely the erosion criterion during follow-up. Few patients with early arthritis were classified as RA based on solely the erosion criteria, and of those who did almost all did so at baseline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Graffiti for science - erosion painting reveals spatially variable erosivity of sediment-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Alexander R.; Kirchner, James W.; Turowski, Jens M.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially distributed detection of bedrock erosion is a long-standing challenge. Here we show how the spatial distribution of surface erosion can be visualized and analysed by observing the erosion of paint from natural bedrock surfaces. If the paint is evenly applied, it creates a surface with relatively uniform erodibility, such that spatial variability in the erosion of the paint reflects variations in the erosivity of the flow and its entrained sediment. In a proof-of-concept study, this approach provided direct visual verification that sediment impacts were focused on upstream-facing surfaces in a natural bedrock gorge. Further, erosion painting demonstrated strong cross-stream variations in bedrock erosion, even in the relatively narrow (5 m wide) gorge that we studied. The left side of the gorge experienced high sediment throughput with abundant lateral erosion on the painted wall up to 80 cm above the bed, but the right side of the gorge only showed a narrow erosion band 15-40 cm above the bed, likely due to deposited sediment shielding the lower part of the wall. This erosion pattern therefore reveals spatial stream bed aggradation that occurs during flood events in this channel. The erosion painting method provides a simple technique for mapping sediment impact intensities and qualitatively observing spatially distributed erosion in bedrock stream reaches. It can potentially find wide application in both laboratory and field studies.

  20. A seepage erosion sediment transport function and geometric headcut relationships for predicting seepage erosion undercutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remain a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including n...

  1. Assessment and spatial distribution of sensitivity of soil erosion in Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXiaodan; ZHONGXianghao; FANJianrong

    2004-01-01

    Based on Universal Soil Loss Equation and methods of mathematics model and GIS analysis, this study classified influence of precipitation, soil, topography and vegetation upon sensitivity of soil erosion into five different degrees which are extreme sensitivity, quite sensitivity, sensitivity, less sensitivity and no sensitivity. Assessment map of each factor was generated separately. Integrated assessment map of sensitivity of soil erosion has also been drawn by overlapping function with Arcinfo. Furthermore, the study analyzed distribution characteristics and spatial difference of sensitivity of soil erosion under special plateau environment of Tibet. According to sensitivity degree, some important controlling regions was confirmed so that departments of water conservancy, traffic management and agriculture could make scientific and reasonable decisions for their respective subject planning.

  2. Reinforcement Learning Based Artificial Immune Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karakose

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the widely used methods for classification that is a decision-making process is artificial immune systems. Artificial immune systems based on natural immunity system can be successfully applied for classification, optimization, recognition, and learning in real-world problems. In this study, a reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier is proposed as a new approach. This approach uses reinforcement learning to find better antibody with immune operators. The proposed new approach has many contributions according to other methods in the literature such as effectiveness, less memory cell, high accuracy, speed, and data adaptability. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation and experimental results using real data in Matlab and FPGA. Some benchmark data and remote image data are used for experimental results. The comparative results with supervised/unsupervised based artificial immune system, negative selection classifier, and resource limited artificial immune classifier are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method.

  3. Evolving Classifiers: Methods for Incremental Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Hulley, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The ability of a classifier to take on new information and classes by evolving the classifier without it having to be fully retrained is known as incremental learning. Incremental learning has been successfully applied to many classification problems, where the data is changing and is not all available at once. In this paper there is a comparison between Learn++, which is one of the most recent incremental learning algorithms, and the new proposed method of Incremental Learning Using Genetic Algorithm (ILUGA). Learn++ has shown good incremental learning capabilities on benchmark datasets on which the new ILUGA method has been tested. ILUGA has also shown good incremental learning ability using only a few classifiers and does not suffer from catastrophic forgetting. The results obtained for ILUGA on the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and Wine datasets are good, with an overall accuracy of 93% and 94% respectively showing a 4% improvement over Learn++.MT for the difficult multi-class OCR dataset.

  4. Averaged Extended Tree Augmented Naive Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Meehan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new general purpose classifier named Averaged Extended Tree Augmented Naive Bayes (AETAN, which is based on combining the advantageous characteristics of Extended Tree Augmented Naive Bayes (ETAN and Averaged One-Dependence Estimator (AODE classifiers. We describe the main properties of the approach and algorithms for learning it, along with an analysis of its computational time complexity. Empirical results with numerous data sets indicate that the new approach is superior to ETAN and AODE in terms of both zero-one classification accuracy and log loss. It also compares favourably against weighted AODE and hidden Naive Bayes. The learning phase of the new approach is slower than that of its competitors, while the time complexity for the testing phase is similar. Such characteristics suggest that the new classifier is ideal in scenarios where online learning is not required.

  5. Dynamic Bayesian Combination of Multiple Imperfect Classifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Edwin; Psorakis, Ioannis; Smith, Arfon

    2012-01-01

    Classifier combination methods need to make best use of the outputs of multiple, imperfect classifiers to enable higher accuracy classifications. In many situations, such as when human decisions need to be combined, the base decisions can vary enormously in reliability. A Bayesian approach to such uncertain combination allows us to infer the differences in performance between individuals and to incorporate any available prior knowledge about their abilities when training data is sparse. In this paper we explore Bayesian classifier combination, using the computationally efficient framework of variational Bayesian inference. We apply the approach to real data from a large citizen science project, Galaxy Zoo Supernovae, and show that our method far outperforms other established approaches to imperfect decision combination. We go on to analyse the putative community structure of the decision makers, based on their inferred decision making strategies, and show that natural groupings are formed. Finally we present ...

  6. Erosion of Brassica incana Genetic Resources: Causes and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscolo, A.; Settineri, G.; Mallamaci, C.; Papalia, T.; Sidari, M.

    2017-07-01

    Brassica incana Ten., possessing a number of useful agronomic traits, represents a precious genetic resource to be used in plant breeding programs to broaden the genetic base in most Brassica crop species. B. incana that grows on limestone cliffs is at risk of genetic erosion for environmental constraints and human activities. We studied the pedological conditions of a Calabrian site where the B. incana grows, and we correlated the soil properties to the physiological and biochemical aspects of B. incana to identify the causes and effects of the genetic erosion of this species. Our results evidenced that physical soil conditions did not affect B. incana growth and nutraceutical properties; conversely, biological soil properties modified its properties. We identified leaf pigments and secondary metabolites that can be used routinely as early warning indicators of plant threat, to evaluate in a short term the dynamic behavior of plants leading to species extinction.

  7. Keeping soil in the field - runoff and erosion management in asparagus crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niziolomski, Joanna; Simmons, Robert; Rickson, Jane; Hann, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Row crop production (including potatoes, onions, carrots, asparagus, bulbs and lettuce) is regarded as one of the most erosive agricultural cropping systems. This is a result of the many practices involved that increase erosion risk including: fine seedbed preparation, a typically short growing season where adequate ground cover protects the soil, permanent bare soil areas between crops, and often intensive harvesting methods that can damage soil structure and result in soil compaction. Sustained exposure of bare soil coupled with onsite compaction on slightly sloping land results in soil and water issues in asparagus production. Asparagus production is a growing British industry covering > 2000 ha and is worth approximately £30 million yr-1. However, no tried and tested erosion control measurements currently exist to manage associated problems. Research has recently been undertaken investigating the effectiveness of erosion control measures suitable for asparagus production systems. These consisted of surface applied wheat straw mulch and shallow soil disturbance (asparagus farm in Herefordshire, UK. Testing was conducted between May and November 2013. Rainfall-event based runoff and erosion measurements were taken including; runoff volume, runoff rate and total soil loss. Runoff and soil erosion was observed from all treatments. However, the surface application of straw mulch alone out performed each shallow soil disturbance practice. This suggests that runoff and erosion from asparagus production can be reduced using the simple surface application of straw.

  8. A Customizable Text Classifier for Text Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-liang Zhang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Text mining deals with complex and unstructured texts. Usually a particular collection of texts that is specified to one or more domains is necessary. We have developed a customizable text classifier for users to mine the collection automatically. It derives from the sentence category of the HNC theory and corresponding techniques. It can start with a few texts, and it can adjust automatically or be adjusted by user. The user can also control the number of domains chosen and decide the standard with which to choose the texts based on demand and abundance of materials. The performance of the classifier varies with the user's choice.

  9. A survey of decision tree classifier methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavian, S. R.; Landgrebe, David

    1991-01-01

    Decision tree classifiers (DTCs) are used successfully in many diverse areas such as radar signal classification, character recognition, remote sensing, medical diagnosis, expert systems, and speech recognition. Perhaps the most important feature of DTCs is their capability to break down a complex decision-making process into a collection of simpler decisions, thus providing a solution which is often easier to interpret. A survey of current methods is presented for DTC designs and the various existing issues. After considering potential advantages of DTCs over single-state classifiers, subjects of tree structure design, feature selection at each internal node, and decision and search strategies are discussed.

  10. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  11. Tools for Ephemeral Gully Erosion Process Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techniques to quantify ephemeral gully erosion have been identified by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) as one of gaps in current erosion assessment tools. One reason that may have contributed to this technology gap is the difficulty to quantify changes in channel geometry to asses...

  12. Saliva parameters and erosive wear in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, N.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Jager, D.H.J.; Ruben, J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 ± 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately.

  13. Saliva Parameters and Erosive Wear in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, N.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J.; Bronkhorst, E. M.; Truin, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 +/- 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately.

  14. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, W.; Skidmore, A.K.; Hao, F.; Wang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate as

  15. Rainfall erosivity in Brazil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, we review the erosivity studies conducted in Brazil to verify the quality and representativeness of the results generated and to provide a greater understanding of the rainfall erosivity (R-factor) in Brazil. We searched the ISI Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, and Google Scholar datab...

  16. Erosion Pressure on the Danish Coasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Sørensen, Per; Kroon, Aart

    , neglects the need for sand replenishment i.e. in the form of repeated sand nourishments. Here we present a conceptual model and method for dividing coastal erosion into acute and chronic erosion pressure, respectively. We focus on the model use for management and climate change adaptation purposes...

  17. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion.......EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion....

  18. Wind erosion potential following application of biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of biosolids to agricultural land has the potential to improve soil health and crop production. These benefits could also possibly reduce the threat of wind erosion in arid and semiarid regions. Therefore, we assessed the impact of biosolids on wind erosion of agricultural land at Li...

  19. Reduction of soil erosion on forest roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward R. Burroughs; John G. King

    1989-01-01

    Presents the expected reduction in surface erosion from selected treatments applied to forest road traveledways, cutslopes, fillslopes, and ditches. Estimated erosion reduction is expressed as functions of ground cover, slope gradient, and soil properties whenever possible. A procedure is provided to select rock riprap size for protection of the road ditch.

  20. The erosive potential of candy sprays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. Material and methods The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy volunteer

  1. Estimation of Soil Erosion Dynamics in the Koshi Basin Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Assess Priority Areas for Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Kabir; Murthy, M S R; Wahid, Shahriar M; Matin, Mir A

    2016-01-01

    High levels of water-induced erosion in the transboundary Himalayan river basins are contributing to substantial changes in basin hydrology and inundation. Basin-wide information on erosion dynamics is needed for conservation planning, but field-based studies are limited. This study used remote sensing (RS) data and a geographic information system (GIS) to estimate the spatial distribution of soil erosion across the entire Koshi basin, to identify changes between 1990 and 2010, and to develop a conservation priority map. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) was used in an ArcGIS environment with rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, cover-management, and support practice factors as primary parameters. The estimated annual erosion from the basin was around 40 million tonnes (40 million tonnes in 1990 and 42 million tonnes in 2010). The results were within the range of reported levels derived from isolated plot measurements and model estimates. Erosion risk was divided into eight classes from very low to extremely high and mapped to show the spatial pattern of soil erosion risk in the basin in 1990 and 2010. The erosion risk class remained unchanged between 1990 and 2010 in close to 87% of the study area, but increased over 9.0% of the area and decreased over 3.8%, indicating an overall worsening of the situation. Areas with a high and increasing risk of erosion were identified as priority areas for conservation. The study provides the first assessment of erosion dynamics at the basin level and provides a basis for identifying conservation priorities across the Koshi basin. The model has a good potential for application in similar river basins in the Himalayan region.

  2. Estimation of Soil Erosion Dynamics in the Koshi Basin Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Assess Priority Areas for Conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Uddin

    Full Text Available High levels of water-induced erosion in the transboundary Himalayan river basins are contributing to substantial changes in basin hydrology and inundation. Basin-wide information on erosion dynamics is needed for conservation planning, but field-based studies are limited. This study used remote sensing (RS data and a geographic information system (GIS to estimate the spatial distribution of soil erosion across the entire Koshi basin, to identify changes between 1990 and 2010, and to develop a conservation priority map. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE was used in an ArcGIS environment with rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, cover-management, and support practice factors as primary parameters. The estimated annual erosion from the basin was around 40 million tonnes (40 million tonnes in 1990 and 42 million tonnes in 2010. The results were within the range of reported levels derived from isolated plot measurements and model estimates. Erosion risk was divided into eight classes from very low to extremely high and mapped to show the spatial pattern of soil erosion risk in the basin in 1990 and 2010. The erosion risk class remained unchanged between 1990 and 2010 in close to 87% of the study area, but increased over 9.0% of the area and decreased over 3.8%, indicating an overall worsening of the situation. Areas with a high and increasing risk of erosion were identified as priority areas for conservation. The study provides the first assessment of erosion dynamics at the basin level and provides a basis for identifying conservation priorities across the Koshi basin. The model has a good potential for application in similar river basins in the Himalayan region.

  3. An important erosion process on steep burnt hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Christoph; Nyman, Petter; Noske, Philip; Lane, Patrick; Sheridan, Gary

    2016-04-01

    Steep forested hillslopes often display a high degree of armouring where diffusive erosion processes preferentially remove the fine fraction of the surface soil. High infiltration capacities, hydraulic resistance to overland flow and physical anchoring by cover plants and litter mean that even the most extreme rainfall events usually do not erode the armouring substantially. We argue that fire (wild or planned) is essential to the mobilization and transport of the armouring by increasing the rates of overland flow and decreasing trapping opportunities. We present evidence of the types of erosion that lead to the stripping of the surface armouring using post-event surveys and high-rate overland flow experiments. The type of erosion depends on the relative abundance of non-cohesive surface material to overland flow, but we found that a particular type of transport dominates that has no representation in current erosion models: On steep slopes overland flow can lead to incipient motion of individual stones that transfer their momentum to other stones leading to a rapid mobilization of the whole non-cohesive, armoured surface layer. Once in motion, the layer quickly separates out into a granular flow front and liquefied body, akin to debris flows in channels. Depending on the size of the event, these hillslope debris flows (HDF) either get trapped or enter into the channel, stripping the hillslope of most armouring on their way. They provide channels with the material and shear stress needed to erode into the channel bed, increasing the risk of channel debris flows. We present a simple physical model of HDF initiation, movement, and possible re-mobilization on hillslopes that was derived from debris flow theory. Understanding this process, its frequency, and magnitude are important for assessing the role of fire in landscape evolution and risk to humans through debris flow impacts.

  4. Modelling rainfall erosion resulting from climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnell, Peter

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that soil erosion leads to agricultural productivity decline and contributes to water quality decline. The current widely used models for determining soil erosion for management purposes in agriculture focus on long term (~20 years) average annual soil loss and are not well suited to determining variations that occur over short timespans and as a result of climate change. Soil loss resulting from rainfall erosion is directly dependent on the product of runoff and sediment concentration both of which are likely to be influenced by climate change. This presentation demonstrates the capacity of models like the USLE, USLE-M and WEPP to predict variations in runoff and erosion associated with rainfall events eroding bare fallow plots in the USA with a view to modelling rainfall erosion in areas subject to climate change.

  5. Model based optimization of wind erosion control by tree shelterbelt for suitable land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartus, M.; Farsang, A.; Szatmári, J.; Barta, K.

    2012-04-01

    The degradation of soil by wind erosion causes huge problem in many parts of the world. The wind erodes the upper, nutrition rich part of the soil, therefore erosion causes soil productivity loss. The length of tree shelterbelts was significantly reduced by the collectivisation (1960-1989) and the wind erosion affected areas expanded in Hungary. The tree shelterbelt is more than just a tool of wind erosion control; by good planning it can increase the yield. The tree shelterbelt reduces the wind speed and changes the microclimate providing better condition to plant growth. The aim of our work is to estimate wind erosion risk and to find the way to reduce it by tree shelterbelts. A GIS based model was created to calculate the risk and the optimal windbreak position was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk to the minimum. The model is based on the DIN 19706 (Ermitlung der Erosiongefährdung von Böden durch Wind, Estimation of Wind Erosion Risk) German standard. The model uses five input data: structure and carbon content of soil, average yearly wind speed at 10 meters height, the cultivated plants and the height and position of windbreak. The study field (16km2) was chosen near Szeged (SE Hungary). In our investigation, the cultivated plant species and the position and height of windbreaks were modified. Different scenarios were made using the data of the land management in the last few years. The best case scenario (zero wind erosion) and the worst case scenario (with no tree shelter belt and the worst land use) were made to find the optimal windbreak position. Finally, the research proved that the tree shelterbelts can provide proper protection against wind erosion, but for optimal land management the cultivated plant types should also controlled. As a result of the research, a land management plan was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk on the study field, which contains the positions of new tree shelterbelts planting and the optimal cultivation.

  6. Design and evaluation of neural classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hintz-Madsen, Mads; Pedersen, Morten With; Hansen, Lars Kai;

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for the design of feedforward neural classifiers based on regularization and adaptive architectures. Using a penalized maximum likelihood scheme we derive a modified form of the entropy error measure and an algebraic estimate of the test error. In conjunction...

  7. Face detection by aggregated Bayesian network classifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.V.; Worring, M.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    A face detection system is presented. A new classification method using forest-structured Bayesian networks is used. The method is used in an aggregated classifier to discriminate face from non-face patterns. The process of generating non-face patterns is integrated with the construction of the aggr

  8. Large margin classifier-based ensemble tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Liu, Qiaoyuan; Yin, Minghao; Wang, ShengSheng

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, many studies consider visual tracking as a two-class classification problem. The key problem is to construct a classifier with sufficient accuracy in distinguishing the target from its background and sufficient generalize ability in handling new frames. However, the variable tracking conditions challenges the existing methods. The difficulty mainly comes from the confused boundary between the foreground and background. This paper handles this difficulty by generalizing the classifier's learning step. By introducing the distribution data of samples, the classifier learns more essential characteristics in discriminating the two classes. Specifically, the samples are represented in a multiscale visual model. For features with different scales, several large margin distribution machine (LDMs) with adaptive kernels are combined in a Baysian way as a strong classifier. Where, in order to improve the accuracy and generalization ability, not only the margin distance but also the sample distribution is optimized in the learning step. Comprehensive experiments are performed on several challenging video sequences, through parameter analysis and field comparison, the proposed LDM combined ensemble tracker is demonstrated to perform with sufficient accuracy and generalize ability in handling various typical tracking difficulties.

  9. Neural Classifier Construction using Regularization, Pruning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hintz-Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan;

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for construction of feed-forward neural classifiers based on regularization and adaptive architectures. Using a penalized maximum likelihood scheme, we derive a modified form of the entropic error measure and an algebraic estimate of the test error. In conjunction...

  10. Adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xianqiang; YANG Yuanxi

    2006-01-01

    The key problems in applying the adaptively robust filtering to navigation are to establish an equivalent weight matrix for the measurements and a suitable adaptive factor for balancing the contributions of the measurements and the predicted state information to the state parameter estimates. In this paper, an adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was proposed, based on the principles of the adaptively robust filtering and bi-factor robust estimation for correlated observations. According to the constant velocity model of Kalman filtering, the state parameter vector was divided into two groups, namely position and velocity. The estimator of the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was derived, and the calculation expressions of the classified adaptive factors were presented. Test results show that the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors is not only robust in controlling the measurement outliers and the kinematic state disturbing but also reasonable in balancing the contributions of the predicted position and velocity, respectively, and its filtering accuracy is superior to the adaptively robust filter with single adaptive factor based on the discrepancy of the predicted position or the predicted velocity.

  11. Classifying Finitely Generated Indecomposable RA Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Cornelissen, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    In 1995, E. Jespers, G. Leal and C. Polcino Milies classified all finite ring alternative loops (RA loops for short) which are not direct products of proper subloops. In this paper we extend this result to finitely generated RA loops and provide an explicit description of all such loops.

  12. Visual Classifier Training for Text Document Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimerl, F; Koch, S; Bosch, H; Ertl, T

    2012-12-01

    Performing exhaustive searches over a large number of text documents can be tedious, since it is very hard to formulate search queries or define filter criteria that capture an analyst's information need adequately. Classification through machine learning has the potential to improve search and filter tasks encompassing either complex or very specific information needs, individually. Unfortunately, analysts who are knowledgeable in their field are typically not machine learning specialists. Most classification methods, however, require a certain expertise regarding their parametrization to achieve good results. Supervised machine learning algorithms, in contrast, rely on labeled data, which can be provided by analysts. However, the effort for labeling can be very high, which shifts the problem from composing complex queries or defining accurate filters to another laborious task, in addition to the need for judging the trained classifier's quality. We therefore compare three approaches for interactive classifier training in a user study. All of the approaches are potential candidates for the integration into a larger retrieval system. They incorporate active learning to various degrees in order to reduce the labeling effort as well as to increase effectiveness. Two of them encompass interactive visualization for letting users explore the status of the classifier in context of the labeled documents, as well as for judging the quality of the classifier in iterative feedback loops. We see our work as a step towards introducing user controlled classification methods in addition to text search and filtering for increasing recall in analytics scenarios involving large corpora.

  13. Classifying web pages with visual features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, V.; van Someren, M.; Lupascu, T.; Filipe, J.; Cordeiro, J.

    2010-01-01

    To automatically classify and process web pages, current systems use the textual content of those pages, including both the displayed content and the underlying (HTML) code. However, a very important feature of a web page is its visual appearance. In this paper, we show that using generic visual fea

  14. MScanner: a classifier for retrieving Medline citations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Russ B

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Keyword searching through PubMed and other systems is the standard means of retrieving information from Medline. However, ad-hoc retrieval systems do not meet all of the needs of databases that curate information from literature, or of text miners developing a corpus on a topic that has many terms indicative of relevance. Several databases have developed supervised learning methods that operate on a filtered subset of Medline, to classify Medline records so that fewer articles have to be manually reviewed for relevance. A few studies have considered generalisation of Medline classification to operate on the entire Medline database in a non-domain-specific manner, but existing applications lack speed, available implementations, or a means to measure performance in new domains. Results MScanner is an implementation of a Bayesian classifier that provides a simple web interface for submitting a corpus of relevant training examples in the form of PubMed IDs and returning results ranked by decreasing probability of relevance. For maximum speed it uses the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH and journal of publication as a concise document representation, and takes roughly 90 seconds to return results against the 16 million records in Medline. The web interface provides interactive exploration of the results, and cross validated performance evaluation on the relevant input against a random subset of Medline. We describe the classifier implementation, cross validate it on three domain-specific topics, and compare its performance to that of an expert PubMed query for a complex topic. In cross validation on the three sample topics against 100,000 random articles, the classifier achieved excellent separation of relevant and irrelevant article score distributions, ROC areas between 0.97 and 0.99, and averaged precision between 0.69 and 0.92. Conclusion MScanner is an effective non-domain-specific classifier that operates on the entire Medline

  15. Regional soil erosion assessment in Slovakia using modelling and farmer's participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenderessy, Pavol; Veihe, Anita

    There has been an increasing interest by decision makers to obtain regional assessments of soil erosion risk, whereas many existing models require substantial amounts of high quality input data with high spatial resolution and they are often only validated at the plot level. Operational models...... for regional assessments should be based on simple data requirements, must consider spatial and temporal variability in hydrological and soil erosion processes, and must be applicable to a variety of regions with a minimum of calibration. This study aims to assess the applicability of the Erosion3D model...... with cereals, sunflowers and corn and is characterised by poor cultivation practices and use of fertilizers leading to land degradation. As a first step, the initial raster-based modelling of soil loss and deposition has provided acceptable and realistic values. The predicted spatial patterns of erosion...

  16. Experimental study of erosion by suffusion at the micro-macro scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cong Doan; Benahmed, Nadia; Philippe, Pierre; Diaz Gonzalez, Elizabeth Victoria

    2017-06-01

    Internal erosion is a complex phenomenon which represents one of the main sources of risk to the safety of earth hydraulic structures such as embankment dams, dikes and levees. Its occurrence may cause instability and failure of these structures with consequences that can be dramatic. Erosion by suffusion corresponds to the process of detachment and transport, under the action of hydraulic flow, of the finest soil particles within the porous media formed mainly of large grains. Its occurrence usually causes change of the initial microstructure and hence a change in the physical, hydraulic and mechanical characteristics of the soil. In this study, we present first an experimental characterization of the erosion mechanism during its occurrence within a granular soil. Particular emphasis was put on the role of hydraulic conditions in triggering of fines migration. Thereafter, we present a preliminary microstructural characterization of the erosion process through direct visualization by optical techniques of particles migration using crushed glass samples as model materials.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of strategies for erosion control on a railway embankment batter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Y.; Sibley, J.; Ashwath, N.

    2001-12-01

    Strategies for erosion control on a railway embankment batter (side slope) are quantitatively evaluated in this paper. The strategies were centred on control (do nothing treatment), grass seeding, gypsum application, jute mat (an erosion control blanket) placement and planting hedgerows of Monto vetiver grass. Rainfall and runoff were monitored at 1 min intervals on 10 m wide embankment batter plots during 1998 and 1999. Total bedload and suspended sediment eroded from the plots were also measured but only for a group of storm events within sampling intervals. It has been demonstrated that vetiver grass is not cost-effective in controlling erosion on railway batters within Central Queensland region. Seeding alone could cause 60% reduction in the erosion rate compared with the control treatment. Applying gypsum to the calcium-deficient soil before seeding yielded an additional 25% reduction in the erosion rate. This is the result, primarily, of 100% grass cover establishment within seven months of sowing. Therefore, for railway embankment batter erosion control, the emphasis needs to be on rapid establishment of 100% grass cover. For rapid establishment of grass cover, irrigation is necessary during the initial stages of growth as the rainfall is unpredictable and the potential evaporation exceeds rainfall in the study region. The risk of seeds and fertilizers being washed out by short-duration and high-intensity rainfall events during the establishment phase may be reduced by the use of erosion control blankets on sections of the batters. Accidental burning of grasses on some plots caused serious erosion problems, resulting in very slow recovery of grass growth. It is therefore recommended that controlled burning of grasses on railway batters should be avoided to protect batters from being exposed to severe erosion.

  18. Hierarchical classifier design in high-dimensional, numerous class cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyong; Landgrebe, David A.

    1991-01-01

    As progress in new sensor technology continues, increasingly high spectral resolution sensors are being developed. These sensors give more detailed and complex data for each picture element and greatly increase the dimensionality of data over past systems. Three methods for designing a decision tree classifier are discussed; a top down approach, a bottom up approach, and a hybrid approach. Three feature extraction techniques are implemented. Canonical and extended canonical techniques are mainly dependent on the mean difference between two classes. An autocorrelation technique is dependent on the correlation differences. The mathematical relationship among sample size, dimensionality, and risk value is derived.

  19. Prevalence of Dental Erosion among the Young Regular Swimmers in Kaunas, Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Zebrauskas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine prevalence of dental erosion among competitive swimmers in Kaunas, the second largest city in Lithuania. Material and Methods: The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey, with a questionnaire and clinical examination protocols. The participants were 12 - 25 year-old swimmers regularly practicing in the swimming pools of Kaunas. Of the total of 132 participants there were 76 (12 - 17 year-old and 56 (18 - 25 year-old individuals; in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Participants were examined for dental erosion, using a portable dental unit equipped with fibre-optic light, compressed air and suction, and standard dental instruments for oral inspection. Lussi index was applied for recording dental erosion. The completed questionnaires focused on the common erosion risk factors were returned by all participants. Results: Dental erosion was found in 25% of the 12 - 17 year-olds, and in 50% of 18 - 25 years-olds. Mean value of the surfaces with erosion was 6.31 (SD 4.37. All eroded surfaces were evaluated as grade 1. Swimming training duration and the participants’ age correlated positively (Kendall correlation, r = 0.65, P < 0.001, meaning that older swimmers had practiced for longer period. No significant correlation between occurrence of dental erosion and the analyzed risk factors (gastroesophageal reflux disease, frequent vomiting, dry mouth, regular intake of acidic medicines, carbonated drinks was found in both study groups. Conclusions: Prevalence of dental erosion of very low degree was high among the regular swimmers in Kaunas, and was significantly related to swimmers’ age.

  20. Using high-resolution radar images to determine vegetation cover for soil erosion assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiel, D; Herrmann, S; Jadczyszyn, J

    2013-07-30

    Healthy soils are crucial for human well-being. Because soils are threatened worldwide, politicians recognize the need for soil protection. For example, the European Commission has launched the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, which requests the European member states to identify high risk areas for soil degradation. Most states use the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to assess soil erosion risk at the national scale. The USLE includes different factors, one of them is the vegetation cover and management factor (C factor). Modern satellite-based radar sensors now provide highly accurate vegetation cover data, enabling opportunities to improve the accuracy of the C factor. The presented study proves the suitability for C factor determination based on a multi-temporal classification of high-resolution radar images. Further USLE factors were derived from existing data sources (meteorological data, soil maps, digital elevation model) to conduct an USLE-based soil erosion assessment. The resulting map illustrates a qualitative assessment for soil erosion risk within a plot of about 7*12 km in an agricultural region in Poland that is very susceptible to soil erosion processes. A high erosion risk of more than 10 tonnes per ha and year was assessed to occur on 13.6% (646 ha) of the agricultural areas within the investigated plot. Further 7.8% (372 ha) of agricultural land is threaten by a medium risk of 5-10 tonnes per ha and year. Such a spatial information about areas of high or medium soil erosion risk are crucial for the development of strategies for the protection of soils.

  1. MODELING EPHEMERAL GULLY EROSION FOR CONSERVATION PLANNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the overland flow and concentrated flow systems that occur in most farm fields. Concentrated flow areas, which are distinct from overland flow areas, can be a major sediment source and are the main conduits that convey runoff and sediment from most farm fields. Ephemeral gully erosion, which occurs in concentrated flow areas, is similar to but differs from both rill and classical gully erosion. Concentrated flow areas occupy much of the flow path between the end of overland flow areas and defined stream channels. This paper describes the erosion and deposition processes that occur in concentrated flow areas and the effect of soil and cover management on these processes. Ephemeral gully erosion is not estimated with rill-interrill erosion prediction methods, which can result in major errors in estimates of sediment yield leaving farm fields. Much deposition can occur in concentrated flow areas resulting in sediment load leaving a farm field being much less than the sediment produced by rill-interrill and ephemeral gully erosion within the field. This paper describes model structure, topographic representation, and features of ephemeral gully erosion control practices needed in mathematical models used in conservation planning for farm fields.

  2. OVERVIEW OF DAM GULLY EROSION RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally gully erosion has been identified with the dissection of the landscape in agricultural settings but it is also recognized as a prevalent erosion feature in earthen dam auxiliary spillways and embankments. Flows through earthen spillways and over dam embankments, due to large rainfall events, have the potential to erode and breach the dam or spillway and result in catastrophic releases from the reservoir. The gully erosion process in an earthen spillway or on an embankment can be characterized by stages of initiation, development, and migration of a headcut. A headcut is defined as a near vertical drop at the upstream end of a gully. The rate of headcut migration is important in determining the breach potential of an earthen spillway and dam embankment. A research program is being conducted to examine the gully erosion processes of earthen dam auxiliary spillways and embankments. This paper describes: 1) the unique test facilities constructed to examine the dominant factors affecting the erosion of earthen spillways and embankments; 2) the observations of the erosion processes and results to date; and 3) the predictive relationships that have been developed for dam gully erosion research at the ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit laboratory in Stillwater, OK.

  3. Soft drinks and in vitro dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravelle, Brent L; Hagen Ii, Ted W; Mayhew, Susan L; Crumpton, Brooks; Sanders, Tyler; Horne, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine to what extent the in vitro exposure of healthy teeth to various commonly consumed carbonated soft drinks may precipitate dental erosion. Forty-two healthy, extracted, previously unerupted human molars were weighed prior to, during, and after suspension in various sugared and diet or zero-calorie carbonated beverages for 20 days; the specimens were stored at room temperature while being stirred at 275 rpm. The percentage decrease in tooth weight from before to after exposure represented the weight loss due to enamel erosion; values in the experimental groups varied from 3.22% to 44.52% after 20 days' exposure. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffe testing at a level of α = 0.05. Nonsugared drinks (diet and zero-calorie) as a whole were more erosive than sugared beverages. A significant positive correlation was found between the amount of titratable acid and percentage of tooth erosion, while a significant negative correlation was revealed between the beverage pH and percentage of tooth erosion. No significant correlations were found between calcium or phosphate ion concentrations and the amount of erosion. It appears that enamel erosion is dependent on not only the beverage flow rate, pH, and amount of titratable acid, but also whether the soft drink is of the diet or zero-calorie variety, which reflects the type of artificial sweetener present.

  4. Obtención de un índice de riesgo de erosión eólica y su aplicación en la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina Erosion risk index attainment and its application in the Buenos Aires province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Goldberg

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se propone un índice climático para estimar el riesgo de ocurrencia de erosión eólica basado en las leyes físicas que cuantifican el efecto de la agresión del medio (turbulencia atmosférica sobre la resistencia del sistema (textura del suelo. Este indicador es obtenido en función de observaciones meteorológicas estándar a partir de un modelo que incluye la alteración del perfil vertical del viento ocasionada por la presencia de partículas de suelo en el aire y es expresado en términos de la probabilidad de que la potencia del viento supere las condiciones umbrales para el comienzo del proceso. Si bien el índice fue obtenido para suelo seco y desnudo, la metodología permite avanzar hacia un modelo de evaluación de riesgo más general, si se determinan previamente los valores de velocidad de fricción umbral que corresponden a distintas condiciones que afectan la resistencia del suelo tales como la humedad del suelo, el contenido de materia orgánica, cobertura y uso de la tierra. Este modelo ha sido utilizado para evaluar la distribución espacial del riesgo de erosión eólica en la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina.This paper proposes a climatic index to estimate the wind erosion risk based upon physical laws that quantify the effect of environment's aggression (atmospheric turbulence on system resistance (soil texture. This index is obtained as a function of standard meteorological observations including the alteration of the wind profile produced by the presence of soil particles in the air and it is expressed in terms of the probability for the wind power to exceed the threshold conditions. Although this index was obtained for dry and bare soil, it may mean an advance towards a more general model for risk evaluation if other factors intervening in soil resistance, such as soil humidity, organic material content, land cover and use are included. This model has been used to evaluate the spatial distribution

  5. Semantic Features for Classifying Referring Search Terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Chandler J.; Henry, Michael J.; McGrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.; Marshall, Eric J.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-05-11

    When an internet user clicks on a result in a search engine, a request is submitted to the destination web server that includes a referrer field containing the search terms given by the user. Using this information, website owners can analyze the search terms leading to their websites to better understand their visitors needs. This work explores some of the features that can be used for classification-based analysis of such referring search terms. We present initial results for the example task of classifying HTTP requests countries of origin. A system that can accurately predict the country of origin from query text may be a valuable complement to IP lookup methods which are susceptible to the obfuscation of dereferrers or proxies. We suggest that the addition of semantic features improves classifier performance in this example application. We begin by looking at related work and presenting our approach. After describing initial experiments and results, we discuss paths forward for this work.

  6. Comparing cosmic web classifiers using information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Florent; Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a decision scheme for optimally choosing a classifier, which segments the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters). Our framework, based on information theory, accounts for the design aims of different classes of possible applications: (i) parameter inference, (ii) model selection, and (iii) prediction of new observations. As an illustration, we use cosmographic maps of web-types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assess the relative performance of the classifiers T-web, DIVA and ORIGAMI for: (i) analyzing the morphology of the cosmic web, (ii) discriminating dark energy models, and (iii) predicting galaxy colors. Our study substantiates a data-supported connection between cosmic web analysis and information theory, and paves the path towards principled design of analysis procedures for the next generation of galaxy surveys. We have made the cosmic web maps, galaxy catalog, and analysis scripts used in this work publicly available.

  7. Classifying Star Forming Cores through Chemical Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoq, Sadia; Jackson, J.; Foster, J.

    2011-05-01

    The chemical makeup of Infrared Dark Clouds may offer a method to classify star forming cores. This study uses the molecular line maps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) Survey, observed using the 22-m ATNF Mopra Telescope. The relative abundances of the four molecules, N2H+, HNC, HCN and HCO+ are calculated for each of 500 cores to determine the chemical signatures of star forming cores in their early evolutionary stages, as deduced from Spitzer data. Cores are classified as prestellar, protostellar, or HII regions. Initial findings indicate that sources with relatively strong N2H+ lines are prestellar, whereas weak N2H+ lines may designate protostellar or HII regions. These chemical anomalies, where the N2H+ lines are either very prominent or weak are rare, suggesting that these are short-lived chemical phases.

  8. Comparing cosmic web classifiers using information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Florent; Lavaux, Guilhem; Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a decision scheme for optimally choosing a classifier, which segments the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters). Our framework, based on information theory, accounts for the design aims of different classes of possible applications: (i) parameter inference, (ii) model selection, and (iii) prediction of new observations. As an illustration, we use cosmographic maps of web-types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assess the relative performance of the classifiers T-WEB, DIVA and ORIGAMI for: (i) analyzing the morphology of the cosmic web, (ii) discriminating dark energy models, and (iii) predicting galaxy colors. Our study substantiates a data-supported connection between cosmic web analysis and information theory, and paves the path towards principled design of analysis procedures for the next generation of galaxy surveys. We have made the cosmic web maps, galaxy catalog, and analysis scripts used in this work publicly available.

  9. Classifying sows' activity types from acceleration patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornou, Cecile; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    -dimensional axes, plus the length of the acceleration vector) are selected for each activity. Each time series is modeled using a Dynamic Linear Model with cyclic components. The classification method, based on a Multi-Process Kalman Filter (MPKF), is applied to a total of 15 times series of 120 observations......An automated method of classifying sow activity using acceleration measurements would allow the individual sow's behavior to be monitored throughout the reproductive cycle; applications for detecting behaviors characteristic of estrus and farrowing or to monitor illness and welfare can be foreseen....... This article suggests a method of classifying five types of activity exhibited by group-housed sows. The method involves the measurement of acceleration in three dimensions. The five activities are: feeding, walking, rooting, lying laterally and lying sternally. Four time series of acceleration (the three...

  10. Classifying objects in LWIR imagery via CNNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Iain; Connor, Barry; Robertson, Neil M.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the presented work is to demonstrate enhanced target recognition and improved false alarm rates for a mid to long range detection system, utilising a Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) sensor. By exploiting high quality thermal image data and recent techniques in machine learning, the system can provide automatic target recognition capabilities. A Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) is trained and the classifier achieves an overall accuracy of > 95% for 6 object classes related to land defence. While the highly accurate CNN struggles to recognise long range target classes, due to low signal quality, robust target discrimination is achieved for challenging candidates. The overall performance of the methodology presented is assessed using human ground truth information, generating classifier evaluation metrics for thermal image sequences.

  11. Max-margin based Bayesian classifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao-cheng HU‡; Jin-hui YU

    2016-01-01

    There is a tradeoff between generalization capability and computational overhead in multi-class learning. We propose a generative probabilistic multi-class classifi er, considering both the generalization capability and the learning/prediction rate. We show that the classifi er has a max-margin property. Thus, prediction on future unseen data can nearly achieve the same performance as in the training stage. In addition, local variables are eliminated, which greatly simplifi es the optimization problem. By convex and probabilistic analysis, an efficient online learning algorithm is developed. The algorithm aggregates rather than averages dualities, which is different from the classical situations. Empirical results indicate that our method has a good generalization capability and coverage rate.

  12. Letter identification and the neural image classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B; Ahumada, Albert J

    2015-02-12

    Letter identification is an important visual task for both practical and theoretical reasons. To extend and test existing models, we have reviewed published data for contrast sensitivity for letter identification as a function of size and have also collected new data. Contrast sensitivity increases rapidly from the acuity limit but slows and asymptotes at a symbol size of about 1 degree. We recast these data in terms of contrast difference energy: the average of the squared distances between the letter images and the average letter image. In terms of sensitivity to contrast difference energy, and thus visual efficiency, there is a peak around ¼ degree, followed by a marked decline at larger sizes. These results are explained by a Neural Image Classifier model that includes optical filtering and retinal neural filtering, sampling, and noise, followed by an optimal classifier. As letters are enlarged, sensitivity declines because of the increasing size and spacing of the midget retinal ganglion cell receptive fields in the periphery.

  13. Combining supervised classifiers with unlabeled data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪艳; 张雪英; 李凤莲; 黄丽霞

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble learning is a wildly concerned issue. Traditional ensemble techniques are always adopted to seek better results with labeled data and base classifiers. They fail to address the ensemble task where only unlabeled data are available. A label propagation based ensemble (LPBE) approach is proposed to further combine base classification results with unlabeled data. First, a graph is constructed by taking unlabeled data as vertexes, and the weights in the graph are calculated by correntropy function. Average prediction results are gained from base classifiers, and then propagated under a regularization framework and adaptively enhanced over the graph. The proposed approach is further enriched when small labeled data are available. The proposed algorithms are evaluated on several UCI benchmark data sets. Results of simulations show that the proposed algorithms achieve satisfactory performance compared with existing ensemble methods.

  14. Classifying bed inclination using pressure images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran Pouyan, M; Ostadabbas, S; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is one of the most prevalent problems for bed-bound patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Pressure ulcers are painful for patients and costly for healthcare systems. Accurate in-bed posture analysis can significantly help in preventing pressure ulcers. Specifically, bed inclination (back angle) is a factor contributing to pressure ulcer development. In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to classify bed inclination. Our approach uses pressure values collected from a commercial pressure mat system. Then, by applying a number of image processing and machine learning techniques, the approximate degree of bed is estimated and classified. The proposed algorithm was tested on 15 subjects with various sizes and weights. The experimental results indicate that our method predicts bed inclination in three classes with 80.3% average accuracy.

  15. Classification Studies in an Advanced Air Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, Sunita; Bhima Rao, R.

    2016-10-01

    In the present paper, experiments are carried out using VSK separator which is an advanced air classifier to recover heavy minerals from beach sand. In classification experiments the cage wheel speed and the feed rate are set and the material is fed to the air cyclone and split into fine and coarse particles which are collected in separate bags. The size distribution of each fraction was measured by sieve analysis. A model is developed to predict the performance of the air classifier. The objective of the present model is to predict the grade efficiency curve for a given set of operating parameters such as cage wheel speed and feed rate. The overall experimental data with all variables studied in this investigation is fitted to several models. It is found that the present model is fitting good to the logistic model.

  16. The effect of single-application fluoride treatment on simulated gastric erosion and erosion-abrasion of enamel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rupert S; Stenhagen, Kjersti Refsholt; Hove, Lene Hystad; Tveit, Anne Bjørg; Moazzez, Rebecca V; Bartlett, David W

    2014-01-01

    To compare single-application fluoride formulations on enamel erosion and erosion-abrasion in vitro. Enamel specimens were pretreated with either sodium, tin, titanium, or sodium/calcium fluoride and subjected to either an erosion model or an erosion-abrasion model, after which optical profilometry was used to measure enamel step height loss. For erosion, the titanium fluoride (P .05). For erosion-abrasion, the titanium fluoride increased enamel loss in comparison to control (P fluoride has differing effects on enamel loss from erosion and erosion-abrasion models.

  17. Improving 2D Boosted Classifiers Using Depth LDA Classifier for Robust Face Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Rahat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Face detection plays an important role in Human Robot Interaction. Many of services provided by robots depend on face detection. This paper presents a novel face detection algorithm which uses depth data to improve the efficiency of a boosted classifier on 2D data for reduction of false positive alarms. The proposed method uses two levels of cascade classifiers. The classifiers of the first level deal with 2D data and classifiers of the second level use depth data captured by a stereo camera. The first level employs conventional cascade of boosted classifiers which eliminates many of nonface sub windows. The remaining sub windows are used as input to the second level. After calculating the corresponding depth model of the sub windows, a heuristic classifier along with a Linear Discriminant analysis (LDA classifier is applied on the depth data to reject remaining non face sub windows. The experimental results of the proposed method using a Bumblebee-2 stereo vision system on a mobile platform for real time detection of human faces in natural cluttered environments reveal significantly reduction of false positive alarms of 2D face detector.

  18. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  19. Bayes classifiers for imbalanced traffic accidents datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujalli, Randa Oqab; López, Griselda; Garach, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Traffic accidents data sets are usually imbalanced, where the number of instances classified under the killed or severe injuries class (minority) is much lower than those classified under the slight injuries class (majority). This, however, supposes a challenging problem for classification algorithms and may cause obtaining a model that well cover the slight injuries instances whereas the killed or severe injuries instances are misclassified frequently. Based on traffic accidents data collected on urban and suburban roads in Jordan for three years (2009-2011); three different data balancing techniques were used: under-sampling which removes some instances of the majority class, oversampling which creates new instances of the minority class and a mix technique that combines both. In addition, different Bayes classifiers were compared for the different imbalanced and balanced data sets: Averaged One-Dependence Estimators, Weightily Average One-Dependence Estimators, and Bayesian networks in order to identify factors that affect the severity of an accident. The results indicated that using the balanced data sets, especially those created using oversampling techniques, with Bayesian networks improved classifying a traffic accident according to its severity and reduced the misclassification of killed and severe injuries instances. On the other hand, the following variables were found to contribute to the occurrence of a killed causality or a severe injury in a traffic accident: number of vehicles involved, accident pattern, number of directions, accident type, lighting, surface condition, and speed limit. This work, to the knowledge of the authors, is the first that aims at analyzing historical data records for traffic accidents occurring in Jordan and the first to apply balancing techniques to analyze injury severity of traffic accidents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Statistical Mechanics of Soft Margin Classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Risau-Gusman, Sebastian; Gordon, Mirta B.

    2001-01-01

    We study the typical learning properties of the recently introduced Soft Margin Classifiers (SMCs), learning realizable and unrealizable tasks, with the tools of Statistical Mechanics. We derive analytically the behaviour of the learning curves in the regime of very large training sets. We obtain exponential and power laws for the decay of the generalization error towards the asymptotic value, depending on the task and on general characteristics of the distribution of stabilities of the patte...

  1. A Bayesian classifier for symbol recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Barrat, Sabine; Tabbone, Salvatore; Nourrissier, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    URL : http://www.buyans.com/POL/UploadedFile/134_9977.pdf; International audience; We present in this paper an original adaptation of Bayesian networks to symbol recognition problem. More precisely, a descriptor combination method, which enables to improve significantly the recognition rate compared to the recognition rates obtained by each descriptor, is presented. In this perspective, we use a simple Bayesian classifier, called naive Bayes. In fact, probabilistic graphical models, more spec...

  2. Deterministic Pattern Classifier Based on Genetic Programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-wu; LI Min-qiang; KOU Ji-song

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a supervised training-test method with Genetic Programming (GP) for pattern classification. Compared and contrasted with traditional methods with regard to deterministic pattern classifiers, this method is true for both linear separable problems and linear non-separable problems. For specific training samples, it can formulate the expression of discriminate function well without any prior knowledge. At last, an experiment is conducted, and the result reveals that this system is effective and practical.

  3. Modeling the erosion of tropical volcanic ocean islands : The Tahiti island case (French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, F.; Sichoix, L.; Barriot, J.; Dumas, P.

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we are interested in modeling the erosion of the Tahiti island, with two main objectives: risk assessment (erodibility of terrains with rainfall, catastrophic runoffs) and estimation of subsidence rate. The Tahiti island created around 1.4 Myears ago by an intraplate hotspot (aerial radiometric dating), is divided into two geological units: the main island Tahiti-Nui to northwest (end of volcanism 200,000 years ago) and the subsidiary Tahiti-Iti to the southeast (end of volcanism 380,000 years ago). It is now volcanically inactive and is deeply dissected by erosion. Tahiti Nui is around 30 km in diameter, and Tahiti Iti around 15 km. Both are linked through the isthmus of Taravao. The highest elevation is 2241 m. The two sub-islands are basaltic edifices, with an overwhelming presence of oxisols (down to tens of meters in some places). Slopes can be divided into three classes: 15° for the global slope of the shield volcanoes, 47° for the incision valleys and 2° for the seashore rim. Rainfalls range from 8,000 mm/year on the East side of Tahiti (trade winds) to 2,000 mm/year on the West side, the humid season of a year is summer. This study is conducted to validate the Unit Stream Power Erosion and Deposition (USPED) model, an enrichment to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to calculate average annual soil loss per unit land area resulting from rill and sheet erosion. The USPED model differs from other USLE models on how it handles the influence of topography on the erosion process, because USLE consider erosion only along the flow line without the influence of flow convergence/divergence. As the result, the USPED model predicts both erosion and deposition, while most other USLE-based models are limited to predictions of erosion only. The USLE, USPED equation can be written as A=R*K*LS*C*P where A is the soil loss, R the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor, K a soil erodibility factor, L a slope-length factor, S a slope steepness factor, C a

  4. Evolving edited k-nearest neighbor classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Pita, Roberto; Yao, Xin

    2008-12-01

    The k-nearest neighbor method is a classifier based on the evaluation of the distances to each pattern in the training set. The edited version of this method consists of the application of this classifier with a subset of the complete training set in which some of the training patterns are excluded, in order to reduce the classification error rate. In recent works, genetic algorithms have been successfully applied to determine which patterns must be included in the edited subset. In this paper we propose a novel implementation of a genetic algorithm for designing edited k-nearest neighbor classifiers. It includes the definition of a novel mean square error based fitness function, a novel clustered crossover technique, and the proposal of a fast smart mutation scheme. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, results using the breast cancer database, the diabetes database and the letter recognition database from the UCI machine learning benchmark repository have been included. Both error rate and computational cost have been considered in the analysis. Obtained results show the improvement achieved by the proposed editing method.

  5. Puerto Rico Relative Vulnerability to Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical factors, such as the slope of the land, the texture of the soil, and the precipitation regime influence erosion in an area. Parts of Puerto Rico are very...

  6. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  7. Geophysical Processes - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  8. Erosion behaviour of hydro turbine steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh K Chauhan; D B Goel; Satya Prakash

    2008-04-01

    The martensitic stainless steel (termed as 13/4) is currently being used for fabrication of underwater parts in hydroelectric projects. There are, however, several maintenance problems associated with the use of this steel. A nitronic steel (termed as 21–4–N) has been developed as an alternative with the specific aim of overcoming these problems. A comparative study has been made on the erosion behaviour of 13/4 and 21–4–N steels by means of solid particle impingement using gas jet. The eroded surfaces after erosion tests were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It is observed that the 21–4–N nitronic steel possesses better resistance to erosion in comparison to 13/4 martensitic stainless steel. The austenitic matrix of the nitronic steel possesses high hardness, high tensile toughness and work hardening ability, which results in higher erosion resistance.

  9. Time-Dependent Erosion of Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Richard E.; Anderson, John R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2008-01-01

    The accurate prediction of thruster life requires time-dependent erosion estimates for the ion optics assembly. Such information is critical to end-of-life mechanisms such as electron backstreaming. CEX2D was recently modified to handle time-dependent erosion, double ions, and multiple throttle conditions in a single run. The modified code is called "CEX2D-t". Comparisons of CEX2D-t results with LDT and ELT post-tests results show good agreement for both screen and accel grid erosion including important erosion features such as chamfering of the downstream end of the accel grid and reduced rate of accel grid aperture enlargement with time.

  10. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Puerto Rico Relative Vulnerability to Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical factors, such as the slope of the land, the texture of the soil, and the precipitation regime influence erosion in an area. Parts of Puerto Rico are very...

  12. Erosion dynamics of a wet granular medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Jop, Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Liquid may give strong cohesion properties to a granular medium, and confer a solidlike behavior. We study the erosion of a fixed circular aggregate of wet granular matter subjected to a flow of dry grains inside a half-filled rotating drum. During the rotation, the dry grains flow around the fixed obstacle. We show that its diameter decreases linearly with time for low liquid content, as wet grains are pulled out of the aggregate. This erosion phenomenon is governed by the properties of the liquids. The erosion rate decreases exponentially with the surface tension while it depends on the viscosity to the power -1. We propose a model based on the force fluctuations arising inside the flow, explaining both dependencies: The capillary force acts as a threshold and the viscosity controls the erosion time scale. We also provide experiments using different flowing grains, confirming our model.

  13. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 1990) and (maximum monthly)...

  14. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 2000) and (maximum monthly)...

  15. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  16. Definition of tolerable soil erosion values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sparovek

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the criteria for defining erosion tolerance are well established, the limits generally used are not consistent with natural, economical and technological conditions. Rates greater than soil formation can be accepted only until a minimum of soil depth is reached, provided that they are not associated with environmental hazard or productivity losses. A sequence of equations is presented to calculate erosion tolerance rates through time. The selection of equation parameters permits the definition of erosion tolerance rates in agreement with environmental, social and technical needs. The soil depth change that is related to irreversible soil degradation can be calculated. The definition of soil erosion tolerance according to these equations can be used as a guideline for sustainable land use planning and is compatible with expert systems.

  17. STUDY ON IMPACT OF SALINE WATER INUNDATION ON FRESHWATER AQUACULTURE IN SUNDARBAN USING RISK ANALYSIS TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K Chand

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of saline water inundation on freshwater aquaculture was evaluated through risk assessment tools. Fishponds in low-lying areas of Sagar and Basanti block are prone to saline water flooding. Respondents of Sagar block considered events like cyclone and coastal flooding as extreme risk; erratic monsoon, storm surge and land erosion as high risk; temperature rise, sea level rise, hot & extended summer and precipitation as medium risk. Likewise, in Basanti block the respondents rated cyclone as extreme risk; erratic monsoon, storm surge as high risk; temperature rise, hot & extended summer, land erosion, and precipitation as medium risk; coastal flooding and sea level rise as low risk. Fish farmers of Sagar block classified the consequences of saline water flooding like breach of pond embankment and mass mortality of fishes as extreme risk; escape of existing fish stock and diseases as high risk; entry of unwanted species, retardation of growth and deterioration of water quality as medium risk; and damage of pond environment as low risk. Farmers of Basanti block categorised breach of pond dyke, mass mortality of fishes and entry of unwanted species as extreme risk; escape of fish and diseases as high risk; retardation of growth as medium risk; deterioration of water quality and damage of pond environment as low risk. To reduce the threats against saline water ingression, farmers are taking some coping measures like increase in pond dyke height; repair and strengthening of dyke; plantation on dyke; dewatering and addition of fresh water; application of chemicals/ lime/ dung; addition of tree branches in pond for hide outs etc.

  18. Impact of Climate Change on Riverbank Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Most. Nazneen Aktar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world. This country is highly vulnerable to climate change because of a number of hydro-geological and socio-economic factors such as geographical location, topography, extreme climate variability, high population density, poverty incidence and dependency of agriculture on climate. Presently this country has been experiencing different hydro-meteorological disastrous events that have never been experienced before. Along with other natural disasters, floods are expected to be impacted by climate change in the future. Since floods are always associated with riverbank erosion, it is essential to assess the impact of climate change on bank erosion. Riverbank erosion is also a serious hazard that directly or indirectly causes the suffering of millions of people. Beyond that, most of the old cities and important infrastructures in this country are situated on riverbanks since once upon a time waterway transportation was the main mode of travel. Moreover, people like to reside near rivers because of their dependency on river water for irrigation purposes. So a major part of the total population of this country lives near riverbanks, which frequently makes them victims of riverbank erosion. The major rivers, the Jamuna, the Ganges and the Padma, annually erode thousand hectares of floodplain land and damage or destroy infrastructures. Consequently, this natural disaster has become a major social hazard. This study aims to find out the relationship between floods and bank erosion; and hence the impact of climate changes on riverbank erosion. Since there is no record on riverbank erosion, this study attempts to measure it with the help of satellite images. It has been found in this study that climate change will play a significant role in riverbank erosion. On an average, the riverbank erosion along the major three rivers will be increased by 13% by 2050 and it will be increased by 18% by

  19. Reconfiguration-based implementation of SVM classifier on FPGA for Classifying Microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanaa M; Benkrid, Khaled; Seker, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    Classifying Microarray data, which are of high dimensional nature, requires high computational power. Support Vector Machines-based classifier (SVM) is among the most common and successful classifiers used in the analysis of Microarray data but also requires high computational power due to its complex mathematical architecture. Implementing SVM on hardware exploits the parallelism available within the algorithm kernels to accelerate the classification of Microarray data. In this work, a flexible, dynamically and partially reconfigurable implementation of the SVM classifier on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is presented. The SVM architecture achieved up to 85× speed-up over equivalent general purpose processor (GPP) showing the capability of FPGAs in enhancing the performance of SVM-based analysis of Microarray data as well as future bioinformatics applications.

  20. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Nearing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natural, non-cropped conditions have been documented to be less than 2 Mg ha−1 yr−1. On-site rates of erosion of lands under cultivation over large cropland areas, such as in the United States, have been documented to be on the order of 6 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. In northeastern China, lands that were brought into production during the last century are thought to have average rates of erosion over this large area of as much as 15 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. Broadly applied soil conservation practices, and in particular conservation tillage and no-till cropping, have been found to be effective in reducing rates of erosion, as was seen in the United States when the average rates of erosion on cropped lands decreased from on the order of 9 Mg ha−1 yr−1 to 6 or 7 Mg ha−1 yr−1 between 1982 and 2002, coincident with the widespread adoption of new conservation tillage and residue management practices. Taking cropped lands out of production and restoring them to perennial plant cover, as was done in areas of the United States under the Conservation Reserve Program, is thought to reduce average erosion rates to approximately 1 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or less on those lands.

  1. Magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Rodney J.; Jones, Michael E.; Grossmann, John M.; Ottinger, Paul F.

    1988-10-01

    Computer simulations demonstrate that the entrainment (or advection) of magnetic field with the flow of cathode-emitted electrons can constitute a dominant mechanism for the magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas. Cross-field drift in the accelerating electric field near the cathode starts the penetration process. Plasma erosion propagates the point for emission and magnetic field injection along the cathode toward the load-for the possibility of rapid switch opening.

  2. Erosion patterns on dissolving blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Patterns in nature are shaped under water flows and wind action, and the understanding of their morphodynamics goes through the identification of the physical mechanisms at play. When a dissoluble body is exposed to a water flow, typical patterns with scallop-like shapes may appear [1,2]. These shapes are observed on the walls of underground rivers or icebergs. We experimentally study the erosion of dissolving bodies made of salt, caramel or ice into water solutions without external flow. The dissolving mixture, which is created at the solid/liquid interface, undergoes a buoyancy-driven instability comparable to a Rayleigh-Bénard instability so that the dissolving front destabilizes into filaments. This mechanism yields to spatial variations of solute concentration and to differential dissolution of the dissolving block. We first observe longitudinal stripes with a well defined wavelength, which evolve towards chevrons and scallops that interact and move again the dissolving current. Thanks to a careful analysis of the competing physical mechanisms, we propose scaling laws, which account for the characteristic lengths and times of the early regime in experiments. The long-term evolution of patterns is understood qualitatively. A close related mechanism has been proposed to explain structures observed on the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes [3] and we suggest that our experiments are analogous and explain the scallop-like patterns on iceberg walls. [1] P. Meakin and B. Jamtveit, Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems, Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 659-694 (2010). [2] P.N. Blumberg and R.L. Curl, Experimental and theoretical studies of dissolution roughness, J. Fluid Mech. 65, 735-751 (1974). [3] L. Solari and G. Parker, Morphodynamic modelling of the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes, J.G.R. 118, 1432-1442 (2013).

  3. Dental erosion: causes, diagnostics and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sosa-Puente

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a commonly studied topic, it is difficult to find studies which explain the problem of dental erosion. For this article, literature was analyzed to find information on the agents which trigger dental erosion, the main diagnosis methods, the most common treatments used nowadays and the interrelationship with dental materials. The etiology of dental erosion is multifactorial, including acids, eating disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, biological factors such as saliva or habits also play a part in the establishment of this condition. In order to establish a reliable diagnosis, clinical appearance becomes decisive. The Basic Index Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE, created in 2008, is an auxiliary diagnosis tool for assessing the status and progress of the erosion. Treatment should be linked to the eradication of the causative agent and it can range from simple observational monitoring of slightly affected teeth to the placement of total crowns in the most severe cases, but this will depend entirely on the extent, severity, symptoms and type of dentition. Regarding dental materials used in the treatment of eroded parts, there are glass ionomer and composite; the latter presents the greatest resistance to biodegradation when interacting with acids. Glass ionomers are the most vulnerable material while resin is seen as the most resistant. In conclusion, dental erosion has become an issue of great importance in the dental practice because of its serious impact on dental structures. Consequently, it is ranked among the most important dental disorders in the present day.

  4. Erosion of Earthen Levees by Wave Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeren, Y.; Wren, D. G.; Reba, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    Earthen levees of aquaculture and irrigation reservoirs in the United States often experience significant erosion due to wind-generated waves. Typically constructed using local soils, unprotected levees are subjected to rapid erosion and retreat due to wind generated waves and surface runoff. Only a limited amount of published work addresses the erosion rates for unprotected levees, and producers who rely on irrigation reservoirs need an economic basis for selecting a protection method for vulnerable levees. This, in turn, means that a relationship between wave energy and erosion of cohesive soils is needed. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out in order to quantify wave induced levee erosion and retreat. A model erodible bank was packed using a soil consisting of approximately 14% sand, 73% silt, and 13% clay in a 20.6 m long 0.7 m wide and 1.2 m deep wave tank at the USDA-ARS, National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford MS. The geometry of the levee face was monitored by digital camera and the waves were measured by means of 6 capacitance wave staffs. Relationships were established between levee erosion, edge and retreat rates, and incident wave energy.

  5. Satellite-based estimation of rainfall erosivity for Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Sterk, G.; Jong, S.M. de

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a measure for the erosive force of rainfall. Rainfall kinetic energy determines the erosivity and is in turn greatly dependent on rainfall intensity. Attempts for its large-scale mapping are rare. Most are based on interpolation of erosivity values derived from rain gauge data.

  6. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 1. Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; J. W. Wagenbrenner; R. E. Brown

    2010-01-01

    Rill erosion can be a large portion of the total erosion in disturbed forests, but measurements of the runoff and erosion at the rill scale are uncommon. Simulated rill erosion experiments were conducted in two forested areas in the northwestern United States on slopes ranging from 18 to 79%. We compared runoff rates, runoff velocities, and sediment flux rates from...

  7. Classifying smoking urges via machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumortier, Antoine; Beckjord, Ellen; Shiffman, Saul; Sejdić, Ervin

    2016-12-01

    Smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and diseases in the developed world, and advances in modern electronics and machine learning can help us deliver real-time intervention to smokers in novel ways. In this paper, we examine different machine learning approaches to use situational features associated with having or not having urges to smoke during a quit attempt in order to accurately classify high-urge states. To test our machine learning approaches, specifically, Bayes, discriminant analysis and decision tree learning methods, we used a dataset collected from over 300 participants who had initiated a quit attempt. The three classification approaches are evaluated observing sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and precision. The outcome of the analysis showed that algorithms based on feature selection make it possible to obtain high classification rates with only a few features selected from the entire dataset. The classification tree method outperformed the naive Bayes and discriminant analysis methods, with an accuracy of the classifications up to 86%. These numbers suggest that machine learning may be a suitable approach to deal with smoking cessation matters, and to predict smoking urges, outlining a potential use for mobile health applications. In conclusion, machine learning classifiers can help identify smoking situations, and the search for the best features and classifier parameters significantly improves the algorithms' performance. In addition, this study also supports the usefulness of new technologies in improving the effect of smoking cessation interventions, the management of time and patients by therapists, and thus the optimization of available health care resources. Future studies should focus on providing more adaptive and personalized support to people who really need it, in a minimum amount of time by developing novel expert systems capable of delivering real-time interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  8. Seasonality of soil erosion under mediterranean conditions at the Alqueva Dam watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha(-1)), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha(-1)) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha(-1), and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 10(3) kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions.

  9. Erosion studies at Lake Pyhäjärvi catchment (SW Finland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkkala, Teija; Ventelä, Anne-Mari; Tarvainen, Marjo; Jolma, Ari

    2014-05-01

    Lake Säkylän Pyhäjärvi is a large and shallow lake located in the centre of an intensive agricultural area in southwest Finland and it suffering from eutrophication. The nutrient load to Pyhäjärvi comes from diffuse agricultural sources in the catchment. The dominant land cover in the catchment area (22%) is made by cultivated fields, the rest comprising forests, peat lands and built-up areas. The soils of the Pyhäjärvi catchment are erosion sensitive clay, silt, till and peat. The suspended solid and nutrient transport of the main rivers flowing to the lake has been monitored since 1980's. Most part (over 70 %) of phosphorus load is particulate and erosion originated. In recent years the climate change has changed runoff patterns. In winter, mean air temperature is about -2.1 ºC and the catchment is also normally covered by snow in winter. However, in recent years there have been many years with higher winter time temperature and precipitation. In winter the fields are usually without vegetation cover and rainfalls increase erosion. There are already clear long term changes observed in runoff patterns and suspended solid load patterns. The erosion risk invention has been made to Yläneenjoki catchment in order to allocate erosion preventing measures. Sedimentation ponds, wetlands, buffer zones and filters have been used to catch the suspended solids from runoff but these methods are inadequate. In order to efficiently reduce nutrient load to the lake, the focus of the restoration measures should be in the soil, especially erosion preventing. Therefore more deep understanding and studying of erosion processes are needed. Runoff and erosion amounts and patterns should be measured in different types of fields should be done and combined to GIS-analysis.

  10. Gearbox Condition Monitoring Using Advanced Classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Večeř

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New efficient and reliable methods for gearbox diagnostics are needed in automotive industry because of growing demand for production quality. This paper presents the application of two different classifiers for gearbox diagnostics – Kohonen Neural Networks and the Adaptive-Network-based Fuzzy Interface System (ANFIS. Two different practical applications are presented. In the first application, the tested gearboxes are separated into two classes according to their condition indicators. In the second example, ANFIS is applied to label the tested gearboxes with a Quality Index according to the condition indicators. In both applications, the condition indicators were computed from the vibration of the gearbox housing. 

  11. Learning Rates for -Regularized Kernel Classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Tong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a family of classification algorithms generated from a regularization kernel scheme associated with -regularizer and convex loss function. Our main purpose is to provide an explicit convergence rate for the excess misclassification error of the produced classifiers. The error decomposition includes approximation error, hypothesis error, and sample error. We apply some novel techniques to estimate the hypothesis error and sample error. Learning rates are eventually derived under some assumptions on the kernel, the input space, the marginal distribution, and the approximation error.

  12. Intelligent neural network classifier for automatic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Baoxing; Yu, Heping

    1996-10-01

    This paper is concerned with an application of a multilayer feedforward neural network for the vision detection of industrial pictures, and introduces a high characteristics image processing and recognizing system which can be used for real-time testing blemishes, streaks and cracks, etc. on the inner walls of high-accuracy pipes. To take full advantage of the functions of the artificial neural network, such as the information distributed memory, large scale self-adapting parallel processing, high fault-tolerance ability, this system uses a multilayer perceptron as a regular detector to extract features of the images to be inspected and classify them.

  13. Cubical sets as a classifying topos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spitters, Bas

    Coquand’s cubical set model for homotopy type theory provides the basis for a computational interpretation of the univalence axiom and some higher inductive types, as implemented in the cubical proof assistant. We show that the underlying cube category is the opposite of the Lawvere theory of De...... Morgan algebras. The topos of cubical sets itself classifies the theory of ‘free De Morgan algebras’. This provides us with a topos with an internal ‘interval’. Using this interval we construct a model of type theory following van den Berg and Garner. We are currently investigating the precise relation...

  14. Classifying spaces of degenerating polarized Hodge structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Kazuya

    2009-01-01

    In 1970, Phillip Griffiths envisioned that points at infinity could be added to the classifying space D of polarized Hodge structures. In this book, Kazuya Kato and Sampei Usui realize this dream by creating a logarithmic Hodge theory. They use the logarithmic structures begun by Fontaine-Illusie to revive nilpotent orbits as a logarithmic Hodge structure. The book focuses on two principal topics. First, Kato and Usui construct the fine moduli space of polarized logarithmic Hodge structures with additional structures. Even for a Hermitian symmetric domain D, the present theory is a refinem

  15. Objectively classifying Southern Hemisphere extratropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catto, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    There has been a long tradition in attempting to separate extratropical cyclones into different classes depending on their cloud signatures, airflows, synoptic precursors, or upper-level flow features. Depending on these features, the cyclones may have different impacts, for example in their precipitation intensity. It is important, therefore, to understand how the distribution of different cyclone classes may change in the future. Many of the previous classifications have been performed manually. In order to be able to evaluate climate models and understand how extratropical cyclones might change in the future, we need to be able to use an automated method to classify cyclones. Extratropical cyclones have been identified in the Southern Hemisphere from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset with a commonly used identification and tracking algorithm that employs 850 hPa relative vorticity. A clustering method applied to large-scale fields from ERA-Interim at the time of cyclone genesis (when the cyclone is first detected), has been used to objectively classify identified cyclones. The results are compared to the manual classification of Sinclair and Revell (2000) and the four objectively identified classes shown in this presentation are found to match well. The relative importance of diabatic heating in the clusters is investigated, as well as the differing precipitation characteristics. The success of the objective classification shows its utility in climate model evaluation and climate change studies.

  16. Adaptive classifier for steel strip surface defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mingming; Li, Guangyao; Xie, Li; Xiao, Mang; Yi, Li

    2017-01-01

    Surface defects detection system has been receiving increased attention as its precision, speed and less cost. One of the most challenges is reacting to accuracy deterioration with time as aged equipment and changed processes. These variables will make a tiny change to the real world model but a big impact on the classification result. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive classifier with a Bayes kernel (BYEC) which update the model with small sample to it adaptive for accuracy deterioration. Firstly, abundant features were introduced to cover lots of information about the defects. Secondly, we constructed a series of SVMs with the random subspace of the features. Then, a Bayes classifier was trained as an evolutionary kernel to fuse the results from base SVMs. Finally, we proposed the method to update the Bayes evolutionary kernel. The proposed algorithm is experimentally compared with different algorithms, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can be updated with small sample and fit the changed model well. Robustness, low requirement for samples and adaptive is presented in the experiment.

  17. A systematic comparison of supervised classifiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Raphael Amancio

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition has been employed in a myriad of industrial, commercial and academic applications. Many techniques have been devised to tackle such a diversity of applications. Despite the long tradition of pattern recognition research, there is no technique that yields the best classification in all scenarios. Therefore, as many techniques as possible should be considered in high accuracy applications. Typical related works either focus on the performance of a given algorithm or compare various classification methods. In many occasions, however, researchers who are not experts in the field of machine learning have to deal with practical classification tasks without an in-depth knowledge about the underlying parameters. Actually, the adequate choice of classifiers and parameters in such practical circumstances constitutes a long-standing problem and is one of the subjects of the current paper. We carried out a performance study of nine well-known classifiers implemented in the Weka framework and compared the influence of the parameter configurations on the accuracy. The default configuration of parameters in Weka was found to provide near optimal performance for most cases, not including methods such as the support vector machine (SVM. In addition, the k-nearest neighbor method frequently allowed the best accuracy. In certain conditions, it was possible to improve the quality of SVM by more than 20% with respect to their default parameter configuration.

  18. Classifying Coding DNA with Nucleotide Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Carels

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we compared the success rate of classification of coding sequences (CDS vs. introns by Codon Structure Factor (CSF and by a method that we called Universal Feature Method (UFM. UFM is based on the scoring of purine bias (Rrr and stop codon frequency. We show that the success rate of CDS/intron classification by UFM is higher than by CSF. UFM classifies ORFs as coding or non-coding through a score based on (i the stop codon distribution, (ii the product of purine probabilities in the three positions of nucleotide triplets, (iii the product of Cytosine (C, Guanine (G, and Adenine (A probabilities in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd positions of triplets, respectively, (iv the probabilities of G in 1st and 2nd position of triplets and (v the distance of their GC3 vs. GC2 levels to the regression line of the universal correlation. More than 80% of CDSs (true positives of Homo sapiens (>250 bp, Drosophila melanogaster (>250 bp and Arabidopsis thaliana (>200 bp are successfully classified with a false positive rate lower or equal to 5%. The method releases coding sequences in their coding strand and coding frame, which allows their automatic translation into protein sequences with 95% confidence. The method is a natural consequence of the compositional bias of nucleotides in coding sequences.

  19. Fcoused crawler bused on Bayesian classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIA Haijun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the network,its information resources are increasingly large and faced a huge amount of information database,search engine plays an important role.Focused crawling technique,as the main core portion of search engine,is used to calculate the relationship between search results and search topics,which is called correlation.Normally,focused crawling method is used only to calculate the correlation between web content and search related topics.In this paper,focused crawling method is used to compute the importance of links through link content and anchor text,then Bayesian classifier is used to classify the links,and finally cosine similarity function is used to calculate the relevance of web pages.If the correlation value is greater than the threshold the page is considered to be associated with the predetermined topics,otherwise not relevant.Experimental results show that a high accuracy can be obtained by using the proposed crawling approach.

  20. Rotational Study of Ambiguous Taxonomic Classified Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Tyler R.; Sanchez, Rick; Wuerker, Wolfgang; Clayson, Timothy; Giles, Tucker

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) moving object catalog (MOC4) provided the largest ever catalog of asteroid spectrophotometry observations. Carvano et al. (2010), while analyzing MOC4, discovered that individual observations of asteroids which were observed multiple times did not classify into the same photometric-based taxonomic class. A small subset of those asteroids were classified as having both the presence and absence of a 1um silicate absorption feature. If these variations are linked to differences in surface mineralogy, the prevailing assumption that an asteroid’s surface composition is predominantly homogenous would need to be reexamined. Furthermore, our understanding of the evolution of the asteroid belt, as well as the linkage between certain asteroids and meteorite types may need to be modified.This research is an investigation to determine the rotational rates of these taxonomically ambiguous asteroids. Initial questions to be answered:Do these asteroids have unique or nonstandard rotational rates?Is there any evidence in their light curve to suggest an abnormality?Observations were taken using PROMPT6 a 0.41-m telescope apart of the SKYNET network at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). Observations were calibrated and analyzed using Canopus software. Initial results will be presented at AAS.

  1. Changes in forcing factors affecting coastal and shallow water erosion in the future Arctic climate change projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, Mikhail; Razumov, Sergey; Brovkin, Victor; Ilyina, Tatiana; Grigoriev, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Driving factors of seabed and coastal erosion in the Arctic can be classified as thermal and mechanical. Thermal factors such as air and ocean temperatures affect the seabed and coastal ground temperatures. Mechanical factors such as ocean currents and surface gravity waves contribute to the seabed and costal erosion due to shear stress. Due to polar amplification, the Arctic experiences strong increase in air and water temperature, sea-ice loss and changes in the ocean and atmospheric circulation, temperature and wind distribution. These climatic changes lead to changes in factors driving seabed and coastal erosion, which is expected to accelerate in the shallow Arctic regions such as the Laptev sea and East Siberian sea. In these regions, the coastal line to a large extent consists of frozen rocks, sediments and organic soils including ground ice. The increase of erosion rate of the coastal line will increase the release of organic and inorganic matter from thawed permafrost. Dynamics of thermal and mechanical drivers of seabed and coastal erosion in the present and future climate change (RCP8.5 scenario) simulated by the CMIP5 version of the MPI Earth system model and wave model WAM will be presented. Special attention will be given to changes in the air temperature, wind dynamics and development of new waves system in the ``ice-free'' Arctic and its role in the seabed and coastal erosion.

  2. 5 CFR 1312.23 - Access to classified information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to classified information. 1312.23... Classified Information § 1312.23 Access to classified information. Classified information may be made... “need to know” and the access is essential to the accomplishment of official government duties....

  3. Predicting surfacing internal erosion in moraine core dams

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Dams that comprise broadly and widely graded glacial materials, such as moraines, have been found to be susceptible to internal erosion, perhaps more than dams of other soil types. Internal erosion washes out fine-grained particles from the filling material; the erosion occurs within the material itself or at an interface to another dam zone, depending on the mode of initiation. Whether or not internal erosion proceeds depend on the adequacy of the filter material. If internal erosion is allo...

  4. Reconstructive laparoscopic prolapse surgery to avoid mesh erosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devassy, Rajesh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of the study is to examine the efficacy of the purely laparoscopic reconstructive management of cystocele and rectocele with mesh, to avoid the risk of erosion by the graft material, a well known complication in vaginal mesh surgery. Material and methods: We performed a prospective, single-case, non-randomized study in 325 patients who received laparoscopic reconstructive management of pelvic organe prolaps with mesh. The study was conducted between January 2004 and December 2012 in a private clinic in India. The most common prolapse symptoms were reducible vaginal lump, urinary stress incontinence, constipation and flatus incontinence, sexual dysfunction and dypareunia. The degree e of the prolaps was staged according to POPQ system. The approach was purely laparoscopic and involved the use of polypropylene (Prolene or polyurethane with activated regenerated cellulose coating (Parietex mesh. Results: The mean age was 55 (30–80 years and the most of the patients were multiparous (272/325. The patients received a plastic correction of the rectocele only (138 cases, a cystocele and rectocele (187 cases with mesh. 132 patients had a concomitant total hysterectomy; in 2 cases a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy was performed and 190 patients had a laparoscopic colposuspension. The mean operation time was 82.2 (60–210 minutes. The mean follow up was 3.4 (3–5 years. Urinary retention developed in 1 case, which required a new laparoscopical intervention. Bladder injury, observed in the same case was in one session closed with absorbable suture. There were four recurrences of the rectocele, receiving a posterior vaginal colporrhaphy. Erosions of the mesh were not reported or documented. Conclusion: The pure laparoscopic reconstructive management of the cystocele and rectocele with mesh seems to be a safe and effective surgical procedure potentially avoiding the risk of mesh erosions.

  5. Hydro-abrasive erosion: Problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, K.

    2014-03-01

    The number of hydro power plants with hydro-abrasive erosion is increasing worldwide. An overall approach is needed to minimize the impact of this phenomenon. Already at the start of the planning phase an evaluation should be done to quantify the erosion and the impact on the operation. For this, the influencing parameters and their impact on the erosion have to be known. The necessary information for the evaluation comprises among others the future design, the particle parameters of the water, which will pass the turbine, and the power plant owner's framework for the future operation like availability or maximum allowable efficiency loss, before an overhaul needs to be done. Based on this evaluation of the erosion, an optimised solution can then be found, by analysing all measures in relation to investments, energy production and maintenance costs as decision parameters. Often a more erosion-resistant design, instead of choosing the turbine design with the highest efficiency, will lead to higher revenue. The paper will discuss the influencing parameters on hydro-abrasive erosion and the problems to acquire this information. There are different optimisation possibilities, which will be shown in different case studies. One key aspect to reduce the erosion and prolong the operation time of the components is to coat all relevant parts. But it is very important that this decision is taken early in the design stage, as the design has to be adapted to the requirements of the coating process. The quality of coatings and their impact on the operation will be discussed in detail in the paper as due to the non-availability of standards many questions arise in projects.

  6. Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel

    2016-01-01

    Speaking up, i.e. expressing ones concerns, is a critical piece of effective communication. Yet, we see many situations in which crew members have concerns and still remain silent. Why would that be the case? And how can we assess the risks of speaking up vs. the risks of keeping silent? And once we do make up our minds to speak up, how should we go about it? Our workshop aims to answer these questions, and to provide us all with practical tools for effective risk assessment and effective speaking-up strategies..

  7. Comparison of Current Frame-Based Phoneme Classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Pfeifer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares today’s most common frame-based classifiers. These classifiers can be divided into the two main groups – generic classifiers which creates the most probable model based on the training data (for example GMM and discriminative classifiers which focues on creating decision hyperplane. A lot of research has been done with the GMM classifiers and therefore this paper will be mainly focused on the frame-based classifiers. Two discriminative classifiers will be presented. These classifiers implements a hieararchical tree root structure over the input phoneme group which shown to be an effective. Based on these classifiers, two efficient training algorithms will be presented. We demonstrate advantages of our training algorithms by evaluating all classifiers over the TIMIT speech corpus.

  8. Susceptibility of bovine dental enamel with initial erosion lesion to new erosive challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gabriela Cristina de; Tereza, Guida Paola Genovez; Boteon, Ana Paula; Ferrairo, Brunna Mota; Gonçalves, Priscilla Santana Pinto; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel da; Honório, Heitor Marques; Rios, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the impact of initial erosion on the susceptibility of enamel to further erosive challenge. Thirty bovine enamel blocks were selected by surface hardness and randomized into two groups (n = 15): GC- group composed by enamel blocks without erosion lesion and GT- group composed by enamel blocks with initial erosion lesion. The baseline profile of each block was determined using the profilometer. The initial erosion was produced by immersing the blocks into HCl 0.01 M, pH 2.3 for 30 seconds, under stirring. The erosive cycling consisted of blocks immersion in hydrochloric acid (0.01 M, pH 2.3) for 2 minutes, followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 120 minutes. This procedure was repeated 4 times a day for 5 days, and the blocks were kept in artificial saliva overnight. After erosive cycling, final profile measurement was performed. Profilometry measured the enamel loss by the superposition of initial and final profiles. Data were analyzed by t-test (pdental enamel does not enhance its susceptibility to new erosive challenges.

  9. Soil carbon and nitrogen erosion in forested catchments: implications for erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. M. Stacy; S. C. Hart; C. T. Hunsaker; D. W. Johnson; A. A. Berhe

    2015-01-01

    Lateral movement of organic matter (OM) due to erosion is now considered an important flux term in terrestrial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) budgets, yet most published studies on the role of erosion focus on agricultural or grassland ecosystems. To date, little information is available on the rate and nature of OM eroded from forest ecosystems. We present annual...

  10. Effects of land use systems on soil erosion in a sloping Mediterranean watershed in Cyprus: From qualitative assessments to quantitative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Bruggeman, Adriana; Camera, Corrado; Zoumides, Christos

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, water catchment sediment yield as a result of water erosion is difficult to model. Applicability of quantitative, process-based soil erosion models at a catchment scale is often problematic due to large data requirements and difficulty of describing all erosion and sediment transport processes. On the other hand, qualitative models require less data and include almost all evident erosion processes, which make them especially suited for watershed erosion assessments. The objective of this study is to compare water erosion estimates of the quantitative PESERA model with qualitative assessments obtained by WOCAT mapping methodology. The PESERA model simulates soil loss based on land cover, soil, climate and vegetation data, while the WOCAT methodology is based on expert observations per land use systems. This study is conducted in the Peristerona Watershed in Cyprus. The study area is 106.4 km2 and has a mean local slope higher than 40% for the mountainous upstream area and less than 8% for plain. Sixteen different land cover types with varying intensity of agriculture were distinguished during the WOCAT field assessment. WOCAT methodology ranked the land cover "complex cultivation" as the most degraded (degree: evident signs of water erosion, extent: 50% of the area, rate: moderately increasing in time),"agriculture, significant area natural vegetation" as less degraded (degree: evident signs of water erosion, extent: 30% of the area, rate: decreasing slowly in time) and "forests" the least degraded (some signs of water erosion, extent 5% of the area, rate: decreasing slowly in time). The classified WOCAT units will be compared with the erosion estimates obtained by the PESERA model. This study provides a linkage between qualitative soil erosion methods with quantitative models and helps to translate the outcomes of the former into latter.

  11. Hybrid Neuro-Fuzzy Classifier Based On Nefclass Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Gliwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents hybrid neuro-fuzzy classifier, based on NEFCLASS model, which wasmodified. The presented classifier was compared to popular classifiers – neural networks andk-nearest neighbours. Efficiency of modifications in classifier was compared with methodsused in original model NEFCLASS (learning methods. Accuracy of classifier was testedusing 3 datasets from UCI Machine Learning Repository: iris, wine and breast cancer wisconsin.Moreover, influence of ensemble classification methods on classification accuracy waspresented.

  12. Advances in Predicting Soil Erosion After Fire Using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Osama Z.; Pierson, Frederick B.; Nearing, Mark A.; Williams, C. Jason; Hernandez, Mariano; Boll, Jan; Nouwakpo, Sayjro; Weltz, Mark A.; Spaeth, Kenneth E.

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of erosion from a hillslope is governed by the availability of sediment and connectivity of overland flow and erosion processes. For undisturbed conditions, sediment is mainly detached and transported by rainsplash and sheetflow (splash-sheet) processes in bare batches, but sediment generally only travels a short distance before deposition. On recently disturbed sites (e.g., after fire), bare ground is more extensive and runoff and erosion rates are higher relative to undisturbed conditions. Increased erosion following disturbance occurs largely due to a shift from splash-sheet to concentrated-flow-dominated processes. On long-disturbed sites (e.g., after woody plant encroachment), years of soil loss can limit sediment availability and soil erosion. In contrast, recently burned landscapes typically have ample sediment available and generate high erosion rates. This presentation highlights recent advancements in hillslope erosion prediction by the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) that accommodate recently burned conditions. The RHEM tool is a process-based model that was developed specifically for predicting hillslope runoff and erosion on rangeland ecosystems. The advancements presented here include development of empirical equations to predict erodibility parameters for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is limited (by runoff or sediment availability) and an erodibility parameter for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is the dominant erosion mechanism and sediment is amply available (burned conditions). The data used for developing and evaluating the erodibility parameter equations were obtained from rainfall simulation databases maintained by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service. The data span undisturbed, long-disturbed, and recently burned conditions. For undisturbed and long-disturbed conditions, a regression analysis was applied to derive the relationship between splash

  13. Watershed management for erosion and sedimentation control Case Study: Goodwin Creek, Panola County, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Goodwin Creek watershed is located within the loessal hills of northern Mississippi, a region of high erosion risk and elevated watershed sediment yields. This manuscript combines a regional history of land management and conservation issues from the time of European settlement to present with a...

  14. Potential for monitoring soil erosion features and soil erosion modeling components from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langran, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil erosion and its effects on soil productivity are essential in agricultural decision making and planning from the field scale to the national level. Erosion models have been primarily developed for designing erosion control systems, predicting sediment yield for reservoir design, predicting sediment transport, and simulating water quality. New models proposed are more comprehensive in that the necessary components (hydrology, erosion-sedimentation, nutrient cycling, tillage, etc.) are linked in a model appropriate for studying the erosion-productivity problem. Recent developments in remote sensing systems, such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), etc., can contribute significantly to the future development and operational use of these models.

  15. Concentrated flow erosion processes under planned fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Christoph; Noske, Phil; Van Der Sant, Rene; Lane, Patrick; Sheridan, Gary

    2016-04-01

    The role of wildfire in accelerating erosion rates for a certain period after fire has been well documented. Much less information is available on the erosion rates and processes after planned fires that typically burn at much lower intensity. Observational evidence, and some studies in southern and southeastern Australia suggest that erosion after planned fire can be significant if rainfall intensities exceed critical intensities and durations. Understanding erosion processes and rates under these event conditions is of critical importance for planning of burn locations away from critical human assets such as water supplies and infrastructure. We conducted concentrated flow experiments with the purpose to understand what critical conditions are required for significant erosion to occur on planned burn hillslopes. Concentrated flow runon was applied on pre-wetted, unbounded plots of 10 m at rates of 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 L/s, with three replicates for each rates applied at 1m distance of each other. The experiments were carried out at three sites within one burn perimeter with different burn severities ranging from low to high, with two replicates at each site. Runon was applied until an apparent steady state in runoff was reached at the lower plot boundary, which was typically between 0.7 and 2.5 minutes. The experiments were filmed and erosion depth was measured by survey methods at 1m intervals. Soil surface properties, including potential sediment trapping objects were measured and surveyed near the plots. We found that fire severity increased plot scale average erosion depth significantly even as experiments were typically much shorter on the high severity plots. Unit stream power was a good predictor for average erosion depth. Uncontrolled for variations in soil surface properties explained process behaviour: finer, ash rich surface material was much less likely to be trapped by fallen, charred branches and litter than coarser, ash-depleted material. Furthermore

  16. Erosion, sediment transportation and accumulation in rivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.I.ALEKSEEVSKIY; K.M.BERKOVICH; R.S.CHALOV

    2008-01-01

    The present paper analyses the interrelation between erosion,sediment transportation and accumulation proposed by N.I.Makkaveyev (1908-1983) and its further development in modem studies of river channel processes in Russia.Spatio-temporal linkages between erosion and accumulation are defined considering channel processes at different scales - river longitudinal profile,channel morphological patterns,alluvial bedforms (bars,dunes) and individual sediment particles.Relations between river geomorphic activity,flow transportation capacity and sediment budgets are established (sediment input and output;channel bed erosion and sediment entrainment into flow -termination of sediment transport and its deposition).Channel planforms,floodplain segments separated by the latter and alluvial channel bedforms are shown to be geomorphic expressions of sediment transport process at different spatial and temporal scales.This paper is dedicated to the 100th anniversary of N.I.Makkaveyev,Professor of the Moscow State University,author of the book "River channel and erosion in its basin" (1955).That book is regarded in Russia as the pioneering work which initiated the complex hydrological and geographical studies of channel processes and laid a basis for the theory of unified fluvial erosion-accumulation process.

  17. Modelling erosion on a daily basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikha Shrestha, Dhruba; Jetten, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Effect of soil erosion causing negative impact on ecosystem services and food security is well known. To assess annual erosion rates various empirical models have been extensively used in all the climatic regions. While these models are simple to operate and do not require lot of input data, the effect of extreme rain is not taken into account in the annual estimations. For analysing the effects of extreme rain the event- based models become handy. These models can simulate detail erosional processes including particle detachment, transportation and deposition of sediments during a storm. But they are not applicable for estimating annual erosion rates. Moreover storm event data may not be available everywhere which prohibits their extensive use. In this paper we describe a method by adapting the revised MMF model to assess erosion on daily basis so that the effects of extreme rains are taken into account. We couple it to a simple surface soil moisture balance on a daily basis and include estimation of daily vegetation cover changes. Annual soil loss is calculated by adding daily erosion rates. We compare the obtained results with that obtained from applying the revised MMF model in a case study in the Mamora plateau in northwest Morocco which is affected by severe gully formation. The results show clearly the effects of exceptional rain in erosional processes which cannot be captured in an annual model.

  18. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate and impac......The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  19. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur. PMID:26468660

  20. Impact of Soil Erosion on Rural Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangyong; LU; Gong; CHEN

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the general situation and regional differences of rural poverty in China, and points out that in the rural areas of central and western regions with serious soil erosion, the poverty is particularly prominent. Based on previous studies, we take agricultural GDP as the dependent variable, farmland area, agricultural labor, agricultural capital stock, irrigation area, and consumption of chemical fertilizer as the independent variables, to establish the C-D production function reflecting impact of soil erosion on rural poverty for regression analysis. The results show that farmland, labor, capital, irrigation, chemical fertilizer and other production factors have a positive effect on agricultural GDP; soil erosion has a significant negative effect on agricultural production; in western China, the total factor productivity is the lowest and soil erosion is the most serious. In order to resolve the dilemma of soil erosion and rural poverty, it is necessary to change the extensive mode of agricultural development, protect the ecological environment, and take the road of intensive development of agroecology.

  1. Solid particle erosion of polymers and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K.; Almajid, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    After a general introduction to the subject of solid particle erosion of polymers and composites, the presentation focusses more specifically on the behavior of unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites under such loadings, using different impact conditions and erodents. The data were analyzed on the basis of a newly defined specific erosive wear rate, allowing a better comparison of erosion data achieved under various testing conditions. Characteristic wear mechanisms of the CF/PEEK composites consisted of fiber fracture, matrix cutting and plastic matrix deformation, the relative contribution of which depended on the impingement angles and the CF orientation. The highest wear rates were measured for impingement angles between 45 and 60°. Using abrasion resistant neat polymer films (in this case PEEK or thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) ones) on the surface of a harder substrate (e.g. a CF/PEEK composite plate) resulted in much lower specific erosive wear rates. The use of such polymeric films can be considered as a possible method to protect composite surfaces from damage caused by minor impacts and erosion. In fact, they are nowadays already successfully applied as protections for wind energy rotor blades.

  2. Spatial changes of wind erosion-caused landscapes and their relation with wind field in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the results of remote sensing investigations of the landscapes of 1995 and 2000,the national distribution of sandy desertified land and its interaction with other landscapes are classified, and five zonal types are distinguished. The data of nationally distributed 400 meteorological stations of 1999 are processed. With the GIS method, the data are spatially interpolated, and the national database of wind field concerned with wind erosion is established. In arid and semi-arid areas of China, the intensity of wind field is one of the key factors that controls the development of landscape especially in desert and its adjacent area. Different indexes are set up to describe the intensity of wind field, the method suggested by the wind erosion prediction models of RWEQ is also adopted to express the intensity of wind. The Weibull distribution is used to describe the wind field in China. Based on the analysis of the process of the wind erosion-driven landscape changes, this article proposes and discusses the control measures of wind erosion.

  3. Shape of Barrett’s epithelium is associated with prevalence of erosive esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Inamori, Masahiko; Iida, Hiroshi; Endo, Hiroki; Hosono, Kunihiro; Sakamoto, Yasunari; Fujita, Koji; Yoneda, Masato; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Koide, Tomoko; Tokoro, Chikako; Goto, Ayumu; Abe, Yasunobu; Shimamura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Saito, Satoru; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that the shape and length of Barrett’s epithelium are associated with prevalence of erosive esophagitis. METHODS: A total study population comprised 869 patients who underwent endoscopy during a health checkup at our hospital. The presence and extent of Barrett’s epithelium were diagnosed based on the Prague C & M Criteria. We originally classified cases of Barrett’s epithelium into two types based on its shape, namely, flame-like and lotus-like Barrett’s epithelium, and into two groups based on its length, its C extent < 2 cm, and ≥ 2 cm. Correlation of shape and length of Barrett’s epithelium with erosive esophagitis was examined. RESULTS: Barrett’s epithelium was diagnosed in 374 cases (43%). Most of these were diagnosed as short-segment Barrett’s epithelium. The prevalence of erosive esophagitis was significantly higher in subjects with flame-like than lotus-like Barrett’s epithelium, and in those with a C extent of ≥ 2 cm than < 2 cm. CONCLUSION: Flame-like rather than lotus-like Barrett’s epithelium, and Barrett’s epithelium with a longer segment were more strongly associated with erosive esophagitis. PMID:20101776

  4. Classifying antiarrhythmic actions: by facts or speculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1992-11-01

    Classification of antiarrhythmic actions is reviewed in the context of the results of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trials, CAST 1 and 2. Six criticisms of the classification recently published (The Sicilian Gambit) are discussed in detail. The alternative classification, when stripped of speculative elements, is shown to be similar to the original classification. Claims that the classification failed to predict the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs for the selection of appropriate therapy have been tested by an example. The antiarrhythmic actions of cibenzoline were classified in 1980. A detailed review of confirmatory experiments and clinical trials during the past decade shows that predictions made at the time agree with subsequent results. Classification of the effects drugs actually have on functioning cardiac tissues provides a rational basis for finding the preferred treatment for a particular arrhythmia in accordance with the diagnosis.

  5. A cognitive approach to classifying perceived behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Dale Paul; Lyons, Damian

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes our work on integrating distributed, concurrent control in a cognitive architecture, and using it to classify perceived behaviors. We are implementing the Robot Schemas (RS) language in Soar. RS is a CSP-type programming language for robotics that controls a hierarchy of concurrently executing schemas. The behavior of every RS schema is defined using port automata. This provides precision to the semantics and also a constructive means of reasoning about the behavior and meaning of schemas. Our implementation uses Soar operators to build, instantiate and connect port automata as needed. Our approach is to use comprehension through generation (similar to NLSoar) to search for ways to construct port automata that model perceived behaviors. The generality of RS permits us to model dynamic, concurrent behaviors. A virtual world (Ogre) is used to test the accuracy of these automata. Soar's chunking mechanism is used to generalize and save these automata. In this way, the robot learns to recognize new behaviors.

  6. Learning Vector Quantization for Classifying Astronomical Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The sizes of astronomical surveys in different wavebands are increas-ing rapidly. Therefore, automatic classification of objects is becoming ever moreimportant. We explore the performance of learning vector quantization (LVQ) inclassifying multi-wavelength data. Our analysis concentrates on separating activesources from non-active ones. Different classes of X-ray emitters populate distinctregions of a multidimensional parameter space. In order to explore the distributionof various objects in a multidimensional parameter space, we positionally cross-correlate the data of quasars, BL Lacs, active galaxies, stars and normal galaxiesin the optical, X-ray and infrared bands. We then apply LVQ to classify them withthe obtained data. Our results show that LVQ is an effective method for separatingAGNs from stars and normal galaxies with multi-wavelength data.

  7. A Spiking Neural Learning Classifier System

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Gerard; Lanzi, Pier-Luca

    2012-01-01

    Learning Classifier Systems (LCS) are population-based reinforcement learners used in a wide variety of applications. This paper presents a LCS where each traditional rule is represented by a spiking neural network, a type of network with dynamic internal state. We employ a constructivist model of growth of both neurons and dendrites that realise flexible learning by evolving structures of sufficient complexity to solve a well-known problem involving continuous, real-valued inputs. Additionally, we extend the system to enable temporal state decomposition. By allowing our LCS to chain together sequences of heterogeneous actions into macro-actions, it is shown to perform optimally in a problem where traditional methods can fail to find a solution in a reasonable amount of time. Our final system is tested on a simulated robotics platform.

  8. Speech Emotion Recognition Using Fuzzy Logic Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniar aghsanavard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, emotions, speech recognition and signal processing have been one of the most significant issues in the adoption of techniques to detect them. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. This paper tries to suggest fuzzy speech emotion recognition based on the classification of speech's signals in order to better recognition along with a higher speed. In this system, the use of fuzzy logic system with 5 layers, which is the combination of neural progressive network and algorithm optimization of firefly, first, speech samples have been given to input of fuzzy orbit and then, signals will be investigated and primary classified in a fuzzy framework. In this model, a pattern of signals will be created for each class of signals, which results in reduction of signal data dimension as well as easier speech recognition. The obtained experimental results show that our proposed method (categorized by firefly, improves recognition of utterances.

  9. Classifying and ranking DMUs in interval DEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun-peng; WU Yu-hua; LI Wen-hua

    2005-01-01

    During efficiency evaluating by DEA, the inputs and outputs of DMUs may be intervals because of insufficient information or measure error. For this reason, interval DEA is proposed. To make the efficiency scores more discriminative, this paper builds an Interval Modified DEA (IMDEA) model based on MDEA.Furthermore, models of obtaining upper and lower bounds of the efficiency scores for each DMU are set up.Based on this, the DMUs are classified into three types. Next, a new order relation between intervals which can express the DM' s preference to the three types is proposed. As a result, a full and more eonvietive ranking is made on all the DMUs. Finally an example is given.

  10. Classifying prion and prion-like phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbi, Djamel; Harrison, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The universe of prion and prion-like phenomena has expanded significantly in the past several years. Here, we overview the challenges in classifying this data informatically, given that terms such as "prion-like", "prion-related" or "prion-forming" do not have a stable meaning in the scientific literature. We examine the spectrum of proteins that have been described in the literature as forming prions, and discuss how "prion" can have a range of meaning, with a strict definition being for demonstration of infection with in vitro-derived recombinant prions. We suggest that although prion/prion-like phenomena can largely be apportioned into a small number of broad groups dependent on the type of transmissibility evidence for them, as new phenomena are discovered in the coming years, a detailed ontological approach might be necessary that allows for subtle definition of different "flavors" of prion / prion-like phenomena.

  11. CLASSIFYING MEDICAL IMAGES USING MORPHOLOGICAL APPEARANCE MANIFOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Erdem; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2013-12-31

    Input features for medical image classification algorithms are extracted from raw images using a series of pre processing steps. One common preprocessing step in computational neuroanatomy and functional brain mapping is the nonlinear registration of raw images to a common template space. Typically, the registration methods used are parametric and their output varies greatly with changes in parameters. Most results reported previously perform registration using a fixed parameter setting and use the results as input to the subsequent classification step. The variation in registration results due to choice of parameters thus translates to variation of performance of the classifiers that depend on the registration step for input. Analogous issues have been investigated in the computer vision literature, where image appearance varies with pose and illumination, thereby making classification vulnerable to these confounding parameters. The proposed methodology addresses this issue by sampling image appearances as registration parameters vary, and shows that better classification accuracies can be obtained this way, compared to the conventional approach.

  12. Human Segmentation Using Haar-Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharani S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation is an important process in many aspects of multimedia applications. Fast and perfect segmentation of moving objects in video sequences is a basic task in many computer visions and video investigation applications. Particularly Human detection is an active research area in computer vision applications. Segmentation is very useful for tracking and recognition the object in a moving clip. The motion segmentation problem is studied and reviewed the most important techniques. We illustrate some common methods for segmenting the moving objects including background subtraction, temporal segmentation and edge detection. Contour and threshold are common methods for segmenting the objects in moving clip. These methods are widely exploited for moving object segmentation in many video surveillance applications, such as traffic monitoring, human motion capture. In this paper, Haar Classifier is used to detect humans in a moving video clip some features like face detection, eye detection, full body, upper body and lower body detection.

  13. Segmentation of Fingerprint Images Using Linear Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjian Chen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for the segmentation of fingerprints and a criterion for evaluating the block feature are presented. The segmentation uses three block features: the block clusters degree, the block mean information, and the block variance. An optimal linear classifier has been trained for the classification per block and the criteria of minimal number of misclassified samples are used. Morphology has been applied as postprocessing to reduce the number of classification errors. The algorithm is tested on FVC2002 database, only 2.45% of the blocks are misclassified, while the postprocessing further reduces this ratio. Experiments have shown that the proposed segmentation method performs very well in rejecting false fingerprint features from the noisy background.

  14. Is rainfall erosivity influenced by climate change?. A case study in a Mediterranean Climate area of North East Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria C.

    2014-05-01

    One of the main characteristics of the Mediterranean climate is the high intensity rainfall events usually recorded in autumn and spring. Those events usually concentrate a high percentage of annual rainfall. Different studies carried out in the Mediterranean countries suggest that notable changes in seasonal precipitation regimes have occurred during the second half of the 20th century. In addition, precipitation extremes seem to increase in association with global warming, which may favour erosion processes. Under this hypothesis one question arise: is the rainfall erosivity increasing influenced by climate change? In this work rainfall erosivity and its variability in the last two decades was analysed in an area located NE Spain, where erosion processes of high magnitude are recorded. The main land use in that area is grape vines, which due to the scarce soil cover is usually associated with the highest erosion rates. The study area was located in the Penedès depression (North East Spain). Hourly data from four observatories Els Hostalets de Pierola (UTM X: 400664, Y: 4598608m, elv: 326m ), La Granada ( X:393758; Y:4580393), Sant Martí Sarroca (X: 385556; Y:4581486, elv: 257m) and Font_Rubi (X: 385118, Y:4587935. elev: 415 m ) belonging to the period 1997-2013 were used in the analysis together with a tipping bucket rainfall series recorded at one minute intervals (10 years within the period 1996-2012). Rainfall erosivity was quantified by the index rainfall kinetic energy multiplied by the maximum intensity in 30minute periods (E*Imax30). The Imax30 was estimated from the relationship between hourly and 30 minute data obtained for the tipping bucket series using the Marquard algoritme. In order to analsye changes in rainfall erosivity, the annual and monthly number of erosive events were analysed for each observatory and in each year, the events were classified into intervals according to their erosivity. The intervals used were: 0-100; 100-200; 200-300; 300

  15. Classifying supernovae using only galaxy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Ryan J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mandel, Kaisey [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present a new method for probabilistically classifying supernovae (SNe) without using SN spectral or photometric data. Unlike all previous studies to classify SNe without spectra, this technique does not use any SN photometry. Instead, the method relies on host-galaxy data. We build upon the well-known correlations between SN classes and host-galaxy properties, specifically that core-collapse SNe rarely occur in red, luminous, or early-type galaxies. Using the nearly spectroscopically complete Lick Observatory Supernova Search sample of SNe, we determine SN fractions as a function of host-galaxy properties. Using these data as inputs, we construct a Bayesian method for determining the probability that an SN is of a particular class. This method improves a common classification figure of merit by a factor of >2, comparable to the best light-curve classification techniques. Of the galaxy properties examined, morphology provides the most discriminating information. We further validate this method using SN samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Palomar Transient Factory. We demonstrate that this method has wide-ranging applications, including separating different subclasses of SNe and determining the probability that an SN is of a particular class before photometry or even spectra can. Since this method uses completely independent data from light-curve techniques, there is potential to further improve the overall purity and completeness of SN samples and to test systematic biases of the light-curve techniques. Further enhancements to the host-galaxy method, including additional host-galaxy properties, combination with light-curve methods, and hybrid methods, should further improve the quality of SN samples from past, current, and future transient surveys.

  16. In Vivo Diagnosis of Plaque Erosion and Calcified Nodule in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome by Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haibo; Abtahian, Farhad; Aguirre, Aaron D; Lee, Stephen; Chia, Stanley; Lowe, Harry; Kato, Koji; Yonetsu, Taishi; Vergallo, Rocco; Hu, Sining; Tian, Jinwei; Lee, Hang; Park, Seung-Jung; Jang, Yang-Soo; Raffel, Owen C.; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Uemura, Shiro; Itoh, Tomonori; Kakuta, Tsunekazu; Choi, So-Yeon; Dauerman, Harold L.; Prasad, Abhiram; Toma, Catalin; McNulty, Iris; Zhang, Shaosong; Yu, Bo; Fuster, Valentine; Narula, Jagat; Virmani, Renu; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the morphological features of plaque erosion and calcified nodule in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Background Plaque erosion and calcified nodule have not been systematically investigated in vivo. Methods One hundred and twenty-six patients with ACS who had undergone pre-intervention OCT imaging were included. The culprit lesions were classified as plaque rupture (PR), erosion (OCT-erosion), calcified nodule (OCT-CN), or others using a new set of diagnostic criteria for OCT. Results The incidences of PR, OCT-erosion, and OCT-CN were 43.7%, 31.0%, and 7.9%, respectively. Patients with OCT-erosion were the youngest compared with those with PR and OCT-CN (53.8±13.1 years vs. 60.6±11.5 years, 65.1±5.0 years, p=0.005). Compared with patients with PR, presentation with non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) was more common in patients with OCT-erosion (61.5% vs. 29.1%, p=0.008) and OCT-CN (100% vs. 29.1%, perosion had a lower frequency of lipid plaque (43.6% vs. 100%, perosion followed by OCT-CN and PR (55.4±14.7% vs. 66.1±13.5% vs. 68.8±12.9%, perosion and OCT-CN in vivo. OCT-erosion is a frequent finding in patients with ACS, especially in those with NSTE-ACS and younger patients. OCT-CN is the least common etiology for ACS and is more common in older patients. PMID:23810884

  17. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Iran currently faces many soil erosion-related problems (see citations below). These issues are resulted from some inherent characteristic and anthropogenic triggering forces. Nowadays, the latter plays more important rule to accelerate the erosion with further emphasis on soil erosion-prone arid and semi arid regions of the country. This contribution attempts to identify and describe the existing main reasons behind accelerated soil erosion in Iran. Appropriate solutions viz. structural and non-structural approaches will be then advised to combat or minimise the problems. Iran can be used as a pilot research site to understand the soil erosion processes in semiarid, arid and mountainous terrain and our research will review the scientific literature and will give an insight of the soil erosion rates in the main factors of the soil erosion in Iran. Key words: Anthropogenic Erosion, Land Degradation; Sediment Management; Sediment Problems Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Aghili Nategh, N., Hemmat, A., & Sadeghi, M. (2014). Assessing confined and semi-confined compression curves of highly calcareous remolded soil amended with farmyard manure. Journal of Terramechanics, 53, 75-82. Arekhi, S., Bolourani, A. D., Shabani, A., Fathizad, H., Ahamdy-Asbchin, S. 2012. Mapping Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield Susceptibility using RUSLE, Remote Sensing and GIS (Case study: Cham Gardalan Watershed, Iran). Advances in Environmental Biology, 6(1), 109-124. Arekhi, S., Shabani, A., Rostamizad, G. 2012. Application of the modified universal soil loss equation (MUSLE) in prediction of sediment yield (Case study: Kengir Watershed, Iran). Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 5(6), 1259-1267.Sadeghi, S. H., Moosavi, V., Karami, A., Behnia, N. 2012. Soil erosion assessment and prioritization of affecting factors at plot

  18. Risk assessment of desertification using GIS in parts of Mond Basin, Southern Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoudi, M.; Asrari, E.

    2009-07-01

    The present paper attempts to evolve a new model by considering various indicators of different types of land degradation desertification, namely water erosion, soil salinity, vegetation degradation, and lowering of ground water table. the Mond river basin, located centrally to this zone, has been selected as a test area to assess the risk and kind of desertification. For this purpose two sub basins of the Payab and Quareh Aghaj have been chosen for detailed study. The thresholds for the severity classes of indicators have been established and then the hazards map for each indicator of types of desertification has been prepared in a GIS. The risk maps of water erosion, soil salinization, lowering of water table, vegetation degradation have been produced for each of the two sub basins. It was possible to distinguish the areas under actual risk from areas under potential risk of desertification types. Also areas under potential risk are classified to subclasses with different probability level to show a statistical picture of risk in future. (Author) 3 refs.

  19. Coastal erosion in Sicily: geomorphologic impact and mitigation (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, V.; Manno, G.

    2009-04-01

    coastal units, in low-coastline and mountainous, with average rates of 29%. The main methods available today for the protection of coastlines in Sicily, are falling in the first approximation in hard (structural), and soft and soft, based not only on nutrition artificial beaches but also on interventions with low environmental impact as the reduction of losses sediments. The right approach is not only in stabilizing the various shores, but also in not induce or accelerate the erosion of the adjacent areas. Indeed this impact accompanies almost all the hard interventions achieved in past years. It is essential to carry out a verification of the effectiveness of the defence of the coast from erosion and structural interventions of nourishment in terms of impact on coastal marine and coastal environment. We started a series of experimental analysis based on the application of new techniques for relief based on remote sensing as the major techniques performed with satellite radar (SAR), measurements morph-altitude high resolution made with the laser system by plane (LIDAR) and precise measurements on the behaviour of works and river mouths with intelligences cameras. The most dominant climate change involve the precipitation and temperature. Temperature is particularly important in snow-dominated basins and in coastal areas, the latter due to the impact of temperature on sea level. Moreover we must say that (as mentioned in 4th Report IPCC) the shores are projected to be exposed to increasing risks, including coastal erosion, due to climate change and sea level rise. Infrastructure in coastal areas is vulnerable to damage from sea-level rise, flooding, and other storms. This effect will be exacerbated by increasing human-induced pressures on coastal areas. Keywords: erosion, shores, coastal defend, monitoring.

  20. Research on cohesive sediment erosion by flow: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Erosion of cohesive sediment by flow is a very complicated phenomenon occurring worldwide. Understanding and modeling of the erosion process are important for many issues such as the breaching of embankments, riverbank stability, siltation of harbors and navigation channels, service life of reservoirs, distribution of (heavy metal) pollutants and water quality problems. In the last few decades, numerous studies have been done on the erosion of cohesive sediment by flow. Nevertheless, the factors affecting the erosion resistance of cohesive sediment are still not fully understood and the knowledge of the physics of cohesive sediment erosion is in- adequate, as a result the mathematical modeling of this erosion is far from satis- factory. In this paper an overview of the studies on the erosion resistance, erosion threshold and the erosion rate of cohesive sediment by flow is presented. The outcomes achieved so far from the studies and the existing problems have been analyzed and summarized, based on which recommendations are proposed for future research.