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Sample records for classification response times

  1. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Long

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA. A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are

  2. Logical-Rule Models of Classification Response Times: A Synthesis of Mental-Architecture, Random-Walk, and Decision-Bound Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fific, Mario; Little, Daniel R.; Nosofsky, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    We formalize and provide tests of a set of logical-rule models for predicting perceptual classification response times (RTs) and choice probabilities. The models are developed by synthesizing mental-architecture, random-walk, and decision-bound approaches. According to the models, people make independent decisions about the locations of stimuli…

  3. Real time automatic scene classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Israël, Menno; Broek, van den Egon L.; Putten, van der Peter; Uyl, den Marten J.; Verbrugge, R.; Taatgen, N.; Schomaker, L.

    2004-01-01

    This work has been done as part of the EU VICAR (IST) project and the EU SCOFI project (IAP). The aim of the first project was to develop a real time video indexing classification annotation and retrieval system. For our systems, we have adapted the approach of Picard and Minka [3], who categorized

  4. Audio Classification from Time-Frequency Texture

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Guoshen

    2008-01-01

    Time-frequency representations of audio signals often resemble texture images. This paper derives a simple audio classification algorithm based on treating sound spectrograms as texture images. The algorithm is inspired by an earlier visual classification scheme particularly efficient at classifying textures. While solely based on time-frequency texture features, the algorithm achieves surprisingly good performance in musical instrument classification experiments.

  5. Ambiguity and Concepts in Real Time Online Internet Traffic Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Awad Hamza Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Internet traffic classification gained significant attention in the last few years. Identifying the Internet applications in the real time is one of the most significant challenges in network traffic classification. Most of the proposed classification methods are limited to offline classification and cannot support online classification. This paper aims to highlight the ambiguity in the definition of online classification. Therefore, some of the previous online classification works are discussed and analyzed. This analysing is to check how far the real time online classification was achieved. The results indicate that most of the previous works consider a real Internet traffic but did not consider a real time online classification. In addition, the paper provides a real time classifier which was proposed and used in [1] [2] [3], to show how to perform a real time online classification.

  6. A Classification Scheme for Glaciological AVA Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, A.; Emir, E.

    2014-12-01

    A classification scheme is proposed for amplitude vs. angle (AVA) responses as an aid to the interpretation of seismic reflectivity in glaciological research campaigns. AVA responses are a powerful tool in characterising the material properties of glacier ice and its substrate. However, before interpreting AVA data, careful true amplitude processing is required to constrain basal reflectivity and compensate amplitude decay mechanisms, including anelastic attenuation and spherical divergence. These fundamental processing steps can be difficult to design in cases of noisy data, e.g. where a target reflection is contaminated by surface wave energy (in the case of shallow glaciers) or by energy reflected from out of the survey plane. AVA methods have equally powerful usage in estimating the fluid fill of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, such applications seldom use true amplitude data and instead consider qualitative AVA responses using a well-defined classification scheme. Such schemes are often defined in terms of the characteristics of best-fit responses to the observed reflectivity, e.g. the intercept (I) and gradient (G) of a linear approximation to the AVA data. The position of the response on a cross-plot of I and G then offers a diagnostic attribute for certain fluid types. We investigate the advantages in glaciology of emulating this practice, and develop a cross-plot based on the 3-term Shuey AVA approximation (using I, G, and a curvature term C). Model AVA curves define a clear lithification trend: AVA responses to stiff (lithified) substrates fall discretely into one quadrant of the cross-plot, with positive I and negative G, whereas those to fluid-rich substrates plot diagonally opposite (in the negative I and positive G quadrant). The remaining quadrants are unoccupied by plausible single-layer responses and may therefore be diagnostic of complex thin-layer reflectivity, and the magnitude and polarity of the C term serves as a further indicator

  7. Real-Time Gender Classification by Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Fares Al Mashagba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of human beings based on their biometric body parts, such as face, fingerprint, gait, iris, and voice, plays an important role in electronic applications and has become a popular area of research in image processing. It is also one of the most successful applications of computer–human interaction and understanding. Out of all the abovementioned body parts,the face is one of most popular traits because of its unique features.In fact, individuals can process a face in a variety of ways to classify it by its identity, along with a number of other characteristics, such as gender, ethnicity, and age. Specifically, recognizing human gender is important because people respond differently according to gender. In this paper, we present a robust method that uses global geometry-based features to classify gender and identify age and human beings from video sequences. The features are extracted based on face detection using skin color segmentation and the computed geometric features of the face ellipse region. These geometric features are then used to form the face vector trajectories, which are inputted to a time delay neural network and are trained using the Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno (BFGS function. Results show that using the suggested method with our own dataset under an unconstrained condition achieves a 100% classification rate in the training set for all application, as well as 91.2% for gender classification, 88% for age identification, and 83% for human identification in the testing set. In addition, the proposed method establishes the real-time system to be used in three applications with a simple computation for feature extraction.

  8. Sources of variation in hydrological classifications: Time scale, flow series origin and classification procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas, Francisco J.; Barquín, José; Álvarez, César

    2016-07-01

    Classification of flow regimes in water management and hydroecological research has grown significantly in recent years. However, depending on available data and the procedures applied, there may be several credible classifications for a specific catchment. In this study, three inductive classifications derived from different initial flow data and one expert-driven classification were defined. The hydrological interpretation, statistical performance and spatial correspondence of these classifications were compared. Daily Gauged Classification (DC) was derived from daily flow data while Monthly Gauged Classification (MC) and Monthly Modeled Classification (MMC) were derived from monthly flow series, using gauged and modeled flow data, respectively. Expert-Driven Classification (EDC) was based on a Spanish nationwide hydrological classification, which is being used in the current River Basin Management Plans. The results showed that MC accounted for much of the critical hydrological information variability comprised within the DC. However, it also presented limitations regarding the inability to represent important hydroecological attributes, especially those related to droughts and high flow events. In addition, DC and MC presented an equivalent performance more than 60% of the time and obtained a mean ARI value of 0.4, indicating a similar classification structure. DC and MC outperformed MMC 100% and more than 50% of the times when they were compared by means of the classification strength and ANOVA, respectively. MMC also showed low correspondence with these classifications (ARI = 0.20). Thus, the use of modeled flow series should be limited to poorly gauged areas. Finally, the significantly reduced performance and the uneven distribution of classes found in EDC questions its application for different management objectives. This study shows that the selection of the most suitable approach according to the available data has significant implications for the

  9. Sparse Representation for Time-Series Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-08

    Comput. Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pp. 4114–4121 (2014). 18. J. Mairal, F. Bach , A. Zisserman, and G. Sapiro. Supervised dictionary learn...ing. In Advances Neural Inform. Process. Syst. (NIPS), pp. 1033–1040 (2008). 19. J. Mairal, F. Bach , and J. Ponce, Task-driven dictionary learning...Series Classification 17 compressive sensing, SISC. 33(1), 250–278 (2011). 41. J. Mairal, F. Bach , J. Ponce, and G. Sapiro, Online dictionary learning for

  10. 18 CFR 3a.13 - Classification responsibility and procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Classification responsibility and procedure. 3a.13 Section 3a.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification §...

  11. Characterizing the DNA Damage Response by Cell Tracking Algorithms and Cell Features Classification Using High-Content Time-Lapse Analysis.

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    Walter Georgescu

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when

  12. Implementing Classification on a Munitions Response Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    History ● Technology Development Objectives  Advanced Processing for Commercial Sensors P b ilt S f Cl ifi ti urpose- u ensors or ass ca on...7Advances in Classification - Wrap Up Advisory Group ● James Austreng, USACE ● Harry Craig, US EPA ● Jon Haliscak, AFCEE ● Bryan Harre, NAVFAC ESC ● Robert

  13. Genetic programming and serial processing for time series classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro-Cid, Eva; Sharman, Ken; Esparcia-Alcázar, Anna I

    2014-01-01

    This work describes an approach devised by the authors for time series classification. In our approach genetic programming is used in combination with a serial processing of data, where the last output is the result of the classification. The use of genetic programming for classification, although still a field where more research in needed, is not new. However, the application of genetic programming to classification tasks is normally done by considering the input data as a feature vector. That is, to the best of our knowledge, there are not examples in the genetic programming literature of approaches where the time series data are processed serially and the last output is considered as the classification result. The serial processing approach presented here fills a gap in the existing literature. This approach was tested in three different problems. Two of them are real world problems whose data were gathered for online or conference competitions. As there are published results of these two problems this gives us the chance to compare the performance of our approach against top performing methods. The serial processing of data in combination with genetic programming obtained competitive results in both competitions, showing its potential for solving time series classification problems. The main advantage of our serial processing approach is that it can easily handle very large datasets.

  14. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Kitty K; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B M

    2014-01-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the second \\textit{XMM-Newton} serendipitous source catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10-fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ${\\sim}$97% on a seven-class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest der...

  15. Designing Information Measures for Real-time Lightcurve Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David Edward; Chen, Yang; Meng, Xiao-Li; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Kashyap, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Since telescope time is limited, real-time lightcurve classification involves carefully selecting future time points at which sources must be observed in order to maximize the information that will be gained for classification. We propose a framework for constructing measures of information for testing/classification/model-selection and demonstrate their use in experimental design. Degroot (1962) developed a general framework for constructing Bayesian measures of the expected information that an experiment will provide for estimation, and our framework analogously constructs measures of information for hypothesis testing. Such test information measures are most useful for model selection and classification problems. Indeed, our framework suggests a probability based measure of test information, which in decision problems has more appealing properties than variance based measures. In the case of lightcurve classification, we adapt our designs to penalize long waits until the next observation time. Lastly, we consider ways to address other aspects of the problem, such as uncertainty estimation arising due to contamination from nearby contaminating sources or background diffuse emission. We acknowledge support from Smithsonian Competitive Grants Fund 40488100HH0043 and NSF grant DMS 1208791.

  16. Hierarchical Real-time Network Traffic Classification Based on ECOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Zhao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Classification of network traffic is basic and essential for manynetwork researches and managements. With the rapid development ofpeer-to-peer (P2P application using dynamic port disguisingtechniques and encryption to avoid detection, port-based and simplepayload-based network traffic classification methods were diminished.An alternative method based on statistics and machine learning hadattracted researchers' attention in recent years. However, most ofthe proposed algorithms were off-line and usually used a single classifier.In this paper a new hierarchical real-time model was proposed which comprised of a three tuple (source ip, destination ip and destination portlook up table(TT-LUT part and layered milestone part. TT-LUT was used to quickly classify short flows whichneed not to pass the layered milestone part, and milestones in layered milestone partcould classify the other flows in real-time with the real-time feature selection and statistics.Every milestone was a ECOC(Error-Correcting Output Codes based model which was usedto improve classification performance. Experiments showed that the proposedmodel can improve the efficiency of real-time to 80%, and themulti-class classification accuracy encouragingly to 91.4% on the datasets which had been captured from the backbone router in our campus through a week.

  17. Response Classification Images in Vernier Acuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Beard, B. L.; Ellis, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Orientation selective and local sign mechanisms have been proposed as the basis for vernier acuity judgments. Linear image features contributing to discrimination can be determined for a two choice task by adding external noise to the images and then averaging the noises separately for the four types of stimulus/response trials. This method is applied to a vernier acuity task with different spatial separations to compare the predictions of the two theories. Three well-practiced observers were presented around 5000 trials of a vernier stimulus consisting of two dark horizontal lines (5 min by 0.3 min) within additive low-contrast white noise. Two spatial separations were tested, abutting and a 10 min horizontal separation. The task was to determine whether the target lines were aligned or vertically offset. The noises were averaged separately for the four stimulus/response trial types (e.g., stimulus = offset, response = aligned). The sum of the two 'not aligned' images was then subtracted from the sum of the 'aligned' images to obtain an overall image. Spatially smoothed images were quantized according to expected variability in the smoothed images to allow estimation of the statistical significance of image features. The response images from the 10 min separation condition are consistent with the local sign theory, having the appearance of two linear operators measuring vertical position with opposite sign. The images from the abutting stimulus have the same appearance with the two operators closer together. The image predicted by an oriented filter model is similar, but has its greatest weight in the abutting region, while the response images fall to nonsignificance there. The response correlation image method, previously demonstrated for letter discrimination, clarifies the features used in vernier acuity.

  18. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Kitty K.; Farrell, Sean; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10 fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ∼97% on a 7 class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest derived outlier measure, we identified 12 anomalous sources, of which 2XMM J180658.7–500250 appears to be the most unusual source in the sample. Its X-ray spectra is suggestive of a ultraluminous X-ray source but its variability makes it highly unusual. Machine-learned classification and anomaly detection will facilitate scientific discoveries in the era of all-sky surveys.

  19. Towards a Real-time Transient Classification Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, Peter E; Bloom, Josh; Starr, Dan; Butler, Nat; Nugent, Peter; Rischard, M.; Eads, D.; Poznanski, Dovi

    2008-02-22

    Temporal sampling does more than add another axis to the vector of observables. Instead, under the recognition that how objects change (and move) in time speaks directly to the physics underlying astronomical phenomena, next-generation wide-field synoptic surveys are poised to revolutionize our understanding of just about anything that goes bump in the night (which is just about everything at some level). Still, even the most ambitious surveys will require targeted spectroscopic follow-up to fill in the physical details of newly discovered transients. We are now building a new system intended to ingest and classify transient phenomena in near real-time from high-throughput imaging data streams. Described herein, the Transient Classification Project at Berkeley will be making use of classification techniques operating on"features" extracted from time series and contextual (static) information. We also highlight the need for a community adoption of a standard representation of astronomical time series data (i.e.,"VOTimeseries").

  20. Towards a Real-time Transient Classification Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, J S; Butler, N R; Nugent, P; Rischard, M; Eads, D; Poznanski, D

    2008-01-01

    Temporal sampling does more than add another axis to the vector of observables. Instead, under the recognition that how objects change (and move) in time speaks directly to the physics underlying astronomical phenomena, next-generation wide-field synoptic surveys are poised to revolutionize our understanding of just about anything that goes bump in the night (which is just about everything at some level). Still, even the most ambitious surveys will require targeted spectroscopic follow-up to fill in the physical details of newly discovered transients. We are now building a new system intended to ingest and classify transient phenomena in near real-time from high-throughput imaging data streams. Described herein, the Transient Classification Project at Berkeley will be making use of classification techniques operating on ``features'' extracted from time series and contextual (static) information. We also highlight the need for a community adoption of a standard representation of astronomical time series data (...

  1. Improving Music Genre Classification by Short-Time Feature Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Anders; Ahrendt, Peter; Larsen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    of seconds instead of milliseconds. The problem of making new features on the larger time scale from the short-time features (feature integration) has only received little attention. This paper investigates different methods for feature integration and late information fusion for music genre classification....... A new feature integration technique, the AR model, is proposed and seemingly outperforms the commonly used mean-variance features....

  2. Real-time fault classification for plasma processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723) is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  3. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723 is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  4. Highly comparative, feature-based time-series classification

    CERN Document Server

    Fulcher, Ben D

    2014-01-01

    A highly comparative, feature-based approach to time series classification is introduced that uses an extensive database of algorithms to extract thousands of interpretable features from time series. These features are derived from across the scientific time-series analysis literature, and include summaries of time series in terms of their correlation structure, distribution, entropy, stationarity, scaling properties, and fits to a range of time-series models. After computing thousands of features for each time series in a training set, those that are most informative of the class structure are selected using greedy forward feature selection with a linear classifier. The resulting feature-based classifiers automatically learn the differences between classes using a reduced number of time-series properties, and circumvent the need to calculate distances between time series. Representing time series in this way results in orders of magnitude of dimensionality reduction, allowing the method to perform well on ve...

  5. Unsupervised action classification using space-time link analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haowei; Feris, Rogerio; Krüger, Volker

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of unsupervised discovery of action classes in video data. Different from all existing methods thus far proposed for this task, we present a space-time link analysis approach which matches the performance of traditional unsupervised action categorization metho...... matching for action classification. We present an experiment to demonstrate that our approach is capable of handling cluttered backgrounds, activities with subtle movements, and video data from moving cameras....

  6. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, ...

  7. Pornography classification: The hidden clues in video space-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Daniel; Avila, Sandra; Perez, Mauricio; Moraes, Daniel; Testoni, Vanessa; Valle, Eduardo; Goldenstein, Siome; Rocha, Anderson

    2016-11-01

    As web technologies and social networks become part of the general public's life, the problem of automatically detecting pornography is into every parent's mind - nobody feels completely safe when their children go online. In this paper, we focus on video-pornography classification, a hard problem in which traditional methods often employ still-image techniques - labeling frames individually prior to a global decision. Frame-based approaches, however, ignore significant cogent information brought by motion. Here, we introduce a space-temporal interest point detector and descriptor called Temporal Robust Features (TRoF). TRoF was custom-tailored for efficient (low processing time and memory footprint) and effective (high classification accuracy and low false negative rate) motion description, particularly suited to the task at hand. We aggregate local information extracted by TRoF into a mid-level representation using Fisher Vectors, the state-of-the-art model of Bags of Visual Words (BoVW). We evaluate our original strategy, contrasting it both to commercial pornography detection solutions, and to BoVW solutions based upon other space-temporal features from the scientific literature. The performance is assessed using the Pornography-2k dataset, a new challenging pornographic benchmark, comprising 2000 web videos and 140h of video footage. The dataset is also a contribution of this work and is very assorted, including both professional and amateur content, and it depicts several genres of pornography, from cartoon to live action, with diverse behavior and ethnicity. The best approach, based on a dense application of TRoF, yields a classification error reduction of almost 79% when compared to the best commercial classifier. A sparse description relying on TRoF detector is also noteworthy, for yielding a classification error reduction of over 69%, with 19× less memory footprint than the dense solution, and yet can also be implemented to meet real-time requirements.

  8. Classification of time series patterns from complex dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, J.C.; Rao, N.

    1998-07-01

    An increasing availability of high-performance computing and data storage media at decreasing cost is making possible the proliferation of large-scale numerical databases and data warehouses. Numeric warehousing enterprises on the order of hundreds of gigabytes to terabytes are a reality in many fields such as finance, retail sales, process systems monitoring, biomedical monitoring, surveillance and transportation. Large-scale databases are becoming more accessible to larger user communities through the internet, web-based applications and database connectivity. Consequently, most researchers now have access to a variety of massive datasets. This trend will probably only continue to grow over the next several years. Unfortunately, the availability of integrated tools to explore, analyze and understand the data warehoused in these archives is lagging far behind the ability to gain access to the same data. In particular, locating and identifying patterns of interest in numerical time series data is an increasingly important problem for which there are few available techniques. Temporal pattern recognition poses many interesting problems in classification, segmentation, prediction, diagnosis and anomaly detection. This research focuses on the problem of classification or characterization of numerical time series data. Highway vehicles and their drivers are examples of complex dynamic systems (CDS) which are being used by transportation agencies for field testing to generate large-scale time series datasets. Tools for effective analysis of numerical time series in databases generated by highway vehicle systems are not yet available, or have not been adapted to the target problem domain. However, analysis tools from similar domains may be adapted to the problem of classification of numerical time series data.

  9. Applying matching pursuit decomposition time-frequency processing to UGS footstep classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Brett W.; Chung, Hugh; Dominguez, Alfonso; Sciacca, Jacob; Kovvali, Narayan; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Allee, David R.

    2013-06-01

    The challenge of rapid footstep detection and classification in remote locations has long been an important area of study for defense technology and national security. Also, as the military seeks to create effective and disposable unattended ground sensors (UGS), computational complexity and power consumption have become essential considerations in the development of classification techniques. In response to these issues, a research project at the Flexible Display Center at Arizona State University (ASU) has experimented with footstep classification using the matching pursuit decomposition (MPD) time-frequency analysis method. The MPD provides a parsimonious signal representation by iteratively selecting matched signal components from a pre-determined dictionary. The resulting time-frequency representation of the decomposed signal provides distinctive features for different types of footsteps, including footsteps during walking or running activities. The MPD features were used in a Bayesian classification method to successfully distinguish between the different activities. The computational cost of the iterative MPD algorithm was reduced, without significant loss in performance, using a modified MPD with a dictionary consisting of signals matched to cadence temporal gait patterns obtained from real seismic measurements. The classification results were demonstrated with real data from footsteps under various conditions recorded using a low-cost seismic sensor.

  10. Preventing Real-Time Packet Classification Using Cryptographic Primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Vasumathi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jamming attacks are especially harmful when ensuring the dependability of wireless communication. Typically, jamming has been addressed under an external threat model. Adversaries with internal knowledge of protocol specifications and network secrets can launch low-effort jamming attacks that are difficult to detect and counter. The problem of selective jamming attacks in wireless networks is addressed in this work. In these attacks, the adversary is active only for a short period of time, specifically targeting messages of high importance. The advantages of selective jamming in terms of network performance degradation and adversary effort is illustrated by presenting two case studies; one is selective attack on TCP and another is on routing. The selective jamming attacks can be launched by performing real-time packet classification at the physical layer. To avoid these attacks, four schemes are developed such as All Or Nothing Transformation-Hiding Scheme (AONT-HS - pseudo message is added with message before transformation and encryption, Strong Hiding Commitment Scheme(SHCS - off-the-shelf symmetric encryption is done, Puzzle Based Hiding Scheme(PBHS- time lock and hash puzzle and Nonce based Authenticated Encryption Scheme(N-AES-Nonce is used for encryption, that prevent real-time packet classification by combining cryptographic primitives with physical-layer attributes.

  11. Ensemble Deep Learning for Biomedical Time Series Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-peng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble learning has been proved to improve the generalization ability effectively in both theory and practice. In this paper, we briefly outline the current status of research on it first. Then, a new deep neural network-based ensemble method that integrates filtering views, local views, distorted views, explicit training, implicit training, subview prediction, and Simple Average is proposed for biomedical time series classification. Finally, we validate its effectiveness on the Chinese Cardiovascular Disease Database containing a large number of electrocardiogram recordings. The experimental results show that the proposed method has certain advantages compared to some well-known ensemble methods, such as Bagging and AdaBoost.

  12. Ensemble Deep Learning for Biomedical Time Series Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin-Peng; Dong, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble learning has been proved to improve the generalization ability effectively in both theory and practice. In this paper, we briefly outline the current status of research on it first. Then, a new deep neural network-based ensemble method that integrates filtering views, local views, distorted views, explicit training, implicit training, subview prediction, and Simple Average is proposed for biomedical time series classification. Finally, we validate its effectiveness on the Chinese Cardiovascular Disease Database containing a large number of electrocardiogram recordings. The experimental results show that the proposed method has certain advantages compared to some well-known ensemble methods, such as Bagging and AdaBoost.

  13. Ensemble Deep Learning for Biomedical Time Series Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble learning has been proved to improve the generalization ability effectively in both theory and practice. In this paper, we briefly outline the current status of research on it first. Then, a new deep neural network-based ensemble method that integrates filtering views, local views, distorted views, explicit training, implicit training, subview prediction, and Simple Average is proposed for biomedical time series classification. Finally, we validate its effectiveness on the Chinese Cardiovascular Disease Database containing a large number of electrocardiogram recordings. The experimental results show that the proposed method has certain advantages compared to some well-known ensemble methods, such as Bagging and AdaBoost.

  14. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma response evaluation with MRI texture classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinonen Tomi T

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To show magnetic resonance imaging (MRI texture appearance change in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL during treatment with response controlled by quantitative volume analysis. Methods A total of 19 patients having NHL with an evaluable lymphoma lesion were scanned at three imaging timepoints with 1.5T device during clinical treatment evaluation. Texture characteristics of images were analyzed and classified with MaZda application and statistical tests. Results NHL tissue MRI texture imaged before treatment and under chemotherapy was classified within several subgroups, showing best discrimination with 96% correct classification in non-linear discriminant analysis of T2-weighted images. Texture parameters of MRI data were successfully tested with statistical tests to assess the impact of the separability of the parameters in evaluating chemotherapy response in lymphoma tissue. Conclusion Texture characteristics of MRI data were classified successfully; this proved texture analysis to be potential quantitative means of representing lymphoma tissue changes during chemotherapy response monitoring.

  15. Advances in Classification Methods for Military Munitions Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    removed Advances in Classification - Classification with EM61 Data Data Analysis Environment Oasis montaj • High performance database • Advanced data...TEMTADS MetalMapper 5Advances in Classification - Classification with Advanced Sensors Data Analysis Environment Oasis montaj • High performance

  16. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of particles are needed to fully exploit the potential of the LAr-TPC technique. Herein, the novel method for electron neutrino classification is presented. The method constructs a feature descriptor from images of observed event. It characterizes the signal distribution propagated from vertex of interest, where the particle interacts with the detector medium. The classifier is learned with a constructed feature descriptor to decide whether the images represent the electron neutrino or cascade produced by photons. The proposed ap...

  17. Dynamic Bayesian Networks in Classification-and-Ranking Architecture of Response Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The first component in classification-and-ranking architecture is a Bayesian classifier that classifies user utterances into response classes based on their semantic and pragmatic interpretations. Bayesian networks are sufficient if data is limited to single user input utterance. However, if the classifier is able to collate features from a sequence of previous n-1 user utterances, the additional information may or may not improve the accuracy rate in response classification. Approach: This article investigates the use of dynamic Bayesian networks to include time-series information in the form of extended features from preceding utterances. The experiment was conducted on SCHISMA corpus, which is a mixed-initiative, transaction dialogue in theater reservation. Results: The results show that classification accuracy is improved, but rather insignificantly. The accuracy rate tends to deteriorate as time-span of dialogue is increased. Conclusion: Although every response utterance reflects form and behavior that are expected by the preceding utterance, influence of meaning and intentions diminishes throughout time as the conversation stretches to longer duration.

  18. A new complexity measure for time series analysis and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nithin; Balasubramanian, Karthi; Dey, Sutirth

    2013-07-01

    Complexity measures are used in a number of applications including extraction of information from data such as ecological time series, detection of non-random structure in biomedical signals, testing of random number generators, language recognition and authorship attribution etc. Different complexity measures proposed in the literature like Shannon entropy, Relative entropy, Lempel-Ziv, Kolmogrov and Algorithmic complexity are mostly ineffective in analyzing short sequences that are further corrupted with noise. To address this problem, we propose a new complexity measure ETC and define it as the "Effort To Compress" the input sequence by a lossless compression algorithm. Here, we employ the lossless compression algorithm known as Non-Sequential Recursive Pair Substitution (NSRPS) and define ETC as the number of iterations needed for NSRPS to transform the input sequence to a constant sequence. We demonstrate the utility of ETC in two applications. ETC is shown to have better correlation with Lyapunov exponent than Shannon entropy even with relatively short and noisy time series. The measure also has a greater rate of success in automatic identification and classification of short noisy sequences, compared to entropy and a popular measure based on Lempel-Ziv compression (implemented by Gzip).

  19. Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Renee Clary and James Wandersee describe the beginnings of "Classification," which lies at the very heart of science and depends upon pattern recognition. Clary and Wandersee approach patterns by first telling the story of the "Linnaean classification system," introduced by Carl Linnacus (1707-1778), who is…

  20. Predictability, stationarity, and classification of hydraulic responses to recharge in two karst aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Long

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Karst aquifers, many of which are rapidly filled and depleted, are likely to be highly susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, and stream base flow at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA. A one-dimensional, lumped-parameter model simulates nonstationary soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a nonstationary convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data was 4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and among aquifers. Combined principal component analysis and cluster analysis of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs separated those sites with IRFs having a large ratio of the mean response time to the system memory from those with large skewness and kurtosis. Classification of the IRF metrics indicate that there is a range of IRF characteristics for different site types (i.e., spring flow, groundwater level, base flow within a karst system. Further, similar site types did not necessarily display similar IRFs. Results indicate that the differences existing within either aquifer are larger than the differences between the two aquifers and that the two aquifers are similar according to this classification. The use of multiple metrics to describe the IRFs provides a novel way to characterize and compare the way in which multiple sites respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for additional aquifers, they could contribute

  1. ASAS classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis: time to modify.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoc, Nurullah; Khan, Muhammad A

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between ankylosing spondylitis and the recently proposed entity called axial spondyloarthritis with its radiographic and non-radiographic forms that have been defined by the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), is currently being debated. The Food and Drug Agency (FDA) had criticized the ASAS criteria and the studies which used these criteria to enroll patients in a clinical trial of certolizumab and adalimumab for the treatment of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis. The primary aim of classification criteria is to create homogenous patient populations for basic and clinical research. But the multi-arm construct of the ASAS criteria is a potential source of heterogeneity reducing their utility. Criteria sets should be regarded as dynamic concepts open to modifications or updates as our knowledge advances. We provide evidence to conclude that it is time to modify the ASAS Criteria for axSpA, and we propose some of the steps that can be taken to start moving forward in improving the validity of these criteria.

  2. Decision time horizon for music genre classification using short time features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrendt, Peter; Meng, Anders; Larsen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper music genre classification has been explored with special emphasis on the decision time horizon and ranking of tapped-delay-line short-time features. Late information fusion as e.g. majority voting is compared with techniques of early information fusion such as dynamic PCA (DPCA......). The most frequently suggested features in the literature were employed including mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC), linear prediction coefficients (LPC), zero-crossing rate (ZCR), and MPEG-7 features. To rank the importance of the short time features consensus sensitivity analysis is applied...

  3. Nonlinear Time Series Model for Shape Classification Using Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A complex nonlinear exponential autoregressive (CNEAR) model for invariant feature extraction is developed for recognizing arbitrary shapes on a plane. A neural network is used to calculate the CNEAR coefficients. The coefficients, which constitute the feature set, are proven to be invariant to boundary transformations such as translation, rotation, scale and choice of starting point in tracing the boundary. The feature set is then used as the input to a complex multilayer perceptron (C-MLP) network for learning and classification. Experimental results show that complicated shapes can be accurately recognized even with the low-order model and that the classification method has good fault tolerance when noise is present.

  4. Real Time Classification of Viruses in 12 Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chenglong; Hernandez, Troy; Zheng, Hui; Yau, Shek-Chung; Huang, Hsin-Hsiung; He, Rong Lucy; Jie YANG; Yau, Stephen S. -T.

    2013-01-01

    The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses authorizes and organizes the taxonomic classification of viruses. Thus far, the detailed classifications for all viruses are neither complete nor free from dispute. For example, the current missing label rates in GenBank are 12.1% for family label and 30.0% for genus label. Using the proposed Natural Vector representation, all 2,044 single-segment referenced viral genomes in GenBank can be embedded in . Unlike other approaches, this allows us...

  5. Robust evaluation of time series classification algorithms for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Dustin Y.; Worden, Keith; Todd, Michael D.

    2014-03-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time damage and performance information for civil, aerospace, and mechanical infrastructure through analysis of structural response measurements. The supervised learning methodology for data-driven SHM involves computation of low-dimensional, damage-sensitive features from raw measurement data that are then used in conjunction with machine learning algorithms to detect, classify, and quantify damage states. However, these systems often suffer from performance degradation in real-world applications due to varying operational and environmental conditions. Probabilistic approaches to robust SHM system design suffer from incomplete knowledge of all conditions a system will experience over its lifetime. Info-gap decision theory enables nonprobabilistic evaluation of the robustness of competing models and systems in a variety of decision making applications. Previous work employed info-gap models to handle feature uncertainty when selecting various components of a supervised learning system, namely features from a pre-selected family and classifiers. In this work, the info-gap framework is extended to robust feature design and classifier selection for general time series classification through an efficient, interval arithmetic implementation of an info-gap data model. Experimental results are presented for a damage type classification problem on a ball bearing in a rotating machine. The info-gap framework in conjunction with an evolutionary feature design system allows for fully automated design of a time series classifier to meet performance requirements under maximum allowable uncertainty.

  6. Mapping Plant Functional Types over Broad Mountainous Regions: A Hierarchical Soft Time-Space Classification Applied to the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danlu Cai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on global climate change requires plant functional type (PFT products. Although several PFT mapping procedures for remote sensing imagery are being used, none of them appears to be specifically designed to map and evaluate PFTs over broad mountainous areas which are highly relevant regions to identify and analyze the response of natural ecosystems. We present a methodology for generating soft classifications of PFTs from remotely sensed time series that are based on a hierarchical strategy by integrating time varying integrated NDVI and phenological information with topography: (i Temporal variability: a Fourier transform of a vegetation index (MODIS NDVI, 2006 to 2010. (ii Spatial partitioning: a primary image segmentation based on a small number of thresholds applied to the Fourier amplitude. (iii Classification by a supervised soft classification step is based on a normalized distance metric constructed from a subset of Fourier coefficients and complimentary altitude data from a digital elevation model. Applicability and effectiveness is tested for the eastern Tibetan Plateau. A classification nomenclature is determined from temporally stable pixels in the MCD12Q1 time series. Overall accuracy statistics of the resulting classification reveal a gain of about 7% from 64.4% compared to 57.7% by the MODIS PFT products.

  7. Response Features Determining Spike Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Richmond

    1999-01-01

    redundant with that carried by the coarse structure. Thus, the existence of precisely timed spike patterns carrying stimulus-related information does not imply control of spike timing at precise time scales.

  8. Real-Time Speech/Music Classification With a Hierarchical Oblique Decision Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    REAL-TIME SPEECH/ MUSIC CLASSIFICATION WITH A HIERARCHICAL OBLIQUE DECISION TREE Jun Wang, Qiong Wu, Haojiang Deng, Qin Yan Institute of Acoustics...time speech/ music classification with a hierarchical oblique decision tree. A set of discrimination features in frequency domain are selected...handle signals without discrimination and can not work properly in the existence of multimedia signals. This paper proposes a real-time speech/ music

  9. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18... REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal is... later than the third calendar day after filing. If the time period for response to a Request or...

  10. Digital modulation classification using multi-layer perceptron and time-frequency features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Ye; Mei Wenbo

    2007-01-01

    Considering that real communication signals corrupted by noise are generally nonstationary, and time-frequency distributions are especially suitable for the analysis of nonstationary signals, time-frequency distributions are introduced for the modulation classification of communication signals.The extracted time-frequency features have good classification information, and they are insensitive to signal to noise ratio (SNR) variation.According to good classification by the correct rate of a neural network classifier, a multilayer perceptron (MLP) classifier with better generalization, as well as, addition of time-frequency features set for classifying six different modulation types has been proposed.Computer simulations show that the MLP classifier outperforms the decision-theoretic classifier at low SNRs, and the classification experiments for real MPSK signals verify engineering significance of the MLP classifier.

  11. Symmetry classification of time-fractional diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, I.; Khan, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a new approach is proposed to construct the symmetry groups for a class of fractional differential equations which are expressed in the modified Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. We perform a complete group classification of a nonlinear fractional diffusion equation which arises in fractals, acoustics, control theory, signal processing and many other applications. Introducing the suitable transformations, the fractional derivatives are converted to integer order derivatives and in consequence the nonlinear fractional diffusion equation transforms to a partial differential equation (PDE). Then the Lie symmetries are computed for resulting PDE and using inverse transformations, we derive the symmetries for fractional diffusion equation. All cases are discussed in detail and results for symmetry properties are compared for different values of α. This study provides a new way of computing symmetries for a class of fractional differential equations.

  12. On Machine-Learned Classification of Variable Stars with Sparse and Noisy Time-Series Data

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Joseph W; Butler, Nathaniel R; Bloom, Joshua S; Brewer, John M; Crellin-Quick, Arien; Higgins, Justin; Kennedy, Rachel; Rischard, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    With the coming data deluge from synoptic surveys, there is a growing need for frameworks that can quickly and automatically produce calibrated classification probabilities for newly-observed variables based on a small number of time-series measurements. In this paper, we introduce a methodology for variable-star classification, drawing from modern machine-learning techniques. We describe how to homogenize the information gleaned from light curves by selection and computation of real-numbered metrics ("feature"), detail methods to robustly estimate periodic light-curve features, introduce tree-ensemble methods for accurate variable star classification, and show how to rigorously evaluate the classification results using cross validation. On a 25-class data set of 1542 well-studied variable stars, we achieve a 22.8% overall classification error using the random forest classifier; this represents a 24% improvement over the best previous classifier on these data. This methodology is effective for identifying sam...

  13. ARMA modelled time-series classification for structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Carden, E.; Brownjohn, James M. W.

    2008-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the subject of a great deal of ongoing research leading to the capability that reliable remote monitoring of civil infrastructure would allow a shift from schedule-based to condition-based maintenance strategies. The first stage in such a system would be the indication of an extraordinary change in the structure's behaviour. A statistical classification algorithm is presented here which is based on analysis of a structure's response in the time domain. The time-series responses are fitted with Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models and the ARMA coefficients are fed to the classifier. The classifier is capable of learning in an unsupervised manner and of forming new classes when the structural response exhibits change. The approach is demonstrated with experimental data from the IASC-ASCE benchmark four-storey frame structure, the Z24 bridge and the Malaysia-Singapore Second Link bridge. The classifier is found to be capable of identifying structural change in all cases and of forming distinct classes corresponding to different structural states in most cases.

  14. Exupery volcano fast response system - The event detection and waveform classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Conny; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions are often preceded by seismic activity which can be used to quantify the volcanic activity since the number and the size of certain types of seismic events usually increase before periods of volcanic crisis. The implementation of an automatic detection and classification system for seismic signals of volcanic origin allows not only for the processing of large amounts of data in short time, but also provides consistent and time-invariant results. Here, we have developed a system based upon a combination of different methods. To enable a first robust event detection in the continuous data stream different modules are implemented in the real time system Earthworm which is widely distributed in active volcano monitoring observatories worldwide. Among those software modules are classical trigger algorithm like STA/LTA and cross-correlation master event matching which is also used to detect different classes of signals. Furthermore an additional module is implemented in the real time system to compute continuous activity parameters which are also used to quantify the volcanic activity. Most automatic classification systems need a sufficiently large pre-classified data set for training the system. However in case of a volcanic crisis we are often confronted with a lack of training data due to insufficient prior observations because prior data acquisition might be carried out with different equipment at a low number of sites and due to the imminent crisis there might be no time for the time-consuming and tedious process of preparing a training data set. For this reason we have developed a novel seismic event spotting technique in order to be less dependent on the existence of previously acquired data bases of event classes. One main goal is therefore to provide observatory staff with a robust event classification based on a minimum number of reference waveforms. By using a "learning-while-recording" approach we are allowing for the fast build-up of a

  15. Real-time dual-microphone noise classification for environment-adaptive pipelines of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved noise classification in environment-adaptive speech processing pipelines of cochlear implants. This improvement is achieved by using a dual-microphone and by using a computationally efficient feature-level combination approach to achieve real-time operation. A new measure named Suppression Advantage is also defined in order to quantify the noise suppression improvement of an entire pipeline due to noise classification. The noise classification and suppression improvement results are presented for four commonly encountered noise environments.

  16. Assessing Subgroup Differences in Item Response Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnipke, Deborah L.; Pashley, Peter J.

    Differences in test performance on time-limited tests may be due in part to differential response-time rates between subgroups, rather than real differences in the knowledge, skills, or developed abilities of interest. With computer-administered tests, response times are available and may be used to address this issue. This study investigates…

  17. Improving Music Genre Classification by Short Time Feature Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Anders; Ahrendt, Peter; Larsen, Jan

    . The problem of making new features on the larger time scale from the short-time features (feature integration) has only received little attention. This paper investigates different methods for feature integration (early information fusion) and late information fusion (assembling of probabilistic outputs...

  18. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response......, the transverse response, or both. In phenomenological scalar models the nonlocal response is described as a smearing out of the commonly assumed infinitely localized response, as characterized by a distribution with a finite width. Here we calculate explicitly whether and how tensorial models......, such as the hydrodynamic Drude model and generalized nonlocal optical response theory, follow this phenomenological description. We find considerable differences, for example that nonlocal response functions, in contrast to simple distributions, assume negative and complex values. Moreover, nonlocal response regularizes...

  19. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubs, M

    2015-11-30

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response, the transverse response, or both. In phenomenological scalar models the nonlocal response is described as a smearing out of the commonly assumed infinitely localized response, as characterized by a distribution with a finite width. Here we calculate explicitly whether and how tensorial models, such as the hydrodynamic Drude model and generalized nonlocal optical response theory, follow this phenomenological description. We find considerable differences, for example that nonlocal response functions, in contrast to simple distributions, assume negative and complex values. Moreover, nonlocal response regularizes some but not all diverging optical near fields. We identify the scalar model that comes closest to the hydrodynamic model. Interestingly, for the hydrodynamic Drude model we find that actually only one third (1/3) of the free-electron response is smeared out nonlocally. In that sense, nonlocal response is stronger for transverse and scalar nonlocal response models, where the smeared-out fractions are 2/3 and 3/3, respectively. The latter two models seem to predict novel plasmonic resonances also below the plasma frequency, in contrast to the hydrodynamic model that predicts standing pressure waves only above the plasma frequency.

  20. Consistent Classification of Landsat Time Series with an Improved Automatic Adaptive Signature Generalization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Dannenberg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Classifying land cover is perhaps the most common application of remote sensing, yet classification at frequent temporal intervals remains a challenging task due to radiometric differences among scenes, time and budget constraints, and semantic differences among class definitions from different dates. The automatic adaptive signature generalization (AASG algorithm overcomes many of these limitations by locating stable sites between two images and using them to adapt class spectral signatures from a high-quality reference classification to a new image, which mitigates the impacts of radiometric and phenological differences between images and ensures that class definitions remain consistent between the two classifications. We refined AASG to adapt stable site identification parameters to each individual land cover class, while also incorporating improved input data and a random forest classifier. In the Research Triangle region of North Carolina, our new version of AASG demonstrated an improved ability to update existing land cover classifications compared to the initial version of AASG, particularly for low intensity developed, mixed forest, and woody wetland classes. Topographic indices were particularly important for distinguishing woody wetlands from other forest types, while multi-seasonal imagery contributed to improved classification of water, developed, forest, and hay/pasture classes. These results demonstrate both the flexibility of the AASG algorithm and the potential for using it to produce high-quality land cover classifications that can utilize the entire temporal range of the Landsat archive in an automated fashion while maintaining consistent class definitions through time.

  1. A Real-Time Infrared Ultra-Spectral Signature Classification Method via Spatial Pyramid Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaoguang; Ma, Yong; Li, Chang; Fan, Fan; Huang, Jun; Ma, Jiayi

    2015-07-03

    The state-of-the-art ultra-spectral sensor technology brings new hope for high precision applications due to its high spectral resolution. However, it also comes with new challenges, such as the high data dimension and noise problems. In this paper, we propose a real-time method for infrared ultra-spectral signature classification via spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which includes two aspects. First, we introduce an infrared ultra-spectral signature similarity measure method via SPM, which is the foundation of the matching-based classification method. Second, we propose the classification method with reference spectral libraries, which utilizes the SPM-based similarity for the real-time infrared ultra-spectral signature classification with robustness performance. Specifically, instead of matching with each spectrum in the spectral library, our method is based on feature matching, which includes a feature library-generating phase. We calculate the SPM-based similarity between the feature of the spectrum and that of each spectrum of the reference feature library, then take the class index of the corresponding spectrum having the maximum similarity as the final result. Experimental comparisons on two publicly-available datasets demonstrate that the proposed method effectively improves the real-time classification performance and robustness to noise.

  2. A Real-Time Infrared Ultra-Spectral Signature Classification Method via Spatial Pyramid Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Mei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art ultra-spectral sensor technology brings new hope for high precision applications due to its high spectral resolution. However, it also comes with new challenges, such as the high data dimension and noise problems. In this paper, we propose a real-time method for infrared ultra-spectral signature classification via spatial pyramid matching (SPM, which includes two aspects. First, we introduce an infrared ultra-spectral signature similarity measure method via SPM, which is the foundation of the matching-based classification method. Second, we propose the classification method with reference spectral libraries, which utilizes the SPM-based similarity for the real-time infrared ultra-spectral signature classification with robustness performance. Specifically, instead of matching with each spectrum in the spectral library, our method is based on feature matching, which includes a feature library-generating phase. We calculate the SPM-based similarity between the feature of the spectrum and that of each spectrum of the reference feature library, then take the class index of the corresponding spectrum having the maximum similarity as the final result. Experimental comparisons on two publicly-available datasets demonstrate that the proposed method effectively improves the real-time classification performance and robustness to noise.

  3. Silicon Timing Response to Particles and Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermilab; Spiropulu, Maria [Caltech

    2015-01-01

    It is observed growing interest to fast timing detectors in high energy physics, related, for example, with collider luminosity increase (LHC) [1]. The options of CMS [2] calorimeter upgrade based on silicon detectors renewed interest to the timing study of this type of detectors. The article is devoted to study of silicon timing response to particles and light.

  4. Cell classification using big data analytics plus time stretch imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Bahram; Chen, Claire L.; Mahjoubfar, Ata

    2016-09-01

    We show that blood cells can be classified with high accuracy and high throughput by combining machine learning with time stretch quantitative phase imaging. Our diagnostic system captures quantitative phase images in a flow microscope at millions of frames per second and extracts multiple biophysical features from individual cells including morphological characteristics, light absorption and scattering parameters, and protein concentration. These parameters form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning and cell classification is performed. We show binary classification of T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well classification of algae cell strains with high and low lipid content. The label-free screening averts the negative impact of staining reagents on cellular viability or cell signaling. The combination of time stretch machine vision and learning offers unprecedented cell analysis capabilities for cancer diagnostics, drug development and liquid biopsy for personalized genomics.

  5. Real-time classification of vehicles by type within infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundegorski, Mikolaj E.; Akçay, Samet; Payen de La Garanderie, Grégoire; Breckon, Toby P.

    2016-10-01

    Real-time classification of vehicles into sub-category types poses a significant challenge within infra-red imagery due to the high levels of intra-class variation in thermal vehicle signatures caused by aspects of design, current operating duration and ambient thermal conditions. Despite these challenges, infra-red sensing offers significant generalized target object detection advantages in terms of all-weather operation and invariance to visual camouflage techniques. This work investigates the accuracy of a number of real-time object classification approaches for this task within the wider context of an existing initial object detection and tracking framework. Specifically we evaluate the use of traditional feature-driven bag of visual words and histogram of oriented gradient classification approaches against modern convolutional neural network architectures. Furthermore, we use classical photogrammetry, within the context of current target detection and classification techniques, as a means of approximating 3D target position within the scene based on this vehicle type classification. Based on photogrammetric estimation of target position, we then illustrate the use of regular Kalman filter based tracking operating on actual 3D vehicle trajectories. Results are presented using a conventional thermal-band infra-red (IR) sensor arrangement where targets are tracked over a range of evaluation scenarios.

  6. A Near Real-time IP Traffic Classification Using Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With drastic increase in internet traffic over last few years due to increase in number of internet users, IP traffic classification has gained significant importance for research community as well as various internet service providers for optimization of their network performance and for governmental intelligence organizations. Today, traditional IP traffic classification techniques such as port number and payload based direct packet inspection techniques are rarely used because of use of dynamic port number instead of well-known port number in packet headers and various cryptographic techniques which inhibit inspection of packet payload. Current trends are use of machine learning (ML techniques for IP traffic classification. In this research paper, a real time internet traffic dataset has been developed using packet capturing tool for 2 second packet capturing duration and other datasets have been developed by reducing number of features of 2 second duration dataset using Correlation and Consistency based Feature Selection (FS Algorithms. Then, five ML algorithms MLP, RBF, C4.5, Bayes Net and Naïve Bayes are employed for IP traffic classification with these datasets. This experimental analysis shows that Bayes Net is an effective ML technique for near real time and online IP traffic classification with reduction in packet capture duration and reduction in number of features characterizing each application sample with Correlation based FS Algorithm.

  7. Combining Blink, Pupil, and Response Time Measures in a Concealed Knowledge Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis eSeymour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The response time (RT based Concealed Knowledge Test (CKT has been shown to accurately detect participants’ knowledge of mock-crime related information. Tests based on ocular measures such as pupil size and blink rate have sometimes resulted in poor classification, or lacked detailed classification analyses. The present study examines the fitness of multiple pupil and blink related responses in the CKT paradigm. To maximize classification efficiency, participants’ concealed knowledge was assessed using both individual test measures and combinations of test measures. Results show that individual pupil-size, pupil-slope, and pre-response blink-rate measures produce efficient classifications. Combining pupil and blink measures yielded more accuracy classifications than individual ocular measures. Although RT-based tests proved efficient, combining RT with ocular measures had little incremental benefit. It is argued that covertly assessing ocular measures during RT-based tests may guard against effective countermeasure use in applied settings. A compound classification procedure was used to categorize individual participants and yielded high hit rates and low false-alarm rates without the need for adjustments between test paradigms or subject populations. We conclude that with appropriate test paradigms and classification analyses, ocular measures may prove as effective as other indices, though additional research is needed.

  8. Time-dependent approach for single trial classification of covert visuospatial attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, L.; Leeb, R.; Millán, J. del R.

    2012-08-01

    Recently, several studies have started to explore covert visuospatial attention as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Covert visuospatial attention represents the ability to change the focus of attention from one point in the space without overt eye movements. Nevertheless, the full potential and possible applications of this paradigm remain relatively unexplored. Voluntary covert visuospatial attention might allow a more natural and intuitive interaction with real environments as neither stimulation nor gazing is required. In order to identify brain correlates of covert visuospatial attention, classical approaches usually rely on the whole α-band over long time intervals. In this work, we propose a more detailed analysis in the frequency and time domains to enhance classification performance. In particular, we investigate the contribution of α sub-bands and the role of time intervals in carrying information about visual attention. Previous neurophysiological studies have already highlighted the role of temporal dynamics in attention mechanisms. However, these important aspects are not yet exploited in BCI. In this work, we studied different methods that explicitly cope with the natural brain dynamics during visuospatial attention tasks in order to enhance BCI robustness and classification performances. Results with ten healthy subjects demonstrate that our approach identifies spectro-temporal patterns that outperform the state-of-the-art classification method. On average, our time-dependent classification reaches 0.74 ± 0.03 of the area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve (AUC) value with an increase of 12.3% with respect to standard methods (0.65 ± 0.4). In addition, the proposed approach allows faster classification (<1 instead of 3 s), without compromising performances. Finally, our analysis highlights the fact that discriminant patterns are not stable for the whole trial period but are changing over short time

  9. Aircraft Target Classification Based on Correlation Features from Time-domain Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Lan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the classification of helicopters, propeller-driven aircraft, and turbojet based on differences in their time-domain modulation periods using a conventional radar system. First, we determine the modulation periods of their time-domain echoes. Then, based on the differences in the time-domain modulation periods, we propose a method for the extraction of time-domain correlation features. Finally, based on the simulated and measured data, via a support vector machine classifier, it is proved that the time-domain correlation features can yield the good classification performance, even with the relatively low pulse repetition frequency, which may induce the ambiguity in Doppler-frequency domain.

  10. Discovery, classification, and scientific exploration of transient events from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Mahabal, A A; Drake, A J; Donalek, C; Graham, M J; Williams, R D; Chen, Y; Moghaddam, B; Turmon, M; Beshore, E; Larson, S

    2011-01-01

    Exploration of the time domain - variable and transient objects and phenomena - is rapidly becoming a vibrant research frontier, touching on essentially every field of astronomy and astrophysics, from the Solar system to cosmology. Time domain astronomy is being enabled by the advent of the new generation of synoptic sky surveys that cover large areas on the sky repeatedly, and generating massive data streams. Their scientific exploration poses many challenges, driven mainly by the need for a real-time discovery, classification, and follow-up of the interesting events. Here we describe the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), that discovers and publishes transient events at optical wavelengths in real time, thus benefiting the entire community. We describe some of the scientific results to date, and then focus on the challenges of the automated classification and prioritization of transient events. CRTS represents a scientific and a technological testbed and precursor for the larger surveys in the futu...

  11. Characterization and Classification of Coals and Rocks Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Hu, Ke-xiang; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Xiao; Ding, En-jie

    2016-09-01

    Being the key unaddressed problem in unmanned mining condition, a new method for the coal-rock interface recognition was proposed in the study. Firstly, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was employed to measure 10 kinds of coals/rocks which were common in China. Secondly, the physical properties of coals/rocks such as absorption coefficient spectra, refractive index, and dielectric properties in THz band were studied. The different responses in THz range caused by diverse components in coals/rocks were discussed, and the dielectric property of coals/rocks in THz band was well fitted by the Lorentz model. Finally, by the means of principal component analysis (PCA), support vector machine (SVM), and THz spectral data, the recognition rate of coals/rocks reaches to 100 % and the recognition rate of different bituminous coals reaches to 97.5 %. The experimental results show that the proposed method is fast, stable, and accurate for the detection of coal-rock interface and could be a promising tool for the classification of different bituminous coals.

  12. Characterization and Classification of Coals and Rocks Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Hu, Ke-xiang; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Xiao; Ding, En-jie

    2017-02-01

    Being the key unaddressed problem in unmanned mining condition, a new method for the coal-rock interface recognition was proposed in the study. Firstly, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was employed to measure 10 kinds of coals/rocks which were common in China. Secondly, the physical properties of coals/rocks such as absorption coefficient spectra, refractive index, and dielectric properties in THz band were studied. The different responses in THz range caused by diverse components in coals/rocks were discussed, and the dielectric property of coals/rocks in THz band was well fitted by the Lorentz model. Finally, by the means of principal component analysis (PCA), support vector machine (SVM), and THz spectral data, the recognition rate of coals/rocks reaches to 100 % and the recognition rate of different bituminous coals reaches to 97.5 %. The experimental results show that the proposed method is fast, stable, and accurate for the detection of coal-rock interface and could be a promising tool for the classification of different bituminous coals.

  13. CLASSIFICATION OF CROPLANDS THROUGH FUSION OF OPTICAL AND SAR TIME SERIES DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Many satellite sensors including Landsat series have been extensively used for land cover classification. Studies have been conducted to mitigate classification problems associated with the use of single data (e.g., such as cloud contamination through multi-sensor data fusion and the use of time series data. This study investigated two areas with different environment and climate conditions: one in South Korea and the other in US. Cropland classification was conducted by using multi-temporal Landsat 5, Radarsat-1 and digital elevation models (DEM based on two machine learning approaches (i.e., random forest and support vector machines. Seven classification scenarios were examined and evaluated through accuracy assessment. Results show that SVM produced the best performance (overall accuracy of 93.87% when using all temporal and spectral data as input variables. Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI, SAR backscattering, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI were identified as more contributing variables than the others for cropland classification.

  14. Optimized Time-Gated Fluorescence Spectroscopy for the Classification and Recycling of Fluorescently Labeled Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Petr; Zhelondz, Dmitry; Kargel, Christian

    2016-08-29

    For the production of high-quality parts from recycled plastics, a very high purity of the plastic waste to be recycled is mandatory. The incorporation of fluorescent tracers ("markers") into plastics during the manufacturing process helps overcome typical problems of non-tracer based optical classification methods. Despite the unique emission spectra of fluorescent markers, the classification becomes difficult when the host plastics exhibit (strong) autofluorescence that spectrally overlaps the marker fluorescence. Increasing the marker concentration is not an option from an economic perspective and might also adversely affect the properties of the plastics. A measurement approach that suppresses the autofluorescence in the acquired signal is time-gated fluorescence spectroscopy (TGFS). Unfortunately, TGFS is associated with a lower signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, which results in larger classification errors. In order to optimize the S/N ratio we investigate and validate the best TGFS parameters-derived from a model for the fluorescence signal-for plastics labeled with four specifically designed fluorescent markers. In this study we also demonstrate the implementation of TGFS on a measurement and classification prototype system and determine its performance. Mean values for a sensitivity of [Formula: see text] = 99.93% and precision [Formula: see text] = 99.80% were achieved, proving that a highly reliable classification of plastics can be achieved in practice.

  15. Classification Consistency and Accuracy for Complex Assessments Using Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Chan

    2010-01-01

    In this article, procedures are described for estimating single-administration classification consistency and accuracy indices for complex assessments using item response theory (IRT). This IRT approach was applied to real test data comprising dichotomous and polytomous items. Several different IRT model combinations were considered. Comparisons…

  16. Human response times in a graphic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Yule, A

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the results obtained from measuring the response times of the users of an interactive graphics system available on the CERN central computers is presented. These results are then used to find an optimum time to wait before rolling the user's program to disc.

  17. Hierarchical Bayes Models for Response Time Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigmile, Peter F.; Peruggia, Mario; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2010-01-01

    Human response time (RT) data are widely used in experimental psychology to evaluate theories of mental processing. Typically, the data constitute the times taken by a subject to react to a succession of stimuli under varying experimental conditions. Because of the sequential nature of the experiments there are trends (due to learning, fatigue,…

  18. Analysing students’ response times with classroom response systems

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Classroom response systems (‘clickers’ etc.) are well documented as having potential for developing knowledge and engagement in the classroom, so much so that they are ubiquitous, almost passé. The wealth of data gathered from such systems is beginning to be analysed and recent work in the peer instruction community (e.g. Miller et. al, 2014) suggests that in some contexts students answering correctly tend to have the shortest (quickest) response times. Recent work at Kingston University ...

  19. Joint Time-Frequency-Space Classification of EEG in a Brain-Computer Interface Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina Gary N Garcia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interface is a growing field of interest in human-computer interaction with diverse applications ranging from medicine to entertainment. In this paper, we present a system which allows for classification of mental tasks based on a joint time-frequency-space decorrelation, in which mental tasks are measured via electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The efficiency of this approach was evaluated by means of real-time experimentations on two subjects performing three different mental tasks. To do so, a number of protocols for visualization, as well as training with and without feedback, were also developed. Obtained results show that it is possible to obtain good classification of simple mental tasks, in view of command and control, after a relatively small amount of training, with accuracies around 80%, and in real time.

  20. Time-Frequency Signal Processing Based on Fractional Fourier Transform in Passive Sonar Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Bagheri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduce a new data SONAR classification method based on Short-Time Fractional Fourier Transform (STFrFT analysis. The passive SONAR system receives the acoustic signals radiated by vessels and attempts to categorize them as a function of the similarities between vessels of the same class.Here, a time-frequency processing and feature extraction method is developed in order to improve the performance of a feedforwardneural network, which is used to classify five classes of vessels.Processing of time-varying signals in fractional fourier domain allows us to estimate the signal with higher concentration than conventional fourier domain, making the technique robust against additive noise, maintaining same computational complexity. With the purpose of dimension reduction and classification improvement, we use Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA technique. The feasibility of the proposed technique (STFrFTLDA has been tested experimentally using a real database. The experimental results show the superiority of the proposed method

  1. A real-time method for autonomous passive acoustic detection-classification of humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, Ted A; Premus, Vincent E; Abbot, Philip A

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a method for real-time, autonomous, joint detection-classification of humpback whale vocalizations. The approach adapts the spectrogram correlation method used by Mellinger and Clark [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 3518-3529 (2000)] for bowhead whale endnote detection to the humpback whale problem. The objective is the implementation of a system to determine the presence or absence of humpback whales with passive acoustic methods and to perform this classification with low false alarm rate in real time. Multiple correlation kernels are used due to the diversity of humpback song. The approach also takes advantage of the fact that humpbacks tend to vocalize repeatedly for extended periods of time, and identification is declared only when multiple song units are detected within a fixed time interval. Humpback whale vocalizations from Alaska, Hawaii, and Stellwagen Bank were used to train the algorithm. It was then tested on independent data obtained off Kaena Point, Hawaii in February and March of 2009. Results show that the algorithm successfully classified humpback whales autonomously in real time, with a measured probability of correct classification in excess of 74% and a measured probability of false alarm below 1%.

  2. Embedded Hardware-Efficient Real-Time Classification With Cascade Support Vector Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrkou, Christos; Bouganis, Christos-Savvas; Theocharides, Theocharis; Polycarpou, Marios M

    2016-01-01

    Cascade support vector machines (SVMs) are optimized to efficiently handle problems, where the majority of the data belong to one of the two classes, such as image object classification, and hence can provide speedups over monolithic (single) SVM classifiers. However, SVM classification is a computationally demanding task and existing hardware architectures for SVMs only consider monolithic classifiers. This paper proposes the acceleration of cascade SVMs through a hybrid processing hardware architecture optimized for the cascade SVM classification flow, accompanied by a method to reduce the required hardware resources for its implementation, and a method to improve the classification speed utilizing cascade information to further discard data samples. The proposed SVM cascade architecture is implemented on a Spartan-6 field-programmable gate array (FPGA) platform and evaluated for object detection on 800×600 (Super Video Graphics Array) resolution images. The proposed architecture, boosted by a neural network that processes cascade information, achieves a real-time processing rate of 40 frames/s for the benchmark face detection application. Furthermore, the hardware-reduction method results in the utilization of 25% less FPGA custom-logic resources and 20% peak power reduction compared with a baseline implementation.

  3. Refining Time-Activity Classification of Human Subjects Using the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Maogui; Li, Wei; Li, Lianfa; Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed spatial location information is important in accurately estimating personal exposure to air pollution. Global Position System (GPS) has been widely used in tracking personal paths and activities. Previous researchers have developed time-activity classification models based on GPS data, most of them were developed for specific regions. An adaptive model for time-location classification can be widely applied to air pollution studies that use GPS to track individual level time-activity patterns. Methods Time-activity data were collected for seven days using GPS loggers and accelerometers from thirteen adult participants from Southern California under free living conditions. We developed an automated model based on random forests to classify major time-activity patterns (i.e. indoor, outdoor-static, outdoor-walking, and in-vehicle travel). Sensitivity analysis was conducted to examine the contribution of the accelerometer data and the supplemental spatial data (i.e. roadway and tax parcel data) to the accuracy of time-activity classification. Our model was evaluated using both leave-one-fold-out and leave-one-subject-out methods. Results Maximum speeds in averaging time intervals of 7 and 5 minutes, and distance to primary highways with limited access were found to be the three most important variables in the classification model. Leave-one-fold-out cross-validation showed an overall accuracy of 99.71%. Sensitivities varied from 84.62% (outdoor walking) to 99.90% (indoor). Specificities varied from 96.33% (indoor) to 99.98% (outdoor static). The exclusion of accelerometer and ambient light sensor variables caused a slight loss in sensitivity for outdoor walking, but little loss in overall accuracy. However, leave-one-subject-out cross-validation showed considerable loss in sensitivity for outdoor static and outdoor walking conditions. Conclusions The random forests classification model can achieve high accuracy for the four major time

  4. Time Domain Response of the ARIANNA Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Hanson, J C; Klein, S R; Kleinfelder, S A; Piasecki, M; Ratzlaff, K; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Walker, J; Young, R; Zou, L

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a high-energy neutrino detector designed to record the Askaryan electric field signature of cosmogenic neutrino interactions in ice. To understand the inherent radio-frequency (RF) neutrino signature, the time-domain response of the ARIANNA RF receiver must be measured. ARIANNA uses Create CLP5130-2N log-periodic dipole arrays (LPDAs). The associated effective height operator converts incident electric fields to voltage waveforms at the LDPA terminals. The effective height versus time and incident angle was measured, along with the associated response of the ARIANNA RF amplifier. The results are verified by correlating to field measurements in air and ice, using oscilloscopes. Finally, theoretical models for the Askaryan electric field are combined with the detector response to predict the neutrino signature.

  5. Mental Speed, Response Time, and Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoosain, Rumjahn

    1980-01-01

    In this study with bilingual Chinese college students, faster subjects in a word-judging task had lower Raven's Progressive Matrices scores. The distinction between test response time and actual mental speed as a correlate of intelligence is discussed. (Author/SJL)

  6. Classification Scheme for Random Longitudinal Road Unevenness Considering Road Waviness and Vehicle Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldřich Kropáč

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to the road unevenness classification based on the power spectral density with consideration of vehicle vibration response and broad interval of road waviness (road elevation PSD slope is presented. This approach enables transformation of two basic parameters of road profile elevation PSD (unevenness index, C, and waviness, w into a single-number indicator Cw when using a correction factor Kw accounting for w. For the road classification proposal two planar vehicle models (passenger car and truck, ten responses (reflecting ride comfort, dynamic load of road and cargo, ride safety and three different vehicle velocities have been considered. The minimum of ten estimated vibration response ranges sum for a broad waviness interval typical for real road sections (w = 1.5 to 3.5 has been used for the correction factor estimation. The introduced unevenness indicator, Cw, reflects the vehicle vibration response and seems to be a suitable alternative to the other currently used single-number indicators or as an extension of the road classification according to the ISO 8608: 1995, which is based on constant waviness value, w = 2.

  7. Exploring Strategies for Classification of External Stimuli Using Statistical Features of the Plant Electrical Response

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Shre Kumar; Maharatna, Koushik; Masi, Elisa; Santopolo, Luisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Vitaletti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Plants sense their environment by producing electrical signals which in essence represent changes in underlying physiological processes. These electrical signals, when monitored, show both stochastic and deterministic dynamics. In this paper, we compute 11 statistical features from the raw non-stationary plant electrical signal time series to classify the stimulus applied (causing the electrical signal). By using different discriminant analysis based classification techniques, we successfully establish that there is enough information in the raw electrical signal to classify the stimuli. In the process, we also propose two standard features which consistently give good classification results for three types of stimuli - Sodium Chloride (NaCl), Sulphuric Acid (H2SO4) and Ozone (O3). This may facilitate reduction in the complexity involved in computing all the features for online classification of similar external stimuli in future.

  8. Advanced real-time classification methods for flow cytometry data analysis and cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; Reece, Lisa M.; Hokanson, James A.; Rosenblatt, Judah I.

    2002-05-01

    While many flow cytometric data analysis and 'discovery' methods have been developed, few of these have been applied to the problem of separating out purified cell subpopulations by cell sorting. The fundamental problem is that the data analysis techniques have been performed using relatively slow computational methods that take far more time than is allowed by the sort decision on a cell sorter (typically less than a millisecond). Thus cell sorting, which is really a form of 'real-time data classification,' is usually done with few, if any, multivariate statistical tools used either in the sort decision or in the evaluation of the correctness of the classification. We have developed new multivariate data analysis and 'data discovery' methods that can be implemented for real-time data classification for cell sorting using linked lookup tables. One multivariate 'data discovery' method, 'subtractive clustering,' has been used to find which clusters of cells are different between two or more files (cell samples) and to help guide analysis or sort boundaries for these cell subpopulations. Multivariate statistical methods (e.g. principal component analysis or discriminant function analysis) were implemented in linked lookup tables to establish analysis/sort boundaries that include 'costs (or penalties) of misclassification. Costs of misclassification provided a measure of the quality of the analysis/sort boundary and were expressed in simple terms that describe the tradeoff between yield and purity.

  9. Predicting decisions in human social interactions using real-time fMRI and pattern classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Hollmann

    Full Text Available Negotiation and trade typically require a mutual interaction while simultaneously resting in uncertainty which decision the partner ultimately will make at the end of the process. Assessing already during the negotiation in which direction one's counterpart tends would provide a tremendous advantage. Recently, neuroimaging techniques combined with multivariate pattern classification of the acquired data have made it possible to discriminate subjective states of mind on the basis of their neuronal activation signature. However, to enable an online-assessment of the participant's mind state both approaches need to be extended to a real-time technique. By combining real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and online pattern classification techniques, we show that it is possible to predict human behavior during social interaction before the interacting partner communicates a specific decision. Average accuracy reached approximately 70% when we predicted online the decisions of volunteers playing the ultimatum game, a well-known paradigm in economic game theory. Our results demonstrate the successful online analysis of complex emotional and cognitive states using real-time fMRI, which will enable a major breakthrough for social fMRI by providing information about mental states of partners already during the mutual interaction. Interestingly, an additional whole brain classification across subjects confirmed the online results: anterior insula, ventral striatum, and lateral orbitofrontal cortex, known to act in emotional self-regulation and reward processing for adjustment of behavior, appeared to be strong determinants of later overt behavior in the ultimatum game. Using whole brain classification we were also able to discriminate between brain processes related to subjective emotional and motivational states and brain processes related to the evaluation of objective financial incentives.

  10. Real-time volume visualization of sensor data for target detection and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Robert A.

    1998-05-01

    The Advanced Volume Visualization Display (AVVD) research program is a joint research program between the Fraunhofer Center for Research in Computer Graphics, Inc. and Innovative Research and Development Corp. It is dedicated to the real- time visualization of high-resolution volumetric sensor data sets, maximizing the use of the human visual system to facilitate detection and classification in extremely hostile environments. The AVVD program has successfully demonstrated the application of high-speed volume visualization to a number of detection and classification problems. Recent emphasis has been on sonar for undersea imaging using data from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center -- Division Newport's High Resolution Array (HRA), and rapid mine detection using data from the Coastal System Station's Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS). The AVVD system introduced a new capability: the intuitive composition of several 'pings' into a synthetic volumetric set. This composite data is higher resolution, approaching optical quality, with soft shadows and broad specularities.

  11. Combining angular response classification and backscatter imagery segmentation for benthic biological habitat mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Backscatter information from multibeam echosounders (MBES) have been shown to contain useful information for the characterisation of benthic habitats. Compared to backscatter imagery, angular response of backscatter has shown advantages for feature discrimination. However its low spatial resolution inhibits the generation of fine scale habitat maps. In this study, angular backscatter response was combined with image segmentation of backscatter imagery to characterise benthic biological habitats in Discovery Bay Marine National Park, Victoria, Australia. Angular response of backscatter data from a Reson Seabat 8101 MBES (240 kHz) was integrated with georeferenced underwater video observations for constructing training data. To produce benthic habitat maps, decision tree supervised classification results were combined with mean shift image segmentation for class assignment. The results from mean angular response characteristics show effects of incidence angle at the outer angle for invertebrates (INV) and mixed red and invertebrates (MRI) classes, whilst mixed brown algae (MB) and mixed brown algae and invertebrates (MBI) showed similar responses independent from incidence angle. Automatic segmentation processing produce over segmented results but showed good discrimination between heterogeneous regions. Accuracy assessment from habitat maps produced overall accuracies of 79.6% (Kappa coefficient = 0.66) and 80.2% (Kappa coefficient = 0.67) for biota and substratum classifications respectively. MRI and MBI produced the lowest average accuracy while INV the highest. The ability to combine angular response and backscatter imagery provides an alternative approach for investigating biological information from acoustic backscatter data.

  12. Bioelectric signal classification using a recurrent probabilistic neural network with time-series discriminant component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hideaki; Shima, Keisuke; Shibanoki, Taro; Kurita, Yuichi; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a probabilistic neural network developed on the basis of time-series discriminant component analysis (TSDCA) that can be used to classify high-dimensional time-series patterns. TSDCA involves the compression of high-dimensional time series into a lower-dimensional space using a set of orthogonal transformations and the calculation of posterior probabilities based on a continuous-density hidden Markov model that incorporates a Gaussian mixture model expressed in the reduced-dimensional space. The analysis can be incorporated into a neural network so that parameters can be obtained appropriately as network coefficients according to backpropagation-through-time-based training algorithm. The network is considered to enable high-accuracy classification of high-dimensional time-series patterns and to reduce the computation time taken for network training. In the experiments conducted during the study, the validity of the proposed network was demonstrated for EEG signals.

  13. World Climate Classification and Search: Data Mining Approach Utilizing Dynamic Time Warping Similarity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Netzel, P.; Jasiewicz, J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a novel method for classification and search of climate over the global land surface excluding Antarctica. Our method classifies climate on the basis of the outcome of time series segmentation and clustering. We use WorldClim 30 arc sec. (approx. 1 km) resolution grid data which is based on 50 years of climatic observations. Each cell in a grid is assigned a 12 month series consisting of 50-years monthly averages of mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures as well as the total precipitation. The presented method introduces several innovations with comparison to existing data-driven methods of world climate classifications. First, it uses only climatic rather than bioclimatic data. Second, it employs object-oriented methodology - the grid is first segmented before climatic segments are classified. Third, and most importantly, the similarity between climates in two given cells is performed using the dynamic time warping (DTW) measure instead of the Euclidean distance. The DTW is known to be superior to Euclidean distance for time series, but has not been utilized before in classification of global climate. To account for computational expense of DTW we use highly efficient GeoPAT software (http://sil.uc.edu/gitlist/) that, in the first step, segments the grid into local regions of uniform climate. In the second step, the segments are classified. We also introduce a climate search - a GeoWeb-based method for interactive presentation of global climate information in the form of query-and-retrieval. A user selects a geographical location and the system returns a global map indicating level of similarity between local climates and a climate in the selected location. The results of the search for location: "University of Cincinnati, Main Campus" are presented on attached map. The results of the search for location: "University of Cincinnati, Main Campus" are presented on the map. We have compared the results of our method to Koeppen classification scheme

  14. Big Davids – Real-Time Sensor Classification. Real-time classification of gorilla video segments in affective categories using crowd-sourced annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, A.; Thomas, E.D.R.; Schavemaker, J.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this sheet book we present a method to classify segments of gorilla videos in different affective categories. The classification method is trained by crowd sourcing annotation. The trained classification than uses video features (computed from the video segments) to classify a new video segment i

  15. Real-time framework for tensor-based image enhancement for object classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyganek, Bogusław; Smołka, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    In many practical situations visual pattern recognition is vastly burdened by low quality of input images due to noise, geometrical distortions, as well as low quality of the acquisition hardware. However, although there are techniques of image quality improvements, such as nonlinear filtering, there are only few attempts reported in the literature that try to build these enhancement methods into a complete chain for multi-dimensional object recognition such as color video or hyperspectral images. In this work we propose a joint multilinear signal filtering and classification system built upon the multi-dimensional (tensor) approach. Tensor filtering is performed by the multi-dimensional input signal projection into the tensor subspace spanned by the best-rank tensor decomposition method. On the other hand, object classification is done by construction of the tensor sub-space constructed based on the Higher-Order Singular Value Decomposition method applied to the prototype patters. In the experiments we show that the proposed chain allows high object recognition accuracy in the real-time even from the poor quality prototypes. Even more importantly, the proposed framework allows unified classification of signals of any dimensions, such as color images or video sequences which are exemplars of 3D and 4D tensors, respectively. The paper discussed also some practical issues related to implementation of the key components of the proposed system.

  16. Classification of Hazelnut Kernels by Using Impact Acoustic Time-Frequency Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Habil; Ince, Nuri Firat; Tewfik, Ahmed H.; Yardimci, Yasemin; Pearson, Tom

    2007-12-01

    Hazelnuts with damaged or cracked shells are more prone to infection with aflatoxin producing molds ( Aspergillus flavus). These molds can cause cancer. In this study, we introduce a new approach that separates damaged/cracked hazelnut kernels from good ones by using time-frequency features obtained from impact acoustic signals. The proposed technique requires no prior knowledge of the relevant time and frequency locations. In an offline step, the algorithm adaptively segments impact signals from a training data set in time using local cosine packet analysis and a Kullback-Leibler criterion to assess the discrimination power of different segmentations. In each resulting time segment, the signal is further decomposed into subbands using an undecimated wavelet transform. The most discriminative subbands are selected according to the Euclidean distance between the cumulative probability distributions of the corresponding subband coefficients. The most discriminative subbands are fed into a linear discriminant analysis classifier. In the online classification step, the algorithm simply computes the learned features from the observed signal and feeds them to the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. The algorithm achieved a throughput rate of 45 nuts/s and a classification accuracy of 96% with the 30 most discriminative features, a higher rate than those provided with prior methods.

  17. Classification of Hazelnut Kernels by Using Impact Acoustic Time-Frequency Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Pearson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazelnuts with damaged or cracked shells are more prone to infection with aflatoxin producing molds (Aspergillus flavus. These molds can cause cancer. In this study, we introduce a new approach that separates damaged/cracked hazelnut kernels from good ones by using time-frequency features obtained from impact acoustic signals. The proposed technique requires no prior knowledge of the relevant time and frequency locations. In an offline step, the algorithm adaptively segments impact signals from a training data set in time using local cosine packet analysis and a Kullback-Leibler criterion to assess the discrimination power of different segmentations. In each resulting time segment, the signal is further decomposed into subbands using an undecimated wavelet transform. The most discriminative subbands are selected according to the Euclidean distance between the cumulative probability distributions of the corresponding subband coefficients. The most discriminative subbands are fed into a linear discriminant analysis classifier. In the online classification step, the algorithm simply computes the learned features from the observed signal and feeds them to the linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier. The algorithm achieved a throughput rate of 45 nuts/s and a classification accuracy of 96% with the 30 most discriminative features, a higher rate than those provided with prior methods.

  18. A Real-Time Cardiac Arrhythmia Classification System with Wearable Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng; Wei, Hongxing; Chen, Youdong; Tan, Jindong

    2012-01-01

    Long term continuous monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) in a free living environment provides valuable information for prevention on the heart attack and other high risk diseases. This paper presents the design of a real-time wearable ECG monitoring system with associated cardiac arrhythmia classification algorithms. One of the striking advantages is that ECG analog front-end and on-node digital processing are designed to remove most of the noise and bias. In addition, the wearable sensor node is able to monitor the patient's ECG and motion signal in an unobstructive way. To realize the real-time medical analysis, the ECG is digitalized and transmitted to a smart phone via Bluetooth. On the smart phone, the ECG waveform is visualized and a novel layered hidden Markov model is seamlessly integrated to classify multiple cardiac arrhythmias in real time. Experimental results demonstrate that the clean and reliable ECG waveform can be captured in multiple stressed conditions and the real-time classification on cardiac arrhythmia is competent to other workbenches. PMID:23112746

  19. A Real-Time Cardiac Arrhythmia Classification System with Wearable Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Tan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Long term continuous monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG in a free living environment provides valuable information for prevention on the heart attack and other high risk diseases. This paper presents the design of a real-time wearable ECG monitoring system with associated cardiac arrhythmia classification algorithms. One of the striking advantages is that ECG analog front-end and on-node digital processing are designed to remove most of the noise and bias. In addition, the wearable sensor node is able to monitor the patient’s ECG and motion signal in an unobstructive way. To realize the real-time medical analysis, the ECG is digitalized and transmitted to a smart phone via Bluetooth. On the smart phone, the ECG waveform is visualized and a novel layered hidden Markov model is seamlessly integrated to classify multiple cardiac arrhythmias in real time. Experimental results demonstrate that the clean and reliable ECG waveform can be captured in multiple stressed conditions and the real-time classification on cardiac arrhythmia is competent to other workbenches.

  20. Predict or classify: The deceptive role of time-locking in brain signal classification

    CERN Document Server

    Rusconi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Several experimental studies claim to be able to predict the outcome of simple decisions from brain signals measured before subjects are aware of their decision. Often, these studies use multivariate pattern recognition methods with the underlying assumption that the ability to classify the brain signal is equivalent to predict the decision itself. Here we show instead that it is possible to correctly classify a signal even if it does not contain any predictive information about the decision. We first define a simple stochastic model that mimics the random decision process between two equivalent alternatives, and generate a large number of independent trials that contain no choice-predictive information. The trials are first time-locked to the time point of the final event and then classified using standard machine-learning techniques. The resulting classification accuracy is above chance level long before the time point of time-locking. We then analyze the same trials using information theory. We demonstrate...

  1. Proposition of novel classification approach and features for improved real-time arrhythmia monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Heo, Jeong; Park, Kwang Suk; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmia refers to a group of conditions in which the heartbeat is irregular, fast, or slow due to abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Some types of arrhythmia such as ventricular fibrillation may result in cardiac arrest or death. Thus, arrhythmia detection becomes an important issue, and various studies have been conducted. Additionally, an arrhythmia detection algorithm for portable devices such as mobile phones has recently been developed because of increasing interest in e-health care. This paper proposes a novel classification approach and features, which are validated for improved real-time arrhythmia monitoring. The classification approach that was employed for arrhythmia detection is based on the concept of ensemble learning and the Taguchi method and has the advantage of being accurate and computationally efficient. The electrocardiography (ECG) data for arrhythmia detection was obtained from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database (n=48). A novel feature, namely the heart rate variability calculated from 5s segments of ECG, which was not considered previously, was used. The novel classification approach and feature demonstrated arrhythmia detection accuracy of 89.13%. When the same data was classified using the conventional support vector machine (SVM), the obtained accuracy was 91.69%, 88.14%, and 88.74% for Gaussian, linear, and polynomial kernels, respectively. In terms of computation time, the proposed classifier was 5821.7 times faster than conventional SVM. In conclusion, the proposed classifier and feature showed performance comparable to those of previous studies, while the computational complexity and update interval were highly reduced.

  2. Classification and Space-Time Analysis of Precipitation Events in Manizales, Caldas, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez Hincapie, J. N.; Vélez, J.; Romo Melo, L.; Chang, P.

    2015-12-01

    Manizales is a mid-mountain Andean city located near the Nevado del Ruiz volcano in west-central Colombia, this location exposes it to earthquakes, floods, landslides and volcanic eruptions. It is located in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and presents a climate with a bimodal rainfall regime (Cortés, 2010). Its mean annual rainfall is 2000 mm, one may observe precipitation 70% of the days over a year. This rain which favors the formation of large masses of clouds and the presence of macroclimatic phenomenon as "El Niño South Oscillation", has historically caused great impacts in the region (Vélez et al, 2012). For example the geographical location coupled with rain events results in a high risk of landslides in the city. Manizales has a hydrometeorological network of 40 stations that measure and transmit data of up to eight climate variables. Some of these stations keep 10 years of historical data. However, until now this information has not been used for space-time classification of precipitation events, nor has the meteorological variables that influence them been thoroughly researched. The purpose of this study was to classify historical events of rain in an urban area of Manizales and investigate patterns of atmospheric behavior that influence or trigger such events. Classification of events was performed by calculating the "n" index of the heavy rainfall, describing the behavior of precipitation as a function of time throughout the event (Monjo, 2009). The analysis of meteorological variables was performed using statistical quantification over variable time periods before each event. The proposed classification allowed for an analysis of the evolution of rainfall events. Specially, it helped to look for the influence of different meteorological variables triggering rainfall events in hazardous areas as the city of Manizales.

  3. Response time in online stated choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Danny; Mørkbak, Morten Raun; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we use paradata relating to the length of time respondents required in a self-administered online stated preference surveys. Although this issue has been previously explored, there is little guidance on how to identify and deal with ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ respondents. In this paper, we...... use scale-adjusted latent class models to address preference and variance heterogeneity and explore how class membership varies with response latency. To test our methodology, we use stated choice data collected via an online survey to establish German anglers’ preferences for fishing site attributes...

  4. Reverberation time in class rooms – Comparison of regulations and classification criteria in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Brunskog, Jonas; Hoffmeyer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory requirements or guidelines for classroom reverberation time exist in all five Nordic countries and in most of Europe – as well as other acoustic criteria for schools, e.g. concerning airborne and impact sound insulation, facade sound insulation and installation noise. There are several...... reasons for having such requirements: Improving learning efficiency for pupils and work conditions for teachers and reducing noise levels, thus increasing comfort for everyone. Instead of including acoustic regulatory requirements for schools directly in the building regulations, Iceland, Norway...... requirements and classification criteria in the Nordic countries and compares and discusses the limit values and trends....

  5. Electrodeposited submicron thermocouples with microsecond response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, M E; van der Veer, W E; Güell, A G; Grüell, A G; Penner, R M

    2007-10-01

    We describe a procedure for preparing submicron scale silver-nickel thermocouples (TCs) using electrochemical step edge decoration on graphite surfaces. Each fabrication operation produced ensembles of 2-20 TCs with diameters in the 1.0 microm to 500 nm range. These "sub-mum TCs" (SMTCs) produced linear voltage versus temperature output over the range from 20 to 100 degrees C characterized by a Seebeck coefficient of 20 +/- 1 microV/degrees C, equal to the 21 microV/degrees C that is theoretically expected for a junction between these two metals. The time response of SMTCs was evaluated using two different laser-heating methods and compared with the smallest mechanically robust commercially available type J TCs. Electrochemical etching of the silver wire introduced constrictions at grain boundaries that reduced the thermal mass of the junction without altering its integrity or its overall diameter, producing a decrease of the measured rise time for SMTCs up to 96%.

  6. Real-Time Classification of Hand Motions Using Ultrasound Imaging of Forearm Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Nima; Baker, Clayton A; Lahlou, Mohamed; Zafar, Hozaifah; Murthy, Karthik G; Rangwala, Huzefa S; Kosecka, Jana; Joiner, Wilsaan M; Pancrazio, Joseph J; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2016-08-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) has been the predominant method for sensing electrical activity for a number of applications involving muscle-computer interfaces, including myoelectric control of prostheses and rehabilitation robots. Ultrasound imaging for sensing mechanical deformation of functional muscle compartments can overcome several limitations of sEMG, including the inability to differentiate between deep contiguous muscle compartments, low signal-to-noise ratio, and lack of a robust graded signal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of real-time graded control using a computationally efficient method to differentiate between complex hand motions based on ultrasound imaging of forearm muscles. Dynamic ultrasound images of the forearm muscles were obtained from six able-bodied volunteers and analyzed to map muscle activity based on the deformation of the contracting muscles during different hand motions. Each participant performed 15 different hand motions, including digit flexion, different grips (i.e., power grasp and pinch grip), and grips in combination with wrist pronation. During the training phase, we generated a database of activity patterns corresponding to different hand motions for each participant. During the testing phase, novel activity patterns were classified using a nearest neighbor classification algorithm based on that database. The average classification accuracy was 91%. Real-time image-based control of a virtual hand showed an average classification accuracy of 92%. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrasound imaging as a robust muscle-computer interface. Potential clinical applications include control of multiarticulated prosthetic hands, stroke rehabilitation, and fundamental investigations of motor control and biomechanics.

  7. Phylogenetic Classification Of Bartonella Species By Comparing The Two-Component System Response Regulator Feup Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhamad Abou-Hamdan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bacterial genus Bartonella is classified in the alpha-2 Proteobacteria on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence comparison. The Bartonella two-component system feuPQ is found in nearly all bacterial species. We investigated the usefulness of the response regulator feuP gene sequence in the classification of 18 well characterized Bartonella species. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using parsimony neighbour-joining and maximum-likelihood methods. Reliable classifications of most of the studied species were obtained. Bartonella were divided into two supported clades containing two supported clusters each. These results were similar to our previous data obtained with groEL ftsZ and ribC genes sequences. The wide range of feuP DNA sequence similarity 78.6 to 96.5 among Bartonella species makes it a promising candidate for multi-locus sequence typing MLST of clinical isolates. This is the first report proving the usefulness of feuP sequences in bartonellae classification at the species level.

  8. Classification of osteosarcoma T-ray responses using adaptive and rational wavelets for feature extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Desmond; Wong, Fu Tian; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Findlay, David; Ferguson, Bradley; Abbott, Derek

    2007-12-01

    In this work we investigate new feature extraction algorithms on the T-ray response of normal human bone cells and human osteosarcoma cells. One of the most promising feature extraction methods is the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). However, the classification accuracy is dependant on the specific wavelet base chosen. Adaptive wavelets circumvent this problem by gradually adapting to the signal to retain optimum discriminatory information, while removing redundant information. Using adaptive wavelets, classification accuracy, using a quadratic Bayesian classifier, of 96.88% is obtained based on 25 features. In addition, the potential of using rational wavelets rather than the standard dyadic wavelets in classification is explored. The advantage it has over dyadic wavelets is that it allows a better adaptation of the scale factor according to the signal. An accuracy of 91.15% is obtained through rational wavelets with 12 coefficients using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) as the classifier. These results highlight adaptive and rational wavelets as an efficient feature extraction method and the enormous potential of T-rays in cancer detection.

  9. Morphology and classification of hemocytes in Pinctada fucata and their responses to ocean acidification and warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Yangjia; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-07-01

    Hemocytes play important roles in the innate immune response and biomineralization of bivalve mollusks. However, the hemocytes in pearl oysters are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the morphology and classification of hemocytes in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. Three types of hemocytes were successfully obtained by light microscopy, electron microscopy and flow cytometry methods: small hyalinocytes, large hyalinocytes and granulocytes. The small hyalinocytes are the major hemocyte population. Morphological analyses indicated that these hemocytes have species-specific characterizations. In addition, we assessed the potential effects of ocean acidification (OA) and ocean warming (OW) on the immune parameters and calcium homeostasis of the hemocytes. OA and OW (31 °C) altered pH value of hemolymph, increased the total hemocyte count, total protein content, and percentage of large hyalinocytes and granulocytes, while it decreased the neutral red uptake ability, suggesting active stress responses of P. fucata to these stressors. Exposure to OW (25 °C) resulted in no significant differences, indicating an excellent immune defense to heat stress at this level. The outflow of calcium from hemocytes to hemolymph was also determined, implying the potential impact of OA and OW on hemocyte-mediated biomineralization. This study, therefore, provides insight into the classification and characterization of hemocyte in the pearl oyster, P. fucata, and also reveals the immune responses of hemocytes to OA and OW, which are helpful for a comprehensive understanding of the effects of global climate change on pearl oysters.

  10. Real-Time Classification of Complex Patterns Using Spike-Based Learning in Neuromorphic VLSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S; Fusi, S; Indiveri, G

    2009-02-01

    Real-time classification of patterns of spike trains is a difficult computational problem that both natural and artificial networks of spiking neurons are confronted with. The solution to this problem not only could contribute to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of computation used in the biological brain, but could also lead to efficient hardware implementations of a wide range of applications ranging from autonomous sensory-motor systems to brain-machine interfaces. Here we demonstrate real-time classification of complex patterns of mean firing rates, using a VLSI network of spiking neurons and dynamic synapses which implement a robust spike-driven plasticity mechanism. The learning rule implemented is a supervised one: a teacher signal provides the output neuron with an extra input spike-train during training, in parallel to the spike-trains that represent the input pattern. The teacher signal simply indicates if the neuron should respond to the input pattern with a high rate or with a low one. The learning mechanism modifies the synaptic weights only as long as the current generated by all the stimulated plastic synapses does not match the output desired by the teacher, as in the perceptron learning rule. We describe the implementation of this learning mechanism and present experimental data that demonstrate how the VLSI neural network can learn to classify patterns of neural activities, also in the case in which they are highly correlated.

  11. Response time accuracy in Apple Macintosh computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neath, Ian; Earle, Avery; Hallett, Darcy; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-06-01

    The accuracy and variability of response times (RTs) collected on stock Apple Macintosh computers using USB keyboards was assessed. A photodiode detected a change in the screen's luminosity and triggered a solenoid that pressed a key on the keyboard. The RTs collected in this way were reliable, but could be as much as 100 ms too long. The standard deviation of the measured RTs varied between 2.5 and 10 ms, and the distributions approximated a normal distribution. Surprisingly, two recent Apple-branded USB keyboards differed in their accuracy by as much as 20 ms. The most accurate RTs were collected when an external CRT was used to display the stimuli and Psychtoolbox was able to synchronize presentation with the screen refresh. We conclude that RTs collected on stock iMacs can detect a difference as small as 5-10 ms under realistic conditions, and this dictates which types of research should or should not use these systems.

  12. A Joint Time-Frequency and Matrix Decomposition Feature Extraction Methodology for Pathological Voice Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Ghoraani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of people affected by speech problems is increasing as the modern world places increasing demands on the human voice via mobile telephones, voice recognition software, and interpersonal verbal communications. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatic pattern classification of pathological voices. The main contribution of this paper is extraction of meaningful and unique features using Adaptive time-frequency distribution (TFD and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF. We construct Adaptive TFD as an effective signal analysis domain to dynamically track the nonstationarity in the speech and utilize NMF as a matrix decomposition (MD technique to quantify the constructed TFD. The proposed method extracts meaningful and unique features from the joint TFD of the speech, and automatically identifies and measures the abnormality of the signal. Depending on the abnormality measure of each signal, we classify the signal into normal or pathological. The proposed method is applied on the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI voice disorders database which consists of 161 pathological and 51 normal speakers, and an overall classification accuracy of 98.6% was achieved.

  13. Classification of frontal cortex haemodynamic responses during cognitive tasks using wavelet transforms and machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abibullaev, Berdakh; An, Jinung

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging demonstrate the potential of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) for use in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). fNIRS uses light in the near-infrared range to measure brain surface haemoglobin concentrations and thus determine human neural activity. Our primary goal in this study is to analyse brain haemodynamic responses for application in a BCI. Specifically, we develop an efficient signal processing algorithm to extract important mental-task-relevant neural features and obtain the best possible classification performance. We recorded brain haemodynamic responses due to frontal cortex brain activity from nine subjects using a 19-channel fNIRS system. Our algorithm is based on continuous wavelet transforms (CWTs) for multi-scale decomposition and a soft thresholding algorithm for de-noising. We adopted three machine learning algorithms and compared their performance. Good performance can be achieved by using the de-noised wavelet coefficients as input features for the classifier. Moreover, the classifier performance varied depending on the type of mother wavelet used for wavelet decomposition. Our quantitative results showed that CWTs can be used efficiently to extract important brain haemodynamic features at multiple frequencies if an appropriate mother wavelet function is chosen. The best classification results were obtained by a specific combination of input feature type and classifier.

  14. Model-based Clustering of Categorical Time Series with Multinomial Logit Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia; Pamminger, Christoph; Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf; Weber, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    A common problem in many areas of applied statistics is to identify groups of similar time series in a panel of time series. However, distance-based clustering methods cannot easily be extended to time series data, where an appropriate distance-measure is rather difficult to define, particularly for discrete-valued time series. Markov chain clustering, proposed by Pamminger and Frühwirth-Schnatter [6], is an approach for clustering discrete-valued time series obtained by observing a categorical variable with several states. This model-based clustering method is based on finite mixtures of first-order time-homogeneous Markov chain models. In order to further explain group membership we present an extension to the approach of Pamminger and Frühwirth-Schnatter [6] by formulating a probabilistic model for the latent group indicators within the Bayesian classification rule by using a multinomial logit model. The parameters are estimated for a fixed number of clusters within a Bayesian framework using an Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling scheme representing a (full) Gibbs-type sampler which involves only draws from standard distributions. Finally, an application to a panel of Austrian wage mobility data is presented which leads to an interesting segmentation of the Austrian labour market.

  15. An iterative approach to optimize change classification in SAR time series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Schulz, Karsten; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    The detection of changes using remote sensing imagery has become a broad field of research with many approaches for many different applications. Besides the simple detection of changes between at least two images acquired at different times, analyses which aim on the change type or category are at least equally important. In this study, an approach for a semi-automatic classification of change segments is presented. A sparse dataset is considered to ensure the fast and simple applicability for practical issues. The dataset is given by 15 high resolution (HR) TerraSAR-X (TSX) amplitude images acquired over a time period of one year (11/2013 to 11/2014). The scenery contains the airport of Stuttgart (GER) and its surroundings, including urban, rural, and suburban areas. Time series imagery offers the advantage of analyzing the change frequency of selected areas. In this study, the focus is set on the analysis of small-sized high frequently changing regions like parking areas, construction sites and collecting points consisting of high activity (HA) change objects. For each HA change object, suitable features are extracted and a k-means clustering is applied as the categorization step. Resulting clusters are finally compared to a previously introduced knowledge-based class catalogue, which is modified until an optimal class description results. In other words, the subjective understanding of the scenery semantics is optimized by the data given reality. Doing so, an even sparsely dataset containing only amplitude imagery can be evaluated without requiring comprehensive training datasets. Falsely defined classes might be rejected. Furthermore, classes which were defined too coarsely might be divided into sub-classes. Consequently, classes which were initially defined too narrowly might be merged. An optimal classification results when the combination of previously defined key indicators (e.g., number of clusters per class) reaches an optimum.

  16. Expected Classification Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M. Rudner

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Every time we make a classification based on a test score, we should expect some number..of misclassifications. Some examinees whose true ability is within a score range will have..observed scores outside of that range. A procedure for providing a classification table of..true and expected scores is developed for polytomously scored items under item response..theory and applied to state assessment data. A simplified procedure for estimating the..table entries is also presented.

  17. High-throughput Biological Cell Classification Featuring Real-time Optical Data Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Jalali, Bahram; Chen, Claire L

    2015-01-01

    High throughput real-time instruments are needed to acquire large data sets for detection and classification of rare events. Enabled by the photonic time stretch digitizer, a new class of instruments with record throughputs have led to the discovery of optical rogue waves [1], detection of rare cancer cells [2], and the highest analog-to-digital conversion performance ever achieved [3]. Featuring continuous operation at 100 million frames per second and shutter speed of less than a nanosecond, the time stretch camera is ideally suited for screening of blood and other biological samples. It has enabled detection of breast cancer cells in blood with record, one-in-a-million, sensitivity [2]. Owing to their high real-time throughput, instruments produce a torrent of data - equivalent to several 4K movies per second - that overwhelm data acquisition, storage, and processing operations. This predicament calls for technologies that compress images in optical domain and in real-time. An example of this, based on war...

  18. IRT parameter estimation with response times as collateral information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, W.J. van der; RKlein Entink, R.H.; Fox, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    Hierarchical modeling of responses and response times on test items facilitates the use of response times as collateral information in the estimation of the response parameters. In addition to the regular information in the response data, two sources of collateral information are identified: (a) the

  19. A new gene superfamily of pathogen-response (repat) genes in Lepidoptera: classification and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Cerrillo, G; Hernández-Martínez, P; Vogel, H; Ferré, J; Herrero, S

    2013-01-01

    Repat (REsponse to PAThogens) genes were first identified in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in response to Bacillus thuringiensis and baculovirus exposure. Since then, additional repat gene homologs have been identified in different studies. In this study the comprehensive larval transcriptome from S. exigua was analyzed for the presence of novel repat-homolog sequences. These analyses revealed the presence of at least 46 repat genes in S. exigua, establishing a new gene superfamily in this species. Phylogenetic analysis and studies of conserved motifs in these hypothetical proteins have allowed their classification in two main classes, αREPAT and βREPAT. Studies on the transcriptional response of repat genes have shown that αREPAT and βREPAT differ in their sequence but also in the pattern of regulation. The αREPAT were mainly regulated in response to the Cry1Ca toxin from B. thuringiensis but not to the increase in the midgut microbiota load. In contrast, βREPAT were neither responding to Cry1Ca toxin nor to midgut microbiota. Differential expression between midgut stem cells and the whole midgut tissue was studied for the different repat genes revealing changes in the gene expression distribution between midgut stem cells and midgut tissue in response to midgut microbiota. This high diversity found in their sequence and in their expression profile suggests that REPAT proteins may be involved in multiple processes that could be of relevance for the understanding of the insect gut physiology.

  20. Automatic classification and robust identification of vestibulo-ocular reflex responses: from theory to practice: introducing GNL-HybELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreyshi, Atiyeh; Galiana, Henrietta

    2011-10-01

    The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) stabilizes images of the world on our retinae when our head moves. Basic daily activities are thus impaired if this reflex malfunctions. During the past few decades, scientists have modeled and identified this system mathematically to diagnose and treat VOR deficits. However, traditional methods do not analyze VOR data comprehensively because they disregard the switching nature of nystagmus; this can bias estimates of VOR dynamics. Here we propose, for the first time, an automated tool to analyze entire VOR responses (slow and fast phases), without a priori classification of nystagmus segments. We have developed GNL-HybELS (Generalized NonLinear Hybrid Extended Least Squares), an algorithmic tool to simultaneously classify and identify the responses of a multi-mode nonlinear system with delay, such as the horizontal VOR and its alternating slow and fast phases. This algorithm combines the procedures of Generalized Principle Component Analysis (GPCA) for classification, and Hybrid Extended Least Squares (HybELS) for identification, by minimizing a cost function in an optimization framework. It is validated here on clean and noisy VOR simulations and then applied to clinical VOR tests on controls and patients. Prediction errors were less than 1 deg for simulations and ranged from .69 deg to 2.1 deg for the clinical data. Nonlinearities, asymmetries, and dynamic parameters were detected in normal and patient data, in both fast and slow phases of the response. This objective approach to VOR analysis now allows the design of more complex protocols for the testing of oculomotor and other hybrid systems.

  1. Real-Time Classification and Sensor Fusion with a Spiking Deep Belief Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eO'Connor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep Belief Networks (DBNs have recently shown impressive performance on a broad range of classification problems. Their generative properties allow better understanding of the performance, and provide a simpler solution for sensor fusion tasks. However, because of their inherent need for feedback and parallel update of large numbers of units, DBNs are expensive to implement on serial computers. This paper proposes a method based on the Siegert approximation for Integrate-and-Fire neurons to map an offline-trained DBN onto an efficient event-driven spiking neural network suitable for hardware implementation. The method is demonstrated in simulation and by a real-time implementation of a 3-layer network with 2694 neurons used for visual classification of MNIST handwritten digits with input from a 128x128 Dynamic Vision Sensor (DVS silicon retina, and sensory-fusion using additional input from a 64-channel AER-EAR silicon cochlea. The system is implemented through the open-source software in the jAER project and runs in real-time on a laptop computer. It is demonstrated that the system can recognize digits in the presence of distractions, noise, scaling, translation and rotation, and that the degradation of recognition performance by using an event-based approach is less than 1%. Recognition is achieved in an average of 5.8 ms after the onset of the presentation of a digit. By cue integration from both silicon retina and cochlea outputs we show that the system can be biased to select the correct digit from otherwise ambiguous input.

  2. Solid waste bin detection and classification using Dynamic Time Warping and MLP classifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md. Shafiqul, E-mail: shafique@eng.ukm.my [Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia); Hannan, M.A., E-mail: hannan@eng.ukm.my [Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia); Basri, Hassan [Dept. of Civil and Structural Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia); Hussain, Aini; Arebey, Maher [Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Solid waste bin level detection using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW). • Gabor wavelet filter is used to extract the solid waste image features. • Multi-Layer Perceptron classifier network is used for bin image classification. • The classification performance evaluated by ROC curve analysis. - Abstract: The increasing requirement for Solid Waste Management (SWM) has become a significant challenge for municipal authorities. A number of integrated systems and methods have introduced to overcome this challenge. Many researchers have aimed to develop an ideal SWM system, including approaches involving software-based routing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Radio-frequency Identification (RFID), or sensor intelligent bins. Image processing solutions for the Solid Waste (SW) collection have also been developed; however, during capturing the bin image, it is challenging to position the camera for getting a bin area centralized image. As yet, there is no ideal system which can correctly estimate the amount of SW. This paper briefly discusses an efficient image processing solution to overcome these problems. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) was used for detecting and cropping the bin area and Gabor wavelet (GW) was introduced for feature extraction of the waste bin image. Image features were used to train the classifier. A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) classifier was used to classify the waste bin level and estimate the amount of waste inside the bin. The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves was used to statistically evaluate classifier performance. The results of this developed system are comparable to previous image processing based system. The system demonstration using DTW with GW for feature extraction and an MLP classifier led to promising results with respect to the accuracy of waste level estimation (98.50%). The application can be used to optimize the routing of waste collection based on the estimated bin level.

  3. Real-Time Subject-Independent Pattern Classification of Overt and Covert Movements from fNIRS Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Neethu; Zaidi, Ali Danish; Rana, Mohit; Prasad, Vinod A; Guan, Cuntai; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2016-01-01

    Recently, studies have reported the use of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for developing Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) by applying online pattern classification of brain states from subject-specific fNIRS signals. The purpose of the present study was to develop and test a real-time method for subject-specific and subject-independent classification of multi-channel fNIRS signals using support-vector machines (SVM), so as to determine its feasibility as an online neurofeedback system. Towards this goal, we used left versus right hand movement execution and movement imagery as study paradigms in a series of experiments. In the first two experiments, activations in the motor cortex during movement execution and movement imagery were used to develop subject-dependent models that obtained high classification accuracies thereby indicating the robustness of our classification method. In the third experiment, a generalized classifier-model was developed from the first two experimental data, which was then applied for subject-independent neurofeedback training. Application of this method in new participants showed mean classification accuracy of 63% for movement imagery tasks and 80% for movement execution tasks. These results, and their corresponding offline analysis reported in this study demonstrate that SVM based real-time subject-independent classification of fNIRS signals is feasible. This method has important applications in the field of hemodynamic BCIs, and neuro-rehabilitation where patients can be trained to learn spatio-temporal patterns of healthy brain activity.

  4. Treatment response classification of liver metastatic disease evaluated on imaging. Are RECIST unidimensional measurements accurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantatzis, Michael; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Amarantidis, Kyriakos; Karayiannakis, Anastasios; Prassopoulos, Panos

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of unidimensional measurements (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors, RECIST) compared with volumetric measurements in patients with liver metastases undergoing chemotherapy. Forty-four patients with newly diagnosed liver lesions underwent three MRI examinations at treatment initiation, during chemotherapy, and immediately post-treatment. Measurements based on RECIST guidelines and volume calculations were performed on the "target" lesions (TLs). The two methods were in agreement in 64/77 of patients and 253/301 of individual lesions classification in response categories ("good" agreement, Cohen kappa = 0.735 and 0.741, respectively). In 16.88% of the comparisons the two methods stratified patients to a different response category; 27.6% of TLs did not follow the response category of the patient in whom lesions were located. The actual volume of TLs differs from the calculated volume of a sphere with the same diameter. Our study supports the use of volumetric techniques that may overcome certain disadvantages of unidimensional measurements.

  5. Sound insulation and reverberation time for classrooms - Criteria in regulations and classification schemes in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    have become more extensive and stricter during the last two decades. The paper focuses on comparison of sound insulation and reverberation time criteria for classrooms in regulations and classification schemes in the Nordic countries. Limit values and changes over time will be discussed as well as how...

  6. The Next Big Steps for Munitions Response. Classification Applied to Munitions Response - Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), 4820 University Square,Huntsville,AL,35816 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...MUNITIONS RESPONSE MR. ANDREW SCHWARTZ U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH) 4820 University Square Huntsville, AL 35816...remaining anomalies Map Entire  MRS Blind seed  ISO Apply adjustments to  procedures or decision  boundaries, as appropriate,  to improve performance

  7. Soft supervised self-organizing mapping (3SOM) for improving land cover classification with MODIS time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawawirojwong, Siam

    Classification of remote sensing data has long been a fundamental technique for studying vegetation and land cover. Furthermore, land use and land cover maps are a basic need for environmental science. These maps are important for crop system monitoring and are also valuable resources for decision makers. Therefore, an up-to-date and highly accurate land cover map with detailed and timely information is required for the global environmental change research community to support natural resource management, environmental protection, and policy making. However, there appears to be a number of limitations associated with data utilization such as weather conditions, data availability, cost, and the time needed for acquiring and processing large numbers of images. Additionally, improving the classification accuracy and reducing the classification time have long been the goals of remote sensing research and they still require the further study. To manage these challenges, the primary goal of this research is to improve classification algorithms that utilize MODIS-EVI time-series images. A supervised self-organizing map (SSOM) and a soft supervised self-organizing map (3SOM) are modified and improved to increase classification efficiency and accuracy. To accomplish the main goal, the performance of the proposed methods is investigated using synthetic and real landscape data derived from MODIS-EVI time-series images. Two study areas are selected based on a difference of land cover characteristics: one in Thailand and one in the Midwestern U.S. The results indicate that time-series imagery is a potentially useful input dataset for land cover classification. Moreover, the SSOM with time-series data significantly outperforms the conventional classification techniques of the Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier (GMLC) and backpropagation neural network (BPNN). In addition, the 3SOM employed as a soft classifier delivers a more accurate classification than the SSOM applied as

  8. Nonparametric Bayesian time-series modeling and clustering of time-domain ground penetrating radar landmine responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kenneth D., Jr.; Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2010-04-01

    Time domain ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been shown to be a powerful sensing phenomenology for detecting buried objects such as landmines. Landmine detection with GPR data typically utilizes a feature-based pattern classification algorithm to discriminate buried landmines from other sub-surface objects. In high-fidelity GPR, the time-frequency characteristics of a landmine response should be indicative of the physical construction and material composition of the landmine and could therefore be useful for discrimination from other non-threatening sub-surface objects. In this research we propose modeling landmine time-domain responses with a nonparametric Bayesian time-series model and we perform clustering of these time-series models with a hierarchical nonparametric Bayesian model. Each time-series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM) with autoregressive (AR) state densities. The proposed nonparametric Bayesian prior allows for automated learning of the number of states in the HMM as well as the AR order within each state density. This creates a flexible time-series model with complexity determined by the data. Furthermore, a hierarchical non-parametric Bayesian prior is used to group landmine responses with similar HMM model parameters, thus learning the number of distinct landmine response models within a data set. Model inference is accomplished using a fast variational mean field approximation that can be implemented for on-line learning.

  9. Volumetric response classification in metastatic solid tumors on MSCT: Initial results in a whole-body setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, A.M., E-mail: a.wulff@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Fabel, M. [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Freitag-Wolf, S., E-mail: freitag@medinfo.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Medizinische Informatik und Statistik, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Tepper, M., E-mail: m.tepper@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Knabe, H.M., E-mail: h.knabe@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Schäfer, J.P., E-mail: jp.schaefer@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Jansen, O., E-mail: o.jansen@neurorad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Bolte, H., E-mail: hendrik.bolte@ukmuenster.de [Klinik für Nuklearmedizin, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Gebäude A1, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To examine technical parameters of measurement accuracy and differences in tumor response classification using RECIST 1.1 and volumetric assessment in three common metastasis types (lung nodules, liver lesions, lymph node metastasis) simultaneously. Materials and methods: 56 consecutive patients (32 female) aged 41–82 years with a wide range of metastatic solid tumors were examined with MSCT for baseline and follow up. Images were evaluated by three experienced radiologists using manual measurements and semi-automatic lesion segmentation. Institutional ethics review was obtained and all patients gave written informed consent. Data analysis comprised interobserver variability operationalized as coefficient of variation and categorical response classification according to RECIST 1.1 for both manual and volumetric measures. Continuous data were assessed for statistical significance with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and categorical data with Fleiss kappa. Results: Interobserver variability was 6.3% (IQR 4.6%) for manual and 4.1% (IQR 4.4%) for volumetrically obtained sum of relevant diameters (p < 0.05, corrected). 4–8 patients’ response to therapy was classified differently across observers by using volumetry compared to standard manual measurements. Fleiss kappa revealed no significant difference in categorical agreement of response classification between manual (0.7558) and volumetric (0.7623) measurements. Conclusion: Under standard RECIST thresholds there was no advantage of volumetric compared to manual response evaluation. However volumetric assessment yielded significantly lower interobserver variability. This may allow narrower thresholds for volumetric response classification in the future.

  10. Classification and Monitoring of Reed Belts Using Dual-Polarimetric TerraSAR-X Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Heine

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic aperture radar polarimetry (PolSAR and polarimetric decomposition techniques have proven to be useful tools for wetland mapping. In this study we classify reed belts and monitor their phenological changes at a natural lake in northeastern Germany using dual-co-polarized (HH, VV TerraSAR-X time series. The time series comprises 19 images, acquired between August 2014 and May 2015, in ascending and descending orbit. We calculated different polarimetric indices using the HH and VV intensities, the dual-polarimetric coherency matrix including dominant and mean alpha scattering angles, and entropy and anisotropy (normalized eigenvalue difference as well as combinations of entropy and anisotropy for the analysis of the scattering scenarios. The image classifications were performed with the random forest classifier and validated with high-resolution digital orthophotos. The time series analysis of the reed belts revealed significant seasonal changes for the double-bounce–sensitive parameters (intensity ratio HH/VV and intensity difference HH-VV, the co-polarimetric coherence phase and the dominant and mean alpha scattering angles and in the dual-polarimetric coherence (amplitude, anisotropy, entropy, and anisotropy-entropy combinations; whereas in summer dense leaves cause volume scattering, in winter, after leaves have fallen, the reed stems cause predominately double-bounce scattering. Our study showed that the five most important parameters for the classification of reed are the intensity difference HH-VV, the mean alpha scattering angle, intensity ratio HH/VV, and the coherence (phase. Due to the better separation of reed and other vegetation (deciduous forest, coniferous forest, meadow, winter acquisitions are preferred for the mapping of reed. Multi-temporal stacks of winter images performed better than summer ones. The combination of ascending and descending images also improved the result as it reduces the influence of the sensor

  11. Real-time Classification of Gorilla Video Segments in Affective Categories Using Crowd-Sourced Annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Thomas, E.D.R.; Havekes, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution we present a method to classify segments of gorilla videos1 in different affective categories. The classification method is trained by crowd sourcing affective annotation. The trained classification then uses video features (computed from the video segments) to classify a new vi

  12. Ketogenic dietary therapies for adults with epilepsy: feasibility and classification of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeler, Natasha E; Wood, Susan; Aldridge, Valerie; Sander, Josemir W; Cross, J Helen; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2014-08-01

    Ketogenic dietary therapies are an effective treatment for children with drug-resistant epilepsy. There is currently no high-quality evidence regarding ketogenic dietary therapies in adults, and further research has been recommended. This audit aimed to provide further evidence for the feasibility of dietary treatment for adults and to consider factors that may aid response classification in this population. We evaluated the effectiveness and tolerability of ketogenic dietary therapies in 23 adults with epilepsy attending specialist clinics. Medical notes were used to obtain seizure frequency information and other effects associated with dietary treatment. Individuals who achieved ≥50% seizure reduction at all follow-up points were classified as responders. Response rates, in terms of seizure frequency, were similar to those commonly reported in pediatric cohorts: 9/23 (39%) adults were classified as responders. These responders remained on the diet for at least one year (follow-up: 1-10 years). Other benefits reported by patients, but not quantified, included a reduction in seizure severity and increased alertness and concentration. Such factors often favor continuation of ketogenic dietary therapies despite a ketogenic dietary therapies long-term, and such treatment can lead to seizure reduction. Other aspects besides seizure frequency may be relevant when classifying response in adults, and appropriate ways to quantify these factors should be considered for use in future studies.

  13. Data Mining and Machine Learning in Time-Domain Discovery and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Richards, Joseph W.

    2012-03-01

    -domain aspect of the data and the objects of interest presents some unique challenges. First, any collection, storage, transport, and computational framework for processing the streaming data must be able to keep up with the dataflow. This is not necessarily true, for instance, with static sky science, where metrics of interest can be computed off-line and on a timescale much longer than the time required to obtain the data. Second, many types of transient (one-off) events evolve quickly in time and require more observations to fully understand the nature of the events. This demands that time-changing events are quickly discovered, classified, and broadcast to other follow-up facilities. All of this must happen robustly with, in some cases, very limited data. Last, the process of discovery and classification must be calibrated to the available resources for computation and follow-up. That is, the precision of classification must be weighed against the computational cost of producing that level of precision. Likewise, the cost of being wrong about the classification of some sorts of sources must be balanced against the scientific gains about being right about the classification of other types of sources. Quantifying these trade-offs, especially in the presence of a limited amount of follow-up resources (such as the availability of larger telescope observations) is not straightforward and inheres domain-specific imperatives that will, in general, differ from astronomer to astronomer. This chapter presents an overview of the current directions in ML and data-mining techniques in the context of time-domain astronomy. Ultimately the goal - if not just the necessity given the data rates and the diversity of questions to be answered - is to abstract the traditional role of astronomer in the entire scientific process. In some sense, this takes us full circle from the pre modern view of the scientific pursuit presented in Vermeer's "The Astronomer" (Figure 6.2): in broad daylight, he

  14. Robust real-time mine classification based on side-scan sonar imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Martin G.

    2000-08-01

    We describe here image processing and neural network based algorithms for detection and classification of mines in side-scan sonar imagery, and the results obtained from their application to two distinct image data bases. These algorithms evolved over a period from 1994 to the present, originally at Draper Laboratory, and currently at Alphatech Inc. The mine-detection/classification system is partitioned into an anomaly screening stage followed by a classification stage involving the calculation of features on blobs, and their input into a multilayer perceptron neural network. Particular attention is given to the selection of algorithm parameters, and training data, in order to optimize performance over the aggregate data set.

  15. Time course of information processing in visual and haptic object classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna eMartinovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vision identifies objects rapidly and efficiently. In contrast, object recognition by touch is much slower. Furthermore, haptics usually serially accumulates information from different parts of objects, whereas vision typically processes object information in parallel. Is haptic object identification slower simply due to sequential information acquisition and the resulting memory load or due to more fundamental processing differences between the senses? To compare the time course of visual and haptic object recognition, we slowed visual processing using a novel, restricted viewing technique. In an electroencephalographic (EEG experiment, participants discriminated familiar, nameable from unfamiliar, unnameable objects both visually and haptically. Analyses focused on the evoked and induced fronto-central theta-band (5-7 Hz; a marker of working memory and the occipital upper alpha-band (10-12 Hz; a marker of perceptual processing locked to the onset of classification. Long-latency modulations of both theta-band and alpha-band activities differentiated between familiar and unfamiliar objects in haptics. Decreases in right occipital alpha-band activity for haptic identification of unfamiliar relative to familiar objects indicate a likely processing role of multisensory extrastriate areas. In contrast, differential visual processing of familiar and unfamiliar objects was characterized only by a relatively early difference in left occipital upper alpha-band activity. We conclude that haptic object recognition relies on common representations with vision but also that there are fundamental differences between the senses that do not merely arise from differences in their speed of processing.

  16. Water monitoring: automated and real time identification and classification of algae using digital microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltelli, Primo; Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Microalgae are unicellular photoautotrophs that grow in any habitat from fresh and saline water bodies, to hot springs and ice. Microalgae can be used as indicators to monitor water ecosystem conditions. These organisms react quickly and predictably to a broad range of environmental stressors, thus providing early signals of a changing environment. When grown extensively, microalgae may produce harmful effects on marine or freshwater ecology and fishery resources. Rapid and accurate recognition and classification of microalgae is one of the most important issues in water resource management. In this paper, a methodology for automatic and real time identification and enumeration of microalgae by means of image analysis is presented. The methodology is based on segmentation, shape feature extraction, pigment signature determination and neural network grouping; it attained 98.6% accuracy from a set of 53,869 images of 23 different microalgae representing the major algal phyla. In our opinion this methodology partly overcomes the lack of automated identification systems and is on the forefront of developing a computer-based image processing technique to automatically detect, recognize, identify and enumerate microalgae genera and species from all the divisions. This methodology could be useful for an appropriate and effective water resource management.

  17. Artificial Neural Network classification of operator workload with an assessment of time variation and noise-enhancement to increase performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander James Casson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Workload classification---the determination of whether a human operator is in a high or low workload state to allow their working environment to be optimized---is an emerging application of passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI systems. Practical systems must not only accurately detect the current workload state, but also have good temporal performance: requiring little time to set up and train the classifier, and ensuring that the reported performance level is consistent and predictable over time. This paper investigates the temporal performance of an Artificial Neural Network based classification system. For networks trained on little EEG data good classification accuracies (86% are achieved over very short time frames, but substantial decreases in accuracy are found as the time gap between the network training and the actual use is increased. Noise-enhanced processing, where artificially generated noise is deliberately added to the testing signals, is investigated as a potential technique to mitigate this degradation without requiring the network to be re-trained using more data. Small stochastic resonance effects are demonstrated whereby the classification process gets better in the presence of more noise. The effect is small and does not eliminate the need for re-training, but it is consistent, and this is the first demonstration of such effects for non-evoked/free-running EEG signals suitable for passive BCI.

  18. Artificial Neural Network classification of operator workload with an assessment of time variation and noise-enhancement to increase performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Workload classification-the determination of whether a human operator is in a high or low workload state to allow their working environment to be optimized-is an emerging application of passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems. Practical systems must not only accurately detect the current workload state, but also have good temporal performance: requiring little time to set up and train the classifier, and ensuring that the reported performance level is consistent and predictable over time. This paper investigates the temporal performance of an Artificial Neural Network based classification system. For networks trained on little EEG data good classification accuracies (86%) are achieved over very short time frames, but substantial decreases in accuracy are found as the time gap between the network training and the actual use is increased. Noise-enhanced processing, where artificially generated noise is deliberately added to the testing signals, is investigated as a potential technique to mitigate this degradation without requiring the network to be re-trained using more data. Small stochastic resonance effects are demonstrated whereby the classification process gets better in the presence of more noise. The effect is small and does not eliminate the need for re-training, but it is consistent, and this is the first demonstration of such effects for non-evoked/free-running EEG signals suitable for passive BCI.

  19. Generation of a Supervised Classification Algorithm for Time-Series Variable Stars with an Application to the LINEAR Dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Kyle B

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of digital astronomy, new benefits and new problems have been presented to the modern day astronomer. While data can be captured in a more efficient and accurate manor using digital means, the efficiency of data retrieval has led to an overload of scientific data for processing and storage. This paper will focus on the construction and application of a supervised pattern classification algorithm for the identification of variable stars. Given the reduction of a survey of stars into a standard feature space, the problem of using prior patterns to identify new observed patterns can be reduced to time tested classification methodologies and algorithms. Such supervised methods, so called because the user trains the algorithms prior to application using patterns with known classes or labels, provide a means to probabilistically determine the estimated class type of new observations. This paper will demonstrate the construction and application of a supervised classification algorithm on variable sta...

  20. Using response times for item selection in adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a s

  1. Study on Response Time of SPE Carbon Monoxide Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The influence of structural design and the parameters of the working electrode on the response time of a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) carbon monoxide sensor has been studied. Results show that the response time is mainly determined by the RC time constant of the catalyst layer and also related with the working electrode potential.

  2. The Importance of Responsibility in Times of Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Dahl Rendtorff

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I would like to show the importance of the concept of responsibility as the foundation of ethics in times of crisis in particular in the fields of politics and economics in the modern civilisation marked by globalization and technological progres. I consider the concept of responsibility as the key notion in order to understand the ethical duty in a modern technological civilisation. We can indeed observe a moralization of the concept of responsibility going beyond a strict legal definition in terms of imputability. The paper begins by discussing the humanistic foundations of such a concept of responsibility. It treats the historical origins of responsibility and it relates this concept to the concept of accountability. On the basis of this historical determination of the concept I would like to present the definition of the concept of responsibility as fundamental ethical principle that has increasing importance as the foundation of the principles of governance in modern welfare states. In this context the paper discusses the extension of the concept of responsibility towards institutional or corporate responsibility where responsibility does not only concerns the responsibility of individuals but also deals with the responsibility of institutional collectivities. In this way the paper is based on the following structure : 1 The ethical foundation of the concept of responsibility 2 Responsibility in technological civilisation 3 Political responsibility for good governance in the welfare state 4 Social responsibility of business corporations in times of globalization 5 Conclusion and discussion : changed conditions of responsibility in modern times.

  3. Classification of damage in structural systems using time series analysis and supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenzetter, Piotr; de Lautour, Oliver R.

    2010-04-01

    Developed for studying long, periodic records of various measured quantities, time series analysis methods are inherently suited and offer interesting possibilities for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. However, their use in SHM can still be regarded as an emerging application and deserves more studies. In this research, Autoregressive (AR) models were used to fit experimental acceleration time histories from two experimental structural systems, a 3- storey bookshelf-type laboratory structure and the ASCE Phase II SHM Benchmark Structure, in healthy and several damaged states. The coefficients of the AR models were chosen as damage sensitive features. Preliminary visual inspection of the large, multidimensional sets of AR coefficients to check the presence of clusters corresponding to different damage severities was achieved using Sammon mapping - an efficient nonlinear data compression technique. Systematic classification of damage into states based on the analysis of the AR coefficients was achieved using two supervised classification techniques: Nearest Neighbor Classification (NNC) and Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ), and one unsupervised technique: Self-organizing Maps (SOM). This paper discusses the performance of AR coefficients as damage sensitive features and compares the efficiency of the three classification techniques using experimental data.

  4. Classification of Hydrological time series using Probabilistic Neural Network for River Flow Modeling by RBF Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abghari, H.; van de Giesen, N.; Mahdavi, M.; Salajegheh, A.

    2009-04-01

    Artificial intelligence modeling of nonstationary rainfall-runoff has some restrictions in simulation accuracy due to the complexity and nonlinearity of training patterns. Preprocessing of trainings dataset could determine homogeneity of rainfall-runoff patterns before modeling. In this presentation, a new hybrid model of Artificial Intelligence in conjunction with clustering is introduced and applied to flow prediction. Simulation of Nazloochaei river flow in North-West Iran was the case used for development of a PNN-RBF model. PNN classify a training dataset in two groups based on Parezen theory using unsupervised classification. Subsequently each data group is used to train and test two RBF networks and the results are compared to the application of all data in a RBF network without classification. Results show that classification of rainfall-runoff patterns using PNN and prediction of runoff with RBF increase prediction precise of networks. Keywords: Probabilistic Neural Network, Radial Base Function Neural Network, Parezen theory, River Flow Prediction

  5. Natural vs human-induced changes at the Tauranga Harbour area (New Zealand): a time -series acoustic seabed classification comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capperucci, Ruggero Maria; Bartholomä, Alexander; Renken, Sabrina; De Lange, Willem

    2013-04-01

    The Tauranga Harbour Bay (New Zealand) is a mesotidal estuary system, enclosed by the Matakana barrier island. It hosts the leading export port in New Zealand and the second largest import port by value. Coastal changes are well documented over the last decades, mainly at the southern entrance of the area, between Matakana Island and Mt. Maunganui. It is an extremely dynamic environment, where natural processes are strongly influenced by human activities. In particular, the understanding of the recent evolution of the system is crucial for policymakers. In fact, the cumulative impact due to the maintenance of the port (mainly dredging activities, shipping, facilities construction, but also increasing tourism) and its already approved expansion clashes with the claim of the local Maori communities, which recently leaded to a court action. A hydroacoustic multiple-device survey (Side-scan Sonar SSS, Multibeam Echo-sounder MBES and Single Beam Echo-sounder) coupled with sediment sampling was carried out in March 2011 over an area of 0.8 km2, southern Matakana Island, along the Western Channel. The area is not directly impacted by dredging activities, resulting in an optimal testing site for assessing indirect effects of human disturbance on coastal dynamics. The main goals were: 1. To test the response of different acoustic systems in such a highly dynamic environment; 2. To study the influence of dredging activities on sediment dynamics and habitat changes, by means of comparing the current data with existing ones, in order to distinguish between natural and human induced changes Results demonstrate a good agreement between acoustic classifications from different systems. They seem to be mainly driven by the sediment distribution, with a distinctive fingerprint given by shells and shell fragments. Nevertheless, the presence of relevant topographic features (i.e. large bedform fields) influences swath-looking systems (SSS and MBES). SSS and MBES classifications tend

  6. a Study on the SAR Data Observation Time for the Classification of Planting Condition of Paddy Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, A.; Kondo, A.; Mochizuki, K.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, cultivation methods of rice have been diversified due to the low cost of rice-growing techniques. For example, there is direct sowing of seed rice in paddy field in addition to the practice of usual paddy field to flooding at the time of planting. The yield of the usual paddy field and the direct sowing is different even though the same varieties are grown in the same area. It is necessary to grasp by performing classification for the usual paddy field or direct sowing for the management of agricultural crops. The main objective of this study was to select the observation time for the classification of paddy fields' planting conditions by utilizing Synthetic Aperture Radar TerraSAR-X satellite. The planting conditions included the usual planting of rice, the direct sowing of rice and the soybean. We selected the observation time by the statistical distance of the microwave backscattering in each paddy field for maximizing the planting condition classification. In addition, the satellite data observation timing considered the processing time of the analysis and the acquisition costs. The acquisition was performed 4 periods from 2 periods in the rice growing season and the planting phase. In the current study, we were able to classify the usual planting of rice, the direct sowing of rice and the soybean by TerraSAR-X data for the later planting of rice during mid-May and initial growth of rice in early June.

  7. Real-time detection and classification of anomalous events in streaming data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Goodall, John R.; Iannacone, Michael D.; Laska, Jason A.; Harrison, Lane T.

    2016-04-19

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The events can be displayed to a user in user-defined groupings in an animated fashion. The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The atypical traffic patterns can then be classified as being of interest or not. In one particular example, in a network environment, the classification can be whether the network traffic is malicious or not.

  8. MSCT follow-up in malignant lymphoma. Comparison of manual linear measurements with semi-automated lymph node analysis for therapy response classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessling, J.; Puesken, M.; Kohlhase, N.; Persigehl, T.; Mesters, R.; Heindel, W.; Buerke, B. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Koch, R. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Biostatistics and Clinical Research

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Assignment of semi-automated lymph node analysis compared to manual measurements for therapy response classification of malignant lymphoma in MSCT. Materials and Methods: MSCT scans of 63 malignant lymphoma patients before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy (307 target lymph nodes) were evaluated. The long axis diameter (LAD), short axis diameter (SAD) and bi-dimensional WHO were determined manually and semi-automatically. The time for manual and semi-automatic segmentation was evaluated. The ref. standard response was defined as the mean relative change across all manual and semi-automatic measurements (mean manual/semi-automatic LAD, SAD, semi-automatic volume). Statistical analysis encompassed t-test and McNemar's test for clustered data. Results: Response classification per lymph node revealed semi-automated volumetry and bi-dimensional WHO to be significantly more accurate than manual linear metric measurements. Response classification per patient based on RECIST revealed more patients to be correctly classified by semi-automatic measurements, e.g. 96.0 %/92.9 % (WHO bi-dimensional/volume) compared to 85.7/84.1 % for manual LAD and SAD, respectively (mean reduction in misclassified patients of 9.95 %). Considering the use of correction tools, the time expenditure for lymph node segmentation (29.7 {+-} 17.4 sec) was the same as with the manual approach (29.1 {+-} 14.5 sec). Conclusion: Semi-automatically derived 'lymph node volume' and 'bi-dimensional WHO' significantly reduce the number of misclassified patients in the CT follow-up of malignant lymphoma by at least 10 %. However, lymph node volumetry does not outperform bi-dimensional WHO. (orig.)

  9. Automated Real-Time Classification and Decision Making in Massive Data Streams from Synoptic Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Donalek, C; Graham, M J; Drake, A J; Turmon, M; Fuchs, T

    2014-01-01

    The nature of scientific and technological data collection is evolving rapidly: data volumes and rates grow exponentially, with increasing complexity and information content, and there has been a transition from static data sets to data streams that must be analyzed in real time. Interesting or anomalous phenomena must be quickly characterized and followed up with additional measurements via optimal deployment of limited assets. Modern astronomy presents a variety of such phenomena in the form of transient events in digital synoptic sky surveys, including cosmic explosions (supernovae, gamma ray bursts), relativistic phenomena (black hole formation, jets), potentially hazardous asteroids, etc. We have been developing a set of machine learning tools to detect, classify and plan a response to transient events for astronomy applications, using the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) as a scientific and methodological testbed. The ability to respond rapidly to the potentially most interesting events is a k...

  10. MODELING DYNAMIC VEGETATION RESPONSE TO RAPID CLIMATE CHANGE USING BIOCLIMATIC CLASSIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling potential global redistribution of terrestrial vegetation frequently is based on bioclimatic classifications which relate static regional vegetation zones (biomes) to a set of static climate parameters. The equilibrium character of the relationships limits our confidence...

  11. Classification and monitoring of reed belts using dual-polarimetric TerraSAR-X time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Iris; Jagdhuber, Thomas; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2016-04-01

    The shorelines of lakes in northeastern Germany are often covered by reed. These reed belts fulfill an important function as erosion protection, biotope for animals, carbon storage, and as cleaning filter for lake water. However, despite their importance for the limnic ecosystem, reed vegetation in northeastern Germany is not regularly monitored. In this research study we investigate the potential of synthetic aperture radar polarimetry (PolSAR) for seasonal monitoring of reed vegetation. SAR imagery enables sunlight- and (almost) weather-independent monitoring. Polarimetric decomposition techniques allow the physical characterization of the scattering scenario and the involved scatterers. Our study is based on 19 dual-polarimetric (HH/VV) TerraSAR-X images acquired between August 2014 and May 2015. We calculated different polarimetric indices comprising the HH and VV intensities, the dual-polarimetric coherency matrix with dominant and mean alpha scattering angles, entropy and anisotropy (normalized eigen-value difference) as well as combinations of entropy and anisotropy for the analysis of the scattering scenarios. The reed areas in the TerraSAR-X images were classified using a random forest algorithm and validated with high-resolution digital orthophotos. The time series analysis of the reed belts revealed significant seasonal changes in the double bounce sensitive parameters (intensity ratio HH/VV and intensity difference HH-VV, the co-polarimetric coherence phase and the dominant and mean alpha scattering angles). Additionally, the dual-polarimetric coherence (amplitude), anisotropy, entropy, and anisotropy-entropy-combinations showed seasonal changes of reed. In summer, the reed areas are characterized within the X-band SAR data by volume scattering, whereas in winter double-bounce scattering dominates. The volume scattering in summer is caused predominantly by reed leaves. In autumn, the leaves start to wither and fall off, so that in winter predominately

  12. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection and classification of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase gene (bla KPC) variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Mediavilla, José R; Endimiani, Andrea; Rosenthal, Marnie E; Zhao, Yanan; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2011-02-01

    Carbapenem resistance mediated by plasmid-borne Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC) is an emerging problem of significant clinical importance in Gram-negative bacteria. Multiple KPC gene variants (bla(KPC)) have been reported, with KPC-2 (bla(KPC-2)) and KPC-3 (bla(KPC-3)) associated with epidemic outbreaks in New York City and various international settings. Here, we describe the development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay using molecular beacons (MB-PCR) for rapid and accurate identification of bla(KPC) variants. The assay consists of six molecular beacons and two oligonucleotide primer pairs, allowing for detection and classification of all currently described bla(KPC) variants (bla(KPC-2) to bla(KPC-11)). The MB-PCR detection limit was 5 to 40 DNA copies per reaction and 4 CFU per reaction using laboratory-prepared samples. The MB-PCR probes were highly specific for each bla(KPC) variant, and cross-reactivity was not observed using DNA isolated from several bacterial species. A total of 457 clinical Gram-negative isolates were successfully characterized by our MB-PCR assay, with bla(KPC-3) and bla(KPC-2) identified as the most common types in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan region. The MB-PCR assay described herein is rapid, sensitive, and specific and should be useful for understanding the ongoing evolution of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. As novel bla(KPC) variants continue to emerge, the MB-PCR assay can be modified in response to epidemiologic developments.

  13. Non-Linear Dynamical Classification of Short Time Series of the Rössler System in High Noise Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscsek, Claudia; Weyhenmeyer, Jonathan; Hernandez, Manuel E.; Poizner, Howard; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Time series analysis with delay differential equations (DDEs) reveals non-linear properties of the underlying dynamical system and can serve as a non-linear time-domain classification tool. Here global DDE models were used to analyze short segments of simulated time series from a known dynamical system, the Rössler system, in high noise regimes. In a companion paper, we apply the DDE model developed here to classify short segments of encephalographic (EEG) data recorded from patients with Parkinson’s disease and healthy subjects. Nine simulated subjects in each of two distinct classes were generated by varying the bifurcation parameter b and keeping the other two parameters (a and c) of the Rössler system fixed. All choices of b were in the chaotic parameter range. We diluted the simulated data using white noise ranging from 10 to −30 dB signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Structure selection was supervised by selecting the number of terms, delays, and order of non-linearity of the model DDE model that best linearly separated the two classes of data. The distances d from the linear dividing hyperplane was then used to assess the classification performance by computing the area A′ under the ROC curve. The selected model was tested on untrained data using repeated random sub-sampling validation. DDEs were able to accurately distinguish the two dynamical conditions, and moreover, to quantify the changes in the dynamics. There was a significant correlation between the dynamical bifurcation parameter b of the simulated data and the classification parameter d from our analysis. This correlation still held for new simulated subjects with new dynamical parameters selected from each of the two dynamical regimes. Furthermore, the correlation was robust to added noise, being significant even when the noise was greater than the signal. We conclude that DDE models may be used as a generalizable and reliable classification tool for even small segments of noisy data. PMID

  14. Classification of agricultural fields using time series of dual polarimetry TerraSAR-X images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mirzaee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its special imaging characteristics, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR has become an important source of information for a variety of remote sensing applications dealing with environmental changes. SAR images contain information about both phase and intensity in different polarization modes, making them sensitive to geometrical structure and physical properties of the targets such as dielectric and plant water content. In this study we investigate multi temporal changes occurring to different crop types due to phenological changes using high-resolution TerraSAR-X imagers. The dataset includes 17 dual-polarimetry TSX data acquired from June 2012 to August 2013 in Lorestan province, Iran. Several features are extracted from polarized data and classified using support vector machine (SVM classifier. Training samples and different features employed in classification are also assessed in the study. Results show a satisfactory accuracy for classification which is about 0.91 in kappa coefficient.

  15. Diagnostic Criteria, Classification and Treatment Goals in Multiple Sclerosis: The Chronicles of Time and Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntranos, Achilles; Lublin, Fred

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most diverse human diseases. Since its first description by Charcot in the nineteenth century, the diagnostic criteria, clinical course classification, and treatment goals for MS have been constantly revised and updated to improve diagnostic accuracy, physician communication, and clinical trial design. These changes have improved the clinical outcomes and quality of life for patients with the disease. Recent technological and research breakthroughs will almost certainly further change how we diagnose, classify, and treat MS in the future. In this review, we summarize the key events in the history of MS, explain the reasoning behind the current criteria for MS diagnosis, classification, and treatment, and provide suggestions for further improvements that will keep enhancing the clinical practice of MS.

  16. Comparison of real-time classification systems for arrhythmia detection on Android-based mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutheuser, Heike; Gradl, Stefan; Kugler, Patrick; Anneken, Lars; Arnold, Martin; Achenbach, Stephan; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2014-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a key diagnostic tool in heart disease and may serve to detect ischemia, arrhythmias, and other conditions. Automatic, low cost monitoring of the ECG signal could be used to provide instantaneous analysis in case of symptoms and may trigger the presentation to the emergency department. Currently, since mobile devices (smartphones, tablets) are an integral part of daily life, they could form an ideal basis for automatic and low cost monitoring solution of the ECG signal. In this work, we aim for a realtime classification system for arrhythmia detection that is able to run on Android-based mobile devices. Our analysis is based on 70% of the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia and on 70% of the MIT-BIH Supraventricular Arrhythmia databases. The remaining 30% are reserved for the final evaluation. We detected the R-peaks with a QRS detection algorithm and based on the detected R-peaks, we calculated 16 features (statistical, heartbeat, and template-based). With these features and four different feature subsets we trained 8 classifiers using the Embedded Classification Software Toolbox (ECST) and compared the computational costs for each classification decision and the memory demand for each classifier. We conclude that the C4.5 classifier is best for our two-class classification problem (distinction of normal and abnormal heartbeats) with an accuracy of 91.6%. This classifier still needs a detailed feature selection evaluation. Our next steps are implementing the C4.5 classifier for Android-based mobile devices and evaluating the final system using the remaining 30% of the two used databases.

  17. Model for Predicting End User Web Page Response Time

    CERN Document Server

    Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan

    2012-01-01

    Perceived responsiveness of a web page is one of the most important and least understood metrics of web page design, and is critical for attracting and maintaining a large audience. Web pages can be designed to meet performance SLAs early in the product lifecycle if there is a way to predict the apparent responsiveness of a particular page layout. Response time of a web page is largely influenced by page layout and various network characteristics. Since the network characteristics vary widely from country to country, accurately modeling and predicting the perceived responsiveness of a web page from the end user's perspective has traditionally proven very difficult. We propose a model for predicting end user web page response time based on web page, network, browser download and browser rendering characteristics. We start by understanding the key parameters that affect perceived response time. We then model each of these parameters individually using experimental tests and statistical techniques. Finally, we d...

  18. Linear time distances between fuzzy sets with applications to pattern matching and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Joakim; Sladoje, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    We present four novel point-to-set distances defined for fuzzy or gray-level image data, two based on integration over α-cuts and two based on the fuzzy distance transform. We explore their theoretical properties. Inserting the proposed point-to-set distances in existing definitions of set-to-set distances, among which are the Hausdorff distance and the sum of minimal distances, we define a number of distances between fuzzy sets. These set distances are directly applicable for comparing gray-level images or fuzzy segmented objects, but also for detecting patterns and matching parts of images. The distance measures integrate shape and intensity/membership of observed entities, providing a highly applicable tool for image processing and analysis. Performance evaluation of derived set distances in real image processing tasks is conducted and presented. It is shown that the considered distances have a number of appealing theoretical properties and exhibit very good performance in template matching and object classification for fuzzy segmented images as well as when applied directly on gray-level intensity images. Examples include recognition of hand written digits and identification of virus particles. The proposed set distances perform excellently on the MNIST digit classification task, achieving the best reported error rate for classification using only rigid body transformations and a kNN classifier.

  19. REAL TIME CLASSIFICATION AND CLUSTERING OF IDS ALERTS USING MACHINE LEARNING ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subbulakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS monitor a secured network for the evidence of malicious activities originating either inside or outside. Upon identifying a suspicious traffic, IDS generates and logs an alert. Unfortunately, most of the alerts generated are either false positive, i.e. benign traffic that has been classified as intrusions, or irrelevant, i.e. attacks that are not successful. The abundance of false positive alerts makes it difficult for the security analyst to find successful attacks and take remedial action. This paper describes a two phase automatic alert classification system to assist the human analyst in identifying the false positives. In the first phase, the alerts collected from one or more sensors are normalized and similar alerts are grouped to form a meta-alert. These meta-alerts are passively verified with an asset database to find out irrelevant alerts. In addition, an optional alert generalization is also performed for root cause analysis and thereby reduces false positives with human interaction. In the second phase, the reduced alerts are labeled and passed to an alert classifier which uses machine learning techniques for building the classification rules. This helps the analyst in automatic classification of the alerts. The system is tested in real environments and found to be effective in reducing the number of alerts as well as false positives dramatically, and thereby reducing the workload of human analyst.

  20. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  1. A toolbox for real-time subject-independent and subject-dependent classification of brain states from fMRI signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit eRana

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a recent increase in the use of multivariate analysis and pattern classification in prediction and real-time feedback of brain states from functional imaging signals and mapping of spatio-temporal patterns of brain activity. Here we present MANAS, a generalized software toolbox for performing online and offline classification of fMRI signals. MANAS has been developed using MATLAB, LIBSVM and SVMlight packages to achieve a cross-platform environment. MANAS is targeted for neuroscience investigations and brain rehabilitation applications, based on neurofeedback and brain-computer interface (BCI paradigms. MANAS provides two different approaches for real-time classification: subject dependent and subject independent classification. In this article, we present the methodology of real-time subject dependent and subject independent pattern classification of fMRI signals; the MANAS software architecture and subsystems; and finally demonstrate the use of the system with experimental results.* M. Rana and N. Gupta are equally contributing authors.

  2. Classification of dry-cured hams according to the maturation time using near infrared spectra and artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevolnik, M; Andronikov, D; Žlender, B; Font-i-Furnols, M; Novič, M; Škorjanc, D; Čandek-Potokar, M

    2014-01-01

    An attempt to classify dry-cured hams according to the maturation time on the basis of near infrared (NIR) spectra was studied. The study comprised 128 samples of biceps femoris (BF) muscle from dry-cured hams matured for 10 (n=32), 12 (n=32), 14 (n=32) or 16 months (n=32). Samples were minced and scanned in the wavelength range from 400 to 2500 nm using spectrometer NIR System model 6500 (Silver Spring, MD, USA). Spectral data were used for i) splitting of samples into the training and test set using 2D Kohonen artificial neural networks (ANN) and for ii) construction of classification models using counter-propagation ANN (CP-ANN). Different models were tested, and the one selected was based on the lowest percentage of misclassified test samples (external validation). Overall correctness of the classification was 79.7%, which demonstrates practical relevance of using NIR spectroscopy and ANN for dry-cured ham processing control.

  3. A time-domain method to generate artificial time history from a given reference response spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Gang Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Oh Seop [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Seismic qualification by test is widely used as a way to show the integrity and functionality of equipment that is related to the overall safety of nuclear power plants. Another means of seismic qualification is by direct integration analysis. Both approaches require a series of time histories as an input. However, in most cases, the possibility of using real earthquake data is limited. Thus, artificial time histories are widely used instead. In many cases, however, response spectra are given. Thus, most of the artificial time histories are generated from the given response spectra. Obtaining the response spectrum from a given time history is straightforward. However, the procedure for generating artificial time histories from a given response spectrum is difficult and complex to understand. Thus, this paper presents a simple time-domain method for generating a time history from a given response spectrum; the method was shown to satisfy conditions derived from nuclear regulatory guidance.

  4. Modeling of the Response Time of Thermal Flow Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a simple theoretical model for the response time of thermal flow sensors. Response time is defined here as the time needed by the sensor output signal to reach 63.2% of amplitude due to a change of fluid flow. This model uses the finite-difference method to solve the heat transfer equations, taking into consideration the transient conduction and convection between the sensor membrane and the surrounding fluid. Program results agree with experimental measurements and explain the response time dependence on the velocity and the sensor geometry. Values of the response time vary from about 5 ms in the case of stagnant flow to 1.5 ms for a flow velocity of 44 m/s.

  5. Evaluating the Potential of PROBA-V Satellite Image Time Series for Improving LC Classification in Semi-Arid African Landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberenz, Johannes; Verbesselt, Jan; Herold, Martin; Tsendbazar, Nandika; Sabatino, Giovanni; Rivolta, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Satellite based land cover classification for Africa’s semi-arid ecosystems is hampered commonly by heterogeneous landscapes with mixed vegetation and small scale land use. Higher spatial resolution remote sensing time series data can improve classification results under these difficult conditions.

  6. It's time to set some standards: Environmental classification of freshwater wetlands in New Zealand and their protection from eutrophication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian Keith; Clarkson, Beverly

    Most natural resource plans provide protection for lakes and rivers from catchment activities leading to eutrophication. However, they are often silent about wetlands, due to the lack of information available for setting standards, defining reference conditions, and predicting responses to nutrient...... states in New Zealand wetlands, present an environmental classification based on physico-chemical and nutrient data, compare wetlands in New Zealand with those in other temperate regions, and argue for some catchment land use standards to protect wetlands from nutrient enrichment. Our database reveals...

  7. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  8. Planck 2013 results. VII. HFI time response and beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2013-01-01

    of the telescope and feeds, the processing of the time-ordered data and deconvolution of the bolometric and electronic time response, and the merging of several surveys to produce maps. The time response transfer functions are measured with observations of Jupiter and Saturn and by minimizing survey difference...... residuals. The scanning beam is the post-deconvolution angular response of the instrument, and is characterized with observations of Mars. The main beam solid angles are determined to better than 0.5% at each HFI frequency band. Observations of Jupiter and Saturn limit near sidelobes to ~0.1% of the total...

  9. Response-time tests of logical-rule models of categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Daniel R; Nosofsky, Robert M; Denton, Stephen E

    2011-01-01

    A recent resurgence in logical-rule theories of categorization has motivated the development of a class of models that predict not only choice probabilities but also categorization response times (RTs; Fifić, Little, & Nosofsky, 2010). The new models combine mental-architecture and random-walk approaches within an integrated framework and predict detailed RT-distribution data at the level of individual participants and individual stimuli. To date, however, tests of the models have been limited to validation tests in which participants were provided with explicit instructions to adopt particular processing strategies for implementing the rules. In the present research, we test conditions in which categories are learned via induction over training exemplars and in which participants are free to adopt whatever classification strategy they choose. In addition, we explore how variations in stimulus formats, involving either spatially separated or overlapping dimensions, influence processing modes in rule-based classification tasks. In conditions involving spatially separated dimensions, strong evidence is obtained for application of logical-rule strategies operating in a serial-self-terminating processing mode. In conditions involving spatially overlapping dimensions, preliminary evidence is obtained that a mixture of serial and parallel processing underlies the application of rule-based classification strategies. The logical-rule models fare considerably better than major extant alternative models in accounting for the categorization RTs.

  10. Distinguishing Fast and Slow Processes in Accuracy - Response Time Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Coomans

    Full Text Available We investigate the relation between speed and accuracy within problem solving in its simplest non-trivial form. We consider tests with only two items and code the item responses in two binary variables: one indicating the response accuracy, and one indicating the response speed. Despite being a very basic setup, it enables us to study item pairs stemming from a broad range of domains such as basic arithmetic, first language learning, intelligence-related problems, and chess, with large numbers of observations for every pair of problems under consideration. We carry out a survey over a large number of such item pairs and compare three types of psychometric accuracy-response time models present in the literature: two 'one-process' models, the first of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally independent and the second of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally dependent, and a 'two-process' model which models accuracy contingent on response time. We find that the data clearly violates the restrictions imposed by both one-process models and requires additional complexity which is parsimoniously provided by the two-process model. We supplement our survey with an analysis of the erroneous responses for an example item pair and demonstrate that there are very significant differences between the types of errors in fast and slow responses.

  11. Diminished response of arctic plants to warming over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelseyann S Kremers

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine if the response of arctic plants to warming is consistent across species, locations and time. This study examined the impact of experimental warming and natural temperature variation on plants at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska beginning in 1994. We considered observations of plant performance collected from 1994-2000 "short-term" and those from 2007-2012 "long-term". The plant traits reported are the number of inflorescences, inflorescence height, leaf length, and day of flower emergence. These traits can inform us about larger scale processes such as plant reproductive effort, plant growth, and plant phenology, and therefore provide valuable insight into community dynamics, carbon uptake, and trophic interactions. We categorized traits of all species monitored at each site into temperature response types. We then compared response types across traits, plant growth forms, sites, and over time to analyze the consistency of plant response to warming. Graminoids were the most responsive to warming and showed a positive response to temperature, while shrubs were generally the least responsive. Almost half (49% of response types (across all traits, species, and sites combined changed from short-term to long-term. The percent of plants responsive to warming decreased from 57% (short-term to 46% (long-term. These results indicate that the response of plants to warming varies over time and has diminished overall in recent years.

  12. Real-Time Gas Identification by Analyzing the Transient Response of Capillary-Attached Conductive Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Bahraminejad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ability of the Capillary-attached conductive gas sensor (CGS in real-time gas identification was investigated. The structure of the prototype fabricated CGS is presented. Portions were selected from the beginning of the CGS transient response including the first 11 samples to the first 100 samples. Different feature extraction and classification methods were applied on the selected portions. Validation of methods was evaluated to study the ability of an early portion of the CGS transient response in target gas (TG identification. Experimental results proved that applying extracted features from an early part of the CGS transient response along with a classifier can distinguish short-chain alcohols from each other perfectly. Decreasing time of exposition in the interaction between target gas and sensing element improved the reliability of the sensor. Classification rate was also improved and time of identification was decreased. Moreover, the results indicated the optimum interval of the early transient response of the CGS for selecting portions to achieve the best classification rates.

  13. GSM-MRF based classification approach for real-time moving object detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Statistical and contextual information are typically used to detect moving regions in image sequences for a fixed camera. In this paper, we propose a fast and stable linear discriminant approach based on Gaussian Single Model (GSM) and Markov Random Field (MRF). The performance of GSM is analyzed first, and then two main improvements corresponding to the drawbacks of GSM are proposed: the latest filtered data based update scheme of the background model and the linear classification judgment rule based on spatial-temporal feature specified by MRF. Experimental results show that the proposed method runs more rapidly and accurately when compared with other methods.

  14. Model for Predicting End User Web Page Response Time

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan; Ravikumar, Srijith

    2012-01-01

    Perceived responsiveness of a web page is one of the most important and least understood metrics of web page design, and is critical for attracting and maintaining a large audience. Web pages can be designed to meet performance SLAs early in the product lifecycle if there is a way to predict the apparent responsiveness of a particular page layout. Response time of a web page is largely influenced by page layout and various network characteristics. Since the network characteristics vary widely...

  15. Congestion Service Facilities Location Problem with Promise of Response Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many services, promise of specific response time is advertised as a commitment by the service providers for the customer satisfaction. Congestion on service facilities could delay the delivery of the services and hurts the overall satisfaction. In this paper, congestion service facilities location problem with promise of response time is studied, and a mixed integer nonlinear programming model is presented with budget constrained. The facilities are modeled as M/M/c queues. The decision variables of the model are the locations of the service facilities and the number of servers at each facility. The objective function is to maximize the demands served within specific response time promised by the service provider. To solve this problem, we propose an algorithm that combines greedy and genetic algorithms. In order to verify the proposed algorithm, a lot of computational experiments are tested. And the results demonstrate that response time has a significant impact on location decision.

  16. A Mechanism for Error Detection in Speeded Response Time Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Clay B.; Yeung, Nick; Coles, Michael G. H.; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of error detection plays a central role in theories of executive control. In this article, the authors present a mechanism that can rapidly detect errors in speeded response time tasks. This error monitor assigns values to the output of cognitive processes involved in stimulus categorization and response generation and detects errors…

  17. Response time to colored stimuli in the full visual field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, R. F.; Dawson, L. M.; Galvan, T.; Reid, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral visual response time was measured in seven dark adapted subjects to the onset of small (45' arc diam), brief (50 msec), colored (blue, yellow, green, red) and white stimuli imaged at 72 locations within their binocular field of view. The blue, yellow, and green stimuli were matched for brightness at about 2.6 sub log 10 units above their absolute light threshold, and they appeared at an unexpected time and location. These data were obtained to provide response time and no-response data for use in various design disciplines involving instrument panel layout. The results indicated that the retina possesses relatively concentric regions within each of which mean response time can be expected to be of approximately the same duration. These regions are centered near the fovea and extend farther horizontally than vertically. Mean foveal response time was fastest for yellow and slowest for blue. Three and one-half percent of the total 56,410 trials presented resulted in no-responses. Regardless of stimulus color, the lowest percentage of no-responses occurred within 30 deg arc from the fovea and the highest within 40 deg to 80 deg arc below the fovea.

  18. Time domain modeling of tunable response of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopeva, Ludmila; Emani, Naresh K.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2013-01-01

    We present a causal numerical model for time domain simulations of the optical response of graphene. The dielectric function is approximated with a conductivity term, a Drude term and a number of the critical points terms.......We present a causal numerical model for time domain simulations of the optical response of graphene. The dielectric function is approximated with a conductivity term, a Drude term and a number of the critical points terms....

  19. Effect of Training Class Label Noise on Classification Performances for Land Cover Mapping with Satellite Image Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pelletier

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Supervised classification systems used for land cover mapping require accurate reference databases. These reference data come generally from different sources such as field measurements, thematic maps, or aerial photographs. Due to misregistration, update delay, or land cover complexity, they may contain class label noise, i.e., a wrong label assignment. This study aims at evaluating the impact of mislabeled training data on classification performances for land cover mapping. Particularly, it addresses the random and systematic label noise problem for the classification of high resolution satellite image time series. Experiments are carried out on synthetic and real datasets with two traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machines (SVM and Random Forests (RF. A synthetic dataset has been designed for this study, simulating vegetation profiles over one year. The real dataset is composed of Landsat-8 and SPOT-4 images acquired during one year in the south of France. The results show that both classifiers are little influenced for low random noise levels up to 25%–30%, but their performances drop down for higher noise levels. Different classification configurations are tested by increasing the number of classes, using different input feature vectors, and changing the number of training instances. Algorithm complexities are also analyzed. The RF classifier achieves high robustness to random and systematic label noise for all the tested configurations; whereas the SVM classifier is more sensitive to the kernel choice and to the input feature vectors. Finally, this work reveals that the cross-validation procedure is impacted by the presence of class label noise.

  20. Real Time Classification and Clustering Of IDS Alerts Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subbulakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS monitor a secured network for the evidence of maliciousactivities originating either inside or outside. Upon identifying a suspicious traffic, IDSgenerates and logs an alert. Unfortunately, most of the alerts generated are either false positive,i.e. benign traffic that has been classified as intrusions, or irrelevant, i.e. attacks that are notsuccessful. The abundance of false positive alerts makes it difficult for the security analyst tofind successful attacks and take remedial action. This paper describes a two phase automaticalert classification system to assist the human analyst in identifying the false positives. In thefirst phase, the alerts collected from one or more sensors are normalized and similar alerts aregrouped to form a meta-alert. These meta-alerts are passively verified with an asset database tofind out irrelevant alerts. In addition, an optional alert generalization is also performed for rootcause analysis and thereby reduces false positives with human interaction. In the second phase,the reduced alerts are labeled and passed to an alert classifier which uses machine learningtechniques for building the classification rules. This helps the analyst in automatic classificationof the alerts. The system is tested in real environments and found to be effective in reducing thenumber of alerts as well as false positives dramatically, and thereby reducing the workload ofhuman analyst.

  1. Femtosecond response time measurements of a Cs2Te photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Aryshev, A; Honda, Y; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the response time measurements of a Cs2Te photocathode illuminated with two 100 fs duration, variable time separation laser pulses at 266 nm wavelength. The response time was confirmed in dispersive region downstream of a 12-cell standing wave S-band acceleration structure using a well-known RF zero-crossing technique. At the same time it was also measured by changing mechanical path-length difference between two micro-bunches. Both methods agree that Cs2Te photocathode time response is of the order of 250 fs and thereby it is possible to generate and control a THz sequence of relativistic electron bunches by a conventional S-band RF gun. This result further opens a possibility to construct wide-range tunable THz FEL.

  2. Uniqueness of system response time for transient condensing flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, G.L.; Bhatt, B.L. (Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States)); Beck, B.T. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan (United States)); Roslund, G.L. (General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI (United States))

    1989-11-01

    The unique characteristics under consideration in this paper are encountered in condensing flows, and have to do with a system's response time for various degrees of outlet flow quality. Specifically, the system response time for condensing flows appears to increase monotonically with decreasing outlet flow quality, reaching a maximum for systems having an outlet flow quality of between 10 and 20%. The system response time then decreases for outlet flow qualities that are less than that value. These unique characteristics are predicted theoretically by system mean void fraction model. The purpose of this paper is to develop analytically the characteristics, explain the physics of the phenomena responsible, and discuss the experimental verification efforts that have thus far been carried out.

  3. Detection, Characterization and Classification of Biological Components in Aerosols by Time-Resolved Laser Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-20

    samples were more than 2 cm from the center of a very open ion source. The laser pyrolysis spectra of the SBR sample (Figure 5a) and a SBR and natural...z) Figure 5. Laser pyrolysis mass spectra of vulcanized SBR (a) and SBR -NR (b) rubber compounds. Spectra consist primarily of fragment and molecular...4X .210󈨢 Ol~~L&42fjy DETECTION, CHARACTERIZATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF BIOLOGICAL COMPONENTS IN AEROSOLS BY TIME-RESOLVED LASER PYROLYSIS MASS

  4. Using random response input in Ibrahim Time Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Brincker, R.

    2013-01-01

    of the technique being Single Input Multiple Output (SIMO). It has earlier been showed that when modifying ITD with Toeplitz matrix averaging. Identification of time data with closely spaced modes is improved. In the traditional formulation of ITD the time data has to be free decays or impulse response functions...

  5. Conceptual Question Response Times in Peer Instruction Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to…

  6. Use of Response Time for Measuring Cognitive Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Kyllonen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review some of the key literature on response time as it has played a role in cognitive ability measurement, providing a historical perspective as well as covering current research. We discuss the speed-level distinction, dimensions of speed and level in cognitive abilities frameworks, speed–accuracy tradeoff, approaches to addressing speed–accuracy tradeoff, analysis methods, particularly item response theory-based, response time models from cognitive psychology (ex-Gaussian function, and the diffusion model, and other uses of response time in testing besides ability measurement. We discuss several new methods that can be used to provide greater insight into the speed and level aspects of cognitive ability and speed–accuracy tradeoff decisions. These include item-level time limits, the use of feedback (e.g., CUSUMs, explicit scoring rules that combine speed and accuracy information (e.g., count down timing, and cognitive psychology models. We also review some of the key psychometric advances in modeling speed and level, which combine speed and ability measurement, address speed–accuracy tradeoff, allow for distinctions between response times on items responded to correctly and incorrectly, and integrate psychometrics with information-processing modeling. We suggest that the application of these models and tools is likely to advance both the science and measurement of human abilities for theory and applications.

  7. Search for an optimum time response of spark counters

    CERN Document Server

    Devismes, A; Kress, T; Gobbi, A; Eschke, J; Herrmann, N; Hildenbrand, K D; Koczón, P; Petrovici, M

    2002-01-01

    A spark counter of the type developed by Pestov has been tested with the aim of searching for an optimum time response function, changing voltage, content of noble and quencher gases, pressure and energy-loss. Replacing the usual argon by neon has brought an improvement of the resolution and a significant reduction of tails in the time response function. It has been proven that a counter as long as 90 cm can deliver, using neon gas mixture, a time resolution sigma<60 ps with about 1% absolute tail and an efficiency of about 90%.

  8. Response Time Optimization for Replica Selection Service in Data Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husni H.E. AL-Mistarihi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Data Grid architecture provides a scalable infrastructure for grid services in order to manage data files and their corresponding replicas that were distributed across the globe. The grid services are designed to support a variety of data grid applications (jobs and projects. Replica selection is a high-level service that chooses a replica location from among many distributed replicas with the minimum response time for the users' jobs. Estimating the response time accurately in the grid environment is not an easy task. The current systems expose high response time in selecting the required replicas because the response time is estimated by considering the data transfer time only. Approach: We proposed a replica selection system that selects the best replica location for the users' running jobs in a minimum response time that can be estimated by considering new factors besides the data transfer time, namely, the storage access latency and the replica requests that waiting in the storage queue. Results: The performance of the proposed system was compared with a similar system that exists in the literature namely, SimpleOptimiser. The simulation results demonstrated that our system performed better than the SimpleOptimiser on an average of 6%. Conclusions: The proposed system can select the best replica location in a lesser response time than the SimpleOptimise. The efficiency of the proposed system is 6% higher than the SimpleOptimise. The efficiency level has a high impact on the quality of service that is perceived by grid users in a data grid environment where the data files are relatively big. For example, the data files produced from the scientific applications are of the size hundreds of Terabytes.

  9. Conceptual question response times in Peer Instruction classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to in-class, conceptual questions [ConcepTests (CTs)] in two introductory physics courses taught using Peer Instruction and use item response theory to determine the difficulty of the CTs. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers both before and after the peer discussion for CTs of varying difficulty. We also determine the relationship between response time and student performance on a standardized test of incoming physics knowledge, precourse self-efficacy, and gender. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response time for correct answers is significantly faster than for incorrect answers, both before and after peer discussion, especially for easy CTs. Second, students with greater incoming physics knowledge and higher self-efficacy respond faster in both rounds. Third, there is no gender difference in response rate after controlling for incoming physics knowledge scores, although males register significantly more attempts before committing to a final answer than do female students. These results provide insight into effective CT pacing during Peer Instruction. In particular, in order to maintain a pace that keeps everyone engaged, students should not be given too much time to respond. When around 80% of the answers are in, the ratio of correct to incorrect responses rapidly approaches levels indicating random guessing and instructors should close the poll.

  10. Classification of human natural killer cells based on migration behavior and cytotoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherberghen, Bruno; Olofsson, Per E; Forslund, Elin; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali; Pacouret, Simon; Guldevall, Karolin; Enqvist, Monika; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Mehr, Ramit; Önfelt, Björn

    2013-02-21

    Despite intense scrutiny of the molecular interactions between natural killer (NK) and target cells, few studies have been devoted to dissection of the basic functional heterogeneity in individual NK cell behavior. Using a microchip-based, time-lapse imaging approach allowing the entire contact history of each NK cell to be recorded, in the present study, we were able to quantify how the cytotoxic response varied between individual NK cells. Strikingly, approximately half of the NK cells did not kill any target cells at all, whereas a minority of NK cells was responsible for a majority of the target cell deaths. These dynamic cytotoxicity data allowed categorization of NK cells into 5 distinct classes. A small but particularly active subclass of NK cells killed several target cells in a consecutive fashion. These "serial killers" delivered their lytic hits faster and induced faster target cell death than other NK cells. Fast, necrotic target cell death was correlated with the amount of perforin released by the NK cells. Our data are consistent with a model in which a small fraction of NK cells drives tumor elimination and inflammation.

  11. An enhanced algorithm for knee joint sound classification using feature extraction based on time-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keo Sik; Seo, Jeong Hwan; Kang, Jin U; Song, Chul Gyu

    2009-05-01

    Vibroarthrographic (VAG) signals, generated by human knee movement, are non-stationary and multi-component in nature and their time-frequency distribution (TFD) provides a powerful means to analyze such signals. The objective of this paper is to improve the classification accuracy of the features, obtained from the TFD of normal and abnormal VAG signals, using segmentation by the dynamic time warping (DTW) and denoising algorithm by the singular value decomposition (SVD). VAG and knee angle signals, recorded simultaneously during one flexion and one extension of the knee, were segmented and normalized at 0.5 Hz by the DTW method. Also, the noise within the TFD of the segmented VAG signals was reduced by the SVD algorithm, and a back-propagation neural network (BPNN) was used to classify the normal and abnormal VAG signals. The characteristic parameters of VAG signals consist of the energy, energy spread, frequency and frequency spread parameter extracted by the TFD. A total of 1408 segments (normal 1031, abnormal 377) were used for training and evaluating the BPNN. As a result, the average classification accuracy was 91.4 (standard deviation +/-1.7) %. The proposed method showed good potential for the non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of joint disorders such as osteoarthritis.

  12. Identification and Classification of Rhizobia by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rui Zong; Zhang, Rong Juan; Wei, Qing; Chen, Wen Feng; Cho, Il Kyu; Chen, Wen Xin; Li, Qing X

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been widely used for specific, sensitive and rapid analysis of proteins and has shown a high potential for bacterial identification and characterization. Type strains of four species of rhizobia and Escherichia coli DH5α were employed as reference bacteria to optimize various parameters for identification and classification of species of rhizobia by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI TOF MS). The parameters optimized included culture medium states (liquid or solid), bacterial growth phases, colony storage temperature and duration, and protein data processing to enhance the bacterial identification resolution, accuracy and reliability. The medium state had little effects on the mass spectra of protein profiles. A suitable sampling time was between the exponential phase and the stationary phase. Consistent protein mass spectral profiles were observed for E. coli colonies pre-grown for 14 days and rhizobia for 21 days at 4°C or 21°C. A dendrogram of 75 rhizobial strains of 4 genera was constructed based on MALDI TOF mass spectra and the topological patterns agreed well with those in the 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree. The potential of developing a mass spectral database for all rhizobia species was assessed with blind samples. The entire process from sample preparation to accurate identification and classification of species required approximately one hour.

  13. Classification of items in a walk-through metal detector using time series of eigenvalues of the polarizability tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Jarmo; Ala-Kleemola, Timo; Vihonen, Juho; Jylhä, Juha; Ruotsalainen, Marja; Järvi, Ari; Visa, Ari

    2009-05-01

    During the last decade, the safety regulations of the airports have been set to a new level. As the number of passengers is constantly increasing, yet effective but quick security control at checkpoints sets great requirements to the 21st century security systems. In this paper, we shall introduce a novel metal detector concept that enables not only to detect but also to classify hidden items, though their orientation and accurate location are unknown. Our new prototype walk-through metal detector generates mutually orthogonal homogeneous magnetic fields so that the measured dipole moments allow classification of even the smallest of the items with high degree of accuracy in real-time. Invariant to different rotations of an object, the classification is based on eigenvalues of the polarizability tensor that incorporate information about the item (size, shape, orientation etc.); as a further novelty, we treat the eigenvalues as time series. In our laboratory settings, no assumptions concerning the typical place, where an item is likely situated, are made. In that case, 90 % of the dangerous and harmless items, including knives, guns, gun parts, belts etc. according to a security organisation, are correctly classified. Made misclassifications are explained by too similar electromagnetic properties of the items in question. The theoretical treatment and simulations are verified via empirical tests conducted using a robotic arm and our prototype system. In the future, the state-of-the-art system is likely to speed-up the security controls significantly with improved safety.

  14. Response time of light emitting diode-logarithmic electrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Y. B.; Vyavahare, P. D.

    1998-02-01

    In a logarithmic electrometer which uses a transistor as a nonlinear element, a capacitance is generally connected across the feedback element of the operational amplifier. This stabilizes the loop but degrades the response at low current levels. However the stability problem is not so serious when a junction diode is used. In the present work an attempt was made to study the response time of a logarithmic electrometer which uses a light emitting diode (LED) as a nonlinear element and without external capacitance. The calculated values of rise time are based on an equivalent circuit with a depletion layer capacitance and voltage dependent conductance. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. This study will be useful in the estimation of dynamical errors in logarithmic electrometers using junction diode/LED, LED photometers and will be helpful in the techniques for improvements of the response time of logarithmic electrometers using a junction diode, particularly at low currents.

  15. A Phenology-Based Classification of Time-Series MODIS Data for Rice Crop Monitoring in Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen-Thanh Son

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice crop monitoring is an important activity for crop management. This study aimed to develop a phenology-based classification approach for the assessment of rice cropping systems in Mekong Delta, Vietnam, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data. The data were processed from December 2000, to December 2012, using empirical mode decomposition (EMD in three main steps: (1 data pre-processing to construct the smooth MODIS enhanced vegetation index (EVI time-series data; (2 rice crop classification; and (3 accuracy assessment. The comparisons between the classification maps and the ground reference data indicated overall accuracies and Kappa coefficients, respectively, of 81.4% and 0.75 for 2002, 80.6% and 0.74 for 2006 and 85.5% and 0.81 for 2012. The results by comparisons between MODIS-derived rice area and rice area statistics were slightly overestimated, with a relative error in area (REA from 0.9–15.9%. There was, however, a close correlation between the two datasets (R2 ≥ 0.89. From 2001 to 2012, the areas of triple-cropped rice increased approximately 31.6%, while those of the single-cropped rain-fed rice, double-cropped irrigated rice and double-cropped rain-fed rice decreased roughly −5.0%, −19.2% and −7.4%, respectively. This study demonstrates the validity of such an approach for rice-crop monitoring with MODIS data and could be transferable to other regions.

  16. Time dependent density functional calculation of plasmon response in clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng(王锋); Zhang Feng-Shou(张丰收); Eric Suraud

    2003-01-01

    We have introduced a theoretical scheme for the efficient description of the optical response of a cluster based on the time-dependent density functional theory. The practical implementation is done by means of the fully fledged timedependent local density approximation scheme, which is solved directly in the time domain without any linearization.As an example we consider the simple Na2 cluster and compute its surface plasmon photoabsorption cross section, which is in good agreement with the experiments.

  17. Planck 2013 results. VII. HFI time response and beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bowyer, J W; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Haissinski, J; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hou, Z; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matsumura, T; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polegre, A M; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Sauvé, A; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper characterizes the effective beams,the effective beam window functions and the associated errors for the Planck HFI detectors. The effective beam is the angular response including the effect of the optics,detectors,data processing and the scan strategy. The window function is the representation of this beam in the harmonic domain which is required to recover an unbiased measurement of the CMB angular power spectrum. The HFI is a scanning instrument and its effective beams are the convolution of: (a) the optical response of the telescope and feeds;(b)the processing of the time-ordered data and deconvolution of the bolometric and electronic time response; and (c) the merging of several surveys to produce maps. The time response functions are measured using observations of Jupiter and Saturn and by minimizing survey difference residuals. The scanning beam is the post-deconvolution angular response of the instrument, and is characterized with observations of Mars. The main beam solid angles are determin...

  18. The Time Is Right for a New Classification System for Diabetes: Rationale and Implications of the β-Cell-Centric Classification Schema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Epstein, Solomon; Corkey, Barbara E; Grant, Struan F A; Gavin, James R; Aguilar, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    The current classification system presents challenges to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), in part due to its conflicting and confounding definitions of type 1 DM, type 2 DM, and latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA). The current schema also lacks a foundation that readily incorporates advances in our understanding of the disease and its treatment. For appropriate and coherent therapy, we propose an alternate classification system. The β-cell-centric classification of DM is a new approach that obviates the inherent and unintended confusions of the current system. The β-cell-centric model presupposes that all DM originates from a final common denominator-the abnormal pancreatic β-cell. It recognizes that interactions between genetically predisposed β-cells with a number of factors, including insulin resistance (IR), susceptibility to environmental influences, and immune dysregulation/inflammation, lead to the range of hyperglycemic phenotypes within the spectrum of DM. Individually or in concert, and often self-perpetuating, these factors contribute to β-cell stress, dysfunction, or loss through at least 11 distinct pathways. Available, yet underutilized, treatments provide rational choices for personalized therapies that target the individual mediating pathways of hyperglycemia at work in any given patient, without the risk of drug-related hypoglycemia or weight gain or imposing further burden on the β-cells. This article issues an urgent call for the review of the current DM classification system toward the consensus on a new, more useful system.

  19. A generic and compositional framework for multicore response time analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altmeyer, S.; Davis, R.I.; Indrusiak, L.; Maiza, C.; Nelis, V.; Reineke, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Multicore Response Time Analysis (MRTA) framework. This framework is extensible to different multicore architectures, with various types and arrangements of local memory, and different arbitration policies for the common interconnects. We instantiate the framework for s

  20. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... in FAR 5.202(a)(7), if to do so would disclose the originality of thought or innovativeness of...

  1. Linear-response thermal time-dependent density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron

    2015-01-01

    The van Leeuwen proof of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is generalized to thermal ensembles. This allows generalization to finite temperatures of the Gross-Kohn relation, the exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT, and fluctuation dissipation theorem for DFT. This produces a natural method for generating new thermal exchange-correlation (XC) approximations.

  2. From Zero to Sixty: Calibrating Real-Time Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulis, Theodoro; Ramsay, James O.; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in data recording technology have given researchers new ways of collecting on-line and continuous data for analyzing input-output systems. For example, continuous response digital interfaces are increasingly used in psychophysics. The statistical problem related to these input-output systems reduces to linking time-varying…

  3. Mean Response Time Approximation for HTTP Transactions over Transport Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses mean response time that end-users experience when using the Internet. HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol is a widely used transfer protocol to retrieve web objects in the Internet. Generally, HTTP uses TCP (Transmission Control Protocol in a transport layer. But it is known that HTTP interacts with TCP inefficiently. As an example of such inefficiencies, HTTP does not require TCP to deliver the rigid order, which may cause head-of-line blocking. As another transport layer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol has attractive features such as multi-streaming and multi-homing unlike TCP. Within an SCTP association, multi-streaming allows for independent delivery among streams, thus can avoid the head-of-line blocking. In addition, SCTP provides very large number of streams; therefore, it can transfer multiple objects more efficiently than the typical HTTP/1.1 over TCP which limits the number of pipelines. Mean response time is one of the main measures that end users using Internet concern. This paper presents the simple analytical model and algorithm to find the mean response time for HTTP over SCTP including the previous HTTP over TCP. Some computational experiences show that the proposed model and algorithm are well approximated to the real environment. Also, it is shown that mean response time for HTTP over SCTP can be less than that for HTTP over TCP.

  4. Demonstration of Advanced Geophysics and Classification Technologies on Munitions Response Sites Fort Rucker, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    for visual review. Each response associated with known TOI was colored blue and each response 20 associated with non-TOI was colored gray. These...osd.mil Program Manager, Munitions Response Mr. Daniel Ruedy HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400 Reston, VA 20190 703-736-4531

  5. Timing and causality in the generation of learned eyelid responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raudel eSánchez-Campusano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum-red nucleus-facial motoneuron (Mn pathway has been reported as being involved in the proper timing of classically conditioned eyelid responses. This special type of associative learning serves as a model of event timing for studying the role of the cerebellum in dynamic motor control. Here, we have re-analyzed the firing activities of cerebellar posterior interpositus (IP neurons and orbicularis oculi (OO Mns in alert behaving cats during classical eyeblink conditioning, using a delay paradigm. The aim was to revisit the hypothesis that the IP neurons can be considered a neuronal phase-modulating device supporting OO Mns firing with an emergent timing mechanism and an explicit correlation code during learned eyelid movements. Optimized experimental and computational tools allowed us to determine the different causal relationships (temporal order and correlation code during and between trials. These intra- and inter-trial timing strategies expanding from sub-second range (millisecond timing to longer-lasting ranges (interval timing expanded the functional domain of cerebellar timing beyond motor control. Interestingly, the results supported the above-mentioned hypothesis. The causal inferences were influenced by the precise motor and premotor spike-timing in the cause-effect interval, and, in addition, the timing of the learned responses depended on cerebellar-Mn network causality. Furthermore, the timing of CRs depended upon the probability of simulated causal conditions in the cause-effect interval and not the mere duration of the inter-stimulus interval. In this work, the close relation between timing and causality was verified. It could thus be concluded that the firing activities of IP neurons may be related more to the proper performance of ongoing CRs (i.e., the proper timing as a consequence of the pertinent causality than to their generation and/or initiation.

  6. Aircraft Fault Detection Using Real-Time Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time method for estimating time-varying aircraft frequency responses from input and output measurements was demonstrated. The Bat-4 subscale airplane was used with NASA Langley Research Center's AirSTAR unmanned aerial flight test facility to conduct flight tests and collect data for dynamic modeling. Orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs, summed with pilot stick and pedal inputs, were used to excite the responses. The aircraft was tested in its normal configuration and with emulated failures, which included a stuck left ruddervator and an increased command path latency. No prior knowledge of a dynamic model was used or available for the estimation. The longitudinal short period dynamics were investigated in this work. Time-varying frequency responses and stability margins were tracked well using a 20 second sliding window of data, as compared to a post-flight analysis using output error parameter estimation and a low-order equivalent system model. This method could be used in a real-time fault detection system, or for other applications of dynamic modeling such as real-time verification of stability margins during envelope expansion tests.

  7. Time-lapse and slow-motion tracking of temperature changes: response time of a thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggio, L.; Onorato, P.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2017-03-01

    We propose the use of a smartphone based time-lapse and slow-motion video techniques together with tracking analysis as valuable tools for investigating thermal processes such as the response time of a thermometer. The two simple experimental activities presented here, suitable also for high school and undergraduate students, allow one to measure in a simple yet rigorous way the response time of an alcohol thermometer and show its critical dependence on the properties of the surrounding environment giving insight into instrument characteristics, heat transfer and thermal equilibrium concepts.

  8. Dose-time-response modeling using negative binomial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Munmun; Choudhury, Kanak; Islam, M M; Matin, M A

    2013-01-01

    People exposed to certain diseases are required to be treated with a safe and effective dose level of a drug. In epidemiological studies to find out an effective dose level, different dose levels are applied to the exposed and a certain number of cures is observed. Negative binomial distribution is considered to fit overdispersed Poisson count data. This study investigates the time effect on the response at different time points as well as at different dose levels. The point estimation and confidence bands for ED(100p)(t) and LT(100p)(d) are formulated in closed form for the proposed dose-time-response model with the negative binomial distribution. Numerical illustrations are carried out in order to check the performance level of the proposed model.

  9. The Time Course Effect of Moderate Intensity Exercise on Response Execution and Response Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Jennifer; Graydon, Jan; McMorris, Terry; Davranche, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the time course effect of a moderate steady-state exercise session on response execution and response inhibition using a stop-task paradigm. Ten participants performed a stop-signal task whilst cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity (40% of maximal aerobic power), immediately following exercise and…

  10. Modeling in Real Time During the Ebola Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Martin I; Santibanez, Scott; Fischer, Leah S; Merlin, Toby L; Adhikari, Bishwa B; Atkins, Charisma Y; Campbell, Caresse; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Gambhir, Manoj; Gift, Thomas; Greening, Bradford; Gu, Weidong; Jacobson, Evin U; Kahn, Emily B; Carias, Cristina; Nerlander, Lina; Rainisch, Gabriel; Shankar, Manjunath; Wong, Karen; Washington, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    To aid decision-making during CDC's response to the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC activated a Modeling Task Force to generate estimates on various topics related to the response in West Africa and the risk for importation of cases into the United States. Analysis of eight Ebola response modeling projects conducted during August 2014-July 2015 provided insight into the types of questions addressed by modeling, the impact of the estimates generated, and the difficulties encountered during the modeling. This time frame was selected to cover the three phases of the West African epidemic curve. Questions posed to the Modeling Task Force changed as the epidemic progressed. Initially, the task force was asked to estimate the number of cases that might occur if no interventions were implemented compared with cases that might occur if interventions were implemented; however, at the peak of the epidemic, the focus shifted to estimating resource needs for Ebola treatment units. Then, as the epidemic decelerated, requests for modeling changed to generating estimates of the potential number of sexually transmitted Ebola cases. Modeling to provide information for decision-making during the CDC Ebola response involved limited data, a short turnaround time, and difficulty communicating the modeling process, including assumptions and interpretation of results. Despite these challenges, modeling yielded estimates and projections that public health officials used to make key decisions regarding response strategy and resources required. The impact of modeling during the Ebola response demonstrates the usefulness of modeling in future responses, particularly in the early stages and when data are scarce. Future modeling can be enhanced by planning ahead for data needs and data sharing, and by open communication among modelers, scientists, and others to ensure that modeling and its limitations are more clearly understood. The activities summarized in

  11. Phenological Classification of the United States: A Geographic Framework for Extending Multi-Sensor Time-Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem J. D. van Leeuwen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces a new geographic framework, phenological classification, for the conterminous United States based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI time-series data and a digital elevation model. The resulting pheno-class map is comprised of 40 pheno-classes, each having unique phenological and topographic characteristics. Cross-comparison of the pheno-classes with the 2001 National Land Cover Database indicates that the new map contains additional phenological and climate information. The pheno-class framework may be a suitable basis for the development of an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR-MODIS NDVI translation algorithm and for various biogeographic studies.

  12. Classification, Dose-response Modelling and the Evaluation of Biomarkers in a Micro-array Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Dose-response microarray experiments consist of monitoring expression levels of thousands of genes with respect to increasing dose of the treatment under investigation. The primary goal of such an experiment is to establish a dose-response relationship, while the secondary goals are to determine the minimum effective dose level and to identify the shape of the dose-response curve. Recently, Lin et al.[1] discussed several testing procedures to test for monotone trend based on isotonic regress...

  13. Seismic Response of Wind Turbines: Time Domain Simulations Including SSI

    OpenAIRE

    Amdal, Åse Marit Wist

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a numerical model of a 5MW offshore wind turbine on a monopile foundation was created in order to calculate the dynamic response of the structure including soil-structure interaction. The main focus was to develop a reliable numerical model of the coupled system - including the tower, monopile foundation and the surrounding soil. The wind turbine was subjected to earthquake load in the time-domain. The global response of the wind turbine was compared for the two prevalent meth...

  14. Is the storm time response of the inner magnetospheric hot ions universally similar or driver dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Katus, Roxanne

    2012-04-01

    The Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model was used to simulate all of the intense storms (Dstmin total energy content, yielding error estimates on the correlation coefficients and root-mean-square error values for each run set. The accuracy of each run set depends on the method of comparison and classification of the driver. For the correlation coefficients, the simulations using a local-time-dependent outer boundary condition were consistently better than those using a local-time-averaged (but high-time-resolution) nightside boundary condition, with the simplistic electric field being better than the self-consistent field description. For the root-mean-square error, the results are less conclusive. For the CIR/HSS-driven storms, those with the high-time-resolution boundary condition were systematically better than those with the local-time-dependent (but lower-time-resolution) boundary condition. For the ICME-driven storms, those run sets employing the self-consistent electric field calculation were systematically better than those using the simplistic electric field. The implication, therefore, is that the inner magnetospheric physical response to strong driving is, at least to some degree, fundamentally different depending on the heliospheric structure impacting geospace. Specifically, for an accurate SYMH* comparison, it is found that CIR/HSS events respond strongly to transient spikes in the plasma outer boundary condition, while ICME passages exhibit a more highly structured electric field.

  15. Real-time multivariate statistical classification of cells for flow cytometry and cell sorting: a data mining application for stem cell isolation and tumor purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.; Reece, Lisa M.; Rosenblatt, Judah I.; Hokanson, James A.

    1999-06-01

    Multivariate statistics can be used for visualization of cell subpopulations in multidimensional data space and for classification of cells within that data space. New data mining techniques we have developed, such as subtractive clustering, can be used to find the differences between test and control multiparameter flow cytometric data, e.g. in the problem of human stem cell isolation with tumor purging. They also can provide training data for subsequent multivariate statistical classification techniques such as discriminant function or logistic regression analyses. Using lookup tables, these multivariate statistical calculations can be performed in real-time, and can even include probabilities of misclassification. Thus, the only distinction between off-line classification of cells in data analysis and real-time statistical decision-making for cell sorting is the time limit in which a classification decision must be made. For real-time cell sorting we presently are able to perform these classifications in less than 625 microseconds, corresponding to the time that it takes the cell to travel from the laser intersection point to the sort decision point in a flow cytometer/cell sorter. Statistical decision making and the ability to include the costs of misclassification into that decision process will become important as flow cytometry/cell sorting moves from diagnostics to therapeutics.

  16. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Shur, Michael [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U{sub 0} = U{sub g} − U{sub th}, where U{sub g} is the gate voltage and U{sub th} is the threshold voltage, such that μU{sub 0}/L < v{sub s}, where L is the channel length and v{sub s} is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L{sup 2}/(μU{sub 0}), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  17. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg; Shur, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U0 = Ug - Uth, where Ug is the gate voltage and Uth is the threshold voltage, such that μU0/L < vs, where L is the channel length and vs is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L2/(μU0), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  18. Lie Group Classifications and Non-differentiable Solutions for Time-Fractional Burgers Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guo-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Lie group method provides an efficient tool to solve nonlinear partial differential equations.This paper suggests Lie group method for fractional partial differential equations.A time-fractional Burgers equation is used as an example to illustrate the effectiveness of the Lie group method and some classes of exact solutions are obtained.

  19. Epilepsy Classification Framework Utilizing Joint Time-Frequency Signal Analysis and Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva KHOSHNOUD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Time Frequency Signal Analysis and Processing (TFSAP have been proposed in order to analyse the signal in both the time and the frequency domains. Electroencephalography (EEG as a time-varying frequency signal is an interesting field in which Time Frequency Distribution (TFD could be used in order to visualize the simultaneous distributions of signal energy in different physiological and pathological brain states. Particularly, epileptic signals due to their great features of seizure activity are introduced as the most attractive research field among researchers. This study outlines an investigation on two main pathologic brain states including, pre-ictal activity and seizure activity compared to normal activity. Pseudo-Wigner -Ville and Choi-William distributions are used in order to visualize the energy content of signals in these states. Different segments of brain electrical activity are analyzed using these distributions. Finally, Renyi’s entropy as an important characteristic which offer insight towards the EEG signal processing has been extracted from TFDs. The results obtained indicate that Renyi’s entropy is a high-quality discriminative feature especially in alpha and delta sub-bands of the EEG signal.

  20. A comparison of time series similarity measures for classification and change detection of ecosystem dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhermitte, S.; Verbesselt, J.; Verstraeten, W.W.; Coppin, P.

    2011-01-01

    Time series of remote sensing imagery or derived vegetation indices and biophysical products have been shown particularly useful to characterize land ecosystem dynamics. Various methods have been developed based on temporal trajectory analysis to characterize, classify and detect changes in ecosyste

  1. Real-Time Source Classification with an Waveform Parameter Filtering of Acoustic Emission Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Park, Jae Ha; Ahn, Bong Young [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The acoustic emission(AE) technique is a well established method to carry out structural health monitoring(SHM) of large structures. However, the real-time monitoring of the crack growth in the roller coaster support structures is not easy since the vehicle operation produces very large noise as well as crack growth. In this investigation, we present the waveform parameter filtering method to classify acoustic sources in real-time. This method filtrates only the AE hits by the target acoustic source as passing hits in a specific parameter band. According to various acoustic sources, the waveform parameters were measured and analyzed to verify the present filtering method. Also, the AE system employing the waveform parameter filter was manufactured and applied to the roller coaster support structure in an actual amusement park

  2. Data Mining and Machine-Learning in Time-Domain Discovery & Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, Joshua S

    2011-01-01

    The changing heavens have played a central role in the scientific effort of astronomers for centuries. Galileo's synoptic observations of the moons of Jupiter and the phases of Venus starting in 1610, provided strong refutation of Ptolemaic cosmology. In more modern times, the discovery of a relationship between period and luminosity in some pulsational variable stars led to the inference of the size of the Milky Way, the distance scale to the nearest galaxies, and the expansion of the Universe. Distant explosions of supernovae were used to uncover the existence of dark energy and provide a precise numerical account of dark matter. Indeed, time-domain observations of transient events and variable stars, as a technique, influences a broad diversity of pursuits in the entire astronomy endeavor. While, at a fundamental level, the nature of the scientific pursuit remains unchanged, the advent of astronomy as a data-driven discipline presents fundamental challenges to the way in which the scientific process must n...

  3. Time series analysis of the response of measurement instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakaki, Dimitra; Polatoglou, Hariton

    2012-01-01

    In this work the significance of treating a set of measurements as a time series is being explored. Time Series Analysis (TSA) techniques, part of the Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) approach, can provide much insight regarding the stochastic correlations that are induced on the outcome of an experiment by the measurement system and can provide criteria for the limited use of the classical variance in metrology. Specifically, techniques such as the Lag Plots, Autocorrelation Function, Power Spectral Density and Allan Variance are used to analyze series of sequential measurements, collected at equal time intervals from an electromechanical transducer. These techniques are used in conjunction with power law models of stochastic noise in order to characterize time or frequency regimes for which the usually assumed white noise model is adequate for the description of the measurement system response. However, through the detection of colored noise, usually referred to as flicker noise, which is expected to appear ...

  4. Real-time classification of datasets with hardware embedded neuromorphic neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bako, Laszlo

    2010-05-01

    Neuromorphic artificial neural networks attempt to understand the essential computations that take place in the dense networks of interconnected neurons making up the central nervous systems in living creatures. This article demonstrates that artificial spiking neural networks--built to resemble the biological model--encoding information in the timing of single spikes, are capable of computing and learning clusters from realistic data. It shows how a spiking neural network based on spike-time coding can successfully perform unsupervised and supervised clustering on real-world data. A temporal encoding procedure of continuously valued data is developed, together with a hardware implementation oriented new learning rule set. Solutions that make use of embedded soft-core microcontrollers are investigated, to implement some of the most resource-consuming components of the artificial neural network. Details of the implementations are given, with benchmark application evaluation and test bench description. Measurement results are presented, showing real-time and adaptive data processing capabilities, comparing these to related findings in the specific literature.

  5. Exact response functions within the time-dependent Gutzwiller approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünemann, J.; Wasner, S.; Oelsen, E. v.; Seibold, G.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the applicability of the two existing versions of a time-dependent Gutzwiller approach (TDGA) beyond the frequently used limit of infinite spatial dimensions. To this end, we study the two-particle response functions of a two-site Hubbard model where we can compare the exact results and those derived from the TDGA. It turns out that only the more recently introduced version of the TDGA can be combined with a diagrammatic approach which allows for the evaluation of Gutzwiller wave functions in finite dimensions. For this TDGA method, we derive the time-dependent Lagrangian for general single-band Hubbard models.

  6. Climatic response to a time varying solar constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, G. R.; Short, D. A.; Mengel, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Recent measurements of the solar constant, theoretical arguments, and climatic measurements combined with signal processing suggest the possibility that the solar constant varies significantly on time scales ranging from billions of years to 11-yr (sunspot) cycles, and even to scales of a few weeks. Simple climate models with a time varying solar constant are examined here, with emphasis on the heat balance models (North et al., 1981). Linear heat balance model results are presented for high (10 cycles/yr) and low (0.1 cycle/yr) frequencies, providing a useful guide in estimating the direct heat response to solar variability.

  7. Collecting response times using Amazon Mechanical Turk and Adobe Flash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Travis; Fiez, Julie A

    2014-03-01

    Crowdsourcing systems like Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) allow data to be collected from a large sample of people in a short amount of time. This use has garnered considerable interest from behavioral scientists. So far, most experiments conducted on AMT have focused on survey-type instruments because of difficulties inherent in running many experimental paradigms over the Internet. This study investigated the viability of presenting stimuli and collecting response times using Adobe Flash to run ActionScript 3 code in conjunction with AMT. First, the timing properties of Adobe Flash were investigated using a phototransistor and two desktop computers running under several conditions mimicking those that may be present in research using AMT. This experiment revealed some strengths and weaknesses of the timing capabilities of this method. Next, a flanker task and a lexical decision task implemented in Adobe Flash were administered to participants recruited with AMT. The expected effects in these tasks were replicated. Power analyses were conducted to describe the number of participants needed to replicate these effects. A questionnaire was used to investigate previously undescribed computer use habits of 100 participants on AMT. We conclude that a Flash program in conjunction with AMT can be successfully used for running many experimental paradigms that rely on response times, although experimenters must understand the limitations of the method.

  8. Response Time Analysis of Distributed Web Systems Using QPNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Rak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A performance model is used for studying distributed Web systems. Performance evaluation is done by obtaining load test measurements. Queueing Petri Nets formalism supports modeling and performance analysis of distributed World Wide Web environments. The proposed distributed Web systems modeling and design methodology have been applied in the evaluation of several system architectures under different external loads. Furthermore, performance analysis is done to determine the system response time.

  9. Detection and classification of defects in ultrasonic NDE signals using time-frequency representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qidwai, Uvais; Costa, Antonio H.; Chen, C. H.

    2000-05-01

    The ultrasonic wave, generated by a piezoelectric transducer coupled to the test specimen, propagates through the material and part of its energy is reflected when it encounters an non-homogeneity or discontinuity in its path, while the remainder is reflected by the back surface of the test specimen. Defect echo signals are masked by the characteristics of the measuring instruments, the propagation paths taken by the ultrasonic wave, and are corrupted by additive noise. This leads to difficulties in comparing and analyzing signals, particularly in automated defect identification systems employing different transducers. Further, the multi-component nature of material defects can add to the complexity of the defect identification criteria. With many one-dimensional (1-D) approaches, the multi-component defects can not be detected. Another drawback is that these techniques are not very robust for sharp ultrasonic peaks especially in a very hazardous environment. This paper proposes a technique based on the time-frequency representations (TFRs) of the real defect signals corresponding to artificially produced defects of various geometries in metals. Cohen's class (quadratic) TFRs with Gaussian kernels are then used to represent the signals in the time-frequency (TF) plane. Once the TFR is obtained, various image processing morphological techniques are applied to the TFR (e.g. region of interest masking, edge detection, and profile separation). Based on the results of these operations, a binary image is produced which, in turn, leads to a novel set of features. Using these new features, defects have not only been detected but also classified as flat-cut, angular-cut, and circular-drills. Moreover, with some modifications of the threshold levels of the TFR kernel design, our technique can be used in relatively hostile environments with SNRs as low as 0 dB. Another important characteristic of our approach is the detection of multiple defects. This consists of detection of

  10. Classification of Topological Insulators with Time-Reversal and Inversion Symmetry*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lan-Feng; CHEN Bo-Lun; KOU Su-Peng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we find that topological insulators with time-reversal symmetry and inversion symmetry featuring two-dimensional quantum spin Hall (QSH) state can be divided into 16 c/asses, which are characterized by four Z2 topological variables ζk = O,1 at four points with high symmetry in the Brillouin zone. We obtain the corresponding edge states for each one of these sixteen classes of QSHs. In addition, it is predicted that massless fermionic excitations appear at the quantum phase transition between different QSH states. In the end, we also briefly discuss the threedimensional case.

  11. Eliciting Responsivity: Exploring Programming Interests of Federal Inmates as a Function of Security Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neller, Daniel J; Vitacco, Michael J; Magaletta, Philip R; Phillips-Boyles, A Brooke

    2016-03-01

    Research supports the effectiveness of the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model for reducing criminal recidivism. Yet programming interests of inmates--one facet of responsivity--remain an understudied phenomenon. In the present study, we explored the programming interests of 753 federal inmates housed across three levels of security. Results suggest that inmates, as a group, prefer specific programs over others, and that some of their interests may differ by security level. We discuss possible implications of these findings.

  12. Integrated inertial sensors and mobile computing for real-time cycling performance guidance via pedaling profile classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, James Y; Nan, Xiaomeng; Ebken, Victor; Wang, Yan; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2015-03-01

    Today, the bicycle is utilized as a daily commute tool, a physical rehabilitation asset, and sporting equipment, prompting studies into the biomechanics of cycling. Of the number of important parameters that affect cycling efficiency, the foot angle profile is one of the most important as it correlates directly with the effective force applied to the bike. However, there has been no compact and portable solution for measuring the foot angle and for providing the cyclist with real-time feedback due to a number of difficulties of the current tracking and sensing technologies and the myriad types of bikes available. This paper presents a novel sensing and mobile computing system for classifying the foot angle profiles during cycling and for providing real-time guidance to the user to achieve the correct profile. Continuous foot angle tracking is firstly converted into a discrete problem requiring only recognition of acceleration profiles of the foot using a single shoe mounted tri-axial accelerometer during each pedaling cycle. A classification method is then applied to identify the pedaling profile. Finally, a mobile solution is presented to provide real-time signal processing and guidance.

  13. On the Late-Time Behavior of Virasoro Blocks and a Classification of Semiclassical Saddles

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, A Liam

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that black hole thermodynamics and information loss/restoration in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ can be derived almost entirely from the behavior of the Virasoro conformal blocks at large central charge, with relatively little dependence on the precise details of the CFT spectrum or OPE coefficients. Here, we elaborate on the non-perturbative behavior of Virasoro blocks by classifying all `saddles' that can contribute for arbitrary values of external and internal operator dimensions in the semiclassical large central charge limit. The leading saddles, which determine the naive semiclassical behavior of the Virasoro blocks, all decay exponentially at late times, and at a rate that is independent of internal operator dimensions. Consequently, the semiclassical contribution of high-energy states does not resolve a well-known version of the information loss problem in AdS$_3$. However, we identify two infinite classes of sub-leading saddles, and one of these classes does not decay at late times.

  14. Real-time recording and classification of eye movements in an immersive virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Gabriel; Cooper, Joseph; Kit, Dmitry; Hayhoe, Mary

    2013-10-10

    Despite the growing popularity of virtual reality environments, few laboratories are equipped to investigate eye movements within these environments. This primer is intended to reduce the time and effort required to incorporate eye-tracking equipment into a virtual reality environment. We discuss issues related to the initial startup and provide algorithms necessary for basic analysis. Algorithms are provided for the calculation of gaze angle within a virtual world using a monocular eye-tracker in a three-dimensional environment. In addition, we provide algorithms for the calculation of the angular distance between the gaze and a relevant virtual object and for the identification of fixations, saccades, and pursuit eye movements. Finally, we provide tools that temporally synchronize gaze data and the visual stimulus and enable real-time assembly of a video-based record of the experiment using the Quicktime MOV format, available at http://sourceforge.net/p/utdvrlibraries/. This record contains the visual stimulus, the gaze cursor, and associated numerical data and can be used for data exportation, visual inspection, and validation of calculated gaze movements.

  15. Exactly solvable model for the time response function of RPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Sezione INFN, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: mangiaro@fi.infn.it; Fonte, P. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Gobbi, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The fluctuation theory for the growth of several avalanches is briefly summarized and extended to include the case of electronegative gas mixtures. Based on such physical picture, the intrinsic time response function of an RPC can be calculated in a closed form and its average and rms extracted from series representations. The corresponding timing resolution, expressed in units of 1/(({alpha}-{eta})vd), is a universal function of the mean number of 'effective' clusters n0 reduced by electron attachment: n0(1-{eta}/{alpha}). A comparison to a few selected good-quality experimental data is attempted for the timing resolution of both 1-gap and 4-gaps RPCs, finding a reasonable agreement.

  16. Stream classification of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River System to support modeling of aquatic habitat response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    A stream classification and associated datasets were developed for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin to support biological modeling of species response to climate change in the southeastern United States. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Department of the Interior’s National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center established the Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) which used downscaled general circulation models to develop landscape-scale assessments of climate change and subsequent effects on land cover, ecosystems, and priority species in the southeastern United States. The SERAP aquatic and hydrologic dynamics modeling efforts involve multiscale watershed hydrology, stream-temperature, and fish-occupancy models, which all are based on the same stream network. Models were developed for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin and subbasins in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, and for the Upper Roanoke River Basin in Virginia. The stream network was used as the spatial scheme through which information was shared across the various models within SERAP. Because these models operate at different scales, coordinated pair versions of the network were delineated, characterized, and parameterized for coarse- and fine-scale hydrologic and biologic modeling. The stream network used for the SERAP aquatic models was extracted from a 30-meter (m) scale digital elevation model (DEM) using standard topographic analysis of flow accumulation. At the finer scale, reaches were delineated to represent lengths of stream channel with fairly homogenous physical characteristics (mean reach length = 350 m). Every reach in the network is designated with geomorphic attributes including upstream drainage basin area, channel gradient, channel width, valley width, Strahler and Shreve stream order, stream power, and measures of stream confinement. The reach network was aggregated from tributary junction to tributary junction to define segments for the

  17. Analysis of bioclimatic time series and their neural network-based classification to characterise drought risk patterns in South Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti, G; Feoli, E; Salvati, L; Brunetti, A; Giovacchini, A

    2007-03-01

    A new approach to characterise geographical areas with a drought risk index (DRI) is suggested, by applying an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier to bioclimatic time series for which operational temporal units (OtUs) are defined. A climatic database, corresponding to a grid of 8 km x 8 km cells covering the Italian peninsula, was considered. Each cell is described by the time series of seven variables recorded from 1989 to 2000. Sixteen cells were selected according to land cover homogeneity and completeness of the time series data. The periodic components of the time series were calculated by means of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method. Temporal units corresponding to the period of the sinusoidal functions most related to the data were used as OtUs. The ANN for each OtU calculates a DRI value ranging between -1 and 1. The value is interpretable as the proximity of the OtUs to one of two situations corresponding to minimum and maximum drought risk, respectively. The former set (DRI = -1) is represented by an ideal OtU with minimum values of temperatures and evapo-transpiration, and maximum values of rainfall, normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) and soil water content. The second set (DRI = 1) is represented by the reciprocal OtU to the former one. The classification of the cells based on DRI time profiles showed that, at the scale used in this work, DRI has no dependence on land cover class, but is related to the location of the cells. The methodology was integrated with GIS (geographic information system) software, and used to show the geographic pattern of DRI in a given area at different periods.

  18. Real-Time Classification of Seagrass Meadows on Flat Bottom with Bathymetric Data Measured by a Narrow Multibeam Sonar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hamana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass meadows, one of the most important habitats for many marine species, provide essential ecological services. Thus, society must conserve seagrass beds as part of their sustainable development efforts. Conserving these ecosystems requires information on seagrass distribution and relative abundance, and an efficient, accurate monitoring system. Although narrow multibeam sonar systems (NMBSs are highly effective in resolving seagrass beds, post-processing methods are required to extract key data. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple method capable of detecting seagrass meadows and estimating their relative abundance in real time using an NMBS. Because most seagrass meadows grow on sandy seafloors, we proposed a way of discriminating seagrass meadows from the sand bed. We classify meadows into three categories of relative seagrass abundance using the 95% confidence level of beam depths and the depth range of the beam depth. These are respectively two times the standard deviation of beam depths, and the difference between the shallowest and the deepest depths in a 0.5 × 0.5 m grid cell sampled with several narrow beams. We examined Zostera caulescens Miki, but this simple NMBS method of seagrass classification can potentially be used to map seagrass meadows with longer shoots of other species, such as Posidonia, as both have gas filled cavities.

  19. Classification mapping and species identification of salt marshes based on a short-time interval NDVI time-series from HJ-1 optical imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Yongxue; Zhao, Saishuai; Zhou, Minxi; Yang, Yuhao; Li, Feixue

    2016-03-01

    Salt marshes are seen as the most dynamic and valuable ecosystems in coastal zones, and in these areas, it is crucial to obtain accurate remote sensing information on the spatial distributions of species over time. However, discriminating various types of salt marsh is rather difficult because of their strong spectral similarities. Previous salt marsh mapping studies have focused mainly on high spatial and spectral (i.e., hyperspectral) resolution images combined with auxiliary information; however, the results are often limited to small regions. With a high temporal and moderate spatial resolution, the Chinese HuanJing-1 (HJ-1) satellite optical imagery can be used not only to monitor phenological changes of salt marsh vegetation over short-time intervals, but also to obtain coverage of large areas. Here, we apply HJ-1 satellite imagery to the middle coast of Jiangsu in east China to monitor changes in saltmarsh vegetation cover. First, we constructed a monthly NDVI time-series to classify various types of salt marsh and then we tested the possibility of using compressed time-series continuously, to broaden the applicability of this particular approach. Our principal findings are as follows: (1) the overall accuracy of salt marsh mapping based on the monthly NDVI time-series was 90.3%, which was ∼16.0% higher than the single-phase classification strategy; (2) a compressed time-series, including NDVI from six key months (April, June-September, and November), demonstrated very little reduction (2.3%) in overall accuracy but led to obvious improvements in unstable regions; and (3) a simple rule for Spartina alterniflora identification was established using a scene solely from November, which may provide an effective way for regularly monitoring its distribution.

  20. Pattern classification of response inhibition in ADHD: Toward the development of neurobiological markers for ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hart, H.; Chantiluke, K.; Cubillo, A.I.; Smith, A.B.; Simmons, A.; Brammer, M.J.; Marquand, A.F.; Rubia, K.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is based on subjective measures despite evidence for multisystemic structural and functional deficits. ADHD patients have consistent neurofunctional deficits in motor response inhibition. The aim of this study was to apply pattern clas

  1. Classification Trees for Quality Control Processes in Automated Constructed Response Scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, David M.; Hone, Anne S.; Miller, Susan; Bejar, Isaac I.

    As the automated scoring of constructed responses reaches operational status, the issue of monitoring the scoring process becomes a primary concern, particularly when the goal is to have automated scoring operate completely unassisted by humans. Using a vignette from the Architectural Registration Examination and data for 326 cases with both human…

  2. Investigation of the trade-off between time window length, classifier update rate and classification accuracy for restorative brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, Sam; Ridding, Michael C; Abbott, Derek; Baumert, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the application of restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) has received significant interest in many BCI labs. However, there are a number of challenges, that need to be tackled to achieve efficient performance of such systems. For instance, any restorative BCI needs an optimum trade-off between time window length, classification accuracy and classifier update rate. In this study, we have investigated possible solutions to these problems by using a dataset provided by the University of Graz, Austria. We have used a continuous wavelet transform and the Student t-test for feature extraction and a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. We find that improved results, for restorative BCIs for rehabilitation, may be achieved by using a 750 milliseconds time window with an average classification accuracy of 67% that updates every 32 milliseconds.

  3. Comparing face processing strategies between typically-developed observers and observers with autism using sub-sampled-pixels presentation in response classification technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Masayoshi; Bennett, Patrick J; Rutherford, M D; Gaspar, Carl M; Kumada, Takatsune; Sekuler, Allison B

    2013-03-07

    In the present study we modified the standard classification image method by subsampling visual stimuli to provide us with a technique capable of examining an individual's face-processing strategy in detail with fewer trials. Experiment 1 confirmed that one testing session (1450 trials) was sufficient to produce classification images that were qualitatively similar to those obtained previously with 10,000 trials (Sekuler et al., 2004). Experiment 2 used this method to compare classification images obtained from observers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and typically-developing (TD) observers. As was found in Experiment 1, classification images obtained from TD observers suggested that they all discriminated faces based on information conveyed by pixels in the eyes/brow region. In contrast, classification images obtained from ASD observers suggested that they used different perceptual strategies: three out of five ASD observers used a typical strategy of making use of information in the eye/brow region, but two used an atypical strategy that relied on information in the forehead region. The advantage of using the response classification technique is that there is no restriction to specific theoretical perspectives or a priori hypotheses, which enabled us to see unexpected strategies, like ASD's forehead strategy, and thus showed this technique is particularly useful in the examination of special populations.

  4. A specialist-generalist classification of the arable flora and its response to changes in agricultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fried Guillaume

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theory in ecology points out the potential link between the degree of specialisation of organisms and their responses to disturbances and suggests that this could be a key element for understanding the assembly of communities. We evaluated this question for the arable weed flora as this group has scarcely been the focus of ecological studies so far and because weeds are restricted to habitats characterised by very high degrees of disturbance. As such, weeds offer a case study to ask how specialization relates to abundance and distribution of species in relation to the varying disturbance regimes occurring in arable crops. Results We used data derived from an extensive national monitoring network of approximately 700 arable fields scattered across France to quantify the degree of specialisation of 152 weed species using six different ecological methods. We then explored the impact of the level of disturbance occurring in arable fields by comparing the degree of specialisation of weed communities in contrasting field situations. The classification of species as specialist or generalist was consistent between different ecological indices. When applied on a large-scale data set across France, this classification highlighted that monoculture harbour significantly more specialists than crop rotations, suggesting that crop rotation increases abundance of generalist species rather than sets of species that are each specialised to the individual crop types grown in the rotation. Applied to a diachronic dataset, the classification also shows that the proportion of specialist weed species has significantly decreased in cultivated fields over the last 30 years which suggests a biotic homogenization of agricultural landscapes. Conclusions This study shows that the concept of generalist/specialist species is particularly relevant to understand the effect of anthropogenic disturbances on the evolution of plant community composition and that

  5. Modeling responses and response times in personality tests with rating scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Ranger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article several latent trait models for the joint distribution of the responses and response times in rating scales are compared. Among these models are two generalizations of established models for binary items, namely a generalization of the approach of Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva (2007a and a generalization of the approach of Ranger and Ortner (2011. Two new models and a variant of the hierarchical model of van der Linden (2007 are also considered. All these models combine the graded response model with a response time model based on the log-normal distribu-tion. The models differ in the assumed relationship between the expected log response time and the underlying latent traits. Although the proposed models have different interpretations and implications they can all be calibrated within the same general framework using marginal maximum likelihood estimation and an application of the ECM-algorithm. The models are used for the analysis of an empirical data set. According to the AIC index, the generalization of the model of Ranger and Ortner (2011 can represent the data best.

  6. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  7. Principal response curves: analysis of time-dependent multivariate responses of biological community to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.J.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a novel multivariate method is proposed for the analysis of community response data from designed experiments repeatedly sampled in time. The long-term effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos on the invertebrate community and the dissolved oxygen (DO)–pH–alkalinity–conductivity syndrom

  8. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  9. You Can’t Think and Hit at the Same Time: Neural Correlates of Baseball Pitch Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eSherwin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hitting a baseball is often described as the most difficult thing to do in sports. A key aptitude of a good hitter is the ability to determine which pitch is coming. This rapid decision requires the batter to make a judgment in a fraction of a second based largely on the trajectory and spin of the ball. When does this decision occur relative to the ball’s trajectory and is it possible to identify neural correlates that represent how the decision evolves over a split second? Using single-trial analysis of electroencephalography (EEG we address this question within the context of subjects discriminating three types of pitches (fastball, curveball, slider based on pitch trajectories. We find clear neural signatures of pitch classification and, using signal detection theory, we identify the times of discrimination on a trial-to-trial basis. Based on these neural signatures we estimate neural discrimination distributions as a function of the distance the ball is from the plate. We find all three pitches yield unique distributions, namely the timing of the discriminating neural signatures relative to the position of the ball in its trajectory. For instance, fastballs are discriminated at the earliest points in their trajectory, relative to the two other pitches, which is consistent with the need for some constant time to generate and execute the motor plan for the swing (or inhibition of the swing. We also find incorrect discrimination of a pitch (errors yields neural sources in Brodmann Area 10 (BA 10, which has been implicated in prospective memory, recall and task difficulty. In summary, we show that single-trial analysis of EEG yields informative distributions of the relative point in a baseball’s trajectory when the batter makes a decision on which pitch is coming.

  10. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis.

  11. Statistical classification of log response as an indicator of facies variation during changes in sea level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inwood, Jennifer; Lofi, Johanna; Davies, Sarah;

    2013-01-01

    composition, and stratal geometries in response to sea-level changes. The novel approach of combining statistical analysis with detailed lithostratigraphic and seismic reflection data sets will be of interest to any scientists working with downhole logs, especially spectral gamma-ray data, and also provides......In this study, a novel application of a statistical approach is utilized for analysis of downhole logging data from Miocene-aged siliciclastic shelf sediments on the New Jersey Margin (eastern USA). A multivariate iterative nonhierarchical cluster analysis (INCA) of spectral gamma-ray logs from...

  12. Effect of defence response time during lunge in foil fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Cruz, Carmen; Rojas, F Javier; Gutiérrez-Davila, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of stimulus change timing on reaction response time parameters, horizontal velocity of the centre of mass (CM) and precision during offensive actions in fencing. Twelve fencers from the Spanish National Foil Team were included in the study. Two 500 Hz force plates were used to register the horizontal component of the reaction force while a 3D video camera set at 250 Hz recorded the spatial position of 11 body markers and a projector connected to a programmed stopwatch projected a moving target (stimulus) on a screen. When the circle (target) appeared in the centre of the plastron, fencers had to execute a step-forward-lunge as fast as possible, trying to touch the circle with the tip of the foil. During the lunge, the position of the target could randomly shift or not to three different positions. The stimulus change was performed randomly at four different times with a progressive delay. The results show that target changes did not have any effect when they occurred at the beginning of the movement sequence. However, when the target change was delayed, reaction and movement times increased and the technical execution of the lunge changed, leading to more errors.

  13. Capturing Real-Time Data in Disaster Response Logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Yagci Sokat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The volume, accuracy, accessibility and level of detail of near real-time data emerging from disaster-affected regions continue to significantly improve. Integration of dynamically evolving in-field data is an important, yet often overlooked, component of the humanitarian logistics models. In this paper, we present a framework for real-time humanitarian logistics data focused on use in mathematical modeling along with modeling implications of this framework. We also discuss how one might measure the attributes of the framework and describe the application of the presented framework to a case study of near real-time data collection in the days following the landfall of Typhoon Haiyan. We detail our first-hand experience of capturing data as the post-disaster response unfolds starting on November 10, 2013 until March 31, 2014 and assess the characteristics and evolution of data pertaining to humanitarian logistics modeling using the proposed framework. The presented logistical content analysis examines the availability of data and informs modelers about the current state of near real-time data. This analysis illustrates what data is available, how early it is available, and how data changes after the disaster. The study describes how our humanitarian logistics team approached the emergence of dynamic online data after the disaster and the challenges faced during the collection process, as well as recommendations to address these challenges in the future (when possible from an academic humanitarian logistics perspective.

  14. A Combined Random Forest and OBIA Classification Scheme for Mapping Smallholder Agriculture at Different Nomenclature Levels Using Multisource Data (Simulated Sentinel-2 Time Series, VHRS and DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Lebourgeois

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sentinel-2 images are expected to improve global crop monitoring even in challenging tropical small agricultural systems that are characterized by high intra- and inter-field spatial variability and where satellite observations are disturbed by the presence of clouds. To overcome these constraints, we analyzed and optimized the performance of a combined Random Forest (RF classifier/object-based approach and applied it to multisource satellite data to produce land use maps of a smallholder agricultural zone in Madagascar at five different nomenclature levels. The RF classifier was first optimized by reducing the number of input variables. Experiments were then carried out to (i test cropland masking prior to the classification of more detailed nomenclature levels, (ii analyze the importance of each data source (a high spatial resolution (HSR time series, a very high spatial resolution (VHSR coverage and a digital elevation model (DEM and data type (spectral, textural or other, and (iii quantify their contributions to classification accuracy levels. The results show that RF classifier optimization allowed for a reduction in the number of variables by 1.5- to 6-fold (depending on the classification level and thus a reduction in the data processing time. Classification results were improved via the hierarchical approach at all classification levels, achieving an overall accuracy of 91.7% and 64.4% for the cropland and crop subclass levels, respectively. Spectral variables derived from an HSR time series were shown to be the most discriminating, with a better score for spectral indices over the reflectances. VHSR data were only found to be essential when implementing the segmentation of the area into objects and not for the spectral or textural features they can provide during classification.

  15. Gemstones and geosciences in space and time. Digital maps to the "Chessboard classification scheme of mineral deposits"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Harald G.; Weber, Berthold

    2013-12-01

    The gemstones, covering the spectrum from jeweler's to showcase quality, have been presented in a tripartite subdivision, by country, geology and geomorphology realized in 99 digital maps with more than 2600 mineralized sites. The various maps were designed based on the "Chessboard classification scheme of mineral deposits" proposed by Dill (2010a, 2010b) to reveal the interrelations between gemstone deposits and mineral deposits of other commodities and direct our thoughts to potential new target areas for exploration. A number of 33 categories were used for these digital maps: chromium, nickel, titanium, iron, manganese, copper, tin-tungsten, beryllium, lithium, zinc, calcium, boron, fluorine, strontium, phosphorus, zirconium, silica, feldspar, feldspathoids, zeolite, amphibole (tiger's eye), olivine, pyroxenoid, garnet, epidote, sillimanite-andalusite, corundum-spinel - diaspore, diamond, vermiculite-pagodite, prehnite, sepiolite, jet, and amber. Besides the political base map (gems by country) the mineral deposit is drawn on a geological map, illustrating the main lithologies, stratigraphic units and tectonic structure to unravel the evolution of primary gemstone deposits in time and space. The geomorphological map is to show the control of climate and subaerial and submarine hydrography on the deposition of secondary gemstone deposits. The digital maps are designed so as to be plotted as a paper version of different scale and to upgrade them for an interactive use and link them to gemological databases.

  16. Classification of stimuli-responsive polymers as anticancer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Bita; Taranejoo, Shahrouz; Monemian, Seyed Ali; Salehi Moghaddam, Zoha; Daliri, Karim; Derakhshankhah, Hossein; Derakhshani, Zaynab

    2015-02-01

    Although several anticancer drugs have been introduced as chemotherapeutic agents, the effective treatment of cancer remains a challenge. Major limitations in the application of anticancer drugs include their nonspecificity, wide biodistribution, short half-life, low concentration in tumor tissue and systemic toxicity. Drug delivery to the tumor site has become feasible in recent years, and recent advances in the development of new drug delivery systems for controlled drug release in tumor tissues with reduced side effects show great promise. In this field, the use of biodegradable polymers as drug carriers has attracted the most attention. However, drug release is still difficult to control even when a polymeric drug carrier is used. The design of pharmaceutical polymers that respond to external stimuli (known as stimuli-responsive polymers) such as temperature, pH, electric or magnetic field, enzymes, ultrasound waves, etc. appears to be a successful approach. In these systems, drug release is triggered by different stimuli. The purpose of this review is to summarize different types of polymeric drug carriers and stimuli, in addition to the combination use of stimuli in order to achieve a better controlled drug release, and it discusses their potential strengths and applications. A survey of the recent literature on various stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems is also provided and perspectives on possible future developments in controlled drug release at tumor site have been discussed.

  17. A colorectal cancer classification system that associates cellular phenotype and responses to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Homicsko, Krisztian; Collisson, Eric A; Gibb, William J; Wullschleger, Stephan; Ostos, Liliane C Gonzalez; Lannon, William A; Grotzinger, Carsten; Del Rio, Maguy; Lhermitte, Benoit; Olshen, Adam B; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Cantley, Lewis C; Gray, Joe W; Hanahan, Douglas

    2013-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer mortality. Whereas some patients respond well to therapy, others do not, and thus more precise, individualized treatment strategies are needed. To that end, we analyzed gene expression profiles from 1,290 CRC tumors using consensus-based unsupervised clustering. The resultant clusters were then associated with therapeutic response data to the epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted drug cetuximab in 80 patients. The results of these studies define six clinically relevant CRC subtypes. Each subtype shares similarities to distinct cell types within the normal colon crypt and shows differing degrees of 'stemness' and Wnt signaling. Subtype-specific gene signatures are proposed to identify these subtypes. Three subtypes have markedly better disease-free survival (DFS) after surgical resection, suggesting these patients might be spared from the adverse effects of chemotherapy when they have localized disease. One of these three subtypes, identified by filamin A expression, does not respond to cetuximab but may respond to cMET receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the metastatic setting. Two other subtypes, with poor and intermediate DFS, associate with improved response to the chemotherapy regimen FOLFIRI in adjuvant or metastatic settings. Development of clinically deployable assays for these subtypes and of subtype-specific therapies may contribute to more effective management of this challenging disease.

  18. Large and Small-Scale Cropland Classification on the Foothills of Mount Kenya Based on SPOT-5 Take-5 Data Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    The SPOT-5 Take 5 campaign provided SPOT time series data of an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. We analysed 29 scenes acquired between May and September 2015 of a semi-arid region in the foothills of Mount Kenya, with two aims: first, to distinguish rainfed from irrigated cropland and cropland from natural vegetation covers, which show similar reflectance patterns; and second, to identify individual crop types. We tested several input data sets in different combinations: the spectral bands and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series, principal components of NDVI time series, and selected NDVI time series statistics. For the classification we used random forests (RF). In the test differentiating rainfed cropland, irrigated cropland, and natural vegetation covers, the best classification accuracies were achieved using spectral bands. For the differentiation of crop types, we analysed the phenology of selected crop types based on NDVI time series. First results are promising.

  19. SO/sub 2/ dose-response sensitivity classification data for crops and natural vegetation species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, P.M.; Ballou, S.W.

    1980-09-01

    Over the past several years studies have been made on the interaction of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and vegetation by performing field research and by developing analytical procedures for applying field observation data to energy impact assessments. As a result of this work, numerous reports have been prepared on crop-pollutant interactions, such as dose-response data; on the applications of such data to screening approaches for identifying crops at risk; and on models that predict crop yield reductions from point source emissions of SO/sub 2/. Data that were used for these studies, such as the crop-at-risk screening procedure, are presented in this report. Maps are also presented that show the national distribution of SO/sub 2/-sensitive crops and natural vegetation.

  20. Brain Machine Interface: Analysis of segmented EEG Signal Classification Using Short-Time PCA and Recurrent Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hema

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain machine interface provides a communication channel between the human brain and an external device. Brain interfaces are studied to provide rehabilitation to patients with neurodegenerative diseases; such patients loose all communication pathways except for their sensory and cognitive functions. One of the possible rehabilitation methods for these patients is to provide a brain machine interface (BMI for communication; the BMI uses the electrical activity of the brain detected by scalp EEG electrodes. Classification of EEG signals extracted during mental tasks is a technique for designing a BMI. In this paper a BMI design using five mental tasks from two subjects were studied, a combination of two tasks is studied per subject. An Elman recurrent neural network is proposed for classification of EEG signals. Two feature extraction algorithms using overlapped and non overlapped signal segments are analyzed. Principal component analysis is used for extracting features from the EEG signal segments. Classification performance of overlapping EEG signal segments is observed to be better in terms of average classification with a range of 78.5% to 100%, while the non overlapping EEG signal segments show better classification in terms of maximum classifications.

  1. Evaluating the Potential of PROBA-V Satellite Image Time Series for Improving LC Classification in Semi-Arid African Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eberenz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite based land cover classification for Africa’s semi-arid ecosystems is hampered commonly by heterogeneous landscapes with mixed vegetation and small scale land use. Higher spatial resolution remote sensing time series data can improve classification results under these difficult conditions. While most large scale land cover mapping attempts rely on moderate resolution data, PROBA-V provides five-daily time series at 100 m spatial resolution. This improves spatial detail and resilience against high cloud cover, but increases the data load. Cloud-based processing platforms can leverage large scale land cover monitoring based on such finer time series. We demonstrate this with PROBA-V 100 m time series data from 2014–2015, using temporal metrics and cloud filtering in combination with in-situ training data and machine learning, implemented on the ESA (European Space Agency Cloud Toolbox infrastructure. We apply our approach to two use cases for a large study area over West Africa: land- and forest cover classification. Our land cover classification reaches a 7% to 21% higher overall accuracy when compared to four global land cover maps (i.e., Globcover-2009, Cover-CCI-2010, MODIS-2010, and Globeland30. Our forest cover classification shows 89% correspondence with the Tropical Ecosystem Environment Observation System (TREES-3 forest cover data which is based on spatially finer Landsat data. This paper illustrates a proof of concept for cloud-based “big-data” driven land cover monitoring. Furthermore, we show that a wide range of temporal metrics can be extracted from detailed PROBA-V 100 m time series data to continuously optimize land cover monitoring.

  2. The simulation of temperature dependence of responsivity and response time for 6H-SiC UV photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi-Men; Zhou Yong-Hua; Zhang Yu-Ming

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the temperature dependence of responsivity and response time for 6H-SiC ultraviolet (UV) photodetector is simulated based on numerical model in the range from 300 K to 900 K. The simulation results show that the responsivity and the response time of device are less sensitive to temperature and this kind of UV photodetector has excellent temperature stability. Also the effects of device structure and bias voltage on the responsivity and the response time are presented. The thicker the drift region is, the higher the responsivity and the longer the response time are. So the thickness of drift region has to be carefully designed to make trade-off between responsivity and response time.

  3. THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON ORBIT: EVENT CLASSIFICATION, INSTRUMENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS, AND CALIBRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Albert, A. [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Atwood, W. B.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Institut fuer Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E., E-mail: echarles@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: luca.baldini@pi.infn.it, E-mail: rando@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2012-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission, the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the instrument response functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper, we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  4. Community Building at the Time of Nargis: The ASEAN Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Santiago Amador III

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclone Nargis was one of the most powerful disasters to hit Myanmar and Southeast Asia. Myanmar was criticized internationally for its allegedly slow effort in allowing international aid to enter into the country. This paper examines the criticism levelled against the ASEAN for its slow response in providing aid to the beleaguered in Myanmar and relates that criticism to ASEAN’s disaster management policy. It focuses on ASEAN’s engagement with Myanmar in order to allow humanitarian aid to flow into the country. The paper suggests that in time ASEAN will have to move from its doctrine of non-intervention in the affairs of a sovereign state to one of non-indifference if it wishes to remain relevant. Ultimately, ASEAN will have to re-evaluate its own goals in order to be a more successful apparatus for interstate and regional affairs, especially with respect to humanitarian crises brought about by natural disasters.

  5. GPS computer navigators to shorten EMS response and transport times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, F S; Muramatsu, R S; Yoshida, B H; Yamamoto, L G

    2001-05-01

    GPS (global positioning satellite system to determine one's position on earth) units have become inexpensive and compact. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a GPS enhanced computer street map navigator to improve the ability of EMS drivers in an urban setting to locate their destination and shorten response times. For part I, residential addresses in the city were randomly selected from a telephone directory. Two driver/navigator teams were assigned to drive to the address adhering to speed limits. One team used a standard street map, whereas the other team used a GPS computer navigator. The travel time and distance of the runs were compared. For part II, the computer GPS navigator was placed on an ambulance to supplement their normal methods of navigation to find the address requesting EMS. After the run was completed, EMS providers were interviewed to determine their opinion of whether the GPS navigator was helpful. For part I the results showed that in the 29 initial test runs, comparing the GPS team versus the standard map team, the mean distances traveled were 8.7 versus 9.0 kilometers (not significant) and the mean travel times were 13.5 versus 14.6 minutes (P=.02), respectively. The GPS team arrived faster in 72% runs. For part II the results showed that most EMS providers surveyed noted that the GPS computer navigator enhanced their ability to find the destination and all EMS providers acknowledged that it would enhance their ability to find a destination in an area in which they were unfamiliar. These results suggest that a portable GPS computer navigator system is helpful and can enhance the ability of prehospital care providers to locate their destination. Because these units are accurate and inexpensive, GPS computer navigators may be a valuable tool in reducing pre-hospital transport times.

  6. Timing and position response of a block detector for fast neutron time-of-flight imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, M. A.; Hayward, J. P.; Zhang, X.; Cates, J. W.

    2014-11-01

    Our research effort seeks to improve the spatial and timing performance of a block detector made of a pixilated plastic scintillator (EJ-200), first demonstrated as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Advanced Portable Neutron Imaging System. Improvement of the position and time response is necessary to achieve better resolution and contrast in the images of shielded special nuclear material. Time-of-flight is used to differentiate between gamma and different sources of neutrons (e.g., transmission and fission neutrons). Factors limiting the timing and position performance of the neutron detector have been revealed through simulations and measurements. Simulations have suggested that the degradation in the ability to resolve pixels in the neutron detector is due to those interactions occurring near the light guide. The energy deposition within the neutron detector is shown to affect position performance and imaging efficiency. This examination details how energy cuts improve the position performance and degrade the imaging efficiency. Measurements have shown the neutron detector to have a timing resolution of σ=238 ps. The majority of this timing uncertainty is from the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of the neutron which is confirmed by simulations and analytical calculations.

  7. Computation Offloading for Frame-Based Real-Time Tasks under Given Server Response Time Guarantees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas S. M. Toma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Computation offloading has been adopted to improve the performance of embedded systems by offloading the computation of some tasks, especially computation-intensive tasks, to servers or clouds. This paper explores computation offloading for real-time tasks in embedded systems, provided given response time guarantees from the servers, to decide which tasks should be offloaded to get the results in time. We consider frame-based real-time tasks with the same period and relative deadline. When the execution order of the tasks is given, the problem can be solved in linear time. However, when the execution order is not specified, we prove that the problem is NP-complete. We develop a pseudo-polynomial-time algorithm for deriving feasible schedules, if they exist.  An approximation scheme is also developed to trade the error made from the algorithm and the complexity. Our algorithms are extended to minimize the period/relative deadline of the tasks for performance maximization. The algorithms are evaluated with a case study for a surveillance system and synthesized benchmarks.

  8. Classification of magnons in rotated ferromagnetic Heisenberg model and their competing responses in transverse fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fadi; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study the rotated ferromagnetic Heisenberg model (RFHM) in two different transverse fields, hx and hz, which can be intuitively visualized as studying spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects in two-dimensional (2D) Ising or anisotropic X Y model in a transverse field. At a special SOC class, it was found in our previous work [Phys. Rev. A 92, 043609 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.043609] that the RFHM at a zero field owns an exact spin-orbit coupled ground state called the Y -x state. It supports not only the commensurate magnons (called C -C0 and C -Cπ ), but also the incommensurate magnons (called C-IC). These magnons are nonrelativistic, not embedded in the exact ground state, so need to be thermally excited or generated by various external probes. Their dramatic response under a longitudinal hy field was recently worked out by Sun et al. [arXiv:1502.05338]. Here we find they respond very differently under the two transverse fields. Any hx (hz) introduces quantum fluctuations to the ground state and changes the collinear Y -x state to a canted coplanar Y X -x (Y Z -x ) state. The C -C0,C -Cπ , and C-IC magnons become relativistic and sneak into the quantum ground state. We determine the competing boundaries among the C -C0,C -Cπ , and C-IC magnons, especially the detailed dispersions of the C-IC magnons inside the canted phases, which can be mapped out by the transverse spin structure factors. As hx (hz) increases further, the C -C0 magnons always win the competition and emerge as the seeds to drive a transition from the Y X -x (or Y Z -x ) to the ferromagnetic along the X (orZ ) direction called the X -FM (or Z -FM) phase. We show that the transition is in the 3D Ising universality class and it becomes the 3D X Y transition at the two Abelian points. We evaluate these magnons' contributions to magnetization and specific heat at low temperatures which can be measured by various established experimental techniques. The nature of the finite

  9. Reclaiming Spare Capacity and Improving Aperiodic Response Times in Real-Time Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scheduling recurring task sets that allow some instances of the tasks to be skipped produces holes in the schedule which are nonuniformly distributed. Similarly, when the recurring tasks are not strictly periodic but are sporadic, there is extra processor bandwidth arising because of irregular job arrivals. The additional computation capacity that results from skips or sporadic tasks can be reclaimed to service aperiodic task requests efficiently and quickly. We present techniques for improving the response times of aperiodic tasks by identifying nonuniformly distributed spare capacity—because of skips or sporadic tasks—in the schedule and adding such extra capacity to the capacity queue of a BASH server. These gaps can account for a significant portion of aperiodic capacity, and their reclamation results in considerable improvement to aperiodic response times. We present two schemes: NCLB-CBS, which performs well in periodic real-time environments with firm tasks, and NCLB-CUS, which can be deployed when the basic task set to schedule is sporadic. Evaluation via simulations and implementation suggests that performance improvements for aperiodic tasks can be obtained with limited additional overhead.

  10. Prairie forb response to timing of vole herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amy T; Howe, Henry F

    2009-05-01

    The timing of herbivory can be an important factor in the strength and direction of plant response to herbivore damage. To determine the effect of vole herbivory timing within a growing season on tallgrass prairie forbs, we used individual plant enclosures to limit vole access to three species, Desmanthus illinoensis, Echinacea purpurea, and Heliopsis helianthoides, in an experimental restoration in northern Illinois, USA. As part of a long-term experiment, we implemented five vole access treatments in 2003: (1) vole access for the entire growing season, (2) early-season access, (3) mid-season access, (4) late-season access, and (5) no vole access. We protected all plants from herbivory in the following growing season (2004) to test whether the effects of herbivory in one growing season carried over to the next. We also tested how restoration planting design, including seeding time (June or December) and density (35 or 350 seeds/m2 of each species) affected patterns of herbivory and plant recovery. Vole access for the entire growing season was most detrimental for the growth and reproduction of all three species. In contrast, vole access for a portion of the growing season had different effects on the three species: Desmanthus growth and reproduction was negatively affected by early-season access, Echinacea reproductive output was reduced by late-season access, and Heliopsis was not affected by early-, mid-, or late-season vole access. Negative effects of continual vole access carried over to the following growing season for Desmanthus and Heliopsis, but not for Echinacea. Effects of herbivory did not carry over to the next season for Echinacea and Heliopsis when plants were accessible to voles for only part of the growing season. In contrast, Desmanthus plants exposed to early-season herbivory in one year continued to produce fewer seeds per plant after being protected from vole herbivory for a growing season. Planting density and planting season had mixed effects

  11. Computerized assessment of pedophilic sexual interest through self-report and viewing time: reliability, validity, and classification accuracy of the affinity program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokros, Andreas; Gebhard, Michael; Heinz, Volker; Marschall, Roland W; Nitschke, Joachim; Glasgow, David V; Gress, Carmen L Z; Laws, D Richard

    2013-06-01

    Affinity is a computerized assessment tool that combines viewing time and self-report measures of sexual interest. The present study was designed to assess the diagnostic properties of Affinity with respect to sexual interest in prepubescent children. Reliability of both self-report and viewing time components was estimated to be high. The group profile of a sample of pedophilic adult male child molesters (n = 42, all of whom admitted their offenses) differed from the group profiles of male community controls (n = 95) and male nonsexual offenders (n = 27), respectively. More specifically, both ratings and viewing times for images showing small children or prejuvenile children were significantly higher within the child molester sample than in either of the other two groups, attesting to the validity of the measures. Overall classification accuracy, however, was mediocre: A multivariate classification routine yielded 50% sensitivity for child molester status at the cost of 13% false positives. The implications for forensic use of Affinity are discussed.

  12. Assembling the Anthropocene: deep-time perspective on the development of a lithostratigraphic classification of Anthropogenic deposits and excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, C. N.; Ford, J. R.; Price, S.; Cooper, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Human modification of the Earth's surface/subsurface is associated with artificial deposits (anthropogenic sedimentary units) and excavated ground (anthropogenic unconformities), analogous to ancient depositional systems. This study examines how artificial ground can be classified by the procedures used for natural deposits. Anthropogenic deposits have different characteristics to other parts of the stratigraphic column: 1) they vary greatly in lateral and vertical extent; 2) they are strictly allostratigraphic, i.e. defined and identified by bounding discontinuities, either unconformities (e.g. artificial deposits resting directly upon bedrock), disconformities (e.g. a time-gap between parallel artificial strata associated with non-deposition or reworking) or the present-day land surface; 3) many units have no overlying strata or bounding surface; 4) they are often poorly exposed, though associated landforms/geomorphology may show characteristic features that can aid definition. Artificial deposits comprise modified geologic materials, e.g. sand, clay, coal and novel anthropogenic materials, e.g. plastic, brick, glass. Such deposits are typically heterogeneous, the lithology determined for practical purposes by current/former landuse activity. BGS maps for the UK use a five-fold morpho-stratigraphic subdivision with no lithological attribution. An enhanced BGS scheme (Price et al. 2011) uses a three-tier hierarchy to describe the origin and landform of the deposit or excavation with lithology and age treated as additional attributes. Though based largely on geomorphlogical expression and genetic origin, the scheme can be used for classifying subsurface deposits lacking landform expression. Anthropogenic modification ('anthropoturbation') of rock and natural sediments, e.g. boreholes, tunnels and mineshafts, may extend to significant depths. Although indicating the extent of human influence they do not affect the classification of the stratigraphy; analogous to

  13. Multivariate Analyses and Classification of Inertial Sensor Data to Identify Aging Effects on the Timed-Up-and-Go Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danique Vervoort

    Full Text Available Many tests can crudely quantify age-related mobility decrease but instrumented versions of mobility tests could increase their specificity and sensitivity. The Timed-up-and-Go (TUG test includes several elements that people use in daily life. The test has different transition phases: rise from a chair, walk, 180° turn, walk back, turn, and sit-down on a chair. For this reason the TUG is an often used test to evaluate in a standardized way possible decline in balance and walking ability due to age and or pathology. Using inertial sensors, qualitative information about the performance of the sub-phases can provide more specific information about a decline in balance and walking ability. The first aim of our study was to identify variables extracted from the instrumented timed-up-and-go (iTUG that most effectively distinguished performance differences across age (age 18-75. Second, we determined the discriminative ability of those identified variables to classify a younger (age 18-45 and older age group (age 46-75. From healthy adults (n = 59, trunk accelerations and angular velocities were recorded during iTUG performance. iTUG phases were detected with wavelet-analysis. Using a Partial Least Square (PLS model, from the 72-iTUG variables calculated across phases, those that explained most of the covariance between variables and age were extracted. Subsequently, a PLS-discriminant analysis (DA assessed classification power of the identified iTUG variables to discriminate the age groups. 27 variables, related to turning, walking and the stand-to-sit movement explained 71% of the variation in age. The PLS-DA with these 27 variables showed a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 85%. Based on this model, the iTUG can accurately distinguish young and older adults. Such data can serve as a reference for pathological aging with respect to a widely used mobility test. Mobility tests like the TUG supplemented with smart technology could be used in

  14. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained.

  15. A Hidden Markov Models Approach for Crop Classification: Linking Crop Phenology to Time Series of Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Siachalou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation monitoring and mapping based on multi-temporal imagery has recently received much attention due to the plethora of medium-high spatial resolution satellites and the improved classification accuracies attained compared to uni-temporal approaches. Efficient image processing strategies are needed to exploit the phenological information present in temporal image sequences and to limit data redundancy and computational complexity. Within this framework, we implement the theory of Hidden Markov Models in crop classification, based on the time-series analysis of phenological states, inferred by a sequence of remote sensing observations. More specifically, we model the dynamics of vegetation over an agricultural area of Greece, characterized by spatio-temporal heterogeneity and small-sized fields, using RapidEye and Landsat ETM+ imagery. In addition, the classification performance of image sequences with variable spatial and temporal characteristics is evaluated and compared. The classification model considering one RapidEye and four pan-sharpened Landsat ETM+ images was found superior, resulting in a conditional kappa from 0.77 to 0.94 per class and an overall accuracy of 89.7%. The results highlight the potential of the method for operational crop mapping in Euro-Mediterranean areas and provide some hints for optimal image acquisition windows regarding major crop types in Greece.

  16. Sea-floor classification using multibeam echo-sounding angular backscatter data: A real-time approach employing hybrid neural network architecture

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.; Baracho, J.

    -consuming sea-floor exploration for offshore geological sampling purposes, a real-time classification approach is of paramount importance. Since ANN has the inherent nature of nonparametric learning, these techniques may have the potential for equal adaptation... scatter plot with respect to the incidence angles. Utilizing the sea-floor slopes, the beam angles are converted to incidence angles. The corrected backscattering strength values (in decibels) for each beam are binned in equal angular bins of 1 intervals...

  17. Object-Oriented Classification of Sugarcane Using Time-Series Middle-Resolution Remote Sensing Data Based on AdaBoost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Kangyu; Kuang, Zhaomin; Zhong, Shiquan; Song, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Most areas planted with sugarcane are located in southern China. However, remote sensing of sugarcane has been limited because useable remote sensing data are limited due to the cloudy climate of this region during the growing season and severe spectral mixing with other crops. In this study, we developed a methodology for automatically mapping sugarcane over large areas using time-series middle-resolution remote sensing data. For this purpose, two major techniques were used, the object-oriented method (OOM) and data mining (DM). In addition, time-series Chinese HJ-1 CCD images were obtained during the sugarcane growing period. Image objects were generated using a multi-resolution segmentation algorithm, and DM was implemented using the AdaBoost algorithm, which generated the prediction model. The prediction model was applied to the HJ-1 CCD time-series image objects, and then a map of the sugarcane planting area was produced. The classification accuracy was evaluated using independent field survey sampling points. The confusion matrix analysis showed that the overall classification accuracy reached 93.6% and that the Kappa coefficient was 0.85. Thus, the results showed that this method is feasible, efficient, and applicable for extrapolating the classification of other crops in large areas where the application of high-resolution remote sensing data is impractical due to financial considerations or because qualified images are limited.

  18. Object-Oriented Classification of Sugarcane Using Time-Series Middle-Resolution Remote Sensing Data Based on AdaBoost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhou

    Full Text Available Most areas planted with sugarcane are located in southern China. However, remote sensing of sugarcane has been limited because useable remote sensing data are limited due to the cloudy climate of this region during the growing season and severe spectral mixing with other crops. In this study, we developed a methodology for automatically mapping sugarcane over large areas using time-series middle-resolution remote sensing data. For this purpose, two major techniques were used, the object-oriented method (OOM and data mining (DM. In addition, time-series Chinese HJ-1 CCD images were obtained during the sugarcane growing period. Image objects were generated using a multi-resolution segmentation algorithm, and DM was implemented using the AdaBoost algorithm, which generated the prediction model. The prediction model was applied to the HJ-1 CCD time-series image objects, and then a map of the sugarcane planting area was produced. The classification accuracy was evaluated using independent field survey sampling points. The confusion matrix analysis showed that the overall classification accuracy reached 93.6% and that the Kappa coefficient was 0.85. Thus, the results showed that this method is feasible, efficient, and applicable for extrapolating the classification of other crops in large areas where the application of high-resolution remote sensing data is impractical due to financial considerations or because qualified images are limited.

  19. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  20. Security classification of information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quist, A.S.

    1989-09-01

    Certain governmental information must be classified for national security reasons. However, the national security benefits from classifying information are usually accompanied by significant costs -- those due to a citizenry not fully informed on governmental activities, the extra costs of operating classified programs and procuring classified materials (e.g., weapons), the losses to our nation when advances made in classified programs cannot be utilized in unclassified programs. The goal of a classification system should be to clearly identify that information which must be protected for national security reasons and to ensure that information not needing such protection is not classified. This document was prepared to help attain that goal. This document is the first of a planned four-volume work that comprehensively discusses the security classification of information. Volume 1 broadly describes the need for classification, the basis for classification, and the history of classification in the United States from colonial times until World War 2. Classification of information since World War 2, under Executive Orders and the Atomic Energy Acts of 1946 and 1954, is discussed in more detail, with particular emphasis on the classification of atomic energy information. Adverse impacts of classification are also described. Subsequent volumes will discuss classification principles, classification management, and the control of certain unclassified scientific and technical information. 340 refs., 6 tabs.

  1. Clicker response timings and their association with grades.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Classroom response systems, including single-function hardware devices known as “clickers” and systems that utilise multifunction mobile devices such as mobile phones, are widely used for education and training. In higher education there is a growing evidence-base showing how they can be used effectively to promote active learning in the classroom and the ubiquity of mobile device ownership amongst students is increasing the access that instructors have to these kinds of response systems. Rec...

  2. Response Time Evaluation for the Plant Protection System Using a Combined Technique of Analysis and Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Jae; Han, Seung; Yun, Jae Hee; Baek, Seung Min [KECO EnC, Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper proposes the response time evaluation methodology for the plant protection system (PPS) trip channel for the advance power reactor 1400 (APR1400) nuclear power plant. To demonstrate that the PPS tip channel is functioning within its allowable response time limit, the proposed methodology uses the combined technique of both the response time analysis and test. The main purpose of determining the trip setpoint for safety systems is to meet the requirement of an analytical limit assumed in performing safety analyses. In addition, the response time assumed during safety analyses shall also be satisfied by the safety-related instrumentation. The response time is another critical factor required to ensure that the safety-related instrumentation channels accept the crucial assumptions of safety analyses. The response time evaluation methodology proposed herein is applied to the low steam generator level (LSGL) reactor trip parameter for the APR1400. The response time analysis for the LSGL trip parameter demonstrated that the analyzed response time would not exceed the allocated response time. The results of the response time also showed that all of the measured response times would be less than the analyzed response time.

  3. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Teja Nukala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS. The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC, two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN, support vector machine (SVM, k-nearest neighbors (KNN and binary decision trees (BDT, based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  4. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y C

    2016-11-29

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  5. Limited information estimation of the diffusion-based item response theory model for responses and response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias; Szardenings, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Psychological tests are usually analysed with item response models. Recently, some alternative measurement models have been proposed that were derived from cognitive process models developed in experimental psychology. These models consider the responses but also the response times of the test takers. Two such models are the Q-diffusion model and the D-diffusion model. Both models can be calibrated with the diffIRT package of the R statistical environment via marginal maximum likelihood (MML) estimation. In this manuscript, an alternative approach to model calibration is proposed. The approach is based on weighted least squares estimation and parallels the standard estimation approach in structural equation modelling. Estimates are determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the observed and the implied covariance matrix. The estimator is simple to implement, consistent, and asymptotically normally distributed. Least squares estimation also provides a test of model fit by comparing the observed and implied covariance matrix. The estimator and the test of model fit are evaluated in a simulation study. Although parameter recovery is good, the estimator is less efficient than the MML estimator.

  6. Leveraging First Response Time into the Knowledge Tracing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutao; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The field of educational data mining has been using the Knowledge Tracing model, which only look at the correctness of student first response, for tracking student knowledge. Recently, lots of other features are studied to extend the Knowledge Tracing model to better model student knowledge. The goal of this paper is to analyze whether or not the…

  7. Timing and tuning for familiarity of cortical responses to faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Bobes

    Full Text Available Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms.

  8. Timing and tuning for familiarity of cortical responses to faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobes, Maria A; Lage Castellanos, Agustin; Quiñones, Ileana; García, Lorna; Valdes-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas) responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate) had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms.

  9. Supply chain planning classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvolby, Hans-Henrik; Trienekens, Jacques; Bonde, Hans

    2001-10-01

    Industry experience a need to shift in focus from internal production planning towards planning in the supply network. In this respect customer oriented thinking becomes almost a common good amongst companies in the supply network. An increase in the use of information technology is needed to enable companies to better tune their production planning with customers and suppliers. Information technology opportunities and supply chain planning systems facilitate companies to monitor and control their supplier network. In spite if these developments, most links in today's supply chains make individual plans, because the real demand information is not available throughout the chain. The current systems and processes of the supply chains are not designed to meet the requirements now placed upon them. For long term relationships with suppliers and customers, an integrated decision-making process is needed in order to obtain a satisfactory result for all parties. Especially when customized production and short lead-time is in focus. An effective value chain makes inventory available and visible among the value chain members, minimizes response time and optimizes total inventory value held throughout the chain. In this paper a supply chain planning classification grid is presented based current manufacturing classifications and supply chain planning initiatives.

  10. Real-time, real-space implementation of the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabana, K.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Iwata, J.-I.; Bertsch, G. F.

    We review our methods to calculate optical response of molecules in the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory. Three distinct formalisms which are implemented in the three-dimensional grid representation are explained in detail. They are the real-time method solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation in the time domain, the modified Sternheimer method which calculates the response to an external field of fixed frequency, and the matrix eigenvalue approach. We also illustrate treatments of the scattering boundary condition, needed to accurately describe photoionization processes. Finally, we show how the real-time formalism for molecules can be used to determine the response of infinite periodic systems.

  11. Real-time, real-space implementation of the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, K.; Nakatsukasa, T. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Iwata, J.I. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Bertsch, G.F. [Department of Physics and Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We review our methods to calculate optical response of molecules in the linear response time-dependent density-functional theory. Three distinct formalisms which are implemented in the three-dimensional grid representation are explained in detail. They are the real-time method solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation in the time domain, the modified Sternheimer method which calculates the response to an external field of fixed frequency, and the matrix eigenvalue approach. We also illustrate treatments of the scattering boundary condition, needed to accurately describe photoionization processes. Finally, we show how the real-time formalism for molecules can be used to determine the response of infinite periodic systems. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Processing of recognition information and additional cues: A model-based analysis of choice, confidence, and response time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Glockner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Research on the processing of recognition information has focused on testing the recognition heuristic (RH. On the aggregate, the noncompensatory use of recognition information postulated by the RH was rejected in several studies, while RH could still account for a considerable proportion of choices. These results can be explained if either a a part of the subjects used RH or b nobody used it but its choice predictions were accidentally in line with predictions of the strategy used. In the current study, which exemplifies a new approach to model testing, we determined individuals' decision strategies based on a maximum-likelihood classification method, taking into account choices, response times and confidence ratings simultaneously. Unlike most previous studies of the RH, our study tested the RH under conditions in which we provided information about cue values of unrecognized objects (which we argue is fairly common and thus of some interest. For 77.5% of the subjects, overall behavior was best explained by a compensatory parallel constraint satisfaction (PCS strategy. The proportion of subjects using an enhanced RH heuristic (RHe was negligible (up to 7.5%; 15% of the subjects seemed to use a take the best strategy (TTB. A more-fine grained analysis of the supplemental behavioral parameters conditional on strategy use supports PCS but calls into question process assumptions for apparent users of RH, RHe, and TTB within our experimental context. Our results are consistent with previous literature highlighting the importance of individual strategy classification as compared to aggregated analyses.

  13. Fertility in Gyr Cows (Bos indicus) with Fixed Time Artificial Insemination and Visual Estrus Detection Using a Classification Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Iglesia, Lilido Nelson; Roman Bravo, Rafael María; Díaz de Ramirez, Adelina; Torres, Leandro J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to compare two artificial insemination protocols (AIP): hormonal synchronization with fixed time artificial insemination (SC-FTAI) and the use of a table based on visual observation of estrus signs (VO) in order to identify cows in natural or spontaneous estrus being assigned to AI (NSE-IA). Two groups were formed: in the first group 109 cows were assigned to SC-FTAI, in which a commercial protocol is used; the second one included 108 randomly chosen cows, which were assigned to NSE-AI and in this group a modified table was used. Response variable was first service fertility rate (FSF), which was coded 1 for pregnant and 0 for empty. Predictor variables were AIP, postpartum anestrus, daily milk yield, body condition score at AI and calving number. Statistical analyses included association chi-square tests and logistic regression. Results showed an overall 41.94% FSF and a significant association was detected (P 0.05). The odds ratio for the effect of AIP was only 1.050, suggesting no differences in FSF between groups. The NSE-AI protocol can enhance both the technique of VO and reproductive efficiency. Further validation of the table is required. PMID:26464929

  14. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiz, Mary Rose [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  15. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations; this provides a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively higher response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to prolong transit time.

  16. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations to provide a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively longer response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to contribute to prolong transit time.

  17. Association timed "up and go" test with respect to gross motor function classification system level in children diagnosed as cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjivani N Dhote; Suvarna S Ganvir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Timed "up and go" (TUG) test is a quick test, used in clinical practice as an outcome measure to assess functional ambulatory mobility or dynamic balance in adults. However, little information is available of TUG test used in cerebral palsy (CP). Hence, the purpose of our study was to find score of TUG with respect to gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) in CP children. Aims: To find the mean score of TUG test with respect to GMFCS level in children diagnosed as CP. ...

  18. A theoretical model for fluvial channel response time during time-dependent climatic and tectonic forcing and its inverse applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Liran

    2016-10-01

    The fluvial response time dictates the duration of fluvial channel adjustment in response to changing climatic and tectonic conditions. However, when these conditions vary continuously, the channel cannot equilibrate and the response time is not well defined. Here I develop an analytical solution to the linear stream power model of fluvial incision that predicts the channel topography as a function of time-dependent climatic and tectonic conditions. From this solution, a general definition of the fluvial response time emerges: the duration over which the tectonic history needs to be known to evaluate channel topography. This new definition is used in linear inversion schemes for inferring climatic or tectonic histories from river long profiles. The analytic solution further reveals that high-frequency climatic oscillations, such as Milankovitch cycles, are not expected to leave significant fingerprints on the long profiles of fluvially incised detachment-limited rivers.

  19. Change in response time of stroke patients and controls during rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner-Bitensky, N; Mayo, N E; Kaizer, F

    1990-02-01

    In this study we investigated motor response times of stroke patients at admission to a rehabilitation hospital and again after 6 wk of hospitalization. A prospective comparative study was carried out on 164 stroke patients; 48 hospitalized patients served as controls. Mean motor response times to visual stimuli presented in the left and right visual fields and to centrally presented stimuli were studied. The principle finding was that stroke patients improved significantly in their response times from initial to final evaluation. While at initial assessment they performed significantly more slowly than controls, by final assessment the response times of the two groups did not differ. Visual hemineglect influenced change in response time differentially depending on side of lesion: right hemisphere lesion patients with neglect improved, whereas left hemisphere lesion patients with neglect actually deteriorated. The presence of depression influenced right hemisphere lesion patients' response times and change in response times but it did not have any influence for left hemisphere lesion patients. The findings that response time generally improved during rehabilitation has important implications for the treatment of individuals with brain injury. It will be important to identify therapeutic practices which will be effective in the remediation of response time for all patients. Ultimately the goal of intervening in slow response time is to improve performance of functional activities which are influenced by an individual's ability to respond to visual stimuli.

  20. 40 CFR 1601.24 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....24 Section 1601.24 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD... an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual; (ii) An urgency to inform the... paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section, if not a full-time member of the news media, must establish that he...

  1. Time-Varying Affective Response for Humanoid Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkina, Lilia; Arkin, Ronald C.; Lee, Jamee K.; Jung, Hyunryong

    This paper describes the design of a complex time-varying affective architecture. It is an expansion of the TAME architecture (traits, attitudes, moods, and emotions) as applied to humanoid robotics. It particular it is intended to promote effective human-robot interaction by conveying the robot’s affective state to the user in an easy-to-interpret manner.

  2. 4 CFR 201.7 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 201.7 Timing of... disclosed in part shall be marked or annotated to show the amount of information deleted unless doing so would harm an interest protected by an applicable exemption. The location of the information...

  3. Time series analysis of physiological response during ICU visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, J T; Hendrickson, S G; Lopez, J

    1994-12-01

    Time series analysis (TSA) is an important statistical procedure for clinical nursing research. The current paucity of nursing research reports using TSA may be due to unfamiliarity with this technique. In this article, TSA is compared with the ordinary least squares regression model; validity concerns of time series designs are discussed; and concomitant and interrupted TSA of data collected on the effects of family visitation on intracranial pressure (ICP), heart rate, and blood pressure of patients in ICUs are presented. The concomitant TSA of the effect of family on ICP suggested that family presence tended to be associated with decreased ICP. Interrupted TSA indicated the effect of family on heart rate and blood pressure was not as consistent: The overall effect on blood pressure appeared to be negligible, and heart rate may increase overall. Restrictive visiting policies, once typical of intensive care units, should be reconsidered.

  4. The time response function of spark counters and RPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobbi, A. E-mail: a.gobbi@gsi.de; Mangiarotti, A. E-mail: mangiaro@fi.infn.it

    2003-08-01

    The fluctuation theory for the avalanche growth with and without space charge effects is briefly summarized and compared to a broad field of applications. These include spark counters as well as timing and trigger RPCs operated in avalanche mode. A large domain in electrical field strength, pressure, gap size and gas mixture type is covered. A reasonable agreement with the experiment is observed, giving confidence on the validity of both assumptions and treatment of the theory.

  5. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.; Guo, Fanmin

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian procedu

  6. Development and application of single-tube multiplex real-time PCR for lineage classification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on large sequence polymorphism in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Hanchaina, Rattanavinan; Sangka, Arunnee; Namwat, Wises; Lulitanond, Viraphong

    2015-07-01

    An appreciation of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is needed for effective planning of strategies in tuberculosis (TB) control. Large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs) are the molecular epidemiological and evolutionary markers for classification of Mtb into East Asian (EA) or Beijing, Indo-Oceanic (IO), Euro-American (EuA) and East African-Indian (EAI) lineages. We aimed to develop a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay using melting curve analysis for lineage classification of Mtb based on LSPs. The technique was optimized and tested with well-characterized strains (n = 89). The developed technique was then applied to classify Mtb isolates from TB patients (n = 256) randomly recruited from 19 provinces covering Northeast Thailand in 2013-2014. The technique demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity based on well-characterized strains compared to conventional techniques. The detection limit of the technique is 0.05 ng of genomic DNA of Mtb. The 256 Mtb isolates represented IO (n = 178, 70%), Beijing (n = 60, 23%) and EuA (n = 18, 7%) lineages. Significant associations of the Beijing lineage with drug resistance (p < 0.001) and younger average age of TB patients (p < 0.001) compared to other lineages were shown. The single-tube multiplex real-time PCR technique provides a simple, rapid and high performance tool for characterizing Mtb based on LSPs.

  7. A hybrid model for improving response time in distributed data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Shonali; Loke, Seng W; Zaslasvky, Arkady

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents a hybrid distributed data mining (DDM) model for optimization of response time. The model combines a mobile agent approach with client server strategies to reduce the overall response time. The hybrid model proposes and develops accurate a priori estimates of the computation and communication components of response time as the costing strategy to support optimization. Experimental evaluation of the hybrid model is presented.

  8. Do Young and Old Preschoolers Exhibit Response Bias Due to Different Mechanisms? Investigating Children's Response Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that younger preschoolers exhibit a yes bias due to underdeveloped cognitive abilities, whereas older preschoolers exhibit a response bias due to other factors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the response latency to yes-no questions pertaining to familiar and unfamiliar objects in 3- to 6-year-olds. The…

  9. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yuren

    2016-01-01

    To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers’ perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers’ vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second). A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers’ perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers’ perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers’ perception-response time. PMID:28042851

  10. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers’ perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers’ vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second. A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers’ perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers’ perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers’ perception-response time.

  11. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yuren

    2016-12-30

    To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers' perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers' vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second). A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers' perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers' perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers' perception-response time.

  12. Classification of small lesions in dynamic breast MRI: Eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation through spatio-temporal analysis of contrast enhancement over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Huber, Markus B; Schlossbauer, Thomas; Leinsinger, Gerda; Krol, Andrzej; Wismüller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Characterizing the dignity of breast lesions as benign or malignant is specifically difficult for small lesions; they don't exhibit typical characteristics of malignancy and are harder to segment since margins are harder to visualize. Previous attempts at using dynamic or morphologic criteria to classify small lesions (mean lesion diameter of about 1 cm) have not yielded satisfactory results. The goal of this work was to improve the classification performance in such small diagnostically challenging lesions while concurrently eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation. To this end, we introduce a method for topological characterization of lesion enhancement patterns over time. Three Minkowski Functionals were extracted from all five post-contrast images of sixty annotated lesions on dynamic breast MRI exams. For each Minkowski Functional, topological features extracted from each post-contrast image of the lesions were combined into a high-dimensional texture feature vector. These feature vectors were classified in a machine learning task with support vector regression. For comparison, conventional Haralick texture features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were also used. A new method for extracting thresholded GLCM features was also introduced and investigated here. The best classification performance was observed with Minkowski Functionals area and perimeter, thresholded GLCM features f8 and f9, and conventional GLCM features f4 and f6. However, both Minkowski Functionals and thresholded GLCM achieved such results without lesion segmentation while the performance of GLCM features significantly deteriorated when lesions were not segmented (p < 0.05). This suggests that such advanced spatio-temporal characterization can improve the classification performance achieved in such small lesions, while simultaneously eliminating the need for precise segmentation.

  13. 基于时序上下文的视频场景分类%Video classification based on time series contextual informa-tion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭太乐; 张文俊; 丁友东; 郭桂芳

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of traditional bag of word model, according to the spatial and semantic similarity between the key frames of adjacent lens, this paper brings a new video scene classification model. It divides video clips into many shots and extracts their key frames and makes the key frames a gauge. The next thing is that the key frames as an image block produces an image on time sequence. SIFT features and HSV feature are extracted. This paper embeds the SIFT features and HSV feature data into Hilbert space. Through multi kernel learning, the algorithm selects the appropriate kernel func-tions to train each image, and gets the classification model. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm for video classi-fication can achieve better performance.%以传统的词袋模型为基础,根据相邻镜头关键帧之间具有相关性的特点提出了一种用于视频场景分类的模型。将视频片段进行分割,提取关键帧,对关键帧图像归一化。将关键帧图像作为图像块以时序关系合成新图像,提取新图像的SIFT特征及HSV颜色特征,将图像的SIFT特征及HSV颜色特征数据映射到希尔伯特空间。通过多核学习,选取合适的核函数组对每个图像进行训练,得到分类模型。通过对多种视频进行实验,实验结果表明,该方法在视频场景分类中能取得很好的效果。

  14. Runoff response time of a loosely defined supraglacial microbasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Scott Munro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A micrometeorological experiment was conducted in the summer of 2008, at Peyto Glacier, during four meltwater production periods of 1, 3, 4 and 5 days duration, the last two days marked by late summer snow cover. The data include a breakdown of net radiation into its short- and long-wave components, as well as wind speed, temperature and humidity profile data for use in bulk transfer estimates of sensible heat and moisture transfer. In addition, a hydrological experiment was conducted, the data comprising sonic sounder measurements of ablation and stage level records of discharge from a supraglacial microbasin. As expected, the ratio of daily average runoff flow measurement to energy budget flow estimates is less than one on most days because of weathering crust development. Also, the conversion of stage level data into discharge from a supraglacial catchment presents challenges, notably defining the area of a loosely defined basin and specifying stage level on a downward moving surface. Nevertheless, it is clear that peak discharge lags peak meltwater energy input by periods of four to six hours. A suitably lagged flow estimate can be achieved by passing the flow through a simple storage reservoir, using delay times of 14.5, 15, 7.5 and 9 h for each respective measurement period. This suggests that a substantial part of the delay in runoff from a glacier basin is tied up in ice surface hydrological processes.

  15. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on hamstrings' response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Francisco; De Ste Croix, Mark; Sainz de Baranda, Pilar; Santonja, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to (a) investigate acute effects of static and dynamic lower limb stretching routines on total response time, pre-motor time and motor time of the medial and lateral hamstrings during maximal eccentric isokinetic knee flexion; and (b) determine whether static and dynamic routines elicit similar responses. A total of 38 active adults completed the following intervention protocols in a randomised order on separate days: (a) non-stretching (control condition), (b) static stretching and (c) dynamic stretching. After the stretching or control intervention, total response time, pre-motor time and motor time of the medial and lateral hamstrings were assessed during eccentric knee flexion movements with participants prone. Measures were compared via a mixed-design factorial ANOVA. There were no main effects for total response time, pre-motor time and motor time. The results suggest that dynamic and static stretching has no influence on hamstrings response times (total response time, pre-motor time and motor time) and hence neither form of stretching reduces this primary risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  16. On the physical origin of tails in the time response of spark counters

    CERN Document Server

    Mangiarotti, A

    2002-01-01

    The time response function of a spark counter is calculated considering that the time delay and its fluctuations originate from the avalanche growth, under space charge effects. The deduced asymmetric time response probability density displays a peak and a tail which both correlate with an increase of the overall time delay. From a comparison to experiment, it is shown that the calculations can reproduce the general trends of the measurements.

  17. On the physical origin of tails in the time response of spark counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. E-mail: mangiaro@fi.infn.it; Gobbi, A. E-mail: a.gobbi@gsi.de

    2002-04-11

    The time response function of a spark counter is calculated considering that the time delay and its fluctuations originate from the avalanche growth, under space charge effects. The deduced asymmetric time response probability density displays a peak and a tail which both correlate with an increase of the overall time delay. From a comparison to experiment, it is shown that the calculations can reproduce the general trends of the measurements.

  18. Response

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Neuromorphic silicon chips have been developed over the last 30 years, inspired by the design of biological nervous systems and offering an alternative paradigm for computation, with real-time massively parallel operation and potentially large power savings with respect to conventional computing architectures. I will present the general principles with a brief investigation of the design choices that have been explored, and I'll discuss how such hardware has been applied to problems such as classification.

  19. If climate action becomes urgent: The importance of response times for various climate strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, D.P.; Stehfest, E.

    2013-01-01

    Most deliberations on climate policy are based on a mitigation response that assumes a gradually increasing reduction over time. However, situations may occur where a more urgent response is needed. A key question for climate policy in general, but even more in the case a rapid response is needed, i

  20. Delayed system response times affect immediate physiology and the dynamics of subsequent button press behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrs, Christin; Hrabal, David; Angenstein, Nicole; Brechmann, André

    2014-11-01

    System response time research is an important issue in human-computer interactions. Experience with technical devices and general rules of human-human interactions determine the user's expectation, and any delay in system response time may lead to immediate physiological, emotional, and behavioral consequences. We investigated such effects on a trial-by-trial basis during a human-computer interaction by measuring changes in skin conductance (SC), heart rate (HR), and the dynamics of button press responses. We found an increase in SC and a deceleration of HR for all three delayed system response times (0.5, 1, 2 s). Moreover, the data on button press dynamics was highly informative since subjects repeated a button press with more force in response to delayed system response times. Furthermore, the button press dynamics could distinguish between correct and incorrect decisions and may thus even be used to infer the uncertainty of a user's decision.

  1. Classification of Satellite Derived Chlorophyll a Space-Time Series by Means of Quantile Regression: An Application to the Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, P.; Pastres, R.; Gaetan, C.; Mangin, A.; Taji, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a classification of Adriatic waters, based on spatial time series of remotely sensed Chlorophyll type-a. The study was carried out using a clustering procedure combining quantile smoothing and an agglomerative clustering algorithms. The smoothing function includes a seasonal term, thus allowing one to classify areas according to “similar” seasonal evolution, as well as according to “similar” trends. This methodology, which is here applied for the first time to Ocean Colour data, is more robust with respect to other classical methods, as it does not require any assumption on the probability distribution of the data. This approach was applied to the classification of an eleven year long time series, from January 2002 to December 2012, of monthly values of Chlorophyll type-a concentrations covering the whole Adriatic Sea. The data set was made available by ACRI (http://hermes.acri.fr) in the framework of the Glob-Colour Project (http://www.globcolour.info). Data were obtained by calibrating Ocean Colour data provided by different satellite missions, such as MERIS, SeaWiFS and MODIS. The results clearly show the presence of North-South and West-East gradient in the level of Chlorophyll, which is consistent with literature findings. This analysis could provide a sound basis for the identification of “water bodies” and of Chlorophyll type-a thresholds which define their Good Ecological Status, in terms of trophic level, as required by the implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. The forthcoming availability of Sentinel-3 OLCI data, in continuity of the previous missions, and with perspective of more than a 15-year monitoring system, offers a real opportunity of expansion of our study as a strong support to the implementation of both the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the UNEP-MAP Ecosystem Approach in the Mediterranean.

  2. Group classification of the Sachs equations for a radiating axisymmetric, non-rotating, vacuum space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, N H; Wessels, E J H; Ellis, George F. R.; Ibragimov, Nail H.; Wessels, Ewald J. H.

    2006-01-01

    We carry out a Lie group analysis of the Sachs equations for a time-dependent axisymmetric non-rotating space-time in which the Ricci tensor vanishes. These equations, which are the first two members of the set of Newman-Penrose equations, define the characteristic initial-value problem for the space-time. We find a particular form for the initial data such that these equations admit a Lie symmetry, and so defines a geometrically special class of such spacetimes. These should additionally be of particular physical interest because of this special geometric feature.

  3. A Time Series Regime Classification Approach for Short-Term Forecasting; Identificacion de Mecanismos en Series Temporales para la Prediccion a Corto Plazo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, C. J.

    2010-03-08

    Abstract: This technical report is focused on the analysis of stochastic processes that switch between different dynamics (also called regimes or mechanisms) over time. The so-called Switching-regime models consider several underlying functions instead of one. In this case, a classification problem arises as the current regime has to be assessed at each time-step. The identification of the regimes allows the performance of regime-switching models for short-term forecasting purposes. Within this framework, identifying different regimes showed by time-series is the aim of this work. The proposed approach is based on a statistical tool called Gamma-test. One of the main advantages of this methodology is the absence of a mathematical definition for the different underlying functions. Applications with both simulated and real wind power data have been considered. Results on simulated time series show that regimes can be successfully identified under certain hypothesis. Nevertheless, this work highlights that further research has to be done when considering real wind power time-series, which usually show different behaviours (e.g. fluctuations or ramps, followed by low variance periods). A better understanding of these events eventually will improve wind power forecasting. (Author) 15 refs.

  4. Association timed "up and go" test with respect to gross motor function classification system level in children diagnosed as cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjivani N Dhote

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Timed "up and go" (TUG test is a quick test, used in clinical practice as an outcome measure to assess functional ambulatory mobility or dynamic balance in adults. However, little information is available of TUG test used in cerebral palsy (CP. Hence, the purpose of our study was to find score of TUG with respect to gross motor function classification system (GMFCS in CP children. Aims: To find the mean score of TUG test with respect to GMFCS level in children diagnosed as CP. Materials and Methods: It was a cross-sectional observational study conducted in neuro rehabilitation unit and included 30 CP children of 4-12 years, those within GMFCS level I, II, III, and IQ ≥50. The sampling technique used was purposive sampling excluding children with cognitive deficit. Subjects performed on TUG on three occasions: Initial assessment (time 1; 30 min after initial assessment (time 2; 1 week after initial assessment (time 3. Three trials were conducted for each of the three occasions. A mean score of three trials was documented as final score. The mean of scores of TUG test of all the subjects within the particular GMFCS levels was calculated. Results: Significant variation was seen in the TUG score for three levels of GMFCS. Conclusions: Significant variation was seen as GMFCS levels get increases time duration of TUG also increases.

  5. Short Text Classification: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Song

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the recent explosive growth of e-commerce and online communication, a new genre of text, short text, has been extensively applied in many areas. So many researches focus on short text mining. It is a challenge to classify the short text owing to its natural characters, such as sparseness, large-scale, immediacy, non-standardization. It is difficult for traditional methods to deal with short text classification mainly because too limited words in short text cannot represent the feature space and the relationship between words and documents. Several researches and reviews on text classification are shown in recent times. However, only a few of researches focus on short text classification. This paper discusses the characters of short text and the difficulty of short text classification. Then we introduce the existing popular works on short text classifiers and models, including short text classification using sematic analysis, semi-supervised short text classification, ensemble short text classification, and real-time classification. The evaluations of short text classification are analyzed in our paper. Finally we summarize the existing classification technology and prospect for development trend of short text classification

  6. From sensation to perception: Using multivariate classification of visual illusions to identify neural correlates of conscious awareness in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoorn, Hinze

    2015-01-01

    An important goal of cognitive neuroscience is understanding the neural underpinnings of conscious awareness. Although the low-level processing of sensory input is well understood in most modalities, it remains a challenge to understand how the brain translates such input into conscious awareness. Here, I argue that the application of multivariate pattern classification techniques to neuroimaging data acquired while observers experience perceptual illusions provides a unique way to dissociate sensory mechanisms from mechanisms underlying conscious awareness. Using this approach, it is possible to directly compare patterns of neural activity that correspond to the contents of awareness, independent from changes in sensory input, and to track these neural representations over time at high temporal resolution. I highlight five recent studies using this approach, and provide practical considerations and limitations for future implementations.

  7. An automated sleep-state classification algorithm for quantifying sleep timing and sleep-dependent dynamics of electroencephalographic and cerebral metabolic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempe MJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Rempe,1,2 William C Clegern,2 Jonathan P Wisor2 1Mathematics and Computer Science, Whitworth University, Spokane, WA, USA; 2College of Medical Sciences and Sleep and Performance Research Center, Washington State University, Spokane, WA, USAIntroduction: Rodent sleep research uses electroencephalography (EEG and electromyography (EMG to determine the sleep state of an animal at any given time. EEG and EMG signals, typically sampled at >100 Hz, are segmented arbitrarily into epochs of equal duration (usually 2–10 seconds, and each epoch is scored as wake, slow-wave sleep (SWS, or rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS, on the basis of visual inspection. Automated state scoring can minimize the burden associated with state and thereby facilitate the use of shorter epoch durations.Methods: We developed a semiautomated state-scoring procedure that uses a combination of principal component analysis and naïve Bayes classification, with the EEG and EMG as inputs. We validated this algorithm against human-scored sleep-state scoring of data from C57BL/6J and BALB/CJ mice. We then applied a general homeostatic model to characterize the state-dependent dynamics of sleep slow-wave activity and cerebral glycolytic flux, measured as lactate concentration.Results: More than 89% of epochs scored as wake or SWS by the human were scored as the same state by the machine, whether scoring in 2-second or 10-second epochs. The majority of epochs scored as REMS by the human were also scored as REMS by the machine. However, of epochs scored as REMS by the human, more than 10% were scored as SWS by the machine and 18 (10-second epochs to 28% (2-second epochs were scored as wake. These biases were not strain-specific, as strain differences in sleep-state timing relative to the light/dark cycle, EEG power spectral profiles, and the homeostatic dynamics of both slow waves and lactate were detected equally effectively with the automated method or the manual scoring

  8. Relationship Between Time Consumption and Quality of Responses to Drug-related Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda; Lydersen, Stian; Schjøtt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to assess the quality of responses produced by drug information centers (DICs) in Scandinavia, and to study the association between time consumption processing queries and the quality of the responses. Methods We posed six identical drug-related queries to seven...... DICs in Scandinavia, and the time consumption required for processing them was estimated. Clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and general practitioners (external experts) reviewed responses individually. We used mixed model linear regression analyses to study the associations between time...... consumption on one hand and the summarized quality scores and the overall impression of the responses on the other hand. Findings Both expert groups generally assessed the quality of the responses as “satisfactory” to “good.” A few responses were criticized for being poorly synthesized and less relevant...

  9. Flushing time as a descriptor for heavily modified water bodies classification and management: application to the Huelva Harbour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sámano, María Luisa; Bárcena, Javier F; García, Andrés; Gómez, Aina G; Álvarez, César; Revilla, José Antonio

    2012-09-30

    Since the flushing time is a physical descriptor used to distinguish between different types of heavily modified water bodies (HMWB), the establishment of a methodology for its calculation becomes important. In order to achieve this task, a methodological procedure involving the tide mean value and variable river flow values is proposed. The hydrodynamics were assessed using a two-dimensional model which integrates the depth-averaged mass and momentum equations in the time and space domains and includes a wet-dry point treatment method. The hydrodynamic model calibration and validation were performed on the basis of tidal gauge and velocity current measurements. A reasonable agreement with the field measurements of water elevation and velocity were achieved. On the other hand, a two-dimensional mathematical model, which solves the depth-averaged advection-diffusion equation, was properly calibrated and used to evaluate the behaviour of a conservative tracer within a water body. The transport model calibration was developed according to the field survey data carried out during late spring when the rivers flows are low. This study allowed the flushing time estimation under four scenarios showing that only the estuarine mouth presents a high renewal rate because the current velocities are higher. For heavy rain periods, a flushing time decrease was observed as river flows modify the circulation in the main channel. Neglecting the river forcing was found to be valid for the dry period.

  10. A new method for measuring the response time of the high pressure ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhentao; Shen, Yixiong; An, Jigang

    2012-08-01

    Time response is an important performance characteristic for gas-pressurized ionization chambers. To study the time response, it is especially crucial to measure the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to study the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. It is carried out with a short-pulsed X-ray source and a high-speed digitizer. The ion drift time in the chamber is then determined from the digitized data. By measuring the ion drift time of a 15 atm xenon testing chamber, the method has been proven to be effective in the time response studies of ionization chambers.

  11. Next-Generation Library Catalogs and the Problem of Slow Response Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Brown-Sica

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Response time as defined for this study is the time that it takes for all files that constitute a single webpage to travel across the Internet from a Web server to the end user’s browser. In this study, the authors tested response times on queries for identical items in five different library catalogs, one of them a next-generation (NextGen catalog. The authors also discuss acceptable response time and how it may affect the discovery process. They suggest that librarians and vendors should develop standards for acceptable response time and use it in the product selection and development processes.

  12. The classification of static electro--vacuum space--times containing an asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurface with compact interior

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T; Chrusciel, Piotr T.; Tod, Paul

    2005-01-01

    We show that static electro--vacuum black hole space--times containing an asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurface with compact interior and with both degenerate and non--degenerate components of the event horizon do not exist. This is done by a careful study of the near-horizon geometry of degenerate horizons, which allows us to eliminate the last restriction of the static electro-vacuum no-hair theory.

  13. Nonlinear response to a click in a time-domain model of the mammalian ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaud, Julien; Lemons, Charlsie

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a state-space implementation of a previously developed frequency-domain model of the cochlea is coupled to a lumped parameter model of the middle ear. After validation of the time-domain model by comparison of its steady-state response to results obtained with a frequency-domain formulation, the nonlinear response of the cochlea to clicks is investigated. As observed experimentally, a compressive nonlinearity progressively develops within the first few cycles of the response of the basilar membrane (BM). Furthermore, a time-frequency analysis shows that the instantaneous frequency of the BM response to a click progressively approaches the characteristic frequency. This phenomenon, called glide, is predicted at all stimulus intensities, as in experiments. In typical experiments with sensitive animals, the click response is characterized by a long ringing and the response envelope includes several lobes. In order to achieve similar results, inhomogeneities are introduced in the cochlear model. Simulations demonstrate the strong link between characteristics of the frequency response, such as dispersion and frequency-dependent nonlinearity, and characteristics of the time-domain response, such as the glide and a time-dependent nonlinearity. The progressive buildup of cochlear nonlinearity in response to a click is shown to be a consequence of the glide and of frequency-dependent nonlinearity.

  14. Improving Student Question Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

  15. A new design criterion and construction method for space-time trellis codes based on classification of error events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The known design criterions of Space-Time Trellis Codes (STTC) on slow Rayleigh fading channel are rank, determinant and trace criterion. These criterions are not advantageous not only in operation but also in performance. With classifying the error events of STTC, a new criterion was presented on slow Rayleigh fading channels. Based on the criterion, an effective and straightforward multi-step method is proposed to construct codes with better performance. This method can reduce the computation of search to small enough. Simulation results show that the codes searched by computer have the same or even better performance than the reported codes.

  16. A low-cost single-board solution for real-time, unsupervised waveform classification of multineuron recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiter, A K; Aertsen, A M; Gerstein, G L

    1989-10-01

    We describe a low-cost single-board system for unsupervised, real-time spike sorting of recordings from a number of neurons on a single microelectrode. The maximum number of spike classes depends on the quality of the recording; it will typically be between 2 and 5. The spike sorter communicates with a conventional microcomputer through a standard serial port (RS232). For typical firing rates as measured in the mammalian central nervous system, this set-up will accommodate up to some 10 parallel spike sorters for as many separate microelectrodes.

  17. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Classification of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase Gene (blaKPC) Variants▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liang; Mediavilla, José R.; Endimiani, Andrea; Rosenthal, Marnie E.; Zhao, Yanan; Robert A Bonomo; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2011-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance mediated by plasmid-borne Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC) is an emerging problem of significant clinical importance in Gram-negative bacteria. Multiple KPC gene variants (blaKPC) have been reported, with KPC-2 (blaKPC-2) and KPC-3 (blaKPC-3) associated with epidemic outbreaks in New York City and various international settings. Here, we describe the development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay using molecular beacons (MB-PCR) for rapid and accurate identific...

  18. Classification of stevia sweeteners in soft drinks using liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakigi, Y; Suzuki, T; Icho, T; Uyama, A; Mochizuki, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the characterisation of stevia sweeteners in soft drinks. By using LC and time-of-flight MS, we detected 30 steviol glycosides from nine stevia sweeteners. The mass spectral data of these compounds were applied to the analysis to determine steviol glycosides in nine soft drinks. On the basis of chromatographic data and principal-component analysis, these soft drinks were classified into three groups, and the soft drinks of each group, respectively, contained high-rebaudioside A extract, normal stevia extract or alfa-glucosyltransferase-treated stevia extract.

  19. Concept mediation in trilingual translation: evidence from response time and repetition priming patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Wendy S; Gallard, Sabrina L K

    2005-12-01

    Translation responses to individual words were elicited from 48 English-Spanish-French trilinguals, who translated in six directions at study and two directions at test. Patterns of translation response times and error rates at study reflected the relative proficiency of the trilinguals in comprehension and production of their three languages. At test, repeated items were translated more quickly than new items, with the strongest priming effects occurring for identical repetitions. Repetition priming was also substantial when only the stimulus language or only the response language matched from study to test, implying that repeated comprehension and production processes contribute to priming in translation. Patterns of response times and repetition priming indicate that translation in all directions involved conceptual access. Additive patterns in response time asymmetries and repetition priming were consistent with the treatment of word comprehension and production processes of translation as independent.

  20. Time Domain Simulation of Transient Responses of Very Large Floating Structures Under Unsteady External Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Liu-chao; LIU Hua

    2005-01-01

    A time domain finite element method (FEM) for the analysis of transient elastic response of a very large floating structure (VLFS) subjected to arbitrary time-dependent external loads is presented. This method is developed directly in time domain and the hydrodynamic problem is formulated based on linear, inviscid and slightly compressible fluid theory and the structural response is analyzed on the thin plate assumption. The time domain finite element procedure herein is validated by comparing numerical results with available experimental data. Finally, the transient elastic response of a pontoon-type VLFS under the landing of an airplane is computed by the proposed time domain FEM. The time histories of the applied force and the position and velocity of an airplane during landing are modeled with data from a Boeing 747-400 jumbo jet.

  1. Multiple Feature Fusion Based on Co-Training Approach and Time Regularization for Place Classification in Wearable Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislavs Dovgalecs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of video acquired with a wearable camera is a challenge that multimedia community is facing with the proliferation of such sensors in various applications. In this paper, we focus on the problem of automatic visual place recognition in a weakly constrained environment, targeting the indexing of video streams by topological place recognition. We propose to combine several machine learning approaches in a time regularized framework for image-based place recognition indoors. The framework combines the power of multiple visual cues and integrates the temporal continuity information of video. We extend it with computationally efficient semisupervised method leveraging unlabeled video sequences for an improved indexing performance. The proposed approach was applied on challenging video corpora. Experiments on a public and a real-world video sequence databases show the gain brought by the different stages of the method.

  2. Low Cost Em Signal Spectral Analysis with Two Element Time Modulated Array System by Multiple Signal Classification Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Balagurappa,

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Today homeland security is a big matter of concern. The present day wireless technology is available to anti-social elements, who are using this in several undesirable manners. By knowing the direction of the source of electromagnetic waves it becomes possible to locate such anti-social groups and take offensive action. In military applications also finding the direction of the signal source becomes very valuable information. The direction finding systems can achieve this goal. Conventional radio direction finding (RDF systems often use an array of two or more antennas and use either phase-comparison or amplitude-comparison of the received signals to determine direction of arrival information. In both of these techniques directional information is derived by processing array data at the receive signal frequency. In this project an alternative approach to direction finding using the concept of a time-switched array is proposed. The time-switched array system uses simple signal processing techniques to provide a directional main beam and pattern nulls at harmonic frequencies. To determine two dimensional angles is three elements, the system cost has been mostly minimised. we now consider the problem of using our low cost system to detect and estimate the direction of arrival of a desired signal in the presence of array antenna. The proposed scheme is cost effective technique in comparison with the existing schemes. MATLAB/GNU OCTAVE simulation tool will be used for simulation. The simulation results, applications, merits and demerits of proposed approach will be analyzed and will be documented.

  3. Response Time Comparisons among Four Base Running Starting Techniques in Slow Pitch Softball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Richard G.; Brown, Rodney L.

    1981-01-01

    Response times among four starting techniques (cross-over step, jab step, standing sprinter's start, and momentum start) were compared. The results suggest that the momentum start was the fastest starting technique for optimum speed in running bases. (FG)

  4. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M;

    2006-01-01

    : Virologic response (viral load SIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...

  5. Hydrological response times in lowland urban catchments characteristed by looped drainage systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Veldhuis, J.A.E.; Skovgard Olsen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrological response times are often used to characterise runoff processes. They provide information about temporal resolution of catchments responses, thus of the required measurement resolutions of in-situ sensors as well as spatial sensors like rainfall radars. The objective of this study was to

  6. A phase transition model for the speed-accuracy trade-off in response time experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, G.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.; Visser, I.; van der Maas, H.L.J.

    2011-01-01

    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases

  7. Time-Dependant Responses of High-Definition Induction Log and Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of drilling mud filtrate invading into a reservoir is time dependant. It causes dynamic invasion profiles of formation parameters such as water saturation, salinity, and formation resistivity. Thus, the responses of a high-definition induction log (HDIL tool are time dependent. The logging time should be considered as an important parameter during logging interpretation for the purposes of determining true formation resistivity, estimating initial water saturation, and evaluating a reservoir. The time-dependent HDIL responses are helpful for log analysts to understand the invasion process physically. Field examples were illustrated for the application of present method.

  8. Implementation of Time and Frequency Response Analysis for Web-Based Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyana Sapula

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Dar Es Salaam has developed the web-based laboratory for Time and Frequency Response Analysis. The purpose of this web-based laboratory is the utilization of real data from real experiments, in terms of instrumentation and experimental circuits, rather than simulations. The use of webbased laboratory came after realizing the difficulties imposed by the traditional laboratories. Web-based laboratories allow students and educators to interact with real laboratory equipment located anywhere in the world at anytime. This paper presents the implementation of web-based laboratory of single stage common emitter, resistor capacitor coupled amplifier using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrument Suite platform. Two components are deployed: time response analysis and frequency response analysis. The experiment allows students to carryout time and frequency analysis of the amplifier. The modular can be used to any microelectronic circuits to carry out any time response and frequency response analysis. Both the time response and frequency response analysis results of the amplifier are validated.

  9. Time and flow-direction responses of shear-styress-sensitive liquid crystal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Muraqtore, J. J.; Heinick, James T.

    1994-01-01

    Time and flow-direction responses of shear-stress liquid crystal coatings were exploresd experimentally. For the time-response experiments, coatings were exposed to transient, compressible flows created during the startup and off-design operation of an injector-driven supersonic wind tunnel. Flow transients were visualized with a focusing schlieren system and recorded with a 100 frame/s color video camera.

  10. Design PID controllers for desired time-domain or frequency-domain response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yugeng; Yang, Genke; Xu, Xiaoming

    2002-10-01

    Practical requirements on the design of control systems, especially process control systems, are usually specified in terms of time-domain response, such as overshoot and rise time, or frequency-domain response, such as resonance peak and stability margin. Although numerous methods have been developed for the design of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, little work has been done in relation to the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses. In this paper, we study the following problem: Given a nominal stable process with time delay, we design a suboptimal PID controller to achieve the required time-domain response or frequency-domain response for the nominal system or the uncertain system. An H(infinity) PID controller is developed based on optimal control theory and the parameters are derived analytically. Its properties are investigated and compared with that of two developed suboptimal controllers: an H2 PID controller and a Maclaurin PID controller. It is shown that all three controllers can provide the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses.

  11. Effect of time of day on performance, hormonal and metabolic response during a 1000-M cycling time trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Lins Fernandes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p0.05, but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p0.05. Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu.

  12. Aeroelastic response of an aircraft wing with mounted engine subjected to time-dependent thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, A.; Kalantari, H.; Fazelzadeh, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the aeroelastic response of a wing containing an engine subjected to different types of time-dependent thrust excitations is presented. In order to precisely consider the spanwise and chordwise locations of the engine and the time-dependent follower force in governing equations, derived through Lagrange's method, the generalized function theory is used. Unsteady aerodynamic lift and moment in the time domain are considered in terms of Wagner's function. Numerical simulations of the aeroelastic response to different types of time-dependent thrust excitation and comparisons with the previously published results are supplied. Effects of the engine mass and location and also the type of time-dependent thrust on the wing aeroelastic response are studied and pertinent conclusions are outlined.

  13. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load Virologic.......026) and time (P virologic response after adjustment for confounders. Stratified by period, regional differences were less evident (early cART, P = 0.967; mid cART, P = 0.291; late cART, P = 0.163). Stratified by region, temporal changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P

  14. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load Virologic.......026) and time (P virologic response after adjustment for confounders. Stratified by period, regional differences were less evident (early cART, P = 0.967; mid cART, P = 0.291; late cART, P = 0.163). Stratified by region, temporal changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P

  15. Photomultiplier nonlinear response in time-domain laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro José Bossy Schip

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure to find the limiting range of the photomultiplier linear response of a low-cost, digital oscilloscope-based time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectrometer (TRLS, is presented. A systematic investigation on the instrument response function with different signal input terminations, and the relationship between the luminescence intensity reaching the photomultiplier and the measured decay time are described. These investigations establish that setting the maximum intensity of the luminescence signal below 0.3V guarantees, for signal input terminations equal or higher than 99.7 ohm, a linear photomultiplier response.

  16. 28 CFR 17.30 - Classification challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... submit classification challenges in writing to the DRC, through the Office of Information and Privacy... DRC shall redact the identity of an individual challenging a classification under paragraph (a) of... 30 days, provide a written response to the DRC. The original classification authority may classify...

  17. Analytical Call Center Model with Voice Response Unit and Wrap-Up Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hampl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The last twenty years of computer integration significantly changed the process of service in a call center service systems. Basic building modules of classical call centers – a switching system and a group of humans agents – was extended with other special modules such as skills-based routing module, automatic call distribution module, interactive voice response module and others to minimize the customer waiting time and wage costs. A calling customer of a modern call center is served in the first stage by the interactive voice response module without any human interaction. If the customer requirements are not satisfied in the first stage, the service continues to the second stage realized by the group of human agents. The service time of second stage – the average handle time – is divided into a conversation time and wrap-up time. During the conversation time, the agent answers customer questions and collects its requirements and during the wrap-up time (administrative time the agent completes the task without any customer interaction. The analytical model presented in this contribution is solved under the condition of statistical equilibrium and takes into account the interactive voice response module service time, the conversation time and the wrap-up time.

  18. Development of seismic analysis model of LMFBR and seismic time history response analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yoo, B. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    The main objective of this paper is to develop the seismic analysis model of KALIMER reactor structures including the primary coolant of sodium and to evaulate the seismic responses of the maximum peak acceleration and the relative displacements by the time history seismic response analysis. The seismic time history response analyses were carried out for both cases of the seismic isolation design and the non-isolation one to verify the seismic isolation performance. From the results of seismic response analysis using the developed seismic analysis model, it is clearly verified that the seismic isolation design gives very significantly reduced seismic responses compared with the non-isolation design. All design criteria for the relative displacement repsonse were satisfied for KALIMER reactor structures.

  19. Tissue Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leemput, Koen; Puonti, Oula

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain have seen tremendous advances in recent years. So-called tissue classification techniques, aimed at extracting the three main brain tissue classes (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid), are now...... well established. In their simplest form, these methods classify voxels independently based on their intensity alone, although much more sophisticated models are typically used in practice. This article aims to give an overview of often-used computational techniques for brain tissue classification...

  20. Changes in the Social Responsibility Attitudes of Engineering Students Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Canney, Nathan E

    2016-10-01

    This research explored how engineering student views of their responsibility toward helping individuals and society through their profession, so-called social responsibility, change over time. A survey instrument was administered to students initially primarily in their first year, senior year, or graduate studies majoring in mechanical, civil, or environmental engineering at five institutions in September 2012, April 2013, and March 2014. The majority of the students (57 %) did not change significantly in their social responsibility attitudes, but 23 % decreased and 20 % increased. The students who increased, decreased, or remained the same in their social responsibility attitudes over time did not differ significantly in terms of gender, academic rank, or major. Some differences were found between institutions. Students who decreased in social responsibility initially possessed more positive social responsibility attitudes, were less likely to indicate that college courses impacted their views of social responsibility, and were more likely to have decreased in the frequency that they participated in volunteer activities, compared to students who did not change or increased their social responsibility. Although the large percentage of engineering students who decreased their social responsibility during college was disappointing, it is encouraging that courses and participation in volunteer activities may combat this trend.

  1. Non-linear wave loads and ship responses by a time-domain strip theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu; Wang, Zhaohui; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1998-01-01

    A non-linear time-domain strip theory for vertical wave loads and ship responses is presented. The theory is generalized from a rigorous linear time-domain strip theory representation. The hydrodynamic memory effect due to the free surface is approximated by a higher order differential equation. ...

  2. Non-Linear Wave Loads and Ship responses by a time-domain Strip Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu; Wang, Zhaohui; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1998-01-01

    A non-linear time-domain strip theory for vertical wave loads and ship responses is presented. The theory is generalized from a rigorous linear time-domain strip theory representaton. The hydrodynamic memory effect due to the free surface is approximated by a higher order differential equation. B...

  3. Anxiety and Sensory Over-Responsivity in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Bidirectional Effects across Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Shulamite A.; Ben-Sasson, Ayelet; Soto, Timothy W.; Carter, Alice S.

    2012-01-01

    This report focuses on the emergence of and bidirectional effects between anxiety and sensory over-responsivity (SOR) in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Participants were 149 toddlers with ASD and their mothers, assessed at 2 annual time points. A cross-lag analysis showed that anxiety symptoms increased over time while SOR remained…

  4. Improved Detection of Time Windows of Brain Responses in Fmri Using Modified Temporal Clustering Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) has been proposed recently as a method to detect time windows of brain responses in functional MRI (fMRI) studies when the timing and location of the activation are completely unknown. Modifications to the TCA technique are introduced in this report to further improve the sensitivity in detecting brain activation.

  5. New Technology for Remote Testing of Response Time of Installed Thermocouples. Volume 2 - Research Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    specific need for a thermocouple with known rapid response time. Glawe and Holanda ~ have reported an extensive study to determine thermocouple time...Continuous Flow Crvo.qenic Tunnel," NASA Technical Memorandum 81825, May 1980. Glawe, G. E., Holanda , R., Krause, L. N., "Recovery and Radiation Corrections

  6. Cortisol Response to Physical Activity in African American Toddlers Attending Full-Time Day Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah J.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Gladden, L. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine African American toddlers' cortisol response to acute physical play activity within a full-time subsidized day care environment. Saliva samples were taken from participants (N = 22, ages 26-45.5 months) before and after physical play and control play conditions at the same time of day. Actiheart[TM]monitors…

  7. Inclusion, Education, and Avoidance: The Prime Time Response to September 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone-Sovell, Tracey; Wilkerson, William R.

    This paper is an initial examination of prime time television's response to the events of September 11, 2001. Based on a review of the 2001-2002 television season's prime time programs, the study identifies 15 programs (out of 65 that ran the entire season) that incorporated September 11th elements. Themes of these programs are discussed as are…

  8. Recommendations for initial evaluation, staging, and response assessment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: the Lugano classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheson, Bruce D; Fisher, Richard I; Barrington, Sally F; Cavalli, Franco; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Zucca, Emanuele; Lister, T Andrew

    2014-09-20

    The purpose of this work was to modernize recommendations for evaluation, staging, and response assessment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). A workshop was held at the 11th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano, Switzerland, in June 2011, that included leading hematologists, oncologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, and nuclear medicine physicians, representing major international lymphoma clinical trials groups and cancer centers. Clinical and imaging subcommittees presented their conclusions at a subsequent workshop at the 12th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma, leading to revised criteria for staging and of the International Working Group Guidelines of 2007 for response. As a result, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)–computed tomography (CT) was formally incorporated into standard staging for FDG-avid lymphomas. A modification of the Ann Arbor descriptive terminology will be used for anatomic distribution of disease extent, but the suffixes A or B for symptoms will only be included for HL. A bone marrow biopsy is no longer indicated for the routine staging of HL and most diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. However, regardless of stage, general practice is to treat patients based on limited (stages I and II, nonbulky) or advanced (stage III or IV) disease, with stage II bulky disease considered as limited or advanced disease based on histology and a number of prognostic factors. PET-CT will be used to assess response in FDG-avid histologies using the 5-point scale. The product of the perpendicular diameters of a single node can be used to identify progressive disease. Routine surveillance scans are discouraged. These recommendations should improve evaluation of patients with lymphoma and enhance the ability to compare outcomes of clinical trials.

  9. Impaired timing adjustments in response to time-varying auditory perturbation during connected speech production in persons who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanqing; Beal, Deryk S; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Guenther, Frank H; Perkell, Joseph S

    2014-02-01

    Auditory feedback (AF), the speech signal received by a speaker's own auditory system, contributes to the online control of speech movements. Recent studies based on AF perturbation provided evidence for abnormalities in the integration of auditory error with ongoing articulation and phonation in persons who stutter (PWS), but stopped short of examining connected speech. This is a crucial limitation considering the importance of sequencing and timing in stuttering. In the current study, we imposed time-varying perturbations on AF while PWS and fluent participants uttered a multisyllabic sentence. Two distinct types of perturbations were used to separately probe the control of the spatial and temporal parameters of articulation. While PWS exhibited only subtle anomalies in the AF-based spatial control, their AF-based fine-tuning of articulatory timing was substantially weaker than normal, especially in early parts of the responses, indicating slowness in the auditory-motor integration for temporal control.

  10. Presentation and response timing accuracy in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Web-based research is becoming ubiquitous in the behavioral sciences, facilitated by convenient, readily available participant pools and relatively straightforward ways of running experiments: most recently, through the development of the HTML5 standard. Although in most studies participants give untimed responses, there is a growing interest in being able to record response times online. Existing data on the accuracy and cross-machine variability of online timing measures are limited, and generally they have compared behavioral data gathered on the Web with similar data gathered in the lab. For this article, we took a more direct approach, examining two ways of running experiments online-Adobe Flash and HTML5 with CSS3 and JavaScript-across 19 different computer systems. We used specialist hardware to measure stimulus display durations and to generate precise response times to visual stimuli in order to assess measurement accuracy, examining effects of duration, browser, and system-to-system variability (such as across different Windows versions), as well as effects of processing power and graphics capability. We found that (a) Flash and JavaScript's presentation and response time measurement accuracy are similar; (b) within-system variability is generally small, even in low-powered machines under high load; (c) the variability of measured response times across systems is somewhat larger; and (d) browser type and system hardware appear to have relatively small effects on measured response times. Modeling of the effects of this technical variability suggests that for most within- and between-subjects experiments, Flash and JavaScript can both be used to accurately detect differences in response times across conditions. Concerns are, however, noted about using some correlational or longitudinal designs online.

  11. Stability of adaptive cruise control systems taking account of vehicle response time and delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.C., E-mail: ldavis7@mailaps.org [10244 Normandy Dr., Plymouth, MI 48170 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    The region of string stability of a platoon of adaptive cruise control vehicles, taking into account the delay and response of the vehicle powertrain, is found. An upper bound on the explicit delay time as a function the first-order powertrain response time constant is determined. The system is characterized by a headway time constant, a sensitivity parameter, relative (to the vehicle immediately in front) velocity control, and delayed-velocity feedback or acceleration feedback. -- Highlights: ► I find the region of stability for a realistic adaptive cruise control system. ► Vehicle response time and explicit delay are included in the analysis. ► Delayed-feedback enlarges the parameter space that gives string stability.

  12. Information Gap Analysis: near real-time evaluation of disaster response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Trevor

    2014-05-01

    Disasters, such as major storm events or earthquakes, trigger an immediate response by the disaster management system of the nation in question. The quality of this response is a large factor in its ability to limit the impacts on the local population. Improving the quality of disaster response therefore reduces disaster impacts. Studying past disasters is a valuable exercise to understand what went wrong, identify measures which could have mitigated these issues, and make recommendations to improve future disaster planning and response. While such ex post evaluations can lead to improvements in the disaster management system, there are limitations. The main limitation that has influenced this research is that ex post evaluations do not have the ability to inform the disaster response being assessed for the obvious reason that they are carried out long after the response phase is over. The result is that lessons learned can only be applied to future disasters. In the field of humanitarian relief, this limitation has led to the development of real time evaluations. The key aspect of real time humanitarian evaluations is that they are completed while the operation is still underway. This results in findings being delivered at a time when they can still make a difference to the humanitarian response. Applying such an approach to the immediate disaster response phase requires an even shorter time-frame, as well as a shift in focus from international actors to the nation in question's government. As such, a pilot study was started and methodology developed, to analyze disaster response in near real-time. The analysis uses the information provided by the disaster management system within the first 0 - 5 days of the response. The data is collected from publicly available sources such as ReliefWeb and sorted under various categories which represent each aspect of disaster response. This process was carried out for 12 disasters. The quantity and timeliness of information

  13. Transporter Classification Database (TCDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Transporter Classification Database details a comprehensive classification system for membrane transport proteins known as the Transporter Classification (TC)...

  14. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2011ei: TIME-DEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE IIb AND Ib SUPERNOVAE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chomiuk, Laura; Sanders, Nathan E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pignata, Giuliano; Bufano, Filomena [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Lab, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Parker, Stuart [Parkdale Observatory, 225 Warren Road, RDl Oxford, Canterbury 7495 (New Zealand); Mazzali, Paolo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pian, Elena [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Pickering, Timothy; Buckley, David A. H.; Crawford, Steven M.; Gulbis, Amanda A. S.; Hettlage, Christian [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Hooper, Eric; Nordsieck, Kenneth H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); O' Donoghue, Darragh, E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [Southern African Large Telescope, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2013-04-10

    We present X-ray, UV/optical, and radio observations of the stripped-envelope, core-collapse supernova (SN) 2011ei, one of the least luminous SNe IIb or Ib observed to date. Our observations begin with a discovery within {approx}1 day of explosion and span several months afterward. Early optical spectra exhibit broad, Type II-like hydrogen Balmer profiles that subside rapidly and are replaced by Type Ib-like He-rich features on a timescale of one week. High-cadence monitoring of this transition suggests absorption attributable to a high-velocity ({approx}> 12, 000 km s{sup -1}) H-rich shell, which is likely present in many Type Ib events. Radio observations imply a shock velocity of v Almost-Equal-To 0.13 c and a progenitor star average mass-loss rate of M-dot {approx}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming wind velocity v{sub w} = 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}). This is consistent with independent constraints from deep X-ray observations with Swift-XRT and Chandra. Overall, the multi-wavelength properties of SN 2011ei are consistent with the explosion of a lower-mass (3-4 M{sub Sun }), compact (R{sub *} {approx}< 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm), He-core star. The star retained a thin hydrogen envelope at the time of explosion, and was embedded in an inhomogeneous circumstellar wind suggestive of modest episodic mass loss. We conclude that SN 2011ei's rapid spectral metamorphosis is indicative of time-dependent classifications that bias estimates of the relative explosion rates for Type IIb and Ib objects, and that important information about a progenitor star's evolutionary state and mass loss immediately prior to SN explosion can be inferred from timely multi-wavelength observations.

  15. Incongruent Abstract Stimulus-Response Bindings Result in Response Interference: fMRI and EEG Evidence from Visual Object Classification Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Aidan J.; Henson, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus repetition often leads to facilitated processing, resulting in neural decreases (repetition suppression) and faster RTs (repetition priming). Such repetition-related effects have been attributed to the facilitation of repeated cognitive processes and/or the retrieval of previously encoded stimulus-response (S-R) bindings. Although…

  16. Striatal direct pathway modulates response time in execution of visual discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukabori, Ryoji; Okada, Kana; Nishizawa, Kayo; Kai, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Kenta; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Tsutsui, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2012-03-01

    The dorsal striatum in the basal ganglia circuitry is a principal structure that mediates the acquisition and performance of instrumental learning. The projections from the dorsal striatum are composed of two subpopulations of medium spiny neurons that constitute the direct and indirect pathways. The mechanism by which these striatal projections control the learning processes of instrumental actions remains unknown. We addressed the behavioral role of the striatal direct (striatonigral) pathway in the performance of visual discrimination. Immunotoxin targeting of the striatal neuronal type containing dopamine D(1) receptor in mice resulted in a moderate level of elimination of the striatonigral pathway. Targeting of the neural pathway from the whole region of the dorsal striatum lengthened the response time but did not affect the accuracy of response selection in a two-choice reaction time task dependent on light stimulus. This lengthened motor response was induced early in the test sessions and was gradually restored to normal levels during repetitive sessions. In addition, subregion-specific pathway targeting revealed that the delay in learned motor response was generated by the elimination of the striatonigral pathway arising from the dorsomedial striatum but not from the dorsolateral striatum. Our findings indicate that the striatonigral pathway, in particular from the dorsomedial striatum, contributes to the regulation of response time in the execution of visual discrimination. The restoration of motor response deficits during repetitive sessions suggests the presence of a mechanism by which the response facilitation is acquired through continuation of learning despite the removal of the striatonigral pathway.

  17. Electromagnet Response Time Tests on Primary CRDM of a Prototype Gen-IV SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Han; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This paper identifies the electromagnetic response characteristics of the electromagnet of a primary control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) used for the reactor scram function. The test measures the electromagnet response time required to release an armature from a stator controlled by a loss of an electromagnetic force on an armature after shorting a power supply to an electromagnet coil. These tests are carried out while changing the electromagnet core material, an assist spring, and an armature holding current. The main factors influencing the test parameters on the response are found to be the armature holding current for holding the armature loads, and the material type of the electromagnet cores. The minimum response time is 0.13 seconds in the case of using SS410 material as an armature, while the S10C material as an armature has a response time of 0.21 seconds. Electromagnet response time characteristics from the test results will be evaluated by comparing the precise moving data of an electromagnet armature through the use of a high-speed camera and a potentiometer in the future.

  18. Solving a Location, Allocation, and Capacity Planning Problem with Dynamic Demand and Response Time Service Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Ka Yuk Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Logistic systems with uncertain demand, travel time, and on-site processing time are studied here where sequential trip travel is allowed. The relationship between three levels of decisions: facility location, demand allocation, and resource capacity (number of service units, satisfying the response time requirement, is analysed. The problem is formulated as a stochastic mixed integer program. A simulation-based hybrid heuristic is developed to solve the dynamic problem under different response time service level. An initial solution is obtained from solving static location-allocation models, followed by iterative improvement of the three levels of decisions by ejection, reinsertion procedure with memory of feasible and infeasible service regions. Results indicate that a higher response time service level could be achieved by allocating a given resource under an appropriate decentralized policy. Given a response time requirement, the general trend is that the minimum total capacity initially decreases with more facilities. During this stage, variability in travel time has more impact on capacity than variability in demand arrivals. Thereafter, the total capacity remains stable and then gradually increases. When service level requirement is high, the dynamic dispatch based on first-come-first-serve rule requires smaller capacity than the one by nearest-neighbour rule.

  19. Profiling and classification of French propolis by combined multivariate data analysis of planar chromatograms and scanning direct analysis in real time mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasset, Thibaut; Häbe, Tim T; Ristivojevic, Petar; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2016-09-23

    Quality control of propolis is challenging, as it is a complex natural mixture of compounds, and thus, very difficult to analyze and standardize. Shown on the example of 30 French propolis samples, a strategy for an improved quality control was demonstrated in which high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprints were evaluated in combination with selected mass signals obtained by desorption-based scanning mass spectrometry (MS). The French propolis sample extracts were separated by a newly developed reversed phase (RP)-HPTLC method. The fingerprints obtained by two different detection modes, i.e. after (1) derivatization and fluorescence detection (FLD) at UV 366nm and (2) scanning direct analysis in real time (DART)-MS, were analyzed by multivariate data analysis. Thus, RP-HPTLC-FLD and RP-HPTLC-DART-MS fingerprints were explored and the best classification was obtained using both methods in combination with pattern recognition techniques, such as principal component analysis. All investigated French propolis samples were divided in two types and characteristic patterns were observed. Phenolic compounds such as caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, chrysin, pinobanksin, pinobanksin-3-acetate, galangin, kaempferol, tectochrysin and pinocembrin were identified as characteristic marker compounds of French propolis samples. This study expanded the research on the European poplar type of propolis and confirmed the presence of two botanically different types of propolis, known as the blue and orange types.

  20. Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube-CTC chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick J.; Lambert, Christopher; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Rai, Shesh N.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in blood using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. 76-element single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (anti-EpCAM), Anti-human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (anti-Her2) and non-specific IgG antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester. Following device functionalization, blood spiked with SKBR3, MCF7 and MCF10A cells (100/1000 cells per 5 μl per device, 170 elements totaling 0.85 ml of whole blood) were adsorbed on to the nanotube device arrays. Electrical signatures were recorded from each device to screen the samples for differences in interaction (specific or non-specific) between samples and devices. A zone classification scheme enabled the classification of all 170 elements in a single map. A kernel-based statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping series to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain blood (control) or SKBR3 spiked blood (case) on anti-Her2 functionalized devices with ˜90% sensitivity, and 90% specificity in capture of 1000 SKBR3 breast cancer cells in blood using anti-Her2 functionalized devices. Screened devices that gave positive electrical signatures were confirmed using optical/confocal microscopy to hold spiked cancer cells. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified to hold spiked blood based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells through staining for DAPI (nuclei), cytokeratin (cancer cells) and CD45 (hematologic cells) with single cell sensitivity. We report 55%-100% cancer cell capture yield depending on the active device area for blood adsorption with mean of 62% (˜12 500 captured off 20 000 spiked cells in 0.1 ml

  1. Modality-specific spectral dynamics in response to visual and tactile sequential shape information processing tasks: An MEG study using multivariate pattern classification analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohel, Bakul; Lee, Peter; Jeong, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Brain regions that respond to more than one sensory modality are characterized as multisensory regions. Studies on the processing of shape or object information have revealed recruitment of the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and other regions regardless of input sensory modalities. However, it remains unknown whether such regions show similar (modality-invariant) or different (modality-specific) neural oscillatory dynamics, as recorded using magnetoencephalography (MEG), in response to identical shape information processing tasks delivered to different sensory modalities. Modality-invariant or modality-specific neural oscillatory dynamics indirectly suggest modality-independent or modality-dependent participation of particular brain regions, respectively. Therefore, this study investigated the modality-specificity of neural oscillatory dynamics in the form of spectral power modulation patterns in response to visual and tactile sequential shape-processing tasks that are well-matched in terms of speed and content between the sensory modalities. Task-related changes in spectral power modulation and differences in spectral power modulation between sensory modalities were investigated at source-space (voxel) level, using a multivariate pattern classification (MVPC) approach. Additionally, whole analyses were extended from the voxel level to the independent-component level to take account of signal leakage effects caused by inverse solution. The modality-specific spectral dynamics in multisensory and higher-order brain regions, such as the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, inferior temporal cortex, and other brain regions, showed task-related modulation in response to both sensory modalities. This suggests modality-dependency of such brain regions on the input sensory modality for sequential shape-information processing.

  2. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    as possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics...... in the process as well as modeling dependences between attributes....

  3. Demonstration of Advanced Geophysics and Classification Technologies on Munitions Response Sites, Pole Mountain Target and Maneuver Area, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    TECHNOLOGY A Geonics EM61-MK2, paired with a Trimble R8 Real Time Kinetic ( RTK ) Global Positioning System ( GPS ), was used to conduct the DGM survey over...EM61-MK2, paired with a Trimble R8 RTK GPS , and an Allegro CX field computer. The EM61-MK2 system consisted of a 1.0 m by 0.5 m coil containing...point data spacing measured using EM61-MK2 and RTK GPS point positioning.  Data Requirements: Mapped production survey data.  Success Criteria

  4. Contracts for Cross-organizational Workflows as Timed Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Slaats, Tijs

    2013-01-01

    We conservatively extend the declarative Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graph process model, introduced in the PhD thesis of the second author, to allow for discrete time deadlines. We prove that safety and liveness properties can be verified by mapping finite timed DCR Graphs to finite state...... transition systems. We exemplify how deadlines can introduce time-locks and deadlocks and violate liveness. We then prove that the general technique for safe distribution of DCR Graphs provided in previous work can be extended to timed DCR Graphs. We exemplify the use of timed DCR Graphs and the distribution...... technique in praxis on a timed extension of a cross-organizational case management process arising from a previous case study. The example shows how a timed DCR Graph can be used to describe the global contract for a timed workflow process involving several organizations, which can then be distributed...

  5. Modeling Response Times in the Go/No-Go Discrimination Task

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The work presented here uses a simple stochastic model as a cognitive psychometric tool for analyzing response time data in the Go/No-Go Discrimination task with motivationally distinct conditions. The parameters of the model inform us of underlying cognitive mechanisms because they have an established psychological meaning and allow us to quantify a subjects ability and response caution. Using these model parameters, we focus on the differences between subjects with varying degrees of substa...

  6. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    OpenAIRE

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-01-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand ...

  7. Molecular response properties from a Hermitian eigenvalue equation for a time-periodic Hamiltonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowski, Filip; Olsen, Jeppe; Jørgensen, Poul

    2015-03-21

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a time-periodic perturbation is recasted into a Hermitian eigenvalue equation, where the quasi-energy is an eigenvalue and the time-periodic regular wave function an eigenstate. From this Hermitian eigenvalue equation, a rigorous and transparent formulation of response function theory is developed where (i) molecular properties are defined as derivatives of the quasi-energy with respect to perturbation strengths, (ii) the quasi-energy can be determined from the time-periodic regular wave function using a variational principle or via projection, and (iii) the parametrization of the unperturbed state can differ from the parametrization of the time evolution of this state. This development brings the definition of molecular properties and their determination on par for static and time-periodic perturbations and removes inaccuracies and inconsistencies of previous response function theory formulations. The development where the parametrization of the unperturbed state and its time evolution may differ also extends the range of the wave function models for which response functions can be determined. The simplicity and universality of the presented formulation is illustrated by applying it to the configuration interaction (CI) and the coupled cluster (CC) wave function models and by introducing a new model-the coupled cluster configuration interaction (CC-CI) model-where a coupled cluster exponential parametrization is used for the unperturbed state and a linear parametrization for its time evolution. For static perturbations, the CC-CI response functions are shown to be the analytical analogues of the static molecular properties obtained from finite field equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) energy calculations. The structural similarities and differences between the CI, CC, and CC-CI response functions are also discussed with emphasis on linear versus non-linear parametrizations and the size-extensivity of the obtained

  8. Time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Donghai; Zhao, Xiang; Liang, Shunlin; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Kaicheng; Tang, Bijian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2015-09-01

    Climate conditions significantly affect vegetation growth in terrestrial ecosystems. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of ecosystems, the vegetation responses to climate vary considerably with the diverse spatial patterns and the time-lag effects, which are the most important mechanism of climate-vegetation interactive effects. Extensive studies focused on large-scale vegetation-climate interactions use the simultaneous meteorological and vegetation indicators to develop models; however, the time-lag effects are less considered, which tends to increase uncertainty. In this study, we aim to quantitatively determine the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors using the GIMMS3g NDVI time series and the CRU temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation datasets. First, this study analyzed the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors. Then, a multiple linear regression model and partial correlation model were established to statistically analyze the roles of different climatic factors on vegetation responses, from which the primary climate-driving factors for different vegetation types were determined. The results showed that (i) both the time-lag effects of the vegetation responses and the major climate-driving factors that significantly affect vegetation growth varied significantly at the global scale, which was related to the diverse vegetation and climate characteristics; (ii) regarding the time-lag effects, the climatic factors explained 64% variation of the global vegetation growth, which was 11% relatively higher than the model ignoring the time-lag effects; (iii) for the area with a significant change trend (for the period 1982-2008) in the global GIMMS3g NDVI (P effects is quite important for better predicting and evaluating the vegetation dynamics under the background of global climate change.

  9. Time series analysis of wind speed using VAR and the generalized impulse response technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Bradley T. [Area of Information Systems and Quantitative Sciences, Rawls College of Business and Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2101 (United States); Kruse, Jamie Brown [Center for Natural Hazard Research, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Schroeder, John L. [Department of Geosciences and Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States); Smith, Douglas A. [Department of Civil Engineering and Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2007-03-15

    This research examines the interdependence in time series wind speed data measured in the same location at four different heights. A multiple-equation system known as a vector autoregression is proposed for characterizing the time series dynamics of wind. Additionally, the recently developed method of generalized impulse response analysis provides insight into the cross-effects of the wind series and their responses to shocks. Findings are based on analysis of contemporaneous wind speed time histories taken at 13, 33, 70 and 160 ft above ground level with a sampling rate of 10 Hz. The results indicate that wind speeds measured at 70 ft was the most variable. Further, the turbulence persisted longer at the 70-ft measurement than at the other heights. The greatest interdependence is observed at 13 ft. Gusts at 160 ft led to the greatest persistence to an 'own' shock and led to greatest persistence in the responses of the other wind series. (author)

  10. Study on I/O response time bounds of networked storage systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bao-jiang; LIU Jun; WANG Gang; LIU Jing

    2006-01-01

    In order to predict and improve the performance of networked storage systems,this paper explored the relationship between the system I/O response time and its performance factors by quantitative analytical method.Through analyzing data flow in networked RAID storage system,we established its analytical model utilizing closed queueing networks and studied the performance bounds of the system I/O response time.Experimental results show that the theoretical bounds are found to be in agreement with the actual performance bounds of the networked RAID storage system and reflect the dynamic trend of its actual performance.Furthermore,it concludes that the CPU processing power and cache hit rate of the central storage server are the key factors affecting the I/O response time as the concurrent jobs are lower,while the network bandwidth and cache hit rate of the central storage server become the key factors as the concurrent jobs go higher.

  11. Response time effects of alerting tone and semantic context for synthesized voice cockpit warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, C. A.; Williams, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Some handbooks and human factors design guides have recommended that a voice warning should be preceded by a tone to attract attention to the warning. As far as can be determined from a search of the literature, no experimental evidence supporting this exists. A fixed-base simulator flown by airline pilots was used to test the hypothesis that the total 'system-time' to respond to a synthesized voice cockpit warning would be longer when the message was preceded by a tone because the voice itself was expected to perform both the alerting and the information transfer functions. The simulation included realistic ATC radio voice communications, synthesized engine noise, cockpit conversation, and realistic flight routes. The effect of a tone before a voice warning was to lengthen response time; that is, responses were slower with an alerting tone. Lengthening the voice warning with another work, however, did not increase response time.

  12. Regular nonlinear response of the driven Duffing oscillator to chaotic time series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuanYe; Li Yue; Danilo P. Mandic; Yang Bao-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear response of the driven Duffing oscillator to periodic or quasi-periodic signals has been well studied. In this paper, we investigate the nonlinear response of the driven Duffing oscillator to non-periodic, more specifically, chaotic time series. Through numerical simulations, we find that the driven Duffing oscillator can also show regular nonlinear response to the chaotic time series with different degree of chaos as generated by the same chaotic series generating model, and there exists a relationship between the state of the driven Duffing oscillator and the chaoticity of the input signal of the driven Duffing oscillator. One real-world and two artificial chaotic time series are used to verify the new feature of Duffing oscillator. A potential application of the new feature of Duffing oscillator is also indicated.

  13. Validation of a simple response-time measure of listening effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; van Rijn, Hedderik; Başkent, Deniz

    2015-09-01

    This study compares two response-time measures of listening effort that can be combined with a clinical speech test for a more comprehensive evaluation of total listening experience; verbal response times to auditory stimuli (RT(aud)) and response times to a visual task (RTs(vis)) in a dual-task paradigm. The listening task was presented in five masker conditions; no noise, and two types of noise at two fixed intelligibility levels. Both the RTs(aud) and RTs(vis) showed effects of noise. However, only RTs(aud) showed an effect of intelligibility. Because of its simplicity in implementation, RTs(aud) may be a useful effort measure for clinical applications.

  14. The Discussion of the Time-Honored Brands’ Identification and Classification Criteria%论老字号的认定和分类标准

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁家方

    2015-01-01

    The time-honored brands are the synonyms of the longevity enterprises, and are the embodiment of Chi-nese cultural characteristics of business forms. this paper taking the time-honored brands of Beijing xicheng district as the research object, conscientiously sum up the related policy formulation and implementation at all levels of gov-ernment, scientifically determine the classification and grading system of the time-honored brands. And to establish and improve the time-honored brands social status, play a better role of the time-honored brands in providing indus-try demonstration, optimization of industrial structure, improve the regional image, enrich the city spirit and pro-mote the Chinese nation excellent culture heritage, expand the old social influence, and to explore new research i-deas and methods, have very important significance.%老字号是长寿的企业和企业名称品牌,是体现中国文化特质的企业形态。以北京西城老字号为研究对象,在认真总结近年来各级政府相关政策制定及实施情况的基础上,科学确定老字号的分级认定条件和分级标准体系,对于确立和提升老字号的社会地位,更好地发挥老字号在提供行业示范、优化产业结构、完善地区形象、充实城市精神、推动中华民族优秀文化传承方面的作用,扩大老字号的社会影响,以及探索新的研究思路和方法,都具有十分重要的意义。

  15. Interhemispheric versus stimulus-response spatial compatibility effects in bimanual reaction times to lateralized visual stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello ePellicano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we tested right- and left-handed participants in a Poffenberger paradigm with bimanual responses and hands either in an anatomical or in a left-right inverted posture. We observed a significant positive crossed-uncrossed difference (CUD in reaction times for both manual dominance groups and both response postures. These results rule out an explanation of the CUD in terms of stimulus-response spatial compatibility and provide convincing evidence on the important role of interhemispheric callosal transfer in bimanual responding in right- as well as left-handed individuals.

  16. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández Ribaya, Yolanda, E-mail: fernandezryolanda@uniovi.es; Álvarez, Eduardo; Paredes Sánchez, José Pablo; Xiberta Bernat, Jorge [Department of Energy E.I.M.E.M., University of Oviedo. 13 Independencia Street 2" n" d floor, 36004, Oviedo (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico).The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  17. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Ribaya, Yolanda; Álvarez, Eduardo; Paredes Sánchez, José Pablo; Xiberta Bernat, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico).The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  18. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Fernández Ribaya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico.The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  19. On the subsystem formulation of linear-response time-dependent DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanello, Michele

    2013-05-28

    A new and thorough derivation of linear-response subsystem time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is presented and analyzed in detail. Two equivalent derivations are presented and naturally yield self-consistent subsystem TD-DFT equations. One reduces to the subsystem TD-DFT formalism of Neugebauer [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134116 (2007)]. The other yields Dyson type equations involving three types of subsystem response functions: coupled, uncoupled, and Kohn-Sham. The Dyson type equations for subsystem TD-DFT are derived here for the first time. The response function formalism reveals previously hidden qualities and complications of subsystem TD-DFT compared with the regular TD-DFT of the supersystem. For example, analysis of the pole structure of the subsystem response functions shows that each function contains information about the electronic spectrum of the entire supersystem. In addition, comparison of the subsystem and supersystem response functions shows that, while the correlated response is subsystem additive, the Kohn-Sham response is not. Comparison with the non-subjective partition DFT theory shows that this non-additivity is largely an artifact introduced by the subjective nature of the density partitioning in subsystem DFT.

  20. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  1. Mind-Wandering at the fingertips: automatic parsing of subjective states based on response time variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael eBastian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Research from the last decade has successfully used two kinds of thought reports in order to probe whether the mind is wandering: random thought-probes and spontaneous reports. However, none of these two methods allows any assessment of the subjective state of the participant between two reports. In this paper, we present a step by step elaboration and testing of a continuous index, based on response time variability within Sustained Attention to Response Tasks (N=106, for a total of 10 conditions. We first show that increased response time variability predicts mind-wandering. We then compute a continuous index of response time variability throughout full experiments and show that the temporal position of a probe relative to the nearest local peak of the continuous index is predictive of mind-wandering. This suggests that our index carries information about the subjective state of the subject even when he or she is not probed, and opens the way for on-line tracking of mind-wandering. Finally we proceed a step further and infer the internal attentional states on the basis of the variability of response times. To this end we use the Hidden Markov Model framework, which allows us to estimate the durations of on-task and off-task episodes.

  2. Mind wandering at the fingertips: automatic parsing of subjective states based on response time variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Mikaël; Sackur, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    RESEARCH FROM THE LAST DECADE HAS SUCCESSFULLY USED TWO KINDS OF THOUGHT REPORTS IN ORDER TO ASSESS WHETHER THE MIND IS WANDERING: random thought-probes and spontaneous reports. However, none of these two methods allows any assessment of the subjective state of the participant between two reports. In this paper, we present a step by step elaboration and testing of a continuous index, based on response time variability within Sustained Attention to Response Tasks (N = 106, for a total of 10 conditions). We first show that increased response time variability predicts mind wandering. We then compute a continuous index of response time variability throughout full experiments and show that the temporal position of a probe relative to the nearest local peak of the continuous index is predictive of mind wandering. This suggests that our index carries information about the subjective state of the subject even when he or she is not probed, and opens the way for on-line tracking of mind wandering. Finally we proceed a step further and infer the internal attentional states on the basis of the variability of response times. To this end we use the Hidden Markov Model framework, which allows us to estimate the durations of on-task and off-task episodes.

  3. Approximating response time distributions in closed queueing network models of computer performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salza, S.; Lavenberg, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Hierarchical decomposition methods for approximating response time distributions in certain closed queueing network models of computer performance are investigated. The methods investigated apply whenever part of a customer's response time consists of a geometrically distributed number of successive cycles within a subnetwork. The key step involves replacing the subnetwork with parallel exponential servers having queue-size dependent service rates. Results on thinning stochastic point processes are used to justify this replacement when the mean number of cycles is large. Preliminary numerical comparisons of the approximations with simulation results indicate that the approximations are quite accurate even when the mean number of cycles is small. 17 references.

  4. Optimal Load Response to Time-of-Use Power Price for Demand Side Management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    -of-use power price for demand side management in order to save the energy costs as much as possible. 3 typical different kinds of loads (industrial load, residential load and commercial load) in Denmark are chosen as study cases. The energy costs decrease up to 9.6% with optimal load response to time......-of-use power price for different loads. Simulation results show that the optimal load response to time-of-use power price for demand side management generates different load profiles and reduces the load peaks. This kind of load patterns may also have significant effects on the power system normal operation....

  5. Time to smell: a cascade model of human olfactory perception based on response-time (RT) measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Jonas K

    2014-01-01

    The timing of olfactory behavioral decisions may provide an important source of information about how the human olfactory-perceptual system is organized. This review integrates results from olfactory response-time (RT) measurements from a perspective of mental chronometry. Based on these findings, a new cascade model of human olfaction is presented. Results show that main perceptual decisions are executed with high accuracy within about 1~s of sniff onset. The cascade model proposes the existence of distinct processing stages within this brief time-window. According to the cascade model, different perceptual features become accessible to the perceiver at different time-points, and the output of earlier processing stages provides the input for later processing stages. The olfactory cascade starts with detecting the odor, which is followed by establishing an odor object. The odor object, in turn, triggers systems for determining odor valence and edibility. Evidence for the cascade model comes from studies showing that RTs for odor valence and edibility assessment are predicted by the shorter RTs needed to establish the odor object. Challenges for future research include innovative task designs for olfactory RT experiments and the integration of the behavioral processing sequence into the underlying cortical processes using complementary RT measures and neuroimaging methods.

  6. Time and frequency response of a resistance-wire aircraft atmospheric temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, G. A.; Friehe, C. A.; Edwards, D. K.

    1994-04-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of an aircraft-mounted resistance-wire atmospheric temperature sensor are modeled to determine the time and frequency responses. The sensor element (Rosemount 102E4AL) consists of a 25-micron-diameter platinum wire wound around a cruciform mica support with approximately 143 diameters of wire between contacts with the mica. A longitudinally distributed, radially lumped capacitance model provided for the convective heat transfer to the wire and the transient heat conduction along it. Similarly, the temperature gradient across the thin dimension of the mica support was neglected, and a radially distributed model provided for the convective heat transfer to the mica and the transient conduction within it. The two solutions are coupled by the boundary conditions at the wire-mica contact. The equations were solved to produce the temperature distribution along the wire and in the mica support as a function of the frequency of a free-stream sinusoidal temperature fluctuation. The frequency response transfer function was determined and fit to a two-time-constant transfer function by regression analysis. The two-time-constant model fits the general solution very well. The small (fast response) time constant is essentially determined by the wire itself. The larger (slow response) time constant is due to conduction into and out of the mica supports. The model predicts that the effects of the mica supports are important for frequencies greater than about 0.1 Hz. The responses to five different temperature waveform inputs (sinusoid, step, pulse, ramp, and ramp level) are derived using the two-time-constant model with Laplace transform techniques for both infinite-length wire (no mica support effects) and the finite-length wire of the 102 probe. The actual temperature signals are distorted by the larger time constant of the mica supports, especially for the pulse and ramp inputs that are typical of aircraft measurements of thermals and

  7. Brain Activations Related to Saccadic Response Conflict are not Sensitive to Time on Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldzik, Ewa; Domagalik, Aleksandra; Oginska, Halszka; Marek, Tadeusz; Fafrowicz, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a role of the dorsal medial frontal cortex in the performance monitoring and cognitive control has been a challenge to neuroscientists for the past decade. In light of recent findings, the conflict monitoring hypothesis has been elaborated to an action-outcome predictor theory. One of the findings that led to this re-evaluation was the fMRI study in which conflict-related brain activity was investigated in terms of the so-called time on task effect, i.e., a linear increase of the BOLD signal with longer response times. The aim of this study was to investigate brain regions involved in the processing of saccadic response conflict and to account for the time on task effect. A modified spatial cueing task was implemented in the event-related fMRI study with oculomotor responses. The results revealed several brain regions which show higher activity for incongruent trials in comparison to the congruent ones, including pre-supplementary motor area together with the frontal and parietal regions. Further analysis accounting for the effect of response time provided evidence that these brain activations were not sensitive to time on task but reflected purely the congruency effect.

  8. Brain activations related to saccadic response conflict are not sensitive to time on task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa eBeldzik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Establishing a role of the dorsal medial frontal cortex in the performance monitoring and cognitive control has been a challenge to neuroscientists for the past decade. In light of recent findings, the conflict monitoring hypothesis has been elaborated to an action-outcome predictor theory. One of the findings that led to this re-evaluation was the fMRI study in which conflict-related brain activity was investigated in terms of the so-called time on task effect, i.e. a linear increase of the BOLD signal with longer response times. The aim of this study was to investigate brain regions involved in the processing of saccadic response conflict and to account for the time on task effect. A modified spatial cueing task was implemented in the event-related fMRI study with oculomotor responses. The results revealed several brain regions which show higher activity for incongruent trials in comparison to the congruent ones, including pre-supplementary motor area together with the frontal and parietal regions. Further analysis accounting for the effect of response time provided evidence that these brain activations were not sensitive to time on task but reflected purely the congruency effect.

  9. Analysis of clinical trials with biologics using dose-time-response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Markus R; Schmidli, Heinz

    2015-09-30

    Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies are increasingly and successfully used for the treatment of many chronic diseases. Unlike conventional small drug molecules, which are commonly given as tablets once daily, biologics are typically injected at much longer time intervals, that is, weeks or months. Hence, both the dose and the time interval have to be optimized during the drug development process for biologics. To identify an adequate regimen for the investigated biologic, the dose-time-response relationship must be well characterized, based on clinical trial data. The proposed approach uses semi-mechanistic nonlinear regression models to describe and predict the time-changing response for complex dosing regimens. Both likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for inference and prediction are discussed. The methodology is illustrated with data from a clinical study in an auto-immune disease.

  10. Combined Characterization of the Time Response of Impression Materials via Traditional and FTIR Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Derchi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the temporal response of four dental impression materials, namely three siloxanes (Imprint 4, Flexitime, Aquasil and one polyether (Impregum. The null hypothesis was that the nominal working times are confirmed by instrumental laboratory tests. We also aimed to identify alternative techniques with strong physical-chemical background for the assessment of temporal response. Traditional characterization was carried out by shark fin test device and durometer at both ambient and body temperature. Additionally, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was performed at room temperature. From shark fin height and Shore hardness versus time the working time and the setting time of the materials were evaluated, respectively. These were in reasonable agreement with the nominal values, except for Impregum, which showed longer working time. Spectroscopy confirmed the different character of the two types of materials, and provided for Imprint 4 and Aquasil an independent evaluation of both evolution times, consistent with the results of the other techniques. Shark fin test and durometer measurements showed deviations in setting time, low sensitivity to temperature for Flexitime, and longer working time at higher temperature for Impregum. Deviations of working time appear in operating conditions from what specified by the manufacturers. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy can provide insight in the correlation between material properties and their composition and structure.

  11. Study of frequency and time responses of a separated absorption and multiplication region avalanche photodiode

    CERN Document Server

    Banoushi, A; Setayeshi, S

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the frequency and time responses of a separated absorption and multiplication avalanche photodiode are studied by solving the carrier continuity equations, in the low gain regime. The discrepancy between the carrier velocities in different layers is considered for the first time. It is shown that considerable error occurs, if the device d characteristics are calculated assuming uniformly distributed velocities in the depletion layer, especially when the different layers have almost equal thickness.

  12. MULTISTAGE ADAPTIVE HIGHER-ORDER NONLINEAR FINITE IMPULSE RESPONSE FILTERS FOR CHAOTIC TIME SERIES PREDICTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JIA-SHU; XIAO XIAN-CI

    2001-01-01

    A multistage adaptive higher-order nonlinear finite impulse response (MAHONFIR) filter is proposed to predict chaotic time series. Using this approach, we may readily derive the decoupled parallel algorithm for the adaptation of the coefficients of the MAHONFIR filter, to guarantee a more rapid convergence of the adaptive weights to their optimal values. Numerical simulation results show that the MAHONFIR filters proposed here illustrate a very good performance for making an adaptive prediction of chaotic time series.

  13. Superposed epoch analysis of storm time response of the ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Zesta, E.; Connor, H.; Su, Y. J.; Sutton, E. K.; Huang, C. Y.; Ober, D. M.; Delay, S. H.; Schuck, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    The thermosphere-ionosphere system response to energy input by Joule heating via Poynting flux and auroral precipitation is strongly intensified during times with high geomagnetic activity or during geomagnetic storms. The most dramatic thermospheric response is the intensification and upwelling of the thermospheric mass density. The neutral mass density is not only a key parameter to understanding the solar wind - IT coupling, but also plays an important role in understanding satellite orbital drag, which in turn impacts satellite position predictions. Results of numerical simulations and satellite observations (CHAMP and GRACE) have shown that the neutral mass density is rapidly intensified (within minutes) after the initial storm shock impact and also after the onset of storm main phase. This almost immediate response is typical of CME-driven storms in which the neutral density is enhanced first in the dayside polar cap and the intensification subsequently spreads out to all magnetic local time regions and lower latitude regions. We perform a superposed epoch analysis using CHAMP and GRACE satellite data as well as DMSP data to study the spatial and temporal distribution of the measured Poynting flux and neutral density response during the main phase of storms of different intensity. We also examine the correlation characteristics between Poynting flux and neutral density response, in space and time during the storm.

  14. Strategic Control over Extent and Timing of Distractor-Based Response Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Kerstin; Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Löw, Andreas; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In choice reaction time (RT) tasks, performance is often influenced by the presence of nominally irrelevant stimuli, referred to as distractors. Recent research provided evidence that distractor processing can be adjusted to the utility of the distractors: Distractors predictive of the upcoming target/response were more attended to and also…

  15. 78 FR 38949 - Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... specialized formats to communicate incident information? 5. What do you see as the pros and cons of... National Institute of Standards and Technology Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department...

  16. Core Muscle Response Times and Postural Reactions in Soccer Players and Nonplayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghuis, Arend Jan; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Hof, At L.

    2011-01-01

    BORGHUIS, A. J., K. A. P. M. LEMMINK, and A. L. HOF. Core Muscle Response Times and Postural Reactions in Soccer Players and Nonplayers. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 43, No. 1, pp. 108-114, 2011. Decreased core stability has been suggested to be associated with a higher occurrence of lower extremit

  17. Decision-Tree Models of Categorization Response Times, Choice Proportions, and Typicality Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, Daniel; Lacouture, Yves; Cohen, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present 3 decision-tree models of categorization adapted from T. Trabasso, H. Rollins, and E. Shaughnessy (1971) and use them to provide a quantitative account of categorization response times, choice proportions, and typicality judgments at the individual-participant level. In Experiment 1, the decision-tree models were fit to…

  18. Visually Guided Hand Movements in Children with Minor Neurological Dysfunction: Response Time and Movement Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, J. M. H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presents preliminary data on how, during the execution of visually guided hand movements, differences in response time between children with and without signs of minor neurological dysfunction may be related to differences in the spatio-temporal organization of their movements. (MP)

  19. Onset time and haemodynamic response after thiopental vs. propofol in the elderly: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martin Kryspin; Dolven, T L; Rasmussen, L S

    2011-01-01

    The induction dose of hypnotic agents should be reduced in the elderly, but it is not well studied whether thiopental or propofol should be preferred in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to compare onset time, hypnosis level and the haemodynamic response after thiopental vs...

  20. On the Interpretation of the Number Attraction Effect: Response Time Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Speakers frequently make subject-verb number agreement errors in the presence of a local noun with a different number from the head of the subject phrase. A series of four experiments used a two-choice response time (RT) paradigm to investigate how the latency of correct agreement decisions is modulated by the presence of a number attractor, and…

  1. Enabling customer satisfaction and stock reduction through service differentiation with response time guarantees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Gabor (Adriana); L.A. van Vianen (Lars); G. Yang (Guangyuan); S. Axsäter (Sven)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn response to customer specific service time guarantee requirements, service providers can offer differentiated services. However, conventional customer differentiation models based on fill rate constraints do not take full advantage of the stock reduction that can be achieved by differ

  2. The time course of the inflammatory response to the Salmonella typhi vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paine, N.J.; Ring, C.; Bosch, J.A.; Drayson, M.T.; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, J.J.C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The Salmonella typhi vaccination induces transient increases in inflammatory-responsive cytokines and molecules. For instance, it causes small, mild increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6) within a few hours and C-reactive protein (CRP) within 24 h. No study has charted either the time course of the infla

  3. Modeling Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Forcing on Centennial and Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R.; Rind, D.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a series of experiments to explore clima responses to two types of solar spectral forcing on decadal and centennial time scales - one based on prior reconstructions, and another implied by recent observations from the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral 1rradiance Monitor). We apply these forcings to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global/Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM). that couples atmosphere with ocean, and has a model top near the mesopause, allowing us to examine the full response to the two solar forcing scenarios. We show different climate responses to the two solar forCing scenarios on decadal time scales and also trends on centennial time scales. Differences between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions are highlighted, including impacts of the time lagged reSponse of the lower atmosphere and ocean. This contrasts with studies that assume separate equilibrium conditions at solar maximum and minimum. We discuss model feedback mechanisms involved in the solar forced climate variations.

  4. Response-Time Variability Is Related to Parent Ratings of Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Martin, Cristina Dominguez; Mairena, Maria Angeles; Di Martino, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Isquith, Peter K.; Gioia, Gerard; Petkova, Eva; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with ADHD are often characterized as inconsistent across many contexts. ADHD is also associated with deficits in executive function. We examined the relationships between response time (RT) variability on five brief computer tasks to parents' ratings of ADHD-related features and executive function in a group of children with…

  5. An Investigation of Relationships Among Question Level, Response Level and Lapse Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel S.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Studied relationships among questioning lapse time'' and the cognitive levels of teachers' questions and youngsters' responses, using Bloom's taxonomy and tape recordings in student teaching. Concluded that teachers' questions above the memory level could serve as a mechanism for promoting youngsters' learning at higher cognitive levels. (CC)

  6. Circadian timed wakefulness at dawn opposes compensatory sleep responses after sleep deprivation in Octodon degus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kas, M J; Edgar, D M

    1999-01-01

    The circadian timing system in mammals is thought to promote wakefulness and oppose sleep drive that accumulates across the activity phase in diurnal and nocturnal species. Whether the circadian system actively opposes compensatory sleep responses in mammals with episodes of alertness consolidated a

  7. Comparison of response times of a mobile-web EHRs system using PHP and JSP languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Antón-Rodríguez, Míriam; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco Javier; Perozo-Rondón, Freddy José

    2012-12-01

    Performance evaluation is highly important in the Electronic Health Records (EHRs) system implementation. Response time's measurement can be considered as one manner to make that evaluation. In the e-health field, after the creation of EHRs available through different platforms such as Web and/or mobile, a performance evaluation is necessary. The operation of the system in the right way is essential. In this paper, a comparison of the response times for the MEHRmobile system is presented. The first version uses PHP language with a MySQL database and the second one employs JSP with an eXist database. Both versions have got the same functionalities. In addition to the technological aspects, a significant difference is the way the information is stored. The main goal of this paper is choosing the version which offers better response times. We have created a new benchmark to calculate the response times. Better results have been obtained for the PHP version. Nowadays, this version is being used for specialists from Fundación Intras, Spain.

  8. 14 CFR 1203.500 - Use of derivative classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of derivative classification. 1203.500... PROGRAM Derivative Classification § 1203.500 Use of derivative classification. The application of derivative classification markings is a responsibility of those who incorporate, paraphrase, restate,...

  9. Comparison of the Child-Turcotte-Pugh classification and the model for end-stage liver disease score as predictors of the severity of the systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing living-donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Cho, Mi-La; Heo, Yu-Jung; Choi, Jong-Ho; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Jaemin

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) classification system and the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score in predicting the severity of the systemic inflammatory response in living-donor liver transplantation patients. Recipients of liver graft were allocated to a recipient group (n = 39) and healthy donors to a donor group (n = 42). The association between the CTP classification, the MELD scores and perioperative cytokine concentrations in the recipient group was evaluated. The pro-inflammatory cytokines measured included interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α; the anti-inflammatory cytokines measured included IL-10 and IL-4. Cytokine concentrations were quantified using sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassays. The IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 concentrations in the recipient group were significantly higher than those in healthy donor group patients. All preoperative cytokine levels, except IL-6, increased in relation to the severity of liver disease, as measured by the CTP classification. Additionally, all cytokine levels, except IL-6, were significantly correlated preoperatively with MELD scores. However, the correlations diminished during the intraoperative period. The CTP classification and the MELD score are equally reliable in predicting the severity of the systemic inflammatory response, but only during the preoperative period.

  10. Choice and response time processes in the identification and categorization of unidimensional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacouture, Yves; Marley, A A J

    2004-10-01

    Lacouture and Marley (1991, 1995, 2001) have successfully modeled the probabilities of correct responses and the mean correct response times (RTs) in unidimensional absolute identification tasks for various stimulus ranges and stimulus/response set sizes, for individual and group data. These fits include those to a set of phenomena often referred to as end-anchor effects. A revised model, with the independent accumulator decision process replaced by a leaky competing accumulator decision process, fits the probabilities of correct responses and the full distributions of RTs in unidimensional absolute identification. The revised model is also applied successfully to a particular class of unidimensional categorization tasks. We discuss possible extensions for handling sequential effects in unidimensional absolute identification, and other extensions of the given class of categorization tasks that are of potential empirical and theoretical importance as a supplement to the study of multidimensional absolute identification tasks.

  11. Finite Difference Solution of Response Time Delay of Magneto-rhelological Damper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Mingsong; HOU Baolin

    2009-01-01

    Magneto-rhelological(MR) dampers are devices that employ rheological fluids to modify their mechanical properties. Their mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, lower power requirements, large force capacity, robustness and safe manner of operation in cases of failure have made them attractive devices for semi-active real-time control in civil, aerospace and automotive applications. Time response characteristic is one of the most important technical performances of MR dampers, and response time directly affects the control frequency, application range and the actual effect of MR dampers. In this study, one kind of finite difference solution for predicting the response time of magneto-rheological dampers from "off-state" to "on-state" is put forward. A laminar flow model is used to describe the flow in the MR valve, and a bi-viscous fluid flow model is utilized to describe the relationship of shear stress and shear rate of MR fluid. An explicit difference format is used to discretize the Novior-Stoks equation, and stability condition of this algorithm is built by Von-Neumann stability criterion. The pressure gradient along the flow duct is solved by a dichotomy algorithm with iteration, and the changing curve of the damping force versus time of MR damper is obtained as well. According to the abovementioned numerical algorithm, the damping forces versus time curves from "off-state" to "on-state" of a cylindrical piston type MR damper are computed. Moreover, the MR damper is installed in a material test system(MTS), the magnetic field in the wire circles of the MR damper is "triggered" when the MR damper is imposed to do a constant speed motion, and the damping force curves are recorded. The comparison between numerical results and experimental results indicates that this finite difference algorithm can be used to estimate the response time delay of MR dampers.

  12. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-08

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations.

  13. Real-time Kadanoff-Baym approach to nuclear response functions

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, H S

    2016-01-01

    Linear density response functions are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter of normal density by time-evolving two-time Green's functions in real time. Of particular interest is the effect of correlations. The system is therefore initially time-evolved with a collision term calculated in a direct Born approximation as well as with full (RPA) ring-summation until fully correlated. An external time-dependent potential is then applied. The ensuing density fluctuations are recorded to calculate the density response. This method was previously used by Kwong and Bonitz for studying plasma oscillations in a correlated electron gas. The energy-weighted sum-rule for the response function is guaranteed by using conserving self-energy insertions as the method then generates the full vertex-functions. These can alternatively be calculated by solving a Bethe -Salpeter equation as done in some previous works. The (first order) mean field is derived from a momentum-dependent (non-local) interaction while $2^{nd}$ order se...

  14. Dynamic response analysis of structure under time-variant interval process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Baizhan; Qin, Yuan; Yu, Dejie; Jiang, Chao

    2016-10-01

    Due to the aggressiveness of the environmental factor, the variation of the dynamic load, the degeneration of the material property and the wear of the machine surface, parameters related with the structure are distinctly time-variant. Typical model for time-variant uncertainties is the random process model which is constructed on the basis of a large number of samples. In this work, we propose a time-variant interval process model which can be effectively used to deal with time-variant uncertainties with limit information. And then two methods are presented for the dynamic response analysis of the structure under the time-variant interval process model. The first one is the direct Monte Carlo method (DMCM) whose computational burden is relative high. The second one is the Monte Carlo method based on the Chebyshev polynomial expansion (MCM-CPE) whose computational efficiency is high. In MCM-CPE, the dynamic response of the structure is approximated by the Chebyshev polynomials which can be efficiently calculated, and then the variational range of the dynamic response is estimated according to the samples yielded by the Monte Carlo method. To solve the dependency phenomenon of the interval operation, the affine arithmetic is integrated into the Chebyshev polynomial expansion. The computational effectiveness and efficiency of MCM-CPE is verified by two numerical examples, including a spring-mass-damper system and a shell structure.

  15. Dose-response association between leisure time physical activity and work ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Sundstrup, Emil

    2015-01-01

    , lifestyle and chronic disease showed that the duration of high-intensity physical activity during leisure was positively associated with work ability, in a dose-response fashion (p high-intensity physical activity per week had on average 8 points higher work ability...... than those not performing such activities. The duration of low-intensity leisure-time physical activity was not associated with work ability (p = 0.5668). CONCLUSIONS: The duration of high-intensity physical activity during leisure time is associated in a dose-response fashion with work ability......INTRODUCTION: Regular physical activity is important for longevity and health, but knowledge about the optimal dose of physical activity for maintaining good work ability is unknown. This study investigates the association between intensity and duration of physical activity during leisure time...

  16. The role of hillslopes in stream flow response: connectivity, flow path, and transit time

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K. J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface flow from hillslopes is widely recognized as an important contributor to stream flow generation; however, processes that control how and when hillslopes connect to streams remain unclear. Much of the difficulty in deciphering hillslope response in the stream is due to riparian zone modulation of these inputs. We investigated stream and hillslope runoff dynamics in a 10 ha catchment in the western Cascades of Oregon where the riparian zone has been removed by debris flows, providing an unambiguous hillslope hydrologic signal to the stream channel. Water transit time was used as a framework to develop a conceptual stream flow generation model for the small basin. We based our conceptualization on observations of hydrometric, stable isotope, and applied tracer responses and computed transit times for multiple runoff components using a simple linear systems model. Event water mean transit times (8 to 34 h) and rapid breakthrough from applied hillslope tracer additions, demonstrated that contributing areas extend far upslope during events. Despite rapid hillslope transport processes during events, vadose zone water and runoff mean transit times during non-storm conditions were greater than the timescale of storm events. Vadose zone water mean transit times ranged between 10 and 25 days. Hillslope seepage and catchment baseflow mean transit times were between 1 and 2 years. We describe a conceptual model that captures variable physical flow pathways and transit times through changing antecedent wetness conditions that illustrate the different stages of hillslope and stream connectivity.

  17. Mean Transit Time as a Predictor of Groundwater Discharge Response in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solder, J. E.; Heilweil, V. M.; Stolp, B. J.; Susong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries support 40 million municipal water users and 5.5 million acres of agriculture in the south western United States (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012). Recent estimates by Rumsey et al. (2015) suggest that a significant portion (about 50 percent) of surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is sustained by groundwater discharge to streams. Predicted climate variation (Cook et al., 2015) and increased water demand (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012) within the UCRB suggest future decreases in groundwater discharge, however transient groundwater responses are not well understood. In this study we calculate groundwater mean transit time (MTT) and transit time distribution (TTD) as predictors of the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress. Samples from nineteen large springs within the UCRB were analyzed for environmental tracers to determine MTT and TTD. The predictive value of the MTT is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the 19 springs range from 10 to 15,000 years with a flow-weighted average of 1,650 years. The composite TTD of the 19 springs suggest that flowpaths representing 45 percent of their combined discharge have transit times greater than 100 years. However, spring discharge records indicate that flow responds to drought on much shorter (0.5 - 6 year) time scales, indicative of a hydraulic pressure response. Springs with shorter MTTs ( 100) also show a hydraulic pressure response. While not fully representative of the UCRB, results from the 19 springs indicate that groundwater discharge responds to climate variation and water-demand imbalances over a relatively short time period of years.

  18. Early Flood Detection for Rapid Humanitarian Response: Harnessing Near Real-Time Satellite and Twitter Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenden Jongman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Humanitarian organizations have a crucial role in response and relief efforts after floods. The effectiveness of disaster response is contingent on accurate and timely information regarding the location, timing and impacts of the event. Here we show how two near-real-time data sources, satellite observations of water coverage and flood-related social media activity from Twitter, can be used to support rapid disaster response, using case-studies in the Philippines and Pakistan. For these countries we analyze information from disaster response organizations, the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS satellite flood signal, and flood-related Twitter activity analysis. The results demonstrate that these sources of near-real-time information can be used to gain a quicker understanding of the location, the timing, as well as the causes and impacts of floods. In terms of location, we produce daily impact maps based on both satellite information and social media, which can dynamically and rapidly outline the affected area during a disaster. In terms of timing, the results show that GFDS and/or Twitter signals flagging ongoing or upcoming flooding are regularly available one to several days before the event was reported to humanitarian organizations. In terms of event understanding, we show that both GFDS and social media can be used to detect and understand unexpected or controversial flood events, for example due to the sudden opening of hydropower dams or the breaching of flood protection. The performance of the GFDS and Twitter data for early detection and location mapping is mixed, depending on specific hydrological circumstances (GFDS and social media penetration (Twitter. Further research is needed to improve the interpretation of the GFDS signal in different situations, and to improve the pre-processing of social media data for operational use.

  19. Time of day influences the voluntary intake and behavioral response to methamphetamine and food reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Diana R; Hart, Carl L; Robotham, Margaret; Tariq, Maliha; Le Sauter, Joseph; Silver, Rae

    2013-09-01

    The circadian timing system influences a vast array of behavioral responses. Substantial evidence indicates a role for the circadian system in regulating reward processing. Here we explore time of day effects on drug anticipation, locomotor activity, and voluntary methamphetamine (MA) and food intake in animals with ad libitum food access. We compared responses to drug versus a palatable treat during their normal sleep times in early day (zeitgeber time (ZT) 0400) or late day (ZT 1000). In the first study, using a between-subjects design, mice were given daily 1-h access to either peanut butter (PB-Alone) or to a low or high concentration of MA mixed in PB (MA+PB). In study 2, we repeated the experiment using a within-subjects design in which mice could choose between PB-Alone and MA+PB at either ZT 0400 or 1000. In study 3, the effects of MA-alone were investigated by evaluating anticipatory activity preceding exposure to nebulized MA at ZT 0400 vs. ZT 1000. Time of day effects were observed for both drug and palatable treat, such that in the between groups design, animals showed greater intake, anticipatory activity, and post-ingestional activity in the early day. Furthermore, there were differences among mice in the amount of MA ingested but individuals were self-consistent in their daily intake. The results for the within-subjects experiment also revealed robust individual differences in preference for MA+PB or PB-Alone. Interestingly, time of day effects on intake were observed only for the preferred substance. Anticipatory activity preceding administration of MA by nebulization was also greater at ZT 0400 than ZT 1000. Finally, pharmacokinetic response to MA administered intraperitoneally did not vary as a function of time of administration. The results indicate that time of day is an important variable mediating the voluntary intake and behavioral effects of reinforcers.

  20. Time-variant modelling of heart rate responses to exercise intensity during road cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, Joris; Berckmans, Daniel; Aerts, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if heart rate responses to training intensity during road cycling could be modelled with compact time-variant mathematical model structures. The model performance was evaluated in terms of model order (complexity), number of inputs and parameter estimation methods used (time-invariant vs. time-variant). Thirteen male cyclists performed two identical cycling tests of 27 km on the road. Uphill sections were introduced to induce dynamic variations in heart rate. The heart rate and training intensity, represented by power output and road inclination, were measured in real-time. Taking only power as system input allowed to explain the variations in heart rate in an accurate way R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, since adding the road inclination as an additional input did not significantly improve the modelling performance R2 T = 0.87 ± 0.08, P = 0.32. Furthermore, we demonstrated that models with first-order dynamics accurately describes the heart rate responses to power variations R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, but that more complex second-order model structures R2 T = 0.88 ± 0.08 were significantly better than the first-order model structures (P = 0.028). Finally, the heart rate dynamics appeared to be time-variant, since the time-variant model structures R2 T = 0.89 ± 0.07 were significantly better than the time-invariant model structures R2 T = 0.84 ± 0.08, P = 0.0002. So, compact time-variant second-order model structures could be used to model the heart rate response to training intensity as a basis for training optimisation.

  1. Analytical solution for beam with time-dependent boundary conditions versus response spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, P.F.; Panahi, K.K. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This paper studies the responses of a uniform simple beam for which the supports are subjected to time-dependent conditions. Analytical solution in terms of series was presented for two cases: (1) Two supports of a simple beam are subjected to a harmonic motion, and (2) One of the two supports is stationary while the other is subjected to a harmonic motion. The results of the analytical solution were investigated and compared with the results of conventional response spectrum method using the beam finite element model. One of the applications of the results presented in this paper can be used to assess the adequacy and accuracy of the engineering approaches such as response spectra methods. It has been found that, when the excitation frequency equals the fundamental frequency of the beam, the results from response spectrum method are in good agreement with the exact calculation. The effects of initial conditions on the responses are also examined. It seems that the non-zero initial velocity has pronounced effects on the displacement time histories but it has no effect on the maximum accelerations. (author)

  2. An explicit time domain solution for ground stratum response to harmonic moving loan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuecheng Bian; Yunmin Chen

    2006-01-01

    Based on the thin 1ayer method originally proposed in frequency domain, an explicit time domain semi-analytical solution has been developed for simulating three-dimensional layered ground responses to harmonic moving loads. The Fourier-Laplace transforms were applied to derive the transformed solution that satisfied the boundary conditions of horizontal infinities. The eigenvalue decomposition was performed with respect to Laplace parameter to express the ground motion corresponding to the eigenmodes. The formulation for each eigenmode incorporating the moving load expression was transformed back into time domain analytically, and the global system responses were given by means of the general mode superposition method. The proposed explicit time domain solution is suitable for studying various types of moving load acting on or inside the ground. In this paper a moving harmonic load with rectangular distribution was adopted to demonstrate the ground response simulation. Two illustrative examples for moving load with speeds below or above the ground Rayleigh wave velocity were presented to test the computational accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach. A parametric study was also performed to investigate the influences of soil properties on the ground responses.

  3. Larger Neural Responses Produce BOLD Signals That Begin Earlier in Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena eThompson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI analyses commonly rely on the assumption that the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic response functions (HRFs are independent of the amplitude of the neural signals that give rise to them. The validity of this assumption is particularly important for techniques that use fMRI to resolve sub-second timing distinctions between responses, in order to make inferences about the ordering of neural processes. Whether or not the detailed shape of the HRF is independent of neural response amplitude remains an open question, however. We performed experiments in which we measured responses in primary visual cortex (V1 to large, contrast-reversing checkerboards at a range of contrast levels, which should produce varying amounts of neural activity. Ten subjects (ages 22-52 were studied in each of two experiments using 3 Tesla scanners. We used rapid, 250 msec, temporal sampling (repetition time, or TR and both short and long inter-stimulus interval (ISI stimulus presentations. We tested for a systematic relationship between the onset of the HRF and its amplitude across conditions, and found a strong negative correlation between the two measures when stimuli were separated in time (long- and medium-ISI experiments, but not the short-ISI experiment. Thus, stimuli that produce larger neural responses, as indexed by HRF amplitude, also produced HRFs with shorter onsets. The relationship between amplitude and latency was strongest in voxels with lowest mean-normalized variance (i.e., parenchymal voxels. The onset differences observed in the longer-ISI experiments are likely attributable to mechanisms of neurovascular coupling, since they are substantially larger than reported differences in the onset of action potentials in V1 as a function of response amplitude.

  4. 精神疲劳实时监测中多面部特征时序分类模型%Time-series classification model based on multiple facial feature for real-time mental fatigue monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云华; 张灵; 丁伍洋; 严明玉

    2013-01-01

    针对现有疲劳监测方法仅根据单帧图像嘴巴形态进行哈欠识别准确率低,采用阈值法分析眨眼参数适应性较差,无法对疲劳状态的过渡进行实时监测等问题,提出一种新的进行精神疲劳实时监测的多面部特征时序分类模型.首先,通过面部视觉特征提取张口度曲线与虹膜似圆比曲线;然后,采用滑动窗口分段、隐马尔可夫模型(HMM)建模等方法在张口度曲线的基础上构建哈欠特征时序并进行类别标记,在虹膜似圆比曲线的基础上构建眨眼持续时间时序并进行类别标记;最后,在HMM的基础上增加时间戳,以便自适应地选取时序初始时刻点并进行多个特征时序的同步与标记结果的融合.实验结果表明,本文模型可降低哈欠误判率,对不同年龄的人群眨眼具有很好的适应性,并可实现对精神疲劳过渡状态的实时监测.%In computer vision based fatigue monitoring,there are still some unresolved issues remained,including low recognition accuracy in yawn detection based on a single-frame; poor adaptability in blink analysis because of the required threshold,the inability to monitor the transition stages of fatigue in real-time.Attempted to solve these problems,we propose a new classification model in this paper,which is based on two feature time-series for real-time mental fatigue monitoring.First,the mouth opening degree and iris circularity ratio are calculated through facial visual feature extraction.Based on this,we can generate a corresponding time-series called α (the proportion of the time during which mouth opening exceeds a given threshold) time series and eye blink time (EBT) time series.Then,using sliding window to partition and annotate the two kinds of time series and build hidden markov model (HMM) for EBT time series.Finally,add a time stamp on HMM to adaptively calculate the initial time point of the next time series,in addition,we can use it to perform the

  5. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M., E-mail: isobe@nifs.ac.jp; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Misawa, T. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori 590-0494 (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho 039-3212 (Japan); Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S. [Toshiba Corporation, Fuchu 183-8511 (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Toshiba Nuclear Engineering Services Corporation, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  6. On the best learning algorithm for web services response time prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Albu, Razvan-Daniel; Popentiu-Vladicescu, Florin

    2013-01-01

    an application is. A Web service is better imagined as an application "segment," or better as a program enabler. Performance is an important quality aspect of Web services because of their distributed nature. Predicting the response of web services during their operation is very important.......In this article we will examine the effect of different learning algorithms, while training the MLP (Multilayer Perceptron) with the intention of predicting web services response time. Web services do not necessitate a user interface. This may seem contradictory to most people's concept of what...

  7. Individual classification of ADHD children by right prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a go/no-go task as assessed by fNIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukifumi Monden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While a growing body of neurocognitive research has explored the neural substrates associated with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD, an objective biomarker for diagnosis has not been established. The advent of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS, which is a noninvasive and unrestrictive method of functional neuroimaging, raised the possibility of introducing functional neuroimaging diagnosis in young ADHD children. Previously, our fNIRS-based measurements successfully visualized the hypoactivation pattern in the right prefrontal cortex during a go/no-go task in ADHD children compared with typically developing control children at a group level. The current study aimed to explore a method of individual differentiation between ADHD and typically developing control children using multichannel fNIRS, emphasizing how spatial distribution and amplitude of hemodynamic response are associated with inhibition-related right prefrontal dysfunction. Thirty ADHD and thirty typically developing control children underwent a go/no-go task, and their cortical hemodynamics were assessed using fNIRS. We explored specific regions of interest (ROIs and cut-off amplitudes for cortical activation to distinguish ADHD children from control children. The ROI located on the border of inferior and middle frontal gyri yielded the most accurate discrimination. Furthermore, we adapted well-formed formulae for the constituent channels of the optimized ROI, leading to improved classification accuracy with an area under the curve value of 85% and with 90% sensitivity. Thus, the right prefrontal hypoactivation assessed by fNIRS would serve as a potentially effective biomarker for classifying ADHD children at the individual level.

  8. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system after first-time lower extremity revascularizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Guzman, R.J. (Raul J.); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective:__ The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was proposed to predict 1-year amputation risk and potential benefit from revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the predictive ability of this scale in a real-w

  9. Can a Clinical Test of Reaction Time Predict a Functional Head-Protective Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECKNER, JAMES T.; LIPPS, DAVID B.; KIM, HOGENE; RICHARDSON, JAMES K.; ASHTON-MILLER, JAMES A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Reaction time is commonly prolonged after a sport-related concussion. Besides being a marker for injury, a rapid reaction time is necessary for protective maneuvers that can reduce the frequency and severity of additional head impacts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a clinical test of simple visuomotor reaction time predicted the time taken to raise the hands to protect the head from a rapidly approaching ball. Methods Twenty-six healthy adult participants recruited from campus and community recreation and exercise facilities completed two experimental protocols during a single session: a manual visuomotor simple reaction time test (RTclin) and a sport-related head-protective response (RTsprt). RTclin measured the time required to catch a thin vertically oriented device on its release by the tester and was calculated from the distance the device fell before being arrested. RTsprt measured the time required to raise the hands from waist level to block a foam tennis ball fired toward the subject’s face from an air cannon and was determined using an optoelectronic camera system. A correlation coefficient was calculated between RTclin and RTsprt, with linear regression used to assess for effect modification by other covariates. Results A strong positive correlation was found between RTclin and RTsprt (r = 0.725, P < 0.001) independent of age, gender, height, or weight. Conclusions RTclin is predictive of a functional sport-related head-protective response. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a clinical test predicting the ability to protect the head in a simulated sport environment. This correlation with a functional head-protective response is a relevant consideration for the potential use of RTclin as part of a multifaceted concussion assessment program. PMID:20689458

  10. Can response time be trained with bilateral limb training in children with Down syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiksha Tilak Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Response time (RT, that is, the time taken to respond is known to be delayed in children with Down syndrome (DS. We performed a pilot study to evaluate whether bilateral limb training can be used to train RT, in children with DS. Settings and Design: 10 children with DS (5 males were recruited from a special school in a suburban region using convenience sampling. Subjects and Methods: Response time was measured using an indigenously developed RT Analyzer, before and after intervention, from right and left hand. Structured bilateral limb training was given for a period of 4 weeks, using low-cost, locally available materials, in community settings. Statistical Analysis Used: The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Significant improvements in RT following 4 weeks of intervention were seen in the left hand (P = 0.006 but not in the right hand (P = 0.104. Conclusions: Response time can be trained in children with DS using 4 weeks of bilateral limb training activities using low-cost, locally available materials.

  11. Changes in the timing of responses following spells of high speed flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.T.V. Adiseshiah

    1955-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the important signs of fatigue in pilots is prolongation of the time taken to respond to signals for action. Since promptness in action is essential in high speed flying, it was of interest to see whether any changes occur in the timing of response of IAF pilots after routing flying sorties. This study was carried out on a group of IAF jet fighter pilots stationed at Palam, New Delhi during the Summer months of 1954. The pilots were tested immediately before and after their flying exercises by measuring their response times to three arrangements of stimuli presented in rapid succession, so as to determine the time required for an immediate response, a discrimination and a choice. Analysis of results showed that there was slight prolongation in the post-flight values This difference was most marked after 'hard' stories. Of the various alternative explanations considered in order to account for this difference, 'transient, fatigue appears to be most plausible.

  12. Response timing and muscular coordination in fencing: a comparison of elite and novice fencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L R; Walmsley, A

    2000-12-01

    Reaction time (RT), movement time (MT), total response time (RMT) and accuracy of elite and novice fencers was studied under three levels of target choice (single-, two- and four-targets) with three variations of movement distance (short, medium and long lunge). In addition, electromyographic activity (EMG) of selected upper and lower limb muscles was used to compare the two groups. The elite subjects were faster for RT and RMT and displayed a higher level of accuracy. The hypothesis that increasing choice would cause increases in RT was not upheld. Except for some differentiation between the short and the two longer distances, the effects of movement distance were not marked. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of EMG revealed the high consistency of response patterns within subjects and highlighted the synergistic roles of selected muscles in distinguishing between elite and novice fencers. These findings confirm that differences in the technical skill of fencers can be distinguished in the laboratory through a combination of response timing measures in association with measures of muscle action. They also draw attention to practical implications for individual skill assessment and training. Analysis of pre-movement muscle activity provided moderate support for the hypothesis that it was part of a single control process and indicates that a dual process can involve both the maintenance of postural stability and the generation of movement. It is suggested that different movement contexts can lead to different levels of coordination between the system controlling posture and that controlling movement.

  13. The Effects of Time on Task in Response Selection--An ERP Study of Mental Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möckel, Tina; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2015-06-09

    Long lasting involvement in a cognitive task leads to mental fatigue. Substantial efforts have been undertaken to understand this phenomenon. However, it has been demonstrated that some changes with time on task are not only related to mental fatigue. The present study intends to clarify these effects of time on task unrelated to mental fatigue on response selection processes at the behavioural and electrophysiological level (using event-related potentials, ERPs). Participants had to perform a Simon task for more than 3 hours and rated their experienced mental fatigue and motivation to continue with the task at several time points during the experiment. The results show that at the beginning of the experiment some unspecific modulations of training and adaptation are evident. With time on task participants' ability to resolve response conflict appears to become impaired. The results reveal that time on task effects cannot be completely explained by mental fatigue. Instead, it seems that an interplay of adaptation at the beginning and motivational effects in the course of a task modulate performance and neurophysiological parameters. In future studies it will be important to account for the relative contribution of adaptation and motivation parameters when time on task effects are investigated.

  14. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (fast chromatography on a state-of-the-art column (38,000 plates), we evaluate the responses produced by different present generation instruments, each with their unique black box digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter. We discuss time uncertainties related to the choice of sampling frequency. Finally, we suggest steps to obtain optimum results from a given system.

  15. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species' flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge.

  16. Streamflow response of a small forested catchment on different time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zabaleta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydrological response of a catchment to rainfall on different time scales is result of a complex system involving a range of physical processes which may operate simultaneously and have different spatial and temporal influences. This paper presents the analysis of streamflow response of a small humid-temperate catchment (Aixola, 4.8 km2 in the Basque Country on different time scales and discusses the role of the controlling factors. Firstly, daily time series analysis was used to establish a hypothesis on the general functioning of the catchment through the relationship between precipitation and discharge on an annual and multi-annual scale (2003–2008. Second, rainfall-runoff relationships and relationships among several hydrological variables, including catchment antecedent conditions, were explored at the event scale (222 events to check and improve the hypothesis. Finally, the evolution of electrical conductivity (EC during some of the monitored storm events (28 events was examined to identify the time-origin of waters. Quick response of the catchment to almost all the rainfall events as well as a considerable regulation capacity was deduced from the correlation and spectral analyses. These results agree with runoff event scale data analysis; however the event analysis revealed the non-linearity of the system, as antecedent conditions play a significant role in this catchment. Further, analysis at the event scale made possible to clarify factors controlling (precipitation, precipitation intensity and initial discharge the different aspects of the runoff response (runoff coefficient and discharge increase for this catchment. Finally, the evolution of EC of the waters enabled the time origin (event or pre-event waters of the quickflow to be established; specifically, the conductivity showed that pre-event waters usually represent a high percentage of the total discharge during runoff peaks. The importance of soil waters in the

  17. Classification of waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.P.; Sauer, M.; Rojahn, T. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk GmbH, Kahl am Main (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    A barrel gamma scanning unit has been in use at the VAK for the classification of radioactive waste materials since 1998. The unit provides the facility operator with the data required for classification of waste barrels. Once these data have been entered into the AVK data processing system, the radiological status of raw waste as well as pre-treated and processed waste can be tracked from the point of origin to the point at which the waste is delivered to a final storage. Since the barrel gamma scanning unit was commissioned in 1998, approximately 900 barrels have been measured and the relevant data required for classification collected and analyzed. Based on the positive results of experience in the use of the mobile barrel gamma scanning unit, the VAK now offers the classification of barrels as a service to external users. Depending upon waste quantity accumulation, this measurement unit offers facility operators a reliable and time-saving and cost-effective means of identifying and documenting the radioactivity inventory of barrels scheduled for final storage. (orig.)

  18. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand the evolution of the energy content during a vehicle crossing event. With this information it is possible to distinguish the effect of several of the governing factors involved in the dynamic response including vehicle's speed and axle configuration as well as non-linear behaviour of the structure.

  19. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M; Gouveia, Célia; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-02

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change.

  20. Transient Hydroelastic Response of VLFS by FEM with Impedance Boundary Conditions in Time Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Liu-chao; LIU Hua

    2005-01-01

    A time-dependent finite element method (FEM) is developed to analyze the transient hydroelastic responses of very large floating structures (VLFS) subjected to dynamic loads. The hydrodynamic problem is formulated based on the linear theory of fluid and the structural response is analyzed based on the thin plate theory. The FEM truncates the unbounded fluid domain by introducing an artificial boundary surface, thus defining a finite computational domain. At this boundary surface an impedance boundary conditions are applied so that no wave reflections occur. In the proposed scheme, all of the procedures are processed directly in time domain, which is efficient for nonlinear analyses of structure floating on unbounded fluid. Numerical results indicate acceptable accuracy of the proposed method.

  1. An integrated model of choices and response times in absolute identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott D; Marley, A A J; Donkin, Christopher; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Recent theoretical developments in the field of absolute identification have stressed differences between relative and absolute processes, that is, whether stimulus magnitudes are judged relative to a shorter term context provided by recently presented stimuli or a longer term context provided by the entire set of stimuli. The authors developed a model (SAMBA: selective attention, mapping, and ballistic accumulation) that integrates shorter and longer term memory processes and accounts for both the choices made and the associated response time distributions, including sequential effects in each. The model's predictions arise as a consequence of its architecture and require estimation of only a few parameters with values that are consistent across numerous data sets. The authors show that SAMBA provides a quantitative account of benchmark choice phenomena in classical absolute identification experiments and in contemporary data involving both choice and response time.

  2. Multi-objective Optimization of Controller for Process with Reverse Response and Dead Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guo-liang; SHAO Hui-he

    2009-01-01

    Due to the difficulty of controlling the process with inverse response and dead time, a Multi-objective Optimization based on Genetic Algorithm (MOGA) method for tuning of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is proposed. The settings of the controller are valued by two criteria, the error between output and reference signals and control moves. An appropriate set of Pareto optimal setting of the PID controller is founded by analyzing the results of Pareto optimal surfaces for balancing the two criteria. A high order process with inverse response and dead time is used to illustrate the results of the proposed method. And the efficiency and robustness of the tuning method are evident compared with methods in recent literature.

  3. Time-course profiling of molecular stress responses to silver nanoparticles in the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Simonsen, Vibeke;

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity, particularly its temporal aspect, is currently limited in the literature. This study seeks to identify and profile changes in molecular response patterns over time during soil exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to AgNPs (82±27 nm......) with reference to dissolved silver salt (AgNO3). Principal component analysis of selected gene and enzyme response profiles revealed dissimilar patterns between AgNO3 and AgNP treatments and also over time. Despite the observed difference in molecular profiles, the body burdens of total Ag were within the same...... range (10–40 mg/kg dry weight worm) for both treatments with apparent correlation to the induction pattern of metallothionein. AgNO3 induced the genes and enzymes related to oxidative stress at day 1, after which markers of energy metabolism were all suppressed at day 2. Exposure to AgNPs likewise led...

  4. Effect of wind turbine response time on optimal dynamic induction control of wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munters, Wim; Meyers, Johan

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we extend recent research efforts on induction-based optimal control in large-eddy simulations of wind farms in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer. More precisely, we investigate the effect of wind turbine response time to requested power setpoints on achievable power gains. We do this by including a time-filtering of the thrust coefficient setpoints in the optimal control framework. We consider simulation cases restricted to underinduction compared to the Betz limit, as well as cases that also allow overinduction. Optimization results show that, except for the most restrictive underinductive slow-response case, all cases still yield increases in energy extraction in the order of 10% and more.

  5. Digital redesign of uncertain interval systems based on time-response resemblance via particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen-Chien; Lin, Geng-Yu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a particle swarm optimization (PSO) based approach is proposed to derive an optimal digital controller for redesigned digital systems having an interval plant based on time-response resemblance of the closed-loop systems. Because of difficulties in obtaining time-response envelopes for interval systems, the design problem is formulated as an optimization problem of a cost function in terms of aggregated deviation between the step responses corresponding to extremal energies of the redesigned digital system and those of their continuous counterpart. A proposed evolutionary framework incorporating three PSOs is subsequently presented to minimize the cost function to derive an optimal set of parameters for the digital controller, so that step response sequences corresponding to the extremal sequence energy of the redesigned digital system suitably approximate those of their continuous counterpart under the perturbation of the uncertain plant parameters. Computer simulations have shown that redesigned digital systems incorporating the PSO-derived digital controllers have better system performance than those using conventional open-loop discretization methods.

  6. Mid Frequency Shock Response Determination by Using Energy Flow Method and Time Domain Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hyun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock induced vibration can be more crucial in the mid frequency range where the dynamic couplings with structural parts and components play important roles. To estimate the behavior of structures in this frequency range where conventional analytical schemes, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA and finite element analysis (FEA methods may become inaccurate, many alternative methodologies have been tried up to date. This study presents an effective and practical method to accurately predict transient responses in the mid frequency range without having to resort to the large computational efforts. Specifically, the present study employs the more realistic frequency response functions (FRFs from the energy flow method (EFM which is a hybrid method combining the pseudo SEA equation (or SEA-Like equation and modal information obtained by the finite element analysis (FEA. Furthermore, to obtain the time responses synthesized with modal characteristics, a time domain correction is practiced with the input force signal and the reference FRF on a position of the response subsystem. A numerical simulation is performed for a simple five plate model to show its suitability and effectiveness over the standard analytical schemes.

  7. Timing of Ca2+ response in pancreatic beta-cells is related to mitochondrial mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, N; Abedi, G; Larsson-Nyrén, G

    2006-01-01

    timing are disturbed in beta-cells from hyperglycemic mice and one of the causes is likely to be an altered mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondria play a key role in the control of nutrient-induced insulin secretion. Here, we used confocal microscopy with the fluorescent probe MitoTracker Red CMXRos...... and Fluo-3 to study how the amount of active mitochondria is related to the lag-time and the magnitude of calcium response to 20mM glucose in isolated beta-cells and in cells within intact lean and ob/ob mouse islets. Results show that the mitochondrial mass is inversely correlated with the lag...

  8. Time course and dose response of alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coombes Jeff S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality particularly in patients with end stage kidney disease. Although observational data from the general population has shown dietary antioxidant intake is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, most clinical intervention trials have failed to support this relationship. This may be a consequence of not using an effective antioxidant dose and/or not investigating patients with elevated oxidative stress. The SPACE study, conducted in haemodialysis patients, reported that 800 IU/day of alpha tocopherol significantly reduced cardiovascular disease endpoints. A recent time course and dose response study conducted in hypercholesterolaemic patients that found 1600 IU/day of alpha tocopherol was an optimal dose. There is no such dose response data available for haemodialysis patients. Therefore the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different doses of oral alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress and the time taken to achieve this effect. Methods The study will consist of a time-course followed by a dose response study. In the time course study 20 haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress will take either 1600 IU/day natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for 20 weeks or placebo. Blood will be collected every two weeks and analysed for a marker of oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. The optimum time period to significantly decrease plasma F2-isoprostanes will be determined from this study. In the dose response study 60 patients will be randomised to receive either placebo, 100, 200, 400, 800 or 1600 IU/day of natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for a time period determined from the time course study. Blood will be collected at baseline and every two weeks and analysed for plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. It is hypothesised that

  9. Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Charles E; Keadle, S. K.; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose-response for se......Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose......-response for sedentary time and light-and moderateto-vigorous-intensity activity using restricted cubic splines, and 2) estimated the mortality benefits associated with replacing sedentary time with physical activity, accounting for total activity. Design: US adults (n = 4840) from NHANES (2003-2006) wore...... an accelerometer for #7 d and were followed prospectively for mortality. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for mortality associations with time spent sedentary and in light-and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity. Splines were used to graphically present...

  10. The pre-states, the time precision and the response pattern of oscillatory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xing

    1998-03-01

    Rate and temporal codes are two main strategies for encoding neural information. The temporal code contains more information but requires substantial timing precision of the spike discharges. Cortical neurons can respond to stimulation with good time precision. However, action potential responses depend not only upon the stimulus but also upon the history of a neuron. We have studied this problem with an oscillatory system: the primary afferent cells that innervate the ampullary electroreceptors in the paddlefish. The endogenous discharges represent a noisy oscillator. We demonstrate how the pre-state of a neuron affects the response timing precision to an applied stimulus, by re-ordering the data according to the time between the last endogenous spike and the delivery of the stimulus. Raster plots of discharges show clear striped patterns for the re-ordered data. In contrast, plots of the original data show random distributions or broadened stripes. We confirm this phenomenon by numerical simulation using a noisy Hodgkin-Huxley model with and without an endogenous oscillator. This technique can also be applied to other systems, e.g. cortical neurons, where oscillations are thought to be important. Oscillatory neurons demonstrate that the pre-state of the system is crucial in determining the post stimulus spike timing and precision.

  11. Real-time open-loop frequency response analysis of flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, J. T.; West, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed to compare the open-loop frequency response of a flight test aircraft real time with linear analysis predictions. The result is direct feedback to the flight control systems engineer on the validity of predictions and adds confidence for proceeding with envelope expansion. Further, gain and phase margins can be tracked for trends in a manner similar to the techniques used by structural dynamics engineers in tracking structural modal damping.

  12. Experimental Effects of Lime Application on Aquatic Macrophytes: 3. Growth Response Versus Exposure Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    ERDC/TN APCRP-EA-17 January 2008 Experimental Effects of Lime Application on Aquatic Macrophytes : 3. Growth Response Versus Exposure Time by William...be effective in both suppressing submersed macrophyte growth and changing species composition (Babin et al. 1992; Chambers et al. 2001; Prepas et al...16 cm height) filled with homogenized sediment (obtained from Eau Galle Reservoir , WI; see James et al. (2005) for a description of sediment

  13. Classification in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Jens Erik

    2004-01-01

    This paper surveys classification research literature, discusses various classification theories, and shows that the focus has traditionally been on establishing a scientific foundation for classification research. This paper argues that a shift has taken place, and suggests that contemporary...... classification research focus on contextual information as the guide for the design and construction of classification schemes....

  14. Evolvement of Classification Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hua

    2011-01-01

    As an independent industry, the emergence of the classification society was perhaps the demand of beneficial interests between shipowners, cargo owners and insurers at the earliest time. Today, as an indispensable link of the international maritime industry, class role has changed fundamentally. Start off from the demand of the insurersSeaborne trade, transport and insurance industries began to emerge successively in the 17th century. The massive risk and benefit brought by seaborne transport provided a difficult problem to insurers.

  15. Is overall similarity classification less effortful than single-dimension classification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Andy J; Milton, Fraser; Longmore, Christopher A; Hester, Sarah; Robinson, Jo

    2013-01-01

    It is sometimes argued that the implementation of an overall similarity classification is less effortful than the implementation of a single-dimension classification. In the current article, we argue that the evidence securely in support of this view is limited, and report additional evidence in support of the opposite proposition--overall similarity classification is more effortful than single-dimension classification. Using a match-to-standards procedure, Experiments 1A, 1B and 2 demonstrate that concurrent load reduces the prevalence of overall similarity classification, and that this effect is robust to changes in the concurrent load task employed, the level of time pressure experienced, and the short-term memory requirements of the classification task. Experiment 3 demonstrates that participants who produced overall similarity classifications from the outset have larger working memory capacities than those who produced single-dimension classifications initially, and Experiment 4 demonstrates that instructions to respond meticulously increase the prevalence of overall similarity classification.

  16. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  17. Sub-Millisecond Response Time in a Photorefractive Composite Operating under CW Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Stevens, Tyler E.; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Jin, Sung-Ho; Oh, Jin-Woo; Winiarz, Jeffrey G.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive study of photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals has yielded data indicating that the inclusion of such nanocrystals enhances the charge-carrier mobility, and subsequently leads to a reduction in the photorefractive response time. Unfortunately, the included nanocrystals may also act as a source of deep traps, resulting in diminished diffraction efficiencies as well as reduced two beam coupling gain coefficients. Nonetheless, previous studies indicate that this problem is mitigated through the inclusion of semiconductor nanocrystals possessing a relatively narrow band-gap. Here, we fully exploit this property by doping PbS nanocrystals into a newly formulated photorefractive composite based on molecular triphenyldiamine photosensitized with C60. Through this approach, response times of 399 μs are observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency, with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm-1 being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. It is anticipated that this approach can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of this class of materials.

  18. The response of nonlinear controlled system under an external excitation via time delay state feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Elnaggar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of primary, superharmonic of order five, and subharmonic of order one-three resonances for non-linear s.d.o.f. system with two distinct time-delays under an external excitation is investigated. The method of multiple scales is used to determine two first order ordinary differential equations which describe the modulation of the amplitudes and the phases. Steady-state solutions and their stabilities in each resonance are studied. Numerical results are obtained by using the Software of Mathematica, which presented in a group of figures. The effect of the feedback gains and time-delays on the non-linear response of the system is discussed and it is found that: an appropriate feedback can enhance the control performance. A suitable choice of the feedback gains and time-delays can enlarge the critical force amplitude, and reduce the peak amplitude of the response (or peak amplitude of the free oscillation term for the case of primary resonance (superharmonic resonance. Furthermore, a proper feedback can eliminate saddle-node bifurcation, thereby eliminating jump and hysteresis phenomena taking place in the corresponding uncontrolled system. For subharmonic resonance, an adequate feedback can reduce the regions of subharmonic resonance response.

  19. Comparing Response Times and Error Rates in a Simultaneous Masking Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Hermens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In simultaneous masking, performance on a foveally presented target is impaired by one or more flanking elements. Previous studies have demonstrated strong effects of the grouping of the target and the flankers on the strength of masking (e.g., Malania, Herzog & Westheimer, 2007. These studies have predominantly examined performance by measuring offset discrimination thresholds as a measure of performance, and it is therefore unclear whether other measures of performance provide similar outcomes. A recent study, which examined the role of grouping on error rates and response times in a speeded vernier offset discrimination task, similar to that used by Malania et al. (2007, suggested a possible dissociation between the two measures, with error rates mimicking threshold performance, but response times showing differential results (Panis & Hermens, 2014. We here report the outcomes of three experiments examining this possible dissociation, and demonstrate an overall similar pattern of results for error rates and response times across a broad range of mask layouts. Moreover, the pattern of results in our experiments strongly correlates with threshold performance reported earlier (Malania et al., 2007. Our results suggest that outcomes in a simultaneous masking paradigm do not critically depend on the outcome measure used, and therefore provide evidence for a common underlying mechanism.

  20. A Space-Time Finite Element Model for Design and Control Optimization of Nonlinear Dynamic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Moita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A design and control sensitivity analysis and multicriteria optimization formulation is derived for flexible mechanical systems. This formulation is implemented in an optimum design code and it is applied to the nonlinear dynamic response. By extending the spatial domain to the space-time domain and treating the design variables as control variables that do not change with time, the design space is included in the control space. Thus, one can unify in one single formulation the problems of optimum design and optimal control. Structural dimensions as well as lumped damping and stiffness parameters plus control driven forces, are considered as decision variables. The dynamic response and its sensitivity with respect to the design and control variables are discretized via space-time finite elements, and are integrated at-once, as it is traditionally used for static response. The adjoint system approach is used to determine the design sensitivities. Design optimization numerical examples are performed. Nonlinear programming and optimality criteria may be used for the optimization process. A normalized weighted bound formulation is used to handle multicriteria problems.

  1. Prediction of pharmacological and xenobiotic responses to drugs based on time course gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available More and more people are concerned by the risk of unexpected side effects observed in the later steps of the development of new drugs, either in late clinical development or after marketing approval. In order to reduce the risk of the side effects, it is important to look out for the possible xenobiotic responses at an early stage. We attempt such an effort through a prediction by assuming that similarities in microarray profiles indicate shared mechanisms of action and/or toxicological responses among the chemicals being compared. A large time course microarray database derived from livers of compound-treated rats with thirty-four distinct pharmacological and toxicological responses were studied. The mRMR (Minimum-Redundancy-Maximum-Relevance method and IFS (Incremental Feature Selection were used to select a compact feature set (141 features for the reduction of feature dimension and improvement of prediction performance. With these 141 features, the Leave-one-out cross-validation prediction accuracy of first order response using NNA (Nearest Neighbor Algorithm was 63.9%. Our method can be used for pharmacological and xenobiotic responses prediction of new compounds and accelerate drug development.

  2. Classification of Building Object Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn

    2011-01-01

    Development of the existing classification systems has been very difficult and time consuming tasks, where many considerations have been taken and many compromises have been made. The results reveal that, although the theoretical foundation was clarified, many deviations and shortcuts have been...... made. This is certainly the case in the Danish development. Based on the theories about these abstraction mechanisms, the basic principles for classification systems are presented and the observed misconceptions are analyses and explained. Furthermore, it is argued that the purpose of classification...

  3. Determination of the Timing and Level of Activities of Lumbopelvic Muscles in Response to Postural Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ebrahimi Takamjani

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most important concerns in orthopedic medicine is the low back. Considering the importance of muscle function in preventing LBT by controlling too much load and stress applied on the spinal joints and ligaments. Materials and Methods: The aim of this research was to determine the timing and level of activities of lumbopelvic muscles in response to postural perturbations caused by unexpected loading of the upper limbs in standing on three different supporting surfaces (neutral, positive slope, negative slope in 20 healthy females 18 to 30 years old ( = 23.20 SD = 2.55 . The electromyographic signals were recorded from the deltoid, gluteus maximus, internal oblique abdominis and lumbar paraspinal muscles of the dominant side of the body to evaluate the onset time, end time, level of muscle activity (RMS and duration of different muscles in one task and one muscle in different tasks. Results: The results showed that the agonists (posterior muscles activated at first to compensate the flexor torque caused by loading and then the antagonists (anterior muscles switched-on to compensate the reaction forces caused by agonist activities. With regards to continuous activity of internal oblique and its attachments via thoracalumbar fascia to the transverse processes of the lumbar vertebrae, it can be considered as one of the major stabilizer muscles of the trunk . Conclusion: Finally the results indicated that supporting surface type didn’t have any effect on timing and scaling of muscle activities in different tasks suggesting that probably spinal and trunk priprioceptors are just responsible for triggering postural responses and they don’t have any role in determining timing and scaling.

  4. Text Classification using Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Kamruzzaman, S M

    2010-01-01

    Text classification is the process of classifying documents into predefined categories based on their content. It is the automated assignment of natural language texts to predefined categories. Text classification is the primary requirement of text retrieval systems, which retrieve texts in response to a user query, and text understanding systems, which transform text in some way such as producing summaries, answering questions or extracting data. Existing supervised learning algorithms for classifying text need sufficient documents to learn accurately. This paper presents a new algorithm for text classification using artificial intelligence technique that requires fewer documents for training. Instead of using words, word relation i.e. association rules from these words is used to derive feature set from pre-classified text documents. The concept of na\\"ive Bayes classifier is then used on derived features and finally only a single concept of genetic algorithm has been added for final classification. A syste...

  5. Text Classification using Data Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Kamruzzaman, S M; Hasan, Ahmed Ryadh

    2010-01-01

    Text classification is the process of classifying documents into predefined categories based on their content. It is the automated assignment of natural language texts to predefined categories. Text classification is the primary requirement of text retrieval systems, which retrieve texts in response to a user query, and text understanding systems, which transform text in some way such as producing summaries, answering questions or extracting data. Existing supervised learning algorithms to automatically classify text need sufficient documents to learn accurately. This paper presents a new algorithm for text classification using data mining that requires fewer documents for training. Instead of using words, word relation i.e. association rules from these words is used to derive feature set from pre-classified text documents. The concept of Naive Bayes classifier is then used on derived features and finally only a single concept of Genetic Algorithm has been added for final classification. A system based on the...

  6. Competition for antigen between Th1 and Th2 responses determines the timing of the immune response switch during Mycobaterium avium subspecies paratuberulosis infection in ruminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesham Magombedze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Johne's disease (JD, a persistent and slow progressing infection of ruminants such as cows and sheep, is caused by slow replicating bacilli Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP infecting macrophages in the gut. Infected animals initially mount a cell-mediated CD4 T cell response against MAP which is characterized by the production of interferon gamma (Th1 response. Over time, Th1 response diminishes in most animals and antibody response to MAP antigens becomes dominant (Th2 response. The switch from Th1 to Th2 response occurs concomitantly with disease progression and shedding of the bacteria in feces. Mechanisms controlling this Th1/Th2 switch remain poorly understood. Because Th1 and Th2 responses are known to cross-inhibit each other, it is unclear why initially strong Th1 response is lost over time. Using a novel mathematical model of the immune response to MAP infection we show that the ability of extracellular bacteria to persist outside of macrophages naturally leads to switch of the cellular response to antibody production. Several additional mechanisms may also contribute to the timing of the Th1/Th2 switch including the rate of proliferation of Th1/Th2 responses at the site of infection, efficiency at which immune responses cross-inhibit each other, and the rate at which Th1 response becomes exhausted over time. Our basic model reasonably well explains four different kinetic patterns of the Th1/Th2 responses in MAP-infected sheep by variability in the initial bacterial dose and the efficiency of the MAP-specific T cell responses. Taken together, our novel mathematical model identifies factors of bacterial and host origin that drive kinetics of the immune response to MAP and provides the basis for testing the impact of vaccination or early treatment on the duration of infection.

  7. Modeling of time-dependent force response of fingertip to dynamic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J Z; Dong, R G; Smutz, W P; Schopper, A W

    2003-03-01

    An extended exposure to repeated loading on fingertip has been associated to many vascular, sensorineural, and musculoskeletal disorders in the fingers, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, hand-arm vibration syndrome, and flexor tenosynovitis. A better understanding of the pathomechanics of these sensorineural and vascular diseases in fingers requires a formulation of a biomechanical model of the fingertips and analyses to predict the mechanical responses of the soft tissues to dynamic loading. In the present study, a model based on finite element techniques has been developed to simulate the mechanical responses of the fingertips to dynamic loading. The proposed model is two-dimensional and incorporates the essential anatomical structures of a finger: skin, subcutaneous tissue, bone, and nail. The skin tissue is assumed to be hyperelastic and viscoelastic. The subcutaneous tissue was considered to be a nonlinear, biphasic material composed of a hyperelastic solid and an invicid fluid, while its hydraulic permeability was considered to be deformation dependent. Two series of numerical tests were performed using the proposed finger tip model to: (a) simulate the responses of the fingertip to repeated loading, where the contact plate was assumed to be fixed, and the bone within the fingertip was subjected to a prescribed sinusoidal displacement in vertical direction; (b) simulate the force response of the fingertip in a single keystroke, where the keyboard was composed of a hard plastic keycap, a rigid support block, and a nonlinear spring. The time-dependent behavior of the fingertip under dynamic loading was derived. The model predictions of the time-histories of force response of the fingertip and the phenomenon of fingertip separation from the contacting plate during cyclic loading agree well with the reported experimental observations.

  8. Enhanced responses to tumor immunization following total body irradiation are time-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Diab

    Full Text Available The development of successful cancer vaccines is contingent on the ability to induce effective and persistent anti-tumor immunity against self-antigens that do not typically elicit immune responses. In this study, we examine the effects of a non-myeloablative dose of total body irradiation on the ability of tumor-naïve mice to respond to DNA vaccines against melanoma. We demonstrate that irradiation followed by lymphocyte infusion results in a dramatic increase in responsiveness to tumor vaccination, with augmentation of T cell responses to tumor antigens and tumor eradication. In irradiated mice, infused CD8(+ T cells expand in an environment that is relatively depleted in regulatory T cells, and this correlates with improved CD8(+ T cell functionality. We also observe an increase in the frequency of dendritic cells displaying an activated phenotype within lymphoid organs in the first 24 hours after irradiation. Intriguingly, both the relative decrease in regulatory T cells and increase in activated dendritic cells correspond with a brief window of augmented responsiveness to immunization. After this 24 hour window, the numbers of dendritic cells decline, as does the ability of mice to respond to immunizations. When immunizations are initiated within the period of augmented dendritic cell activation, mice develop anti-tumor responses that show increased durability as well as magnitude, and this approach leads to improved survival in experiments with mice bearing established tumors as well as in a spontaneous melanoma model. We conclude that irradiation can produce potent immune adjuvant effects independent of its ability to induce tumor ablation, and that the timing of immunization and lymphocyte infusion in the irradiated host are crucial for generating optimal anti-tumor immunity. Clinical strategies using these approaches must therefore optimize such parameters, as the correct timing of infusion and vaccination may mean the difference

  9. Time-Course Analysis of Gene Expression During the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hypoxic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrine Bendjilali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cells experience hypoxia, or low oxygen, and respond by dramatically altering gene expression. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes that respond are required for many oxygen-dependent cellular processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis, and redox regulation. To more fully characterize the global response to hypoxia, we exposed yeast to hypoxic conditions, extracted RNA at different times, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq analysis. Time-course statistical analysis revealed hundreds of genes that changed expression by up to 550-fold. The genes responded with varying kinetics suggesting that multiple regulatory pathways are involved. We identified most known oxygen-regulated genes and also uncovered new regulated genes. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that the lysine methyltransferase EFM6 and the recombinase DMC1, both conserved in humans, are indeed oxygen-responsive. Looking more broadly, oxygen-regulated genes participate in expected processes like respiration and lipid metabolism, but also in unexpected processes like amino acid and vitamin metabolism. Using principle component analysis, we discovered that the hypoxic response largely occurs during the first 2 hr and then a new steady-state expression state is achieved. Moreover, we show that the oxygen-dependent genes are not part of the previously described environmental stress response (ESR consisting of genes that respond to diverse types of stress. While hypoxia appears to cause a transient stress, the hypoxic response is mostly characterized by a transition to a new state of gene expression. In summary, our results reveal that hypoxia causes widespread and complex changes in gene expression to prepare the cell to function with little or no oxygen.

  10. Effect of bimodularity on frequency response of cylindrical panels using Galerkin time domain approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kallol Khan; Badri Prasad Patel; Yogendra Nath

    2010-12-01

    The forced vibration analysis of bimodulus material laminated structures is a challenging problem due to non-smooth nonlinear nature of governing equations. The most commonly used direct time integration schemes show numerical instability and do not predict steady state response except for limited number of cases without considering in-plane inertia. This is due to the sudden change of restoring force from positive/negative half cycle to negative/positive half cycle exciting higher modes/harmonics at every instant of a cycle change leading to numerical instability in the time marching scheme. In the present work, Galerkin time domain approach is successfully used for the forced vibration analysis of bimodular cylindrical panels. The effect of bimodularity ratio on the frequency response of cylindrical panels for few typical geometrical and lamination parameters is studied for the first time. It is found that the positive half cycle amplitude is greater than the negative half cycle amplitude for $E_{2t}/E_{2c} < 1$ and is smaller for $E_{2t}/E_{2c} > 1$. Further, the percentage difference of positive and negative half cycle amplitudes decreases with the increase in $E_{2t}/E_{2c}$. The stresses under dynamic loading are different for positive and negative half of a vibration cycle.

  11. Rasch analysis for the evaluation of rank of student response time in multiple choice examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James J; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of computerized testing has broadened the scope of person assessment beyond the usual accuracy-ability domain to include response time analyses. Because there are contexts in which speed is important, e.g. medical practice, it is important to develop tools by which individuals can be evaluated for speed. In this paper, the ability of Rasch measurement to convert ordinal nonparametric rankings of speed to measures is examined and compared to similar measures derived from parametric analysis of response times (pace) and semi-parametric logarithmic time-scaling procedures. Assuming that similar spans of the measures were used, non-parametric methods of raw ranking or percentile-ranking of persons by questions gave statistically acceptable person estimates of speed virtually identical to the parametric or semi-parametric methods. Because no assumptions were made about the underlying time distributions with ranking, generality of conclusions was enhanced. The main drawbacks of the non-parametric ranking procedures were the lack of information on question duration and the overall assignment by the model of variance to the person by question interaction.

  12. Hardware Approach of a Multipurpose Finite Impulse Response Filter for Real-Time Filtering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. S. Amin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Finite Impulse Response (FIR filters are widely used in various DSP applications. The design of digital FIR filters is a very basic problem in digital signal processing. A FIR filter with multiple operation capability is certainly very useful for any real-time filtering applications. This article presents a multipurpose FIR filter design modeled by the hardware description language VHDL for real-time filtering application. Approach: The VHDL has its concept of concurrency to cope with the parallelism of digital hardware. The novel feature is the capability of the design to accomplish up to 127variable filter order and an arbitrary filter frequency response. The coefficients are calculated by Hamming windowing technique. Basing on selection embedded in the design, the model is able to execute highpass, lowpass, bandstop and bandpass filtering operations. It is set at 8-bit signed data processing. To filter the input data in time domain, Linear Constant Coefficient Difference Equation (LCCDE is used by the filter. Results: The design outputs are validated through simulation and compilation. The output results are also compared with the MATLAB implemented calculated output results to test the correctness that proves the effectiveness of the design. Conclusion: With the capability of filtering signal in real time mode utilizing arbitrary filter shape, the multipurpose filter proves to be versatile.

  13. Response time distributions in rapid chess: A large-scale decision making experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Sigman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid chess provides an unparalleled laboratory to understand decision making in a natural environment. In a chess game, players choose consecutively around 40 moves in a finite time budget. The goodness of each choice can be determined quantitatively since current chess algorithms estimate precisely the value of a position. Web-based chess produces vast amounts of data, millions of decisions per day, incommensurable with traditional psychological experiments. We generated a database of response times and position value in rapid chess games. We measured robust emergent statistical observables: 1 Response time (RT distributions are long-tailed and show qualitatively distinct forms at different stages of the game, 2 RT of successive moves are highly correlated both for intra- and inter-player moves. These findings have theoretical implications since they deny two basic assumptions of sequential decision making algorithms: RTs are not stationary and can not be generated by a state function. Our results also have practical implications. First, we characterized the capacity of blunders and score fluctuations to predict a player strength, which is yet an open problem in chess softwares. Second, we show that the winning likelihood can be reliably estimated from a weighted combination of remaining times and position evaluation.

  14. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe.

  15. Physiological demands of women's rugby union: time-motion analysis and heart rate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virr, Jody Lynn; Game, Alex; Bell, Gordon John; Syrotuik, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of women's rugby union match play using time-motion analysis and heart rate (HR) response. Thirty-eight premier club level female rugby players, ages 18-34 years were videotaped and HRs monitored for a full match. Performances were coded into 12 different movement categories: 5 speeds of locomotion (standing, walking, jogging, striding, sprinting), 4 forms of intensive non-running exertion (ruck/maul/tackle, pack down, scrum, lift) and 3 discrete activities (kick, jump, open field tackle). The main results revealed that backs spend significantly more time sprinting and walking whereas forwards spend more time in intensive non-running exertion and jogging. Forwards also had a significantly higher total work frequency compared to the backs, but a higher total rest frequency compared to the backs. In terms of HR responses, forwards displayed higher mean HRs throughout the match and more time above 80% of their maximum HR than backs. In summary, women's rugby union is characterised by intermittent bursts of high-intensity activity, where forwards and backs have similar anaerobic energy demands, but different specific match demands.

  16. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-08-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  17. Modeling of time-dose-LET effects in the cellular response to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, Lisa Antje

    2015-07-20

    This work is dedicated to the elucidation of time-dose- and if applicable linear energy transfer (LET) effects in the cellular response to ion or photon radiation. In particular, the common concept of the Local Effect Model (LEM) and the Giant Loop Binary Lesion (GLOBLE) model, which explains cell survival probabilities on the hand of clustering of double-strand breaks (DSB) in micrometer-sized sub-structural units of the DNA, was investigated with regard to temporal aspects. In previous studies with the LEM and GLOBLE model, it has been demonstrated that the definition of two lesion classes, characterized by single or multiple DSB in a DNA giant loop, with two repair fidelities is adequate to comprehensively describe the dose dependence of the cellular response to instantaneous photon irradiation or ion irradiation with varying LET. Furthermore, with the GLOBLE model for photon radiation, it has been shown that the assignment of two repair time scales to the two lesion classes allows to adequately reproduce time-dose effects after photon irradiation with an arbitrary constant dose-rate. In this work, the results of four projects that strengthen the mechanistic consistency and the practical applicability of the LEM and GLOBLE model will be presented. First, it was found that the GLOBLE model is applicable to describe time-dose effects in the cellular response to two split photon doses and in the occurrence of deterministic radiation effects. Second, in a comparison of ten models for the temporal course of DSB rejoining, it was revealed that a bi-exponential approach, as suggested by the LEM and GLOBLE model, finds a relatively large support by 61 experimental data sets. Third, in a comparison of four kinetic photon cell survival models that was based on fits to 13 dose-rate experiments, it was shown that the GLOBLE model performs well with respect to e.g. accuracy, parsimony, reliability and other factors that characterize a good approach. Last but not least, the

  18. 28 CFR 524.76 - Appeals of CIM classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeals of CIM classification. 524.76..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.76 Appeals of CIM classification. An inmate may at any time appeal (through the Administrative Remedy Program)...

  19. Repeated diffusion MRI reveals earliest time point for stratification of radiotherapy response in brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Johannesen, Helle H.; Geertsen, Poul; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2017-04-01

    An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later. In this prospective study we investigated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient derived from diffusion weighted MRI as potential early biomarkers for radiotherapy response of brain metastases. It was a particular aim to assess the optimal time point for acquiring the DW-MRI scan during the course of treatment, since to our knowledge this important question has not been addressed directly in previous studies. Twenty-nine metastases (N  =  29) from twenty-one patients, treated with whole-brain fractionated external beam RT were analyzed. Patients were scanned with a 1 T MRI system to acquire DW-, T2*W-, T2W- and T1W scans, before start of RT, at each fraction and at follow up two to three months after RT. The DW-MRI parameters were derived using regions of interest based on high b-value images (b  =  800 s mm‑2). Both volumetric and RECIST criteria were applied for response evaluation. It was found that in non-responding metastases the mean ADC decreased and in responding metastases it increased. The volume based response proved to be far more consistently predictable by the ADC change found at fraction number 7 and later, compared to the linear response (RECIST). The perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient did not show sufficient prognostic value with either response assessment criteria. In conclusion this study shows that the ADC derived using high b-values may be a reliable biomarker for early assessment of radiotherapy response for brain metastases patients. The earliest response stratification can be achieved using two DW-MRI scans, one pre-treatment and one at treatment day 7–9 (equivalent to 21

  20. The Time Response of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers to Heavily Ionizing Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A; Bogomilov, M; Booth, C; Borghi, S; Catanesi, M G; Chimenti, P; Gastaldi, Ugo; Giani, S; Graulich, J S; Grégoire, G; Grossheim, A; Guglielmi, A; Ivantchenko, V; Kolev, D; Meurer, C; Mezzetto, M; Panman, J; Popov, B; Radicioni, E; Schroeter, R; Temnikov, P; Chernyaev, E; Tsenov, R; Tsukerman, I; Wiebusch, C

    2007-01-01

    The HARP system of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) was designed to perform particle identification by the measurement of the difference in the time-of-flight of different particles. In previous papers an apparent discrepancy was shown between the response of the RPCs to minimum ionizing pions and heavily ionizing protons. Using the kinematics of elastic scattering off a hydrogen target a controlled beam of low momentum recoil protons was directed onto the chambers. With this method the trajectory and momentum, and hence the time-of-flight of the protons can be precisely predicted without need for a measurement of momentum of the protons. It is demonstrated that the measurement of the time-of-arrival of particles by the thin gas-gap glass RPC system of the HARP experiment depends on the primary ionization deposited by the particle in the detector.