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Sample records for classification oncogenic pathway

  1. Epigenetic Pathways of Oncogenic Viruses: Therapeutic Promises.

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    El-Araby, Amr M; Fouad, Abdelrahman A; Hanbal, Amr M; Abdelwahab, Sara M; Qassem, Omar M; El-Araby, Moustafa E

    2016-02-01

    Cancerous transformation comprises different events that are both genetic and epigenetic. The ultimate goal for such events is to maintain cell survival and proliferation. This transformation occurs as a consequence of different features such as environmental and genetic factors, as well as some types of infection. Many viral infections are considered to be causative agents of a number of different malignancies. To convert normal cells into cancerous cells, oncogenic viruses must function at the epigenetic level to communicate with their host cells. Oncogenic viruses encode certain epigenetic factors that lead to the immortality and proliferation of infected cells. The epigenetic effectors produced by oncogenic viruses constitute appealing targets to prevent and treat malignant diseases caused by these viruses. In this review, we highlight the importance of epigenetic reprogramming for virus-induced oncogenesis, with special emphasis on viral epigenetic oncoproteins as therapeutic targets. The discovery of molecular components that target epigenetic pathways, especially viral factors, is also discussed. PMID:26754591

  2. Genome and transcriptome delineation of two major oncogenic pathways governing invasive ductal breast cancer development

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    Aswad, Luay; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Grinchuk, Oleg; Ivshina, Anna V.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is a major histo-morphologic type of breast cancer. Histological grading (HG) of IDC is widely adopted by oncologists as a prognostic factor. However, HG evaluation is highly subjective with only 50%–85% inter-observer agreements. Specifically, the subjectivity in the assignment of the intermediate grade (histologic grade 2, HG2) breast cancers (comprising ~50% of IDC cases) results in uncertain disease outcome prediction and sub-optimal systemic therapy. Despite several attempts to identify the mechanisms underlying the HG classification, their molecular bases are poorly understood. We performed integrative bioinformatics analysis of TCGA and several other cohorts (total 1246 patients). We identified a 22-gene tumor aggressiveness grading classifier (22g-TAG) that reflects global bifurcation in the IDC transcriptomes and reclassified patients with HG2 tumors into two genetically and clinically distinct subclasses: histological grade 1-like (HG1-like) and histological grade 3-like (HG3-like). The expression profiles and clinical outcomes of these subclasses were similar to the HG1 and HG3 tumors, respectively. We further reclassified IDC into low genetic grade (LGG = HG1+HG1-like) and high genetic grade (HGG = HG3-like+HG3) subclasses. For the HG1-like and HG3-like IDCs we found subclass-specific DNA alterations, somatic mutations, oncogenic pathways, cell cycle/mitosis and stem cell-like expression signatures that discriminate between these tumors. We found similar molecular patterns in the LGG and HGG tumor classes respectively. Our results suggest the existence of two genetically-predefined IDC classes, LGG and HGG, driven by distinct oncogenic pathways. They provide novel prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers and could open unique opportunities for personalized systemic therapies of IDC patients. PMID:26474389

  3. REGγ is associated with multiple oncogenic pathways in human cancers

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    He Jing

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest a role of the proteasome activator, REGγ, in cancer progression. Since there are limited numbers of known REGγ targets, it is not known which cancers and pathways are associated with REGγ. Methods REGγ protein expressions in four different cancers were investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC analysis. Following NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database search, microarray platform validation, differential expressions of REGγ in corresponding cancers were statistically analyzed. Genes highly correlated with REGγ were defined based on Pearson's correlation coefficient. Functional links were estimated by Ingenuity Core analysis. Finally, validation was performed by RT-PCR analysis in established cancer cell lines and IHC in human colon cancer tissues Results Here, we demonstrate overexpression of REGγ in four different cancer types by micro-tissue array analysis. Using meta-analysis of publicly available microarray databases and biological studies, we verified elevated REGγ gene expression in the four types of cancers and identified genes significantly correlated with REGγ expression, including genes in p53, Myc pathways, and multiple other cancer-related pathways. The predicted correlations were largely consistent with quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions This study provides us novel insights in REGγ gene expression profiles and its link to multiple cancer-related pathways in cancers. Our results indicate potentially important pathogenic roles of REGγ in multiple cancer types and implicate REGγ as a putative cancer marker.

  4. REGγ is associated with multiple oncogenic pathways in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies suggest a role of the proteasome activator, REGγ, in cancer progression. Since there are limited numbers of known REGγ targets, it is not known which cancers and pathways are associated with REGγ. REGγ protein expressions in four different cancers were investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Following NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database search, microarray platform validation, differential expressions of REGγ in corresponding cancers were statistically analyzed. Genes highly correlated with REGγ were defined based on Pearson's correlation coefficient. Functional links were estimated by Ingenuity Core analysis. Finally, validation was performed by RT-PCR analysis in established cancer cell lines and IHC in human colon cancer tissues Here, we demonstrate overexpression of REGγ in four different cancer types by micro-tissue array analysis. Using meta-analysis of publicly available microarray databases and biological studies, we verified elevated REGγ gene expression in the four types of cancers and identified genes significantly correlated with REGγ expression, including genes in p53, Myc pathways, and multiple other cancer-related pathways. The predicted correlations were largely consistent with quantitative RT-PCR analysis. This study provides us novel insights in REGγ gene expression profiles and its link to multiple cancer-related pathways in cancers. Our results indicate potentially important pathogenic roles of REGγ in multiple cancer types and implicate REGγ as a putative cancer marker

  5. Carcinogen-specific mutations in preferred Ras-Raf pathway oncogenes directed by strand bias.

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    Keller, Ross R; Gestl, Shelley A; Lu, Amy Q; Hoke, Alicia; Feith, David J; Gunther, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    Carcinogen exposures inscribe mutation patterns on cancer genomes and sometimes bias the acquisition of driver mutations toward preferred oncogenes, potentially dictating sensitivity to targeted agents. Whether and how carcinogen-specific mutation patterns direct activation of preferred oncogenes remains poorly understood. Here, mouse models of breast cancer were exploited to uncover a mechanistic link between strand-biased mutagenesis and oncogene preference. When chemical carcinogens were employed during Wnt1-initiated mammary tumorigenesis, exposure to either 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) dramatically accelerated tumor onset. Mammary tumors that followed DMBA exposure nearly always activated the Ras pathway via somatic Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations. Surprisingly, mammary tumors that followed ENU exposure typically lacked Hras mutations, and instead activated the Ras pathway downstream via Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations. Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations involve an A-to-T change on the sense strand, whereas Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations involve an inverse T-to-A change, suggesting that strand-biased mutagenesis may determine oncogene preference. To examine this possibility further, we turned to an alternative Wnt-driven tumor model in which carcinogen exposures augment a latent mammary tumor predisposition in Apc(min) mice. DMBA and ENU each accelerated mammary tumor onset in Apc(min) mice by introducing somatic, "second-hit" Apc mutations. Consistent with our strand bias model, DMBA and ENU generated strikingly distinct Apc mutation patterns, including stringently strand-inverse mutation signatures at A:T sites. Crucially, these contrasting signatures precisely match those proposed to confer bias toward Hras(CAA61CTA) versus Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations in the original tumor sets. Our findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby exposure history acts through strand-biased mutagenesis to specify activation of preferred oncogenes. PMID:27207659

  6. Pinworm and TNKS inhibitors, an eccentric duo to derail the oncogenic WNT pathway.

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    Ouelaa-Benslama, Radia; Emami, Shahin

    2011-09-01

    The WNT/β-catenin pathway underlies many human cancers through mutations in the APC, β-catenin, and Axin genes. Activation of WNT signalling can also occur due to the localization of glycogen synthase kinase 3β(GSK3β) to the multivesicular bodies, which prevents the degradation of β-catenin. This leads to accumulation of β-catenin within the cytoplasmic matrix and nucleus of cancer cells, which triggers the transactivation of genes involved in cell proliferation, including various oncogenes. Recent research into the mechanistic regulations of molecule homeostasis and identification of new small-targeted inhibitors has provided further insights into the WNT signalling pathway and its role in human cancers. Novel WNT inhibitors target unsuspected cellular enzymes, such as tankyrases, or casein kinase 1α/γ, which controls the destruction of β-catenin and GSK3β. These could lead to the identification of new biomarkers and WNT-targeted inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:21782548

  7. Multidimensional Screening Platform for Simultaneously Targeting Oncogenic KRAS and Hypoxia-Inducible Factors Pathways in Colorectal Cancer.

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    Bousquet, Michelle S; Ma, Jia Jia; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Havre, Pamela A; Yao, Jin; Dang, Nam H; Paul, Valerie J; Carney, Thomas J; Dang, Long H; Luesch, Hendrik

    2016-05-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genetic disease, due to progressive accumulation of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Large scale genomic sequencing projects revealed >100 mutations in any individual CRC. Many of these mutations are likely passenger mutations, and fewer are driver mutations. Of these, activating mutations in RAS proteins are essential for cancer initiation, progression, and/or resistance to therapy. There has been significant interest in developing drugs targeting mutated cancer gene products or downstream signaling pathways. Due to the number of mutations involved and inherent redundancy in intracellular signaling, drugs targeting one mutation or pathway have been either ineffective or led to rapid resistance. We have devised a strategy whereby multiple cancer pathways may be simultaneously targeted for drug discovery. For proof-of-concept, we targeted the oncogenic KRAS and HIF pathways, since oncogenic KRAS has been shown to be required for cancer initiation and progression, and HIF-1α and HIF-2α are induced by the majority of mutated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CRC. We have generated isogenic cell lines defective in either oncogenic KRAS or both HIF-1α and HIF-2α and subjected them to multiplex genomic, siRNA, and high-throughput small molecule screening. We have identified potential drug targets and compounds for preclinical and clinical development. Screening of our marine natural product library led to the rediscovery of the microtubule agent dolastatin 10 and the class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor largazole to inhibit oncogenic KRAS and HIF pathways. Largazole was further validated as an antiangiogenic agent in a HIF-dependent manner in human cells and in vivo in zebrafish using a genetic model with activated HIF. Our general strategy, coupling functional genomics with drug susceptibility or chemical-genetic interaction screens, enables the identification of potential drug targets and candidates with

  8. Constitutive Photomorphogensis Protein1 (COP1 mediated p53 pathway and its oncogenic role

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    Md. Golam Rabbani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed the COP1 mediated tumor suppressor protein p53 pathway and its oncogenic role. COP1 is a negative regulator of p53 and acts as a pivotal controller of p53-Akt death-live switch (Protein kinase B. In presence of p53, COP1 is overexpressed in breast, ovarian, gastric cancers, even without MDM2 (Mouse double minute-2 amplification. Following DNA damage, COP1 is phosphorylated instantly by ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated and degraded by 14-3-3 and #963; following nuclear export and enhancing ubiquitination. In ATM lacking cell, other kinases, i.e. ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein, Jun kinases and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase cause COP1 and CSN3 (COP9 signalosome complex subunit-3 phosphorylation and initiate COP1's down regulation. Although, it has been previously found that co-knockout of MDM2 and COP1 enhance p53's half life by eight fold, the reason is still unknown. Additionally, while interacting with p53, COP1 upregulate MDM2's E3 ubiquitin ligase, Akt, CSN6 (COP9 signalosome 6 activity and inhibit 14-3-3 and #963;'s negative regulation on MDM2 and COP1 itself. Conclusively, there persists an amplification loop among COP1, MDM2, Akt and 14-3-3 and #963; to regulate p53's stability and activity. However, the role of another tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue is yet to be discovered. This study provides insight on the molecular genetic pathways related to cancer and might be helpful for therapeutic inventions. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(5.000: 142-151

  9. The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review).

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    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2015-10-01

    The cell survival pathways of the diploblastic early multicellular eukaryotic hosts contain and operate the molecular machinery resembling those of malignantly transformed individual cells of highly advanced multicellular hosts (including Homo). In the present review, the STAT/NF-κB pathway of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis is compared with that of human tumors (malignant lymphomas, including Reed-Sternberg cells) pointing out similarities, including possible viral initiation in both cases. In the ctenophore genome and proteome, β-catenin gains intranuclear advantages due to a physiologically weak destructive complex in the cytoplasm, and lack of natural inhibitors (the dickkopfs). Thus, a scenario similar to what tumor cells initiate and achieve is presented through several constitutive loss-of-function type mutations in the destructive complex and in the elimination of inhibitors. Vice versa, malignantly transformed individual cells of advanced multicellular hosts assume pheno-genotypic resemblance to cells of unicellular or early multicellular hosts, and presumably to their ancient predecessors, by returning to the semblance of immortality and to the resumption of the state of high degree of resistance to physicochemical insults. Human leukemogenic and oncogenic pathways are presented for comparisons. The supreme bioengineers RNA/DNA complex encoded both the malignantly transformed immortal cell and the human cerebral cortex. The former generates molecules for the immortality of cellular life in the Universe. The latter invents the inhibitors of the process in order to gain control over it. PMID:26239915

  10. KLK6-regulated miRNA networks activate oncogenic pathways in breast cancer subtypes.

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    Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos G; Ding, Qiang; Pampalakis, Georgios; White, Nicole M A; Boulos, Peter; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Yousef, George M

    2016-08-01

    KLK6 is expressed in normal mammary tissues and is aberrantly regulated in breast cancer. At physiological levels of expression, i.e. those found in normal mammary tissues, KLK6 acts as a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer. However, aberrant overexpression of KLK6 (i.e. 50-100-fold higher than normal), a characteristic of a subset of human breast cancers is associated with increased tumorigenicity (Pampalakis et al. Cancer Res 69:3779-3787, 2009). Here, we stably transfected KLK6-non-expressing MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with the full-length KLK6 cDNA to overexpress KLK6 at levels comparable to those observed in patients, and investigated potential oncogenic miRNA networks regulated by these abnormally high KLK6 expression levels and increased activity of this serine protease. A number of miRNAs that are upregulated (e.g. miR-146a) or downregulated (e.g. miR-34a) via KLK6-induced alterations in the miRNA biogenesis machinery were identified. Integrated experimental and bioinformatics analyses identified convergent miRNA networks targeting the cell cycle, MYC, MAPK, and other signaling pathways. In large clinical datasets, significant correlations between KLK6 and downstream MAPK and MYC targets at both the RNA and protein levels was confirmed, as well as negative correlation with GATA3. It was also demonstrated that KLK6 overexpression and likely its proteolytic activity is associated with alterations in downstream miRNAs and their targets, and these differ with the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The data partly explains the different characteristics of breast cancer subtypes. Importantly, we introduce a combined KLK6-CDKN1B+MYC+CDKN1C score for prediction of long-term patient survival outcomes, with higher scores indicating poor survival. PMID:27093921

  11. A novel function of the human oncogene Stil: Regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility through the Shh pathway.

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    Li, Lei; Carr, Aprell L; Sun, Lei; Drewing, Audrey; Lee, Jessica; Rao, Zihe

    2015-01-01

    The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in vertebrate species. Here, we report new findings of Stil in the regulation of toxic susceptibility in mammalian dopaminergic (DA)-like PC12 cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Stil expression did not affect the survival of proliferating PC12 cells but caused a significant amount of cell death in differentiated neurons after toxic drug treatment. In contrast, overexpression of Stil increased toxic susceptibility only in proliferating cells but produced no effect in mature neurons. Exogenetic inactivation or activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction mimicked the effect of Stil knockdown or overexpression in regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility, suggesting that Stil exerts its role through the Shh pathway. Together, the data provide evidence for novel functions of the human oncogene Stil in neural toxic susceptibility. PMID:26549353

  12. Medulloblastoma: molecular pathways and histopathological classification.

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    Borowska, Anna; Jóźwiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death among pediatric patients, and medulloblastoma constitutes 20% of them. Currently, the treatment is risk-adapted. Maximum surgical resection is recommended, always followed by chemotherapy and neuroaxis radiotherapy. In spite of the improving survival rate, survivors succumb to treatment-induced side effects. To reduce toxic effects, molecular-targeted treatment is proposed. Medulloblastoma research is very robust, and new articles on the subject are published daily. In the current review we have tried to bring together molecular pathophysiology of the neoplasm and current pathological classification, thus making an effort to relate tumor biology and the histological picture. PMID:27279861

  13. Hepatoma-derived growth factor/nucleolin axis as a novel oncogenic pathway in liver carcinogenesis.

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    Chen, San-Cher; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Kung, Mei-Lang; Chu, Tian-Huei; Yi, Li-Na; Huang, Shih-Tsung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Liu, Li-Feng; Wu, Han-Chung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chang, Min-Chi; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2015-06-30

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) overexpression is involved in liver fibrosis and carcinogenesis. However, the receptor(s) and signaling for HDGF remain unclear. By using affinity chromatography and proteomic techniques, nucleolin (NCL) was identified and validated as a HDGF-interacting membrane protein in hepatoma cells. Exogenous HDGF elicited the membrane NCL accumulation within 0.5 hour by protein stabilization and transcriptional NCL upregulation within 24 hours. Blockade of surface NCL by antibodies neutralization potently suppressed HDGF uptake and HDGF-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in hepatoma cells. By using rescectd hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, immunohistochemical analysis revealed NCL overexpression was correlated with tumour grades, vascular invasion, serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and the poor survival in HCC patients. Multivariate analysis showed NCL was an independent prognostic factor for survival outcome of HCC patients after surgery. To delineate the role of NCL in liver carcinogenesis, ectopic NCL overexpression promoted the oncogenic behaviours and induced PI3K/Akt activation in hepatoma cells. Conversely, NCL knockdown by RNA interference attenuated the oncogenic behaviours and PI3K/Akt signaling, which could be partially rescued by exogenous HDGF supply. In summary, this study provides the first evidence that surface NCL transmits the oncogenic signaling of HDGF and facilitates a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25938538

  14. MicroRNA-135b promotes cancer progression by acting as a downstream effector of oncogenic pathways in colon cancer.

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    Valeri, Nicola; Braconi, Chiara; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Murgia, Claudio; Lampis, Andrea; Paulus-Hock, Viola; Hart, Jonathan R; Ueno, Lynn; Grivennikov, Sergei I; Lovat, Francesca; Paone, Alessio; Cascione, Luciano; Sumani, Khlea M; Veronese, Angelo; Fabbri, Muller; Carasi, Stefania; Alder, Hansjuerg; Lanza, Giovanni; Gafa', Roberta; Moyer, Mary P; Ridgway, Rachel A; Cordero, Julia; Nuovo, Gerard J; Frankel, Wendy L; Rugge, Massimo; Fassan, Matteo; Groden, Joanna; Vogt, Peter K; Karin, Michael; Sansom, Owen J; Croce, Carlo M

    2014-04-14

    MicroRNA deregulation is frequent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs), but little is known as to whether it represents a bystander event or actually drives tumor progression in vivo. We show that miR-135b overexpression is triggered in mice and humans by APC loss, PTEN/PI3K pathway deregulation, and SRC overexpression and promotes tumor transformation and progression. We show that miR-135b upregulation is common in sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease-associated human CRCs and correlates with tumor stage and poor clinical outcome. Inhibition of miR-135b in CRC mouse models reduces tumor growth by controlling genes involved in proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis. We identify miR-135b as a key downsteam effector of oncogenic pathways and a potential target for CRC treatment. PMID:24735923

  15. Divergent genomic and epigenomic landscapes of lung cancer subtypes underscore the selection of different oncogenic pathways during tumor development.

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    William W Lockwood

    Full Text Available For therapeutic purposes, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has traditionally been regarded as a single disease. However, recent evidence suggest that the two major subtypes of NSCLC, adenocarcinoma (AC and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC respond differently to both molecular targeted and new generation chemotherapies. Therefore, identifying the molecular differences between these tumor types may impact novel treatment strategy. We performed the first large-scale analysis of 261 primary NSCLC tumors (169 AC and 92 SqCC, integrating genome-wide DNA copy number, methylation and gene expression profiles to identify subtype-specific molecular alterations relevant to new agent design and choice of therapy. Comparison of AC and SqCC genomic and epigenomic landscapes revealed 778 altered genes with corresponding expression changes that are selected during tumor development in a subtype-specific manner. Analysis of >200 additional NSCLCs confirmed that these genes are responsible for driving the differential development and resulting phenotypes of AC and SqCC. Importantly, we identified key oncogenic pathways disrupted in each subtype that likely serve as the basis for their differential tumor biology and clinical outcomes. Downregulation of HNF4α target genes was the most common pathway specific to AC, while SqCC demonstrated disruption of numerous histone modifying enzymes as well as the transcription factor E2F1. In silico screening of candidate therapeutic compounds using subtype-specific pathway components identified HDAC and PI3K inhibitors as potential treatments tailored to lung SqCC. Together, our findings suggest that AC and SqCC develop through distinct pathogenetic pathways that have significant implication in our approach to the clinical management of NSCLC.

  16. Cross-regulation between oncogenic BRAF(V600E kinase and the MST1 pathway in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

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    Seong Jin Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The BRAF(V600E mutation leading to constitutive signaling of MEK-ERK pathways causes papillary thyroid cancer (PTC. Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A, which is an important regulator of MST1 tumor suppressor pathways, is inactivated by hypermethylation of its promoter region in 20 to 32% of PTC. However, in PTC without RASSF1A methylation, the regulatory mechanisms of RASSF1A-MST1 pathways remain to be elucidated, and the functional cooperation or cross regulation between BRAF(V600E and MST1,which activates Foxo3,has not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The negative regulators of the cell cycle, p21 and p27, are strongly induced by transcriptional activation of FoxO3 in BRAF(V600E positive thyroid cancer cells. The FoxO3 transactivation is augmented by RASSF1A and the MST1 signaling pathway. Interestingly, introduction of BRAF(V600Emarkedly abolished FoxO3 transactivation and resulted in the suppression of p21 and p27 expression. The suppression of FoxO3 transactivation by BRAF(V600Eis strongly increased by coexpression of MST1 but it is not observed in the cells in which MST1, but not MST2,is silenced. Mechanistically, BRAF(V600Ewas able to bind to the C-terminal region of MST1 and resulted in the suppression of MST1 kinase activities. The induction of the G1-checkpoint CDK inhibitors, p21 and p27,by the RASSF1A-MST1-FoxO3 pathway facilitates cellular apoptosis, whereas addition of BRAF(V600E inhibits the apoptotic processes through the inactivation of MST1. Transgenic induction of BRAF(V600Ein the thyroid gland results in cancers resembling human papillary thyroid cancers. The development of BRAF(V600Etransgenic mice with the MST1 knockout background showed that these mice had abundant foci of poorly differentiated carcinomas and large areas without follicular architecture or colloid formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study revealed that the oncogenic effect of BRAF(V600E is

  17. Gonadotropins Activate Oncogenic Pathways to Enhance Proliferation in Normal Mouse Ovarian Surface Epithelium

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    Joanna E. Burdette

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy affecting American women. The gonadotropins, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH, have been implicated as growth factors in ovarian cancer. In the present study, pathways activated by FSH and LH in normal ovarian surface epithelium (OSE grown in their microenvironment were investigated. Gonadotropins increased proliferation in both three-dimensional (3D ovarian organ culture and in a two-dimensional (2D normal mouse cell line. A mouse cancer pathway qPCR array using mRNA collected from 3D organ cultures identified Akt as a transcriptionally upregulated target following stimulation with FSH, LH and the combination of FSH and LH. Activation of additional pathways, such as Birc5, Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdkn2a identified in the 3D organ cultures, were validated by western blot using the 2D cell line. Akt and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors blocked gonadotropin-induced cell proliferation in 3D organ and 2D cell culture. OSE isolated from 3D organ cultures stimulated with LH or hydrogen peroxide initiated growth in soft agar. Hydrogen peroxide stimulated colonies were further enhanced when supplemented with FSH. LH colony formation and FSH promotion were blocked by Akt and EGFR inhibitors. These data suggest that the gonadotropins stimulate some of the same proliferative pathways in normal OSE that are activated in ovarian cancers.

  18. Developmental defects in zebrafish for classification of EGF pathway inhibitors

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    Pruvot, Benoist; Curé, Yoann; Djiotsa, Joachim; Voncken, Audrey; Muller, Marc, E-mail: m.muller@ulg.ac.be

    2014-01-15

    One of the major challenges when testing drug candidates targeted at a specific pathway in whole animals is the discrimination between specific effects and unwanted, off-target effects. Here we used the zebrafish to define several developmental defects caused by impairment of Egf signaling, a major pathway of interest in tumor biology. We inactivated Egf signaling by genetically blocking Egf expression or using specific inhibitors of the Egf receptor function. We show that the combined occurrence of defects in cartilage formation, disturbance of blood flow in the trunk and a decrease of myelin basic protein expression represent good indicators for impairment of Egf signaling. Finally, we present a classification of known tyrosine kinase inhibitors according to their specificity for the Egf pathway. In conclusion, we show that developmental indicators can help to discriminate between specific effects on the target pathway from off-target effects in molecularly targeted drug screening experiments in whole animal systems. - Highlights: • We analyze the functions of Egf signaling on zebrafish development. • Genetic blocking of Egf expression causes cartilage, myelin and circulatory defects. • Chemical inhibition of Egf receptor function causes similar defects. • Developmental defects can reveal the specificity of Egf pathway inhibitors.

  19. RABEX-5 is upregulated and plays an oncogenic role in gastric cancer development by activating the VEGF signaling pathway.

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    Shuang Wang

    Full Text Available RABEX-5, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for RAB-5, is implicated in tumorigenesis and in the development of certain human cancers. Here, we report that RABEX-5 promotes tumor growth and the metastatic ability of gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of RABEX-5 is significantly higher in gastric cancer tissues and is associated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis. In addition, targeted silencing of RABEX-5 reduced gastric cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro via the induction of a G0/G1 phase arrest, and stimulated gastric cancer cell apoptosis. Knockdown of RABEX-5 also inhibited wound healing, migration and the invasive abilities of gastric cancer cells. The results of in vivo animal experiments were also consistent with these in vitro findings. Silencing of RABEX-5 led to decreased expression of VEGF. These results indicate that RABEX-5 is upregulated and plays an oncogenic role in gastric cancer development by activating the VEGF signaling pathway.

  20. Broccoli consumption interacts with GSTM1 to perturb oncogenic signalling pathways in the prostate.

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    Maria Traka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies suggest that people who consume more than one portion of cruciferous vegetables per week are at lower risk of both the incidence of prostate cancer and of developing aggressive prostate cancer but there is little understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we quantify and interpret changes in global gene expression patterns in the human prostate gland before, during and after a 12 month broccoli-rich diet. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Volunteers were randomly assigned to either a broccoli-rich or a pea-rich diet. After six months there were no differences in gene expression between glutathione S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1 positive and null individuals on the pea-rich diet but significant differences between GSTM1 genotypes on the broccoli-rich diet, associated with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFbeta1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF signalling pathways. Comparison of biopsies obtained pre and post intervention revealed more changes in gene expression occurred in individuals on a broccoli-rich diet than in those on a pea-rich diet. While there were changes in androgen signalling, regardless of diet, men on the broccoli diet had additional changes to mRNA processing, and TGFbeta1, EGF and insulin signalling. We also provide evidence that sulforaphane (the isothiocyanate derived from 4-methylsuphinylbutyl glucosinolate that accumulates in broccoli chemically interacts with TGFbeta1, EGF and insulin peptides to form thioureas, and enhances TGFbeta1/Smad-mediated transcription. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that consuming broccoli interacts with GSTM1 genotype to result in complex changes to signalling pathways associated with inflammation and carcinogenesis in the prostate. We propose that these changes may be mediated through the chemical interaction of isothiocyanates with signalling peptides in the plasma. This study provides, for the first time, experimental evidence obtained in humans to

  1. The structural pathway of interleukin 1 (IL-1) initiated signaling reveals mechanisms of oncogenic mutations and SNPs in inflammation and cancer

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    Gürsoy, Attila; Özbabacan, Saliha Ece Acuner; Keskin, Özlem Zehra; Nussinov, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The Structural Pathway of Interleukin 1 (IL-1) Initiated Signaling Reveals Mechanisms of Oncogenic Mutations and SNPs in Inflammation and Cancer Saliha Ece Acuner Ozbabacan1, Attila Gursoy1*, Ruth Nussinov2,3, Ozlem Keskin1* 1 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and College of Engineering, Koc University, Sariyer Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Cancer and Inflammation Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., National Cancer Institute, Frederick National Laboratory, Freder...

  2. The structural pathway of interleukin 1 (IL-1) initiated signaling reveals mechanisms of oncogenic mutations and SNPs in inflammation and cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Saliha Ece Acuner Ozbabacan; Attila Gursoy; Ruth Nussinov; Ozlem Keskin

    2014-01-01

    The Structural Pathway of Interleukin 1 (IL-1) Initiated Signaling Reveals Mechanisms of Oncogenic Mutations and SNPs in Inflammation and Cancer Saliha Ece Acuner Ozbabacan1, Attila Gursoy1*, Ruth Nussinov2,3, Ozlem Keskin1* 1 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and College of Engineering, Koc University, Sariyer Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Cancer and Inflammation Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., National Cancer Institute, Frederick National Laboratory, Freder...

  3. eIF4B is a convergent target and critical effector of oncogenic Pim and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways in Abl transformants.

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    Chen, Ke; Yang, Jianling; Li, Jianning; Wang, Xuefei; Chen, Yuhai; Huang, Shile; Chen, Ji-Long

    2016-03-01

    Activation of eIF4B correlates with Abl-mediated cellular transformation, but the precise mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show that eIF4B is a convergent substrate of JAK/STAT/Pim and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways in Abl transformants. Both pathways phosphorylated eIF4B in Abl-transformed cells, and such redundant regulation was responsible for the limited effect of single inhibitor on Abl oncogenicity. Persistent inhibition of one signaling pathway induced the activation of the other pathway and thereby restored the phosphorylation levels of eIF4B. Simultaneous inhibition of the two pathways impaired eIF4B phosphorylation more effectively, and synergistically induced apoptosis in Abl transformed cells and inhibited the growth of engrafted tumors in nude mice. Similarly, the survival of Abl transformants exhibited a higher sensitivity to the pharmacological inhibition, when combined with the shRNA-based silence of the other pathway. Interestingly, such synergy was dependent on the phosphorylation status of eIF4B on Ser422, as overexpression of eIF4B phosphomimetic mutant S422E in the transformants greatly attenuated the synergistic effects of these inhibitors on Abl oncogenicity. In contrast, eIF4B knockdown sensitized Abl transformants to undergo apoptosis induced by the combined blockage. Collectively, the results indicate that eIF4B integrates the signals from Pim and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways in Abl-expressing leukemic cells, and is a promising therapeutic target for such cancers. PMID:26848623

  4. Metabolic Rewiring by Oncogenic BRAF V600E Links Ketogenesis Pathway to BRAF-MEK1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Bum; Fan, Jun; Lin, Ruiting; Elf, Shannon; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhao, Liang; Jin, Lingtao; Seo, Jae Ho; Shan, Changliang; Arbiser, Jack L; Cohen, Cynthia; Brat, Daniel; Miziorko, Henry M; Kim, Eunhee; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Merghoub, Taha; Fröhling, Stefan; Scholl, Claudia; Tamayo, Pablo; Barbie, David A; Zhou, Lu; Pollack, Brian P; Fisher, Kevin; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Lawson, David H; Sica, Gabriel; Rossi, Michael; Lonial, Sagar; Khoury, Hanna J; Khuri, Fadlo R; Lee, Benjamin H; Boggon, Titus J; He, Chuan; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Many human cancers share similar metabolic alterations, including the Warburg effect. However, it remains unclear whether oncogene-specific metabolic alterations are required for tumor development. Here we demonstrate a "synthetic lethal" interaction between oncogenic BRAF V600E and a ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMGCL). HMGCL expression is upregulated in BRAF V600E-expressing human primary melanoma and hairy cell leukemia cells. Suppression of HMGCL specifically attenuates proliferation and tumor growth potential of human melanoma cells expressing BRAF V600E. Mechanistically, active BRAF upregulates HMGCL through an octamer transcription factor Oct-1, leading to increased intracellular levels of HMGCL product, acetoacetate, which selectively enhances binding of BRAF V600E but not BRAF wild-type to MEK1 in V600E-positive cancer cells to promote activation of MEK-ERK signaling. These findings reveal a mutation-specific mechanism by which oncogenic BRAF V600E "rewires" metabolic and cell signaling networks and signals through the Oct-1-HMGCL-acetoacetate axis to selectively promote BRAF V600E-dependent tumor development. PMID:26145173

  5. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrader Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL. Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR, CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF-receptors and Interleukin (IL 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL. Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell

  6. Classification of odorants across layers in locust olfactory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Pavel; Kee, Tiffany; Gupta, Nitin; Stopfer, Mark; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-05-01

    Olfactory processing takes place across multiple layers of neurons from the transduction of odorants in the periphery, to odor quality processing, learning, and decision making in higher olfactory structures. In insects, projection neurons (PNs) in the antennal lobe send odor information to the Kenyon cells (KCs) of the mushroom bodies and lateral horn neurons (LHNs). To examine the odor information content in different structures of the insect brain, antennal lobe, mushroom bodies and lateral horn, we designed a model of the olfactory network based on electrophysiological recordings made in vivo in the locust. We found that populations of all types (PNs, LHNs, and KCs) had lower odor classification error rates than individual cells of any given type. This improvement was quantitatively different from that observed using uniform populations of identical neurons compared with spatially structured population of neurons tuned to different odor features. This result, therefore, reflects an emergent network property. Odor classification improved with increasing stimulus duration: for similar odorants, KC and LHN ensembles reached optimal discrimination within the first 300-500 ms of the odor response. Performance improvement with time was much greater for a population of cells than for individual neurons. We conclude that, for PNs, LHNs, and KCs, ensemble responses are always much more informative than single-cell responses, despite the accumulation of noise along with odor information. PMID:26864765

  7. p210 Bcr-Abl confers overexpression of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase : an intrinsic pathway to drug resistance mediated by oncogene.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharehbaghi, K.; Burgess, G. S.; Collart, F. R.; Litz-Jackson, S.; Huberman, E.; Jayaram, H. N.; Boswell, H. S.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Lab. for Experimental Oncology; Indiana Univ. School of Medicine

    1994-01-01

    The p210 bcr-abl fusion protein tyrosine kinase oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). Specific intracellular functions performed by p210 bcr-abl have recently been delineated. We considered the possibility that p210 bcr-abl may also regulate the abundance of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) which is a rate-limiting enzyme for de novo guanylate synthesis. We performed studies of the inhibition of IMPDH by tiazofurin, which acts as a competitive inhibitor through its active species that mimics nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), i.e. thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD). The mean inhibitory concentration (IC50) of tiazofurin for cellular proliferation inhibition was 2.3-2.8-fold greater in cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their corresponding parent cells proliferating under the influence of growth factors or in growth factor-independent derivative cells not expressing detectable p210 bcr-abl. IMPDH activity was 1.5-2.3-fold greater within cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their parent cells. This increase in enzyme activity was a result of 2-fold increased IMPDH protein as determined by immunoblotting. In addition, an increase in the Km value for NAD utilization by IMPDH was observed in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells, but this increase was within the range of resident NAD concentrations observed in the cells. Increased IMPDH protein in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells was traced to an increased level of IMP dehydrogenase II messenger RNA. Thus, regulation of IMPDH gene expression is mediated at least in part by the bcr-abl gene product and may therefore be indicative of a specific mechanism of intrinsic resistance to tiazofurin.

  8. p210 bcr-abl confers overexpression of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: an intrinsic pathway to drug resistance mediated by oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehbaghi, K; Burgess, G S; Collart, F R; Litz-Jackson, S; Huberman, E; Jayaram, H N; Boswell, H S

    1994-08-01

    The p210 bcr-abl fusion protein tyrosine kinase oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). Specific intracellular functions performed by p210 bcr-abl have recently been delineated. We considered the possibility that p210 bcr-abl may also regulate the abundance of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) which is a rate-limiting enzyme for de novo guanylate synthesis. We performed studies of the inhibition of IMPDH by tiazofurin, which acts as a competitive inhibitor through its active species that mimics nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), i.e. thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD). The mean inhibitory concentration (IC50) of tiazofurin for cellular proliferation inhibition was 2.3-2.8-fold greater in cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their corresponding parent cells proliferating under the influence of growth factors or in growth factor-independent derivative cells not expressing detectable p210 bcr-abl. IMPDH activity was 1.5-2.3-fold greater within cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their parent cells. This increase in enzyme activity was a result of 2-fold increased IMPDH protein as determined by immunoblotting. In addition, an increase in the Km value for NAD utilization by IMPDH was observed in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells, but this increase was within the range of resident NAD concentrations observed in the cells. Increased IMPDH protein in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells was traced to an increased level of IMP dehydrogenase II messenger RNA. Thus, regulation of IMPDH gene expression is mediated at least in part by the bcr-abl gene product and may therefore be indicative of a specific mechanism of intrinsic resistance to tiazofurin. PMID:7520100

  9. Improved prognostic classification of breast cancer defined by antagonistic activation patterns of immune response pathway modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidating the activation pattern of molecular pathways across a given tumour type is a key challenge necessary for understanding the heterogeneity in clinical response and for developing novel more effective therapies. Gene expression signatures of molecular pathway activation derived from perturbation experiments in model systems as well as structural models of molecular interactions ('model signatures') constitute an important resource for estimating corresponding activation levels in tumours. However, relatively few strategies for estimating pathway activity from such model signatures exist and only few studies have used activation patterns of pathways to refine molecular classifications of cancer. Here we propose a novel network-based method for estimating pathway activation in tumours from model signatures. We find that although the pathway networks inferred from cancer expression data are highly consistent with the prior information contained in the model signatures, that they also exhibit a highly modular structure and that estimation of pathway activity is dependent on this modular structure. We apply our methodology to a panel of 438 estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and 785 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers to infer activation patterns of important cancer related molecular pathways. We show that in ER negative basal and HER2+ breast cancer, gene expression modules reflecting T-cell helper-1 (Th1) and T-cell helper-2 (Th2) mediated immune responses play antagonistic roles as major risk factors for distant metastasis. Using Boolean interaction Cox-regression models to identify non-linear pathway combinations associated with clinical outcome, we show that simultaneous high activation of Th1 and low activation of a TGF-beta pathway module defines a subtype of particularly good prognosis and that this classification provides a better prognostic model than those based on the individual pathways. In ER+ breast cancer, we find that

  10. Cellular oncogenes in neoplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, V T; McGee, J O

    1987-01-01

    In recent years cellular homologues of many viral oncogenes have been identified. As these genes are partially homologous to viral oncogenes and are activated in some tumour cell lines they are termed "proto-oncogenes". In tumour cell lines proto-oncogenes are activated by either quantitative or qualitative changes in gene structure: activation of these genes was originally thought to be a necessary primary event in carcinogenesis, but activated cellular oncogenes, unlike viral oncogenes, do ...

  11. Targeting PML-RARα and Oncogenic Signaling Pathways by Chinese Herbal Mixture Tien-Hsien Liquid in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia NB4 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jung Yao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Hsien Liquid (THL is a Chinese herbal mixture that has been used worldwide as complementary treatment for cancer patients in the past decade. Recently, THL has been shown to induce apoptosis in various types of solid tumor cells in vitro. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not yet been well elucidated. In this study, we explored the effects of THL on acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL NB4 cells, which could be effectively treated by some traditional Chinese remedies containing arsenic trioxide. The results showed THL could induce G2/M arrest and apoptosis in NB4 cells. Accordingly, the decrease of cyclin A and B1 were observed in THL-treated cells. The THL-induced apoptosis was accompanied with caspase-3 activation and decrease of PML-RARα fusion protein. Moreover, DNA methyltransferase 1 and oncogenic signaling pathways such as Akt/mTOR, Stat3 and ERK were also down-regulated by THL. By using ethyl acetate extraction and silica gel chromatography, an active fraction of THL named as EAS5 was isolated. At about 0.5–1% of the dose of THL, EAS5 appeared to have most of THL-induced multiple molecular targeting effects in NB4 cells. Based on the findings of these multi-targeting effects, THL might be regarding as a complementary and alternative therapeutic agent for refractory APL.

  12. Oncogenic NanogP8 expression regulates cell proliferation and migration through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human gastric cancer – SGC-7901cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Yao; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although elevated expression of NanogP8 has been detected in many human tumor tissues, its role in gastric tumorigenesis remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the function and regulatory mechanism of NanogP8 in gastric cancer. Methods In this study, NanogP8 cDNA was amplified by real time polymerase chain reaction from the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. The shRNA for RNA interference was established. The NanogP8, pAkt, Akt, pERK, ERK, p-mTOR, and mTOR proteins were detected by using the Western blot assay. Cell viability was evaluated by using the CCK-8 assay. Cell migration and invasion were also examined by using the transwell assay. Results The results indicated that the NanogP8 overexpression promoted proliferation and migration of SGC-7901 cell line, whereas its ablation exerted opposite effects. Interestingly, NanogP8 activated Akt, a key mediator of survival signals, and without affecting total Akt protein level. The NanogP8-increased gastric cell proliferation was downregulated by Akt inhibition. Our results further showed that increasing NanogP8 expression in human gastric cancer cells promoted cell proliferation by activating the AKT/mTOR pathway and further maintained gastric cell survival. Conclusion Our findings extend the knowledge regarding the oncogenic functions and proved that the NanogP8 regulates cell proliferation and migration by Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human gastric cancer SGC-7901cell line.

  13. Targeting of multiple oncogenic signaling pathways by Hsp90 inhibitor alone or in combination with berberine for treatment of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yen-Hao; Tang, Wan-Chun; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Sia, Peik; Huang, Chi-Chen; Lee, Yi-Chao; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Ming-Heng; Lai, I-Lu; Lee, Jun-Wei; Lee, Kuen-Haur

    2015-10-01

    There is a wide range of drugs and combinations under investigation and/or approved over the last decade to treat colorectal cancer (CRC), but the 5-year survival rate remains poor at stages II-IV. Therefore, new, more-efficient drugs still need to be developed that will hopefully be included in first-line therapy or overcome resistance when it appears, as part of second- or third-line treatments in the near future. In this study, we revealed that heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors have high therapeutic potential in CRC according to combinative analysis of NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository and chemical genomic database of Connectivity Map (CMap). We found that second generation Hsp90 inhibitor, NVP-AUY922, significantly downregulated the activities of a broad spectrum of kinases involved in regulating cell growth arrest and death of NVP-AUY922-sensitive CRC cells. To overcome NVP-AUY922-induced upregulation of survivin expression which causes drug insensitivity, we found that combining berberine (BBR), a herbal medicine with potency in inhibiting survivin expression, with NVP-AUY922 resulted in synergistic antiproliferative effects for NVP-AUY922-sensitive and -insensitive CRC cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that treatment of NVP-AUY922-insensitive CRC cells with the combination of NVP-AUY922 and BBR caused cell growth arrest through inhibiting CDK4 expression and induction of microRNA-296-5p (miR-296-5p)-mediated suppression of Pin1-β-catenin-cyclin D1 signaling pathway. Finally, we found that the expression level of Hsp90 in tumor tissues of CRC was positively correlated with CDK4 and Pin1 expression levels. Taken together, these results indicate that combination of NVP-AUY922 and BBR therapy can inhibit multiple oncogenic signaling pathways of CRC. PMID:25982393

  14. Oncogenic NanogP8 expression regulates cell proliferation and migration through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human gastric cancer – SGC-7901cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Z

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Zheng Jiang, Yao Liu, Chuan Wang Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Background: Although elevated expression of NanogP8 has been detected in many human tumor tissues, its role in gastric tumorigenesis remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the function and regulatory mechanism of NanogP8 in gastric cancer.Methods: In this study, NanogP8 cDNA was amplified by real time polymerase chain reaction from the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. The shRNA for RNA interference was established. The NanogP8, pAkt, Akt, pERK, ERK, p-mTOR, and mTOR proteins were detected by using the Western blot assay. Cell viability was evaluated by using the CCK-8 assay. Cell migration and invasion were also examined by using the transwell assay.Results: The results indicated that the NanogP8 overexpression promoted proliferation and migration of SGC-7901 cell line, whereas its ablation exerted opposite effects. Interestingly, NanogP8 activated Akt, a key mediator of survival signals, and without affecting total Akt protein level. The NanogP8-increased gastric cell proliferation was downregulated by Akt inhibition. Our results further showed that increasing NanogP8 expression in human gastric cancer cells promoted cell proliferation by activating the AKT/mTOR pathway and further maintained gastric cell survival.Conclusion: Our findings extend the knowledge regarding the oncogenic functions and proved that the NanogP8 regulates cell proliferation and migration by Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human gastric cancer SGC-7901cell line. Keywords: NanogP8, cell proliferation, Akt, mTOR

  15. MicroRNA-214 acts as a potential oncogene in breast cancer by targeting the PTEN-PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhuo; Zhu, Mingzhi; Gu, Yuanting

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer ranks as the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in females worldwide. It has been proven that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs), a type of non‑coding RNA, are involved in tumorigenesis. An increasing number of studies has confirmed the critical role of miR‑214 in certain types of cancer. Nevertheless, the biological function of miR‑214, as well as its underlying mechanisms of action in breast cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, the expression of miR‑214 was found to be upregulated in four human breast cancer cell lines in contrast to its expression level in the non‑malignant breast epithelial cell line, MCF‑10A. Moreover, the overexpression of miR‑214 markedly increased cell viability and abrogated the apoptosis triggered by serum starvation, indicating that miR‑214 plays a pivotal role in breast cancer cell growth. Further analysis suggested that the upregulation of miR‑214 markedly induced the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which largely accounted for the protective effects of miR‑124 on cancer cell growth. This was further confimed by pre‑treatment with the PI3K/Akt inhibitor, LY294002, which markedly attenuated the miR‑214‑induced increase in cell viability and resistance to apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was decreased following transfection wtih miR‑214 mimics and PTEN was confirmed as the direct target of miR‑214 by bioinformatics analysis and a dual‑firefly luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, the introduction of PTEN cDNA lacking the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) significantly inhibited the miR‑214‑induced activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and abrogated the protetive effects of miR‑214 on cell survival and resistance to apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR‑214 possesses oncogenic activity and that its effects are mediated through the promotion of cell

  16. BRAF and RAS oncogenes regulate Rho GTPase pathways to mediate migration and invasion properties in human colon cancer cells: a comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makrodouli, E.; Oikonomou, E.; Koc, Michal; Anděra, Ladislav; Sasazuki, T.; Shirasawa, S.; Pintzas, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2011), e118. ISSN 1476-4598 Grant ostatní: GSRT(GR) 03ED562; EK(XE) LSHC-CT-2006-037278 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : colorectal cancer * invasiveness * oncogenes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.993, year: 2011

  17. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. IMPORTANCE  : Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an accumulation of DNA

  18. Gene Ontology and KEGG Pathway Enrichment Analysis of a Drug Target-Based Classification System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Drug-target interaction (DTI is a key aspect in pharmaceutical research. With the ever-increasing new drug data resources, computational approaches have emerged as powerful and labor-saving tools in predicting new DTIs. However, so far, most of these predictions have been based on structural similarities rather than biological relevance. In this study, we proposed for the first time a "GO and KEGG enrichment score" method to represent a certain category of drug molecules by further classification and interpretation of the DTI database. A benchmark dataset consisting of 2,015 drugs that are assigned to nine categories ((1 G protein-coupled receptors, (2 cytokine receptors, (3 nuclear receptors, (4 ion channels, (5 transporters, (6 enzymes, (7 protein kinases, (8 cellular antigens and (9 pathogens was constructed by collecting data from KEGG. We analyzed each category and each drug for its contribution in GO terms and KEGG pathways using the popular feature selection "minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR" method, and key GO terms and KEGG pathways were extracted. Our analysis revealed the top enriched GO terms and KEGG pathways of each drug category, which were highly enriched in the literature and clinical trials. Our results provide for the first time the biological relevance among drugs, targets and biological functions, which serves as a new basis for future DTI predictions.

  19. Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Renee Clary and James Wandersee describe the beginnings of "Classification," which lies at the very heart of science and depends upon pattern recognition. Clary and Wandersee approach patterns by first telling the story of the "Linnaean classification system," introduced by Carl Linnacus (1707-1778), who is…

  20. Proto-oncogenes II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P

    1988-12-01

    In reviewing recent literature on activated proto-oncogenes including retroviral infection (without oncogene), translocation and inherited childhood cancer, I have come to the conclusion that activated proto-oncogenes are not involved in development of tumors. There is one exception in which a translocated proto-myc leads to transformation. That is the case of the trangenic mouse embryo where faulty development occurs. PMID:3226361

  1. Comparative classification of species and the study of pathway evolution based on the alignment of metabolic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background Pathways provide topical descriptions of cellular circuitry. Comparing analogous pathways reveals intricate insights into individual functional differences among species. While previous works in the field performed genomic comparisons and evolutionary studies that were based on specific genes or proteins, whole genomic sequence, or even single pathways, none of them described a genomic system level comparative analysis of metabolic pathways. In order to properly implement such an a...

  2. Oncogenic viruses and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxiang; George; Luo; Jing-hsiung; James; Ou

    2015-01-01

    <正>This special issue of the journal is dedicated to the important topic of oncogenic viruses and cancer.It contains seven review articles covering all known oncogenic viruses except for human T-lymphotropic virus type1(HTLV-1).These review articles are contributed by experts on specific viruses and their associated human cancers.Viruses account for about 20%of total human cancer cases.Although many viruses can cause various tumors in animals,only seven of them

  3. Oncogenes, radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the oncogenic virus and the analysis of its nucleic acid, together with the development of new biochemical technology have permitted the partial knowledge of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cellular neoplastic transformation. This work, besides describing the discovery of the first oncogenic virus and the experiments to demonstrate the existence of the oncogenes, summarizes its activation mechanisms and its intervention in cellular metabolisms. Ionizing radiation is among the external agents that induce the neoplastic process. Its participation in the genesis of this process and the contribution of oncogenes to the cellular radioresistance are among the topics, which are referred to another topic that makes reference. At the same time as the advancement of theoretical knowledge, lines of investigation for the application of the new concepts in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutical treatment, were developed. An example of this, is the study of the participation of the oncogen c-erbB-2 in human breast cancer and its implications on the anti tumoral therapy. (author)

  4. Hedgehog Cholesterolysis: Specialized Gatekeeper to Oncogenic Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, Brian P.; Chunyu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of therapeutic suppression of hedgehog (Hh) signaling almost exclusively focus on receptor antagonism; however, hedgehog’s biosynthesis represents a unique and potentially targetable aspect of this oncogenic signaling pathway. Here, we review a key biosynthetic step called cholesterolysis from the perspectives of structure/function and small molecule inhibition. Cholesterolysis, also called cholesteroylation, generates cholesterol-modified Hh ligand via autoprocessing of a hedgeho...

  5. Trisubstituted-Imidazoles Induce Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells by Targeting the Oncogenic PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Srinivasa, V; Rangappa, Shobith; Mervin, Lewis; Mohan, Surender; Paricharak, Shardul; Baday, Sefer; Li, Feng; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Bender, Andreas; Sethi, Gautam; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2016-01-01

    Overactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR is linked with carcinogenesis and serves a potential molecular therapeutic target in treatment of various cancers. Herein, we report the synthesis of trisubstituted-imidazoles and identified 2-chloro-3-(4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl) pyridine (CIP) as lead cytotoxic agent. Naïve Base classifier model of in silico target prediction revealed that CIP targets RAC-beta serine/threonine-protein kinase which comprises the Akt. Furthermore, CIP downregulated the phosphorylation of Akt, PDK and mTOR proteins and decreased expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, procaspase-3 and increased cleavage of PARP. In addition, CIP significantly downregulated the CXCL12 induced motility of breast cancer cells and molecular docking calculations revealed that all compounds bind to Akt2 kinase with high docking scores compared to the library of previously reported Akt2 inhibitors. In summary, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of imidazoles that induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells by negatively regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27097161

  6. Trisubstituted-Imidazoles Induce Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells by Targeting the Oncogenic PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervin, Lewis; Mohan, Surender; Paricharak, Shardul; Baday, Sefer; Li, Feng; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. E.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Bender, Andreas; Sethi, Gautam; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2016-01-01

    Overactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR is linked with carcinogenesis and serves a potential molecular therapeutic target in treatment of various cancers. Herein, we report the synthesis of trisubstituted-imidazoles and identified 2-chloro-3-(4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl) pyridine (CIP) as lead cytotoxic agent. Naïve Base classifier model of in silico target prediction revealed that CIP targets RAC-beta serine/threonine-protein kinase which comprises the Akt. Furthermore, CIP downregulated the phosphorylation of Akt, PDK and mTOR proteins and decreased expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, procaspase-3 and increased cleavage of PARP. In addition, CIP significantly downregulated the CXCL12 induced motility of breast cancer cells and molecular docking calculations revealed that all compounds bind to Akt2 kinase with high docking scores compared to the library of previously reported Akt2 inhibitors. In summary, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of imidazoles that induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells by negatively regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27097161

  7. Oncogenes in retroviruses and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Reinhard

    1983-09-01

    Oncogenes are genes that cause cancer. Retroviruses contain oncogenes and cause cancer in animals and, perhaps, in man. The viruses have appropriated their oncogenes from normal cellular DNA by genetic recombination. Correspondingly, uninfected vertebrate cells contain a family of evolutionary conserved cellular oncogenes. Retrovirus infection, introducing additional viral oncogenes into the cells, as well as carcinogen-mediated activation of cellular oncogenes may both lead to increased synthesis of oncogene encoded transforming proteins which convert normal cells to tumor cells. Unique retroviruses of human origin have recently been identified. They may, on occasion, directly cause tumors in man. However, the general significance of retroviruses may better be illustrated by their remarkable genetic composition which allows them to promote tumor growth by a variety of genetic mechanisms.

  8. Targeting energy metabolic and oncogenic signaling pathways in triple-negative breast cancer by a novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Hsu, En-Chi; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K; Shapiro, Charles L; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2011-11-11

    The antitumor activities of the novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, OSU-53, were assessed in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer. OSU-53 directly stimulated recombinant AMPK kinase activity (EC(50), 0.3 μM) and inhibited the viability and clonogenic growth of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells with equal potency (IC(50), 5 and 2 μM, respectively) despite lack of LKB1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Nonmalignant MCF-10A cells, however, were unaffected. Beyond AMPK-mediated effects on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and lipogenesis, OSU-53 also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition. OSU-53 also modulated energy homeostasis by suppressing fatty acid biosynthesis and shifting the metabolism to oxidation by up-regulating the expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and the transcription factor nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, OSU-53 suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation, and inhibited hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in association with the silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and the E-cadherin repressor Snail. In MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice, daily oral administration of OSU-53 (50 and 100 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth by 47-49% and modulated relevant intratumoral biomarkers of drug activity. However, OSU-53 also induced protective autophagy that attenuated its antiproliferative potency. Accordingly, cotreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine increased the in vivo tumor-suppressive activity of OSU-53. OSU-53 is a potent, orally bioavailable AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of antitumor activities. PMID

  9. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  10. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  11. Curcumin, a dietary component, has anticancer, chemosensitization, and radiosensitization effects by down-regulating the MDM2 oncogene through the PI3K/mTOR/ETS2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mao; Zhang, Zhuo; Hill, Donald L; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2007-03-01

    The oncoprotein MDM2, a major ubiquitin E3 ligase of tumor suppressor p53, has been suggested as a novel target for human cancer therapy based on its p53-dependent and p53-independent activities. We have identified curcumin, which has previously been shown to have anticancer activity, as an inhibitor of MDM2 expression. Curcumin down-regulates MDM2, independent of p53. In a human prostate cancer cell lines PC3 (p53(null)), curcumin reduced MDM2 protein and mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and enhanced the expression of the tumor suppressor p21(Waf1/CIP1). The inhibitory effects occur at the transcriptional level and seem to involve the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin/erythroblastosis virus transcription factor 2 pathway. Curcumin induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation of PC3 cells in culture, but both MDM2 overexpression and knockdown reduced these effects. Curcumin also inhibited the growth of these cells and enhanced the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine. When it was administered to tumor-bearing nude mice, curcumin inhibited growth of PC3 xenografts and enhanced the antitumor effects of gemcitabine and radiation. In these tumors, curcumin reduced the expression of MDM2. Down-regulation of the MDM2 oncogene by curcumin is a novel mechanism of action that may be essential for its chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. Our observations help to elucidate the process by which mitogens up-regulate MDM2, independent of p53, and identify a mechanism by which curcumin functions as an anticancer agent. PMID:17332326

  12. Oncogenic Pathways in Lobular Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, C.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer affects approximately 1 in 8 women in the Western world with more than one million new cases worldwide per year, of which 30% will eventually die. It is a heterogeneous disease with several histological and molecular characteristics within tumors and between patients. Invasive lobular

  13. Principles of cancer therapy: oncogene and non-oncogene addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ji; Solimini, Nicole L; Elledge, Stephen J

    2009-03-01

    Cancer is a complex collection of distinct genetic diseases united by common hallmarks. Here, we expand upon the classic hallmarks to include the stress phenotypes of tumorigenesis. We describe a conceptual framework of how oncogene and non-oncogene addictions contribute to these hallmarks and how they can be exploited through stress sensitization and stress overload to selectively kill cancer cells. In particular, we present evidence for a large class of non-oncogenes that are essential for cancer cell survival and present attractive drug targets. Finally, we discuss the path ahead to therapeutic discovery and provide theoretical considerations for combining orthogonal cancer therapies. PMID:19269363

  14. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Luis Acencio

    Full Text Available Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI. This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved

  15. Conditional mouse models demonstrate oncogene-dependent differences in tumor maintenance and recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diversity in the pathophysiology of breast cancer frustrates therapeutic progress. We need to understand how mechanisms activated by specific combinations of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and hormonal signaling pathways govern response to therapy and prognosis. A recent series of investigations conducted by Chodosh and colleagues offers new insights into the similarities and differences between specific oncogenic pathways. Expression of three oncogenes relevant to pathways activated in human breast cancers (c-myc, activated neu and Wnt1) were targeted to murine mammary epithelial cells using the same transgenic tetracycline-responsive conditional gene expression system. While the individual transgenic lines demonstrate similarly high rates of tumor penetrance, rates of oncogene-independent tumor maintenance and recurrence following initial regression are significantly different, and are modifiable by mutations in specific cooperating oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressor gene expression. The experiments make three notable contributions. First, they illustrate that rates of tumor regression and recurrence following initial regression are dependent upon the pathways activated by the initiating oncogene. The experiments also demonstrate that altered expression or mutation of specific cooperating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes results in different rates of tumor regression and recurrence. Finally, they exemplify the power of conditional mouse models for elucidating how specific molecular mechanisms give rise to the complexity of human cancer

  16. Metabonomics classifies pathways affected by bioactive compounds. Artificial neural network classification of NMR spectra of plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Karl-Heinz; Araníbar, Nelly; Singh, Bijay; Stockton, Gerald W

    2003-03-01

    The biochemical mode-of-action (MOA) for herbicides and other bioactive compounds can be rapidly and simultaneously classified by automated pattern recognition of the metabonome that is embodied in the 1H NMR spectrum of a crude plant extract. The ca. 300 herbicides that are used in agriculture today affect less than 30 different biochemical pathways. In this report, 19 of the most interesting MOAs were automatically classified. Corn (Zea mays) plants were treated with various herbicides such as imazethapyr, glyphosate, sethoxydim, and diuron, which represent various biochemical modes-of-action such as inhibition of specific enzymes (acetohydroxy acid synthase [AHAS], protoporphyrin IX oxidase [PROTOX], 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase [EPSPS], acetyl CoA carboxylase [ACC-ase], etc.), or protein complexes (photosystems I and II), or major biological process such as oxidative phosphorylation, auxin transport, microtubule growth, and mitosis. Crude isolates from the treated plants were subjected to 1H NMR spectroscopy, and the spectra were classified by artificial neural network analysis to discriminate the herbicide modes-of-action. We demonstrate the use and refinement of the method, and present cross-validated assignments for the metabolite NMR profiles of over 400 plant isolates. The MOA screen also recognizes when a new mode-of-action is present, which is considered extremely important for the herbicide discovery process, and can be used to study deviations in the metabolism of compounds from a chemical synthesis program. The combination of NMR metabolite profiling and neural network classification is expected to be similarly relevant to other metabonomic profiling applications, such as in drug discovery. PMID:12590124

  17. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  18. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...

  19. Asbestos, radiation and oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to clarify the mechanisms of asbestos carcinogenicity, the effects of the interaction between asbestos and gamma radiation on cytotoxicity and oncogenic transformation were studied in vitro in C3H 10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts. The data demonstrated that asbestos fibres, at a concentration which itself was ineffective in inducing oncogenic transformation in vitro, did potentiate the oncogenicity of gamma rays. However asbestos did not appear capable of acting as a promoter when added to 10T1/2 cells 3 days after irradiation. Thus, in the context of the 2-stage model of carcinogenesis, asbestos can be aptly categorized as a co-carcinogen. (U.K.)

  20. Diversity of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and its oncogenic mechanism in medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan; Sheikholeslami, Sara; Afsari, Farinaz

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for nearly 1% of all of human cancer. Thyroid cancer has four main histological types: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are derived from follicular thyroid cells, whereas medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the neural crest parafollicular cells or C-cells of the thyroid gland. MTC represents a neuroendocrine tumor and differs considerably from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. MTC is one of the aggressive types of thyroid cancer, which represents 3-10% of all thyroid cancers. It occurs in hereditary (25%) and sporadic (75%) forms. The hereditary form of MTC has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. According to the present classification, hereditary MTC is classified as a multiple endocrine neoplasi type 2 A & B (MEN2A & MEN2B) and familial MTC (FMTC). The RET proto-oncogene is located on chromosome 10q11.21. It is composed of 21 exons and encodes a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. RET regulates a complex network of signal transduction pathways during development, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of the enteric nervous system progenitor cells. Gain of function mutations in RET have been well demonstrated in MTC development. Variants of MTC result from different RET mutations, and they have a good genotype-phenotype correlation. Various MTC related mutations have been reported in different exons of the RET gene. We proposed that RET genetic mutations may be different in distinct populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find a geographical pattern of RET mutations in different populations. PMID:26678667

  1. From oncogenes to tumor antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents 26 manuscripts which comprise comprehensive reviews and recent experimental data from four main areas of cancer research: oncogenes, transforming proteins and growth factors; immunodeficiencies and tumors; new markers for tumor immunodiagnosis; and prospects of immunological cancer treatment. (Auth.)

  2. S.E. Mitchell Vascular Anomalies Flow Chart (SEMVAFC): A visual pathway combining clinical and imaging findings for classification of soft-tissue vascular anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classification of vascular anomalies (VAs) is challenging due to overlapping clinical symptoms, confusing terminology in the literature and unfamiliarity with this complex entity. It is important to recognize that VAs include two distinct entities, vascular tumours (VTs) and vascular malformations (VaMs). In this article, we describe SE Mitchell Vascular Anomalies Flow Chart (SEMVAFC), which arises from a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates clinical symptoms, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings to establish International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA)-based classification of the VAs. SEMVAFC provides a clear visual pathway for physicians to accurately diagnose Vas, which is important as treatment, management, and prognosis differ between VTs and VaMs

  3. ARF and ATM/ATR cooperate in p53-mediated apoptosis upon oncogenic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of apoptosis is pivotal for eliminating cells with damaged DNA or deregulated proliferation. We show that tumor suppressor ARF and ATM/ATR kinase pathways cooperate in the induction of apoptosis in response to elevated expression of c-myc, β-catenin or human papilloma virus E7 oncogenes. Overexpression of oncogenes leads to the formation of phosphorylated H2AX foci, induction of Rad51 protein levels and ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of p53. Inhibition of ATM/ATR kinases abolishes both induction of Rad51 and phosphorylation of p53, and remarkably reduces the level of apoptosis induced by co-expression of oncogenes and ARF. However, the induction of apoptosis is downregulated in p53-/- cells and does not depend on activities of ATM/ATR kinases, indicating that efficient induction of apoptosis by oncogene activation depends on coordinated action of ARF and ATM/ATR pathways in the regulation of p53

  4. Oncogenic AKTivation of translation as a therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, A C; Truitt, M L; Ruggero, D

    2011-01-01

    The AKT signalling pathway is a major regulator of protein synthesis that impinges on multiple cellular processes frequently altered in cancer, such as proliferation, cell growth, survival, and angiogenesis. AKT controls protein synthesis by regulating the multistep process of mRNA translation at every stage from ribosome biogenesis to translation initiation and elongation. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of oncogenic AKT to drive cellular transformation by altering gene expressio...

  5. Alternative splicing of Caspase 9 is modulated by the PI3K/Akt pathway via phosphorylation of SRp30a

    OpenAIRE

    Shultz, Jacqueline C.; Rachel W Goehe; Wijesinghe, D. Shanaka; Murudkar, Charuta; Hawkins, Amy J.; Shay, Jerry W.; Minna, John D.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the functional importance of alternative splice variations in cancer pathophysiology. Two splice variants are derived from the CASP9 gene via the inclusion (Casp9a) or exclusion (Casp9b) of a four exon cassette. Here we show that alternative splicing of Casp9 is dysregulated in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) regardless of their pathological classification. Based on these findings we hypothesized that survival pathways activated by oncogenic mutation regulate...

  6. Comparison of liver oncogenic potential among human RAS isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sook In; Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Kim, Dae Yeong; Cho, Kyung Joo; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Calvisi, Diego F.; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in one of three RAS genes (i.e., HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) leading to constitutive activation of RAS signaling pathways is considered a key oncogenic event in human carcinogenesis. Whether activated RAS isoforms possess different oncogenic potentials remains an unresolved question. Here, we compared oncogenic properties among RAS isoforms using liver-specific transgenesis in mice. Hydrodynamic transfection was performed using transposons expressing short hairpin RNA downregulating p53 and an activated RAS isoform, and livers were harvested at 23 days after gene delivery. No differences were found in the hepatocarcinogenic potential among RAS isoforms, as determined by both gross examination of livers and liver weight per body weight ratio (LW/BW) of mice expressing HRASQ61L, KRAS4BG12V and NRASQ61K. However, the tumorigenic potential differed significantly between KRAS splicing variants. The LW/BW ratio in KRAS4AG12V mice was significantly lower than in KRAS4BG12V mice (p mice lived significantly longer than KRRAS4BG12V mice (p mice displayed higher expression of the p16INK4A tumor suppressor when compared with KRAS4BG12V tumors. Forced overexpression of p16INK4A significantly reduced tumor growth in KRAS4BG12V mice, suggesting that upregulation of p16INK4A by KRAS4AG12V presumably delays tumor development driven by the latter oncogene. PMID:26799184

  7. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 104 foci per μg of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment

  8. Oncogenic Brain Metazoan Parasite Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela N. Spurgeon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations suggest that certain parasitic infections can be oncogenic. Among these, neurocysticercosis is associated with increased risk for gliomas and hematologic malignancies. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with colocalization of a metazoan parasite, possibly cysticercosis, and a WHO grade IV neuroepithelial tumor with exclusively neuronal differentiation by immunohistochemical stains (immunopositive for synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, and Neu-N and not for GFAP, vimentin, or S100. The colocalization and temporal relationship of these two entities suggest a causal relationship.

  9. [Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs

  10. Inhibiting oncogenic signaling by sorafenib activates PUMA via GSK3β and NF-κB to suppress tumor cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Dudgeon, Crissy; Peng, Rui; WANG, PENG; Sebastiani, Andrea; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling is one of the most prevalent oncogenic alterations and confers survival advantage to tumor cells. Inhibition of this pathway can effectively suppress tumor cell growth. For example, sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor targeting c-Raf and other oncogenic kinases, has been used clinically for treating advanced liver and kidney tumors, and also has shown efficacy against other malignancies. However, how inhibition of oncogenic signaling by sorafenib and other d...

  11. Can we improve accuracy and reliability of MRI interpretation in children with optic pathway glioma? Proposal for a reproducible imaging classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images from children with optic pathway glioma (OPG) are complex. We initiated this study to evaluate the accuracy of MR imaging (MRI) interpretation and to propose a simple and reproducible imaging classification for MRI. We randomly selected 140 MRIs from among 510 MRIs performed on 104 children diagnosed with OPG in France from 1990 to 2004. These images were reviewed independently by three radiologists (F.T., 15 years of experience in neuroradiology; D.L., 25 years of experience in pediatric radiology; and J.L., 3 years of experience in radiology) using a classification derived from the Dodge and modified Dodge classifications. Intra- and interobserver reliabilities were assessed using the Bland-Altman method and the kappa coefficient. These reviews allowed the definition of reliable criteria for MRI interpretation. The reviews showed intraobserver variability and large discrepancies among the three radiologists (kappa coefficient varying from 0.11 to 1). These variabilities were too large for the interpretation to be considered reproducible over time or among observers. A consensual analysis, taking into account all observed variabilities, allowed the development of a definitive interpretation protocol. Using this revised protocol, we observed consistent intra- and interobserver results (kappa coefficient varying from 0.56 to 1). The mean interobserver difference for the solid portion of the tumor with contrast enhancement was 0.8 cm3 (limits of agreement = -16 to 17). We propose simple and precise rules for improving the accuracy and reliability of MRI interpretation for children with OPG. Further studies will be necessary to investigate the possible prognostic value of this approach. (orig.)

  12. Can we improve accuracy and reliability of MRI interpretation in children with optic pathway glioma? Proposal for a reproducible imaging classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambron, Julien; Frampas, Eric; Toulgoat, Frederique [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nantes (France); Rakotonjanahary, Josue [University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Angers (France); University Paris Diderot, INSERM CIE5 Robert Debre Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris (France); Loisel, Didier [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Angers (France); Carli, Emilie de; Rialland, Xavier [University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Angers (France); Delion, Matthieu [University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Angers (France)

    2016-02-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images from children with optic pathway glioma (OPG) are complex. We initiated this study to evaluate the accuracy of MR imaging (MRI) interpretation and to propose a simple and reproducible imaging classification for MRI. We randomly selected 140 MRIs from among 510 MRIs performed on 104 children diagnosed with OPG in France from 1990 to 2004. These images were reviewed independently by three radiologists (F.T., 15 years of experience in neuroradiology; D.L., 25 years of experience in pediatric radiology; and J.L., 3 years of experience in radiology) using a classification derived from the Dodge and modified Dodge classifications. Intra- and interobserver reliabilities were assessed using the Bland-Altman method and the kappa coefficient. These reviews allowed the definition of reliable criteria for MRI interpretation. The reviews showed intraobserver variability and large discrepancies among the three radiologists (kappa coefficient varying from 0.11 to 1). These variabilities were too large for the interpretation to be considered reproducible over time or among observers. A consensual analysis, taking into account all observed variabilities, allowed the development of a definitive interpretation protocol. Using this revised protocol, we observed consistent intra- and interobserver results (kappa coefficient varying from 0.56 to 1). The mean interobserver difference for the solid portion of the tumor with contrast enhancement was 0.8 cm{sup 3} (limits of agreement = -16 to 17). We propose simple and precise rules for improving the accuracy and reliability of MRI interpretation for children with OPG. Further studies will be necessary to investigate the possible prognostic value of this approach. (orig.)

  13. The Metastasis Suppressor, N-MYC Downstream-regulated Gene-1 (NDRG1), Down-regulates the ErbB Family of Receptors to Inhibit Downstream Oncogenic Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Menezes, Sharleen V; Sahni, Sumit; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Bae, Dong-Hun; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2016-01-15

    N-MYC downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent growth and metastasis suppressor that acts through its inhibitory effects on a wide variety of cellular signaling pathways, including the TGF-β pathway, protein kinase B (AKT)/PI3K pathway, RAS, etc. To investigate the hypothesis that its multiple effects could be regulated by a common upstream effector, the role of NDRG1 on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other members of the ErbB family, namely human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), was examined. We demonstrate that NDRG1 markedly decreased the expression and activation of EGFR, HER2, and HER3 in response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand, while also inhibiting formation of the EGFR/HER2 and HER2/HER3 heterodimers. In addition, NDRG1 also decreased activation of the downstream MAPKK in response to EGF. Moreover, novel anti-tumor agents of the di-2-pyridylketone class of thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, which markedly up-regulate NDRG1, were found to inhibit EGFR, HER2, and HER3 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells. However, the mechanism involved appeared dependent on NDRG1 for di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, but was independent of this metastasis suppressor for di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone. This observation demonstrates that small structural changes in thiosemicarbazones result in marked alterations in molecular targeting. Collectively, these results reveal a mechanism for the extensive downstream effects on cellular signaling attributed to NDRG1. Furthermore, this study identifies a novel approach for the treatment of tumors resistant to traditional EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26534963

  14. MicroRNAs: Modulators of the Ras Oncogenes in Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan; Alzahrani, Ali S

    2016-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) of the head and neck is one of the six most common cancers in the world. OSCC remains the most common cause of cancer deaths in Asian countries. Conventional treatments for OSCC have not improved the overall 5 years survival and therefore alternative therapeutic targets are often sought. Ras is one of the most frequently deregulated oncogenes in oral cancer. Direct targeting the ras has proven unrealistic and hence, exploring and understanding alternative pathways and/or molecules which regulate ras and its signaling that could pave the way for novel molecular targets and therapy for oral cancer. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to regulate ras oncogenes in human cancers. In this article, we address the microRNA-mediated regulation of the ras oncogenes in oral cancer. We describe extensively the tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles of miRNAs in regulation of ras oncogenes in OSCC. We also discuss the role of miRNA-mediated ras regulation in therapeutic determination of oral cancer. Complete understanding of the miRNA regulation of ras oncogenes in oral cancer may facilitate to plan better strategies for diagnosis, molecular therapeutic targeting and the overall prognosis of this common and deadly cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1424-1431, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26620726

  15. Phosphoproteomics identifies oncogenic Ras signaling targets and their involvement in lung adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putty-Reddy Sudhir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ras is frequently mutated in a variety of human cancers, including lung cancer, leading to constitutive activation of MAPK signaling. Despite decades of research focused on the Ras oncogene, Ras-targeted phosphorylation events and signaling pathways have not been described on a proteome-wide scale. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By functional phosphoproteomics, we studied the molecular mechanics of oncogenic Ras signaling using a pathway-based approach. We identified Ras-regulated phosphorylation events (n = 77 using label-free comparative proteomics analysis of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells with and without the expression of oncogenic Ras. Many were newly identified as potential targets of the Ras signaling pathway. A majority (∼60% of the Ras-targeted events consisted of a [pSer/Thr]-Pro motif, indicating the involvement of proline-directed kinases. By integrating the phosphorylated signatures into the Pathway Interaction Database, we further inferred Ras-regulated pathways, including MAPK signaling and other novel cascades, in governing diverse functions such as gene expression, apoptosis, cell growth, and RNA processing. Comparisons of Ras-regulated phosphorylation events, pathways, and related kinases in lung cancer-derived cells supported a role of oncogenic Ras signaling in lung adenocarcinoma A549 and H322 cells, but not in large cell carcinoma H1299 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reveals phosphorylation events, signaling networks, and molecular functions that are regulated by oncogenic Ras. The results observed in this study may aid to extend our knowledge on Ras signaling in lung cancer.

  16. From genotypes to phenotypes: classification of the tumour profiles for different variants of the cadherin adhesion pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Drasdo, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    The E-cadherin adhesive profile expressed by a tumour is a characterization of the intracellular and intercellular protein interactions that control cell-cell adhesion. Within the intracellular proteins that determine the tumour adhesive profile, Src and PI3 are two essentials to initiate the formation of the E-cadherin adhesion complex. On the other hand, Src has also the capability of disrupting the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex and down-regulating cell-cell adhesion. In this paper, using a multi-scale mathematical model, we study the role of each of these proteins in the adhesive profile and invasive properties of the tumour. To do this, we create three versions of an intracellular model that explains the interplay between the proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, Src and PI3; and we couple them to the strength of the cell-cell adhesion forces within an individual-cell-based model. The simulation results show how the tumour profile and its aggressive potential may change depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the protein pathways, and how these pathways may influence the early stages of cancer invasion. Our major findings may be summarized as follows. (1) Intermediate levels of Src synthesis rates generate the least invasive tumour phenotype. (2) Conclusions drawn from findings obtained from the intracellular molecular dynamics (here cadherin-catenin binding complexes) to the multi-cellular invasive potential of a tumour may be misleading or erroneous. The conclusions should be validated in a multi-cellular context on timescales relevant for population growth. (3) Monoclonal populations of more cohesive cells with otherwise equal properties tend to grow slower. (4) Less cohesive cells tend to outcompete more cohesive cells. (5) Less cohesive cells have a larger probability of invasion as migration forces can more easily outbalance cohesive forces.

  17. From genotypes to phenotypes: classification of the tumour profiles for different variants of the cadherin adhesion pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The E-cadherin adhesive profile expressed by a tumour is a characterization of the intracellular and intercellular protein interactions that control cell–cell adhesion. Within the intracellular proteins that determine the tumour adhesive profile, Src and PI3 are two essentials to initiate the formation of the E-cadherin adhesion complex. On the other hand, Src has also the capability of disrupting the β-catenin–E-cadherin complex and down-regulating cell–cell adhesion. In this paper, using a multi-scale mathematical model, we study the role of each of these proteins in the adhesive profile and invasive properties of the tumour. To do this, we create three versions of an intracellular model that explains the interplay between the proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, Src and PI3; and we couple them to the strength of the cell–cell adhesion forces within an individual-cell-based model. The simulation results show how the tumour profile and its aggressive potential may change depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the protein pathways, and how these pathways may influence the early stages of cancer invasion. Our major findings may be summarized as follows. (1) Intermediate levels of Src synthesis rates generate the least invasive tumour phenotype. (2) Conclusions drawn from findings obtained from the intracellular molecular dynamics (here cadherin–catenin binding complexes) to the multi-cellular invasive potential of a tumour may be misleading or erroneous. The conclusions should be validated in a multi-cellular context on timescales relevant for population growth. (3) Monoclonal populations of more cohesive cells with otherwise equal properties tend to grow slower. (4) Less cohesive cells tend to outcompete more cohesive cells. (5) Less cohesive cells have a larger probability of invasion as migration forces can more easily outbalance cohesive forces. (paper)

  18. The DNA damage checkpoint precedes activation of ARF in response to escalating oncogenic stress during tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, K.; Bartkova, J.; Kotsinas, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic stimuli trigger the DNA damage response (DDR) and induction of the alternative reading frame (ARF) tumor suppressor, both of which can activate the p53 pathway and provide intrinsic barriers to tumor progression. However, the respective timeframes and signal thresholds for ARF induction...

  19. A novel dithiocarbamate derivative induces cell apoptosis through p53-dependent intrinsic pathway and suppresses the expression of the E6 oncogene of human papillomavirus 18 in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Qi, Hongxue; Li, Xiaobo; Hou, Xueling; Lu, Xueying; Xiao, Xiangwen

    2015-06-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) exhibit a broad spectrum of antitumor activities, however, their molecular mechanisms of antitumor have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have synthesized a series of novel dithiocarbamate derivatives. These DTCs were examined for cytotoxic activities against five human cancer cell lines. In this study, one of dithiocarbamate (DTC1) with higher potential for HeLa cells was chosen to investigate molecular mechanisms for its anti-tumor activities. DTC1 could inhibit proliferation, and highly induce apoptosis in HeLa cells by activating caspase-3, -6 and -9; moreover, activities of caspase-3, -6 and -9 were inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, DTC1 decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased expression of cytosol cytochrome c, Bak, Bax and p53 in a time-dependent manner but had no effect on the level of Rb. It was shown that DTC1 induced HeLa cells apoptosis through a p53-dependent pathway as tested by the wild type p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α. Additionally, the relative expression of E6 and E7 were evaluated in HPV18-positive (HeLa cells) by real-time PCR and western blotting. The results firstly demonstrated that DTC1 suppressed both expression of E6 mRNA and E6 oncoprotein, but had no effect on the expression of E7 mRNA and protein in HPV18. Our results suggested that DTC1 may serve as novel chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cervical cancer and potential anti-HPV virus candidates that merit further studies. PMID:25772545

  20. Host epigenetic modifications by oncogenic viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Flanagan, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations represent an important step in the initiation and progression of most human cancers, but it is difficult to differentiate the early cancer causing alterations from later consequences. Oncogenic viruses can induce transformation via expression of only a small number of viral genes. Therefore, the mechanisms by which oncogenic viruses cause cancer may provide clues as to which epigenetic alterations are critical in early carcinogenesis.

  1. 〈Review〉Driver oncogene mutations and personalized treatment of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    [Abstract] Discovery of activating mutation of the EGFR gene in 2004 opened the era of personalized therapy in thoracic oncology. These tumors are highly dependent on the EGFR pathway and inhibition of this pathway results in dramatic induction of apoptosis in vitro, even though cancer cells may have various genetic alterations (oncogene addiction). These observations were soon translated into clinical trials, which reproducibly showed significantly longer progression free survival for those ...

  2. Oncogene-induced progression of preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial cells to neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) induced preneoplastic variants of rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells can be neo plastically transformed following transfection with oncogenic DNA. Variants differ with respect to the oncogenes required for neoplastic conversion. Polyma virus DNA transformed each of four variants neo plastically, whereas viral ras DNA only transformed two of four variants. These data demonstrate that preneoplastic variants of RTE cells differ with respect to the changes needed for conversion to neoplastic cells and that the variants tested are either at different stages or on different pathways of progression to neoplasia. (author)

  3. Oncogenic viruses: Lessons learned using next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippot, Ronan; Malouf, Gabriel G; Su, Xiaoping; Khayat, David; Spano, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Fifteen percent of cancers are driven by oncogenic human viruses. Four of those viruses, hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus, integrate the host genome. Viral oncogenesis is the result of epigenetic and genetic alterations that happen during viral integration. So far, little data have been available regarding integration mechanisms and modifications in the host genome. However, the emergence of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools enables researchers to establish the landscape of genomic alterations and predict the events that follow viral integration. Cooperative working groups are currently investigating these factors in large data sets. Herein, we provide novel insights into the initiating events of cancer onset during infection with integrative viruses. Although much remains to be discovered, many improvements are expected from the clinical point of view, from better prognosis classifications to better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27156225

  4. Systematic RNA interference reveals that oncogenic KRAS-driven cancers require TBK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbie, David A; Tamayo, Pablo; Boehm, Jesse S; Kim, So Young; Moody, Susan E; Dunn, Ian F; Schinzel, Anna C; Sandy, Peter; Meylan, Etienne; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Chan, Edmond M; Sos, Martin L; Michel, Kathrin; Mermel, Craig; Silver, Serena J; Weir, Barbara A; Reiling, Jan H; Sheng, Qing; Gupta, Piyush B; Wadlow, Raymond C; Le, Hanh; Hoersch, Sebastian; Wittner, Ben S; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Livingston, David M; Sabatini, David M; Meyerson, Matthew; Thomas, Roman K; Lander, Eric S; Mesirov, Jill P; Root, David E; Gilliland, D Gary; Jacks, Tyler; Hahn, William C

    2009-11-01

    The proto-oncogene KRAS is mutated in a wide array of human cancers, most of which are aggressive and respond poorly to standard therapies. Although the identification of specific oncogenes has led to the development of clinically effective, molecularly targeted therapies in some cases, KRAS has remained refractory to this approach. A complementary strategy for targeting KRAS is to identify gene products that, when inhibited, result in cell death only in the presence of an oncogenic allele. Here we have used systematic RNA interference to detect synthetic lethal partners of oncogenic KRAS and found that the non-canonical IkappaB kinase TBK1 was selectively essential in cells that contain mutant KRAS. Suppression of TBK1 induced apoptosis specifically in human cancer cell lines that depend on oncogenic KRAS expression. In these cells, TBK1 activated NF-kappaB anti-apoptotic signals involving c-Rel and BCL-XL (also known as BCL2L1) that were essential for survival, providing mechanistic insights into this synthetic lethal interaction. These observations indicate that TBK1 and NF-kappaB signalling are essential in KRAS mutant tumours, and establish a general approach for the rational identification of co-dependent pathways in cancer. PMID:19847166

  5. Dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation makes malignant melanoma cells addicted to glycolysis driven by the (V600E)BRAF oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Meyle, Kathrine Damm; Lange, Marina Krarup; Klima, Martin; Sanderhoff, May; Dahl, Christina; Abildgaard, Cecilie; Thorup, Katrine; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Jensen, Per Bo; Bartek, Jiri; Guldberg, Per; Christensen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene addiction describes how cancer cells exhibit dependence on single oncogenes to escape apoptosis and senescence. While oncogene addiction constitutes the basis for new cancer treatment strategies targeting individual kinases and pathways activated by oncogenic mutations, the biochemical...... basis for this addiction is largely unknown. Here we provide evidence for a metabolic rationale behind the addiction to (V600E)BRAF in two malignant melanoma cell lines. Both cell lines display a striking addiction to glycolysis due to underlying dysfunction of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS......). Notably, even minor reductions in glycolytic activity lead to increased OXPHOS activity (reversed Warburg effect), however the mitochondria are unable to sustain ATP production. We show that (V600E)BRAF upholds the activity of glycolysis and therefore the addiction to glycolysis de facto becomes an...

  6. Autism Linked to Increased Oncogene Mutations but Decreased Cancer Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Bassuk, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one phenotypic aspect of many monogenic, hereditary cancer syndromes. Pleiotropic effects of cancer genes on the autism phenotype could lead to repurposing of oncology medications to treat this increasingly prevalent neurodevelopmental condition for which there is currently no treatment. To explore this hypothesis we sought to discover whether autistic patients more often have rare coding, single-nucleotide variants within tumor suppressor and oncogenes and whether autistic patients are more often diagnosed with neoplasms. Exome-sequencing data from the ARRA Autism Sequencing Collaboration was compared to that of a control cohort from the Exome Variant Server database revealing that rare, coding variants within oncogenes were enriched for in the ARRA ASD cohort (p<1.0x10-8). In contrast, variants were not significantly enriched in tumor suppressor genes. Phenotypically, children and adults with ASD exhibited a protective effect against cancer, with a frequency of 1.3% vs. 3.9% (p<0.001), but the protective effect decreased with age. The odds ratio of neoplasm for those with ASD relative to controls was 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.19; p<0.0001) in the 0 to 14 age group; 0.35 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.87; p = 0.024) in the 15 to 29 age group; 0.41 (95% CI: 0.15, 1.17; p = 0.095) in the 30 to 54 age group; and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.14, 1.74; p = 0.267) in those 55 and older. Both males and females demonstrated the protective effect. These findings suggest that defects in cellular proliferation, and potentially senescence, might influence both autism and neoplasm, and already approved drugs targeting oncogenic pathways might also have therapeutic value for treating autism. PMID:26934580

  7. Activation of Oncogenic Pathways in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia M. Stella

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is defined as a specific form of chronic, progressive fibrosing interstitial pneumonia of unknown cause. The most recent hypotheses on IPF pathogenesis suggest a central role of epithelial cell damage, followed by a dysregulated molecular cross talk between epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Thus, IPF progression has often been assimilated to that of cancer, and several signaling patterns appear to be disrupted in both diseases. Here, we analyze the expression in an IPF series of a panel of molecules, which are known to play a role in tumorigenic process. Our findings, although preliminary, reveal that IPF landscape is enriched in neoplastic potential expressed in a context of complex genomic polyclonality and cellular heterogeneity. These results provide a rationale for further investigations aimed to exploit—in a similar fashion to cancer—targeted therapies for a “precision medicine” approach to IPF.

  8. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, David W; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W S; Dick, Ian M; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  9. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  10. Oncogenic osteomalacia diagnosed by blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare metabolic bone disease characterized by phosphaturia and hypophosphatemia. Certain tumors secrete a phosphaturic factor, which results in this metabolic abnormality; this factor called as phosphatonin, is in fact a fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) involved closely in phosphate homeostasis and skeletogenesis. Complete excision of these tumors facilitates reversal of the problem. We have reported here the case of a patient who was crippled with this disease and on thorough investigation revealed an oncogenic osteomalacia with tumor focus in the right tibia. The tumor was identified as a mesenchymal tumor, i.e., hemangiopericytoma. Tumor excision alleviated patient symptoms with rapid symptomatic and biochemical improvement

  11. SOCS1 in cancer: An oncogene and a tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaurivage, Claudia; Champagne, Audrey; Tobelaim, William S; Pomerleau, Véronique; Menendez, Alfredo; Saucier, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    The Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1) has been extensively investigated in immune cells where it works as a potent inhibitor of inflammation by negative feedback regulation of the cytokine-activated JAK-STAT signaling pathways. SOCS1 is also recognized as a tumor suppressor in numerous cancers and its critical functional relevance in non-immune cells, including epithelial cells, has just begun to emerge. Most notably, conflicting results from clinical and experimental studies suggest that SOCS1 may function as either a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter, in a cell context-dependent manner. Here, we present an overview of the mechanisms underlying SOCS1 function as a tumor suppressor and discuss the emerging evidences of SOCS1 activity as an oncogene. PMID:26811119

  12. Oncogenic Transcription Factors: Cornerstones of Inflammation-Linked Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Sandra; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that regulate gene expression by modulating the synthesis of messenger RNA. Since this process is frequently one dominant control point in the production of many proteins, transcription factors represent the key regulators of numerous cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Pancreatic cancer progression is characterized by the activation of inflammatory signaling pathways converging on a limited set of transcription factors that fine-tune gene expression patterns contributing to the growth and maintenance of these tumors. Thus, strategies targeting these transcriptional networks activated in pancreatic cancer cells could block the effects of upstream inflammatory responses participating in pancreatic tumorigenesis. In this article we review this field of research and summarize current strategies to target oncogenic transcription factors and their activating signaling networks in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21997559

  13. Effect of ionizing radiation on the biological activity of activated oncogenes and dormant proto-oncogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied the effect of ionizing radiation on the cloned human activated Ha-ras oncogene, on the Ha-ras gene in integrated form and on the dormant proto-oncogene murine c-mos using the NIH/3T3 transfection system. NIH/3T3 cells were transfected with DNA from the plasmid pT24 carrying the cloned Ha-ras oncogene of the T24 bladder carcinoma cell line. Various individual foci which developed were injected into nude mice. DNA was isolated from tumours, digested with the restriction enzyme Bam HI, electrophoresed on agarose and blotted onto nitrocellulose filter according to Southern. Hybridization with a pT24 probe showed that all the primary foci of transformed cells contained various fragments of the pT24 plasmid indicating that fibroblast transformation had been induced by introduction of the Ha-ras oncogene. (Auth.)

  14. An Optimization-Based Framework for the Transformation of Incomplete Biological Knowledge into a Probabilistic Structure and Its Application to the Utilization of Gene/Protein Signaling Pathways in Discrete Phenotype Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Mohammad Shahrokh; Dougherty, Edward R

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype classification via genomic data is hampered by small sample sizes that negatively impact classifier design. Utilization of prior biological knowledge in conjunction with training data can improve both classifier design and error estimation via the construction of the optimal Bayesian classifier. In the genomic setting, gene/protein signaling pathways provide a key source of biological knowledge. Although these pathways are neither complete, nor regulatory, with no timing associated with them, they are capable of constraining the set of possible models representing the underlying interaction between molecules. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework and the mathematical tools to transform signaling pathways to prior probabilities governing uncertainty classes of feature-label distributions used in classifier design. Structural motifs extracted from the signaling pathways are mapped to a set of constraints on a prior probability on a Multinomial distribution. Being the conjugate prior for the Multinomial distribution, we propose optimization paradigms to estimate the parameters of a Dirichlet distribution in the Bayesian setting. The performance of the proposed methods is tested on two widely studied pathways: mammalian cell cycle and a p53 pathway model. PMID:26671803

  15. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  16. Multiple oncogenic mutations related to targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yuan Zhao; Yu-Xiang Ma; Zhi-Huang Hu; Pei-Yu Huang; Li Zhang; Tao Qin; Shao-Dong Hong; Jing Zhang; Wen-Feng Fang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yun-Peng Yang; Cong Xue; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:An increasing number of targeted drugs have been tested for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to detect targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations in NPC and to determine which targeted therapy might be potentially effective in treating NPC. Methods:By using the SNaPshot assay, a rapid detection method, 19 mutation hotspots in 6 targeted therapy-related oncogenes were examined in 70 NPC patients. The associations between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic factors were analyzed. Results:Among 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) had mutations in 5 oncogenes:7 (10.0%) had v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) mutation, 2 (2.8%) had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and 1 (1.4%) had simultaneous EGFR and v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations. No significant differences were observed between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics. Additionally, these oncogenic mutations were not associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions:Oncogenic mutations are present in NPC patients. The efficacy of targeted drugs on patients with the related oncogenic mutations requires further validation.

  17. Inhibition of oncogene-induced inflammatory chemokines using a farnesyltransferase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Rothstein Jay L; Testa James S; DeGeorge Brent R; DeGeorge Katharine C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) are small molecule agents originally formulated to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Ras. Although subsequent analysis of FTI activity revealed wider effects on other pathways, the drug has been demonstrated to reduce Ras signaling by direct measurements. The purpose of the current study was to determine if FTI could be used to inhibit the inflammatory activities of a known Ras-activating human oncoprotein, RET/PTC3. RET/PTC3 is a fusi...

  18. Nominal classification

    OpenAIRE

    Senft, G.

    2007-01-01

    This handbook chapter summarizes some of the problems of nominal classification in language, presents and illustrates the various systems or techniques of nominal classification, and points out why nominal classification is one of the most interesting topics in Cognitive Linguistics.

  19. An Oncogenic Role for Alternative NF-κB Signaling in DLBCL Revealed upon Deregulated BCL6 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baochun Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL is a complex disease comprising diverse subtypes and genetic profiles. Possibly because of the prevalence of genetic alterations activating canonical NF-κB activity, a role for oncogenic lesions that activate the alternative NF-κB pathway in DLBCL has remained elusive. Here, we show that deletion/mutation of TRAF3, a negative regulator of the alternative NF-κB pathway, occurs in ∼15% of DLBCLs and that it often coexists with BCL6 translocation, which prevents terminal B cell differentiation. Accordingly, in a mouse model constitutive activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway cooperates with BCL6 deregulation in DLBCL development. This work demonstrates a key oncogenic role for the alternative NF-κB pathway in DLBCL development.

  20. The fos oncogene: Transformation and growth control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The v-fos oncogene is carried by two murine retroviruses. The FBJ murine sarcoma virus (FBJ-MSV) which was isolated from a spontaneous bone tumor in a CF1 mouse, and the FBR murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MSV) which was isolated from a /sup 90/Sr-induced bone tumor in an XGF mouse. Both viruses induce osteogenic sarcomas when inoculated into newborn mice. The normal cellular gene (the fos proto-oncogene or c-fos) from which v-fos was derived is expressed in extrambryonal membranes, placenta and macrophages. However, expression can be induced in may cell types following treatment with polypeptide growth factors and other agents. It is proposed that the c-fos protein functions as a nuclear signal involved in coupling short-term signals, elicited by activation of growth factor receptors, to long-term alterations in gene expression

  1. Emerging Roles of Agrobacterial Plant-Transforming Oncogenes in Plant Defense Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakov, Victor P.; Inyushkina, Yuliya V.; Gorpenchenko, Tatiana Y.; Koren, Olga G.; Shkryl, Yuri N.; Zhuravlev, Yuri N.

    2009-01-01

    For recent years, engineering plant metabolic pathways by using rol genes looks promising in several aspects. New directions of rol-gene studies are highlighted in this work underlying the unique regulatory properties of the genes. It is known that following agrobacterial infection, the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rolA, rolB and rolC genes are transferred to plant genome, causing tumor formation and hairy root disease. In this report, we show mat these oncogenes are also involved in regulation of plant defense reactions, including the production of secondary metabolites. Situations occur where the rol genes perform their own critical function to regulate secondary metabolism by bypassing upstream plant control mechanisms and directing defense reactions via a "short cut." The rolC gene expressed in transformed plant cells is efficient in establishing an enhanced resistance of host cells to salt and temperature stresses. The emerging complexity of the rol-gene triggered effects and the involvement of signals generated by these genes in basic processes of cell biology such as calcium and ROS signaling indicate that the plant oncogenes, like some animal protooncogenes, use sophisticated strategies to affect cell growth and differentiation. The data raise the intriguing possibility that some components of plant and animal oncogene signaling pathways share common features.

  2. Human Gene Control by Vital Oncogenes: Revisiting a Theoretical Model and Its Implications for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph E. Willis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model

  3. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that a...

  4. Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Olsen, Jesper V; Brandts, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrant...... patterns of the receptor itself. Thus, intracellular activation of RTKs by oncogenic mutations in the biosynthetic route may exploit cellular architecture to initiate aberrant signaling cascades, thus evading negative regulation....

  5. Myeloproliferative neoplasms and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Mendes de Freitas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMyeloproliferative neoplasms are caused by a clonal proliferation of a hematopoietic progenitor. First described in 1951 as 'Myeloproliferative Diseases' and reevaluated by the World Health Organization classification system in 2011, myeloproliferative neoplasms include polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis in a subgroup called breakpoint cluster region-Abelson fusion oncogene-negative neoplasms. According to World Health Organization regarding diagnosis criteria for myeloproliferative neoplasms, the presence of the JAK2 V617F mutation is considered the most important criterion in the diagnosis of breakpoint cluster region-Abelson fusion oncogene-negative neoplasms and is thus used as a clonal marker. The V617F mutation in the Janus kinase 2(JAK2 gene produces an altered protein that constitutively activates the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription pathway and other pathways downstream as a result of signal transducers and activators of transcription which are subsequently phosphorylated. This affects the expression of genes involved in the regulation of apoptosis and regulatory proteins and modifies the proliferation rate of hematopoietic stem cells.

  6. Dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation makes malignant melanoma cells addicted to glycolysis driven by the V600EBRAF oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Meyle, Kathrine Damm; Lange, Marina Krarup;

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene addiction describes how cancer cells exhibit dependence on single oncogenes to escape apoptosis and senescence. While oncogene addiction constitutes the basis for new cancer treatment strategies targeting individual kinases and pathways activated by oncogenic mutations, the biochemical...... basis for this addiction is largely unknown. Here we provide evidence for a metabolic rationale behind the addiction to V600EBRAF in two malignant melanoma cell lines. Both cell lines display a striking addiction to glycolysis due to underlying dysfunction of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Notably......, even minor reductions in glycolytic activity lead to increased OXPHOS activity (reversed Warburg effect), however the mitochondria are unable to sustain ATP production. We show that V600EBRAF upholds the activity of glycolysis and therefore the addiction to glycolysis de facto becomes an addiction to V...

  7. Inhibition of the Pim1 oncogene results in diminished visual function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yin

    Full Text Available Our objective was to profile genetic pathways whose differential expression correlates with maturation of visual function in zebrafish. Bioinformatic analysis of transcriptomic data revealed Jak-Stat signalling as the pathway most enriched in the eye, as visual function develops. Real-time PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization data confirm that multiple Jak-Stat pathway genes are up-regulated in the zebrafish eye between 3-5 days post-fertilisation, times associated with significant maturation of vision. One of the most up-regulated Jak-Stat genes is the proto-oncogene Pim1 kinase, previously associated with haematological malignancies and cancer. Loss of function experiments using Pim1 morpholinos or Pim1 inhibitors result in significant diminishment of visual behaviour and function. In summary, we have identified that enhanced expression of Jak-Stat pathway genes correlates with maturation of visual function and that the Pim1 oncogene is required for normal visual function.

  8. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC. PMID:26714478

  9. Targeting oncogenes to improve breast cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Laura A; Finch, Rick A; Booker, Adam J; Vasquez, Karen M

    2006-04-15

    Despite recent advances in treatment, breast cancer remains a serious health threat for women. Traditional chemotherapies are limited by a lack of specificity for tumor cells and the cell cycle dependence of many chemotherapeutic agents. Here we report a novel strategy to help overcome these limitations. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to direct DNA damage site-specifically to oncogenes overexpressed in human breast cancer cells, we show that the effectiveness of the anticancer nucleoside analogue gemcitabine can be improved significantly. TFOs targeted to the promoter region of c-myc directly inhibited gene expression by approximately 40%. When used in combination, specific TFOs increased the incorporation of gemcitabine at the targeted site approximately 4-fold, presumably due to induction of replication-independent DNA synthesis. Cells treated with TFOs and gemcitabine in combination showed a reduction in both cell survival and capacity for anchorage-independent growth (approximately 19% of untreated cells). This combination affected the tumorigenic potential of these cancer cells to a significantly greater extent than either treatment alone. This novel strategy may be used to increase the range of effectiveness of antitumor nucleosides in any tumor which overexpresses a targetable oncogene. Multifaceted chemotherapeutic approaches such as this, coupled with triplex-directed gene targeting, may lead to more than incremental improvements in nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. PMID:16618728

  10. Targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs with multimodal synthetic small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Duc Duy; Staedel, Cathy; Zehnacker, Laura; Benhida, Rachid; Darfeuille, Fabien; Duca, Maria

    2014-03-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered category of small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs are aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers and revealed to be oncogenic and to play a pivotal role in initiation and progression of these pathologies. It is now clear that the inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs, defined as blocking their biosynthesis or their function, could find an application in the therapy of different types of cancer in which these miRNAs are implicated. Here we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new small-molecule RNA ligands targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs. In this work we focused our attention on miR-372 and miR-373 that are implicated in the tumorigenesis of different types of cancer such as gastric cancer. These two oncogenic miRNAs are overexpressed in gastric cancer cells starting from their precursors pre-miR-372 and pre-miR-373, two stem-loop structured RNAs that lead to mature miRNAs after cleavage by the enzyme Dicer. The small molecules described herein consist of the conjugation of two RNA binding motives, i.e., the aminoglycoside neomycin and different natural and artificial nucleobases, in order to obtain RNA ligands with increased affinity and selectivity compared to that of parent compounds. After the synthesis of this new series of RNA ligands, we demonstrated that they are able to inhibit the production of the oncogenic miRNA-372 and -373 by binding their pre-miRNAs and inhibiting the processing by Dicer. Moreover, we proved that some of these compounds bear anti-proliferative activity toward gastric cancer cells and that this activity is likely linked to a decrease in the production of targeted miRNAs. To date, only few examples of small molecules targeting oncogenic miRNAs have been reported, and such inhibitors could be extremely useful for the development of new anticancer therapeutic

  11. The MYC 3' Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennoll, Sherri A; Eshelman, Melanie A; Raup-Konsavage, Wesley M; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Yochum, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC) by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF) and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3' Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3' WRE) with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE) within the MYC 3' WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3' WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3' WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27223305

  12. The Plasticity of Oncogene Addiction: Implications for Targeted Therapies Directed to Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinochani Pillay

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A common mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an extracellular truncation known as the de2-7 EGFR (or EGFRvIII. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is the ligand for the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK c-Met, and this signaling axis is often active in GBM. The expression of the HGF/c-Met axis or de2-7 EGFR independently enhances GBMgrowth and invasiveness, particularly through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/pAkt pathway. Using RTK arrays, we show that expression of de2-7 EGFR in U87MG GBM cells leads to the coactivation of several RTKs, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor β and c-Met. A neutralizing antibody to HGF (AMG102 did not inhibit de2-7 EGFR-mediated activation of c-Met, demonstrating that it is ligand-independent. Therapy for parental U87MG xenografts with AMG 102 resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, whereas U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts were profoundly resistant. Treatment of U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts with panitumumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, only partially inhibited tumor growth as xenografts rapidly reverted to the HGF/c-Met signaling pathway. Cotreatment with panitumumab and AMG 102 prevented this escape leading to significant tumor inhibition through an apoptotic mechanism, consistent with the induction of oncogenic shock. This observation provides a rationale for using panitumumab and AMG 102 in combination for the treatment of GBM patients. These results illustrate that GBM cells can rapidly change the RTK driving their oncogene addiction if the alternate RTK signals through the same downstream pathway. Consequently, inhibition of a dominant oncogene by targeted therapy can alter the hierarchy of RTKs resulting in rapid therapeutic resistance.

  13. Oncogene regulation. An oncogenic super-enhancer formed through somatic mutation of a noncoding intergenic element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Marc R; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Durbin, Adam D; Etchin, Julia; Lawton, Lee; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Sanda, Takaomi; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2014-12-12

    In certain human cancers, the expression of critical oncogenes is driven from large regulatory elements, called super-enhancers, that recruit much of the cell's transcriptional apparatus and are defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases, we found that heterozygous somatic mutations are acquired that introduce binding motifs for the MYB transcription factor in a precise noncoding site, which creates a super-enhancer upstream of the TAL1 oncogene. MYB binds to this new site and recruits its H3K27 acetylase-binding partner CBP, as well as core components of a major leukemogenic transcriptional complex that contains RUNX1, GATA-3, and TAL1 itself. Additionally, most endogenous super-enhancers found in T-ALL cells are occupied by MYB and CBP, which suggests a general role for MYB in super-enhancer initiation. Thus, this study identifies a genetic mechanism responsible for the generation of oncogenic super-enhancers in malignant cells. PMID:25394790

  14. Deregulation of p27 by oncogenic signaling and its prognostic significance in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p27 is a key regulator of progression from G1 to S phase. Although the gene encoding p27 is rarely mutated in human cancers, p27 is functionally inactivated in a majority of human cancers through accelerated p27 proteolysis, through sequestration by cyclin D–cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and by cytoplasmic mislocalization. Here we review mechanisms whereby oncogenic activation of receptor tyrosine kinase and Ras pathways lead to accelerated p27 proteolysis and p27 mislocalization in cancer cells. The prognostic significance of p27 in human breast cancer is also reviewed

  15. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs

  16. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Systems biology modeling reveals a possible mechanism of the tumor cell death upon oncogene inactivation in EGFR addicted cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ping Zhou

    Full Text Available Despite many evidences supporting the concept of "oncogene addiction" and many hypotheses rationalizing it, there is still a lack of detailed understanding to the precise molecular mechanism underlying oncogene addiction. In this account, we developed a mathematic model of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR associated signaling network, which involves EGFR-driving proliferation/pro-survival signaling pathways Ras/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K/AKT, and pro-apoptotic signaling pathway apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1/p38. In the setting of sustained EGFR activation, the simulation results show a persistent high level of proliferation/pro-survival effectors phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT, and a basal level of pro-apoptotic effector phospho-p38. The potential of p38 activation (apoptotic potential due to the elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS is largely suppressed by the negative crosstalk between PI3K/AKT and ASK1/p38 pathways. Upon acute EGFR inactivation, the survival signals decay rapidly, followed by a fast increase of the apoptotic signal due to the release of apoptotic potential. Overall, our systems biology modeling together with experimental validations reveals that inhibition of survival signals and concomitant release of apoptotic potential jointly contribute to the tumor cell death following the inhibition of addicted oncogene in EGFR addicted cancers.

  18. Molecular Process Producing Oncogene Fusion in Lung Cancer Cells by Illegitimate Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Seki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of oncogenes by fusion to partner genes, caused by chromosome translocation and inversion, is a critical genetic event driving lung carcinogenesis. Fusions of the tyrosine kinase genes ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase, ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1, or RET (rearranged during transfection occur in 1%–5% of lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs and their products constitute therapeutic targets for kinase inhibitory drugs. Interestingly, ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions occur preferentially in LADCs of never- and light-smokers, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms that cause these rearrangements are smoking-independent. In this study, using previously reported next generation LADC genome sequencing data of the breakpoint junction structures of chromosome rearrangements that cause oncogenic fusions in human cancer cells, we employed the structures of breakpoint junctions of ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions in 41 LADC cases as “traces” to deduce the molecular processes of chromosome rearrangements caused by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and illegitimate joining. We found that gene fusion was produced by illegitimate repair of DSBs at unspecified sites in genomic regions of a few kb through DNA synthesis-dependent or -independent end-joining pathways, according to DSB type. This information will assist in the understanding of how oncogene fusions are generated and which etiological factors trigger them.

  19. Oncogenic BRAF-Mediated Melanoma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezhe Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma patients with oncogenic BRAFV600E mutation have poor prognoses. While the role of BRAFV600E in tumorigenesis is well established, its involvement in metastasis that is clinically observed in melanoma patients remains a topic of debate. Here, we show that BRAFV600E melanoma cells have extensive invasion activity as assayed by the generation of F-actin and cortactin foci that mediate membrane protrusion, and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Inhibition of BRAFV600E blocks melanoma cell invasion. In a BRAFV600E-driven murine melanoma model or in patients’ tumor biopsies, cortactin foci decrease upon inhibitor treatment. In addition, genome-wide expression analysis shows that a number of invadopodia-related genes are downregulated after BRAFV600E inhibition. Mechanistically, BRAFV600E induces phosphorylation of cortactin and the exocyst subunit Exo70 through ERK, which regulates actin dynamics and matrix metalloprotease secretion, respectively. Our results provide support for the role of BRAFV600E in metastasis and suggest that inhibiting invasion is a potential therapeutic strategy against melanoma.

  20. Beyond the second messenger: Oncogenes and transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoplasia is the consequence of a breakdown in the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cell growth and development. The last decade of research on retroviral oncogenes (v-onc) and their cellular progenitors, protooncogenes (c-onc), has yielded specific nucleic acid and antibody probes that are now being used to dissect the causes and consequences of this failure of inter- and intracellular communication. A unifying theme arising from these investigations is that oncogene products appear to function in the transmission of information between and within cells, i.e., in signal transduction processes. Several proto-oncogenes have now been shown to encode proteins similar or identical to growth factors and their receptors, G proteins, protein kinases, or nuclear proteins induced by growth factors. The authors have been pursuing studies on the fos oncogene in an effort to elucidate its role as a nuclear messenger in a variety of normal and transformed cells

  1. Oncogene interactions are required for glioma development and progression as revealed by a tissue specific transgenic mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lynette M. Moore; Kristen M. Holmes; Gregory N. Fuller; Wei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The aggressive and invasive nature of brain tumors has hampered progress in the design and implementation of efficacious therapies. The recent success of targeted therapies in other tumor types makes this an attractive area for research yet complicating matters is the ability of brain tumors to circumvent the targeted pathways to develop drug resistance. Effective therapies will likely need to target more than one signaling pathway or target multiple nodes within a given pathway. Key to identifying these targets is the elucidation of the driver and passenger molecules within these pathways. Animal models provide a useful tool with many advantages in the study of these pathways. These models provide a means to dissect the critical components of tumorigenesis, as well as serve as agents for preclinical testing. This review focuses on the use of the RCAS/tv-a mouse model of brain tumors and describes their unique ability to provide insight into the role of oncogene cooperation in tumor development and progression.

  2. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Vishwamitra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase–expressing (NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5(p23;q35 that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm.

  3. MECP2 Is a Frequently Amplified Oncogene with a Novel Epigenetic Mechanism That Mimics the Role of Activated RAS in Malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neupane, Manish; Clark, Allison P.; Landini, Serena;

    2016-01-01

    activated RAS, the MAPK and PI3K pathways. MECP2 rescued the growth of a KRAS(G12C)-addicted cell line after KRAS downregulation, and activated KRAS rescues the growth of an MECP2-addicted cell line after MECP2 downregulation. MECP2 binding to the epigenetic modification 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is required...... for efficient transformation. These observations suggest that MECP2 is a commonly amplified oncogene with an unusual epigenetic mode of action. MECP2 is a commonly amplified oncogene in human malignancies with a unique epigenetic mechanism of action. Cancer Discov; 6(1); 45-58. ©2015 AACR.This article...

  4. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25873174

  5. Oncogenic BRAF(V600E Induces Clastogenesis and UVB Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis A. Simpson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The oncogenic BRAF(V600E mutation is common in melanomas as well as moles. The roles that this mutation plays in the early events in the development of melanoma are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that expression of BRAF(V600E is not only clastogenic, but synergizes for clastogenesis caused by exposure to ultraviolet radiation in the 300 to 320 nM (UVB range. Expression of BRAF(V600E was associated with induction of Chk1 pS280 and a reduction in chromatin remodeling factors BRG1 and BAF180. These alterations in the Chk1 signaling pathway and SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling pathway may contribute to the clastogenesis and UVB sensitivity. These results emphasize the importance of preventing sunburns in children with developing moles.

  6. Variable expression of PIK3R3 and PTEN in Ewing Sarcoma impacts oncogenic phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F Niemeyer

    Full Text Available Ewing Sarcoma is an aggressive malignancy of bone and soft tissue affecting children and young adults. Ewing Sarcoma is driven by EWS/Ets fusion oncoproteins, which cause widespread alterations in gene expression in the cell. Dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, particularly involving IGF-1R, also plays an important role in Ewing Sarcoma pathogenesis. However, the basis of this dysregulation, including the relative contribution of EWS/Ets-dependent and independent mechanisms, is not well understood. In the present study, we identify variable expression of two modifiers of PI3K signaling activity, PIK3R3 and PTEN, in Ewing Sarcoma, and examine the consequences of this on PI3K pathway regulation and oncogenic phenotypes. Our findings indicate that PIK3R3 plays a growth-promotional role in Ewing Sarcoma, but suggest that this role is not strictly dependent on regulation of PI3K pathway activity. We further show that expression of PTEN, a well-established, potent tumor suppressor, is lost in a subset of Ewing Sarcomas, and that this loss strongly correlates with high baseline PI3K pathway activity in cell lines. In support of functional importance of PTEN loss in Ewing Sarcoma, we show that re-introduction of PTEN into two different PTEN-negative Ewing Sarcoma cell lines results in downregulation of PI3K pathway activity, and sensitization to the IGF-1R small molecule inhibitor OSI-906. Our findings also suggest that PTEN levels may contribute to sensitivity of Ewing Sarcoma cells to the microtubule inhibitor vincristine, a relevant chemotherapeutic agent in this cancer. Our studies thus identify PIK3R3 and PTEN as modifiers of oncogenic phenotypes in Ewing Sarcoma, with potential clinical implications.

  7. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/[mu]), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of [sup 14]C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ([sup 3]H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The [sup 14]C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with [sup 14]C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  8. Identification of a pan-cancer oncogenic microRNA superfamily anchored by a central core seed motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark P.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Hartig, Sean M.; Reva, Boris; McLellan, Michael D.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Zack, Travis I.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Wheeler, David A.; Coarfa, Cristian; McGuire, Sean E.

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs modulate tumorigenesis through suppression of specific genes. As many tumour types rely on overlapping oncogenic pathways, a core set of microRNAs may exist, which consistently drives or suppresses tumorigenesis in many cancer types. Here we integrate The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pan-cancer data set with a microRNA target atlas composed of publicly available Argonaute Crosslinking Immunoprecipitation (AGO-CLIP) data to identify pan-tumour microRNA drivers of cancer. Through this analysis, we show a pan-cancer, coregulated oncogenic microRNA ‘superfamily’ consisting of the miR-17, miR-19, miR-130, miR-93, miR-18, miR-455 and miR-210 seed families, which cotargets critical tumour suppressors via a central GUGC core motif. We subsequently define mutations in microRNA target sites using the AGO-CLIP microRNA target atlas and TCGA exome-sequencing data. These combined analyses identify pan-cancer oncogenic cotargeting of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, TGFβ and p53 pathways by the miR-17-19-130 superfamily members.

  9. Strategic Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Hardt, Moritz; Megiddo, Nimrod; Papadimitriou, Christos; Wootters, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning relies on the assumption that unseen test instances of a classification problem follow the same distribution as observed training data. However, this principle can break down when machine learning is used to make important decisions about the welfare (employment, education, health) of strategic individuals. Knowing information about the classifier, such individuals may manipulate their attributes in order to obtain a better classification outcome. As a result of this behavior...

  10. p53-independent upregulation of miR-34a during oncogene-induced senescence represses MYC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, N R; Shalgi, R; Frankel, L B;

    2010-01-01

    activation of B-RAF. Among the regulated miRNAs, both miR-34a and miR-146a were strongly induced during senescence. Although members of the miR-34 family are known to be transcriptionally regulated by p53, we find that miR-34a is regulated independently of p53 during oncogene-induced senescence. Instead......, upregulation of miR-34a is mediated by the ETS family transcription factor, ELK1. During senescence, miR-34a targets the important proto-oncogene MYC and our data suggest that miR-34a thereby coordinately controls a set of cell cycle regulators. Hence, in addition to its integration in the p53 pathway, we show...

  11. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  12. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Audemard, Eric [McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rak, Janusz, E-mail: janusz.rak@mcgill.ca [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells.

  13. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells

  14. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  15. Multiple oncogene activation in a radiation carcinogenesis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence from animal systems to suggest that certain oncogenes may be activated by the direct action of the initiating carcinogen. Consistent activation by a point mutation of a single member of the ras oncogene family in different tumors produced by a single agent has been demonstrated. In contrast the c-myc and other oncogenes have been shown to be activated by a process involving chromosomal translocations, enhanced expression, and/or gene amplification. We have examined a panel of 12 late stage rat skin tumors for activation of oncogenes from the ras and myc complementation groups. These tumors were four squamous cell carcinomas, three poorly differentiated carcinomas (clear cell), one each of basal cell carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma, sarcoma, fibroma, and mixed (largely squamous) histology carcinoma. The positive tumor DNAs were from three poorly differentiated clear cell carcinomas, a sebaceous carcinoma, a squamous cell carcinoma, and a sarcoma. DNA from one of the primary transfectants was positive in a second round of transfection. The transformed phenotype of the transfectants was confirmed by anchorage independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Southern blot analysis of DNA from primary and secondary transfectants, as well as from nude mouse tumors arising after injection of transfectant cells revealed the presence of rat derived restriction fragments homologous to the K-ras oncogene against the mouse background. Similar experiments using N- and H-ras probes, revealed only the endogenous mouse fragments in transfectant DNA. 11 refs., 1 tab

  16. Combining immunotherapy with oncogene-targeted therapy: a new road for melanoma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana eAris

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma arises from the malignant transformation of skin melanocytes; its incidence and mortality have been increasing steadily over the last fifty-years, now representing 3% of total tumors. Once melanoma metastasizes, prognosis is somber and therapeutic options are limited. However, the discovery of prevalent BRAF mutations in at least 50% of melanoma tumors led to development of BRAF inhibitors, and other drugs targeting the MAPK pathway including MEK inhibitors, are changing this reality. These recently approved treatments for metastatic melanoma have made a significant impact on patient survival; though the results are shadowed by the appearance of drug-resistance. Combination therapies provide a rational strategy to potentiate efficacy and potentially overcome resistance. Undoubtedly, the last decade has also born an renaissance of immunotherapy, and encouraging advances in metastatic melanoma treatment are illuminating the road. Immune checkpoint blockades, such as CTLA-4 antagonist-antibodies, and multiple cancer vaccines are now invaluable arms of anti-tumor therapy. Recent work has brought to light the delicate relationship between tumor biology and the immune system. Host immunity contributes to the antitumor activity of oncogene-targeted inhibitors within a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, combining immunotherapy with oncogene-targeted drugs may be the key to melanoma control. Here we review ongoing clinical studies of combination therapies using both oncogene inhibitors and immunotherapeutic strategies in melanoma patients. We will revisit the preclinical evidence that tested sequential and concurrent schemes in suitable animal models and formed the basis for the current trials. Finally, we will discuss potential future directions of the field.

  17. Human Oncogenic Herpesvirus and Post-translational Modifications – Phosphorylation and SUMOylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Campbell, Mel; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, especially viruses, evolve abilities to utilize cellular machineries to facilitate their survival and propagation. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially phosphorylation and SUMOylation, that reversibly modulate the function and interactions of target proteins are among the most important features in cell signaling pathways. PTM-dependent events also serve as one of the favorite targets for viruses. Among the seven unambiguous human oncogenic viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), human papillomavirus (HPV), Human T lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), two are herpesviruses. The life cycle of herpesviruses consists of latent and lytic phases and the rapid switch between these states includes global remodeling of the viral genome from heterochromatin-to-euchromatin. The balance between lytic replication and latency is essential for herpesvirus to maintain a persistent infection through a combination of viral propagation and evasion of the host immune response, which consequently may contribute to tumorigenesis. It is no surprise that the swift reversibility of PTMs, especially SUMOylation, a modification that epigenetically regulates chromatin structure, is a major hijack target of the host for oncogenic herpesviruses. In this brief review, we summarize the varied ways in which herpesviruses engage the host immune components through PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation and SUMOylation. PMID:27379086

  18. Oncogene Mimicry as a Mechanism of Primary Resistance to BRAF Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Sos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of potent RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibitors, only a fraction of BRAF-mutant patients benefit from treatment with these drugs. Using a combined chemogenomics and chemoproteomics approach, we identify drug-induced RAS-RAF-MEK complex formation in a subset of BRAF-mutant cancer cells characterized by primary resistance to vemurafenib. In these cells, autocrine interleukin-6 (IL-6 secretion may contribute to the primary resistance phenotype via induction of JAK/STAT3 and MAPK signaling. In a subset of cell lines, combined IL-6/MAPK inhibition is able to overcome primary resistance to BRAF-targeted therapy. Overall, we show that the signaling plasticity exerted by primary resistant BRAF-mutant cells is achieved by their ability to mimic signaling features of oncogenic RAS, a strategy that we term “oncogene mimicry.” This model may guide future strategies for overcoming primary resistance observed in these tumors.

  19. RUNX3 Has an Oncogenic Role in Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Kudo, Yasusei; Iizuka, Shinji; Ogawa, Ikuko; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Takata, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is a tumor suppressor of cancer and appears to be an important component of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß)-induced tumor suppression pathway. Surprisingly, we found that RUNX3 expression level in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tissues, which is one of the most common types of human cancer, was higher than that in normal tissues by a previously published microarray dataset in our preliminary study. Therefore, here we examined the oncogenic role of RUNX3 in HNSCC. Principal Findings Frequent RUNX3 expression and its correlation with malignant behavior were observed in HNSCC. Ectopic RUNX3 overexpression promoted cell growth and inhibited serum starvation-induced apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells. These findings were confirmed by RUNX3 knockdown. Moreover, RUNX3 overexpression enhanced tumorsphere formation. RUNX3 expression level was well correlated with the methylation status in HNSCC cells. Moreover, RUNX3 expression was low due to the methylation of its promoter in normal oral epithelial cells. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that i) RUNX3 has an oncogenic role in HNSCC, ii) RUNX3 expression observed in HNSCC may be caused in part by demethylation during cancer development, and iii) RUNX3 expression can be a useful marker for predicting malignant behavior and the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs in HNSCC. PMID:19521519

  20. Viral Interactions with PDZ Domain-Containing Proteins—An Oncogenic Trait?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire D. James

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the human viruses with oncogenic capabilities, either in their natural host or in experimental systems (hepatitis B and C, human T cell leukaemia virus type 1, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, human immunodeficiency virus, high-risk human papillomaviruses and adenovirus type 9, encode in their limited genome the ability to target cellular proteins containing PSD95/ DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ interaction modules. In many cases (but not always, the viruses have evolved to bind the PDZ domains using the same short linear peptide motifs found in host protein-PDZ interactions, and in some cases regulate the interactions in a similar fashion by phosphorylation. What is striking is that the diverse viruses target a common subset of PDZ proteins that are intimately involved in controlling cell polarity and the structure and function of intercellular junctions, including tight junctions. Cell polarity is fundamental to the control of cell proliferation and cell survival and disruption of polarity and the signal transduction pathways involved is a key event in tumourigenesis. This review focuses on the oncogenic viruses and the role of targeting PDZ proteins in the virus life cycle and the contribution of virus-PDZ protein interactions to virus-mediated oncogenesis. We highlight how many of the viral associations with PDZ proteins lead to deregulation of PI3K/AKT signalling, benefitting virus replication but as a consequence also contributing to oncogenesis.

  1. Avian sarcoma virus 17 carries the jun oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    Maki, Y; Bos, T J; Davis, C; Starbuck, M; Vogt, P K

    1987-01-01

    Biologically active molecular clones of avian sarcoma virus 17 (ASV 17) contain a replication-defective proviral genome of 3.5 kilobases (kb). The genome retains partial gag and env sequences, which flank a cell-derived putative oncogene of 0.93 kb, termed jun. The jun gene lacks preserved coding domains of tyrosine-specific protein kinases. It also shows no significant nucleic acid homology with other known oncogenes. The probable transformation-specific protein in ASV 17-transformed cells i...

  2. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Karen; Turkel, Nezaket; Willoughby, Lee F; Ellul, Jason; Murray, Michael J; Richardson, Helena E; Brumby, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch) in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib). Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF) domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo). chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that EMT

  3. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  4. Transporter Classification Database (TCDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Transporter Classification Database details a comprehensive classification system for membrane transport proteins known as the Transporter Classification (TC)...

  5. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, Yoshitaka; Taketo, Makoto [Banyu Tsukuba Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Nozaki, Masami [Osaka Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Y; Taketo, M; Nozaki, M; Seldin, M F

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. PMID:7601474

  7. Tissue Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leemput, Koen; Puonti, Oula

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain have seen tremendous advances in recent years. So-called tissue classification techniques, aimed at extracting the three main brain tissue classes (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid), are no...... software packages such as SPM, FSL, and FreeSurfer....

  8. Classifying Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakowski, Janice

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the experience of a group of first-grade teachers as they tackled the science process of classification, a targeted learning objective for the first grade. While the two-year process was not easy and required teachers to teach in a new, more investigation-oriented way, the benefits were great. The project helped teachers and…

  9. The MYC 3′ Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Eshelman, Melanie A.; Raup-Konsavage, Wesley M.; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC) by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF) and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3′ Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3′ WRE) with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE) within the MYC 3′ WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3′ WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3′ WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27223305

  10. The MYC 3′ Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri A. Rennoll

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC. The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3′ Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3′ WRE with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE within the MYC 3′ WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3′ WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3′ WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC.

  11. The activation of cellular oncogenes by retroviral insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replication-competent retroviruses can induce a variety of tumors by insertional activation of cellular oncogenes. Transposon tagging techniques have uncovered many novel cellular genes implicated in tumorigenesis. Activation of these genes can occur by insertion of viral promoters, transcriptional enhancement over large distances, or the generation of novel chimeric proteins

  12. Targeting MET Amplification as a New Oncogenic Driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain genetically defined cancers are dependent on a single overactive oncogene for their proliferation and survival, a phenomenon known as “oncogene addiction”. A new generation of drugs that selectively target such “driver oncogenes” manifests a clinical efficacy greater than that of conventional chemotherapy in appropriate genetically defined patients. MET is a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant activation of MET signaling occurs in a subset of advanced cancers as result of various genetic alterations including gene amplification, polysomy, and gene mutation. Our preclinical studies have shown that inhibition of MET signaling either with the small-molecule MET inhibitor crizotinib or by RNA interference targeted to MET mRNA resulted in marked antitumor effects in cancer cell lines with MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, patients with non-small cell lung cancer or gastric cancer positive for MET amplification have shown a pronounced clinical response to crizotinib. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence thus suggests that MET amplification is an “oncogenic driver” and therefore a valid target for treatment. However, the prevalence of MET amplification has not been fully determined, possibly in part because of the difficulty in evaluating gene amplification. In this review, we provide a rationale for targeting this genetic alteration in cancer therapy

  13. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, Christopher J; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M; Worboys, Jonathan D; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C; Miller, Crispin J; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRAS(G12D)) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRAS(G12D) signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRAS(G12D) engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D). Consequently, reciprocal KRAS(G12D) produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D) alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27087446

  14. In silico search of DNA drugs targeting oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent a class of drug candidates for antigene therapy. Based on strict criteria, we investigated the potential of 25 known oncogenes to be regulated by TFOs in the mRNA synthesis level and we report specific target sequences found in seven of these genes. PMID:23221090

  15. Targeting MET Amplification as a New Oncogenic Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hisato [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okamoto, Isamu, E-mail: okamotoi@kokyu.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Okamoto, Wataru [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Division of Transrlational Research, Exploratory Oncology Research & Clinical Trial Center, National Cancer Center, 6-5-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8577 (Japan); Tanizaki, Junko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, HIM223, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Nishio, Kazuto [Department of Genome Biology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)

    2014-07-22

    Certain genetically defined cancers are dependent on a single overactive oncogene for their proliferation and survival, a phenomenon known as “oncogene addiction”. A new generation of drugs that selectively target such “driver oncogenes” manifests a clinical efficacy greater than that of conventional chemotherapy in appropriate genetically defined patients. MET is a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant activation of MET signaling occurs in a subset of advanced cancers as result of various genetic alterations including gene amplification, polysomy, and gene mutation. Our preclinical studies have shown that inhibition of MET signaling either with the small-molecule MET inhibitor crizotinib or by RNA interference targeted to MET mRNA resulted in marked antitumor effects in cancer cell lines with MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, patients with non-small cell lung cancer or gastric cancer positive for MET amplification have shown a pronounced clinical response to crizotinib. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence thus suggests that MET amplification is an “oncogenic driver” and therefore a valid target for treatment. However, the prevalence of MET amplification has not been fully determined, possibly in part because of the difficulty in evaluating gene amplification. In this review, we provide a rationale for targeting this genetic alteration in cancer therapy.

  16. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is described in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; (3) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration

  17. AKT-independent signaling downstream of oncogenic PIK3CA mutations in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Krishna M; Barbie, David A; Davies, Michael A; Rabinovsky, Rosalia; McNear, Chontelle J; Kim, Jessica J; Hennessy, Bryan T; Tseng, Hsiuyi; Pochanard, Panisa; Kim, So Young; Dunn, Ian F; Schinzel, Anna C; Sandy, Peter; Hoersch, Sebastian; Sheng, Qing; Gupta, Piyush B; Boehm, Jesse S; Reiling, Jan H; Silver, Serena; Lu, Yiling; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Dutta, Bhaskar; Joy, Corwin; Sahin, Aysegul A; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Rameh, Lucia E; Jacks, Tyler; Root, David E; Lander, Eric S; Mills, Gordon B; Hahn, William C; Sellers, William R; Garraway, Levi A

    2009-07-01

    Dysregulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway occurs frequently in human cancer. PTEN tumor suppressor or PIK3CA oncogene mutations both direct PI3K-dependent tumorigenesis largely through activation of the AKT/PKB kinase. However, here we show through phosphoprotein profiling and functional genomic studies that many PIK3CA mutant cancer cell lines and human breast tumors exhibit only minimal AKT activation and a diminished reliance on AKT for anchorage-independent growth. Instead, these cells retain robust PDK1 activation and membrane localization and exhibit dependency on the PDK1 substrate SGK3. SGK3 undergoes PI3K- and PDK1-dependent activation in PIK3CA mutant cancer cells. Thus, PI3K may promote cancer through both AKT-dependent and AKT-independent mechanisms. Knowledge of differential PI3K/PDK1 signaling could inform rational therapeutics in cancers harboring PIK3CA mutations. PMID:19573809

  18. HOTAIR:an oncogenic long non-coding RNA in different cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammadreza Hajjari; Abbas Salavaty

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) refer to a group of RNAs that are usually more than 200 nucleotides and are not involved in protein generation. Instead, lncRNAs are involved in different regulatory processes, such as regulation of gene expression. Different lncRNAs exist throughout the genome. LncRNAs are also known for their roles in different human diseases such as cancer. HOTAIR is an lncRNA that plays a role as an oncogenic molecule in different cancer cells, such as breast, gastric, colorectal, and cervical cancer cells. Therefore, HOTAIR expression level is a potential biomarker for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in several cancers. hTis RNA takes part in epigenetic regulation of genes and plays an important role in different cellular pathways by interacting with Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). In this review, we describe the molecular function and regulation of HOTAIR and its role in different types of cancers.

  19. Oncogenes and inflammation rewire host energy metabolism in the tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Curry, Joseph M.; Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Tuluc, Madalina; Cognetti, David; Birbe, Ruth C.; Pribitkin, Edmund; Bombonati, Alessandro; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Here, we developed a model system to evaluate the metabolic effects of oncogene(s) on the host microenvironment. A matched set of “normal” and oncogenically transformed epithelial cell lines were co-cultured with human fibroblasts, to determine the “bystander” effects of oncogenes on stromal cells. ROS production and glucose uptake were measured by FACS analysis. In addition, expression of a panel of metabolic protein biomarkers (Caveolin-1, MCT1, and MCT4) was analyzed in parallel. Interesti...

  20. Global metabolic profiling of infection by an oncogenic virus: KSHV induces and requires lipogenesis for survival of latent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracie Delgado

    Full Text Available Like cancer cells, virally infected cells have dramatically altered metabolic requirements. We analyzed global metabolic changes induced by latent infection with an oncogenic virus, Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS, the most common tumor of AIDS patients. Approximately one-third of the nearly 200 measured metabolites were altered following latent infection of endothelial cells by KSHV, including many metabolites of anabolic pathways common to most cancer cells. KSHV induced pathways that are commonly altered in cancer cells including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, amino acid production and fatty acid synthesis. Interestingly, over half of the detectable long chain fatty acids detected in our screen were significantly increased by latent KSHV infection. KSHV infection leads to the elevation of metabolites involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, not degradation from phospholipids, and leads to increased lipid droplet organelle formation in the infected cells. Fatty acid synthesis is required for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells, as inhibition of key enzymes in this pathway led to apoptosis of infected cells. Addition of palmitic acid to latently infected cells treated with a fatty acid synthesis inhibitor protected the cells from death indicating that the products of this pathway are essential. Our metabolomic analysis of KSHV-infected cells provides insight as to how oncogenic viruses can induce metabolic alterations common to cancer cells. Furthermore, this analysis raises the possibility that metabolic pathways may provide novel therapeutic targets for the inhibition of latent KSHV infection and ultimately KS tumors.

  1. STAT3 the oncogene - still eluding therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Matthew S; Watson, Christine J

    2015-07-01

    The STAT family of transcription factors (signal transducers and activators of transcription) transduce signals from cytokine receptors to the nucleus, where STAT dimers bind to DNA and regulate transcription. STAT3 is the most ubiquitous of the STATs, being activated by a wide variety of cytokines and growth factors. STAT3 has many roles in physiological processes such as inflammatory signalling, aerobic glycolysis and immune suppression, and was also the first family member shown to be aberrantly activated in a wide range of both solid and liquid tumours. STAT3 promotes tumorigenesis by regulating the expression of various target genes, including cell-cycle regulators, angiogenic factors and anti-apoptosis genes. Paradoxically, in some circumstances, STAT3 signalling induces cell death. The best known example is the involuting mammary gland, where STAT3 is essential for induction of a lysosomal pathway of cell death. Nevertheless, direct silencing or inhibition of STAT3 diminishes tumour growth and survival in both animal and human studies. This suggests that abolishing STAT3 activity may be an effective cancer therapeutic strategy. However, despite this potential as a therapeutic target, and the extensive attempts by many laboratories and pharmaceutical companies to develop an effective STAT3 inhibitor for use in the clinic, no direct STAT3 inhibitor has been approved for clinical use. In this review, we focus on the role of STAT3 in tumorigenesis, and discuss its potential as a therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:25825152

  2. Evolution and classification of oncogenic human papillomavirus types and variants associated with cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zigui; de Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The nomenclature of human papillomavirus (HPV) is established by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Virus (ICTV). However, the ICTV does not set standards for HPV below species levels. This chapter describes detailed genotyping methods for determining and classifying HPV variants. PMID:25348294

  3. Identification and Functional Analysis of A Novel Candidate Oncogene RAP2B in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobin FU

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective RAP2B is one of the 50 novel candidate genes cloned from the differential expression cDNA libraries constructed in lung cancer cells. Though RAP2B contains conserved domain and belongs to Ras superfamily, the function of RAP2B in carcinogenesis is still poorly understood. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of RAP2B gene in carcinogenesis. Methods RT-PCR was applied to examine transcriptional status of RAP2B in the tumor and corresponding adjacent tissues collected from 27 patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma. RAP2B expression plasmid was constructed and transfected into Rat1 cells to evaluate the in vitro transformation ability through colony formation assay. Reporter gene assay was performed to reveal the relationship between RAP2B geneand NF-kappaB pathway. Results About 67% (18/27 of tumor tissues show higher mRNA expression than that in the corresponding adjacent normal tissues. Typical transforming focus formation was observed in Rat1 cells which were transfected with RAP2B gene. The reporter gene assay data showed that RAP2B activated NF-kappaB pathway more than3 folds compared with the mock vector. Conclusion RAP2B may be a novel candidate oncogene that plays important roles in carcinogenesis through activation of NF-kappaB pathway.

  4. Dysregulation of the mevalonate pathway promotes transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendening, James W.; Pandyra, Aleks; Boutros, Paul C.; Ghamrasni, Samah El; Khosravi, Fereshteh; Trentin, Grace A.; Martirosyan, Anna; Hakem, Anne; Hakem, Razqallah; Jurisica, Igor; Penn, Linda Z.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of cancer metabolism has been appreciated for many years, but the intricacies of how metabolic pathways interconnect with oncogenic signaling are not fully understood. With a clear understanding of how metabolism contributes to tumorigenesis, we will be better able to integrate the targeting of these fundamental biochemical pathways into patient care. The mevalonate (MVA) pathway, paced by its rate-limiting enzyme, hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is required for the generation of several fundamental end-products including cholesterol and isoprenoids. Despite years of extensive research from the perspective of cardiovascular disease, the contribution of a dysregulated MVA pathway to human cancer remains largely unexplored. We address this issue directly by showing that dysregulation of the MVA pathway, achieved by ectopic expression of either full-length HMGCR or its novel splice variant, promotes transformation. Ectopic HMGCR accentuates growth of transformed and nontransformed cells under anchorage-independent conditions or as xenografts in immunocompromised mice and, importantly, cooperates with RAS to drive the transformation of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells. We further explore whether the MVA pathway may play a role in the etiology of human cancers and show that high mRNA levels of HMGCR and additional MVA pathway genes correlate with poor prognosis in a meta-analysis of six microarray datasets of primary breast cancer. Taken together, our results suggest that HMGCR is a candidate metabolic oncogene and provide a molecular rationale for further exploring the statin family of HMGCR inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:20696928

  5. Oncogene expression in primary lung tumors in dogs that inhaled 239PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten radiation-induced and three spontaneous lung tumors were analyzed for aberrant expression of known oncogenes. In 12 of 13 tumors tested, sequences hybridizing to the c-myc oncogene were expressed at levels 1.5 times higher than sequences hybridizing to β-actin. This level of oncogene expression was also observed in 9 of 13 tumors for 1 or more members of the ras family of oncogenes. Seven of thirteen tumors examined express sequences that hybridize with clones of v-ros or c-met. The ros and met clones both code for oncogenes whose normal homologues are transmembrane proteins related to the insulin receptor. (author)

  6. The Oncogenic Risks of Diagnostic CT Scam Studies in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, R.

    2004-07-01

    Brenner et al (2001) reported that estimates of the exposure to children from CT scans indicates that the exposures are both higher than from conventional radiographic studies and higher than is necessary to obtain quality examinations. utilizing the oncogenic risk data from the RERF study in Japan, Brenner et al estimated that the oncogenic risk in this population of CT exposed children exposed each year would result in an additional 500 cases of cancer. This risk estimate is supported by the RERF epidemiological data obtained from the populations exposed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. the increased risks associated with the increased exposure from CT scans have raised concern and stimulated discussion. Although there is little doubt about the benefits of CT scans in improving the health care of children, there is concern about the estimated oncogenic risk, especially since the frequency of CT studies has been increasing. Applying the oncogenic risks of ionizing radiation from the RERF data may not be appropriate for all types of radiation exposure for accurately predicting the incidence of cancer in exposed children because of the impact of 1) partial versus whole-body irradiation, and 2) the protraction of the exposure. Other population of children who have been exposed to radiation and whose incidence of cancer has been studied will be presented and those studies indicate that the risk of cancer is much lower or not increased at all with exposures in the diagnostic range. finally, the dramatic impact of the use of CT scans in clinical pediatric practice saves lives and improves diagnostic accuracy. Therefore, it is crucial that a scholarly evaluation of the risks and benefits should be initiated. The radiology community and the manufacturers have already initiated programs to decrease the exposure significantly. But it is essential that well-planned, retrospective and prospective epidemiology studies should be initiated to study the oncogenic risks. If you want to

  7. Finding Combination of Features from Promoter Regions for Ovarian Cancer-related Gene Group Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Olayan, Rawan S.

    2012-12-01

    In classification problems, it is always important to use the suitable combination of features that will be employed by classifiers. Generating the right combination of features usually results in good classifiers. In the situation when the problem is not well understood, data items are usually described by many features in the hope that some of these may be the relevant or most relevant ones. In this study, we focus on one such problem related to genes implicated in ovarian cancer (OC). We try to recognize two important OC-related gene groups: oncogenes, which support the development and progression of OC, and oncosuppressors, which oppose such tendencies. For this, we use the properties of promoters of these genes. We identified potential “regulatory features” that characterize OC-related oncogenes and oncosuppressors promoters. In our study, we used 211 oncogenes and 39 oncosuppressors. For these, we identified 538 characteristic sequence motifs from their promoters. Promoters are annotated by these motifs and derived feature vectors used to develop classification models. We made a comparison of a number of classification models in their ability to distinguish oncogenes from oncosuppressors. Based on 10-fold cross-validation, the resultant model was able to separate the two classes with sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 100% with the complete set of features. Moreover, we developed another recognition model where we attempted to distinguish oncogenes and oncosuppressors as one group from other OC-related genes. That model achieved accuracy of 82%. We believe that the results of this study will help in discovering other OC-related oncogenes and oncosuppressors not identified as yet.

  8. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy

  9. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  10. Oncogenic osteomalacia presenting as bilateral stress fractures of the tibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a patient with bilateral stress fractures of the tibia who subsequently showed classic biochemical features of oncogenic osteomalacia. Conventional radiographs were normal. MR imaging revealed symmetric, bilateral, band-like low-signal lesions perpendicular to the medial cortex of the tibiae and corresponding to the only lesions subsequently seen on the bone scan. A maxillary sinus lesion was subsequently detected and surgically removed resulting in prompt alleviation of symptoms and normalization of hypophosphatemia and low 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D3. The lesion was pathologically diagnosed as a hemangiopericytoma-like tumor. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia may present with stress fractures limited to the tibia, as seen in athletes. The clue to the real diagnosis lies in paying close attention to the serum phosphate levels, especially in patients suffering generalized symptoms of weakness and not given to unusual physical activity. (orig.)

  11. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.

  12. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Mi [Yonsei University, Division of Biological Science and Technology, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Myounghee [Clinical Trial Center for Functional Foods, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo-Kyoung [Yonsei University, Division of Biological Science and Technology, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Ik-Soon; Choi, Jong-Soon [Proteome Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il-Chul [School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Je-Ho [Molecular Therapy Research Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo, E-mail: junsoo@yonsei.ac.kr [Yonsei University, Division of Biological Science and Technology, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.

  13. Comparison of the oncogenic potential of several chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several chemotherapeutic drugs that have been routinely used in cancer treatment were tested for their carcinogenic potential. Two antitumor antibiotics (adriamycin and vincristine), an alkalating agent (melphalan), 5-azacytidine and the bifunctional agent cis-platinum that mimics alkylating agents and/or binds Oxygen-6 or Nitrogen-7 atoms of quanine were tested. Cell killing and cancer induction was assessed using in vitro transformation system. C3H/10T 1/2 cells, while normally exhibiting contact inhibition, can undergo transformation from normal contact inhibited cells to tumorgenic cells when exposed to chemical carcinogens. These cells have been used in the past by this laboratory to study oncogenic transformation of cells exposed to ionizing radiation and electron affinic compounds that sensitize hypoxic cells to x-rays. The endpoints of cell killing and oncogenic transformation presented here give an estimate of the carcinogenic potential of these agents

  14. Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes: comparative genomics and network perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Kevin; Liu, Qi; Zhou, Yubo; Tao, Cui; Zhao, Zhongming; Sun, Jingchun; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background Defective tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and hyperactive oncogenes (OCGs) heavily contribute to cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development through genetic variations such as somatic mutations and deletions. Moreover, they usually do not perform their cellular functions individually but rather execute jointly. Therefore, a comprehensive comparison of their mutation patterns and network properties may provide a deeper understanding of their roles in the cancer developm...

  15. Targeting oncogenic mutant p53 for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoo eIwakuma; Alejandro eParrales

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function (GOF) activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p...

  16. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in ...

  17. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. Progress is described in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; (3) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration. 59 refs., 4 tabs

  18. Analysis of RAS oncogene mutations in human lymphoid malignancies.

    OpenAIRE

    Neri, A.; Knowles, D M; Greco, A.; McCormick, F; Dalla-Favera, R

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the frequency of mutations activating RAS oncogenes in human lymphoid malignancies, including B- and T-cell-derived acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. By the polymerase chain reaction/oligonucleotide hybridization method, DNA from 178 cases was analyzed for activating mutations involving codons 12 and 61 of the HRAS, KRAS and NRAS genes and codon 13 of the NRAS gene. Mutations involving codons 12 or 13 of the NRAS gene were de...

  19. Oncogene-tumor suppressor gene feedback interactions and their control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguda, Baltazar D; del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Chan, Michael W Y

    2015-12-01

    We propose the hypothesis that for a particular type of cancer there exists a key pair of oncogene (OCG) and tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is normally involved in strong stabilizing negative feedback loops (nFBLs) of molecular interactions, and it is these interactions that are sufficiently perturbed during cancer development. These nFBLs are thought to regulate oncogenic positive feedback loops (pFBLs) that are often required for the normal cellular functions of oncogenes. Examples given in this paper are the pairs of MYC and p53, KRAS and INK4A, and E2F1 and miR-17-92. We propose dynamical models of the aforementioned OCG-TSG interactions and derive stability conditions of the steady states in terms of strengths of cycles in the qualitative interaction network. Although these conditions are restricted to predictions of local stability, their simple linear expressions in terms of competing nFBLs and pFBLs make them intuitive and practical guides for experimentalists aiming to discover drug targets and stabilize cancer networks. PMID:26775863

  20. PVT1: A Rising Star among Oncogenic Long Noncoding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that short and long noncoding RNAs critically participate in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and (misfunction. However, while the functional characterization of short non-coding RNAs has been reaching maturity, there is still a paucity of well characterized long noncoding RNAs, even though large studies in recent years are rapidly increasing the number of annotated ones. The long noncoding RNA PVT1 is encoded by a gene that has been long known since it resides in the well-known cancer risk region 8q24. However, a couple of accidental concurrent conditions have slowed down the study of this gene, that is, a preconception on the primacy of the protein-coding over noncoding RNAs and the prevalent interest in its neighbor MYC oncogene. Recent studies have brought PVT1 under the spotlight suggesting interesting models of functioning, such as competing endogenous RNA activity and regulation of protein stability of important oncogenes, primarily of the MYC oncogene. Despite some advancements in modelling the PVT1 role in cancer, there are many questions that remain unanswered concerning the precise molecular mechanisms underlying its functioning.

  1. Lung cancers unrelated to smoking: characterized by single oncogene addiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2011-08-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Currently, adenocarcinoma is its most common histological subtype in many countries. In contrast with small cell lung cancer or squamous cell carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma often arises in never-smokers, especially in East Asian countries, as well as in smokers. Adenocarcinoma in never-smokers is associated with a lower incidence of genetic alterations (i.e., somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity, and methylation) than in smokers. In addition, most adenocarcinomas in never-smokers harbor one of the proto-oncogene aberrations that occur in a mutually exclusive manner (EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, HER2 mutations, or ALK translocation). It is of note that the proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells that harbor one of these oncogenic aberrations depend on the signaling from each aberrantly activated oncoprotein (oncogene addiction). Therefore, most adenocarcinomas in never-smokers can be effectively treated by molecularly targeted drugs that inhibit each oncoprotein. Moreover, from a pathological aspect, lung adenocarcinoma in never-smokers is characterized by terminal respiratory unit-type adenocarcinoma and a particular gene expression profile. Finally, epidemiological analyses have identified many candidate causes of lung cancer in never-smokers (genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors). The elucidation of the particular features of lung cancer unrelated to smoking and the development of new therapeutic modalities may reduce the mortality from lung cancers in the future. PMID:21655907

  2. PERK Integrates Oncogenic Signaling and Cell Survival During Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yiwen; Diehl, J Alan

    2016-10-01

    Unfolded protein responses (UPR), consisting of three major transducers PERK, IRE1, and ATF6, occur in the midst of a variety of intracellular and extracellular challenges that perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER stress occurs and is thought to be a contributing factor to a number of human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and various metabolic syndromes. In the context of neoplastic growth, oncogenic stress resulting from dysregulation of oncogenes such as c-Myc, Braf(V600E) , and HRAS(G12V) trigger the UPR as an adaptive strategy for cancer cell survival. PERK is an ER resident type I protein kinase harboring both pro-apoptotic and pro-survival capabilities. PERK, as a coordinator through its downstream substrates, reprograms cancer gene expression to facilitate survival in response to oncogenes and microenvironmental challenges, such as hypoxia, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Herein, we discuss how PERK kinase engages in tumor initiation, transformation, adaption microenvironmental stress, chemoresistance and potential opportunities, and potential opportunities for PERK targeted therapy. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2088-2096, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864318

  3. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells toward the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected cells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. Progress is described. 121 refs.

  4. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells toward the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These ''partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that ''complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected cells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. Progress is described. 121 refs

  5. Synonymous codon changes in the oncogenes of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus lead to increased oncogenicity and immunogenicity of the virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Hu, Jiafen; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses use rare codons with respect to the host. The reasons for this are incompletely understood but among the hypotheses is the concept that rare codons result in low protein production and this allows the virus to escape immune surveillance. We changed rare codons in the oncogenes E6 and E7 of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus to make them more mammalian-like and tested the mutant genomes in our in vivo animal model. While the amino acid sequences of the proteins remained unchanged, the oncogenic potential of some of the altered genomes increased dramatically. In addition, increased immunogenicity, as measured by spontaneous regression, was observed as the numbers of codon changes increased. This work suggests that codon usage may modify protein production in ways that influence disease outcome and that evaluation of synonymous codons should be included in the analysis of genetic variants of infectious agents and their association with disease. PMID:23433866

  6. Squamous precursor lesions of the vulva: current classification and diagnostic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Lien N; Park, Kay J; Soslow, Robert A; Murali, Rajmohan

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence has established two major types of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), which correspond to two distinct oncogenic pathways to vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC). While the incidence of VSCC has remained relatively stable over the last three decades, the incidence of VIN has increased. VIN of usual type (uVIN) is human papillomavirus (HPV)-driven, affects younger women and is a multicentric disease. In contrast, VIN of differentiated type (dVIN) occurs in post-menopausal women and develops independent of HPV infection. dVIN often arises in a background of lichen sclerosus and chronic inflammatory dermatoses. Although isolated dVIN is significantly less common than uVIN, dVIN bears a greater risk for malignant transformation to VSCC and progresses over a shorter time interval. On histological examination, uVIN displays conspicuous architectural and cytological abnormalities, while the morphological features that characterise dVIN are much more subtle and raise a wide differential diagnosis. On the molecular level, dVIN is characterised by a higher number of somatic mutations, particularly in TP53. Here we review the classification, epidemiology, clinical features, histomorphology, ancillary markers and molecular genetics of both types of VIN, and discuss the morphological challenges faced by pathologists in interpreting these lesions. PMID:27113549

  7. Classification in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, John

    Despite some inroads by the Library of Congress Classification and short-lived experimentation with Universal Decimal Classification and Bliss Classification, Dewey Decimal Classification, with its ability in recent editions to be hospitable to local needs, remains the most widely used classification system in Australia. Although supplemented at…

  8. Classification in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Jens Erik

    2004-01-01

    This paper surveys classification research literature, discusses various classification theories, and shows that the focus has traditionally been on establishing a scientific foundation for classification research. This paper argues that a shift has taken place, and suggests that contemporary cla...... classification research focus on contextual information as the guide for the design and construction of classification schemes....

  9. Multi-borders classification

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The number of possible methods of generalizing binary classification to multi-class classification increases exponentially with the number of class labels. Often, the best method of doing so will be highly problem dependent. Here we present classification software in which the partitioning of multi-class classification problems into binary classification problems is specified using a recursive control language.

  10. Oncogenic intra-p53 family member interactions in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eFerraiuolo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene family members p53, p73 and p63 display several isoforms derived from the presence of internal promoters and alternative splicing events. They are structural homologues but hold peculiar functional properties. p53, p73 and p63 are tumor suppressor genes that promote differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. p53, unlike p73 and p63, is frequently mutated in cancer often displaying oncogenic gain of function (GOF activities correlated with the induction of proliferation, invasion, chemoresistance and genomic instability in cancer cells. These oncogenic functions are promoted either by the aberrant transcriptional cooperation of mutant p53 (mutp53 with transcription cofactors (e.g., NF-Y, E2F1, Vitamin D Receptor (VDR, Ets-1, NF-kB and YAP or by the interaction with the p53 family members, p73 and p63, determining their functional inactivation. The instauration of these aberrant transcriptional networks leads to increased cell growth, low activation of DNA damage response pathways (DNA damage response (DDR, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs response, enhanced invasion and high chemoresistance to different conventional chemotherapeutic treatments. Several studies have clearly shown that different cancers harboring mutant p53 proteins exhibit a poor prognosis when compared to those carrying wild type p53 (wt-p53 protein. The interference of mutantp53/p73 and/or mutantp53/p63 interactions, thereby restoring p53, p73 and p63 tumor suppression functions, could be among the potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of mutant p53 human cancers.

  11. Prox1-Heterozygosis Sensitizes the Pancreas to Oncogenic Kras-Induced Neoplastic Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis Drosos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current paradigm of pancreatic neoplastic transformation proposes an initial step whereby acinar cells convert into acinar-to-ductal metaplasias, followed by progression of these lesions into neoplasias under sustained oncogenic activity and inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving these processes is crucial to the early diagnostic and prevention of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that transcription factors that control exocrine pancreatic development could have either, protective or facilitating roles in the formation of preneoplasias and neoplasias in the pancreas. We previously identified that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a novel regulator of mouse exocrine pancreas development. Here we investigated whether Prox1 function participates in early neoplastic transformation using in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches. We found that Prox1 expression is transiently re-activated in acinar cells undergoing dedifferentiation and acinar-to-ductal metaplastic conversion. In contrast, Prox1 expression is largely absent in neoplasias and tumors in the pancreas of mice and humans. We also uncovered that Prox1-heterozygosis markedly increases the formation of acinar-to-ductal-metaplasias and early neoplasias, and enhances features associated with inflammation, in mouse pancreatic tissues expressing oncogenic Kras. Furthermore, we discovered that Prox1-heterozygosis increases tissue damage and delays recovery from inflammation in pancreata of mice injected with caerulein. These results are the first demonstration that Prox1 activity protects pancreatic cells from acute tissue damage and early neoplastic transformation. Additional data in our study indicate that this novel role of Prox1 involves suppression of pathways associated with inflammatory responses and cell invasiveness.

  12. Estradiol and Estrogen Receptor Agonists Oppose Oncogenic Actions of Leptin in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Minqian; Shi, Haifei

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for certain cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Leptin, a hormone secreted by white adipose tissue, precipitates HCC development. Epidemiology data show that men have a much higher incidence of HCC than women, suggesting that estrogens and its receptors may inhibit HCC development and progression. Whether estrogens antagonize oncogenic action of leptin is uncertain. To investigate potential inhibitory effects of estrogens on leptin-induced HCC development, HCC cell line HepG2 cells were treated with leptin in combination with 17 β-estradiol (E2), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) selective agonist PPT, ER-β selective agonist DPN, or G protein-coupled ER (GPER) selective agonist G-1. Cell number, proliferation, and apoptosis were determined, and leptin- and estrogen-related intracellular signaling pathways were analyzed. HepG2 cells expressed a low level of ER-β mRNA, and leptin treatment increased ER-β expression. E2 suppressed leptin-induced HepG2 cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally E2 reversed leptin-induced STAT3 and leptin-suppressed SOCS3, which was mainly achieved by activation of ER-β. E2 also enhanced ERK via activating ER-α and GPER and activated p38/MAPK via activating ER-β. To conclude, E2 and its receptors antagonize the oncogenic actions of leptin in HepG2 cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and stimulating cell apoptosis, which was associated with reversing leptin-induced changes in SOCS3/STAT3 and increasing p38/MAPK by activating ER-β, and increasing ERK by activating ER-α and GPER. Identifying roles of different estrogen receptors would provide comprehensive understanding of estrogenic mechanisms in HCC development and shed light on potential treatment for HCC patients. PMID:26982332

  13. Inhibition of oncogene-induced inflammatory chemokines using a farnesyltransferase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothstein Jay L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI are small molecule agents originally formulated to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Ras. Although subsequent analysis of FTI activity revealed wider effects on other pathways, the drug has been demonstrated to reduce Ras signaling by direct measurements. The purpose of the current study was to determine if FTI could be used to inhibit the inflammatory activities of a known Ras-activating human oncoprotein, RET/PTC3. RET/PTC3 is a fusion oncoprotein expressed in the thyroid epithelium of patients afflicted with thyroid autoimmune disease and/or differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Previous studies have demonstrated that RET/PTC3 signals through Ras and can provoke nuclear translocation of NFκB and the downstream release of pro-inflammatory mediators from thyroid follicular cells in vitro and in vivo, making it an ideal target for studies using FTI. Methods For the studies described here, an in vitro assay was developed to measure FTI inhibition of RET/PTC3 pro-inflammatory effects. Rat thyrocytes transfected with RET/PTC3 or vector control cDNA were co-cultured with FTI and examined for inhibition of chemokine expression and secretion measured by RT-PCR and ELISA. Immunoblot analysis was used to confirm the level at which FTI acts on RET/PTC3-expressing cells, and Annexin V/PI staining of cells was used to assess cell death in RET/PTC3-expressing cells co-cultured with FTI. Results These analyses revealed significant mRNA and protein inhibition of chemokines Ccl2 and Cxcl1 with nanomolar doses of FTI. Neither RET/PTC3 protein expression nor apoptosis were affected at any dose of FTI investigated. Conclusion These data suggest that FTI may be applied as an effective inhibitor for RET/PTC3-oncogene induced pro-inflammatory mediators.

  14. Characterization of new cell line stably expressing CHI3L1 oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekhonin V. P.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To characterize the immortalized 293 cell line after stable transfection with human oncogene (CHI3L1. Methods. 293 cells, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1_CHI3L1, and 293 cells, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1 as a negative control, were used throughout all experiments. The clones of CHI3L1-expressing 293 cells and 293 cells, transfected with pcDNA3.1, were analyzed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Cell proliferation was measured using MTT assay; analyses of ERK1/2 and AKT activation and their cellular localization were performed with anti-phospho-ERK and anti-phospho-AKT antibodies. Specific activation of MAP and PI3 kinases was measured by densitometric analysis of Western-blot signals. Results. The obtained results show quite modest ability of CHI3L1 to stimulate cell growth and reflect rather an improved cellular plating efficiency of the 293 cells stably transfected with pcDNA3.1_CHI3L1 as compared to the 293 cells transfected with an «empty» vector. ERK1/2 and AKT are activated in the 293_CHI3L1 cells. In these cells phosphorylated ERK1/2 were localized in both cell cytoplasm and nuclei while AKT only in cytoplasm. The 293_CHI3L1 cells differed from the 293 cells, transfected with an «empty» vector, in their size and ability to adhere to the culture plates. Conclusions. The overexpression of CHI3L1 is likely to have an important role in tumorigenesis via a mechanism which involves activation of PI3K and ERK1/2 pathways. The tumors which can be induced by orthotopic implantation of the transformed human cells with overexpressed human oncogene CHI3L1 into the rat brain can be used as a target for anticancer drug development.

  15. Oncogene and therapeutic target analyses in atypical fibroxanthomas and pleomorphic dermal sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pütz, Katharina; Tantcheva-Poor, Iliana; Mauch, Cornelia; Büttner, Reinhard; Quaas, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Until now, almost nothing is known about the tumorigenesis of atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) and pleomorphic dermal sarcoma (PDS). Our hypothesis is that AFX is the non-infiltrating precursor lesion of PDS. Materials and Methods We performed the world-wide most comprehensive immunohistochemical and mutational analysis in well-defined AFX (n=5) and PDS (n=5). Results In NGS-based mutation analyses of selected regions by a 17 hotspot gene panel of 102 amplicons we could detect TP53 mutations in all PDS as well as in the only analyzed AFX and PDS of the same patient. Besides, we detected mutations in the CDKN2A, HRAS, KNSTRN and PIK3CA genes. Performing immunohistochemistry for CTNNB1, KIT, CDK4, c-MYC, CTLA-4, CCND1, EGFR, EPCAM, ERBB2, IMP3, INI-1, MKI67, MDM2, MET, p40, TP53, PD-L1 and SOX2 overexpression of TP53, CCND1 and CDK4 was seen in AFX as well as in PDS. IMP3 was upregulated in 2 AFX (weak staining) and 4 PDS (strong staining). FISH analyses for the genes FGFR1, FGFR2 and FGFR3 revealed negative results in all tumors. Conclusions UV-induced TP53 mutations as well as CCND1/CDK4 changes seem to play essential roles in tumorigenesis of PDS. Furthermore, we found some more interesting mutated genes in other oncogene pathways (activating mutations of HRAS and PIK3CA). All AFX and PDS investigated immunohistochemically presented with similar oncogene expression profiles (TP53, CCND1, CDK4 overexpression) and the single case with an AFX and PDS showed complete identical TP53 and PIK3CA mutation profiles in both tumors. This reinforces our hypothesis that AFX is the non-infiltrating precursor lesion of PDS. PMID:26943575

  16. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In ...

  17. Distinct and competitive regulatory patterns of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs and oncogenes (OCGs that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we developed a novel computational framework for identifying target genes of TSGs and OCGs using TFs as bridges through the integration of protein-protein interactions and gene expression data. We applied this pipeline to ovarian cancer and constructed a three-layer regulatory network. In the network, the top layer was comprised of modulators (TSGs and OCGs, the middle layer included TFs, and the bottom layer contained target genes. Based on regulatory relationships in the network, we compiled TSG and OCG profiles and performed clustering analyses. Interestingly, we found TSGs and OCGs formed two distinct branches. The genes in the TSG branch were significantly enriched in DNA damage and repair, regulating macromolecule metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis, while the genes in the OCG branch were significantly enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. Remarkably, their specific targets showed a reversed functional enrichment in terms of apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway: the target genes regulated by OCGs only were enriched in anti-apoptosis and the target genes regulated by TSGs only were enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first comprehensive investigation of the interplay of TSGs and OCGs in a regulatory network modulated by TFs. Our application in ovarian cancer revealed distinct regulatory patterns of TSGs and OCGs, suggesting a competitive

  18. Classification and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Automated procedures to classify objects are discussed. The classification problem is reviewed, and the relation of epistemology and classification is considered. The classification of stellar spectra and of resolved images of galaxies is addressed.

  19. Hazard classification methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document outlines the hazard classification methodology used to determine the hazard classification of the NIF LTAB, OAB, and the support facilities on the basis of radionuclides and chemicals. The hazard classification determines the safety analysis requirements for a facility

  20. Remote Sensing Information Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the classification of Remote Sensing data in relation to epidemiology. Classification is a way to reduce the dimensionality and precision to something a human can understand. Classification changes SCALAR data into NOMINAL data.

  1. Transforming growth factor alpha dramatically enhances oncogene-induced carcinogenesis in transgenic mouse pancreas and liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandgren, E P; Luetteke, N C; Qiu, T H; Palmiter, R D; Brinster, R L; Lee, D C

    1993-01-01

    To characterize the effect(s) of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) during multistage carcinogenesis, we examined tumor development in pancreas and liver of transgenic mice that coexpressed TGF alpha with either viral (simian virus 40 T antigens [TAg]) or cellular (c-myc) oncogenes. In pancreas, TGF alpha itself was not oncogenic, but it nevertheless dramatically accelerated growth of tumors induced by either oncogene alone, thereby reducing the host life span up to 60%. Coexpressio...

  2. At least two regions of the viral genome determine the oncogenic potential of avian leukosis viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, H L; Blais, B M; Tsichlis, P N; Coffin, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Recombinants of oncogenic and nononcogenic avian leukosis viruses were tested for their oncogenic potential in chickens. The results indicate that at least two regions of the viral genome determine the oncogenic potential of these viruses. The first region contains sequences that control viral mRNA synthesis. These sequences determine the potential of a virus to induce a low incidence of lymphomas, carcinomas, chondrosarcomas, fibrosarcomas, and osteopetrosis. The second region lies outside t...

  3. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Deeksha Vishwamitra; Choladda V. Curry; Ping Shi; Serhan Alkan; Amin, Hesham M.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase–expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with ...

  4. Oncogenic activation of Pak1-dependent pathway of macropinocytosis determines BCG entry into bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Iyer, Gopa; Solit, David; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that is used widely as a vaccine for tuberculosis and is used as an effective treatment for superficial bladder carcinoma. Despite being the most successful cancer biotherapy, its mechanism of action and response determinants remain obscure. Here we establish a model system to analyze BCG interaction with bladder cancer cells, using it to show that these cells vary dramatically in their susceptibility to BCG infectio...

  5. Classification of the web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Jens Erik

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges faced by investigations into the classification of the Web and outlines inquiries that are needed to use principles for bibliographic classification to construct classifications of the Web. This paper suggests that the classification of the Web meets challenges...

  6. Seven Novel and Stable Translocations Associated with Oncogenic Gene Expression in Malignant Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Okamoto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetics has not only precipitated the discovery of several oncogenes, but has also led to the molecular classification of numerous malignancies. The correct identification of aberrations in many tumors has, however, been hindered by extensive tumor complexity and the limitations of molecular cytogenetic techniques. In this study, we have investigated five malignant melanoma (MM cell lines from at least three different passages using high-resolution R-banding and the recently developed methods of comparative genomic hybridization and multicolor or multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization. We subsequently detected nine consistent translocations, seven of which were novel: dic(1;11(p10;q14, der(9t(3;9(p12;p11, der(4t(9;4;7(q33::p15-q23::q21, der(14t(5;14 (q12;q32, der(9t(9;22(p21;q11, der(19t(19;20(p13.3;p11, der(10t(2;12;7;10(q31::p12→pter::q11.2→q31::q21,der(19t(10;19(q23;q13, and der(20t(Y;20(q11.23;q13.3. Furthermore, using the human HG-U133A Gene-Chip, positive expression levels of oncogenes or tumor-related genes located at the regions of chromosomal breakpoints were identified, including AKT1, BMI1, CDK6, CTNNB1, E2F1, GPNMB, GPRK7, KBRAS2, LDB2, LIMK1, MAPK1, MEL, MP1, MUC18, NRCAM, PBX3, RAB22A, RAB38, SNK, and STK4, indicating an association between chromosomal breakpoints and altered gene expression. Moreover, we also show that growth of all five cell lines can be significantly reduced by downregulating CDK6 gene expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA. Because the majority of these breakpoints have been reported previously in MM, our results support the idea of commonmechanisms in this disease.

  7. Oncogenic osteomalacia -- hypophosphataemic spectrum from "benignancy" to "malignancy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, P; Tan, H C; Bee, Y M; Chandran, M

    2013-03-01

    Though case reports and case series about oncogenic osteomalacia due to benign mesenchymal tumours and much more rarely, secondary to malignant ones exist in the literature, there has not been any series reported from a single department spanning the gamut of causes from benign to malignant. We present 3 patients who were seen at the department of endocrinology of our hospital between 2010 and 2012 with hypophosphataemia and severe skeletal complications. All of them were found to have oncogenic osteomalacia otherwise known as tumour induced osteomalacia (TIO) - a paraneoplastic syndrome characterised by renal phosphate wasting and severe hypophosphataemia. The implicating tumours in our patients ranged from a subcutaneous mesenchymal tumour in the heel to a mixed connective tissue variant within the nasal cavity to metastatic prostate cancer. All our patients had protracted periods before the diagnosis was made, during which time the burden of their metabolic and skeletal pathology had increased. A timely recognition of the clinical features and biochemical findings of this rare but potentially debilitating disease is critical. Physicians should be cognizant of the presence of the disease and its localising and treatment strategies. PMID:23220596

  8. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'. PMID:24780858

  9. Development of lung adenocarcinomas with exclusive dependence on oncogene fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Motonobu; Shimada, Yoko; Shiraishi, Kouya; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Tsuta, Koji; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Kato, Mamoru; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    This report delivers a comprehensive genetic alteration profile of lung adenocarcinomas (LADC) driven by ALK, RET, and ROS1 oncogene fusions. These tumors are difficult to study because of their rarity. Each drives only a low percentage of LADCs. Whole-exome sequencing and copy-number variation analyses were performed on a Japanese LADC cohort (n = 200) enriched in patients with fusions (n = 31, 15.5%), followed by deep resequencing for validation. The driver fusion cases showed a distinct profile with smaller numbers of nonsynonymous mutations in cancer-related genes or truncating mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex genes than in other LADCs (P < 0.0001). This lower mutation rate was independent of age, gender, smoking status, pathologic stage, and tumor differentiation (P < 0.0001) and was validated in nine fusion-positive cases from a U.S. LADCs cohort (n = 230). In conclusion, our findings indicate that LADCs with ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions develop exclusively via their dependence on these oncogene fusions. The presence of such few alterations beyond the fusions supports the use of monotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the fusion products in fusion-positive LADCs. PMID:25855381

  10. MicroRNA 17-92 cluster mediates ETS1 and ETS2-dependent RAS-oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbout, Mohamed; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Sharma, Sudarshana; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Srinivasan, Ruchika; Piper, Melissa; Marsh, Clay B; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    The ETS-family transcription factors Ets1 and Ets2 are evolutionarily conserved effectors of the RAS/ERK signaling pathway, but their function in Ras cellular transformation and biology remains unclear. Taking advantage of Ets1 and Ets2 mouse models to generate Ets1/Ets2 double knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we demonstrate that deletion of both Ets1 and Ets2 was necessary to inhibit HrasG12V induced transformation both in vitro and in vivo. HrasG12V expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts increased ETS1 and ETS2 expression and binding to cis-regulatory elements on the c-Myc proximal promoter, and consequently induced a robust increase in MYC expression. The expression of the oncogenic microRNA 17-92 cluster was increased in HrasG12V transformed cells, but was significantly reduced when ETS1 and ETS2 were absent. MYC and ETS1 or ETS2 collaborated to increase expression of the oncogenic microRNA 17-92 cluster in HrasG12V transformed cells. Enforced expression of exogenous MYC or microRNA 17-92 rescued HrasG12V transformation in Ets1/Ets2-null cells, revealing a direct function for MYC and microRNA 17-92 in ETS1/ETS2-dependent HrasG12V transformation. PMID:24968297

  11. A Screen Identifies the Oncogenic Micro-RNA miR-378a-5p as a Negative Regulator of Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne Marije; Rudkjær, Lise Christine; Lees, Michael James; Steinhauer, Cornelia; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) can occur in response to hyperactive oncogenic signals and is believed to be a fail-safe mechanism protecting against tumorigenesis. To identify new factors involved in OIS, we performed a screen for microRNAs that can overcome or inhibit OIS in human diploid......-associated β-galactosidase. Moreover, cells with ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p retain proliferative capacity even in the presence of an activated Braf oncogene. Finally, we identified several miR-378a-5p targets in diploid fibroblasts that might explain the mechanism by which the microRNA can delay OIS. We...... speculate that miR-378a-5p might positively influence tumor formation by delaying OIS, which is consistent with a known pro-oncogenic function of this microRNA....

  12. Comparative Full Length Sequence Analysis of Oncogenic and Vaccine (Rispens) Strains of Marek's Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete DNA sequence of the Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 vaccine strain CVI988 was determined and consists of 178,311 bp with an overall gene organization identical to that of the oncogenic strains. In examining open reading frames (ORFs), nine ORFs differ between vaccine and oncogenic stra...

  13. Can anti-tumor immunity help to explain “oncogene addiction”?

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P

    2010-01-01

    Oncogene addiction” refers to the process of tumor cell death that can occur after inactivation of a single oncogene. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Rakhra, et al. argue that complete tumor clearance after molecular targeted therapies requires a functioning immune system, pointing the way toward radically new combination therapies.

  14. GENES FOR TUMOR MARKERS ARE CLUSTERED WITH CELLULAR PROTO-ONCOGENES ON HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative mapping positions of genes for polypeptides expressed abnormally in tumors (tumor markers) and cellular proto-oncogenes were analyzed and a remarkable degree of co-mapping of tumor marker genes with oncogenes in the human karyotype were found. It is proposed that abe...

  15. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  16. Oncogenic Mutation of AIMP2/p38 Inhibits Its Tumor-Suppressive Interaction with Smurf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Gyu; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Ha Yeon; Kang, Beom Sik; Jang, Song-Yee; Kim, Myung Hee; Guo, Min; Han, Jung Min; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-06-01

    AIMP2/p38 is a multifunctional tumor suppressor that normally resides in the cytosol as a scaffold protein of the multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC). One of the tumor-suppressive functions of AIMP2 is to facilitate ubiquitin-mediated degradation of FUSE-binding protein (FBP, FUBP1), a transcriptional activator of c-Myc. However, the mechanism by which AIMP2 functions within this pathway and its significance in tumorigenesis are uncertain. Here, we report that Smurf2 is responsible for AIMP2-mediated ubiquitination of FBP, and a mutation in AIMP2 that inhibited its nuclear interaction with Smurf2 enhanced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis in vivo Treatment of HeLa cells with TGFβ resulted in the phosphorylation of AIMP2 on S156, a residue that is exposed on the embedded GST domain of AIMP2. We further found that phospho-AIMP2 dissociated from the MSC and translocated to the nucleus, where it bound to Smurf2, enhancing ubiquitination of FBP. AIMP2 also inhibited nuclear export of Smurf2 to sustain TGFβ signaling. Collectively, these findings present a novel tumor-suppressive interaction between AIMP2 and Smurf2 and suggest that the disruption of this interaction can lead to oncogenic transformation. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3422-36. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197155

  17. High miR-196a levels promote the oncogenic phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carl Christoph Schimanski; Kirsten Frerichs; Fareed Rahman; Martin Berger; Hauke Lang; Peter R Galle; Markus Moehler; Ines Gockel

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the relevance of the microRNA miR- 196a for colorectal oncogenesis. METHODS: The impact of miR-196a on the restriction targets HoxA7, HoxB8, HoxC8 and HoxD8 was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after transient transfection of SW480 cancer cells. The miR-196a transcription profile in colorectal cancer samples, mucosa samples and diverse cancer cell lines was quantified by RT-PCR. Transiently miR- 196a-transfected colorectal cancer cells were used for diverse functional assays in vitro and for a xenograft lung metastasis model in vivo. RESULTS: HoxA7, HoxB8, HoxC8 and HoxD8 were restricted by miR-196a in a dose-dependent and gene-specific manner. High levels of miR-196a activated the AKT signaling pathway as indicated by increased phosphorylation of AKT. In addition, high levels of miR-196a promoted cancer cell detachment, migration, invasion and chemosensitivity towards platin derivatives but did not impact on proliferation or apoptosis. Furthermore, miR-196a increased the development of lung metastases in mice after tail vein injection. CONCLUSION: miR-196a exerts a pro-oncogenic influence in colorectal cancer.

  18. Oncogenic herpesvirus HHV-8 promotes androgen-independent prostate cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygatt, Justin G; Singhal, Adit; Sukumar, Gauthaman; Dalgard, Clifton L; Kaleeba, Johnan A R

    2013-09-15

    Mechanisms underlying progression to androgen-independent prostate cancer following radical ablation therapy remain poorly defined. Although intraprostatic infections have been highlighted as potential cofactors, pathogen influences on pathways that support tumor regrowth are not known. To explore this provocative concept, we derived androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate epithelial cells persistently infected with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been detected in normal prostate epithelium, prostate adenocarcinoma, and biologic fluids of patients with prostate cancer, to explore its effects on transition to hormone-refractory disease. Strikingly, we found that HHV-8 infection of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells conferred the capacity for androgen-independent growth. This effect was associated with altered expression and transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). However, HHV-8 infection bypassed AR signaling by promoting enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)-mediated epigenetic silencing of tumor-suppressor genes, including MSMB and DAB2IP that are often inactivated in advanced disease. Furthermore, we found that HHV-8 triggered epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Although HHV-8 has not been linked etiologically to prostate cancer, virologic outcomes revealed by our study provide mechanistic insight into how intraprostatic infections could constitute risk for progression to androgen-independent metastatic disease where EZH2 has been implicated. Taken together, our findings prompt further evaluations of the relationship between HHV-8 infections and risk of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:24005834

  19. C11ORF95-RELA FUSIONS DRIVE ONCOGENIC NF-KB SIGNALING IN EPENDYMOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Richard; Parker, Matthew; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M.; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Weinlich, Ricardo; Dalton, James D.; Li, Yongjin; Lee, Ryan; Tatevossian, Ruth G.; Phoenix, Timothy N.; Thiruvenkatam, Radhika; White, Elsie; Tang, Bo; Orisme, Wilda; Gupta, Kirti; Rusch, Michael; Chen, Xiang; Li, Yuxin; Nagahawhatta, Panduka; Hedlund, Erin; Finkelstein, David; Wu, Gang; Shurtleff, Sheila; Easton, John; Boggs, Kristy; Yergeau, Donald; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Mulder, Heather L.; Becksford, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Huether, Robert; Ma, Jing; Song, Guangchun; Gajjar, Amar; Merchant, Thomas; Boop, Frederick; Smith, Amy A; Ding, Li; Lu, Charles; Ochoa, Kerri; Zhao, David; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Green, Douglas R.; Zhang, Jinghui; Ellison, David W.; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) family of transcriptional regulators are central mediators of the cellular inflammatory response. Although constitutive NF-kB signaling is present in most human tumours, mutations in pathway members are rare, complicating efforts to understand and block aberrant NF-kB activity in cancer. METHODS: To identify additional genetic alterations that drive ependymoma, we sequenced the whole genomes (WGS) of 41 tumours and matched normal blood, and the transcriptomes (RNAseq) of 77 tumours. The transforming significance of alterations were tested in mouse NSCs that we showed previously to be cells of origin of ependymoma. RESULTS: Here, we show that more than two thirds of supratentorial ependymomas contain oncogenic fusions between RELA, the principal effector of canonical NF-kB signalling, and an uncharacterized gene, C11orf95. In each case, C11orf95-RELA fusions resulted from chromothripsis involving chromosome 11q13.1. C11orf95-RELA fusion proteins translocated spontaneously to the nucleus to activate NF-kB target genes, and rapidly transformed neural stem cells—the cell of origin of ependymoma—to form these tumours in mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identify the first highly recurrent genetic alteration of RELA in human cancer, and the C11orf95-RELA fusion protein as a potential therapeutic target in supratentorial ependymoma. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Neuropathology & Tumor Biomarkers.

  20. Rapid internalization of the oncogenic K+ channel K(V10.1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kohl

    Full Text Available K(V10.1 is a mammalian brain voltage-gated potassium channel whose ectopic expression outside of the brain has been proven relevant for tumor biology. Promotion of cancer cell proliferation by K(V10.1 depends largely on ion flow, but some oncogenic properties remain in the absence of ion permeation. Additionally, K(V10.1 surface populations are small compared to large intracellular pools. Control of protein turnover within cells is key to both cellular plasticity and homeostasis, and therefore we set out to analyze how endocytic trafficking participates in controlling K(V10.1 intracellular distribution and life cycle. To follow plasma membrane K(V10.1 selectively, we generated a modified channel of displaying an extracellular affinity tag for surface labeling by α-bungarotoxin. This modification only minimally affected K(V10.1 electrophysiological properties. Using a combination of microscopy and biochemistry techniques, we show that K(V10.1 is constitutively internalized involving at least two distinct pathways of endocytosis and mainly sorted to lysosomes. This occurs at a relatively fast rate. Simultaneously, recycling seems to contribute to maintain basal K(V10.1 surface levels. Brief K(V10.1 surface half-life and rapid lysosomal targeting is a relevant factor to be taken into account for potential drug delivery and targeting strategies directed against K(V10.1 on tumor cells.

  1. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is described in three areas corresponding to carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; and DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration. Approximately 200 rats were exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons (2.0 Mev) was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. For double skin thickness irradiations electrons there was an unusually large excess of connective tissue tumors, fibromas and sarcomas. Presumably the latter tumors are occurring, because more connective tissue is exposed by deeply penetrating, i.e., energetic, beams. 13 refs

  2. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn M; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark A; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Rickman, David S; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-06-14

    Mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a computational drug-repositioning approach for targeting TF activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions, and a global drug-protein network analysis supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently overexpressed oncogenic TF, predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of electronic medical record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy for identifying drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  3. Conditional Expression of Oncogenic C-RAF in Mouse Pulmonary Epithelial Cells Reveals Differential Tumorigenesis and Induction of Autophagy Leading to Tumor Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Ceteci

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a novel conditional mouse lung tumor model for investigation of the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. On the basis of the frequent involvement of the Ras-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in human non–small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, we have explored the target cell availability, reversibility, and cell type specificity of transformation by oncogenic C-RAF. Targeting expression to alveolar type II cells or to Clara cells, the two likely precursors of human NSCLC, revealed differential tumorigenicity between these cells. Whereas expression of oncogenic C-RAF in alveolar type II cells readily induced multifocal macroscopic lung tumors independent of the developmental state, few tumors with type II pneumocytes features and incomplete penetrance were found when targeted to Clara cells. Induced tumors did not progress and were strictly dependent on the initiating oncogene. Deinduction of mice resulted in tumor regression due to autophagy rather than apoptosis. Induction of autophagic cell death in regressing lung tumors suggests the use of autophagy enhancers as a treatment choice for patients with NSCLC.

  4. A novel oncogenic BTK isoform is overexpressed in colon cancers and required for RAS-mediated transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassilli, E; Pisano, F; Cialdella, A;

    2016-01-01

    tissues correlates with ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, p65BTK inhibition affects growth and survival of colon cancer cells. Our data reveal that BTK, via p65BTK expression, is a novel and powerful oncogene acting downstream of the RAS/MAPK pathway and suggest that its targeting may be a promising......Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is essential for B-cell proliferation/differentiation and it is generally believed that its expression and function are limited to bone marrow-derived cells. Here, we report the identification and characterization of p65BTK, a novel isoform abundantly expressed in...... colon carcinoma cell lines and tumour tissue samples. p65BTK protein is expressed, through heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK)-dependent and internal ribosome entry site-driven translation, from a transcript containing an alternative first exon in the 5'-untranslated region, and is post...

  5. Regulation of Stat5 by FAK and PAK1 in Oncogenic FLT3- and KIT-Driven Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Chatterjee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations of FLT3 and KIT receptors are associated with poor survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, and currently available drugs are largely ineffective. Although Stat5 has been implicated in regulating several myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, how precisely Stat5 regulates leukemogenesis, including its nuclear translocation to induce gene transcription, is poorly understood. In leukemic cells, we show constitutive activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK whose inhibition represses leukemogenesis. Downstream of FAK, activation of Rac1 is regulated by RacGEF Tiam1, whose inhibition prolongs the survival of leukemic mice. Inhibition of the Rac1 effector PAK1 prolongs the survival of leukemic mice in part by inhibiting the nuclear translocation of Stat5. These results reveal a leukemic pathway involving FAK/Tiam1/Rac1/PAK1 and demonstrate an essential role for these signaling molecules in regulating the nuclear translocation of Stat5 in leukemogenesis.

  6. Deciphering hepatocellular responses to metabolic and oncogenic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrina L. Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Each cell type responds uniquely to stress and fractionally contributes to global and tissue-specific stress responses. Hepatocytes, liver macrophages (MΦ, and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC play functionally important and interdependent roles in adaptive processes such as obesity and tumor growth. Although these cell types demonstrate significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, their distinctions enabling disease-specific responses remain understudied. We developed a strategy for the simultaneous isolation and quantification of these liver cell types based on antigenic cell surface marker expression. To demonstrate the utility and applicability of this technique, we quantified liver cell-specific responses to high-fat diet (HFD or diethylnitrosamine (DEN, a liver-specific carcinogen, and found that while there was only a marginal increase in hepatocyte number, MΦ and SEC populations were quantitatively increased. Global gene expression profiling of hepatocytes, MΦ and SEC identified characteristic gene signatures that define each cell type in their distinct physiological or pathological states. Integration of hepatic gene signatures with available human obesity and liver cancer microarray data provides further insight into the cell-specific responses to metabolic or oncogenic stress. Our data reveal unique gene expression patterns that serve as molecular “fingerprints” for the cell-centric responses to pathologic stimuli in the distinct microenvironment of the liver. The technical advance highlighted in this study provides an essential resource for assessing hepatic cell-specific contributions to metabolic and oncogenic stress, information that could unveil previously unappreciated molecular mechanisms for the cellular crosstalk that underlies the continuum from metabolic disruption to obesity and ultimately hepatic cancer.

  7. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1+/−) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1+/− and Cx43+/− mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1+/− mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases

  8. Intrinsic structural disorder confers cellular viability on oncogenic fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Hegyi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations, which often generate chimeric proteins by fusing segments of two distinct genes, represent the single major genetic aberration leading to cancer. We suggest that the unifying theme of these events is a high level of intrinsic structural disorder, enabling fusion proteins to evade cellular surveillance mechanisms that eliminate misfolded proteins. Predictions in 406 translocation-related human proteins show that they are significantly enriched in disorder (43.3% vs. 20.7% in all human proteins, they have fewer Pfam domains, and their translocation breakpoints tend to avoid domain splitting. The vicinity of the breakpoint is significantly more disordered than the rest of these already highly disordered fusion proteins. In the unlikely event of domain splitting in fusion it usually spares much of the domain or splits at locations where the newly exposed hydrophobic surface area approximates that of an intact domain. The mechanisms of action of fusion proteins suggest that in most cases their structural disorder is also essential to the acquired oncogenic function, enabling the long-range structural communication of remote binding and/or catalytic elements. In this respect, there are three major mechanisms that contribute to generating an oncogenic signal: (i a phosphorylation site and a tyrosine-kinase domain are fused, and structural disorder of the intervening region enables intramolecular phosphorylation (e.g., BCR-ABL; (ii a dimerisation domain fuses with a tyrosine kinase domain and disorder enables the two subunits within the homodimer to engage in permanent intermolecular phosphorylations (e.g., TFG-ALK; (iii the fusion of a DNA-binding element to a transactivator domain results in an aberrant transcription factor that causes severe misregulation of transcription (e.g. EWS-ATF. Our findings also suggest novel strategies of intervention against the ensuing neoplastic transformations.

  9. Mutation and genomic amplification of the PIK3CA proto-oncogene in pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murat, C.B.; Braga, P.B.S.; Fortes, M.A.H.Z. [Laboratório de Endocrinologia Celular e Molecular (LIM-25), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bronstein, M.D. [Unidade de Neuroendocrinologia, Serviço de Endocrinologia, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Corrêa-Giannella, M.L.C.; Giorgi, R.R. [Laboratório de Endocrinologia Celular e Molecular (LIM-25), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-13

    The tumorigenesis of pituitary adenomas is poorly understood. Mutations of the PIK3CA proto-oncogene, which encodes the p110-α catalytic subunit of PI3K, have been reported in various types of human cancers regarding the role of the gene in cell proliferation and survival through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Only one Chinese study described somatic mutations and amplification of the PIK3CA gene in a large series of pituitary adenomas. The aim of the present study was to determine genetic alterations of PIK3CA in a second series that consisted of 33 pituitary adenomas of different subtypes diagnosed by immunohistochemistry: 6 adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting microadenomas, 5 growth hormone-secreting macroadenomas, 7 prolactin-secreting macroadenomas, and 15 nonfunctioning macroadenomas. Direct sequencing of exons 9 and 20 assessed by qPCR was employed to investigate the presence of mutations and genomic amplification defined as a copy number ≥4. Previously identified PIK3CA mutations (exon 20) were detected in four cases (12.1%). Interestingly, the Chinese study reported mutations only in invasive tumors, while we found a PIK3CA mutation in one noninvasive corticotroph microadenoma. PIK3CA amplification was observed in 21.2% (7/33) of the cases. This study demonstrates the presence of somatic mutations and amplifications of the PIK3CA gene in a second series of pituitary adenomas, corroborating the previously described involvement of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the tumorigenic process of this gland.

  10. Mutation and genomic amplification of the PIK3CA proto-oncogene in pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumorigenesis of pituitary adenomas is poorly understood. Mutations of the PIK3CA proto-oncogene, which encodes the p110-α catalytic subunit of PI3K, have been reported in various types of human cancers regarding the role of the gene in cell proliferation and survival through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Only one Chinese study described somatic mutations and amplification of the PIK3CA gene in a large series of pituitary adenomas. The aim of the present study was to determine genetic alterations of PIK3CA in a second series that consisted of 33 pituitary adenomas of different subtypes diagnosed by immunohistochemistry: 6 adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting microadenomas, 5 growth hormone-secreting macroadenomas, 7 prolactin-secreting macroadenomas, and 15 nonfunctioning macroadenomas. Direct sequencing of exons 9 and 20 assessed by qPCR was employed to investigate the presence of mutations and genomic amplification defined as a copy number ≥4. Previously identified PIK3CA mutations (exon 20) were detected in four cases (12.1%). Interestingly, the Chinese study reported mutations only in invasive tumors, while we found a PIK3CA mutation in one noninvasive corticotroph microadenoma. PIK3CA amplification was observed in 21.2% (7/33) of the cases. This study demonstrates the presence of somatic mutations and amplifications of the PIK3CA gene in a second series of pituitary adenomas, corroborating the previously described involvement of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the tumorigenic process of this gland

  11. Formaldehyde-induced histone H3 phosphorylation via JNK and the expression of proto-oncogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ikuma; Ibuki, Yuko, E-mail: ibuki@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Formaldehyde modified histones. • The phosphorylation of H3S10 was increased at the promoter regions of proto-oncogenes. • The phosphorylation of H2AXS139 was attributed to FA-induced DNA damage. • The FA-induced initiation and promotion of cancer could be judged by these modifications. - Abstract: Formaldehyde (FA) is a very reactive compound that forms DNA adducts and DNA-protein crosslinks, which are known to contribute to FA-induced mutations and carcinogenesis. Post-translational modifications to histones have recently attracted attention due to their link with cancer. In the present study, we examined histone modifications following a treatment with FA. FA significantly phosphorylated histone H3 at serine 10 (H3S10), and at serine 28 (H3S28), the time-course of which was similar to the phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γ-H2AX), a marker of DNA double strand breaks. The temporal deacetylation of H3 was observed due to the reaction of FA with the lysine residues of histones. The phosphorylation mechanism was then analyzed by focusing on H3S10. The nuclear distribution of the phosphorylation of H3S10 and γ-H2AX did not overlap, and the phosphorylation of H3S10 could not be suppressed with an inhibitor of ATM/ATR, suggesting that the phosphorylation of H3S10 was independent of the DNA damage response. ERK and JNK in the MAPK pathways were phosphorylated by the treatment with FA, in which the JNK pathway was the main target for phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of H3S10 increased at the promoter regions of c-fos and c-jun, indicating a relationship between FA-induced tumor promotion activity and phosphorylation of H3S10. These results suggested that FA both initiates and promotes cancer, as judged by an analysis of histone modifications.

  12. Direct Targeting of β-Catenin by a Small Molecule Stimulates Proteasomal Degradation and Suppresses Oncogenic Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Young Hwang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a major role in tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation can lead to various human diseases. Aberrant activation of β-catenin is oncogenic and is a critical driver in the development and progression of human cancers. Despite the significant potential of targeting the oncogenic β-catenin pathway for cancer therapy, the development of specific inhibitors remains insufficient. Using a T cell factor (TCF-dependent luciferase-reporter system, we screened for small-molecule compounds that act against Wnt/β-catenin signaling and identified MSAB (methyl 3-{[(4-methylphenylsulfonyl]amino}benzoate as a selective inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. MSAB shows potent anti-tumor effects selectively on Wnt-dependent cancer cells in vitro and in mouse cancer models. MSAB binds to β-catenin, promoting its degradation, and specifically downregulates Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Our findings might represent an effective therapeutic strategy for cancers addicted to the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  13. Combined drug action of 2-phenylimidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazole derivatives on cancer cells according to their oncogenic molecular signatures.

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    Alessandro Furlan

    Full Text Available The development of targeted molecular therapies has provided remarkable advances into the treatment of human cancers. However, in most tumors the selective pressure triggered by anticancer agents encourages cancer cells to acquire resistance mechanisms. The generation of new rationally designed targeting agents acting on the oncogenic path(s at multiple levels is a promising approach for molecular therapies. 2-phenylimidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazole derivatives have been highlighted for their properties of targeting oncogenic Met receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signaling. In this study, we evaluated the mechanism of action of one of the most active imidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazol-2-ylphenyl moiety-based agents, Triflorcas, on a panel of cancer cells with distinct features. We show that Triflorcas impairs in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis of cancer cells carrying Met mutations. Moreover, Triflorcas hampers survival and anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells characterized by "RTK swapping" by interfering with PDGFRβ phosphorylation. A restrained effect of Triflorcas on metabolic genes correlates with the absence of major side effects in vivo. Mechanistically, in addition to targeting Met, Triflorcas alters phosphorylation levels of the PI3K-Akt pathway, mediating oncogenic dependency to Met, in addition to Retinoblastoma and nucleophosmin/B23, resulting in altered cell cycle progression and mitotic failure. Our findings show how the unusual binding plasticity of the Met active site towards structurally different inhibitors can be exploited to generate drugs able to target Met oncogenic dependency at distinct levels. Moreover, the disease-oriented NCI Anticancer Drug Screen revealed that Triflorcas elicits a unique profile of growth inhibitory-responses on cancer cell lines, indicating a novel mechanism of drug action. The anti-tumor activity elicited by 2-phenylimidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazole derivatives through combined inhibition of distinct effectors in

  14. Hand eczema classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diepgen, T L; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandao, F M;

    2008-01-01

    the disease is rarely evidence based, and a classification system for different subdiagnoses of hand eczema is not agreed upon. Randomized controlled trials investigating the treatment of hand eczema are called for. For this, as well as for clinical purposes, a generally accepted classification system...... classification system for hand eczema is proposed. Conclusions It is suggested that this classification be used in clinical work and in clinical trials....

  15. Mutation of ras oncogenes in leukemic patients with a history of atomic bomb exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the involvement of ras oncogenes in the development of leukemia in A-bomb survivors, ras oncogene mutation was examined in 25 A-bomb survivors exposed within 3,000 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima and 47 non-exposed patients. Twenty five A-bomb survivors consisted of 8 with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML), 4 with refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB), 9 with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), and 4 with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). For the non-exposed group, CML was seen in 25, one in RAEB, 13 in AML, and 8 in ALL. In vivo selection assay for the exposed group detected N-ras oncogenes in one each patient with CML, ALL and RAEB, and 2 AML patients; and K-ras oncogenes in one CML patient. According to subtypes of leukemia, there was no significant difference in either the incidence of ras oncogenes or mutation site between the exposed and non-exposed groups. Using the combined PCR method and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, patients with RAEB+AML and ALL in the exposed group were found to have a tendency for slightly decreased incidence of ras oncogene mutation. Overall, 8 patients (33%) in the exposed group had ras oncogene mutation, consisting of 2 CML, 2 RAEB, 3 AML, and one ALL patients. (N.K.)

  16. Classification of articulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihani, A

    1980-03-01

    A simple classification in familiar terms with definite, clear characteristics can be adopted. This classification system is based on the number of records used and the adjustments necessary for the articulator to accept these records. The classification divides the articulators into nonadjustable, semiadjustable, and fully adjustable articulators (Table I). PMID:6928204

  17. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nuno R. dos, E-mail: nrsantos@ualg.pt; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-11-05

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL.

  18. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 micrometer2 at about 500 keV/micrometer. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/micrometer produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micrometer). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  19. Identification and classification of genes regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase- and TRKB-mediated signalling pathways during neuronal differentiation in two subtypes of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaki Yoshiyuki

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SH-SY5Y cells exhibit a neuronal phenotype when treated with all-trans retinoic acid (RA, but the molecular mechanism of activation in the signalling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K is unclear. To investigate this mechanism, we compared the gene expression profiles in SK-N-SH cells and two subtypes of SH-SY5Y cells (SH-SY5Y-A and SH-SY5Y-E, each of which show a different phenotype during RA-mediated differentiation. Findings SH-SY5Y-A cells differentiated in the presence of RA, whereas RA-treated SH-SY5Y-E cells required additional treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF for full differentiation. After exposing cells to a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, we identified 386 genes and categorised these genes into two clusters dependent on the PI3K signalling pathway during RA-mediated differentiation in SH-SY5Y-A cells. Transcriptional regulation of the gene cluster, including 158 neural genes, was greatly reduced in SK-N-SH cells and partially impaired in SH-SY5Y-E cells, which is consistent with a defect in the neuronal phenotype of these cells. Additional stimulation with BDNF induced a set of neural genes that were down-regulated in RA-treated SH-SY5Y-E cells but were abundant in differentiated SH-SY5Y-A cells. Conclusion We identified gene clusters controlled by PI3K- and TRKB-mediated signalling pathways during the differentiation of two subtypes of SH-SY5Y cells. The TRKB-mediated bypass pathway compensates for impaired neural function generated by defects in several signalling pathways, including PI3K in SH-SY5Y-E cells. Our expression profiling data will be useful for further elucidation of the signal transduction-transcriptional network involving PI3K or TRKB.

  20. Cross-regulation of signaling pathways: An example of nuclear hormone receptors and the canonical Wnt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beildeck, Marcy E. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3970 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Gelmann, Edward P. [Columbia University, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Byers, Stephen W., E-mail: byerss@georgetown.edu [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3970 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Predicting the potential physiological outcome(s) of any given molecular pathway is complex because of cross-talk with other pathways. This is particularly evident in the case of the nuclear hormone receptor and canonical Wnt pathways, which regulate cell growth and proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metastatic potential in numerous tissues. These pathways are known to intersect at many levels: in the intracellular space, at the membrane, in the cytoplasm, and within the nucleus. The outcomes of these interactions are important in the control of stem cell differentiation and maintenance, feedback loops, and regulating oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the importance of considering pathway cross-talk when predicting functional outcomes of signaling, using nuclear hormone receptor/canonical Wnt pathway cross-talk as an example.

  1. The Wnt pathway: emerging anticancer strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aman; Verma, Anukriti; Mishra, Ashutosh K; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Jain, Chakresh K

    2013-05-01

    The canonical Wnt cascade has emerged as a critical regulator of cancer cells. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway has also been associated with stem cell, thus raising the possibility of its role in embryogenesis and in the proliferation of malignant cancer cells. Wnt pathway has been reported to be involved in normal physiological processes in adult animals and integrally associated with cancer cell growth and maintenance, thus has been harnessed to devise strategies for anticancer therapy. The presence or absence of some members in this pathway, such as β-catenin, Axin or APC, has been found to involve in different types of tumors in human beings. Dysregulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, mostly by inactivating mutations of the APC tumor suppressor, or oncogenic mutations of β-catenin, has been implicated in colorectal tumorigenesis. Further, elevated levels of β-catenin protein, a hallmark of activated canonical Wnt pathway, have been significantly observed in common forms of human malignancies, indicating that activation of the Wnt pathway may play an important role in tumor development and hence could be a crucial consideration for drug development. The paper discusses the potential therapeutic and diagnostic strategies directing on Wnt pathways on the basis of recent patents and their analysis. PMID:23432158

  2. Identification and classification of genes regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase- and TRKB-mediated signalling pathways during neuronal differentiation in two subtypes of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaki Yoshiyuki; Maeda Aasami; Ozawa Ritsuko; Adati Naoki; Nishida Yuichiro; Takeda Tadayuki

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background SH-SY5Y cells exhibit a neuronal phenotype when treated with all-trans retinoic acid (RA), but the molecular mechanism of activation in the signalling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is unclear. To investigate this mechanism, we compared the gene expression profiles in SK-N-SH cells and two subtypes of SH-SY5Y cells (SH-SY5Y-A and SH-SY5Y-E), each of which show a different phenotype during RA-mediated differentiation. Findings SH-SY5Y-A cells diffe...

  3. Pharmacological modulation of oncogenic Ras by natural products and their derivatives: Renewed hope in the discovery of novel anti-Ras drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Shun Ying; Tan, Michelle Siying; Teh, Yuan Han; Stanslas, Johnson

    2016-06-01

    Oncogenic rat sarcoma (Ras) is linked to the most fatal cancers such as those of the pancreas, colon, and lung. Decades of research to discover an efficacious drug that can block oncogenic Ras signaling have yielded disappointing results; thus, Ras was considered "undruggable" until recently. Inhibitors that directly target Ras by binding to previously undiscovered pockets have been recently identified. Some of these molecules are either isolated from natural products or derived from natural compounds. In this review, we described the potential of these compounds and other inhibitors of Ras signaling in drugging Ras. We highlighted the modes of action of these compounds in suppressing signaling pathways activated by oncogenic Ras, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. The anti-Ras strategy of these compounds can be categorized into four main types: inhibition of Ras-effector interaction, interference of Ras membrane association, prevention of Ras-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) formation, and downregulation of Ras proteins. Another promising strategy that must be validated experimentally is enhancement of the intrinsic Ras-guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity by small chemical entities. Among the inhibitors of Ras signaling that were reported thus far, salirasib and TLN-4601 have been tested for their clinical efficacy. Although both compounds passed phase I trials, they failed in their respective phase II trials. Therefore, new compounds of natural origin with relevant clinical activity against Ras-driven malignancies are urgently needed. Apart from salirasib and TLN-4601, some other compounds with a proven inhibitory effect on Ras signaling include derivatives of salirasib, sulindac, polyamine, andrographolide, lipstatin, levoglucosenone, rasfonin, and quercetin. PMID:27016467

  4. FOXM1 is an oncogenic mediator in Ewing Sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Christensen

    Full Text Available Ewing Family Tumors (Ewing Sarcoma and peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor are common bone and soft tissue malignancies of childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. Chromosomal translocation in these tumors produces fusion oncogenes of the EWS/ETS class, with EWS/FLI1 being by far the most common. EWS/ETS chimera are the only well established driver mutations in these tumors and they function as aberrant transcription factors. Understanding the downstream genes whose expression is modified has been a central approach to the study of these tumors. FOXM1 is a proliferation associated transcription factor which has increasingly been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that FOXM1 is expressed in Ewing primary tumors and cell lines. Reduction in FOXM1 expression in Ewing cell lines results in diminished potential for anchorage independent growth. FOXM1 expression is enhanced by EWS/FLI1, though, unlike other tumor systems, it is not driven by expression of the EWS/FLI1 target GLI1. Thiostrepton is a compound known to inhibit FOXM1 by direct binding. We show that Thiostrepton diminishes FOXM1 expression in Ewing cell lines and this reduction reduces cell viability through an apoptotic mechanism. FOXM1 is involved in Ewing tumor pathogenesis and may prove to be a useful therapeutic target in Ewing tumors.

  5. Oncogenic activation of ERG: A predominant mechanism in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taduru L Sreenath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalent gene fusions involving regulatory sequences of the androgen receptor (AR regulated genes (primarily TMPRSS2 and protein coding sequences of nuclear transcription factors of the ETS gene family (predominantly ERG result in unscheduled androgen dependent ERG expression in prostate cancer (CaP.Cumulative data from a large number of studies in the past six years accentuate ERG alterations in more than half of all CaP patients in Western countries. Studies underscore that ERG functions are involved in the biology of CaP. ERG expression in normal context is selective to endothelial cells, specific hematopoetic cells and pre-cartilage cells. Normal functions of ERG are highlighted in hematopoetic stem cells. Emerging data continues to unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ERG may contribute to CaP. Herein, we focus on biological and clinical aspects of ERG oncogenic alterations, potential of ERG-based stratification of CaP and the possibilities of targeting the ERG network in developing new therapeutic strategies for the disease.

  6. Oncogenic activation of ERG: A predominant mechanism in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, Taduru L; Dobi, Albert; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Srivastava, Shiv

    2011-01-01

    Prevalent gene fusions involving regulatory sequences of the androgen receptor (AR) regulated genes (primarily TMPRSS2) and protein coding sequences of nuclear transcription factors of the ETS gene family (predominantly ERG) result in unscheduled androgen dependent ERG expression in prostate cancer (CaP).Cumulative data from a large number of studies in the past six years accentuate ERG alterations in more than half of all CaP patients in Western countries. Studies underscore that ERG functions are involved in the biology of CaP. ERG expression in normal context is selective to endothelial cells, specific hematopoetic cells and pre-cartilage cells. Normal functions of ERG are highlighted in hematopoetic stem cells. Emerging data continues to unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ERG may contribute to CaP. Herein, we focus on biological and clinical aspects of ERG oncogenic alterations, potential of ERG-based stratification of CaP and the possibilities of targeting the ERG network in developing new therapeutic strategies for the disease. PMID:22279422

  7. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichero, Laura, E-mail: lsichero@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Simao Sobrinho, Joao [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Lina Villa, Luisa [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  8. Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Oncogene Mutation in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Xiao-qin Ha; Tong-de Lv; Chuan-ping Xing; Bin Liu; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are considered to be the major causes of cervical cancer. HPV16 is the most common type of HR-HPVs and HPV16 E6 gene is one of the major oncogenes. Specific mutations are considered as dangerous factors causing CC. This study was designed to find mutations of HPV16 E6 and the relationship between the mutations and the happening of CC.Methods: The tissue DNA was extracted from 15 biopsies of CC. Part of HPV16 E6 gene (nucleotide 201-523) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the CC tissue DNA. The PCR fragments were sequenced and analyzed.Results: The result of PCR showed that the positive rate of HPV16 E6 was 93.33% (14/15). After sequencing and analyzing, in the 13 out of 14 PCR fragments, 4 maintained prototype (30.77%), 8 had a same 350G mutation (61.54%), and 1 had a 249G mutation (7.69%).Conclusion: This study suggest that there is a high infection rate of HPV in cervical cancer and most of the HPV16 E6 gene has mutations. Those mutations may have an association with the development of cervical cancer.

  9. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  10. Analysis of acquired resistance to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) in oncogene transfected SHOK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHOK (Syrian hamster Osaka-Kanazawa) cells were transfected with activated oncogenes (v-mos, c-myc, N-ras, H-ras, K-ras). These oncogene transfected cells were treated with 195mPt-cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP). Clonogenic cell survival assay showed that oncogene-transfected cells exhibited a 1.3-4.8 fold increases resistance to cisplatin compared to the parental SHOK cells. The CDDP concentration binding to DNA, RNA and protein were measured by counting the 195mPt-radioactivity. The CDDP uptake was decreased in these oncogene transfected cells. The CDDP uptake in DNA of H-ras transfected cells decreased faster than control SHOK cells. (author)

  11. Recursive heuristic classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David C.

    1994-01-01

    The author will describe a new problem-solving approach called recursive heuristic classification, whereby a subproblem of heuristic classification is itself formulated and solved by heuristic classification. This allows the construction of more knowledge-intensive classification programs in a way that yields a clean organization. Further, standard knowledge acquisition and learning techniques for heuristic classification can be used to create, refine, and maintain the knowledge base associated with the recursively called classification expert system. The method of recursive heuristic classification was used in the Minerva blackboard shell for heuristic classification. Minerva recursively calls itself every problem-solving cycle to solve the important blackboard scheduler task, which involves assigning a desirability rating to alternative problem-solving actions. Knowing these ratings is critical to the use of an expert system as a component of a critiquing or apprenticeship tutoring system. One innovation of this research is a method called dynamic heuristic classification, which allows selection among dynamically generated classification categories instead of requiring them to be prenumerated.

  12. Security classification of information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quist, A.S.

    1993-04-01

    This document is the second of a planned four-volume work that comprehensively discusses the security classification of information. The main focus of Volume 2 is on the principles for classification of information. Included herein are descriptions of the two major types of information that governments classify for national security reasons (subjective and objective information), guidance to use when determining whether information under consideration for classification is controlled by the government (a necessary requirement for classification to be effective), information disclosure risks and benefits (the benefits and costs of classification), standards to use when balancing information disclosure risks and benefits, guidance for assigning classification levels (Top Secret, Secret, or Confidential) to classified information, guidance for determining how long information should be classified (classification duration), classification of associations of information, classification of compilations of information, and principles for declassifying and downgrading information. Rules or principles of certain areas of our legal system (e.g., trade secret law) are sometimes mentioned to .provide added support to some of those classification principles.

  13. Influence of Cell Cycle and Oncogene Activity upon Topoisomerase IIα Expression and Drug Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey, Dennis W.; Hitomi, Masahiro; Chen, Guan

    2000-01-01

    The cell cycle, oncogenic signaling, and topoisomerase (topo) IIα levels all influence sensitivity to anti-topo II drugs. Because the cell cycle and oncogenic signaling influence each other as well as topo IIα levels, it is difficult to assess the importance of any one of these factors independently of the others during drug treatment. Such information, however, is vital to an understanding of the cellular basis of drug toxicity. We, therefore, developed a series of analytical procedures to i...

  14. Novel Gene Therapy Viral Vector Using Non-Oncogenic Lymphotropic Herpesvirus

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiro Shimizu; Nobuyuki Kobayashi; Kazuya Shimada; Kuniaki Oura; Tadao Tanaka; Aikou Okamoto; Kazuhiro Kondo

    2013-01-01

    Despite the use of retroviral vectors, efficiently introducing target genes into immunocytes such as T cells is difficult. In addition, retroviral vectors carry risks associated with the oncogenicity of the native virus and the potential for introducing malignancy in recipients due to genetic carryover from immortalized cells used during vector production. To address these issues, we have established a new virus vector that is based on human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), a non-oncogenic lymphotropic...

  15. Enhanced RNA Polymerase III-dependent Transcription Is Required for Oncogenic Transformation*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Sandra A. S.; Dubeau, Louis; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription, responsible for the synthesis of various stable RNAs, including 5 S rRNAs and tRNAs, is regulated by oncogenic proteins and tumor suppressors. Although it is well established that RNA pol III-dependent transcription is deregulated in transformed cells and malignant tumors, it has not been determined whether this represents a cause or consequence of these processes. We show that Rat1a fibroblasts undergoing oncogenic transformatio...

  16. Driving gradual endogenous c-myc overexpression by flow-sorting: intracellular signaling and tumor cell phenotype correlate with oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kasper Jermiin; Holm, G.M.N.; Krabbe, J.S.;

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-exposed rat mammary cancer cells were flow sorted based on a c-myc reporter plasmid encoding a destabilized green fluorescent protein. Sorted cells exhibited gradual increases in c-myc levels. Cells overexpressing c-myc by only 10% exhibited phenotypic changes attributable to c-myc overex...... alternative modeling of the receptor-mediated carcinogenic process, compared to the currently used approaches of recombinant constitutive or conditional overexpression of oncogenic transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases or oncogenic transcription factors.......Insulin-exposed rat mammary cancer cells were flow sorted based on a c-myc reporter plasmid encoding a destabilized green fluorescent protein. Sorted cells exhibited gradual increases in c-myc levels. Cells overexpressing c-myc by only 10% exhibited phenotypic changes attributable to c...... exhibited overexpression of the IGF-1R, and slightly elevated expression of the IR. Increased susceptibility to the mitogenic effect of insulin was seen in a small proportion of the sorted cells, and insulin was more effective in activating the p44/42 MAPK pathway, but not the PI3K pathway, in the sorted...

  17. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lei [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physiology, Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin 300071 (China); Carr, Aprell L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Lei, E-mail: Li.78@nd.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  18. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bmi1 modulates its oncogenic potential, E3 ligase activity, and DNA damage repair activity in mouse prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacerddine, Karim; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Westerman, Bart; Mattiroli, Francesca; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Poel, Henk; Ponz, Olga Balagué; Pritchard, Colin; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Zevenhoven, John; Tanger, Ellen; Sixma, Titia K; Ganesan, Shridar; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major lethal malignancy in men, but the molecular events and their interplay underlying prostate carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Epigenetic events and the upregulation of polycomb group silencing proteins including Bmi1 have been described to occur during PCa progression. Here, we found that conditional overexpression of Bmi1 in mice induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and elicited invasive adenocarcinoma when combined with PTEN haploinsufficiency. In addition, Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway were coactivated in a substantial fraction of human high-grade tumors. We found that Akt mediated Bmi1 phosphorylation, enhancing its oncogenic potential in an Ink4a/Arf-independent manner. This process also modulated the DNA damage response and affected genomic stability. Together, our findings demonstrate the etiological role of Bmi1 in PCa, unravel an oncogenic collaboration between Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway, and provide mechanistic insights into the modulation of Bmi1 function by phosphorylation during prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22505453

  19. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease

  20. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bmi1 modulates its oncogenic potential, E3 ligase activity, and DNA damage repair activity in mouse prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacerddine, Karim; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Westerman, Bart; Mattiroli, Francesca; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Poel, Henk; Ponz, Olga Balagué; Pritchard, Colin; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Zevenhoven, John; Tanger, Ellen; Sixma, Titia K.; Ganesan, Shridar; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major lethal malignancy in men, but the molecular events and their interplay underlying prostate carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Epigenetic events and the upregulation of polycomb group silencing proteins including Bmi1 have been described to occur during PCa progression. Here, we found that conditional overexpression of Bmi1 in mice induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and elicited invasive adenocarcinoma when combined with PTEN haploinsufficiency. In addition, Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway were coactivated in a substantial fraction of human high-grade tumors. We found that Akt mediated Bmi1 phosphorylation, enhancing its oncogenic potential in an Ink4a/Arf-independent manner. This process also modulated the DNA damage response and affected genomic stability. Together, our findings demonstrate the etiological role of Bmi1 in PCa, unravel an oncogenic collaboration between Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway, and provide mechanistic insights into the modulation of Bmi1 function by phosphorylation during prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22505453

  1. Expression of EBV-encoded oncogenes and EBV-like virions in multiple canine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Fan, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Chiou, Shiow-Her; Chiang, Shu-Fen; Chiou, Che-Hao; Wu, Guo-Hua; Yang, Hsiu-Ching; Ho, Shu-Peng; Chen, Yuh-Kun; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Sun, H Sunny

    2013-04-12

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous human oncovirus. Previous studies by us and others have indicated that pet dogs frequently encounter EBV or EBV-related viral infection. In this study, we explored whether EBV is involved in canine malignancies in dogs. EBV-specific BamHI W sequence was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 10 of 12 canine tumor specimens, including 8 of 10 oral tumors. Using reverse transcription-PCR, gene expressions of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP 1) and BamHI H rightward reading frame 1 (BHRF1) were identified in 8 and 7 of 12 specimens, respectively. A novel LMP1 variant, T0905, was predominant in 5 canine tumor specimens and found to exist in EBV positive human BC-2 cells. Another LMP1 variant, T0902, was similar to human tumor variant JB7. The BHRF1 sequence identified from these canine tumors was identical to that of the B95-8 viral strain. LMP1 protein and EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) were detected by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent in situ hybridization, respectively, in several tumors, particularly in tumor nests of oral amelanotic melanomas. Furthermore, EBV-like virions adopting a herpesvirus egress pathway were detected in a canthal fibroblastic osteosarcoma and an oral amelanotic melanoma. In conclusion, we report the expressions of BHRF1 transcript (a viral anti-apoptotic protein), LMP1 (a viral oncoprotein) transcript and protein, EBER (a viral oncogenic RNA), and EBV-like virions in multiple canine tumors. The identity of BHRF1 and the resemblance of LMP1 variants between canine and human tumors indicate either a close evolutionary relationship between canine and human EBV, or the possibility of zoonotic transmission. PMID:23380461

  2. Genistein inhibits prostate cancer cell growth by targeting miR-34a and oncogenic HOTAIR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Chiyomaru

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genistein is a soy isoflavone that has antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. It has been shown that genistein inhibits many type of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa by regulating several cell signaling pathways and microRNAs (miRNAs. Recent studies suggest that the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are also involved in many cellular processes. At present there are no reports about the relationship between gensitein, miRNAs and lncRNAs. In this study, we focused on miRNAs, lncRNA that are regulated by genistein and investigated their functional role in PCa. METHOD: Microarray (SurePrint G3 Human GE 8×60K was used for expression profiling of genistein treated and control PCa cells (PC3 and DU145. Functional assay (cell proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle assays were performed with the PCa cell lines, PC3 and DU145. Both in vitro and in vivo (nude mouse models were used for growth assays. Luciferase reporter assays were used for binding of miR-34a to HOTAIR. RESULTS: LncRNA profiling showed that HOTAIR was highly regulated by genistein and its expression was higher in castration-resistant PCa cell lines than in normal prostate cells. Knockdown (siRNA of HOTAIR decreased PCa cell proliferation, migration and invasion and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. miR-34a was also up-regulated by genistein and may directly target HOTAIR in both PC3 and DU145 PCa cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that genistein inhibited PCa cell growth through down-regulation of oncogenic HOTAIR that is also targeted by tumor suppressor miR-34a. These findings enhance understanding of how genistein regulates lncRNA HOTAIR and miR-34a in PCa.

  3. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccon, M; Merlo, M E Boggio; Mologni, L; Poggio, T; Varesio, L M; Menotti, M; Bombelli, S; Rigolio, R; Manazza, A D; Di Giacomo, F; Ambrogio, C; Giudici, G; Casati, C; Mastini, C; Compagno, M; Turner, S D; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Chiarle, R; Voena, C

    2016-07-21

    Most of the anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase). NPM-ALK-deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines, NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive because of heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or relocalization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knockout or knockdown caused ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2) increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2- and γH2AX (phosphorylated H2A histone family member X)-mediated DNA-damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK-amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A 'drug holiday' where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification. PMID:26657151

  4. Molecular Pathways: Targeting the PI3K Pathway in Cancer-BET Inhibitors to the Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratikopoulos, Elias E; Parsons, Ramon E

    2016-06-01

    The PI3K signaling pathway is a complex and tightly regulated network that is critical for many physiologic processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and survival. Aberrant activation of this pathway can occur through mutation of almost any of its major nodes and has been implicated in a number of human diseases, including cancer. The high frequency of mutations in this pathway in multiple types of cancer has led to the development of small-molecule inhibitors of PI3K, several of which are currently in clinical trials. However, several feedback mechanisms either within the PI3K pathway or in compensatory pathways can render tumor cells resistant to therapy. Recently, targeting proteins of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of epigenetic readers of histone acetylation has been shown to effectively block adaptive signaling response of cancer cells to inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, which at least in some cases can restore sensitivity. BET inhibitors also enforce blockade of the MAPK, JAK/STAT, and ER pathways, suggesting they may be a rational combinatorial partner for divergent oncogenic signals that are subject to homeostatic regulation. Here, we review the PI3K pathway as a target for cancer therapy and discuss the potential use of BET inhibition to enhance the clinical efficacy of PI3K inhibitors. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2605-10. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27250929

  5. SS18-SSX2 and the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in mouse and human synovial sarcomas

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Kevin B.; Su, Le; Jin, Huifeng; Lenz, Carol; Randall, R. Lor; Underhill, T. Michael; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Sharma, Sunil; Capecchi, Mario R.

    2012-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a deadly malignancy with limited sensitivity to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. SS18-SSX fusion oncogene expression characterizes human synovial sarcomas and drives oncogenesis in a mouse model. Elevated expression of BCL2 is considered a consistent feature of the synovial sarcoma expression profile. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of apoptotic pathway members in synovial sarcomas and interrogate the impact of modulating SS18-SSX expression on this pathway...

  6. Trisomy of the Dscr1 gene suppresses early progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia driven by oncogenic Kras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Choon; Shin, Jimin; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck, E-mail: khbaek@skku.edu

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •A single extra copy of Dscr1 restrains progression of PanIN-1A to PanIN-1B lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy attenuates calcineurin–NFAT pathway in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •Dscr1 trisomy leads to upregulation of p15{sup INK4b} in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •A single extra copy of Dscr1 reduces epithelial proliferation in early PanIN lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy may protect Down syndrome individuals from pancreatic cancer. -- Abstract: Individuals with Down syndrome exhibit remarkably reduced incidence of most solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. Multiple mechanisms arising from the genetic complexity underlying Down syndrome has been suggested to contribute to such a broad cancer protection. In this study, utilizing a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we demonstrate that trisomy of the Down syndrome critical region-1 (Dscr1), an endogenous calcineurin inhibitor localized on chromosome 21, suppresses the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1A (PanIN-1A) to PanIN-1B lesions without affecting the initiation of PanIN lesions mediated by oncogenic Kras{sup G12D}. In addition, we show that Dscr1 trisomy attenuates nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) accompanied by upregulation of the p15{sup Ink4b} tumor suppressor and reduction of cell proliferation in early PanIN lesions. Our data suggest that attenuation of calcineurin–NFAT signaling in neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium by a single extra copy of Dscr1 is sufficient to inhibit the progression of early PanIN lesions driven by oncogenic Kras, and thus may be a potential mechanism underlying reduced incidence of pancreatic cancer in Down syndrome individuals.

  7. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarmenBlanco Aparicio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  8. Trisomy of the Dscr1 gene suppresses early progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia driven by oncogenic Kras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •A single extra copy of Dscr1 restrains progression of PanIN-1A to PanIN-1B lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy attenuates calcineurin–NFAT pathway in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •Dscr1 trisomy leads to upregulation of p15INK4b in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •A single extra copy of Dscr1 reduces epithelial proliferation in early PanIN lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy may protect Down syndrome individuals from pancreatic cancer. -- Abstract: Individuals with Down syndrome exhibit remarkably reduced incidence of most solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. Multiple mechanisms arising from the genetic complexity underlying Down syndrome has been suggested to contribute to such a broad cancer protection. In this study, utilizing a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we demonstrate that trisomy of the Down syndrome critical region-1 (Dscr1), an endogenous calcineurin inhibitor localized on chromosome 21, suppresses the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1A (PanIN-1A) to PanIN-1B lesions without affecting the initiation of PanIN lesions mediated by oncogenic KrasG12D. In addition, we show that Dscr1 trisomy attenuates nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) accompanied by upregulation of the p15Ink4b tumor suppressor and reduction of cell proliferation in early PanIN lesions. Our data suggest that attenuation of calcineurin–NFAT signaling in neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium by a single extra copy of Dscr1 is sufficient to inhibit the progression of early PanIN lesions driven by oncogenic Kras, and thus may be a potential mechanism underlying reduced incidence of pancreatic cancer in Down syndrome individuals

  9. Classiology and soil classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, V. A.

    2012-03-01

    Classiology can be defined as a science studying the principles and rules of classification of objects of any nature. The development of the theory of classification and the particular methods for classifying objects are the main challenges of classiology; to a certain extent, they are close to the challenges of pattern recognition. The methodology of classiology integrates a wide range of methods and approaches: from expert judgment to formal logic, multivariate statistics, and informatics. Soil classification assumes generalization of available data and practical experience, formalization of our notions about soils, and their representation in the form of an information system. As an information system, soil classification is designed to predict the maximum number of a soil's properties from the position of this soil in the classification space. The existing soil classification systems do not completely satisfy the principles of classiology. The violation of logical basis, poor structuring, low integrity, and inadequate level of formalization make these systems verbal schemes rather than classification systems sensu stricto. The concept of classification as listing (enumeration) of objects makes it possible to introduce the notion of the information base of classification. For soil objects, this is the database of soil indices (properties) that might be applied for generating target-oriented soil classification system. Mathematical methods enlarge the prognostic capacity of classification systems; they can be applied to assess the quality of these systems and to recognize new soil objects to be included in the existing systems. The application of particular principles and rules of classiology for soil classification purposes is discussed in this paper.

  10. Efficient Pairwise Multilabel Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Loza Mencía, Eneldo

    2013-01-01

    Multilabel classification learning is the task of learning a mapping between objects and sets of possibly overlapping classes and has gained increasing attention in recent times. A prototypical application scenario for multilabel classification is the assignment of a set of keywords to a document, a frequently encountered problem in the text classification domain. With upcoming Web 2.0 technologies, this domain is extended by a wide range of tag suggestion tasks and the trend definitely...

  11. Efficient multivariate sequence classification

    OpenAIRE

    Kuksa, Pavel P.

    2014-01-01

    Kernel-based approaches for sequence classification have been successfully applied to a variety of domains, including the text categorization, image classification, speech analysis, biological sequence analysis, time series and music classification, where they show some of the most accurate results. Typical kernel functions for sequences in these domains (e.g., bag-of-words, mismatch, or subsequence kernels) are restricted to {\\em discrete univariate} (i.e. one-dimensional) string data, such ...

  12. Classifier in Age classification

    OpenAIRE

    B. Santhi; R.Seethalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Face is the important feature of the human beings. We can derive various properties of a human by analyzing the face. The objective of the study is to design a classifier for age using facial images. Age classification is essential in many applications like crime detection, employment and face detection. The proposed algorithm contains four phases: preprocessing, feature extraction, feature selection and classification. The classification employs two class labels namely child and Old. This st...

  13. Aspects de la classification

    OpenAIRE

    Mari, Jean-François; Napoli, Amedeo

    1996-01-01

    Les techniques de classification numérique ont toujours été présentes en reconnaissance des formes. Les réseaux de neurones montrent chaque jour leurs (très ?) bonnes propriétés de classification, et la classification se fait de plus en plus présente en représentation des connaissances. Ainsi, ce rapport présente, simplement dans un but introductif, les aspects mathématiques, statistiques, neuromimétiques et cognitifs de la classification.

  14. Ontologies vs. Classification Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bodil Nistrup; Erdman Thomsen, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    What is an ontology compared to a classification system? Is a taxonomy a kind of classification system or a kind of ontology? These are questions that we meet when working with people from industry and public authorities, who need methods and tools for concept clarification, for developing meta...... data sets or for obtaining advanced search facilities. In this paper we will present an attempt at answering these questions. We will give a presentation of various types of ontologies and briefly introduce terminological ontologies. Furthermore we will argue that classification systems, e.g. product...... classification systems and meta data taxonomies, should be based on ontologies....

  15. Molecular evolution of the Yap/Yorkie proto-oncogene and elucidation of its core transcriptional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikmi, Aissam; Gaertner, Bjoern; Seidel, Christopher; Srivastava, Mansi; Zeitlinger, Julia; Gibson, Matthew C

    2014-06-01

    Throughout Metazoa, developmental processes are controlled by a surprisingly limited number of conserved signaling pathways. Precisely how these signaling cassettes were assembled in early animal evolution remains poorly understood, as do the molecular transitions that potentiated the acquisition of their myriad developmental functions. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of the proto-oncogene yes-associated protein (Yap)/Yorkie, a key effector of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Based on heterologous functional analysis of evolutionarily distant Yap/Yorkie orthologs, we demonstrate that a structurally distinct interaction interface between Yap/Yorkie and its partner TEAD/Scalloped became fixed in the eumetazoan common ancestor. We then combine transcriptional profiling of tissues expressing phylogenetically diverse forms of Yap/Yorkie with ChIP-seq validation to identify a common downstream gene expression program underlying the control of tissue growth in Drosophila. Intriguingly, a subset of the newly identified Yorkie target genes are also induced by Yap in mammalian tissues, thus revealing a conserved Yap-dependent gene expression signature likely to mediate organ size control throughout bilaterian animals. Combined, these experiments provide new mechanistic insights while revealing the ancient evolutionary history of Hippo signaling. PMID:24509725

  16. Effect of the Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor on the expression of oncogenes in the irradiated rat colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the authors tested the influence of i.p. Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (BBI) administration on oncogene expression in unirradiated and irradiated rat colonic mucosa. Total cellular RNA was collected from the colonic mucosa, and the levels of c-myc, c-fos, c-Ha-ras, c-EGFR, and c-actin mRNA were examined by standard dot and Northern blot analyses. The data demonstrate that BBI is capable of preventing radiation-induced overexpression of c-myc and c-fos without interfering with the constitutive expression of these 2 genes. It was also determined that BBI did not interfere with either radiation-induced overexpression of c-Ha-ras and c-EGFR or the constitutive expression of c-Ha-ras, c-EGFR, or c-actin. The data demonstrate that the anticarcinogenic BBI selectively inhibits the overexpression of c-myc and c-fos while not affecting crypt cell proliferation. These results suggest that a protease is involved in the pathway for enhanced c-myc and c-fos expression and that protease inhibitors such as BBI can interrupt this pathway

  17. Developments in Burkitt’s lymphoma: novel cooperations in oncogenic MYC signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive disorder associated with extremely high rates of cell proliferation tempered by high levels of apoptosis. Despite the high levels of cell death, the net effect is one of rapid tumor growth. The tumor arises within the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid tissues and is identifiable by translocation of the c-MYC gene into the immunoglobulin gene loci, resulting in deregulation of the proto-oncogene. Many of the major players involved in determining the development of BL have been characterized in human BL cell lines or in mouse models of MYC-driven lymphomagenesis. Both systems have been useful so far in characterizing the role of tumor suppressor genes (for example, p53), prosurvival signaling pathways, and members of the B-cell lymphoma-2 family of apoptosis regulators in determining the fate of c-MYC overexpressing B-cells, and ultimately in regulating lymphoma development. Signaling through phosphoinositide (PI)3-kinase stands out as being critical for BL cell survival. Recurrent mutations in ID3 or TCF3 (E2A) that promote signaling through PI3-kinase have recently been identified in human BL samples, and new therapeutic strategies based on coordinately targeting both the prosurvival factor, B-cell lymphoma-XL, and the PI3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway to synergistically induced BL apoptosis have been proposed. Now, engineering both constitutive c-MYC expression and PI3-kinase activity, specifically in murine B-cells undergoing the germinal center reaction, has revealed that there is synergistic cooperation between c-MYC and PI3-kinase during BL development. The resulting tumors phenocopy the human malignancy, and acquire tertiary mutations also present in human tumors. This model may, therefore, prove useful in further studies to identify functionally relevant mutational events necessary for BL pathogenesis. This review discusses these cooperating interactions, the possible

  18. Concepts of Classification and Taxonomy. Phylogenetic Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic approaches to classification have been heavily developed in biology by bioinformaticians. But these techniques have applications in other fields, in particular in linguistics. Their main characteristics is to search for relationships between the objects or species in study, instead of grouping them by similarity. They are thus rather well suited for any kind of evolutionary objects. For nearly fifteen years, astrocladistics has explored the use of Maximum Parsimony (or cladistics) for astronomical objects like galaxies or globular clusters. In this lesson we will learn how it works. 1 Why phylogenetic tools in astrophysics? 1.1 History of classification The need for classifying living organisms is very ancient, and the first classification system can be dated back to the Greeks. The goal was very practical since it was intended to distinguish between eatable and toxic aliments, or kind and dangerous animals. Simple resemblance was used and has been used for centuries. Basically, until the XVIIIth...

  19. ER functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressors: Modulators of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittremieux, Mart; Parys, Jan B; Pinton, Paolo; Bultynck, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signals that arise from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the major intracellular Ca(2+)-storage organelle, impact several mitochondrial functions and dictate cell survival and cell death processes. Furthermore, alterations in Ca(2+) signaling in cancer cells promote survival and establish a high tolerance towards cell stress and damage, so that the on-going oncogenic stress does not result in the activation of cell death. Over the last years, the mechanisms underlying these oncogenic alterations in Ca(2+) signaling have started to emerge. An important aspect of this is the identification of several major oncogenes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Mcl-1, PKB/Akt, and Ras, and tumor suppressors, such as p53, PTEN, PML, BRCA1, and Beclin 1, as direct and critical regulators of Ca(2+)-transport systems located at the ER membranes, including IP3 receptors and SERCA Ca(2+) pumps. In this way, these proteins execute part of their function by controlling the ER-mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes, favoring either survival (oncogenes) or cell death (tumor suppressors). Oncogenic mutations, gene deletions or amplifications alter the expression and/or function of these proteins, thereby changing the delicate balance between oncogenes and tumor suppressors, impacting oncogenesis and favoring malignant cell function and behavior. In this review, we provided an integrated overview of the impact of the major oncogenes and tumor suppressors, often altered in cancer cells, on Ca(2+) signaling from the ER Ca(2+) stores. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26772784

  20. Library Classification 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In this article the author explores how a new library classification system might be designed using some aspects of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) and ideas from other systems to create something that works for school libraries in the year 2020. By examining what works well with the Dewey Decimal System, what features should be carried…

  1. Musings on galaxy classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classification schemes and their utility are discussed with a number of examples, particularly for cD galaxies. Data suggest that primordial turbulence rather than tidal torques is responsible for most of the presently observed angular momentum of galaxies. Finally, some of the limitations on present-day schemes for galaxy classification are pointed out. 54 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  2. Change of mitotic cycle and DNA repair in embryonic cells of rat, immortalized by E1 A oncogene and transformated by E1 A and c-Ha-Ras oncogenes under ionizing radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparison investigation into the repair of mitotic cycle and the reunion of DN single- and double-strand breaks in gamma-ray irradiated initial E1 A oncogene immortalized and E1 A and c-Ha-Ras oncogene transformed (mutant form) lines of rat embryonic fibroblasts was carried out. Possible involvement of Ras gene product in DNA repair speed governing and absence of tumor suppression function of p 53 protein in the embryonic and E1 A oncogene immortalized cells of rat fibroblast, as well as, presence of the mentioned function of p 53 protein in E1 A and c-Ha-Ras oncogene transformed cells were studied

  3. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection of...... fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  4. Modulating factors in the expression of radiation-induced oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many assays for oncogenic transformation have been developed ranging from those in established rodent cell lines where morphological alteration is scored, to those in human cells growing in nude mice where tumor invasiveness is scored. In general, systems that are most quantitaive are also the least relevant in terms of human carcinogenesis and human risk estimation. The development of cell culture systems has made it possible to assess at the cellular level the oncogenic potential of a variety of chemical, physical and viral agents. Cell culture systems afford the opportunity to identify factors and conditions that may prevent or enhance cellular transformation by radiation and chemicals. Permissive and protective factors in radiation-induced transformation include thyroid hormone and the tumor promoter TPA that increase the transformation incidence for a given dose of radiation, and retinoids, selenium, vitamin E, and 5-aminobenzamide that inhibit the expression of transformation. Densely ionizing α-particles, similar to those emitted by radon daughters, are highly effective in inducing transformations and appear to interact in a supra-additive fashion with asbestos fibers. The activation of a known dominant oncogene has not yet been demonstrated in radiation-induced oncogenic transformation. The most likely mechanism for radiation activation of an oncogene would be via the production of a chromosomal translocation. Radiation also efficiently induces deletions and may thus lead to the loss of a suppressor gene

  5. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Jin [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm [Department of Herbal Crop Research, NIHHS, RDA, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Yuseok, E-mail: moon@pnu.edu [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  6. Cluster Based Text Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    We propose a cluster based classification model for suspicious email detection and other text classification tasks. The text classification tasks comprise many training examples that require a complex classification model. Using clusters for classification makes the model simpler and increases the...... classifier is trained on each cluster having reduced dimensionality and less number of examples. The experimental results show that the proposed model outperforms the existing classification models for the task of suspicious email detection and topic categorization on the Reuters-21578 and 20 Newsgroups...... datasets. Our model also outperforms A Decision Cluster Classification (ADCC) and the Decision Cluster Forest Classification (DCFC) models on the Reuters-21578 dataset....

  7. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, usin...

  8. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  9. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U.

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft-max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classif...

  10. Bioinformatics of non small cell lung cancer and the ras proto-oncogene

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, Amita; Babu M, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is initiated by activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutations in the K-ras proto-oncogene are responsible for 10–30% of adenocarcinomas. Clinical Findings point to a wide variety of other cancers contributing to lung cancer incidence. Such a scenario makes identification of lung cancer difficult and thus identifying its mechanisms can contribute to the society. Identifying unique conserved patterns common to contributing proto-oncogenes may further be a boon to Pharmacogenomics and pharmacoinformatics. This calls for ab initio/de novo drug discovery that in turn will require a comprehensive in silico approach of Sequence, Domain, Phylogenetic and Structural analysis of the receptors, ligand screening and optimization and detailed Docking studies. This brief involves extensive role of the RAS subfamily that includes a set of proteins, which cause an over expression of cancer-causing genes like M-ras and initiate tumour formation in lungs. SNP Studies and Structure based ...

  11. Canadian oncogenic human papillomavirus cervical infection prevalence: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Ba'

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV infection prevalence is required to determine optimal vaccination strategies. We systematically reviewed the prevalence of oncogenic cervical HPV infection among Canadian females prior to immunization. Methods We included studies reporting DNA-confirmed oncogenic HPV prevalence estimates among Canadian females identified through searching electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE and public health websites. Two independent reviewers screened literature results, abstracted data and appraised study quality. Prevalence estimates were meta-analyzed among routine screening populations, HPV-positive, and by cytology/histology results. Results Thirty studies plus 21 companion reports were included after screening 837 citations and 120 full-text articles. Many of the studies did not address non-response bias (74% or use a representative sampling strategy (53%. Age-specific prevalence was highest among females aged Conclusion Our results support vaccinating females

  12. Pancreatitis-induced Inflammation Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer by Inhibiting Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Carmen; Collado, Manuel; Navas, Carolina; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Cañamero, Marta; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Barbacid, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells of adult mice (≥P60) are resistant to transformation by some of the most robust oncogenic insults including expression of K-Ras oncogenes and loss of p16Ink4a/p19Arf or Trp53 tumor suppressors. Yet, these acinar cells yield pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (mPanIN) and ductal adenocarcinomas (mPDAC) if exposed to limited bouts of non-acute pancreatitis, providing they harbor K-Ras oncogenes. Pancreatitis contributes to tumor progression by abrogating the senescence barrier characteristic of low-grade mPanINs. Attenuation of pancreatitis-induced inflammation also accelerates tissue repair and thwarts mPanIN expansion. Patients with chronic pancreatitis display senescent PanINs, if they have received anti-inflammatory drugs. These results put forward the concept that anti-inflammatory treatment of people diagnosed with pancreatitis may reduce their risk of developing PDAC. PMID:21665147

  13. Learning Apache Mahout classification

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    If you are a data scientist who has some experience with the Hadoop ecosystem and machine learning methods and want to try out classification on large datasets using Mahout, this book is ideal for you. Knowledge of Java is essential.

  14. Classification in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen

    detection in a cardiovascular disease study. The third focus is to deepen the understanding of classification mechanism by visualizing the knowledge learned by a classifier. More specifically, to build the most typical patterns recognized by the Fisher's linear discriminant rule with applications......Classification is extensively used in the context of medical image analysis for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. In order to classify image content correctly, one needs to extract efficient features with discriminative properties and build classifiers based on these features. In addition......, a good metric is required to measure distance or similarity between feature points so that the classification becomes feasible. Furthermore, in order to build a successful classifier, one needs to deeply understand how classifiers work. This thesis focuses on these three aspects of classification...

  15. Oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a hemangiopericytoma of the hip: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baronofsky, S.I.; Kalbhen, C.L.; Demos, T.C.; Sizemore, G.W. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Medicine, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Osteomalacia is characterized by abnormally increased unmineralized osteoid within the bone matrix. This metabolic bone disease is usually the result of decreased uptake or abnormal metabolism of vitamin D or of renal tubular phosphate loss. Dietary deficiency, malabsorption, cirrhosis, renal tubular acidosis and certain drugs can cause osteomalacia., Oncogenic osteomalacia - osteomalacia secondary to tumours - is rare, and the exact mechanisms by which neoplasms induce osteomalacia are not known. We describe a patient with chronic osteomalacia of unknown origin who was subsequently found to have oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a hemangiopericytoma of the hip. (author)

  16. Beyond ALK-RET, ROS1 and other oncogene fusions in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kohno, Takashi; Nakaoku, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Fusions of the RET and ROS1 protein tyrosine kinase oncogenes with several partner genes were recently identified as new targetable genetic aberrations in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lacking activating EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, or HER2 oncogene aberrations. RET and ROS1 fusion-positive tumors are mainly observed in young, female, and/or never smoking patients. Studies based on in vitro and in vivo (i.e., mouse) models and studies of several fusion-positive patients indicate that ...

  17. Assessing the subcellular distribution of oncogenic phosphoinositide 3-kinase using microinjection into live cells

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Meredith J.; Rynkiewicz, Natalie K.; Ivetac, Ivan; Horan, Kristy A.; Mitchell, Christina A.; Phillips, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA lead to an increase in intrinsic phosphoinositide kinase activity, but it is thought that increased access of PI3Kα (phosphoinositide 3-kinase α) to its PM (plasma membrane) localized substrate is also required for increased levels of downstream PIP3/Akt [phosphoinositide-3,4,5-trisphosphate/also called PKB (protein kinase B)] signalling. We have studied the subcellular localization of wild-type and the two most common oncogenic mutants of PI3Kα in cells maintain...

  18. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-08-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In this article, we will discuss the evidence for RAF and PI3K as key downstream RAS effectors, as well as the RAL guanine exchange factor, which is equally essential for transformation. Furthermore, we will delineate alternative pathways, including cytokine activation and autophagy, which are co-opted by oncogenic RAS signaling and also represent attractive targets for therapy. Finally, we will present strategies for combining inhibitors of these downstream KRAS signaling pathways in a rational fashion, as multitargeted therapy will be required to achieve a cure. PMID:25303301

  19. Inhibition in multiclass classification

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Ramón; Vembu, Shankar; Amigó, José M.; Nowotny, Thomas; Elkan, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The role of inhibition is investigated in a multiclass support vector machine formalism inspired by the brain structure of insects. The so-called mushroom bodies have a set of output neurons, or classification functions, that compete with each other to encode a particular input. Strongly active output neurons depress or inhibit the remaining outputs without knowing which is correct or incorrect. Accordingly, we propose to use a classification function that embodies unselective inhibition and ...

  20. Multiple sparse representations classification

    OpenAIRE

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan; Niessen, Wiro; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small...

  1. Multiple Sparse Representations Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan S.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Sparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small patch surro...

  2. Twitter content classification

    OpenAIRE

    Dann, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper delivers a new Twitter content classification framework based sixteen existing Twitter studies and a grounded theory analysis of a personal Twitter history. It expands the existing understanding of Twitter as a multifunction tool for personal, profession, commercial and phatic communications with a split level classification scheme that offers broad categorization and specific sub categories for deeper insight into the real world application of the service.

  3. Text classification method review

    OpenAIRE

    Mahinovs, Aigars; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Roy, Rajkumar; Baxter, David

    2007-01-01

    With the explosion of information fuelled by the growth of the World Wide Web it is no longer feasible for a human observer to understand all the data coming in or even classify it into categories. With this growth of information and simultaneous growth of available computing power automatic classification of data, particularly textual data, gains increasingly high importance. This paper provides a review of generic text classification process, phases of that process and met...

  4. Automatic Arabic Text Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Al-harbi, S; Almuhareb, A.; Al-Thubaity , A; Khorsheed, M. S.; Al-Rajeh, A.

    2008-01-01

    Automated document classification is an important text mining task especially with the rapid growth of the number of online documents present in Arabic language. Text classification aims to automatically assign the text to a predefined category based on linguistic features. Such a process has different useful applications including, but not restricted to, e-mail spam detection, web page content filtering, and automatic message routing. This paper presents the results of experiments on documen...

  5. Classification of Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Thorpy

    2012-01-01

    The classification of sleep disorders is necessary to discriminate between disorders and to facilitate an understanding of symptoms, etiology, and pathophysiology that allows for appropriate treatment. The earliest classification systems, largely organized according to major symptoms (insomnia, excessive sleepiness, and abnormal events that occur during sleep), were unable to be based on pathophysiology because the cause of most sleep disorders was unknown. These 3 symptom-based categories ar...

  6. Latent classification models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2005-01-01

    parametric family ofdistributions.  In this paper we propose a new set of models forclassification in continuous domains, termed latent classificationmodels. The latent classification model can roughly be seen ascombining the \\NB model with a mixture of factor analyzers,thereby relaxing the assumptions of...... classification model, and wedemonstrate empirically that the accuracy of the proposed model issignificantly higher than the accuracy of other probabilisticclassifiers....

  7. Classifications of Software Transfers

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlin, Claes; Smite, Darja

    2012-01-01

    Many companies have development sites around the globe. This inevitably means that development work may be transferred between the sites. This paper defines a classification of software transfer types; it divides transfers into three main types: full, partial and gradual transfers to describe the context of a transfer. The differences between transfer types, and hence the need for a classification, are illustrated with staffing curves for two different transfer types. The staffing curves are ...

  8. A New Classification Approach Based on Multiple Classification Rules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongmei Zhou

    2014-01-01

    A good classifier can correctly predict new data for which the class label is unknown, so it is important to construct a high accuracy classifier. Hence, classification techniques are much useful in ubiquitous computing. Associative classification achieves higher classification accuracy than some traditional rule-based classification approaches. However, the approach also has two major deficiencies. First, it generates a very large number of association classification rules, especially when t...

  9. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  10. Hierarchical classification of social groups

    OpenAIRE

    Витковская, Мария

    2001-01-01

    Classification problems are important for every science, and for sociology as well. Social phenomena, examined from the aspect of classification of social groups, can be examined deeper. At present one common classification of groups does not exist. This article offers the hierarchical classification of social group.

  11. Direct inhibition of oncogenic KRAS by Bacillus pumilus ribonuclease (binase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskaya, Olga N; Singh, Indrabahadur; Dudkina, Elena; Ulyanova, Vera; Kayumov, Airat; Barreto, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    RAS proteins function as molecular switches that transmit signals from cell surface receptors into specific cellular responses via activation of defined signaling pathways (Fang, 2015). Aberrant constitutive RAS activation occurs with high incidence in different types of cancer (Bos, 1989). Thus, inhibition of RAS-mediated signaling is extremely important for therapeutic approaches against cancer. Here we showed that the ribonuclease (RNase) binase, directly interacts with endogenous KRAS. Further, molecular structure models suggested an inhibitory nature of binase-RAS interaction involving regions of RAS that are important for different aspects of its function. Consistent with these models, phosphorylation analysis of effectors of RAS-mediated signaling revealed that binase inhibits the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Interestingly, RAS activation assays using a non-hydrolysable GTP analog (GTPγS) demonstrated that binase interferes with the exchange of GDP by GTP. Furthermore, we showed that binase reduced the interaction of RAS with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), SOS1. Our data support a model in which binase-KRAS interaction interferes with the function of GEFs and stabilizes the inactive GDP-bound conformation of RAS thereby inhibiting MAPK/ERK signaling. This model plausibly explains the previously reported, antitumor-effect of binase specific towards RAS-transformed cells and suggests the development of anticancer therapies based on this ribonuclease. PMID:27066977

  12. Evaluation of the ‘Hedgehog’ signaling pathways in squamous and basal cell carcinomas of the eyelids and conjunctiva

    OpenAIRE

    Celebi, Ali Riza Cenk; Kiratli, Hayyam; SOYLEMEZOGLU, FIGEN

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of hedgehog signaling pathway in the carcinogenesis of eyelid skin and conjunctival epithelial malignant tumors. The study was conducted on specimens from 41 patients with cutaneous eyelid basal cell carcinoma, 22 with bulbar conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma, 12 with bulbar conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia. Major molecules of Hedgehog signaling pathway (Sonic Hedgehog [Shh] and Patched-1 [Ptch-1] and Glioma-associated oncogene ...

  13. Genetic variations regulate alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated regions of the mouse glioma-associated oncogene 1, Gli1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaphiropoulos Peter G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is one of the key mechanisms that generate biological diversity. Even though alternative splicing also occurs in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs, the understanding of the significance and the regulation of these variations is rather limited. Results We investigated 5' UTR mRNA variants of the mouse Gli1 oncogene, which is the terminal transcriptional effector of the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway. In addition to identifying novel transcription start sites, we demonstrated that the expression ratio of the Gli1 splice variants in the 5' UTR is regulated by the genotype of the mouse strain analyzed. The GT allele, which contains the consensus intronic dinucleotides at the 5' splice site of intron 1B, favors exon 1B inclusion, while the GC allele, having a weaker 5' splice site sequence, promotes exon 1B skipping. Moreover, the alternative Gli1 5' UTRs had an impact on translational capacity, with the shorter and the exon 1B-skipped mRNA variants being most effective. Conclusions Our findings implicate novel, genome-based mechanisms as regulators of the terminal events in the mouse HH signaling cascade.

  14. Inhibition of MerTK increases chemosensitivity and decreases oncogenic potential in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, L N; Winges, A; Christoph, S; Sather, S; Migdall-Wilson, J; Schlegel, J; McGranahan, A; Gao, D; Liang, X; Deryckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric leukemia survival rates have improved dramatically over the past decades. However, current treatment protocols are still largely ineffective in cases of relapsed leukemia and are associated with a significant rate of chronic health conditions. Thus, there is a continued need for new therapeutic options. Here, we show that mer receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) was abnormally expressed in approximately one half of pediatric T-cell leukemia patient samples and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Stimulation of MerTK by the ligand Gas6 led to activation of the prosurvival proteins Erk 1/2 and Stat5, and MerTK-dependent activation of the STAT pathway in leukemia represents a novel finding. Furthermore, inhibition of MerTK expression increased the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and decreased the oncogenic potential of the Jurkat T-ALL cell line in a methylcellulose colony-forming assay. Lastly, inhibition of MerTK expression significantly increased median survival in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia (30.5 days vs 60 days, P<0.0001). These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for dose reduction of currently used chemotherapeutics resulting in decreased rates of therapy-associated toxicities. PMID:23353780

  15. Inhibition of MerTK increases chemosensitivity and decreases oncogenic potential in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric leukemia survival rates have improved dramatically over the past decades. However, current treatment protocols are still largely ineffective in cases of relapsed leukemia and are associated with a significant rate of chronic health conditions. Thus, there is a continued need for new therapeutic options. Here, we show that mer receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) was abnormally expressed in approximately one half of pediatric T-cell leukemia patient samples and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Stimulation of MerTK by the ligand Gas6 led to activation of the prosurvival proteins Erk 1/2 and Stat5, and MerTK-dependent activation of the STAT pathway in leukemia represents a novel finding. Furthermore, inhibition of MerTK expression increased the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and decreased the oncogenic potential of the Jurkat T-ALL cell line in a methylcellulose colony-forming assay. Lastly, inhibition of MerTK expression significantly increased median survival in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia (30.5 days vs 60 days, P<0.0001). These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for dose reduction of currently used chemotherapeutics resulting in decreased rates of therapy-associated toxicities

  16. Characterization of oncogene-induced metabolic alterations in hepatic cells by using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhi; Cao, Tingting; Lin, Shuhai; Fu, Li; Li, Shangfu; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Cai, Zongwei

    2016-05-15

    Elucidation of altered metabolic pathways by using metabolomics may open new avenues for basic research on disease mechanisms and facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we report the development of ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolomics platform with capability of measuring both cationic and anionic intermediates in cellular metabolism. The platform was established based on the hydrophobic ion-pairing interaction chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The MRM transitions were created and optimized via energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation experiments, serving as an essential reference point for the quantification and identification. For chromatographic separation, application of hydrophobic ion-pairing interaction led to dramatic enhancement on retention of water-soluble metabolites and provision of good peak shapes. Two volatile ion-pairing reagents, namely heptafluorobutyric acid and tributylamine, were used with dedicated C18 columns as complementary separation systems coupled with the MRM analysis, allowing measurement of the metabolites of interest at nanomolar levels. The developed platform was successfully applied to investigate the altered metabolism in hepatic cells with over-expression of an oncogene, thus can provide important information on the rewired metabolism. PMID:26992502

  17. Lyn sustains oncogenic signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia by strengthening SET-mediated inhibition of PP2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonta, Francesca; Pagano, Mario Angelo; Trentin, Livio; Tibaldi, Elena; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Facco, Monica; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Pavan, Valeria; Ribaudo, Giovanni; Bordin, Luciana; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Brunati, Anna Maria

    2015-06-11

    Aberrant protein kinase activities, and the consequent dramatic increase of Ser/Thr and -Tyr phosphorylation, promote the deregulation of the survival pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), which is crucial to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. In this study, we show that the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), one of the major Ser/Thr phosphatases, is in an inhibited form because of the synergistic contribution of 2 events, the interaction with its physiologic inhibitor SET and the phosphorylation of Y307 of the catalytic subunit of PP2A. The latter event is mediated by Lyn, a Src family kinase previously found to be overexpressed, delocalized, and constitutively active in CLL cells. This Lyn/PP2A axis accounts for the persistent high level of phosphorylation of the phosphatase's targets and represents a key connection linking phosphotyrosine- and phosphoserine/threonine-mediated oncogenic signals. The data herein presented show that the disruption of the SET/PP2A complex by a novel FTY720-analog (MP07-66) devoid of immunosuppressive effects leads to the reactivation of PP2A, which in turn triggers apoptosis of CLL cells. When used in combination with SFK inhibitors, the action of MP07-66 is synergistically amplified, providing a new option in the therapeutic strategy for CLL patients. PMID:25931585

  18. Using {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT to Detect an occult Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Oncogenic Osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate excretion, hypophosphatemia, and osteomalacia. This syndrome is often caused by tumors of mesenchymal origin. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia have abnormal bone mineralization, resulting in a high frequency of fractures. Tumor resection is the treatment of choice, as it will often correct the metabolic imbalance. Although oncogenic osteomalacia is a potentially curable disease, diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because of the small size and sporadic location of the tumor. Bone scintigraphy and radiography best characterize osteoma lacia; magnetic resonance imaging findings are nonspecific. Here, we report a case of oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor that was successfully detected by {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18F} FDG PET/CT). This case illustrates the advantages of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in detecting the occult mesenchymal tumor that causes oncogenic osteomalacia.

  19. Product Classification in Supply Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Lihong; Xu, Yaoxuan

    2010-01-01

    Oriflame is a famous international direct sale cosmetics company with complicated supply chain operation but it lacks of a product classification system. It is vital to design a product classification method in order to support Oriflame global supply planning and improve the supply chain performance. This article is aim to investigate and design the multi-criteria of product classification, propose the classification model, suggest application areas of product classification results and intro...

  20. Retinoblastoma pathway defects show differential ability to activate the constitutive DNA damage response in human tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tort, F.; Bartkova, J.; Sehested, M.;

    2006-01-01

    culture models with differential defects of retinoblastoma pathway components, as overexpression of cyclin D1 or lack of p16(Ink4a), either alone or combined, did not elicit detectable DDR. In contrast, inactivation of pRb, the key component of the pathway, activated the DDR in cultured human or mouse...... hierarchical positions along the retinoblastoma pathway. Our data provide new insights into oncogene-evoked DDR in human tumorigenesis, with potential implications for individualized management of tumors with elevated cyclin D1 versus cyclin E, due to their distinct clinical variables and biological behavior....

  1. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones. The...... illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  2. Gene expression of oncogenes, antimicrobial peptides, and cytokines in the development of oral leukoplakia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.; Pantelis, A.; Najafi, T.; Deschner, J.; Allam, J.P.; Novak, N.; Reich, R.; Martini, M.; Berge, S.J.; Fischer, H.P.; Jepsen, S.; Winter, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression pattern of oncogenes, antimicrobial peptides, and genes involved in inflammation in leukoplakia of the oral cavity compared with healthy gingiva. STUDY DESIGN: Biopsies of healthy gingiva (n=20) and leukoplakia (n=20), were obtained

  3. Attenuation of Marek's disease virus lacking the Meq oncogene in cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, meq, which structurally resembles the jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. Chickens vaccinated with ...

  4. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  5. Rapid Detection of high-level oncogene amplifications in ultrasonic surgical aspirations of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Long N

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic tumor information, such as identification of amplified oncogenes, can be used to plan treatment. The two sources of a brain tumor that are commonly available include formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE sections from the small diagnostic biopsy and the ultrasonic surgical aspiration that contains the bulk of the tumor. In research centers, frozen tissue of a brain tumor may also be available. This study compared ultrasonic surgical aspiration and FFPE specimens from the same brain tumors for retrieval of DNA and molecular assessment of amplified oncogenes. Methods Surgical aspirations were centrifuged to separate erythrocytes from the tumor cells that predominantly formed large, overlying buffy coats. These were sampled to harvest nuclear pellets for DNA purification. Four glioblastomas, 2 lung carcinoma metastases, and an ependymoma were tested. An inexpensive PCR technique, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA, quantified 79 oncogenes using 3 kits. Copy number (CN results were normalized to DNA from non-neoplastic brain (NB in calculated ratios, [tumor DNA]/[NB DNA]. Bland-Altman and Spearman rank correlative comparisons were determined. Regression analysis identified outliers. Results Purification of DNA from ultrasonic surgical aspirations was rapid ( Conclusions Buffy coats of centrifuged ultrasonic aspirations contained abundant tumor cells whose DNA permitted rapid, multiplex detection of high-level oncogene amplifications that were confirmed in FFPE. Virtual slides http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1883718801686466

  6. Correlation of in vitro genotoxicity and oncogenicity induced by radiation and asbestos fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vitro cytotoxicity and oncogenic potential of both native and acid leached asbestos fibres were studied using the C3H 10T1/2 cell model. Both native and leached fibres induced a dose-dependent toxicity. At high fibre concentrations, acid leached fibres were significantly less toxic than their untreated counterparts. While asbestos fibres alone do not induce oncogenic transformation at the concentration examined, it was found that both leached and native fibres substantially enhanced the oncogenicity of gamma-irradiation in a more than additive fashion. Although no significant chromosomal aberrations or sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were found in asbestos treated cultures, a significantly higher number of SCEs was observed in cells treated with both asbestos and radiation compared to cells receiving radiation alone. The results suggest that the enhancement in radiation induced oncogenicity by asbestos fibres may be attributed to the mere physical presence of the fibres rather than any chemical contaminants the fibres may contain. Furthermore, the carcinogenicity of asbestos may be unrelated to genotoxicity. (author)

  7. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  8. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Leitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  9. Skin carcinomas in organ-transplant recipients : from early oncogenic events to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Ymke Grete Leontien de

    2008-01-01

    Skin carcinomas develop at a high rate in organ-transplant recipients who are kept on immune suppressive drugs to prevent graft rejection. The present study dealt with a broad range of aspects of this elevated carcinoma risk, starting from the earliest oncogenic events to the ultimate therapy. Advan

  10. Type-1-cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibition to induce tumor growth arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquavella, Nicolas; Clever, David; Yu, Zhiya; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Palmer, Douglas C.; Xi, Liqiang; Pflicke, Holger; Ji, Yun; Gros, Alena; Hanada, Ken-ichi; Goldlust, Ian S.; Mehta, Gautam U.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Crompton, Joseph G.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Morrow, James J.; Franco, Zulmarie; Gattinoni, Luca; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Raffeld, Mark; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Both targeted inhibition of oncogenic driver mutations and immune-based therapies show efficacy in treatment of patients with metastatic cancer but responses can be either short-lived or incompletely effective. Oncogene inhibition can augment the efficacy of immune-based therapy but mechanisms by which these two interventions might cooperate are incompletely resolved. Using a novel transplantable BRAFV600E-mutant murine melanoma model (SB-3123), we explore potential mechanisms of synergy between the selective BRAFV600E inhibitor vemurafenib and adoptive cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapy. We found that vemurafenib cooperated with ACT to delay melanoma progression without significantly affecting tumor infiltration or effector function of endogenous or adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells as previously observed. Instead, we found that the T-cell cytokines IFNγ and TNFα synergized with vemurafenib to induce cell-cycle arrest of tumor cells in vitro. This combinatorial effect was recapitulated in human melanoma-derived cell lines and was restricted to cancers bearing a BRAFV600E-mutation. Molecular profiling of treated SB-3123 indicated that the provision of vemurafenib promoted the sensitization of SB-3123 to the anti-proliferative effects of T-cell effector cytokines. The unexpected finding that immune cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibitors to induce growth arrest have major implications for understanding cancer biology at the intersection of oncogenic and immune signaling and provides a basis for design of combinatorial therapeutic approaches for patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:25358764

  11. A single oncogenic enhancer rearrangement causes concomitant EVI1 and GATA2 deregulation in leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gröschel, Stefan; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hoogenboezem, Remco; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; Erpelinck, Claudia; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Havermans, Marije; Avellino, Roberto; van Lom, Kirsten; Rombouts, Elwin J; van Duin, Mark; Döhner, Konstanze; Beverloo, H Berna; Bradner, James E; Döhner, Hartmut; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M; Bindels, Eric M J; de Laat, Wouter; Delwel, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements without gene fusions have been implicated in leukemogenesis by causing deregulation of proto-oncogenes via relocation of cryptic regulatory DNA elements. AML with inv(3)/t(3;3) is associated with aberrant expression of the stem-cell regulator EVI1. Applying functional geno

  12. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  13. Calpain Activity Is Generally Elevated during Transformation but Has Oncogene-Specific Biological Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.O. Carragher

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several oncogene and tumor-suppressor gene products are known substrates for the calpain family of cysteine proteases, and calpain is required for transformation by v-src and tumor invasion. Thus, we have now addressed whether calpain is generally associated with transformation and how calpain contributes to oncogene function. Our results demonstrate that calpain activity is enhanced upon transformation induced by the v-Src, v-Jun, v-Myc, k-Ras, and v-Fos oncoproteins. Furthermore, elevated calpain activity commonly promotes focal adhesion remodelling, disruption of actin cytoskeleton, morphological transformation, and cell migration, although proteolysis of target substrates (such as focal adhesion kinase, talin, and spectrin is differently specified by individual oncoproteins. Interestingly, v-Fos differs from other common oncoproteins in not requiring calpain activity for actin/adhesion remodelling or migration of v-Fos transformed cells. However, anchorage-independent growth of all transformed cells is sensitive to calpain inhibition. In addition, elevated calpain activity contributes to oncogene-induced apoptosis associated with transformation by v-Myc. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that calpain activity is necessary for full cellular transformation induced by common oncoproteins, but has distinct roles in oncogenic events induced by individual transforming proteins. Thus, targeting calpain activity may represent a useful general strategy for interfering with activated protooncogenes in cancer cells.

  14. N-Linked oligosaccharide changes with oncogenic transformation require sialylation of multiantennae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Santer, U.V.; DeSantis, R.; Hård, K.; Kuik, J.A. van; Won, B.; Glick, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Glycopeptides derived from NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and these cells transformed by transfection with human DNA containing oncogene H-ras were analyzed by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy and binding to immobilized lectins. The cells were metabolically labeled with D-[3H]glucosamine or L-[3H]fucose and the gly

  15. Concepts of Classification and Taxonomy Phylogenetic Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraix-Burnet, D.

    2016-05-01

    Phylogenetic approaches to classification have been heavily developed in biology by bioinformaticians. But these techniques have applications in other fields, in particular in linguistics. Their main characteristics is to search for relationships between the objects or species in study, instead of grouping them by similarity. They are thus rather well suited for any kind of evolutionary objects. For nearly fifteen years, astrocladistics has explored the use of Maximum Parsimony (or cladistics) for astronomical objects like galaxies or globular clusters. In this lesson we will learn how it works.

  16. Exploitation of the complement system by oncogenic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus for cell survival and persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Shin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During evolution, herpesviruses have developed numerous, and often very ingenious, strategies to counteract efficient host immunity. Specifically, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV eludes host immunity by undergoing a dormant stage, called latency wherein it expresses a minimal number of viral proteins to evade host immune activation. Here, we show that during latency, KSHV hijacks the complement pathway to promote cell survival. We detected strong deposition of complement membrane attack complex C5b-9 and the complement component C3 activated product C3b on Kaposi's sarcoma spindle tumor cells, and on human endothelial cells latently infected by KSHV, TIME-KSHV and TIVE-LTC, but not on their respective uninfected control cells, TIME and TIVE. We further showed that complement activation in latently KSHV-infected cells was mediated by the alternative complement pathway through down-regulation of cell surface complement regulatory proteins CD55 and CD59. Interestingly, complement activation caused minimal cell death but promoted the survival of latently KSHV-infected cells grown in medium depleted of growth factors. We found that complement activation increased STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation (Y705 of KSHV-infected cells, which was required for the enhanced cell survival. Furthermore, overexpression of either CD55 or CD59 in latently KSHV-infected cells was sufficient to inhibit complement activation, prevent STAT3 Y705 phosphorylation and abolish the enhanced survival of cells cultured in growth factor-depleted condition. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus subverts and exploits the host innate immune system to promote viral persistent infection.

  17. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment does not enhance tumorigenesis in oncogenic K-ras and xenograft mouse models of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponvijay Kombairaju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulforaphane (SFN, an activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2, is a promising chemopreventive agent which is undergoing clinical trial for several diseases. Studies have indicated that there is gain of Nrf2 function in lung cancer and other solid tumors because of mutations in the inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1. More recently, several oncogenes have been shown to activate Nrf2 signaling as the main prosurvival pathway mediating ROS detoxification, senescence evasion, and neoplastic transformation. Thus, it is important to determine if there is any risk of enhanced lung tumorigenesis associated with prolonged administration of SFN using mouse models of cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on oncogenic K-ras (K-ras LSL-G12D -driven lung tumorigenesis. One week post mutant-K-ras expression, mice were treated with SFN (0.5 mg, 5 d/wk for 3 months by means of a nebulizer. Fourteen weeks after mutant K-ras expression (K-ras LSL-G12D , mice were sacrificed, and lung sections were screened for neoplastic foci. Expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was measured using real time RT-PCR. We also determined the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on the growth of preclinical xenograft models using human A549 (with mutant K-ras and Keap1 allele and H1975 [with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR allele] nonsmall cell lung cancer cells. Results: Systemic SFN administration did not promote the growth of K-ras LSL-G12D -induced lung tumors and had no significant effect on the growth of A549 and H1975 established tumor xenografts in nude mice. Interestingly, localized delivery of SFN significantly attenuated the growth of A549 tumors in nude mice, suggesting an Nrf2-independent antitumorigenic activity of SFN. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that prolonged SFN treatment does not promote lung tumorigenesis in various mouse models of lung cancer.

  18. Assessing the subcellular distribution of oncogenic phosphoinositide 3-kinase using microinjection into live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith J. Layton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA lead to an increase in intrinsic phosphoinositide kinase activity, but it is thought that increased access of PI3Kα (phosphoinositide 3-kinase α to its PM (plasma membrane localized substrate is also required for increased levels of downstream PIP3/Akt [phosphoinositide-3,4,5-trisphosphate/also called PKB (protein kinase B] signalling. We have studied the subcellular localization of wild-type and the two most common oncogenic mutants of PI3Kα in cells maintained in growth media, and starved or stimulated cells using a novel method in which PI3Kα is pre-formed as a 1:1 p110α:p85α complex in vitro then introduced into live cells by microinjection. Oncogenic E545K and H1047R mutants did not constitutively interact with membrane lipids in vitro or in cells maintained in 10% (v/v FBS. Following stimulation of RTKs (receptor tyrosine kinases, microinjected PI3Kα was recruited to the PM, but oncogenic forms of PI3Kα were not recruited to the PM to a greater extent and did not reside at the PM longer than the wild-type PI3Kα. Instead, the E545K mutant specifically bound activated Cdc42 in vitro and microinjection of E545K was associated with the formation of cellular protrusions, providing some preliminary evidence that changes in protein–protein interactions may play a role in the oncogenicity of the E545K mutant in addition to the well-known changes in lipid kinase activity.

  19. The paradox of atheoretical classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2016-01-01

    A distinction can be made between “artificial classifications” and “natural classifications,” where artificial classifications may adequately serve some limited purposes, but natural classifications are overall most fruitful by allowing inference and thus many different purposes. There is strong...... support for the view that a natural classification should be based on a theory (and, of course, that the most fruitful theory provides the most fruitful classification). Nevertheless, atheoretical (or “descriptive”) classifications are often produced. Paradoxically, atheoretical classifications may be...... very successful. The best example of a successful “atheoretical” classification is probably the prestigious Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) since its third edition from 1980. Based on such successes one may ask: Should the claim that classifications ideally are natural and...

  20. Information gathering for CLP classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Marcello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation 1272/2008 includes provisions for two types of classification: harmonised classification and self-classification. The harmonised classification of substances is decided at Community level and a list of harmonised classifications is included in the Annex VI of the classification, labelling and packaging Regulation (CLP. If a chemical substance is not included in the harmonised classification list it must be self-classified, based on available information, according to the requirements of Annex I of the CLP Regulation. CLP appoints that the harmonised classification will be performed for carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction substances (CMR substances and for respiratory sensitisers category 1 and for other hazard classes on a case-by-case basis. The first step of classification is the gathering of available and relevant information. This paper presents the procedure for gathering information and to obtain data. The data quality is also discussed.

  1. The oncogenic properties of EWS/WT1 of desmoplastic small round cell tumors are unmasked by loss of p53 in murine embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is characterized by the presence of a fusion protein EWS/WT1, arising from the t (11;22) (p13;q12) translocation. Here we examine the oncogenic properties of two splice variants of EWS/WT1, EWS/WT1-KTS and EWS/WT1 + KTS. We over-expressed both EWS/WT1 variants in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) of wild-type, p53+/- and p53-/- backgrounds and measured effects on cell-proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, clonogenicity after serum withdrawal, and sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and gamma irradiation in comparison to control cells. We examined gene expression profiles in cells expressing EWS/WT1. Finally we validated our key findings in a small series of DSRCT. Neither isoform of EWS/WT1 was sufficient to transform wild-type MEFs however the oncogenic potential of both was unmasked by p53 loss. Expression of EWS/WT1 in MEFs lacking at least one allele of p53 enhanced cell-proliferation, clonogenic survival and anchorage-independent growth. EWS/WT1 expression in wild-type MEFs conferred resistance to cell-cycle arrest after irradiation and daunorubicin induced apoptosis. We show DSRCT commonly have nuclear localization of p53, and copy-number amplification of MDM2/MDMX. Expression of either isoform of EWS/WT1 induced characteristic mRNA expression profiles. Gene-set enrichment analysis demonstrated enrichment of WNT pathway signatures in MEFs expressing EWS/WT1 + KTS. Wnt-activation was validated in cell lines with over-expression of EWS/WT1 and in DSRCT. In conclusion, we show both isoforms of EWS/WT1 have oncogenic potential in MEFs with loss of p53. In addition we provide the first link between EWS/WT1 and Wnt-pathway signaling. These data provide novel insights into the function of the EWS/WT1 fusion protein which characterize DSRCT

  2. Vertebral fracture classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, Paola C.; Tankó, László B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    A novel method for classification and quantification of vertebral fractures from X-ray images is presented. Using pairwise conditional shape models trained on a set of healthy spines, the most likely unfractured shape is estimated for each of the vertebrae in the image. The difference between the true shape and the reconstructed normal shape is an indicator for the shape abnormality. A statistical classification scheme with the two shapes as features is applied to detect, classify, and grade various types of deformities. In contrast with the current (semi-)quantitative grading strategies this method takes the full shape into account, it uses a patient-specific reference by combining population-based information on biological variation in vertebra shape and vertebra interrelations, and it provides a continuous measure of deformity. Good agreement with manual classification and grading is demonstrated on 204 lateral spine radiographs with in total 89 fractures.

  3. Classification problem in CBIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Jaworska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available At present a great deal of research is being done in different aspects of Content-Based Im-age Retrieval (CBIR. Image classification is one of the most important tasks in image re-trieval that must be dealt with. The primary issue we have addressed is: how can the fuzzy set theory be used to handle crisp image data. We propose fuzzy rule-based classification of image objects. To achieve this goal we have built fuzzy rule-based classifiers for crisp data. In this paper we present the results of fuzzy rule-based classification in our CBIR. Further-more, these results are used to construct a search engine taking into account data mining.

  4. Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Jha, Saurabh; Kuhlmann, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    We have publicly released a blinded mix of simulated SNe, with types (Ia, Ib, Ic, II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation is realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). We challenge scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type for each SN. A spectroscopically confirmed subset is provided for training. The goals of this challenge are to (1) learn the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different classification algorithms, (2) use the results to improve classification algorithms, and (3) understand what spectroscopically confirmed sub-...

  5. Bosniak classification system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graumann, Ole; Osther, Susanne Sloth; Karstoft, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Bosniak classification was originally based on computed tomographic (CT) findings. Magnetic resonance (MR) and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) imaging may demonstrate findings that are not depicted at CT, and there may not always be a clear correlation between the findings...... at MR and CEUS imaging and those at CT. PURPOSE: To compare diagnostic accuracy of MR, CEUS, and CT when categorizing complex renal cystic masses according to the Bosniak classification. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From February 2011 to June 2012, 46 complex renal cysts were prospectively evaluated by...... three readers. Each mass was categorized according to the Bosniak classification and CT was chosen as gold standard. Kappa was calculated for diagnostic accuracy and data was compared with pathological results. RESULTS: CT images found 27 BII, six BIIF, seven BIII, and six BIV. Forty-three cysts could...

  6. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Schemes for the classification of dwellings according to different building performances have been proposed in the last years worldwide. The general idea behind these schemes relates to the positive impact a higher label, and thus a better performance, should have. In particular, focusing on sound...... insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms of...... descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal “acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO work item. This paper...

  7. Classification problem in CBIR

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Jaworska

    2013-01-01

    At present a great deal of research is being done in different aspects of Content-Based Im-age Retrieval (CBIR). Image classification is one of the most important tasks in image re-trieval that must be dealt with. The primary issue we have addressed is: how can the fuzzy set theory be used to handle crisp image data. We propose fuzzy rule-based classification of image objects. To achieve this goal we have built fuzzy rule-based classifiers for crisp data. In this paper we present the results ...

  8. Classification of syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhorat, T H

    2000-01-01

    Syringomyelia poses special challenges for the clinician because of its complex symptomatology, uncertain pathogenesis, and multiple options of treatment. The purpose of this study was to classify intramedullary cavities according to their most salient pathological and clinical features. Pathological findings obtained in 175 individuals with tubular cavitations of the spinal cord were correlated with clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in a database of 927 patients. A classification system was developed in which the morbid anatomy, cause, and pathogenesis of these lesions are emphasized. The use of a disease-based classification of syringomyelia facilitates diagnosis and the interpretation of MR imaging findings and provides a guide to treatment. PMID:16676921

  9. Classification des rongeurs

    OpenAIRE

    Mignon, Jacques; Hardouin, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Les lecteurs du Bulletin BEDIM semblent parfois avoir des difficultés avec la classification scientifique des animaux connus comme "rongeurs" dans le langage courant. Vu les querelles existant encore aujourd'hui dans la mise en place de cette classification, nous ne nous en étonnerons guère. La brève synthèse qui suit concerne les animaux faisant ou susceptibles de faire partie du mini-élevage. The note aims at providing the main characteristics of the principal families of rodents relevan...

  10. Neuroblastoma: oncogenic mechanisms and therapeutic exploitation of necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, S; Pieraccioli, M; Peschiaroli, A; Melino, G; Raschellà, G

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial childhood tumor classified in five stages (1, 2, 3, 4 and 4S), two of which (3 and 4) identify chemotherapy-resistant, highly aggressive disease. High-risk NB frequently displays MYCN amplification, mutations in ALK and ATRX, and genomic rearrangements in TERT genes. These NB subtypes are also characterized by reduced susceptibility to programmed cell death induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. The latter feature is a major cause of failure in the treatment of advanced NB patients. Thus, proper reactivation of apoptosis or of other types of programmed cell death pathways in response to treatment is relevant for the clinical management of aggressive forms of NB. In this short review, we will discuss the most relevant genomic rearrangements that define high-risk NB and the role that destabilization of p53 and p73 can have in NB aggressiveness. In addition, we will propose a strategy to stabilize p53 and p73 by using specific inhibitors of their ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Finally, we will introduce necroptosis as an alternative strategy to kill NB cells and increase tumor immunogenicity. PMID:26633716

  11. Oncogenic micro-RNAs and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eGrange

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor formation is a complex process that occurs in different steps and involves many cell types, including tumor cells, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells, which interact to promote growth of the tumor mass and metastasization. Epigenetic alterations occurring in transformed cells result in de-regulation of miRNA expression (a class of small non-coding RNA that regulates multiple functions which contributes to tumorigenesis. The specific miRNAs, which have an aberrant expression in tumors, are defined as oncomiRNAs, and may be either over- or under-expressed, but down-regulation is most commonly observed.Renal cell carcinoma is a frequent form of urologic tumor, associated with an alteration of multiple signaling pathways. Many molecules involved in the progression of renal cell carcinomas, such as HIF, VEGF or mTOR, are possible targets of deregulated miRNAs. Within tumor mass, the cancer stem cell population is a fundamental component that promotes tumor growth. The cancer stem cell hypothesis postulates that cancer stem cells have the unique ability to self-renew and to maintain tumor growth and metastasis. Cancer stem cells present in renal cell carcinoma were shown to express the mesenchymal stem cell marker CD105 and to exhibit self-renewal and clonogenic properties, as well as the ability to generate serially transplantable tumors. The phenotype of cancer stem cell has been related to the potential to undergo the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which has been linked to the expression pattern of tumorigenic miRNAs or down-regulation of anti-tumor miRNAs. In addition, the pattern of circulating miRNAs may allow discrimination between healthy and tumor patients. Therefore, a miRNA signature may be used as a tumor biomarker for cancer diagnosis, as well as to classify the risk of relapse and metastasis, and for a guide for therapy.

  12. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft...

  13. Shark Teeth Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tom; Creel, Sally; Lee, Velda

    2009-01-01

    On a recent autumn afternoon at Harmony Leland Elementary in Mableton, Georgia, students in a fifth-grade science class investigated the essential process of classification--the act of putting things into groups according to some common characteristics or attributes. While they may have honed these skills earlier in the week by grouping their own…

  14. Classification system: Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    Although people have always classified soils, it is only since the mid 19th century that soil classification emerged as an important topic within soil science. It forced soil scientists to think systematically about soils and its genesis and developed to facilitate communication between soil scienti

  15. Text document classification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novovičová, Jana

    č. 62 (2005), s. 53-54. ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2075302; GA AV ČR KSK1019101; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : document representation * categorization * classification Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  16. Automated Stellar Spectral Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer-Jones, Coryn; Irwin, Mike; von Hippel, Ted

    1996-05-01

    Stellar classification has long been a useful tool for probing important astrophysical phenomena. Beyond simply categorizing stars it yields fundamental stellar parameters, acts as a probe of galactic abundance distributions and gives a first foothold on the cosmological distance ladder. The MK system in particular has survived on account of its robustness to changes in the calibrations of the physical parameters. Nonetheless, if stellar classification is to continue as a useful tool in stellar surveys, then it must adapt to keep pace with the large amounts of data which will be acquired as magnitude limits are pushed ever deeper. We are working on a project to automate the multi-parameter classification of visual stellar spectra, using artificial neural networks and other techniques. Our techniques have been developed with 10,000 spectra (B Analysis as a front-end compression of the data. Our continuing work also looks at the application of synthetic spectra to the direct classification of spectra in terms of the physical parameters of Teff, log g, and [Fe/H].

  17. Classification of waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.P.; Sauer, M.; Rojahn, T. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk GmbH, Kahl am Main (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    A barrel gamma scanning unit has been in use at the VAK for the classification of radioactive waste materials since 1998. The unit provides the facility operator with the data required for classification of waste barrels. Once these data have been entered into the AVK data processing system, the radiological status of raw waste as well as pre-treated and processed waste can be tracked from the point of origin to the point at which the waste is delivered to a final storage. Since the barrel gamma scanning unit was commissioned in 1998, approximately 900 barrels have been measured and the relevant data required for classification collected and analyzed. Based on the positive results of experience in the use of the mobile barrel gamma scanning unit, the VAK now offers the classification of barrels as a service to external users. Depending upon waste quantity accumulation, this measurement unit offers facility operators a reliable and time-saving and cost-effective means of identifying and documenting the radioactivity inventory of barrels scheduled for final storage. (orig.)

  18. The Classification Conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Charles R.

    1983-01-01

    Argues against the five-kingdom scheme of classification as using inconsistent criteria, ending up with divisions that are forced, not natural. Advocates an approach using cell type/complexity and modification of the metabolic machinery, recommending the five-kingdom scheme as starting point for class discussion on taxonomy and its conceptual…

  19. Improving Student Question Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

  20. Classifications in popular music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Venrooij; V. Schmutz

    2015-01-01

    The categorical system of popular music, such as genre categories, is a highly differentiated and dynamic classification system. In this article we present work that studies different aspects of these categorical systems in popular music. Following the work of Paul DiMaggio, we focus on four questio

  1. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre;

    possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics in...

  2. Classification of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lotte; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Hosbond, Susanne Elisabeth;

    2013-01-01

    The classification of myocardial infarction into 5 types was introduced in 2007 as an important component of the universal definition. In contrast to the plaque rupture-related type 1 myocardial infarction, type 2 myocardial infarction is considered to be caused by an imbalance between demand and...

  3. Oncogenic pathways and myrna: effects on messenger's turnover, regulation by synthetic oligo ribonucleotides and therapeutic applications in experimental settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project has been focusing on molecular mechanisms determining the rate of RNA degradation eventually important to regulate gene expression and phenotype at post transcription level. Exogenous synthetic oligonucleotides targeting the relevant domains of b- RNA degradation could stabilize the transcript, efficiently enhance gene expression and alter the cellular phenotype accordingly. The experimental model was the bcl2 RNA (b-RNA), its molecular mechanisms of degradation and the functional effects of turnover modifications by exogenous means

  4. Translational approaches targeting the p53 pathway for anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor blocks cancer development by triggering apoptosis or cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress or DNA damage. Consequently, the p53 signalling pathway is virtually always inactivated in human cancer cells. This unifying feature has commenced tremendous efforts to develop p53-based anti-cancer therapies. Different strategies exist that are adapted to the mechanisms of p53 inactivation. In p53-mutated tumours, delivery of wild-type p53 by adenovirus-based gen...

  5. Development of Drugs Targeting the PI3K Signalling Pathway in Leukaemias and Lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Arcaro

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) family of signalling enzymes play a key role in the transduction of signals from activated cell surface receptors controlling cell growth and proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. The intracellular signalling pathway from activated receptors to PI3K and its downstream targets v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is very frequently deregulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in human...

  6. ATR pathway inhibition is synthetically lethal in cancer cells with ERCC1 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Kavanaugh, Gina M.; Cortez, David

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR and its effector kinase CHEK1 are required for cancer cells to survive oncogene-induced replication stress. ATR inhibitors exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with deficiencies in the DNA damage response enzymes ATM and XRCC1 and with overexpression of the cell cycle kinase Cyclin E. Here we report a systematic screen to identify synthetic lethal interactions with ATR-pathway targeted drugs, rationalized by their predicted therapeutic utility in the oncolo...

  7. V-cbl, an oncogene from a dual-recombinant murine retrovirus that induces early B-lineage lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cas NS-1 is an acutely transforming murine retrovirus that induces pre-B and pro-B cell lymphomas. Molecular cloning showed it was generated from the ecotropic Cas-Br-M virus by sequential recombinations with endogenous retroviral sequences and a cellular oncogene. The oncogene sequence shows no homology with known oncogenes but some similarity to the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. A 100-kDa gag-cbl fusion protein, with no detectable kinase activity, is responsible for the cellular transformation. The cellular homologue of v-cbl, present in mouse and human DNA, is expressed in a range of hemopoietic lineages

  8. [Classification of primary bone tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominok, G W; Frege, J

    1986-01-01

    An expanded classification for bone tumors is presented based on the well known international classification as well as earlier systems. The current status and future trends in this area are discussed. PMID:3461626

  9. Multiple Sparse Representations Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan; Klein, Stefan S; Niessen, Wiro J; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Sparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small patch surrounding it. Using these patches, a dictionary is trained for each class in a supervised fashion. Commonly, redundant/overcomplete dictionaries are trained and image patches are sparsely represented by a linear combination of only a few of the dictionary elements. Given a set of trained dictionaries, a new patch is sparse coded using each of them, and subsequently assigned to the class whose dictionary yields the minimum residual energy. We propose a generalization of this scheme. The method, which we call multiple sparse representations classification (mSRC), is based on the observation that an overcomplete, class specific dictionary is capable of generating multiple accurate and independent estimates of a patch belonging to the class. So instead of finding a single sparse representation of a patch for each dictionary, we find multiple, and the corresponding residual energies provides an enhanced statistic which is used to improve classification. We demonstrate the efficacy of mSRC for three example applications: pixelwise classification of texture images, lumen segmentation in carotid artery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bifurcation point detection in carotid artery MRI. We compare our method with conventional SRC, K-nearest neighbor, and support vector machine classifiers. The results show that mSRC outperforms SRC and the other reference methods. In addition, we present an extensive evaluation of the effect of the main mSRC parameters: patch size, dictionary size, and

  10. Efficient Fingercode Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Wei; Law, Kwok-Yan; Gollmann, Dieter; Chung, Siu-Leung; Li, Jian-Bin; Sun, Jia-Guang

    In this paper, we present an efficient fingerprint classification algorithm which is an essential component in many critical security application systems e. g. systems in the e-government and e-finance domains. Fingerprint identification is one of the most important security requirements in homeland security systems such as personnel screening and anti-money laundering. The problem of fingerprint identification involves searching (matching) the fingerprint of a person against each of the fingerprints of all registered persons. To enhance performance and reliability, a common approach is to reduce the search space by firstly classifying the fingerprints and then performing the search in the respective class. Jain et al. proposed a fingerprint classification algorithm based on a two-stage classifier, which uses a K-nearest neighbor classifier in its first stage. The fingerprint classification algorithm is based on the fingercode representation which is an encoding of fingerprints that has been demonstrated to be an effective fingerprint biometric scheme because of its ability to capture both local and global details in a fingerprint image. We enhance this approach by improving the efficiency of the K-nearest neighbor classifier for fingercode-based fingerprint classification. Our research firstly investigates the various fast search algorithms in vector quantization (VQ) and the potential application in fingerprint classification, and then proposes two efficient algorithms based on the pyramid-based search algorithms in VQ. Experimental results on DB1 of FVC 2004 demonstrate that our algorithms can outperform the full search algorithm and the original pyramid-based search algorithms in terms of computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy.

  11. Molecular Pathways: Targeting ATR in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnitz, Larry M; Zou, Lee

    2015-11-01

    The human ATR gene encodes a kinase that is activated by DNA damage and replication stress as a central transducer of a checkpoint signaling pathway. Once activated, ATR phosphorylates multiple substrates, including the kinase Chk1, to regulate cell-cycle progression, replication fork stability, and DNA repair. These events promote cell survival during replication stress and in cells with DNA damage. Accordingly, there has been the tantalizing possibility that ATR inhibitors would be therapeutically useful, especially if they were more effective in tumor versus normal cells. Indeed, multiple studies have demonstrated that alterations that promote tumorigenesis, such as defects in the ATM-p53 pathway, constitutive oncogene activation, and acquisition of the alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway, render tumor cells sensitive to ATR inhibitor monotherapy and/or increase the synergy between ATR inhibitors and genotoxic chemotherapies. Now, nearly two decades after the discovery of ATR, two highly selective and potent ATR inhibitors, AZD6738 and VX-970, are in early-phase clinical trials either as monotherapies or paired with a variety of genotoxic chemotherapies. These trials will generate important insights into the effects of ATR inhibition in humans and the potential role of inhibiting this kinase in the treatment of human malignancies. PMID:26362996

  12. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J;

    2008-01-01

    report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine....... Several studies have shown great interexaminer and intraexaminer variability in the assessment of the presence or absence and the grade of oral epithelial dysplasia. The Working Group considered the two class classification (no/questionable/ mild - low risk; moderate or severe - implying high risk) and...

  13. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. PMID:26861606

  14. The paradox of atheoretical classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2016-01-01

    sometimes termed “descriptive” classifications). Paradoxically atheoretical classifications may be very successful. The best example of a successful “atheoretical” classification is probably the prestigious Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) since its third edition from 1980. On the...

  15. Etiologic Classification in Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Ay

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is an etiologically heterogenous disorder. Classification of ischemic stroke etiology into categories with discrete phenotypic, therapeutic, and prognostic features is indispensible to generate consistent information from stroke research. In addition, a functional classification of stroke etiology is critical to ensure unity among physicians and comparability among studies. There are two major approaches to etiologic classification in stroke. Phenotypic systems define subtypes...

  16. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far. PMID:26230535

  17. Role of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in cellular transformation and ARF repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Merghoub, Taha; Guernah, Ilhem; Zelent, Arthur; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-20

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodelling and histone deacetylation has been postulated to represent a driving force underlying tumorigenesis because histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to be effective in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transcriptional derepression would be linked to tumour suppression are poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor Pokemon (encoded by the Zbtb7 gene) as a critical factor in oncogenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Zbtb7 are completely refractory to oncogene-mediated cellular transformation. Conversely, Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene ARF through direct binding. We find that Pokemon is aberrantly overexpressed in human cancers and that its expression levels predict biological behaviour and clinical outcome. Pokemon's critical role in cellular transformation makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15662416

  18. Radiosensitivity and ras oncogene expression in preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells to the cytotoxic effects of high- and low-LET radiation, and the modulating effect of the viral ras oncogene on this sensitivity were determined. Two lines of preneoplastic RTE cells have the same responsiveness to high-LET radiation, but differ in their responsiveness to a transfected ras oncogene and in their sensitivities to low-LET radiation. Cells that respond to ras by becoming neoplastic are more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of low-LET radiation than cells that are not transformable by ras. The radiosensitivity of ras-responsive cells was not altered by transfection with ras. However, transfection of ras-non responsive cells with ras decreased their sensitivity to low-LET radiation. These data suggest that the ability of cells to repair radiation damage changes as they progress to neoplasia. (author)

  19. Plac8 Links Oncogenic Mutations to Regulation of Autophagy and Is Critical to Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conan Kinsey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in p53 and RAS potently cooperate in oncogenic transformation, and correspondingly, these genetic alterations frequently coexist in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and other human cancers. Previously, we identified a set of genes synergistically activated by combined RAS and p53 mutations as frequent downstream mediators of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that the synergistically activated gene Plac8 is critical for pancreatic cancer growth. Silencing of Plac8 in cell lines suppresses tumor formation by blocking autophagy, a process essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis in PDA, and genetic inactivation in an engineered mouse model inhibits PDA progression. We show that Plac8 is a critical regulator of the autophagic machinery, localizing to the lysosomal compartment and facilitating lysosome-autophagosome fusion. Plac8 thus provides a mechanistic link between primary oncogenic mutations and the induction of autophagy, a central mechanism of metabolic reprogramming, during PDA progression.

  20. Sequence Classification: 892122 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available netic level; participates in a signaling pathway required for optimal cell wall integrity; homolog of mammalian kinase SGK; Ypk2p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6323751 ...

  1. Sequence Classification: 894035 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available dependent methylglyoxal reductase (D-lactaldehyde dehydrogenase); stress induced (osmotic, ionic, oxidative, heat shock and heavy met...als); regulated by the HOG pathway; Gre2p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324421 ...

  2. Sequence Classification: 891406 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is regulated by the available nitrogen source; Ser2p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6321647 ... ...oserine phosphatase of the phosphoglycerate pathway, involved in serine and glycine biosynthesis, expression

  3. Transcription-responsive regulation of c-myc proto-oncogene – structural and biophysical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cukier, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The Far-UpStream Element (FUSE) regulatory system tightly controls the expression of c-myc proto-oncogene – a master regulator of cellular proliferation and differentiation. The FUSE mechanism relies on the inter-molecular interactions between a DNA regulatory sequence – the FUSE, a transcriptional activator – FUSEBinding Protein (FBP) and a transcriptional repressor – FBP-Interacting Repressor (FIR). The FUSE DNA element serves as a sensor of the level of ongoing c-myc tran...

  4. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, C J; Casas-Selves, M.; Kim, J; Zaberezhnyy, V.; Aghili, L.; Daniel, A.E.; Jimenez, L; Azam, T.; McNamee, E.N.; Clambey, E.T.; Klawitter, J; Serkova, N.J.; Tan, A.C.; Dinarello, C A; DeGregori, J.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV1...

  5. Distinct and Competitive Regulatory Patterns of Tumor Suppressor Genes and Oncogenes in Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Background So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and oncogenes (OCGs) that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs) to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation...

  6. Targeting the oncogenic protein beta-catenin to enhance chemotherapy outcome against solid human cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Rempinski Donald R; Saifo Maher S; Rustum Youcef M; Azrak Rami G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Beta-catenin is a multifunctional oncogenic protein that contributes fundamentally to cell development and biology. Elevation in expression and activity of β-catenin has been implicated in many cancers and associated with poor prognosis. Beta-catenin is degraded in the cytoplasm by glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) through phosphorylation. Cell growth and proliferation is associated with β-catenin translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This laboratory wa...

  7. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Serena Bonomi; Stefania Gallo; Morena Catillo; Daniela Pignataro; Giuseppe Biamonti; Claudia Ghigna

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer ...

  8. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis.

  9. Pro-oncogene Pokemon promotes breast cancer progression by upregulating survivin expression

    OpenAIRE

    ZU, XUYU; Ma, Jun; Liu, Hongxia; Liu, Feng; Tan, Chunyan; Yu, Lingling; Wang, Jue; Xie, Zhenhua; Cao, Deliang; Jiang, Yuyang

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Pokemon is an oncogenic transcription factor involved in cell growth, differentiation and oncogenesis, but little is known about its role in human breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to reveal the role of Pokemon in breast cancer progression and patient survival and to understand its underlying mechanisms. Methods Tissue microarray analysis of breast cancer tissues from patients with complete clinicopathological data and more than 20 years of follow-up were used to evaluate Po...

  10. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K.; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut ) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer i...

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine-phosphorylated protein substrates of oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanner, S B; Reynolds, A B; Vines, R R; Parsons, J T

    1990-01-01

    Cellular transformation by oncogenic retroviruses encoding protein tyrosine kinases coincides with the tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of multiple protein substrates. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein of 120 kDa, p120, correlated with src transformation in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Additionally, we previously identified two phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins, p130 and p110, that formed stable complexes with activated variants of pp60src, the ...

  12. Identification of potential human oncogenes by mapping the common viral integration sites in avian nephroblastoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pajer, Petr; Pečenka, Vladimír; Králová, Jarmila; Karafiát, Vít; Průková, Dana; Zemanová, Zdeňka; Kodet, R.; Dvořák, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 1 (2006), s. 78-86. ISSN 0008-5472 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : avian nephroblastoma * common sites of integration * human oncogenes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.656, year: 2006

  13. Telomerase flies the coop: the telomerase RNA component as a viral-encoded oncogene

    OpenAIRE

    Artandi, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Telomerase, the enzyme that elongates our telomeres, is crucial for cancer development based on extensive analyses of human cells, human cancers, and mouse models. New data now suggest that a viral telomerase RNA gene encoded by Marek's disease virus (MDV), an oncogenic herpesvirus of chickens, promotes tumor formation. These findings highlight the importance of telomerase in cancer and raise new questions regarding the mechanisms by which the telomerase RNA component supports tumorigenesis.

  14. Oncogene amplification detected by in situ hybridization in radiation induced rat skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncogene activation may play an important role in radiation induced carcinogenesis. C-myc oncogene amplification was detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors, including squamous and basal cell carcinomas. In situ hybridization was performed with a biotinylated human c-myc third exon probe, visualized with an avidin-biotinylated alkaline phosphate detection system. No c-myc oncogene amplification was detected in normal rat skin at very early times after exposure to ionizing radiation, which is consistent with the view that c-myc amplification is more likely to be related to carcinogenesis than to normal cell proliferation. The incorporation of tritiated thymidine into the DNA of rat skin cells showed that the proliferation of epidermal cells reached a peak on the seventh day after exposure to ionizing radiation and then decreased. No connection between the proliferation of epidermal cell and c-myc oncogene amplification in normal or irradiated rat skin was found. The results indicated that c-myc amplification as measured by in situ hybridization was correlated with the Southern bolt results, but only some of the cancer cells were amplified. The c-myc positive cells were distributed randomly within regions of the tumor and exhibited a more uniform nuclear structure in comparison to the more vacuolated c-myc negative cells. No c-myc signal was detected in unirradiated normal skin or in irradiated skin cells near the tumors. C-myc amplification appears to be cell or cell cycle specific within radiation-induced carcinomas. 28 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Role of 18F FDG PET scan to localize tumor in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome of renal phosphate wasting which is usually caused by phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors. Conventional radiologic techniques usually fail to detect these small, slow growing neoplasms located at unusual sites. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of 18F FDG PET imaging in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients (8 males and 7 females) (mean age: 38.5 ± 12.2 years) with clinical and biochemical evidence of oncogenic osteomalacia were subjected to 'total' whole body 18F FDG PET scan including both limbs and skull views. The images were reconstructed and the final output was displayed as per the standard institution protocol. Results: 18F FDG PET imaging localized suspicious hypermetabolic foci of SUVmax ranging from 1.4 to 3.8 (Mean ± S.D.: 2.39 ± 0.63) suggesting presence of occult tumor in 11 of 15 patients. The suspected foci were localized in lower limbs in ten patients and in the petrous temporal region of skull in 1 patient. FDG localized tumors were histopathologically correlated in 6 patients who underwent surgical biopsy/excision after correlative radiological investigations. Four of these patients were cured after surgical excision while partial surgical excision/biopsy was performed in two patients. Conclusions: 18F FDG PET imaging is a promising technique for detection of occult tumors in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia. It is mandatory to include limbs in the field as these tumors are common in limbs and may be easily missed. Preoperative localization increases odds for cure after surgical removal of tumor

  16. Neutralizing monoclonal antibody against ras oncogene product p21 which impairs guanine nucleotide exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, S; Clanton, D J; Satoh, T.; Nakamura, S.; Kaziro, Y; Kawakita, M; Shih, T Y

    1987-01-01

    The neutralizing monoclonal antibody Y13-259 severely hampers the nucleotide exchange reaction between p21-bound and exogenous guanine nucleotides but does not interfere with the association of GDP to p21. These results suggest that the nucleotide exchange reaction is critical for p21 function. Interestingly, the v-ras p21 has a much faster dissociation rate than the p21 of the c-ras proto-oncogene.

  17. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis

  18. Genomic profiling identifies TITF1 as a lineage-specific oncogene amplified in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kwei, KA; Kim, YH; Girard, L; Kao, J; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; Salari, K; Lee, J.; Choi, Y-L; Sato, M.; Wang, P.; Hernandez-Boussard, T; Gazdar, AF; Petersen, I. (Inga); Minna, JD; Pollack, JR

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death, where the amplification of oncogenes contributes to tumorigenesis. Genomic profiling of 128 lung cancer cell lines and tumors revealed frequent focal DNA amplification at cytoband 14q13.3, a locus not amplified in other tumor types. The smallest region of recurrent amplification spanned the homeobox transcription factor TITF1 (thyroid transcription factor 1; also called NKX2-1), previously linked to normal lung development and function. When amp...

  19. Mechanisms that link the oncogenic epithelial–mesenchymal transition to suppression of anoikis

    OpenAIRE

    Frisch, Steven M.; Schaller, Michael; Cieply, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to tumor progression in various context-dependent ways, including increased metastatic potential, expansion of cancer stem cell subpopulations, chemo-resistance and disease recurrence. One of the hallmarks of EMT is resistance of tumor cells to anoikis. This resistance contributes to metastasis and is a defining property not only of EMT but also of cancer stem cells. Here, we review the mechanistic coupling between EMT and resi...

  20. Therapeutic targeting of the focal adhesion complex prevents oncogenic TGF-β signaling and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Michael K.; William P. Schiemann

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Mammary tumorigenesis is associated with the increased expression of several proteins in the focal adhesion complex, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and various integrins. Aberrant expression of these molecules occurs concomitant with the conversion of TGF-β function from a tumor suppressor to a tumor promoter. We previously showed that interaction between β3 integrin and TβR-II facilitates TGF-β-mediated oncogenic signaling, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and met...

  1. DNA vaccination protective activity in congenic chickens against v-.I.src ./I.oncogene induced tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jan

    Lugano, 2001, s. -. [International Workshop on Retroviral Pathogenesis /13./. Lugano (CH), 26.10.2001-29.10.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : retroviruses * immunity * oncogenes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Panaxquin quefolium diolsaponins dose-dependently inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by downregulating proto-oncogene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that PQDS may reduce AngII-stimulated VSMC proliferation by suppressing the expression of proto-oncogenes. These results may provide insights for the development of novel traditional Chinese medicines to prevent atherosclerosis.

  3. Unintentional weakness of cancers: the MEK-ERK pathway as a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in molecular targeted therapies have greatly improved treatment outcomes for cancers driven by oncogenic mutations. Despite initial and dramatic clinical responses, tumors eventually acquire resistance to these targeted therapies, showing flexible and diverse responses. Interestingly, cancer cells sometimes overadapt to the drug treatment environment, leading to a state in which cancer cells cannot survive without the drug. This interesting phenomenon (often called "drug dependency" or "drug addiction") is exemplified in preclinical acquired resistance models of BRAF-mutated melanoma treated with vemurafenib and EGFR-mutated lung cancer treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A number of intriguing parallels in drug-addicted cancers became apparent in a comparison of the two models: (i) overexpression of driver oncogenes as causes of acquired resistance; (ii) overexpression of driver oncogenes causing MEK-ERK hyperactivation under drug-free conditions; (iii) hyperactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway as critical to this drug addiction phenomenon; (iv) ongoing dependence on the oncogenic driver; and (v) morphologic changes in resistant cells under drug-free conditions. This Perspective article not only focuses on this interesting and peculiar phenomenon but also discusses weapon strategies to exploit this unintentional weakness of cancers. PMID:23900694

  4. Opposing activities of the Ras and Hippo pathways converge on regulation of YAP protein turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Chen, Qingfeng; Zhang, Rui; Hagman, Zandra; Voorhoeve, P Mathijs; Cohen, Stephen M

    2014-11-01

    Cancer genomes accumulate numerous genetic and epigenetic modifications. Yet, human cellular transformation can be accomplished by a few genetically defined elements. These elements activate key pathways required to support replicative immortality and anchorage independent growth, a predictor of tumorigenesis in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key barrier to Ras-mediated cellular transformation. The Hippo pathway targets YAP1 for degradation via the βTrCP-SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. In contrast, the Ras pathway acts oppositely, to promote YAP1 stability through downregulation of the ubiquitin ligase complex substrate recognition factors SOCS5/6. Depletion of SOCS5/6 or upregulation of YAP1 can bypass the requirement for oncogenic Ras in anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. Through the YAP1 target, Amphiregulin, Ras activates the endogenous EGFR pathway, which is required for transformation. Thus, the oncogenic activity of Ras(V12) depends on its ability to counteract Hippo pathway activity, creating a positive feedback loop, which depends on stabilization of YAP1. PMID:25180228

  5. Mutant p53 - heat shock response oncogenic cooperation: a new mechanism of cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evguenia eAlexandrova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main tumor suppressor function of p53 as a ‘guardian of the genome’ is to respond to cellular stress by transcriptional activation of apoptosis, growth arrest or senescence in damaged cells. Not surprisingly, mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in human cancers. Importantly, mutant p53 (mutp53 proteins not only lose their wild-type tumor suppressor activity, but also can actively promote tumor development. Two main mechanisms accounting for mutp53 proto-oncogenic activity are inhibition of the wild-type p53 in a dominant-negative fashion and gain of additional oncogenic activities known as gain-of-function (GOF. Here we discuss a novel mechanism of mutp53 GOF, which relies on its oncogenic cooperation with the heat shock machinery. This coordinated adaptive mechanism renders cancer cells more resistant to proteotoxic stress and provides both, a strong survival advantage to cancer cells and a promising means for therapeutic intervention.

  6. p53 mutations cooperate with oncogenic Kras to promote adenocarcinoma from pancreatic ductal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J M; Hendley, A M; Lafaro, K J; Pruski, M A; Jones, N C; Alsina, J; Younes, M; Maitra, A; McAllister, F; Iacobuzio-Donahue, C A; Leach, S D

    2016-08-11

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, with virtually all patients eventually succumbing to their disease. Mutations in p53 have been documented in >50% of pancreatic cancers. Owing to the high incidence of p53 mutations in PanIN 3 lesions and pancreatic tumors, we interrogated the comparative ability of adult pancreatic acinar and ductal cells to respond to oncogenic Kras and mutant Tp53(R172H) using Hnf1b:CreER(T2) and Mist1:CreER(T2) mice. These studies involved co-activation of a membrane-tethered GFP lineage label, allowing for direct visualization and isolation of cells undergoing Kras and mutant p53 activation. Kras activation in Mist1(+) adult acinar cells resulted in brisk PanIN formation, whereas no evidence of pancreatic neoplasia was observed for up to 6 months following Kras activation in Hnf1beta(+) adult ductal cells. In contrast to the lack of response to oncogenic Kras alone, simultaneous activation of Kras and mutant p53 in adult ductal epithelium generated invasive PDAC in 75% of mice as early as 2.5 months after tamoxifen administration. These data demonstrate that pancreatic ductal cells, whereas exhibiting relative resistance to oncogenic Kras alone, can serve as an effective cell of origin for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in the setting of gain-of-function mutations in p53. PMID:26592447

  7. Oncogene-mediated downregulation of RECK, a novel transformation suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasahara R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The RECK gene was initially isolated as a transformation suppressor gene encoding a novel membrane-anchored glycoprotein and later found to suppress tumor invasion and metastasis by regulating matrix metalloproteinase-9. Its expression is ubiquitous in normal tissues, but undetectable in many tumor cell lines and in fibroblastic lines transformed by various oncogenes. The RECK gene promoter has been cloned and characterized. One of the elements responsible for the oncogene-mediated downregulation of mouse RECK gene is the Sp1 site, where the Sp1 and Sp3 factors bind. Sp1 transcription factor family is involved in the basal level of promoter activity of many genes, as well as in dynamic regulation of gene expression; in a majority of cases as a positive regulator, or, as exemplified by the oncogene-mediated suppression of RECK gene expression, as a negative transcription regulator. The molecular mechanisms of the downregulation of mouse RECK gene and other tumor suppressor genes are just beginning to be uncovered. Understanding the regulation of these genes may help to develop strategies to restore their expression in tumor cells and, hence, suppress the cells' malignant behavior.

  8. Cellular oncogene expression following exposure of mice to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the effects of total body exposure of BCF1 mice to γ-rays (300 cGy) in modulating expression of cellular oncogenes in both gut and liver tissues. We selected specific cellular oncogenes (c-fos, c-myc, c-src, and c-H-ras), based on their normal expression in liver and gut tissues from untreated mice. As early as 5 min. following whole body exposure of BCF1 mice to γ-rays we detected induction of mRNA specific for c-src and c-H-ras in both liver and gut tissues. c-fos RNA was slightly decreased in accumulation in gut but was unaffected in liver tissue from irradiated mice relative to untreated controls. c-myc mRNA accumulation was unaffected in all tissues examined. These experiments document that modulation of cellular oncogene expression can occur as an early event in tissues following irradiation and suggest that this modulation may play a role in radiation-induced carcinogenesis

  9.  Oncogenic osteomalacia and its symptoms: hypophosphatemia, bone pain and pathological fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Kaniuka-Jakubowska

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available  Oncogenic osteomalacia (OOM is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome induced by tumor produced phosphaturic factors, i.e. phosphatonins. The disorder is characterized by renal tubular phosphate loss, secondary to this process hypophosphatemia and defective production of active form of vitamin D. The clinical course of oncogenic osteomalacia is characterized by bone pain, pathological fractures, muscle weakness and general fatigue. Osteomalacia-associated tumors are usually located in the upper and lower limbs, with half of the lesions primarily situated in the bones. Most of them are small, slow-growing tumors. Their insignificant size and various location coupled with rare occurrence of the disease and non-specificity of clinical symptoms lead to difficulties in reaching a diagnosis, which is often time-consuming and requires a number of additional tests. The average time between the appearance of the first symptoms and the establishment of an accurate diagnosis and the beginning of treatment is over 2.5 years. The aim of this study is to discuss the pathophysiology of disease symptoms, pathomorphology of tumors, diagnostic methods and treatment of oncogenic osteomalacia.

  10. Development of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for oncogenic human papillomavirus types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Martha J; Seitz, Hanna; Towne, Victoria; Müller, Martin; Finnefrock, Adam C

    2014-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for all cervical cancers, a significant number of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Two licensed vaccines offer protection against the most prevalent oncogenic types, 16 and 18, responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and one of these also offers protection against types 6 and 11, responsible for 90% of genital warts. The vaccines are comprised of recombinantly expressed major capsid proteins that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) and prevent infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies. Adding the other frequently identified oncogenic types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 to a vaccine would increase the coverage against HPV-induced cancers to approximately 90%. We describe the generation and characterization of panels of monoclonal antibodies to these five additional oncogenic HPV types, and the selection of antibody pairs that were high affinity and type specific and recognized conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. Such characteristics make these antibodies useful tools for monitoring the production and potency of a prototype vaccine as well as monitoring vaccine-induced immune responses in the clinic. PMID:24574536

  11. Synthetic lethal interaction between oncogenic KRAS dependency and STK33 suppression in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Dunn, Ian F; Schinzel, Anna C; Barbie, David A; Kim, So Young; Silver, Serena J; Tamayo, Pablo; Wadlow, Raymond C; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Döhner, Konstanze; Bullinger, Lars; Sandy, Peter; Boehm, Jesse S; Root, David E; Jacks, Tyler; Hahn, William C; Gilliland, D Gary

    2009-05-29

    An alternative to therapeutic targeting of oncogenes is to perform "synthetic lethality" screens for genes that are essential only in the context of specific cancer-causing mutations. We used high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) to identify synthetic lethal interactions in cancer cells harboring mutant KRAS, the most commonly mutated human oncogene. We find that cells that are dependent on mutant KRAS exhibit sensitivity to suppression of the serine/threonine kinase STK33 irrespective of tissue origin, whereas STK33 is not required by KRAS-independent cells. STK33 promotes cancer cell viability in a kinase activity-dependent manner by regulating the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis mediated through S6K1-induced inactivation of the death agonist BAD selectively in mutant KRAS-dependent cells. These observations identify STK33 as a target for treatment of mutant KRAS-driven cancers and demonstrate the potential of RNAi screens for discovering functional dependencies created by oncogenic mutations that may enable therapeutic intervention for cancers with "undruggable" genetic alterations. PMID:19490892

  12. Sound classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    needed, and a European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs 2009-2013, one of the main objectives being to prepare a proposal for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality......National schemes for sound classification of dwellings exist in more than ten countries in Europe, typically published as national standards. The schemes define quality classes reflecting different levels of acoustical comfort. Main criteria concern airborne and impact sound insulation between...... dwellings, facade sound insulation and installation noise. The schemes have been developed, implemented and revised gradually since the early 1990s. However, due to lack of coordination between countries, there are significant discrepancies, and new standards and revisions continue to increase the diversity...

  13. Soil Classification Using GATree

    CERN Document Server

    Bhargavi, P

    2010-01-01

    This paper details the application of a genetic programming framework for classification of decision tree of Soil data to classify soil texture. The database contains measurements of soil profile data. We have applied GATree for generating classification decision tree. GATree is a decision tree builder that is based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs). The idea behind it is rather simple but powerful. Instead of using statistic metrics that are biased towards specific trees we use a more flexible, global metric of tree quality that try to optimize accuracy and size. GATree offers some unique features not to be found in any other tree inducers while at the same time it can produce better results for many difficult problems. Experimental results are presented which illustrate the performance of generating best decision tree for classifying soil texture for soil data set.

  14. Avian erythroblastosis virus E26: only one (myb) of two cell-derived coding regions is necessary for oncogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Y.; Duesberg, P

    1994-01-01

    The oncogene hypothesis postulates that mutated cellular genes, termed proto-onc genes, function as cancer genes because they are related to retroviral onc genes. However, in contrast to retroviral onc genes, mutated proto-onc genes from cancers are not sufficient for carcinogenesis. Therefore, it has been proposed that mutated proto-onc genes depend on other proto-onc genes for carcinogenesis. Since the oncogene of the avian leukemia virus E26 includes coding regions derived from two cellula...

  15. Short Text Classification: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Song

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the recent explosive growth of e-commerce and online communication, a new genre of text, short text, has been extensively applied in many areas. So many researches focus on short text mining. It is a challenge to classify the short text owing to its natural characters, such as sparseness, large-scale, immediacy, non-standardization. It is difficult for traditional methods to deal with short text classification mainly because too limited words in short text cannot represent the feature space and the relationship between words and documents. Several researches and reviews on text classification are shown in recent times. However, only a few of researches focus on short text classification. This paper discusses the characters of short text and the difficulty of short text classification. Then we introduce the existing popular works on short text classifiers and models, including short text classification using sematic analysis, semi-supervised short text classification, ensemble short text classification, and real-time classification. The evaluations of short text classification are analyzed in our paper. Finally we summarize the existing classification technology and prospect for development trend of short text classification

  16. Estuary Classification Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Guha, Anirban; Lawrence, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the governing equations of a tidally-averaged, width-averaged, rectangular estuary in completely nondimensionalized forms. Subsequently, we discover that the dynamics of an estuary is entirely controlled by only two variables: (i) the Estuarine Froude number, and (ii) a nondimensional number related to the Estuarine Aspect ratio and the Tidal Froude number. Motivated by this new observation, the problem of estuary classification is re-investigated. Our analysis shows that ...

  17. Classification of Arabic Documents

    OpenAIRE

    Elbery, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Arabic language is a very rich language with complex morphology, so it has a very different and difficult structure than other languages. So it is important to build an Arabic Text Classifier (ATC) to deal with this complex language. The importance of text or document classification comes from its wide variety of application domains such as text indexing, document sorting, text filtering, and Web page categorization. Due to the immense amount of Arabic documents as well as the number of inter...

  18. Qatar content classification

    OpenAIRE

    Handosa, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Short title: Qatar content classification. Long title: Develop methods and software for classifying Arabic texts into a taxonomy using machine learning. Contact person and their contact information: Tarek Kanan, . Project description: Starting 4/1/2012, and running through 12/31/2015, is a project to advance digital libraries in the country of Qatar. This is led by VT, but also involves Penn State, Texas A&M, and Qatar University. Tarek is a GRA on this effort. His di...

  19. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  20. Classification of Meteorological Drought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qiang; Zou Xukai; Xiao Fengjin; Lu Houquan; Liu Haibo; Zhu Changhan; An Shunqing

    2011-01-01

    Background The national standard of the Classification of Meteorological Drought (GB/T 20481-2006) was developed by the National Climate Center in cooperation with Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences,National Meteorological Centre and Department of Forecasting and Disaster Mitigation under the China Meteorological Administration (CMA),and was formally released and implemented in November 2006.In 2008,this Standard won the second prize of the China Standard Innovation and Contribution Awards issued by SAC.Developed through independent innovation,it is the first national standard published to monitor meteorological drought disaster and the first standard in China and around the world specifying the classification of drought.Since its release in 2006,the national standard of Classification of Meteorological Drought has been used by CMA as the operational index to monitor and drought assess,and gradually used by provincial meteorological sureaus,and applied to the drought early warning release standard in the Methods of Release and Propagation of Meteorological Disaster Early Warning Signal.

  1. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  2. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  3. Cigarette smoke activates the proto-oncogene c-src to promote airway inflammation and lung tissue destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew; Foronjy, Robert F

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke-mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  4. Oncogenic RAS enables DNA damage- and p53-dependent differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia cells in response to chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Meyer

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a clonal disease originating from myeloid progenitor cells with a heterogeneous genetic background. High-dose cytarabine is used as the standard consolidation chemotherapy. Oncogenic RAS mutations are frequently observed in AML, and are associated with beneficial response to cytarabine. Why AML-patients with oncogenic RAS benefit most from high-dose cytarabine post-remission therapy is not well understood. Here we used bone marrow cells expressing a conditional MLL-ENL-ER oncogene to investigate the interaction of oncogenic RAS and chemotherapeutic agents. We show that oncogenic RAS synergizes with cytotoxic agents such as cytarabine in activation of DNA damage checkpoints, resulting in a p53-dependent genetic program that reduces clonogenicity and increases myeloid differentiation. Our data can explain the beneficial effects observed for AML patients with oncogenic RAS treated with higher dosages of cytarabine and suggest that induction of p53-dependent differentiation, e.g. by interfering with Mdm2-mediated degradation, may be a rational approach to increase cure rate in response to chemotherapy. The data also support the notion that the therapeutic success of cytotoxic drugs may depend on their ability to promote the differentiation of tumor-initiating cells.

  5. Gene profiling, biomarkers and pathways characterizing HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Luigi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis are not yet fully elucidated. Besides indirect effects as tissue inflammation and regeneration, a more direct oncogenic activity of HCV can be postulated leading to an altered expression of cellular genes by early HCV viral proteins. In the present study, a comparison of gene expression patterns has been performed by microarray analysis on liver biopsies from HCV-positive HCC patients and HCV-negative controls. Methods Gene expression profiling of liver tissues has been performed using a high-density microarray containing 36'000 oligos, representing 90% of the human genes. Samples were obtained from 14 patients affected by HCV-related HCC and 7 HCV-negative non-liver-cancer patients, enrolled at INT in Naples. Transcriptional profiles identified in liver biopsies from HCC nodules and paired non-adjacent non-HCC liver tissue of the same HCV-positive patients were compared to those from HCV-negative controls by the Cluster program. The pathway analysis was performed using the BRB-Array- Tools based on the "Ingenuity System Database". Significance threshold of t-test was set at 0.001. Results Significant differences were found between the expression patterns of several genes falling into different metabolic and inflammation/immunity pathways in HCV-related HCC tissues as well as the non-HCC counterpart compared to normal liver tissues. Only few genes were found differentially expressed between HCV-related HCC tissues and paired non-HCC counterpart. Conclusion In this study, informative data on the global gene expression pattern of HCV-related HCC and non-HCC counterpart, as well as on their difference with the one observed in normal liver tissues have been obtained. These results may lead to the identification of specific biomarkers relevant to develop tools for detection

  6. Regulation of human RNase-L by the miR-29 family reveals a novel oncogenic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teresa Y; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Lapidus, Rena G; Scheibner, Kara A; Hassel, Bret A

    2013-01-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase-L is the terminal component of an interferon-regulated RNA decay pathway known as the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system, whose established functions include antimicrobial and tumor suppressive activities. RNase-L activity requires binding of the small molecule 2-5A, leading to RNase-L dimerization and cleavage of single-stranded RNA. RNase-L expression is controlled post-transcriptionally by its 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR), which exerts a strong negative effect on RNase-L levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that repress expression of target genes by binding to regions of complementarity often in the 3' UTR. The miR-29 family acts as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and has many oncogenic targets. We report that the miR-29 family represses RNase-L protein expression across several cell types. Using a luciferase reporter, we showed that miR-29 acts via 4 target sites within the RNASEL 3' UTR. Mutation of all sites is required for abrogation of miR-29 repression. In light of the reported tumor suppressive role of miR-29 in K562 CML cells and miR-29 repression of RNase-L in these cells, we generated K562 cells with stable RNase-L knockdown and demonstrated that loss of RNase-L inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as tumor growth in a xenograft model. Our findings identify a previously unknown miRNA regulator of RNase-L expression and support a novel oncogenic role for RNase-L in CML and potentially other hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:23113544

  7. Preponderance of the oncogenic V599E and V599K mutations in B-raf kinase domain is enhanced in melanoma cutaneous/subcutaneous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downstream of Ras, the serine/threonine kinase B-raf has been reported to be mutated, among other carcinomas, in a substantial subset of primary melanomas with a preponderance of mutations within the kinase domain including the activating V599E and V599K transitions. We here investigated a representative series of 60 resection specimens of cutaneous and subcutaneous melanoma metastases for the presence of mutations within the activation segment (exon 15) of the B-raf kinase domain by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of cloned PCR-SSCP amplicons resulted in 24 (40%) samples harbouring somatic mutations which is not exceeding the mutation frequency in recently investigated primary melanomas. The activating mutation T1796A was present in 24/60 (40%) resection specimens, followed in frequency by the oncogenic g1795A mutation in 8/60 (13%) cases. As to the B-raf protein sequence, the acidic amino acid transitions V599E and V599K were predicted in 19/60 (32%) and 6/60 (10%) cases, resepectively, but were not associated with enhanced risk for subsequent metastasis in patients' follow up. In comparison to the primary melanomas that we recently investigated, the spectrum of predicted B-raf protein mutations narrowed significantly in the cutaneous/subcutaneous metastases. Unexpectedly, V599 and V599E mutations were absent in cutaneous/subcutaneous metastases derived from acrolentiginous melanomas as preceding primary tumours. During transition from primary melanomas towards cutaneous/subcutaneous metastases, the spectrum of predicted B-raf mutations narrows significantly. Focusing on the V599E and V599K, these oncogenic mutations are likely to affect melanocyte-specific pathways controlling proliferation and differentiation

  8. The PI3K/AKT Pathway as a Target for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Ingrid A; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2016-01-01

    Anticancer targeted therapies are designed to exploit a particular vulnerability in the tumor, which in most cases results from its dependence on an oncogene and/or loss of a tumor suppressor. Genes in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway are the most frequently altered in human cancers. Aberrant activation of this pathway, as a result of these somatic alterations, is associated with cellular transformation, tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug resistance. Several drugs targeting PI3K/ATK are currently in clinical trials, alone or in combination, in both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. These drugs are the focus of this review. PMID:26473415

  9. On the Classification of Psychology in General Library Classification Schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudek, Miluse

    1980-01-01

    Holds that traditional library classification systems are inadequate to handle psychological literature, and advocates the establishment of new theoretical approaches to bibliographic organization. (FM)

  10. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin. Final progress report, May 1, 1990--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-12-31

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/{mu}), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of {sup 14}C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ({sup 3}H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The {sup 14}C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with {sup 14}C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  11. SPORT FOOD ADDITIVE CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Prokopenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Correctly organized nutritive and pharmacological support is an important component of an athlete's preparation for competitions, an optimal shape maintenance, fast recovery and rehabilitation after traumas and defatigation. Special products of enhanced biological value (BAS for athletes nutrition are used with this purpose. Easy-to-use energy sources are administered into athlete's organism, yielded materials and biologically active substances which regulate and activate exchange reactions which proceed with difficulties during certain physical trainings. The article presents sport supplements classification which can be used before warm-up and trainings, after trainings and in competitions breaks.

  12. Classification of Emergency Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Muench, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In most of today's emergency scenarios information plays a crucial role. Therefore, information has to be constantly collected and shared among all rescue team members and this requires new innovative technologies. In this paper a classification of emergency scenarios is presented, describing their special characteristics and common strategies employed by rescue units to handle them. Based on interviews with professional firefighters, requirements for new systems are listed. The goal of this article is to support developers designing new systems by providing them a deeper look into the work of first responders.

  13. Classification of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Aalto-Korte, K; Andersen, K E;

    2015-01-01

    recruited from nine different tertiary referral centres. All patients underwent examination by specialists in dermatology and were checked using relevant allergy testing. Patients were classified into one of the six diagnostic subgroups of HE: allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, atopic......%) could not be classified. 38% had one additional diagnosis and 26% had two or more additional diagnoses. Eczema on feet was found in 30% of the patients, statistically significantly more frequently associated with hyperkeratotic and vesicular endogenous eczema. CONCLUSION: We find that the classification...

  14. Classification of smooth Fano polytopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Mikkel

    A simplicial lattice polytope containing the origin in the interior is called a smooth Fano polytope, if the vertices of every facet is a basis of the lattice. The study of smooth Fano polytopes is motivated by their connection to toric varieties. The thesis concerns the classification of smooth...... Fano polytopes up to isomorphism. A smooth Fano -polytope can have at most vertices. In case of vertices an explicit classification is known. The thesis contains the classification in case of vertices. Classifications of smooth Fano -polytopes for fixed exist only for . In the thesis an algorithm for...... the classification of smooth Fano -polytopes for any given is presented. The algorithm has been implemented and used to obtain the complete classification for ....

  15. Sequence Classification: 890492 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a component of a signaling pathway that controls a variety of cellular processes..., including metabolism, cell cycle, stress response, stationary phase, and sporulation; Bcy1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6322156 ...

  16. Sequence Classification: 891219 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aminobutyrate (GABA) transaminase (4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase) involved in the 4-aminobutyrate and glutamate degradation pathwa...ys; required for normal oxidative stress tolerance and nitrogen utilization; Uga1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6321456 ...

  17. Sequence Classification: 890121 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available egrity, interacts with components of the TOR pathway; ssd1 mutant of a clinical S. c...TMB Non-TMH TMB TMB TMB TMB >gi|6320499|ref|NP_010579.1| Protein with a role in maintenance of cellular int...erevisiae strain displays elevated virulence; Ssd1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6320499 ...

  18. Sequence Classification: 889423 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ; Ca++ binding protein that regulates Ca++ independent processes (mitosis, bud growth, actin organization, e...ndocytosis, etc.) and Ca++ dependent processes (stress-activated pathways), targets include Nuf1p, Myo2p and calcineurin; Cmd1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6319585 ...

  19. Sequence Classification: 894284 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ol 4,5-bisphosphate 5-phosphatase, synaptojanin-like protein with an N-terminal Sac1 domain, plays a role in a TGN (trans Golgi netwo...rk)-to-early endosome pathway; hyperosmotic stress causes translocation to actin patches; Inp53p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324683 ...

  20. Sequence Classification: 893072 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available scriptional activator, responsible for the regulation of the sulfur amino acid pathway, requires different c...TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|6324226|ref|NP_014296.1| Lecine-zipper tran

  1. Sequence Classification: 890824 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion factor that is activated by a MAP kinase signaling cascade, activates genes involved in mating or pseudohyphal/invasive... growth pathways; cooperates with Tec1p transcription factor to regulate genes specific for invasive growth; Ste12p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6321876 ...

  2. Sequence Classification: 894828 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6322538|ref|NP_012612.1| Tryptophan ... 2,3-diox ... , required for biosynthesis of nicotinic acid from tryptophan ... via kynurenine pathway; Bna2p || http://www.ncbi.n ...

  3. Sequence Classification: 890382 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6322042|ref|NP_012117.1| Myosin-like protein ass ... connects the nuclear pore complex with the nuclear interior ; involved in the Tel1p pathway that controls telom ...

  4. Expression of bcl-2 oncogene in gastric precancerous lesions and its correlation with syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Hu; Shao-Xian Lao; Chun-Zhi Tang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protein and mRNA expression of bcl-2 oncogene in gastric precancerous lesions (GPL) and to analyze its correlation with syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with GPL confirmed by gastroscopy and pathology were studied, including 39 cases of moderate gastric mucosal dysplasia, 19 casesof severe gastric mucosa dysplasia, g cases of incompletecolon metaplasia. In syndrome differentiation of TCM, 17 cases belonged to the syndrome of qi and yin deficiency of the spleen and stomach complicated by qi stagnation, 21 cases belonged to the syndrome of qi and yin deficiency of the spleen and stomach complicated by stomach heat, 29 cases belonged to the syndrome of qi and yin deficiency of the spleen and stomach complicated by blood stasis. Protein and mRNA expression of bcl-2 oncogene weredetected by labeled streptavidin biotin (LSAB) immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization respectively. RESULTS: Abnormal expression of protein and mRNA on bcl-2 oncogene was found in GPL, which increased gradually with the course of lesions. In moderate and severe gastric mucosal dysplasia and incomplete colon metaplasia, there was no difference in the expression of bcl-2 oncogene (P>0.05). In different accompanying syndromes, the expression of protein and mRNA on bcl-2 oncogene increased gradually in the following order: deficiency of both qi and yin of the spleen and stomach accompanying qi stagnation → stomach heat → blood stasis. In GPL, compared with accompanying blood stasis, there was an obvious difference in the expression of bd-2 oncogene between the syndrome of qi and yin deficiency of the spleen and stomach and accompanying stomach heat, so did accompanying qi stagnation (the level of protein: χ2 = 8.45, P<0.05; the level of mRNA: χ2 = 7.35,P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Apoptosis-associated bcl-2 oncogene is abnormally expressed in GPL, which correlates with different accompanying syndromes in TCM.

  5. Active Learning for Text Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Rong

    2011-01-01

    Text classification approaches are used extensively to solve real-world challenges. The success or failure of text classification systems hangs on the datasets used to train them, without a good dataset it is impossible to build a quality system. This thesis examines the applicability of active learning in text classification for the rapid and economical creation of labelled training data. Four main contributions are made in this thesis. First, we present two novel selection strategies to cho...

  6. Random Forests for Poverty Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Ruben Thoplan

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies a relatively novel method in data mining to address the issue of poverty classification in Mauritius. The random forests algorithm is applied to the census data in view of improving classification accuracy for poverty status. The analysis shows that the numbers of hours worked, age, education and sex are the most important variables in the classification of the poverty status of an individual. In addition, a clear poverty-gender gap is identified as women have higher chance...

  7. The Revised Classification of Eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Adl, Sina M; Simpson, Alastair G.B.; Lane, Christopher E.; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S.; Brown, Matthew W.; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; Le Gall, Line; Lynn, Denis H.

    2013-01-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. [J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 52 (2005) 399], retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothes...

  8. DCC Briefing Paper: Genre classification

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, Daisy; Kim, Yunhyong

    2008-01-01

    Genre classification is the process of grouping objects together based on defined similarities such as subject, format, style, or purpose. Genre classification as a means of managing information is already established in music (e.g. folk, blues, jazz) and text and is used, alongside topic classification, to organise materials in the commercial sector (the children's section of a bookshop) and intellectually (for example, in the Usenet newsgroup directory hierarchy). However, in the case o...

  9. Classification and Labelling for Biocides

    OpenAIRE

    Rubbiani, Maristella

    2015-01-01

    CLP and biocides The EU Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and Mixtures, the CLP-Regulation, entered into force on 20th January, 2009. Since 1st December, 2010 the classification, labelling and packaging of substances has to comply with this Regulation. For mixtures, the rules of this Regulation are mandatory from 1st June, 2015; this means that until this date classification, labelling and packaging could either be carried out according to D...

  10. Classification & Structure of Blood Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands Review Quiz Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the Heart Blood Classification & Structure of Blood ...

  11. Vav3 oncogene activates estrogen receptor and its overexpression may be involved in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhongyun

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous study revealed that Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human prostate cancer, activates androgen receptor, and stimulates growth in prostate cancer cells. The current study is to determine a potential role of Vav3 oncogene in human breast cancer and impact on estrogen receptor a (ERα-mediated signaling axis. Methods Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed in 43 breast cancer specimens and western blot analysis was used for human breast cancer cell lines to determine the expression level of Vav3 protein. The impact of Vav3 on breast cancer cell growth was determined by siRNA knockdown of Vav3 expression. The role of Vav3 in ERα activation was examined in luciferase reporter assays. Deletion mutation analysis of Vav3 protein was performed to localize the functional domain involved in ERα activation. Finally, the interaction of Vav3 and ERα was assessed by GST pull-down analysis. Results We found that Vav3 was overexpressed in 81% of human breast cancer specimens, particularly in poorly differentiated lesions. Vav3 activated ERα partially via PI3K-Akt signaling and stimulated growth of breast cancer cells. Vav3 also potentiated EGF activity for cell growth and ERα activation in breast cancer cells. More interestingly, we found that Vav3 complexed with ERα. Consistent with its function for AR, the DH domain of Vav3 was essential for ERα activation. Conclusion Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human breast cancer. Vav3 complexes with ERα and enhances ERα activity. These findings suggest that Vav3 overexpression may aberrantly enhance ERα-mediated signaling axis and play a role in breast cancer development and/or progression.

  12. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • As2O3 inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As2O3 is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer

  13. Vav3 oncogene activates estrogen receptor and its overexpression may be involved in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous study revealed that Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human prostate cancer, activates androgen receptor, and stimulates growth in prostate cancer cells. The current study is to determine a potential role of Vav3 oncogene in human breast cancer and impact on estrogen receptor a (ERα)-mediated signaling axis. Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed in 43 breast cancer specimens and western blot analysis was used for human breast cancer cell lines to determine the expression level of Vav3 protein. The impact of Vav3 on breast cancer cell growth was determined by siRNA knockdown of Vav3 expression. The role of Vav3 in ERα activation was examined in luciferase reporter assays. Deletion mutation analysis of Vav3 protein was performed to localize the functional domain involved in ERα activation. Finally, the interaction of Vav3 and ERα was assessed by GST pull-down analysis. We found that Vav3 was overexpressed in 81% of human breast cancer specimens, particularly in poorly differentiated lesions. Vav3 activated ERα partially via PI3K-Akt signaling and stimulated growth of breast cancer cells. Vav3 also potentiated EGF activity for cell growth and ERα activation in breast cancer cells. More interestingly, we found that Vav3 complexed with ERα. Consistent with its function for AR, the DH domain of Vav3 was essential for ERα activation. Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human breast cancer. Vav3 complexes with ERα and enhances ERα activity. These findings suggest that Vav3 overexpression may aberrantly enhance ERα-mediated signaling axis and play a role in breast cancer development and/or progression

  14. 78 FR 68983 - Cotton Futures Classification: Optional Classification Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ...-Doxey data into the cotton futures classification process in March 2012 (77 FR 5379). When verified by a... October 9, 2013 (78 FR 54970). AMS received two comments: one from a national trade organization... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 27 RIN 0581-AD33 Cotton Futures Classification:...

  15. 78 FR 54970 - Cotton Futures Classification: Optional Classification Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... process in March 2012 (77 FR 5379). When verified by a futures classification, Smith-Doxey data serves as...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 27 RIN 0581-AD33 Cotton Futures... for the addition of an optional cotton futures classification procedure--identified and known...

  16. Heart tumors specifically induced in young avian embryos by the v-myc oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    Saule, S; Mérigaud, J P; Al-Moustafa, A E; Ferré, F; Rong, P M; Amouyel, P; Quatannens, B; Stéhelin, D; Dieterlen-Lièvre, F

    1987-01-01

    To determine if expression of the v-myc oncogene had any effect during ontogeny, we injected avian myelocytomatosis virus strain MC29 into avian embryos at various stages of development. The injection of MC29 at embryonic day 2 (E2) or 3 (E3) caused, about 10 days later, rhabdomyosarcomas of the heart and, in some cases, skin muscle hypertrophy. When the injection was performed at E4 or E5, the number of heart tumors declined, whereas the number of skin muscle tumors increased significantly. ...

  17. Effects of Cadmium on Hepatocellular DNA Damage, Proto-Oncogene Expression and Apoptosis in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RIAN YU; LIN-GFEI HE; XUE-MIN CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of cadmium on hepatocellular DNA damage, expression of proto-oncogenes c-myc, c-fos,and c-jun as well as apoptosis in rats. Methods Cadmium chloride at the doses of 5, 10, and 20 μmol/kg was given to rats by i.p. and there were 5 male SD rats in each group. Hepatocellular DNA damage was measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (or comet assay), while expression of proto-oncogenes c-myc, c-fos, and c-jun in rat hepatocytes were measured by Northern dot hybridization. C-Myc, c-Fos, and c-Jun were detected with immuno-histochemical method. Hepatocellular apoptosis was determined by TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP Nick End Labelling) and flow cytometry. Results At the doses of 5, 10, and 20 μmol/kg, cadmium chloride induced DNA damage in rat hepatocytes and the rates of comet cells were 50.20%,88.40%, and 93.80%, respectively. Results also showed an obvious dose-response relationship between the rates of comet cells and the dose of cadmium chloride (r=0.9172, P<0.01). Cadmium chloride at the doses of 5, 10, and 20 μmol/kg induced expression of proto-oncogenes c-myc, c-fos, and c-jun. The positive brown-yellow signal for c-myc, c-fos, and c-jun was mainly located in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes with immunohistochemical method. TUNEL-positive cells were detected in cadmium-treated rat livers. Apoptotic rates (%) of cadmium-treated liver cells at the doses of 5, 10, and 20 μmol/kg were (17.24±2.98), (20.58±1.35), and (24.06±1.77) respectively, being significantly higher than those in the control. The results also displayed an obvious dose-response relationship between apoptotic rates and the dose of cadmium chloride (r=0.8619, P<0.05).Conclusion Cadmium at 5-20 μmol/kg can induce hepatocellular DNA damage, expression of proto-oncogenes c-myc, c-fos,and c-jun as well as apoptosis in rats.

  18. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies specific for products of avian oncogene myb.

    OpenAIRE

    Evan, G. I.; Lewis, G K; Bishop, J M

    1984-01-01

    We isolated a series of monoclonal antibodies which were raised against a bacterially expressed protein, bp37v-myb, and coded for by part of the avian v-myb gene. These monoclonal antibodies recognized a range of antigenic specificities on bp37v-myb, and this was reflected in their differing specificities for the gene products of the v-myb, c-myb, and E26 viral oncogenes. One monoclonal antibody recognized, in addition to the v-myb and c-myb gene products, a conserved nuclear protein found in...

  19. MYCN is a novel oncogenic target in pediatric T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Astolfi, Annalisa; Vendemini, Francesca; Urbini, Milena; Melchionda, Fraia; Masetti, Riccardo; Franzoni, Monica; Libri, Virginia; Serravalle, Salvatore; Togni, Marco; Paone, Giuseppina; Montemurro, Luca; Bressanin, Daniela; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Tonelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    MYCN is an oncogene frequently overexpressed in pediatric solid tumors whereas few evidences suggest his involvement in the pathogenesis of haematologic malignancies. Here we show that MYCN is overexpressed in a relevant proportion (40 to 50%) of adult and pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL). Focusing on pediatric T-ALL, MYCN-expressing samples were found almost exclusively in the TAL1-positive subgroup. Moreover, TAL1 knockdown in T-ALL cell lines resulted in a reduction o...

  20. An Oncogenic Super-Enhancer Formed Through Somatic Mutation of a Noncoding Intergenic Element

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Marc R.; Abraham, Brian J.; Anders, Lars; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Durbin, Adam D.; Etchin, Julia; Lawton, Lee; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B.; Loh, Mignon L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Sanda, Takaomi; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In certain human cancers, the expression of critical oncogenes is driven from large regulatory elements, called super-enhancers, which recruit much of the cell’s transcriptional apparatus and are defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases, we found that heterozygous somatic mutations are acquired that introduce binding motifs for the MYB transcription factor in a precise noncoding site, which creates a s...

  1. Ras oncogene expression and DNA content in plasma cell dyscrasias: a flow cytofluorimetric study.

    OpenAIRE

    Danova, M. (M); Riccardi, A.; Ucci, G.; Luoni, R.; Giordano, M.; G Mazzini

    1990-01-01

    Using bivariate flow cytofluorometry, we have determined the nuclear DNA distribution and the expression of the p21 protein (coded by the Ha-ras oncogene) in the bone marrow (BM) cells of five solid tumour patients having histologically normal BM and in those of 57 patients with plasma cell dyscrasia (28 with monoclonal gammopathies of undertermined significance, MGUS, and 29 with multiple myeloma, MM). All normal and MGUS and 21/29 (72.4%) MM BM had diploid modal DNA content and 8/29 (27.6%)...

  2. Mutation analysis of the c-mos proto-oncogene in human ovarian teratomas.

    OpenAIRE

    de Foy, K. A.; Gayther, S A; Colledge, W.H.; Crockett, S; Scott, I V; Evans, M.J.; Ponder, B A

    1998-01-01

    Female transgenic mice lacking a functional c-mos proto-oncogene develop ovarian teratomas, indicating that c-mos may behave as a tumour-suppressor gene for this type of tumour. We have analysed the entire coding region of the c-MOS gene in a series of human ovarian teratomas to determine whether there are any cancer-causing alterations. DNA from twenty teratomas was analysed by single-strand conformational analysis (SSCA) and heteroduplex analysis (HA) to screen for somatic and germline muta...

  3. Markers for sebaceoma show a spectrum of cell cycle regulators, tumor suppressor genes, and oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sebaceoma is a tumor for which the causative oncogenes are not well-understood. Sebaceomas demonstrate some histopathologic features similar to basal cell carcinoma (BCC, such as palisading borders and basaloid cells with additional features, including foamy cytoplasm and indented nuclei. Aims: We examine multiple cell-cycle, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene markers in sebaceomas, to try to find some suitable biological markers for this tumor, and compare with other published studies. Materials and Methods: We investigated a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC stains that are important for cellular signaling, including a cell cycle regulator, tumor suppressor gene, oncogene, hormone receptor, and genomic stability markers in our cohort of sebaceomas. We collected 30 sebaceomas from three separate USA dermatopathology laboratories. The following IHC panel: Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/CD227, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cyclin D1, human breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA-1, C-erb-2, Bcl-2, human androgen receptor (AR, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27 kip1 , p53, topoisomerase II alpha, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and Ki-67 were tested in our cases. Results: EMA/CD227 was positive in the well-differentiated sebaceomas (13/30. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B was positive in tumors with intermediate differentiation (22/30. The less well-differentiated tumors failed to stain with EMA and AR. Most of the tumors with well-differentiated palisaded areas demonstrated positive staining for topoisomerase II alpha, p27 kip1 , and p53, with positive staining in tumoral basaloid areas (22/30. Numerous tumors were focally positive with multiple markers, indicating a significant degree of variability in the complete group. Conclusions: Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle regulators, and hormone receptors are variably expressed in sebaceomas. Our results suggest that in these tumors, selected marker staining seems to correlate

  4. 14 CFR 1203.412 - Classification guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification guides. 1203.412 Section 1203.412 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.412 Classification guides. (a) General. A classification guide, based upon classification...

  5. 22 CFR 9.4 - Original classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Original classification. 9.4 Section 9.4... classification. (a) Definition. Original classification is the initial determination that certain information... classification. (b) Classification levels. (1) Top Secret shall be applied to information the...

  6. 22 CFR 9.6 - Derivative classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 2001.22. (c) Department of State Classification Guide. The Department of State Classification... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Derivative classification. 9.6 Section 9.6... classification. (a) Definition. Derivative classification is the incorporating, paraphrasing, restating...

  7. 32 CFR 2400.15 - Classification guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification guides. 2400.15 Section 2400.15... Derivative Classification § 2400.15 Classification guides. (a) OSTP shall issue and maintain classification guides to facilitate the proper and uniform derivative classification of information. These guides...

  8. 15 CFR 2008.9 - Classification guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification guides. 2008.9 Section... REPRESENTATIVE Derivative Classification § 2008.9 Classification guides. Classification guides shall be issued by... direct derivative classification, shall identify the information to be protected in specific and...

  9. Characterization of a human cell line stably over-expressing the candidate oncogene, dual specificity phosphatase 12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Cain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements within primary tumors has been influential in the identification of novel oncogenes. Identification of the "driver" gene(s within cancer-derived amplicons is, however, hampered by the fact that most amplicons contain many gene products. Amplification of 1q21-1q23 is strongly associated with liposarcomas and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization narrowed down the likely candidate oncogenes to two: the activating transcription factor 6 (atf6 and the dual specificity phosphatase 12 (dusp12. While atf6 is an established transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response, the potential role of dusp12 in cancer remains uncharacterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the oncogenic potential of dusp12, we established stable cell lines that ectopically over-express dusp12 in isolation and determined whether this cell line acquired properties frequently associated with transformed cells. Here, we demonstrate that cells over-expressing dusp12 display increased cell motility and resistance to apoptosis. Additionally, over-expression of dusp12 promoted increased expression of the c-met proto-oncogene and the collagen and laminin receptor intergrin alpha 1 (itga1 which is implicated in metastasis. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results suggest that dusp12 is oncologically relevant and exposes a potential association between dusp12 and established oncogenes that could be therapeutically targeted.

  10. Identification of ALV-J associated acutely transforming virus Fu-J carrying complete v-fps oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Fang, Lichun; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    Transduction of oncogenes by ALVs and generation of acute transforming viruses is common in natural viral infections. In order to understand the molecular basis for the rapid oncogenicity of Fu-J, an acutely transforming avian leukosis virus isolated from fibrosarcomas in crossbreed broilers infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in China, complete genomic structure of Fu-J virus was determined by PCR amplification and compared with those of Fu-J1, Fu-J2, Fu-J3, Fu-J4, and Fu-J5 reported previously. The results showed that the genome of Fu-J was defective, with parts of gag gene replaced by the complete v-fps oncogene and encoded a 137 kDa Gag-fps fusion protein. Sequence analysis revealed that Fu-J and Fu-J1 to Fu-J5 were related quasi-species variants carrying different lengths of v-fps oncogenes generated from recombination between helper virus and c-fps gene. Comparison of virus carrying v-fps oncogene also gave us a glimpse of the molecular characterization and evolution process of the acutely transforming ALV. PMID:27108997

  11. Frequent PTEN genomic alterations and activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in basal-like breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Bérengère; Maire, Virginie; Gravier, Eléonore; Rigaill, Guillem; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Kappler, Marion; Lebigot, Ingrid; Djelti, Fathia; Tourdès, Audrey; Gestraud, Pierre; Hupé, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Cruzalegui, Francisco; Tucker, Gordon C.; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Basal-like carcinomas (BLCs) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpressing (HER2+) carcinomas are the subgroups of breast cancers that have the most aggressive clinical behaviour. In contrast to HER2+ carcinomas, no targeted therapy is currently available for the treatment of patients with BLCs. In order to discover potential therapeutic targets, we aimed to discover deregulated signalling pathways in human BLCs. Methods In this study, we focused on the oncogenic ph...

  12. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30II accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30II/c-MYC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30II protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30II interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30II and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30II induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30II in c-myc−/− HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30II is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30II inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30II/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Acetylation of c-MYC is required for oncogenic transformation by HTLV-1 p30II/c-MYC. • Acetylation-defective c-MYC mutants are impaired for foci-formation by p30II/c-MYC. • The HTLV-1 p30II protein induces lysine-acetylation of c-MYC. • p30II is present in c-MYC nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. • HTLV-1 p30II inhibits apoptosis in c-MYC-expressing proliferating cells

  13. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30{sup II} accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Department of Biological Sciences, and The Dedman College Center for Drug Discovery, Design, and Delivery, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275-0376 (United States); Ratner, Lee [Departments of Medicine and Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Lairmore, Michael D. [University of California-Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95618 (United States); Martinez, Ernest [Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Lüscher, Bernhard [Institute of Biochemistry, Klinikum, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Robson, Craig N. [Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, The Medical School, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Henriksson, Marie [Department of Microbiology, Cell and Tumor Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Harrod, Robert, E-mail: rharrod@smu.edu [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Department of Biological Sciences, and The Dedman College Center for Drug Discovery, Design, and Delivery, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275-0376 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30{sup II} protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30{sup II} interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30{sup II} and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30{sup II} induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30{sup II} in c-myc{sup −/−} HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30{sup II}/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Acetylation of c-MYC is required for oncogenic transformation by HTLV-1 p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • Acetylation-defective c-MYC mutants are impaired for foci-formation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • The HTLV-1 p30{sup II} protein induces lysine-acetylation of c-MYC. • p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. • HTLV-1 p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in c-MYC-expressing proliferating cells.

  14. Sequence Classification: 894084 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inase involved in sphingolipid-mediated signaling pathway that controls endocytosis; activates Ypk1p and Ykr2p, components... of signaling cascade required for maintenance of cell wall integrity; redundant with Pkh1p; Pkh2p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324472 ... ...TMB Non-TMH TMB TMB TMB TMB >gi|6324472|ref|NP_014541.1| Serine/threonine protein k

  15. Sequence Classification: 890310 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in kinase involved in sphingolipid-mediated signaling pathway that controls endocytosis; activate...s Ypk1p and Ykr2p, components of signaling cascade required for maintenance of cell wall integrity; redundant with Pkh2p; Pkh1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6320698 ... ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB TMB >gi|6320698|ref|NP_010778.1| Serine/threonine prote

  16. Sequence Classification: 891167 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6321401|ref|NP_011478.1| Nicotinamidase that ... s part of the NAD(+) salvage pathway, required for life ... span extension by calorie restriction; PNC1 expres ... ponds to all known stimuli that extend replicative life ... span; Pnc1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein ...

  17. Sequence Classification: 893748 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TMB Non-TMH TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|6325168|ref|NP_015236.1| MADS-box transcription factor, comp ... onent of the protein kinase C-mediated MAP ... kinase pathway involved in the maintenance of cell ... integrity; phosphorylated and activated by the MAP -kinase Slt2p; Rlm1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov ...

  18. Sequence Classification: 893544 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available porter, mediates transport of di- and tri-peptides; conserved protein that contains 12 transmembrane domains...Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6322946|ref|NP_013019.1| Integral membrane peptide trans...; PTR2 expression is regulated by the N-end rule pathway via repression by Cup9p; Ptr2p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6322946 ...

  19. Sequence Classification: 893227 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6324384|ref|NP_014454.1| Putative transmembran...largonic acid; BIO5 is in a cluster of 3 genes (BIO3, BIO4, and BIO5) that mediate biotin synthesis; Bio5p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324384 ... ...e protein involved in the biotin biosynthesis pathway; responsible for uptake of 7-keto 8-aminope

  20. Sequence Classification: 893377 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Membrane) complexes which escort hydrophobic inner membrane proteins en route to the TIM22 complex; Hot13p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6322766 ... ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6322766|ref|NP_012839.1| Mitochondrial inter...membrane space protein, first component of a pathway mediating assembly of small TIM (Translocase of the Inner

  1. Seismic texture classification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinther, R.

    1997-12-31

    The seismic texture classification method, is a seismic attribute that can both recognize the general reflectivity styles and locate variations from these. The seismic texture classification performs a statistic analysis for the seismic section (or volume) aiming at describing the reflectivity. Based on a set of reference reflectivities the seismic textures are classified. The result of the seismic texture classification is a display of seismic texture categories showing both the styles of reflectivity from the reference set and interpolations and extrapolations from these. The display is interpreted as statistical variations in the seismic data. The seismic texture classification is applied to seismic sections and volumes from the Danish North Sea representing both horizontal stratifications and salt diapers. The attribute succeeded in recognizing both general structure of successions and variations from these. Also, the seismic texture classification is not only able to display variations in prospective areas (1-7 sec. TWT) but can also be applied to deep seismic sections. The seismic texture classification is tested on a deep reflection seismic section (13-18 sec. TWT) from the Baltic Sea. Applied to this section the seismic texture classification succeeded in locating the Moho, which could not be located using conventional interpretation tools. The seismic texture classification is a seismic attribute which can display general reflectivity styles and deviations from these and enhance variations not found by conventional interpretation tools. (LN)

  2. Estuary Classification Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    The governing equations of a tidally averaged, width averaged, rectangular estuary has been investigated. It's theoretically shown that the dynamics of an estuary is entirely controlled by three parameters: (i) the Estuarine Froude number, (ii) the Tidal Froude number and (iii) the Estuarine Aspect ratio. The momentum, salinity and integral salt balance equations can be completely expressed in terms of these control variables. The estuary classification problem has also been reinvestigated. It's found that these three control variables can completely specify the estuary type. Comparison with real estuary data shows very good match. Additionally, we show that the well accepted leading order estuarine integral salt balance equation is inconsitent with the leading order salinity equation in an order of magnitude sense.

  3. Classification of enterprise expenditures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Ostapenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The need to diversify share of costs is grounded. It is proposed to classify expenditures by types of income (loss of current activity (covered and uncovered expenditures, by the level of costs to its planned size (planned cost; costs that exceed the planned size; costs that are lower than the planned size, with the aim to influence the activity result (effective and ineffective expenditures, by the period of their appearance (intermediate and annual expenditures.The existing classification of expenditures by kinds of activity is improved through emphasizing such feature: by ability to increase enterprise cost (essential and unessential expenditures. The traditional definition of exhausted (consumed and unexhausted (not consumed expenditures that helped to separate expenses in their structure which don’t ensure formation of exhausted and unexhausted expenditures (management costs is criticized

  4. Nonlinear estimation and classification

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Mark; Holmes, Christopher; Mallick, Bani; Yu, Bin

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in many disciplines face the formidable task of analyzing massive amounts of high-dimensional and highly-structured data This is due in part to recent advances in data collection and computing technologies As a result, fundamental statistical research is being undertaken in a variety of different fields Driven by the complexity of these new problems, and fueled by the explosion of available computer power, highly adaptive, non-linear procedures are now essential components of modern "data analysis," a term that we liberally interpret to include speech and pattern recognition, classification, data compression and signal processing The development of new, flexible methods combines advances from many sources, including approximation theory, numerical analysis, machine learning, signal processing and statistics The proposed workshop intends to bring together eminent experts from these fields in order to exchange ideas and forge directions for the future

  5. Classification of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  6. Classification-based reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Fernando; Segami, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    A representation formalism for N-ary relations, quantification, and definition of concepts is described. Three types of conditions are associated with the concepts: (1) necessary and sufficient properties, (2) contingent properties, and (3) necessary properties. Also explained is how complex chains of inferences can be accomplished by representing existentially quantified sentences, and concepts denoted by restrictive relative clauses as classification hierarchies. The representation structures that make possible the inferences are explained first, followed by the reasoning algorithms that draw the inferences from the knowledge structures. All the ideas explained have been implemented and are part of the information retrieval component of a program called Snowy. An appendix contains a brief session with the program.

  7. Predictive Classification Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosz, Stephan; Müller-Funk, Ulrich

    CART (Breiman et al., Classification and Regression Trees, Chapman and Hall, New York, 1984) and (exhaustive) CHAID (Kass, Appl Stat 29:119-127, 1980) figure prominently among the procedures actually used in data based management, etc. CART is a well-established procedure that produces binary trees. CHAID, in contrast, admits multiple splittings, a feature that allows to exploit the splitting variable more extensively. On the other hand, that procedure depends on premises that are questionable in practical applications. This can be put down to the fact that CHAID relies on simultaneous Chi-Square- resp. F-tests. The null-distribution of the second test statistic, for instance, relies on the normality assumption that is not plausible in a data mining context. Moreover, none of these procedures - as implemented in SPSS, for instance - take ordinal dependent variables into account. In the paper we suggest an alternative tree-algorithm that: Requires explanatory categorical variables

  8. Classification of Rainbows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, J. L.; Peter, A. L.; Barckicke, J.

    2015-12-01

    CLASSIFICATION OF RAINBOWS Jean Louis Ricard,1,2,* Peter Adams ,2 and Jean Barckicke 2,3 1CNRM, Météo-France,42 Avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse, France 2CEPAL, 148 Himley Road, Dudley, West Midlands DY1 2QH, United Kingdom 3DP/Compas,Météo-France,42 Avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse, France *Corresponding author: Dr_Jean_Ricard@yahoo,co,ukRainbows are the most beautiful and most spectacular optical atmospheric phenomenon. Humphreys (1964) pointedly noted that "the "explanations" generally given of the rainbow [ in textbooks] may well be said to explain beautifully that which does not occur, and to leave unexplained which does" . . . "The records of close observations of rainbows soon show that not even the colors are always the same". Textbooks stress that the main factor affecting the aspect of the rainbow is the radius of the water droplets. In his well-known textbook entitled "the nature of light & colour in the open air", Minnaert (1954) gives the chief features of the rainbow depending on the diameter of the drops producing it. For this study, we have gathered hundreds of pictures of primary bows. We sort out the pictures into classes. The classes are defined in a such way that rainbows belonging to the same class look similar. Our results are surprising and do not confirm Minnaert's classification. In practice, the size of the water droplets is only a minor factor controlling the overall aspect of the rainbow. The main factor appears to be the height of the sun above the horizon. At sunset, the width of the red band increases, while the width of the other bands of colours decreases. The orange, the violet, the blue and the green bands disappear completely in this order. At the end, the primary bow is mainly red and slightly yellow. Picture = Contrast-enhanced photograph of a primary bow picture (prepared by Andrew Dunn).

  9. Vietnamese Document Representation and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang-Son; Gao, Xiaoying; Andreae, Peter

    Vietnamese is very different from English and little research has been done on Vietnamese document classification, or indeed, on any kind of Vietnamese language processing, and only a few small corpora are available for research. We created a large Vietnamese text corpus with about 18000 documents, and manually classified them based on different criteria such as topics and styles, giving several classification tasks of different difficulty levels. This paper introduces a new syllable-based document representation at the morphological level of the language for efficient classification. We tested the representation on our corpus with different classification tasks using six classification algorithms and two feature selection techniques. Our experiments show that the new representation is effective for Vietnamese categorization, and suggest that best performance can be achieved using syllable-pair document representation, an SVM with a polynomial kernel as the learning algorithm, and using Information gain and an external dictionary for feature selection.

  10. Small-scale classification schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2004-01-01

    important means of discretely balancing the contractual aspect of requirements engineering against facilitating the users in an open-ended search for their system requirements. The requirements classification is analysed in terms of the complementary concepts of boundary objects and coordination mechanisms......Small-scale classification schemes are used extensively in the coordination of cooperative work. This study investigates the creation and use of a classification scheme for handling the system requirements during the redevelopment of a nation-wide information system. This requirements...... classification inherited a lot of its structure from the existing system and rendered requirements that transcended the framework laid out by the existing system almost invisible. As a result, the requirements classification became a defining element of the requirements-engineering process, though its main...

  11. Agriculture classification using POLSAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Dall, Jørgen; Ferro-Famil, Laurent;

    2005-01-01

    data, and a very important class of algorithms is the knowledge-based approaches. Here, generic characteristics of different cover types are derived by combining physical reasoning with the available empirical evidence. These are then used to define classification rules. Because of their emphasis on...... the physical content of the SAR data they attempt to generate robust, widely applicable methods, which are nonetheless capable of taking local conditions into account. In this paper a classification approach is presented, that uses a knowledge-based approach, where the crops are first classified into...... crops. This part of the classification process is not as well established as the first part, and both a supervised approach and a knowledge-based approach have been evaluated. Both POLSAR and PolInSAR data may be included in the classification scheme. The classification approach has been evaluated using...

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Core from Two Different Genotypes Has an Oncogenic Potential but Is Not Sufficient for Transforming Primary Rat Embryo Fibroblasts in Cooperation with the H-ras Oncogene

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jun; Yang, Se-Hwan; Cho, Young-gyu; Hwang, Soon Bong; Hahn, Young Shin; Sung, Young Chul

    1998-01-01

    Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To examine the oncogenic potential of the HCV core gene product, primary rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) were transfected with the core gene in the presence or absence of the H-ras oncogene. In contrast to a previous report (R. B. Ray, L. M. Lagging, K. Meyer, and R. Ray, J. Virol. 70:4438–4443, 1996), HCV core proteins from two different genotypes (type 1a and t...

  13. On the classification of Yang Mills fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme of Classification for Yang Mills fields analogous to the Petrov Classification in general relativity is discussed. It is also shown how such a classification is used to obtain explicit solutions of the equations of motion. (author)

  14. 75 FR 10529 - Mail Classification Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Mail Classification Change AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... Classification Schedule. The change affects a change in terminology. This notice addresses procedural steps....90 et seq. concerning a change in classification which reflects a change in terminology from...

  15. Effects of cadmium on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and proto-oncogene expression in zebrafish liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying Ying; Zhu, Jin Yong; Chan, King Ming

    2014-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major transitional metal that has toxic effects in aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem; however, its hepatic toxicity and carcinogenicity are not very well characterized. We used a zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line as a model to investigate the mechanism of Cd-induced toxicity on hepatocytes. Our results showed that Cd can be effectively accumulated in ZFL cells in our exposure experiments. Cell cytotoxicity assays and flow cytometer measurements revealed that Cd(2+) stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers indicating potentially tumorigenic effects of Cd in ZFL cells. Gene expression profiles also indicated that Cd downregulated oncogenes p53 and rad51 and upregulated immediate response oncogenes, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (gadd45) genes, and growth factors. We also found dramatic changes in the gene expression of c-jun and igf1rb at different exposure time points, supporting the notion that potentially tumorigenic of Cd-is involved in the activation of immediate early genes or genes related to apoptosis in cancer promotion. PMID:25456234

  16. Interaction of x-rays and food pyrolysis products in producing oncogenic transformation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years it has become evident from epidemiological and experimental data that a large number of environmental factors, including diet, play a role in modifying the incidence of cancer. Cell culture systems in which oncogenic transformation serves as an end point are powerful tools for evaluating these questions. Using such systems it has been shown recently that pyrolysis products from charred surfaces of broiled meat and fish can transform hamster embryo cells in vitro as well as produce tumors in the animal. Our studies in vitro have demonstrated the oncogenic potential of ionizing radiation in both hamster and human cells and have established in hamster cells the dose response relationship at doses ranging from 1 to 600 rad for x-rays and 0.1 to 150 rad for neutrons. The present work was aimed at evaluating whether there exists a cocarcinogenic interaction between a pyrolysis product and x-rays in their ability to transform hamster embryo cells in vitro. We have found that when cells are exposed to x-rays prior to treatment with the pyrolysis product there appears to be a synergistic interaction between the two agents in their ability to transform the cells

  17. Large-scale analysis by SAGE reveals new mechanisms of v-erbA oncogene action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faure Claudine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The v-erbA oncogene, carried by the Avian Erythroblastosis Virus, derives from the c-erbAα proto-oncogene that encodes the nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine (T3R. v-ErbA transforms erythroid progenitors in vitro by blocking their differentiation, supposedly by interference with T3R and RAR (Retinoic Acid Receptor. However, v-ErbA target genes involved in its transforming activity still remain to be identified. Results: By using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, we identified 110 genes deregulated by v-ErbA and potentially implicated in the transformation process. Bioinformatic analysis of promoter sequence and transcriptional assays point out a potential role of c-Myb in the v-ErbA effect. Furthermore, grouping of newly identified target genes by function revealed both expected (chromatin/transcription and unexpected (protein metabolism functions potentially deregulated by v-ErbA. We then focused our study on 15 of the new v-ErbA target genes and demonstrated by real time PCR that in majority their expression was activated neither by T3, nor RA, nor during differentiation. This was unexpected based upon the previously known role of v-ErbA. Conclusion: This paper suggests the involvement of a wealth of new unanticipated mechanisms of v-ErbA action.

  18. Effects of cadmium on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and proto-oncogene expression in zebrafish liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying Ying; Zhu, Jin Yong; Chan, King Ming, E-mail: kingchan@cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers. • Cd down regulated p53 and RAD51. • Cd up regulated immediate early cancer genes of GADD45 and growth factors. • Cd promoted tumorigenic effects in ZFL cells. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major transitional metal that has toxic effects in aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem; however, its hepatic toxicity and carcinogenicity are not very well characterized. We used a zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line as a model to investigate the mechanism of Cd-induced toxicity on hepatocytes. Our results showed that Cd can be effectively accumulated in ZFL cells in our exposure experiments. Cell cytotoxicity assays and flow cytometer measurements revealed that Cd{sup 2+} stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers indicating potentially tumorigenic effects of Cd in ZFL cells. Gene expression profiles also indicated that Cd downregulated oncogenes p53 and rad51 and upregulated immediate response oncogenes, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (gadd45) genes, and growth factors. We also found dramatic changes in the gene expression of c-jun and igf1rb at different exposure time points, supporting the notion that potentially tumorigenic of Cd-is involved in the activation of immediate early genes or genes related to apoptosis in cancer promotion.

  19. Overexpression of hepatoma-derived growth factor in melanocytes does not lead to oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HDGF is a growth factor which is overexpressed in a wide range of tumors. Importantly, expression levels were identified as a prognostic marker in some types of cancer such as melanoma. To investigate the presumed oncogenic/transforming capacity of HDGF, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing HDGF in melanocytes. These mice were bred with mice heterozygous for a defective copy of the Ink4a tumor suppressor gene and were exposed to UV light to increase the risk for tumor development both genetically and physiochemically. Mice were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Furthermore, primary melanocytes were isolated from different strains created. Transgenic animals overexpressed HDGF in hair follicle melanocytes. Interestingly, primary melanocytes isolated from transgenic animals were not able to differentiate in vitro whereas cells isolated from wild type and HDGF-deficient animals were. Although, HDGF-/-/Ink4a+/- mice displayed an increased number of epidermoid cysts after exposure to UV light, no melanomas or premelanocytic alterations could be detected in this mouse model. The results therefore provide no evidence that HDGF has a transforming capacity in tumor development. Our results in combination with previous findings point to a possible role in cell differentiation and suggest that HDGF promotes tumor progression after secondary upregulation and may represent another protein fitting into the concept of non-oncogene addiction of tumor tissue

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine-phosphorylated protein substrates of oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular transformation by oncogenic retroviruses encoding protein tyrosine kinases coincides with the tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of multiple protein substrates. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein of 120 kDa, p120, correlated with src transformation in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Additionally, the authors previously identified two phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins, p130 and p110, that formed stable complexes with activated variants of pp60src, the src-encoded tyrosine kinase. To study transformation-relevant tyrosine kinase substrates, they have generated monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine phosphoproteins, including p130, p120, p110, and five additional phosphoproteins (p210, p125, p118, p85, and p185/p64). These antibodies detected several of the same tyrosine phosphoproteins in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by avian retroviruses Y73 and CT10, encoding the yes and crk oncogenes, respectively. Protein substrates in mouse, rat, hamster, and human cells overexpressing activated variants of chicken pp60src were also detected by several of the monoclonal antibodies