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Sample records for classical trajectory model

  1. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  2. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields. Semiclassical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dealing with timely and interesting issues in strong laser physics. Illustrates complex strong field atomic ionization with the simple semiclassical model of classical trajectory perspective for the first time. Provides a theoretical model that can be used to account for recent experiments. The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers in the field of laser physics, atom molecule physics and theoretical physics. Dr. Jie Liu is a professor of Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, China and Peking University.

  3. Anderson localization from classical trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, Piet W.; Altland, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    We show that Anderson localization in quasi-one dimensional conductors with ballistic electron dynamics, such as an array of ballistic chaotic cavities connected via ballistic contacts, can be understood in terms of classical electron trajectories only. At large length scales, an exponential proliferation of trajectories of nearly identical classical action generates an abundance of interference terms, which eventually leads to a suppression of transport coefficients. We quantitatively descri...

  4. Quantum-classical hybrids in a simplified model of QED and geometric phase induced by charged particle trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, T

    2016-01-01

    We derive a model of quantum-classical hybrids for a simplified model of quantum electrodynamics in the framework of the stochastic variational method. In this model, charged particle trajectories are affected by the interaction with quantized electromagnetic fields, and this quantum-classical interaction induces a displacement current. We further investigate a geometric phase in the wave functional of the gauge field configuration, which is induced by adiabatic motions of the charged particles. This phase contains the quantum-classical backreaction effect and usual Berry's phase is reproduced in the vanishing limit of the fluctuation of the charged particle trajectories.

  5. Classical trajectories and quantum tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B I

    2003-01-01

    The problem of inter-band tunneling in a semiconductor (Zener breakdown) in a nonstationary and homogeneous electric field is solved exactly. Using the exact analytical solution, the approximation based on classical trajectories is studied. A new mechanism of enhanced tunneling through static non-one-dimensional barriers is proposed in addition to well known normal tunneling solely described by a trajectory in imaginary time. Under certain conditions on the barrier shape and the particle energy, the probability of enhanced tunneling is not exponentially small even for non-transparent barriers, in contrast to the case of normal tunneling.

  6. Decoherence and the Branching of Chaos-less Classical Trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    This study was started to know mysterious classicality of nuclei. This time, I found a new rule for decoherence. I used a model without chaos. As a result, it was shown that not only the intersection of classical trajectories but also branching of classical trajectories are needed for decoherence. In other words, it was shown that interactions between a main system and environments have to make enough branchings of classical trajectories of the main system for decoherence.

  7. Simulation of molecular transitions using classical trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, A.; Martens, C. C. [University of California, California (United States)

    2001-03-01

    In the present work, we describe the implementation of a semiclassical method to study physical-chemical processes in molecular systems where electronic state transitions and quantum coherence play a dominant role. The method is based on classical trajectory propagation on the underlying coupled electronic surfaces and is derived from the semiclassical limit of the quantum Liouville equation. Unlike previous classical trajectory-based methods, quantum electronic coherence are treated naturally within this approach as complex weighted trajectory ensembles propagating on the average electronic surfaces. The method is tested on a model problem consisting of one-dimensional motion on two crossing electronic surfaces. Excellent agreement is obtained when compared to the exact results obtained by wave packet propagation. The method is applied to model quantum wave packet interferometry, where two wave packets, differing only in a relative phase, collide in the region where the two electronic surfaces cross. The dependence of the resulting population transfer on the initial relative phase of the wave packets is perfectly captured by our classical trajectory method. Comparison with an alternative method, surface hopping, shows that our approach is appropriate for modelling quantum interference phenomena. [Spanish] En este trabajo se describe la implementacion de un metodo semiclasico para estudiar procesos fisicos-quimicos en sistemas moleculares donde las transiciones entre estados electronicos y las coherencias cuanticas juegan un papel predominante. El metodo se basa en la propagacion de trayectorias clasicas sobre las correspondientes superficies electronicas acopladas y se deriva a partir del limite semiclasico de la ecuacion cuantica de Liouville. A diferencia de metodos previos basados en trayectoria clasica, dentro de este esquema, las coherencias electronicas cuanticas son tratadas de manera natural como ensamble de trayectorias con pesos complejos, moviendose en

  8. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo model calculations for ionization of the uracil molecule by impact of heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2016-09-01

    The ionization of the uracil molecule induced by heavy-ion impact has been investigated using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. Assuming the validity of the independent-particle model approximation, the collision problem is solved by considering the three-body dynamics of the projectile, an active electron and the molecule core. The interaction of the molecule core with the other two particles is described by a multi-center potential built from screened atomic potentials. The cross section differential with respect to the energy and angle of the electrons ejected in the ionization process has been calculated for an impact of 3.5 MeV u-1 {{{C}}}6+ ions. Total electron emission cross sections (TCS) are presented for {{{C}}}q+ (q=0-6) and {{{O}}}6+ projectiles as a function of the impact energy in the range from 10 keV u-1 to 10 MeV u-1. The dependence of the TCS on the charge state of the projectile has been investigated for 2.5 MeV u-1 {{{O}}}q+ (q=4-8) and {{{F}}}q+ (q=5-9) ions. The results of the calculations are compared with available experimental data and the predictions of other theoretical models: the first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1), the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state approach (CDW-EIS), and the combined classical-trajectory Monte Carlo-classical over-the-barrier model (CTMC-COB).

  9. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo model calculations for the antiproton-induced ionization of atomic hydrogen at low impact energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkadi, L

    2015-01-01

    The three-body dynamics of the ionization of the atomic hydrogen by 30 keV antiproton impact has been investigated by calculation of fully differential cross sections (FDCS) using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The results of the calculations are compared with the predictions of quantum mechanical descriptions: The semi-classical time-dependent close-coupling theory, the fully quantal, time-independent close-coupling theory, and the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state model. In the analysis particular emphasis was put on the role of the nucleus-nucleus (NN) interaction played in the ionization process. For low-energy electron ejection CTMC predicts a large NN interaction effect on FDCS, in agreement with the quantum mechanical descriptions. By examining individual particle trajectories it was found that the relative motion between the electron and the nuclei is coupled very weakly with that between the nuclei, consequently the two motions can be treated independently. A simple ...

  10. Heavy-ion fusion: comparison of experimental data with classical trajectory models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently available data on fusion excitation functions for heavy-ion induced reactions over a wide mass range are compared to results calculated with a classical dynamical model based on the proximity nuclear potential of Blocki et al., the Coulomb potential of Bondorf et al., and one-body nuclear friction in the proximity formalism of Randrup. With these conservative and dissipative forces and the radial parameters of Myers, overall good agreement is obtained between the theoretical excitation functions and most of the available data. Extensive calculations have been performed to test the sensitivity of the calculated fusion cross-sections to a number of parameters, including the radial dependence of the Coulomb and nuclear potentials, the radial and tangential friction form factors as well as the projectile and target radii. (Auth.)

  11. Monte Carlo/RRKM/classical trajectories modeling of collisional excitation and dissociation of n-butylbenzene ion in multipole collision cells of tandem mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Vadim D; Stein, Stephen E

    2010-06-10

    The two-channel reaction of collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the n-butylbenzene cation under the conditions of multipole collision cells of tandem mass spectrometers was studied computationally. The results were compared with the experimental data from earlier CID studies. The Monte Carlo method used includes simulation of the trajectories of flight of the parent (n-C(4)H(9)C(6)H(5)(+)) and the product (C(7)H(7)(+) and C(7)H(8)(+)) ions in the electromagnetic field of multipole ion guides and collision cells, classical trajectory modeling of collisional activation and scattering of ions, and RRKM modeling of the parent ion decomposition. Experimental information on the energy dependences of the rates of the n-butylbenzene cation dissociation via two channels was used to create an RRKM model of the reaction. Effects of uncertainties in the critical parameters of the model of the reaction and the collision cells on the results of calculations were evaluated and shown to be minor. The results of modeling demonstrate a good agreement with experiment, providing support for the applied computational method in general and the use of classical trajectory modeling of collisional activation of ions in particular. PMID:20481494

  12. Effects of complex parameters on classical trajectories of Hamiltonian systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asiri Nanayakkara; Thilagarajah Mathanaranjan

    2014-06-01

    Anderson et al have shown that for complex energies, the classical trajectories of real quartic potentials are closed and periodic only on a discrete set of eigencurves. Moreover, recently it was revealed that when time is complex $t(t = t_r e^{i_})$, certain real Hermitian systems possess close periodic trajectories only for a discrete set of values of . On the other hand, it is generally true that even for real energies, classical trajectories of non-PT symmetric Hamiltonians with complex parameters are mostly non-periodic and open. In this paper, we show that for given real energy, the classical trajectories of complex quartic Hamiltonians $H = p^2 + ax^4 + bx^k$ (where is real, is complex and = 1 or 2) are closed and periodic only for a discrete set of parameter curves in the complex -plane. It was further found that given complex parameter , the classical trajectories are periodic for a discrete set of real energies (i.e., classical energy gets discretized or quantized by imposing the condition that trajectories are periodic and closed). Moreover, we show that for real and positive energies (continuous), the classical trajectories of complex Hamiltonian $H = p^2 + x^4$, ($= _r$ e$^{i}$) are periodic when $ = 4 \\tan^{−1}$[($n/(2m + n)$)] for $\\forall n$ and $m \\mathbb{Z}$.

  13. Locating transition states using double-ended classical trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Matro, A; Doll, J D

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for locating transition states and higher-order saddles on potential energy surfaces using double-ended classical trajectories. We then apply this method to 7- and 8-atom Lennard-Jones clusters, finding one previously unreported transition state for the 7-atom cluster and two for the 8-atom cluster.

  14. Real-time quantum trajectories for classically allowed dynamics in strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimak, L. I.; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Both the physical picture of the dynamics of atoms and molecules in intense infrared fields and its theoretical description use the concept of electron trajectories. Here, we address a key question which arises in this context: Are distinctly quantum features of these trajectories, such as the complex-valued coordinates, physically relevant in the classically allowed region of phase space, and what is their origin? First, we argue that solutions of classical equations of motion can account for quantum effects. To this end, we construct an exact solution to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation which accounts for dynamics of the wave packet, and show that this solution is physically correct in the limit ?. Second, we show that imaginary components of classical trajectories are directly linked to the finite size of the initial wave packet in momentum space. This way, if the electronic wave packet produced by optical tunnelling in strong infrared fields is localised both in coordinate and momentum, its motion after tunnelling ipso facto cannot be described with purely classical trajectories - in contrast to popular models in the literature.

  15. Classical trajectories and RRKM modeling of collisional excitation and dissociation of benzylammonium and tert-butyl benzylammonium ions in a quadrupole-hexapole-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Vadim D; Stein, Stephen E

    2010-03-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of the benzylammonium and the 4-tert-butyl benzylammonium ions was studied experimentally in an electrospray ionization quadrupole-hexapole-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer. Ion fragmentation efficiencies were determined as functions of the kinetic energy of ions and the collider gas (argon) pressure. A theoretical Monte Carlo model of ion collisional excitation, scattering, and decomposition was developed. The model includes simulation of the trajectories of the parent and the product ions flight through the hexapole collision cell, quasiclassical trajectory modeling of collisional activation and scattering of ions, and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the parent ion decomposition. The results of modeling demonstrate a general agreement between calculations and experiment. Calculated values of ion fragmentation efficiency are sensitive to initial vibrational excitation of ions, scattering of product ions from the collision cell, and distribution of initial ion velocities orthogonal to the axis of the collision cell. Three critical parameters of the model were adjusted to reproduce the experimental data on the dissociation of the benzylammonium ion: reaction enthalpy and initial internal and translational temperatures of the ions. Subsequent application of the model to decomposition of the t-butyl benzylammonium ion required adjustment of the internal ion temperature only. Energy distribution functions obtained in modeling depend on the average numbers of collisions between the ion and the atoms of the collider gas and, in general, have non-Boltzmann shapes. PMID:20060316

  16. Classical trajectory study of the photodissociation spectrum of H+3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photodissociation spectrum of H+3 is studied using classical mechanical methods. Tunneling rates and product translational energies are computed for a large range of total angular momentum and energy. We predict that the experimentally measured spectrum of Carrington and Kennedy is dominated by low total angular momentum and low energy (relative to dissociation). There is an almost one to one correspondence between the measured product translational energy and the total angular momentum. The classical dipole spectrum of chaotic trajectories is found to be relatively structureless, changes slowly with total J, and does not show any correspondence or indication of the experimentally measured regular structure found in the coarse grained spectrum. We conclude that the regularity found in the coarse grained spectrum should be associated with a stable manifold of trajectories. We find that the horseshoe periodic orbit previously found to be stable at J = 0 exists also for nonzero J and is stable with respect to small perturbations in 3D. The rotational constant of the rotating horseshoe is 30 cm-1 in interesting agreement with the experiment. The properties of the rotating horseshoe are studied in detail, a novel adiabatic switching method is used to study the stability of the orbit. A quantum formalism of Taylor and Zakrzewski that shows how periodic orbits may cause structure in quantal spectra is used to indicate why the features of the rotating horseshoe orbit may appear in the coarse grained spectrum. The experimental coarse grained features are interpreted as an R branch of the ν3 mode of the rotating horseshoe

  17. Transition state theory description of surface self-diffusion: Comparison with classical trajectory results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have computed the surface self-diffusion constants on four different crystal faces [fcc(111), fcc(100), bcc(110), and bcc(211)] using classical transition state theory methods. These results can be compared directly with previous classical-trajectory results which used the same Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential and template model; the agreement is good, though dynamical effects are evident for the fcc(111) and bcc(110) surfaces. Implications are discussed for low-temperature diffusion studies, which are inaccessible to direct molecular dynamics, and the use of ab initio potentials rather than approximate pairwise potentials

  18. Classical trajectory study of rotational excitation in collisions of hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of classical trajectory calculations for rigid rotator p-H2-p-H2 collisions are presented. Several trajectory methodologies are compared. Over the range for which quantal results are available classical-quantal comparisons are poor. (Auth.)

  19. Grassmannization of classical models

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Lode; Prokof'ev, Nikolay V; Svistunov, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Applying Feynman diagrammatics to non-fermionic strongly correlated models with local constraints might seem generically impossible for two separate reasons: (i) the necessity to have a Gaussian (non-interacting) limit on top of which the perturbative diagrammatic expansion is generated by Wick's theorem, and (ii) the Dyson's collapse argument implying that the expansion in powers of coupling constant is divergent. We show that for arbitrary classical lattice models both problems can be solved/circumvented by reformulating the high-temperature expansion (more generally, any discrete representation of the model) in terms of Grassmann integrals. Discrete variables residing on either links, plaquettes, or sites of the lattice are associated with the Grassmann variables in such a way that the partition function (and correlations) of the original system and its Grassmann-field counterpart are identical. The expansion of the latter around its Gaussian point generates Feynman diagrams. A proof-of-principle implement...

  20. Trajectory description of the quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2016-08-01

    The quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum-classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum-classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference.

  1. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2009-01-01

    This third volume completes the Work Mechanical Systems, Classical Models. The first two volumes dealt with particle dynamics and with discrete and continuous mechanical systems. The present volume studies analytical mechanics. Topics like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the Hamilton-Jacobi method, and a study of systems with separate variables are thoroughly discussed. Also included are variational principles and canonical transformations, integral invariants and exterior differential calculus, and particular attention is given to non-holonomic mechanical systems. The author explains in detail all important aspects of the science of mechanics, regarded as a natural science, and shows how they are useful in understanding important natural phenomena and solving problems of interest in applied and engineering sciences. Professor Teodorescu has spent more than fifty years as a Professor of Mechanics at the University of Bucharest and this book relies on the extensive literature on the subject as well as th...

  2. Analysis of the Forward-Backward Trajectory Solution for the Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Mixed quantum-classical methods provide powerful algorithms for the simulation of quantum processes in large and complex systems. The forward-backward trajectory solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation in the mapping basis [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A507 (2012)] is one such scheme. It simulates the dynamics via the propagation of forward and backward trajectories of quantum coherent state variables, and the propagation of bath trajectories on a mean-field potential determined jointly by the forward and backward trajectories. An analysis of the properties of this solution, numerical tests of its validity and an investigation of its utility for the study of nonadiabtic quantum processes are given. In addition, we present an extension of this approximate solution that allows one to systematically improve the results. This extension, termed the jump forward-backward trajectory solution, is analyzed and tested in detail and its various implementations are discussed.

  3. Analysis of the forward-backward trajectory solution for the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    Mixed quantum-classical methods provide powerful algorithms for the simulation of quantum processes in large and complex systems. The forward-backward trajectory solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation in the mapping basis [C.-Y. Hsieh and R. Kapral, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A507 (2012)] is one such scheme. It simulates the dynamics via the propagation of forward and backward trajectories of quantum coherent state variables, and the propagation of bath trajectories on a mean-field potential determined jointly by the forward and backward trajectories. An analysis of the properties of this solution, numerical tests of its validity and an investigation of its utility for the study of nonadiabtic quantum processes are given. In addition, we present an extension of this approximate solution that allows one to systematically improve the results. This extension, termed the jump forward-backward trajectory solution, is analyzed and tested in detail and its various implementations are discussed. PMID:23574211

  4. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo investigation for Lorentz ionization of H (1s)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Bin; Wang Jian-Guo; Liu Chun-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Lorentz ionization of H(1s) is investigated by classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation.The effect of the transverse magnetic field on the considered process is analyzed in terms of the time evolution of interactions in the system,total electron energy,and electron trajectories.A classical mechanism for the ionization is found,where the variation of the kinetic energy of the nuclei is found to be important in the process.Compared with the results of tunneling ionization,the classical mechanism becomes more and more important with the increase of the velocity of the H-atom or the strength of the magnetic field.

  5. Real-time quantum trajectories for classically allowed dynamics in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Plimak, L I

    2015-01-01

    Both the physical picture of the dynamics of atoms and molecules in intense infrared fields and its theoretical description use the concept of electron trajectories. Here we address a key question which arises in this context: Are distinctly quantum features of these trajectories, such as the complex-valued coordinates, physically relevant in the classically allowed region of phase space, and what is their origin? First, we argue that solutions of classical equations of motion can account for quantum effects. To this end, we construct an exact solution to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation which accounts for dynamics of the wave packet, and show that this solution is physically correct in the limit $\\hbar \\to 0$. Second, we show that imaginary components of classical trajectories are directly linked to the finite size of the initial wavepacket in momentum space. This way, if the electronic wavepacket produced by optical tunneling in strong infrared fiels is localised both in coordinate and momentum, its m...

  6. Classical stochastic measurement trajectories: Bosonic atomic gases in an optical cavity and quantum measurement backaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2014-08-01

    We formulate computationally efficient classical stochastic measurement trajectories for a multimode quantum system under continuous observation. Specifically, we consider the nonlinear dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate contained within an optical cavity subject to continuous monitoring of the light leaking out of the cavity. The classical trajectories encode within a classical phase-space representation a continuous quantum measurement process conditioned on a given detection record. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the quasiprobability distribution of the combined condensate-cavity system. We unravel the dynamics into stochastic classical trajectories that are conditioned on the quantum measurement process of the continuously monitored system. Since the dynamics of a continuously measured observable in a many-atom system can be closely approximated by classical dynamics, the method provides a numerically efficient and accurate approach to calculate the measurement record of a large multimode quantum system. Numerical simulations of the continuously monitored dynamics of a large atom cloud reveal considerably fluctuating phase profiles between different measurement trajectories, while ensemble averages exhibit local spatially varying phase decoherence. Individual measurement trajectories lead to spatial pattern formation and optomechanical motion that solely result from the measurement backaction. The backaction of the continuous quantum measurement process, conditioned on the detection record of the photons, spontaneously breaks the symmetry of the spatial profile of the condensate and can be tailored to selectively excite collective modes.

  7. Current flow paths in deformed graphene: from quantum transport to classical trajectories in curved space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Thomas; Szpak, Nikodem

    2016-05-01

    In this work we compare two fundamentally different approaches to the electronic transport in deformed graphene: (a) the condensed matter approach in which current flow paths are obtained by applying the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) method to the tight-binding model with local strain, (b) the general relativistic approach in which classical trajectories of relativistic point particles moving in a curved surface with a pseudo-magnetic field are calculated. The connection between the two is established in the long-wave limit via an effective Dirac Hamiltonian in curved space. Geometrical optics approximation, applied to focused current beams, allows us to directly compare the wave and the particle pictures. We obtain very good numerical agreement between the quantum and the classical approaches for a fairly wide set of parameters, improving with the increasing size of the system. The presented method offers an enormous reduction of complexity from irregular tight-binding Hamiltonians defined on large lattices to geometric language for curved continuous surfaces. It facilitates a comfortable and efficient tool for predicting electronic transport properties in graphene nanostructures with complicated geometries. Combination of the curvature and the pseudo-magnetic field paves the way to new interesting transport phenomena such as bending or focusing (lensing) of currents depending on the shape of the deformation. It can be applied in designing ultrasensitive sensors or in nanoelectronics.

  8. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2007-01-01

    All phenomena in nature are characterized by motion; this is an essential property of matter, having infinitely many aspects. Motion can be mechanical, physical, chemical or biological, leading to various sciences of nature, mechanics being one of them. Mechanics deals with the objective laws of mechanical motion of bodies, the simplest form of motion. In the study of a science of nature mathematics plays an important role. Mechanics is the first science of nature which was expressed in terms of mathematics by considering various mathematical models, associated to phenomena of the surrounding nature. Thus, its development was influenced by the use of a strong mathematical tool; on the other hand, we must observe that mechanics also influenced the introduction and the development of many mathematical notions. In this respect, the guideline of the present book is precisely the mathematical model of mechanics. A special accent is put on the solving methodology as well as on the mathematical tools used; vectors, ...

  9. String Models, Stability and Regge Trajectories for Hadron States

    CERN Document Server

    Sharov, G S

    2013-01-01

    Various string models of mesons and baryons include a string carrying 2 or 3 massive points (quarks or antiquarks). Rotational states (planar uniform rotations) of these systems generate quasilinear Regge trajectories and may be used for describing excited hadron states on these trajectories. For different string models of baryon we are to solve the problem of choice between them and the stability problem for their rotational states. An unexpected result is that for the Y string baryon model these rotations are unstable with respect to small disturbances on the classical level. This instability has specific feature, disturbances grow linearly, whereas for the linear string baryon model they grow exponentially and may increase predictions for baryon's width $\\Gamma$. The classical instability of rotational states and nonstandard Regge slope are the arguments in favor of the stable simplest model of string with massive ends both for baryons and mesons. Rotational states of this model with two types of spin-orbi...

  10. Regularized Finite Mixture Models for Probability Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedden, Kerby; Zucker, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Finite mixture models are widely used in the analysis of growth trajectory data to discover subgroups of individuals exhibiting similar patterns of behavior over time. In practice, trajectories are usually modeled as polynomials, which may fail to capture important features of the longitudinal pattern. Focusing on dichotomous response measures, we…

  11. Bohmian mechanics, collapse models and the emergence of classicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroš, Marko; Donadi, Sandro; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the emergence of classical trajectories in Bohmian mechanics, when a macroscopic object interacts with an external environment. We show that in such a case the conditional wave function of the system follows a dynamics which, under reasonable assumptions, corresponds to that of the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories evolve classically. Our analysis also shows how the GRW (istantaneous) collapse process can be derived by an underlying continuous interaction of a quantum system with an external agent, thus throwing a light on how collapses can emerge from a deeper level theory.

  12. The revision of classical stock model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶柏青; 王洪利

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of classical stock model, according to the limitation of the model, the article puts forward the revision of classical model and enforces the applicability of the stock model.

  13. A simple model of quantum trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Brun, Todd A.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum trajectory theory, developed largely in the quantum optics community to describe open quantum systems subjected to continuous monitoring, has applications in many areas of quantum physics. In this paper I present a simple model, using two-level quantum systems (q-bits), to illustrate the essential physics of quantum trajectories and how different monitoring schemes correspond to different ``unravelings'' of a mixed state master equation. I also comment briefly on the relationship of t...

  14. Comparison between the sensitivity behavior of direct and long-lived classical trajectories and quantum wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare the sensitivities to initial conditions for both direct (regular) and long-lived (chaotic) trajectories in classical scattering calculations with the corresponding properties of trajectories of position and momentum expectation values for quantum wave packets. The collinear H+H2 reaction is used as an example. The results show that the high sensitivity seen in chaotic trajectories is not reflected in the quantum dynamics. We conclude that it is possible for a classical ensemble consisting of only regular trajectories to respond trajectory by trajectory to perturbations in much the same way as a quantum wave packet. (There will of course be cases that are exceptions to this rule.) The response of an ensemble consisting of chaotic trajectories may on the average be similar to that of a wave packet, but not at the level of individual trajectories. In addition, the sensitivities of these trajectories to variations in the potential are analyzed. We conclude that the large contributions to the sensitivities from particular long-lived trajectories must approximately cancel when an exact ensemble average is taken. An algorithm is presented to smoothly account for the contributions to the sensitivities from these trajectories

  15. The revision of classical stock model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Bai-qing; WANG Hong-li

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of classical stock model, according to th e limitation of the model, the article puts forward the revision of classical mo del and enforces the applicability of the stock model.

  16. Quasi-Classical Trajectory Study of the Chemical Reaction Ca+CH3I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-hong; CHEN Mao-du; CONG Shu-lin

    2008-01-01

    The Ca+CH3I→CaI+CH3 reaction system has been studied with the quasi-classical trajectory method on the extended Lond-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato(LEPS)potential energy surface.At collision energy Ecol=10.78 kJ/mol,the calculated results show that the CaI vibrational population peaks are located at v=2.The calculated cross section decreases slowly with the collision energy increasing.The angle product distributions tend toward backward scattering.The calculated〈P2(J'·K)〉values deviate slightly from-0.5 and decrease with increasing collision energy.The Quasielassical trajectory ealculation(QCT)results are in reasonable agreement with experimental data.Moreover,the dynamics of the reaction has been discussed.

  17. State-specific tunneling lifetimes from classical trajectories: H-atom dissociation in electronically excited pyrrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weiwei; Domcke, Wolfgang; Farantos, Stavros C.; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A trajectory method of calculating tunneling probabilities from phase integrals along straight line tunneling paths, originally suggested by Makri and Miller [J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4026 (1989)] and recently implemented by Truhlar and co-workers [Chem. Sci. 5, 2091 (2014)], is tested for one- and two-dimensional ab initio based potentials describing hydrogen dissociation in the 1B1 excited electronic state of pyrrole. The primary observables are the tunneling rates in a progression of bending vibrational states lying below the dissociation barrier and their isotope dependences. Several initial ensembles of classical trajectories have been considered, corresponding to the quasiclassical and the quantum mechanical samplings of the initial conditions. It is found that the sampling based on the fixed energy Wigner density gives the best agreement with the quantum mechanical dissociation rates.

  18. Pseudoclassical fermionic model and classical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study classical limit of fermionic fields seen as Grassmann variables and deduce the proper quantization prescription using Dirac's method for constrained systems and investigate quantum meaning of classical solutions for the Thirring model. (author)

  19. Empirical Model for Predicting Rockfall Trajectory Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asteriou, Pavlos; Tsiambaos, George

    2016-03-01

    A methodology for the experimental investigation of rockfall in three-dimensional space is presented in this paper, aiming to assist on-going research of the complexity of a block's response to impact during a rockfall. An extended laboratory investigation was conducted, consisting of 590 tests with cubical and spherical blocks made of an artificial material. The effects of shape, slope angle and the deviation of the post-impact trajectory are examined as a function of the pre-impact trajectory direction. Additionally, an empirical model is proposed that estimates the deviation of the post-impact trajectory as a function of the pre-impact trajectory with respect to the slope surface and the slope angle. This empirical model is validated by 192 small-scale field tests, which are also presented in this paper. Some important aspects of the three-dimensional nature of rockfall phenomena are highlighted that have been hitherto neglected. The 3D space data provided in this study are suitable for the calibration and verification of rockfall analysis software that has become increasingly popular in design practice.

  20. A Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, Rebekah F.; Ryan, Emily L.; Sefton, Jennifer M. I.; Rebecca D Sanders; Lucioni, Patricia Jumbo; Kenneth H Moberg; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disorder that results from profound impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Despite decades of research, the underlying pathophysiology of classic galactosemia remains unclear, in part owing to the lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, we report the establishment of a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia; this is the first whole-animal genetic model to mimic aspects of the patient phenotype. Analogous t...

  1. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Andrey K; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The Landau--Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs the recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Four different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn--Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs; and nearly constant ...

  2. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, Andrey K., E-mail: belyaev@herzen.spb.ru [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation); Domcke, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.domcke@ch.tum.de [Department Chemie, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Lasser, Caroline, E-mail: classer@ma.tum.de; Trigila, Giulio, E-mail: trigila@ma.tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-03-14

    The Landau–Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn–Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent.

  3. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  4. Regularities in hadron systematics, Regge trajectories and a string quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Levchenko, B.B. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2006-08-15

    An empirical principle for the construction of a linear relationship between the total angular momentum and squared-mass of baryons is proposed. In order to examine linearity of the trajectories, a rigorous least-squares regression analysis was performed. Unlike the standard Regge-Chew-Frautschi approach, the constructed trajectories do not have non-linear behaviour. A similar regularity may exist for lowest-mass mesons. The linear baryonic trajectories are well described by a semi-classical picture based on a spinning relativistic string with tension. The obtained numerical solution of this model was used to extract the (di)quark masses. (orig.)

  5. Solar sails: Modeling, estimation, and trajectory control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Reyes, Leonel

    There has been great interest in developing solar sail technology and missions by several international space agencies in recent years. However, at present there is no consensus on how one can mathematically model forces and moments acting on a solar sail. Traditional analytical models and finite element methods are not feasible for integration into a precise navigation system. This dissertation takes a step toward resolving this issue by developing tools and concepts that can be integrated into a precise solar sail navigation system. These steps are the derivation of a generalized sail model, a linear estimation method for estimating and predicting forces and moments acting on a solar sail, and a new trajectory control methodology for tracking a nominal trajectory when the sail performance exceeds the nominal design performance. The main contributions of this dissertation follow. First, the generalized sail model (GSM) is defined to analytically describe the forces and moments acting on a solar sail of arbitrary shape. The GSM is derived by performing an integration, of all the differential forces and moments acting on the sail, over the sail surface. Next, the GSM is applied to several examples to illustrate the use of the GSM's analytic equations. These examples allow comparisons of forces and moments generated by different solar sails, the computation of force derivatives, and the application of the model to orbital mechanics problems. Since it is difficult to model the sail geometry based on ground measurements; errors in the sail model are expected once the sail is deployed in space. Due to this difficulty; a least-squares estimation method for the force and moment coefficients of the GSM is derived. For realistic implementation of a sail trajectory, the deployed sail must have an excess thrust capacity. We develop and implement a control methodology for flying a nominal mission profile with such an excess capacity. Control laws for maintaining a flat, ideal

  6. Hybrid Models for Trajectory Error Modelling in Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelatsa, E.; Parés, M. E.; Colomina, I.

    2016-06-01

    This paper tackles the first step of any strategy aiming to improve the trajectory of terrestrial mobile mapping systems in urban environments. We present an approach to model the error of terrestrial mobile mapping trajectories, combining deterministic and stochastic models. Due to urban specific environment, the deterministic component will be modelled with non-continuous functions composed by linear shifts, drifts or polynomial functions. In addition, we will introduce a stochastic error component for modelling residual noise of the trajectory error function. First step for error modelling requires to know the actual trajectory error values for several representative environments. In order to determine as accurately as possible the trajectories error, (almost) error less trajectories should be estimated using extracted nonsemantic features from a sequence of images collected with the terrestrial mobile mapping system and from a full set of ground control points. Once the references are estimated, they will be used to determine the actual errors in terrestrial mobile mapping trajectory. The rigorous analysis of these data sets will allow us to characterize the errors of a terrestrial mobile mapping system for a wide range of environments. This information will be of great use in future campaigns to improve the results of the 3D points cloud generation. The proposed approach has been evaluated using real data. The data originate from a mobile mapping campaign over an urban and controlled area of Dortmund (Germany), with harmful GNSS conditions. The mobile mapping system, that includes two laser scanner and two cameras, was mounted on a van and it was driven over a controlled area around three hours. The results show the suitability to decompose trajectory error with non-continuous deterministic and stochastic components.

  7. Comparison of quantum mechanical and classical trajectory calculations of cross sections for ion-atom impact ionization of negative - and positive -ions for heavy ion fusion applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2GeV I$^{-}$ and Cs$^{+}$ ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of six, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stri...

  8. Calculation Of Change-Changing Cross Sections Of IONS Or Atoms Colliding With Fast IONS Using The Classical Trajectory Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D., Shnidman, Ariel, Mebane, Harrison, Davidson, R.C.

    2008-10-10

    Evaluation of ion-atom charge-changing cross sections is needed for many accelerator applications. A classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation has been used to calculate ionization and charge exchange cross sections. For benchmarking purposes, an extensive study has been performed for the simple case of hydrogen and helium targets in collisions with various ions. Despite the fact that the simulation only accounts for classical mechanics, the calculations are comparable to experimental results for projectile velocities in the region corresponding to the vicinity of the maximum cross section. Shortcomings of the CTMC method for multielectron target atoms are discussed.

  9. Calculation Of Change-Changing Cross Sections Of IONS Or Atoms Colliding With Fast IONS Using The Classical Trajectory Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of ion-atom charge-changing cross sections is needed for many accelerator applications. A classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation has been used to calculate ionization and charge exchange cross sections. For benchmarking purposes, an extensive study has been performed for the simple case of hydrogen and helium targets in collisions with various ions. Despite the fact that the simulation only accounts for classical mechanics, the calculations are comparable to experimental results for projectile velocities in the region corresponding to the vicinity of the maximum cross section. Shortcomings of the CTMC method for multielectron target atoms are discussed

  10. Trajectories and models of individual growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseniy Karkach

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognized that the patterns of growth play an important role in the evolution of age trajectories of fertility and mortality (Williams, 1957. Life history studies would benefit from a better understanding of strategies and mechanisms of growth, but still no comparative research on individual growth strategies has been conducted. Growth patterns and methods have been shaped by evolution and a great variety of them are observed. Two distinct patterns - determinate and indeterminate growth - are of a special interest for these studies since they present qualitatively different outcomes of evolution. We attempt to draw together studies covering growth in plant and animal species across a wide range of phyla focusing primarily on the noted qualitative features. We also review mathematical descriptions of growth, namely empirical growth curves and growth models, and discuss the directions of future research.

  11. Reduced parameter model on trajectory tracking data with applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王正明; 朱炬波

    1999-01-01

    The data fusion in tracking the same trajectory by multi-measurernent unit (MMU) is considered. Firstly, the reduced parameter model (RPM) of trajectory parameter (TP), system error and random error are presented,and then the RPM on trajectory tracking data (TTD) is obtained, a weighted method on measuring elements (ME) is studied and criteria on selection of ME based on residual and accuracy estimation are put forward. According to RPM,the problem about selection of ME and self-calibration of TTD is thoroughly investigated. The method improves data accuracy in trajectory tracking obviously and gives accuracy evaluation of trajectory tracking system simultaneously.

  12. CLASSICAL RISK MODEL WITH THRESHOLD DIVIDEND STRATEGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ming; Guo Junyi

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a threshold dividend strategy is used for classical risk model.Under this dividend strategy, certain probability of ruin, which occurs in case of constant barrier strategy, is avoided. Using the strong Markov property of the surplus process and the distribution of the deficit in classical risk model, the survival probability for this model is derived, which is more direct than that in Asmussen(2000, P195, Proposition 1.10). The occupation time of non-dividend of this model is also discussed by means of Martingale method.

  13. A Trajectory UML profile For Modeling Trajectory Data: A Mobile Hospital Use Case

    CERN Document Server

    Oueslati, Wided

    2011-01-01

    A large amount of data resulting from trajectories of moving objects activities are collected thanks to localization based services and some associated automated processes. Trajectories data can be used either for transactional and analysis purposes in various domains (heath care, commerce, environment, etc.). For this reason, modeling trajectory data at the conceptual level is an important stair leading to global vision and successful implementations. However, current modeling tools fail to fulfill specific moving objects activities requirements. In this paper, we propose a new profile based on UML in order to enhance the conceptual modeling of trajectory data related to mobile objects by new stereotypes and icons. As illustration, we present a mobile hospital use case.

  14. Two simple models of classical heat pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Marathe, Rahul; Jayannavar, A. M.; Dhar, Abhishek

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent studies on models of particle and heat quantum pumps, we study similar simple classical models and examine the possibility of heat pumping. Unlike many of the usual ratchet models of molecular engines, the models we study do not have particle transport. We consider a two-spin system and a coupled oscillator system which exchange heat with multiple heat reservoirs and which are acted upon by periodic forces. The simplicity of our models allows accurate numerical and exact s...

  15. Modeling Pulsar Trajectories to Determine Birth Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Albert, Brent; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Neutron stars are the remnants of massive stars after their deaths in supernova explosions. They typically have higher velocities than their progenitor stellar population due to either kicks from supernova asymmetries or from remnant velocities of compact binaries after they are disrupted by explosions. Velocities are large enough that pulsars will typically move large distances from their birth sites. By determining the present day location and velocity, we project back to twice the pulsars characteristic age to constrain the location of the progenitor star (within the uncertainty of the unknown line-of-sight velocity component). We use precision measurements of the proper motion and parallax determined with the Very Long Baseline Array as input to trajectory modeling that includes deceleration in the Galactic potential. Using a python implementation utilizing astropy and galpy, we verify the results of Vlemmings et al. (2004, ApJ, 610, 402) on two pulsars, B2020+28 and B2012+51, which found that the two objects very likely originated in the same star cluster and whose progenitor stars could have been in the same binary system. We have applied the trace back algorithm to other pulsars using the most recent astrometric measurements to identify their birth locations. Results on these objects will be reported.

  16. Classical Dynamics of Rotating Relativistic String with Massive Ends: the Regge Trajectories and Quark Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic equations in the theory of a relativistic string with point masses at the ends are formulated in terms of geometric invariants of the world trajectories of the massive ends of the string (curvature ki and torsion κi(τ), i=1,2 of the trajectories). With these characteristics we reproduce the string world surface up to its position in Minkowski space E21. The torsions κi(τ), i=1,2 obey a system of second order differential equations with delay arguments describing the retardation effects of the interaction of masses through the string, ki being constants. The constant torsions are investigated in detail. In this case the string world sheet is a helicoid in E21. A nonlinear relation (the Regge trajectory) between the angular momentum of the system, J and the mass squared, M2, is derived. For given meson masses (M) and spin (J), the masses of quarks are calculated. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Comparisons of classical and Wigner sampling of transition state energy levels for quasiclassical trajectory chemical dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasiclassical trajectory calculations are compared, with classical and Wigner sampling of transition state (TS) energy levels, for C2H5F≠→HF+C2H4 product energy partitioning and [Cl···CH3···Cl]- central barrier dynamics. The calculations with Wigner sampling are reported here for comparison with the previously reported calculations with classical sampling [Y. J. Cho et al., J. Chem. Phys. 96, 8275 (1992); L. Sun and W. L. Hase, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 8831 (2004)]. The C2H5F≠ calculations were performed with direct dynamics at the MP2/6-31G* level of theory. Classical and Wigner sampling give post-transition state dynamics, for these two chemical systems, which are the same within statistical uncertainties. This is a result of important equivalences in these two sampling methods for selecting initial conditions at a TS. In contrast, classical and Wigner sampling often give different photodissociation dynamics [R. Schinke, J. Phys. Chem. 92, 3195 (1988)]. Here the sampling is performed for a vibrational state of the ground electronic state potential energy surface (PES), which is then projected onto the excited electronic state's PES. Differences between the ground and the excited PESs may give rise to substantially different excitations of the vibrational and dissociative coordinates on the excited state PES by classical and Wigner sampling, resulting in different photodissociation dynamics.

  18. Modeling Classical Heat Conduction in FLAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hendon, Raymond Cori [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory FLAG code contains both electron and ion heat conduction modules; these have been constructed to be directly relevant to user application problems. However, formal code verification of these modules requires quantitative comparison to exact solutions of the underlying mathematical models. A wide variety of exact solutions to the classical heat conduction equation are available for this purpose. This report summarizes efforts involving the representation of the classical heat conduction equation as following from the large electron-ion coupling limit of the electron and ion 3T temperature equations, subject to electron and ion conduction processes. In FLAG, this limiting behavior is quantitatively verified using a simple exact solution of the classical heat conduction equation. For this test problem, both heat conduction modules produce nearly identical spatial electron and ion temperature profiles that converge at slightly less than 2nd order to the corresponding exact solution.

  19. Developmental Trajectories of Adolescent Popularity: A Growth Curve Modelling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2006-01-01

    Growth curve modelling was used to examine developmental trajectories of sociometric and perceived popularity across eight years in adolescence, and the effects of gender, overt aggression, and relational aggression on these trajectories. Participants were 303 initially popular students (167 girls, 136 boys) for whom sociometric data were…

  20. Model predictive control classical, robust and stochastic

    CERN Document Server

    Kouvaritakis, Basil

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a textbook that brings together classical predictive control with treatment of up-to-date robust and stochastic techniques. Model Predictive Control describes the development of tractable algorithms for uncertain, stochastic, constrained systems. The starting point is classical predictive control and the appropriate formulation of performance objectives and constraints to provide guarantees of closed-loop stability and performance. Moving on to robust predictive control, the text explains how similar guarantees may be obtained for cases in which the model describing the system dynamics is subject to additive disturbances and parametric uncertainties. Open- and closed-loop optimization are considered and the state of the art in computationally tractable methods based on uncertainty tubes presented for systems with additive model uncertainty. Finally, the tube framework is also applied to model predictive control problems involving hard or probabilistic constraints for the cases of multiplic...

  1. Classical trajectory study on an ab initio CI vibrotor potential energy surface for Li+-CO differential cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previous rigid rotor potential surface for Li+-CO has been improved by computing surface points for two additional CO bond lengths at three different angles of orientation. The CI calculations including all single and double excitations which can be generated within the Hartree-Fock SCF molecular orbital basis have been improved by taking certain quadrupole excitations into account in an approximate way. Classical trajectories computed on this surface have been used to determine differential cross sections at scattering angles of 37.10, 43.20 and 49.20, and for a relative kinetic energy of 4.23 eV. Comparison with experiment shows that inclusion of CO vibrations does not account for the discrepancy found previously between the classical rigid rotor and the experimental results. When summed over all final vibrational levels the vibrotor results are nearly identical to the rigid rotor cross sections. (Auth.)

  2. Foot trajectory approximation using the pendulum model of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Juan; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Galen, Sujay; Conway, Bernard A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Generating a natural foot trajectory is an important objective in robotic systems for rehabilitation of walking. Human walking has pendular properties, so the pendulum model of walking has been used in bipedal robots which produce rhythmic gait patterns. Whether natural foot trajectories can be produced by the pendulum model needs to be addressed as a first step towards applying the pendulum concept in gait orthosis design. This study investigated circle approximation of the foot trajectories, with focus on the geometry of the pendulum model of walking. Three able-bodied subjects walked overground at various speeds, and foot trajectories relative to the hip were analysed. Four circle approximation approaches were developed, and best-fit circle algorithms were derived to fit the trajectories of the ankle, heel and toe. The study confirmed that the ankle and heel trajectories during stance and the toe trajectory in both the stance and the swing phases during walking at various speeds could be well modelled by a rigid pendulum. All the pendulum models were centred around the hip with pendular lengths approximately equal to the segment distances from the hip. This observation provides a new approach for using the pendulum model of walking in gait orthosis design.

  3. The Biharmonic Oscillator and Asymmetric Linear Potentials: From Classical Trajectories to Momentum-Space Probability Densities in the Extreme Quantum Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckle, L. J.; Belloni, M.; Robinett, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    The biharmonic oscillator and the asymmetric linear well are two confining power-law-type potentials for which complete bound-state solutions are possible in both classical and quantum mechanics. We examine these problems in detail, beginning with studies of their trajectories in position and momentum space, evaluation of the classical probability…

  4. A Classical Probabilistic Computer Model of Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show that human consciousness can be modeled as a classical (not quantum) probabilistic computer. A quantum computer representation does not appear to be indicated because no known feature of consciousness depends on Planck's constant h, the telltale sign of quantum phenomena. It is argued that the facets of consciousness are describable by an object-oriented design with dynamically defined classes and objects. A comparison to economic theory is also made. We argue consciousness may also h...

  5. Comparison of quantum mechanical and classical trajectory calculations of cross sections for ion-atom impact ionization of negative - and positive -ions for heavy ion fusion applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaganovich, I D; Davidson, R C; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2GeV I$^{-}$ and Cs$^{+}$ ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of six, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stripping cross sections at high energies for electron orbitals with low ionization potential.

  6. Semiclassical approach to mesoscopic systems classical trajectory correlations and wave interference

    CERN Document Server

    Waltner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This volume describes mesoscopic systems with classically chaotic dynamics using semiclassical methods which combine elements of classical dynamics and quantum interference effects. Experiments and numerical studies show that Random Matrix Theory (RMT) explains physical properties of these systems well. This was conjectured more than 25 years ago by Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit for the spectral properties. Since then, it has been a challenge to understand this connection analytically.  The author offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. He extends previous semiclassical approaches that treated spectral and conductance properties. He shows that RMT results can in general only be obtained semiclassically when taking into account classical configurations not considered previously, for example those containing multiply traversed periodic orbits. Furthermore, semiclassics is capable of describing effects beyond RMT. In this context he studies the effect of a non-zero Eh...

  7. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Caitlin R; Balsor, Justin L; Jones, David G; Murphy, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, myelin is viewed as insulation around axons, however, more recent studies have shown it also plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism, and neuroimmune signaling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T-cells. Furthermore, Golli-MBP has been called a "molecular link" between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex specifically, myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan. Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging. Golli-MBP has early developmental changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, and gradually increases into aging. There are three stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition, the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  8. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin R Siu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally myelin is viewed as insulation around axons however more recent studies have shown it plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism and neuroimmune signalling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T cells, and has been called a 'molecular link' between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan: Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging; Golli-MBP has changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, before gradually increasing into aging. There are 3 stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  9. RETADD: a Regional Trajectory And Diffusion-Deposition model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C. L.; Murphy, B. D.; Nappo, Jr., C. J.

    1978-06-01

    The Regional Trajectory and Diffusion-Deposition Model (RETADD) is based upon a version of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory's Regional-Continental Scale Transport, Diffusion, and Deposition Model. The FORTRAN IV computer model uses a trajectory analysis technique for estimating the transport and long-range diffusion of material emitted from a point source. The wind trajectory portion of the code uses observed upper air winds to compute the transport of the material. Ground level concentrations and depositions are computed by using the Gaussian plume equation for wind trajectories projected forward in time. Options are included to specify an upper bound for the mixed layer and a chemical decomposition rate for the effluent. The limitations to the technique are discussed, the equations and model are described, and listings of the program, input, and output are included.

  10. Evaluating the TD model of classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvig, Elliot A; Sutton, Richard S; Kehoe, E James

    2012-09-01

    The temporal-difference (TD) algorithm from reinforcement learning provides a simple method for incrementally learning predictions of upcoming events. Applied to classical conditioning, TD models suppose that animals learn a real-time prediction of the unconditioned stimulus (US) on the basis of all available conditioned stimuli (CSs). In the TD model, similar to other error-correction models, learning is driven by prediction errors--the difference between the change in US prediction and the actual US. With the TD model, however, learning occurs continuously from moment to moment and is not artificially constrained to occur in trials. Accordingly, a key feature of any TD model is the assumption about the representation of a CS on a moment-to-moment basis. Here, we evaluate the performance of the TD model with a heretofore unexplored range of classical conditioning tasks. To do so, we consider three stimulus representations that vary in their degree of temporal generalization and evaluate how the representation influences the performance of the TD model on these conditioning tasks.

  11. Scattering of fast N-2 from Pd(111) : A classical trajectory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Vicanek, M; Heiland, W

    1997-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen is well known for its chemical inactivity. Experimental results for grazing incidence N-2 scattering from Pd(111) surfaces in the keV range also reveal negligible influences of electronical processes on molecular fragmentation. Therefore, we carry out gn appropriate classical trea

  12. VOTERS DECIDE. CLASSICAL MODELS OF ELECTORAL BEHAVIOR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is a extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decide becomes a central concern. In this paper we intend to locate the determinants of the vote decision in the electoral behavior classical theoretical models developed over time. After doing synthesis of classical schools of thought on electoral behavior we conclude that it has been made a journey through the mind, soul and cheek, as follows: the mind as reason in theory developed by Downs, soul as preferably for an actor in Campbell's theory, etc. and cheek as an expression of the impossibility of detachment from social groups to which we belong in Lazarsfeld's theory.

  13. Probabilistic Modeling of Aircraft Trajectories for Dynamic Separation Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    With a proliferation of new and unconventional vehicles and operations expected in the future, the ab initio airspace design will require new approaches to trajectory prediction for separation assurance and other air traffic management functions. This paper presents an approach to probabilistic modeling of the trajectory of an aircraft when its intent is unknown. The approach uses a set of feature functions to constrain a maximum entropy probability distribution based on a set of observed aircraft trajectories. This model can be used to sample new aircraft trajectories to form an ensemble reflecting the variability in an aircraft's intent. The model learning process ensures that the variability in this ensemble reflects the behavior observed in the original data set. Computational examples are presented.

  14. Classical model for bulk-ensemble NMR quantum computation

    OpenAIRE

    Schack, R.; Caves, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    We present a classical model for bulk-ensemble NMR quantum computation: the quantum state of the NMR sample is described by a probability distribution over the orientations of classical tops, and quantum gates are described by classical transition probabilities. All NMR quantum computing experiments performed so far with three quantum bits can be accounted for in this classical model. After a few entangling gates, the classical model suffers an exponential decrease of the measured signal, whe...

  15. Classical trajectory calculations for anisotropy-dependent cross sections for He-N2 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical expressions for kinetic theory cross sections which are related to the Senftleben-Beenakker effect on viscosity, diffusion, conductivity and thermal diffusion are evaluated, in the temperature range 77.3-1100 K. The depolarised Rayleigh scattering and rotational-relaxation cross sections are also obtained. Comparisons with experiment show that the present values for these cross sections are 10-80% larger than the measurments. These consistent discrepancies suggest that this potential surface is too anisotropic. (author)

  16. Semiclassical approach to mesoscopic systems. Classical trajectory correlations and wave interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltner, Daniel [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-07-01

    This volume describes mesoscopic systems with classically chaotic dynamics using semiclassical methods which combine elements of classical dynamics and quantum interference effects. Experiments and numerical studies show that Random Matrix Theory (RMT) explains physical properties of these systems well. This was conjectured more than 25 years ago by Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit for the spectral properties. Since then, it has been a challenge to understand this connection analytically. The author offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. He extends previous semiclassical approaches that treated spectral and conductance properties. He shows that RMT results can in general only be obtained semiclassically when taking into account classical configurations not considered previously, for example those containing multiply traversed periodic orbits. Furthermore, semiclassics is capable of describing effects beyond RMT. In this context he studies the effect of a non-zero Ehrenfest time, which is the minimal time needed for an initially spatially localized wave packet to show interference. He derives its signature on several quantities characterizing mesoscopic systems, e. g. dc and ac conductance, dc conductance variance, n-pair correlation functions of scattering matrices and the gap in the density of states of Andreev billiards. (orig.)

  17. A semiclassical model for the calculation of nonadiabatic transition probabilities for classically forbidden transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Phuong-Thanh; Herman, Michael F

    2009-02-01

    A semiclassical surface hopping model is presented for the calculation of nonadiabatic transition probabilities for the case in which the avoided crossing point is in the classically forbidden regions. The exact potentials and coupling are replaced with simple functional forms that are fitted to the values, evaluated at the turning point in the classical motion, of the Born-Oppenheimer potentials, the nonadiabatic coupling, and their first few derivatives. For the one-dimensional model considered, reasonably accurate results for transition probabilities are obtained down to around 10(-10). The possible extension of this model to many dimensional problems is discussed. The fact that the model requires only information at the turning point, a point that the trajectories encounter would be a significant advantage in many dimensional problems over Landau-Zener type models, which require information at the avoided crossing seam, which is in the forbidden region where the trajectories do not go.

  18. Galileo's Trajectory with Mild Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of Galileo's classical trajectory that persists in a simple resistance model is noted. The resistive model provides a case study for the classroom analysis of limiting behaviour of an implicitly defined function. (Contains 1 note.)

  19. Classical-trajectory calculations on Ar+ sputtering of a Si(001) surface using an ab initio potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe classical-trajectory calculations of sputtering yields for Ar+-ion collisions with a Si(001) surface. The Ar+-Si and short-ranged Si-Si interaction potentials were calculated using the ab initio Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. The low-energy potential describing the silicon solid is the two- and three-body form due to Stillinger and Weber. We compare the calculated sputtering yields with experiment. The potential-energy surface strongly influences the calculated sputtering yields, and it is found that the most reasonable agreement is obtained from our potentials using the (2 x 1) Si(001) reconstructed surface rather than the bulk-terminated surface. Analysis of the kinetic energy and angular distributions of the sputtered silicon atoms and of cluster yields has provided a mechanism of ejection

  20. Characterization of induced nanoplasmonic fields in time-resolved photoemission from gold nanospheres: a classical trajectory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saydanzad, Erfan; Thumm, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    Attosecond time-resolved (XUV-pump, IR-probe) spectroscopy has been shown to be a powerful method for investigating the electron dynamics in atoms, and this technique is now being transferred to the investigation of electronic excitations, electron propagation, and collective electronic (plasmonic) effects in solids. Based on classical trajectory calculations, we simulated (i) the final photoelectron velocity distribution in order to provide observable velocity-map images for gold nanospheres of 10 and 100 nm diameter and (ii) streaked photoemission spectra. By analyzing our numerical results, we illustrate how spatio-temporal information about the sub-IR-cycle plasmonic and electronic dynamics is encoded in velocity-map images and streaked photoelectron spectra. Supported by the NE/KS NSF-EPSCOR program.

  1. Zipf exponent of trajectory distribution in the hidden Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V. V.; Lerner, E. Yu

    2014-03-01

    This paper is the first step of generalization of the previously obtained full classification of the asymptotic behavior of the probability for Markov chain trajectories for the case of hidden Markov models. The main goal is to study the power (Zipf) and nonpower asymptotics of the frequency list of trajectories of hidden Markov frequencys and to obtain explicit formulae for the exponent of the power asymptotics. We consider several simple classes of hidden Markov models. We prove that the asymptotics for a hidden Markov model and for the corresponding Markov chain can be essentially different.

  2. Wind field and trajectory models for tornado-propelled objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of the second phase of a research program which has as its objective the development of a mathematical model to predict the trajectory of tornado-borne objects postulated to be in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. An improved tornado wind field model satisfies the no-slip ground boundary condition of fluid mechanics and includes the functional dependence of eddy viscosity with altitude. Sub-scale wind tunnel data are obtained for all of the missiles currently specified for nuclear plant design. Confirmatory full-scale data are obtained for a 12-inch pipe and automobile. The original six-degree-of-freedom trajectory model is modified to include the improved wind field and increased capability as to body shapes and inertial characteristics that can be handled. The improved trajectory model is used to calculate maximum credible speeds, which for all of the heavy missiles are considerably less than those currently specified for design. Equivalent coefficients for use in three-degree-of-freedom models are developed and the sensitivity of range and speed to various trajectory parameters for the 12-inch diameter pipe is examined

  3. Crack trajectory near a weld: Modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, M.M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2008-01-01

    A 2D computational model of ductile fracture, in which arbitrary crack extension through the mesh is accommodated without mesh bias, is used to study ductile fracture near the weld line in welded aluminum plates. Comparisons of the calculated toughness behavior and crack trajectory are made...

  4. Lagrangian Time Series Models for Ocean Surface Drifter Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Sykulski, Adam M; Lilly, Jonathan M; Danioux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes stochastic models for the analysis of ocean surface trajectories obtained from freely-drifting satellite-tracked instruments. The proposed time series models are used to summarise large multivariate datasets and infer important physical parameters of inertial oscillations and other ocean processes. Nonstationary time series methods are employed to account for the spatiotemporal variability of each trajectory. Because the datasets are large, we construct computationally efficient methods through the use of frequency-domain modelling and estimation, with the data expressed as complex-valued time series. We detail how practical issues related to sampling and model misspecification may be addressed using semi-parametric techniques for time series, and we demonstrate the effectiveness of our stochastic models through application to both real-world data and to numerical model output.

  5. Quasi-classical trajectory approach to the stereo-dynamics of the reaction F+HO→HF+O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations are employed for the reaction F + HO(0,0)→HF + O based on the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) of the ground 3A″triplet state. The average rotational alignment factor as a function of collision energy and the four polarization dependent generalized differential cross sections have been calculated in the center-of-mass (CM) frame, separately. The distribution P(θr) of the angle between k and j′, the distribution P(θr) of dihedral angle denoting k-k′-j′ correlation, and the angular distribution P(θr, Φr) of product rotational vectors in the form of polar plots are calculated as well. The effect of Heavy-Light-Heavy (HLH) mass combination and atom F’s relatively strong absorbability to charges on the alignment and the orientation of product molecule HF rotational angular momentum vectors j′ is revealed.

  6. Higgs Triplet Model with Classically Conformal Invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Hiroshi; Yagyu, Kei

    2015-01-01

    We discuss an extension of the minimal Higgs triplet model with a classically conformal invariance and with a gauged $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry. In our scenario, tiny masses of neutrinos are generated by a hybrid contribution from the type-I and type-II seesaw mechanisms. The shape of the Higgs potential at low energies is determined by solving one-loop renormalization group equations for all the scalar quartic couplings with a set of initial values of parameters at the Planck scale. We find a successful set of the parameters in which the $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism at the ${\\cal O}$(10) TeV scale, and the electroweak symmetry breaking is also triggered by the $U(1)_{B-L}$ breaking. Under this configuration, we can predict various low energy observables such as the mass spectrum of extra Higgs bosons, and the mixing angles. Furthermore, using these predicted mass parameters, we obtain upper limits on Yukawa couplings among an isospin triplet Higgs field and lepton...

  7. A Multi-billion Parcel Atmospheric Trajectory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, C.; Clune, T. L.; Lait, L. R.; Ranawake, U.; Burns, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    We present a new parallel implementation of an atmospheric trajectory modelling framework which provides improved numerical accuracy, greater flexibility for specifying experiments, and sufficient raw performance to simultaneously simulate billions of parcel trajectories on suitable computing platforms. The application is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library and can scale efficiently on a wide variety of modern computing platforms. The ability to treat such large numbers of parcels is expected to enable a new generation of experiments to explore questions related to global stratosphere-troposphere exchange, age-of-air spectra, and transport of trace gases and aerosols. The modelling framework is written in C++ for easy integration with other computing technologies. It also provides a great deal of flexibility by allowing users to select from (or add to) alternative subclasses for vertical coordinates (pressure, potential temperature), integration schemes (Runge-Kutta, Euler), meteorological data sources (NCEP/NCAR Reanalsyis, MERRA), data interpolation methods (linear, log-linear, splines), and output (parcel histories, summary statistics, min/max quantities encountered). Significantly improved numerical accuracy, especially near the poles, is provided by expressing integration in terms of purely geometric constructs which avoid various complications associated with spherical coordinates near the poles. The entire package has been rigorously developed using Test-Driven Development (TDD) which both provides confidence in the implementation and should also assist other developers that wish to extend the framework. Several tests are performed to demonstrate the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme with our spherical geometric constructs. Tilted solid body rotation provides a baseline synthetic wind field for assessing model performance, and a time-varying case is used to examine the errors introduced by interpolating linearly in time

  8. Calculation of charge-changing cross-sections of ions or atoms colliding with fast ions using the classical trajectory method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of ion-atom charge-changing cross-sections is needed for many accelerator applications. A Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation has been used to calculate ionization and charge-exchange cross-sections. For benchmarking purposes, an extensive study has been performed for the simple case of hydrogen and helium targets in collisions with various ions. Despite the fact that the simulation only accounts for classical mechanics, the calculations are comparable to experimental results for projectile velocities in the region corresponding to the vicinity of the maximum cross-section. The shortcomings of the CTMC method for multielectron target atoms are discussed.

  9. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a new prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by T...

  10. Chemical reaction dynamics of Rydberg atoms with neutral molecules: a comparison of molecular-beam and classical trajectory results for the H(n)+D2-->HD+D(n') reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Chia Chen; Harich, Steven A; Hayes, Michael Y; Wang, Xiuyan; Gerlich, Dieter; Yang, Xueming; Skodje, Rex T

    2005-08-15

    Recent molecular-beam experiments have probed the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom reaction, H(n)+D2-->HD+D(n) at low collision energies. It was discovered that the rotationally resolved product distribution was remarkably similar to a much more limited data set obtained at a single scattering angle for the ion-molecule reaction H++D2-->D++HD. The equivalence of these two problems would be consistent with the Fermi-independent-collider model (electron acting as a spectator) and would provide an important new avenue for the study of ion-molecule reactions. In this work, we employ a classical trajectory calculation on the ion-molecule reaction to facilitate a more extensive comparison between the two systems. The trajectory simulations tend to confirm the equivalence of the ion+molecule dynamics to that for the Rydberg-atom+molecule system. The theory reproduces the close relationship of the two experimental observations made previously. However, some differences between the Rydberg-atom experiments and the trajectory simulations are seen when comparisons are made to a broader data set. In particular, the angular distribution of the differential cross section exhibits more asymmetry in the experiment than in the theory. The potential breakdown of the classical model is discussed. The role of the "spectator" Rydberg electron is addressed and several crucial issues for future theoretical work are brought out.

  11. Chemical reaction dynamics of Rydberg atoms with neutral molecules: A comparison of molecular-beam and classical trajectory results for the H(n)+D2→HD+D(n') reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent molecular-beam experiments have probed the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom reaction, H(n)+D2→HD+D(n) at low collision energies. It was discovered that the rotationally resolved product distribution was remarkably similar to a much more limited data set obtained at a single scattering angle for the ion-molecule reaction H++D2→D++HD. The equivalence of these two problems would be consistent with the Fermi-independent-collider model (electron acting as a spectator) and would provide an important new avenue for the study of ion-molecule reactions. In this work, we employ a classical trajectory calculation on the ion-molecule reaction to facilitate a more extensive comparison between the two systems. The trajectory simulations tend to confirm the equivalence of the ion+molecule dynamics to that for the Rydberg-atom+molecule system. The theory reproduces the close relationship of the two experimental observations made previously. However, some differences between the Rydberg-atom experiments and the trajectory simulations are seen when comparisons are made to a broader data set. In particular, the angular distribution of the differential cross section exhibits more asymmetry in the experiment than in the theory. The potential breakdown of the classical model is discussed. The role of the 'spectator' Rydberg electron is addressed and several crucial issues for future theoretical work are brought out

  12. Mathematical Model to Simulate the Trajectory Elements ofan Artillery Projectile Proof Shot

    OpenAIRE

    K.K. Chand; H.S. Panda

    2007-01-01

    In external ballistics of a conventional spin-stabilised artillery projectile, there are a numberof trajectory models developed for computing trajectory elements having varying degrees ofcomplexity. The present study attempts to propose a single mathematical model, viz., simplifiedpoint-mass/simple particle trajectory model to simulate the trajectory elements of a typical spin-stabilised flat-head artillery projectile proof shot. Due to difficulties in the projectile shape andsize, and the co...

  13. Pomeron and odderon Regge trajectories from a dynamical holographic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossoli, Eduardo Folco; Li, Danning; Boschi-Filho, Henrique

    2016-09-01

    In this work we use gauge/string dualities and a dynamical model that takes into account dynamical corrections to the metric of the anti de Sitter space due to a quadratic dilaton field and calculate the masses of even and odd spin glueball states with P = C = + 1, and P = C = - 1, respectively. Then we construct the corresponding Regge trajectories which are associated with the pomeron for even states with P = C = + 1, and with the odderon for odd states with P = C = - 1. We compare our results with those coming from experimental data as well as other models.

  14. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3 σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. A finite mixture latent trajectory model for modeling ultrarunners' behavior in a 24-hour race

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolucci, Francesco; Murphy, Thomas Brendan

    2015-01-01

    A finite mixture latent trajectory model is developed to study the performance and strategy of runners in a 24-h long ultra running race. The model facilitates clustering of runners based on their speed and propensity to rest and thus reveals the strategies used in the race. Inference for the adopted latent trajectory model is achieved using an expectation-maximization algorithm. Fitting the model to data from the 2013 World Championships reveals three clearly separated clusters of runners wh...

  16. Rock shape, restitution coefficients and rockfall trajectory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, James; Christen, Marc; Bühler, Yves; Bartelt, Perry

    2014-05-01

    Restitution coefficients are used in rockfall trajectory modelling to describe the ratio between incident and rebound velocities during ground impact. They are central to the problem of rockfall hazard analysis as they link rock mass characteristics to terrain properties. Using laboratory experiments as a guide, we first show that restitution coefficients exhibit a wide range of scatter, although the material properties of the rock and ground are constant. This leads us to the conclusion that restitution coefficients are poor descriptors of rock-ground interaction. The primary problem is that "apparent" restitution coefficients are applied at the rock's centre-of-mass and do not account for rock shape. An accurate description of the rock-ground interaction requires the contact forces to be applied at the rock surface with consideration of the momentary rock position and spin. This leads to a variety of rock motions including bouncing, sliding, skipping and rolling. Depending on the impact configuration a wide range of motions is possible. This explains the large scatter of apparent restitution coefficients. We present a rockfall model based on newly developed hard-contact algorithms which includes the effects of rock shape and therefore is able to reproduce the results of different impact configurations. We simulate the laboratory experiments to show that it is possible to reproduce run-out and dispersion of different rock shapes using parameters obtained from independent tests. Although this is a step forward in rockfall trajectory modelling, the problem of parametersing real terrain remains.

  17. Classical conformality in the Standard Model from Coleman's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2016-01-01

    The classical conformality is one of the possible candidates for explaining the gauge hierarchy of the Standard Model. We show that it is naturally obtained from the Coleman's theory on baby universe.

  18. Plasma sheath studies using the kinetic trajectory simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma sheath formed in front of a material wall for different cases have been studied. For given electron and ion distributions at the sheath entrance we use Kinetic Trajectory Simulation (KTS) model to obtain the solution to a non-neutral, time-independent, collisionless plasma sheath. The characteristic feature of the KTS method is that the distribution functions of the particle species involved are calculated directly by solving the related kinetic equations along the respective collisionless particle trajectories. For a given potential distribution, we calculate the exact ion distribution function by integrating Vlasov's equation along its characteristics and taking into account the scraping-off effect at the wall. The electron distribution, on the other hand, is calculated analytically, however taking into account the cut-off introduced by electron absorption at the wall.We also present a scheme for coupling a quasineutral two-fluid (electron-ion) presheath solution to a non-neutral, collisionless kinetic sheath solution for a 1d1v case. It has been observed that the sheath structure is highly influenced by the magnitude of potential applied to the wall. The applied kinetic model is thus expected to give better insight to the sheath phenomena. (author)

  19. Dynamic Modeling of Trajectory Patterns using Data Mining and Reverse Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alvares, Luis Otavio; Bogorny, Vania; FERNANDES de MACEDO, J.A.; Moelans, Bart; Spaccapietra, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    The constant increase of moving object data imposes the need for modeling, processing, and mining trajectories, in order to find and understand the patterns behind these data. Existing works have mainly focused on the geometric properties of trajectories, while the semantics and the background geographic information has rarely been addressed. We claim that meaningful patterns can only be extracted from trajectories if the geographic space where trajectories are located is considered. In this ...

  20. Application of particle trajectory model in 1D planar ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘坤; 柏劲松; 李平

    2008-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional planar model for ejection was set up based on experiments.And numerical simulation was performed on this model with particle trajectory model method.An Eulerian finite volume method was conducted to resolve gas field.And Lagrangian method was imposed to track each particle.The interaction between gas and particles was responded as source terms in governing equations which were induced by forces.The effects of total spraying mass,particle size and other factors on the mixture of particles and gas were investigated.The spatial distributions of particle mass and velocity at different time were presented.The result shows that the numerical results are qualitatively consistent to those of experiments.

  1. Modeling the Classic Meselson and Stahl Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, JoBeth

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of molecular models in biology and chemistry. Presents a laboratory activity on DNA. Uses different colored wax strips to represent "heavy" and "light" DNA, cesium chloride for identification of small density differences, and three different liquids with varying densities to model gradient centrifugation. (YDS)

  2. Moving Object Trajectories Meta-Model and Spatio-Temporal Queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azedine Boulmakoul

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a general moving object trajectories framework is put forward to allow independent applications processing trajectories data benefit from a high level of interoperability, information sharing as well as an efficient answer for a wide range of complex trajectory queries. Our proposed meta-model is based on ontology and event approach, incorporates existing presentations of trajectory and integrates new patterns like space–time path to describe activities in geographical space-time. We introduce recursive Region of Interest concepts and deal mobile objects trajectories with diverse spatio-temporal samplingprotocols and different sensors available that traditional data model alone are incapable for this purpose.

  3. Moving Object Trajectories Meta-Model And Spatio-Temporal Queries

    CERN Document Server

    Boulmakoul, Azedine; Lbath, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a general moving object trajectories framework is put forward to allow independent applications processing trajectories data benefit from a high level of interoperability, information sharing as well as an efficient answer for a wide range of complex trajectory queries. Our proposed meta-model is based on ontology and event approach, incorporates existing presentations of trajectory and integrates new patterns like space-time path to describe activities in geographical space-time. We introduce recursive Region of Interest concepts and deal mobile objects trajectories with diverse spatio-temporal sampling protocols and different sensors available that traditional data model alone are incapable for this purpose.

  4. Classical models of the spin 1/2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Lazaro, Carlos H.

    We proposed a Quaternionic mechanical system motivated by the Foucault pendulum as a classical model for the dynamics of the spin ½ system. We showed that this mechanical system contains the dynamics of the spin state of the electron under a uniform magnetic field as it is given by the Schrodinger-Pauli-Equation (SPE). We closed with a characterization of the dynamics of this generalized classical system by showing that it is equivalent with the dynamics of the Schrodinger Pauli Equation as long as the solutions to the generalized classical system are roots of the Lagrangian, that is the condition L = 0 holds.

  5. Classical solutions of some field theoretic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years much attention has been paid to simpler fields theories, so chosen that they possess several properties of nonabelian gauge theories. They preserve the conformal invariance of the action and one can define the topological charge for them. They possess nontrivial solutions to the equations of motion. The perturbation theory based on the fluctuations around each solution is characterized by asymptotic freedom. A model called CP sup(n-1) is presented and some models which are its natural generalizations are discussed. (M.F.W.)

  6. On a Classical Spin Glass Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemmen, JL; Enter, A.C.D. van; Canisius, J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple, exactly soluble, model of a spin-glass with weakly correlated disorder is presented. It includes both randomness and frustration, but its solution can be obtained without replicas. As the temperature T is lowered, the spin-glass phase is reached via an equilibrium phase transition at T=Tf.

  7. Classical solutions of a flag manifold sigma-model

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    We study a sigma-model with target space the flag manifold U(3)/U(1)^3. A peculiarity of the model is that the complex structure on the target space enters explicitly in the action. We describe the classical solutions of the model for the case when the worldsheet is a sphere CP^1.

  8. Outline and Preliminary Evaluation of the Classical Digital Library Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCall, Steven L.; Cleveland, Ana D.; Gibson, Ian E.

    1999-01-01

    Outlines the classical digital library model, which is derived from traditional practices of library and information science professionals, as an alternative to the database retrieval model. Reports preliminary results from an evaluation study of library and information professionals and endusers involved with primary care medicine. (AEF)

  9. Comparison of quantum-mechanical and classical trajectory calculations of cross sections for ion-atom impact ionization of negative and positive ions for heavy-ion fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2 GeV I- and Cs+ ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of 6, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stripping cross sections at high energies for electron orbitals with low ionization potential

  10. Autoparallel vs. Geodesic Trajectories in a Model of Torsion Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Acedo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider a parametrized torsion gravity model for Riemann–Cartan geometry around a rotating axisymmetric massive body. In this model, the source of torsion is given by a circulating vector potential following the celestial parallels around the rotating object. Ours is a variant of the Mao, Tegmark, Guth and Cabi (MTGC model in which the total angular momentum is proposed as a source of torsion. We study the motion of bodies around the rotating object in terms of autoparallel trajectories and determine the leading perturbations of the orbital elements by using standard celestial mechanics techniques. We find that this torsion model implies new gravitational physical consequences in the Solar system and, in particular, secular variations of the semi-major axis of the planetary orbits. Perturbations on the longitude of the ascending node and the perihelion of the planets are already under discussion in the astronomical community, and if confirmed as truly non-zero effects at a statistically significant level, we might be at the dawn of an era of torsion phenomenology in the Solar system.

  11. Optimal Hankel Norm Model Reduction by Truncation of Trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, B.; Weiland, S.

    2000-01-01

    We show how optimal Hankel-norm approximations of dynamical systems allow for a straightforward interpretation in terms of system trajectories. It is shown that for discrete time single-input systems optimal reductions are obtained by cutting 'balanced trajectories', i.e., by disconnecting the past

  12. THE NEW CLASSICAL THEORY AND THE REAL BUSINESS CYCLE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Simona HUDEA (CARAMAN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at describing some key elements of the new classical theory-related model, namely the Real Business Cycle, mainly describing the economy from the perspective of a perfectly competitive market, characterised by price, wage and interest rate flexibility. The rendered impulse-response functions, that help us in revealing the capacity of the model variables to return to their steady state under the impact of a structural shock, be it technology or monetary policy oriented, give points to the neutrality of the monetary entity decisions, therefore confirming the well-known classical dichotomy existing between the nominal and the real factors of the economy.

  13. An incremental DPMM-based method for trajectory clustering, modeling, and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Li, Xi; Tian, Guodong; Maybank, Stephen; Zhang, Zhongfei

    2013-05-01

    Trajectory analysis is the basis for many applications, such as indexing of motion events in videos, activity recognition, and surveillance. In this paper, the Dirichlet process mixture model (DPMM) is applied to trajectory clustering, modeling, and retrieval. We propose an incremental version of a DPMM-based clustering algorithm and apply it to cluster trajectories. An appropriate number of trajectory clusters is determined automatically. When trajectories belonging to new clusters arrive, the new clusters can be identified online and added to the model without any retraining using the previous data. A time-sensitive Dirichlet process mixture model (tDPMM) is applied to each trajectory cluster for learning the trajectory pattern which represents the time-series characteristics of the trajectories in the cluster. Then, a parameterized index is constructed for each cluster. A novel likelihood estimation algorithm for the tDPMM is proposed, and a trajectory-based video retrieval model is developed. The tDPMM-based probabilistic matching method and the DPMM-based model growing method are combined to make the retrieval model scalable and adaptable. Experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm. PMID:23520251

  14. Research on Three-dimensional Modeling and Visualization for Well Trajectory of Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiaorong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to realize 3D visualization of well trajectory more efficiently by use of a new method. In view of the shortcomings of traditional three-dimensional (3D modeling methods for well trajectory, a new method of slice-based 3D modeling for the tubular well trajectory was put forward, by which a 3D well trajectory model was established. The method can realize the 3D tubular well trajectory seamless connection efficiently and conveniently without interpolation smoothing treatment of the well trajectory’s crook. In order to provide a convenience to observe and analyze intuitively as well as control the well trajectory effectively in drilling for the drilling staff, realized 3D visualization of the well trajectory based on virtual reality technology and provided flexible human-computer interaction functions with which the drilling staff can make interactive operation such as zooming, translating and rotating, etc., for the 3D well trajectory. Consequently, the well trajectory can be observed from multi-azimuth and multi-angle, improving the oil reservoir encountering rate. Finally, an application example of 3D visualization for well trajectory in Dagang Oilfield was given.

  15. Communication: Note on detailed balance in symmetrical quasi-classical models for electronically non-adiabatic dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William H., E-mail: millerwh@berkeley.edu; Cotton, Stephen J., E-mail: StephenJCotton47@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, University of California and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-04-07

    It is noted that the recently developed symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) treatment of the Meyer-Miller (MM) model for the simulation of electronically non-adiabatic dynamics provides a good description of detailed balance, even though the dynamics which results from the classical MM Hamiltonian is “Ehrenfest dynamics” (i.e., the force on the nuclei is an instantaneous coherent average over all electronic states). This is seen to be a consequence of the SQC windowing methodology for “processing” the results of the trajectory calculation. For a particularly simple model discussed here, this is shown to be true regardless of the choice of windowing function employed in the SQC model, and for a more realistic full classical molecular dynamics simulation, it is seen to be maintained correctly for very long time.

  16. Communication: Note on detailed balance in symmetrical quasi-classical models for electronically non-adiabatic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is noted that the recently developed symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) treatment of the Meyer-Miller (MM) model for the simulation of electronically non-adiabatic dynamics provides a good description of detailed balance, even though the dynamics which results from the classical MM Hamiltonian is “Ehrenfest dynamics” (i.e., the force on the nuclei is an instantaneous coherent average over all electronic states). This is seen to be a consequence of the SQC windowing methodology for “processing” the results of the trajectory calculation. For a particularly simple model discussed here, this is shown to be true regardless of the choice of windowing function employed in the SQC model, and for a more realistic full classical molecular dynamics simulation, it is seen to be maintained correctly for very long time

  17. Quasi-classical trajectory study of the role of vibrational and translational energy in the Cl(2P) + NH3 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Palacios, M; Corchado, J C; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2012-05-28

    A detailed state-to-state dynamics study was performed to analyze the effects of vibrational excitation and translational energy on the dynamics of the Cl((2)P) + NH(3)(v) gas-phase reaction, effects which are connected to such issues as mode selectivity and Polanyi's rules. This reaction evolves along two deep wells in the entry and exit channels. At low and high collision energies quasi-classical trajectory calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface previously developed by our group, together with a simplified model surface in which the reactant well is removed to analyze the influence of this well. While at high energy the independent vibrational excitation of all NH(3)(v) modes increases the reactivity by a factor ≈1.1-2.9 with respect to the vibrational ground-state, at low energy the opposite behaviour is found (factor ≈ 0.4-0.9). However, when the simplified model surface is used at low energy the independent vibrational excitation of all NH(3)(v) modes increases the reactivity, showing that the behaviour at low energies is a direct consequence of the existence of the reactant well. Moreover, we find that this reaction exhibits negligible mode selectivity, first because the independent excitation of the N-H symmetric and asymmetric stretch modes, which lie within 200 cm(-1) of each other, leads to reactions with similar reaction probabilities, and second because the vibrational excitation of the reactive N-H stretch mode is only partially retained in the products. For this "late transition-state" reaction, we also find that vibrational energy is more effective in driving the reaction than an equivalent amount of energy in translation, consistent with an extension of Polanyi's rules. Finally, we find that the non-reactive events, Cl((2)P)+NH(3)(v) → Cl((2)P) + NH(3)(v'), lead to a great number of populated vibrational states in the NH(3)(v') product, even starting from the NH(3)(v = 0) vibrational ground state at low energies

  18. Classical solutions for Hele-Shaw models with surface tension

    OpenAIRE

    Escher, Joachim; Simonett, Gieri

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that surface tension effects on the free boundary are regularizing for Hele-Shaw models. This implies, in particular, existence and uniqueness of classical solutions for a large class of initial data. As a consequence, we give a rigorous proof of the fact that homogeneous Hele-Shaw flows with positive surface tension are volume preserving and area shrinking.

  19. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CPN-1 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CPN-1 model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied

  20. General classical solutions in the CPsup(n-1) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the classical solutions with finite action of the CPsup(n-1) non-linear sigma model in two dimensions. The general solution can be expressed explicitly in terms of n rational analytic functions. All solutions which are neither instantons nor anti-instantons turn out to be saddle points of the action

  1. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  2. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under $SU(3)_C$ with masses lower than $1\\,{\\rm TeV}$, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than $2.6\\,{\\rm TeV}$.

  3. THE NEW CLASSICAL THEORY AND THE REAL BUSINESS CYCLE MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Oana Simona HUDEA (CARAMAN); Sorin George TOMA; Marin BURCEA

    2014-01-01

    The present paper aims at describing some key elements of the new classical theory-related model, namely the Real Business Cycle, mainly describing the economy from the perspective of a perfectly competitive market, characterised by price, wage and interest rate flexibility. The rendered impulse-response functions, that help us in revealing the capacity of the model variables to return to their steady state under the impact of a structural shock, be it technology or monetary policy oriented, ...

  4. Mode specific dynamics of the H{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} → H + CH{sub 4} reaction studied using quasi-classical trajectory and eight-dimensional quantum dynamics methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems, National Center for Magnetic Resonance in Wuhan, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Hubei University for Nationalities, Enshi 445000 (China); Li, Jun; Guo, Hua, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Chen, Liuyang; Yang, Minghui, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems, National Center for Magnetic Resonance in Wuhan, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Lu, Yunpeng [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-10-21

    An eight-dimensional quantum dynamical model is proposed and applied to the title reaction. The reaction probabilities and integral cross sections have been determined for both the ground and excited vibrational states of the two reactants. The results indicate that the H{sub 2} stretching and CH{sub 3} umbrella modes, along with the translational energy, strongly promote the reactivity, while the CH{sub 3} symmetric stretching mode has a negligible effect. The observed mode specificity is confirmed by full-dimensional quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The mode specificity can be interpreted by the recently proposed sudden vector projection model, which attributes the enhancement effects of the reactant modes to their strong couplings with the reaction coordinate at the transition state.

  5. Modelling BMI trajectories in children for genetic association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The timing of associations between common genetic variants and changes in growth patterns over childhood may provide insight into the development of obesity in later life. To address this question, it is important to define appropriate statistical models to allow for the detection of genetic effects influencing longitudinal childhood growth. METHODS AND RESULTS: Children from The Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine; n=1,506 Study were genotyped at 17 genetic loci shown to be associated with childhood obesity (FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, GNPDA2, KCTD15, NEGR1, BDNF, ETV5, SEC16B, LYPLAL1, TFAP2B, MTCH2, BCDIN3D, NRXN3, SH2B1, MRSA and an obesity-risk-allele-score was calculated as the total number of 'risk alleles' possessed by each individual. To determine the statistical method that fits these data and has the ability to detect genetic differences in BMI growth profile, four methods were investigated: linear mixed effects model, linear mixed effects model with skew-t random errors, semi-parametric linear mixed models and a non-linear mixed effects model. Of the four methods, the semi-parametric linear mixed model method was the most efficient for modelling childhood growth to detect modest genetic effects in this cohort. Using this method, three of the 17 loci were significantly associated with BMI intercept or trajectory in females and four in males. Additionally, the obesity-risk-allele score was associated with increased average BMI (female: β=0.0049, P=0.0181; male: β=0.0071, P=0.0001 and rate of growth (female: β=0.0012, P=0.0006; male: β=0.0008, P=0.0068 throughout childhood. CONCLUSIONS: Using statistical models appropriate to detect genetic variants, variations in adult obesity genes were associated with childhood growth. There were also differences between males and females. This study provides evidence of genetic effects that may identify individuals early in life that are more likely to rapidly increase their BMI

  6. Windfield and trajectory models for tornado-propelled objects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-phased research project to develop a six-degree-of-freedom mathematical model to predict the trajectories of tornado-propelled objects. The model is based on the meteorological, aerodynamic, and dynamic processes that govern the trajectories of missiles in a tornadic windfield. The aerodynamic coefficients for the postulated missiles were obtained from full-scale wind tunnel tests on a 12-inch pipe and car and from drop tests. Rocket sled tests were run whereby the 12-inch pipe and car were injected into a worst-case tornado windfield in order to verify the trajectory model. To simplify and facilitate the use of the trajectory model for design applications without having to run the computer program, this report gives the trajectory data for NRC-postulated missiles in tables based on given variables of initial conditions of injection and tornado windfield. Complete descriptions of the tornado windfield and trajectory models are presented. The trajectory model computer program is also included for those desiring to perform trajectory or sensitivity analyses beyond those included in the report or for those wishing to examine other missiles and use other variables

  7. Quasi-classical trajectory approach to the O(1D)+HBr→OH+Br reaction stereo-dynamics on X1A' potential energy surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hong; Zheng Bin; Yin Ji-Qing; Meng Qing-Tian

    2011-01-01

    The vector properties of reaction O(1D)+HBr→OH+Br on the potential energy surface (PES) of X1A' ground singlet state are studied by using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) theory.The polarization-dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs),the average rotational alignment factor 〈P2 (j' · k)〉,as well as the distributionS reflecting vector correlations are also computed.The analysis of the results shows that the alignment and the orientation distribution of the rotation angular momentum vector of product molecule OH is influenced by both the effect of heavy-light-heavy (HLH) type mass combination and the deep well of PES.

  8. Study of the H+HS reaction on a newly built potential energy surface using the quasi-classical trajectory method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Meng-Meng; Ge, Mei-Hua; Yang, Huan; Zheng, Yu-Jun

    2012-12-01

    The quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method is used to study the H+HS reaction on a newly built potential energy surface (PES) of the triplet state of H2S (3A″) in a collision energy range of 0-60 kcal/mol. Both scalar properties, such as the reaction probability and the integral cross section (ICS), and the vector properties, such as the angular distribution between the relative velocity vector of the reactant and that of the product, etc., are investigated using the QCT method. It is found that the ICSs obtained by the QCT method and the quantum mechanical (QM) method accord well with each other. In addition, the distribution for the product vibrational states is cold, while that for the product rotational states is hot for both reaction channels in the whole energy range studied here.

  9. Study of the H+HS reaction on a newly built potential energy surface using the quasi-classical trajectory method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Meng-Meng; Ge Mei-Hua; Yang Huan; Zheng Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    The quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method is used to study the H+HS reaction on a newly built potential energy surface (PES) of the triplet state of H2S (3A") in a collision energy range of 0-60 kcal/mol.Both scalar properties,such as the reaction probability and the integral cross section (ICS),and the vector properties,such as the angular distribution between the relative velocity vector of the reactant and that of the product,etc.,are investigated using the QCT method.It is found that the ICSs obtained by the QCT method and the quantum mechanical (QM) method accord well with each other.In addition,the distribution for the product vibrational states is cold,while that for the product rotational states is hot for both reaction channels in the whole energy range studied here.

  10. Mathematical Model to Simulate the Trajectory Elements ofan Artillery Projectile Proof Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Chand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In external ballistics of a conventional spin-stabilised artillery projectile, there are a numberof trajectory models developed for computing trajectory elements having varying degrees ofcomplexity. The present study attempts to propose a single mathematical model, viz., simplifiedpoint-mass/simple particle trajectory model to simulate the trajectory elements of a typical spin-stabilised flat-head artillery projectile proof shot. Due to difficulties in the projectile shape andsize, and the complicated nature of air resistance, an accurate mathematical prediction of thetrajectory is difficult. To simplify the computations, the governing equations of motion of theprojectile have been simplified and assumed that the projectile is a particle and the only forcesacting on the projectile are drag and gravity. With this model, trajectory elements have beengenerated and compared with experimental results obtained in the field test. The measuringinstrument used in this case is a Doppler radar.

  11. Quasi-classical trajectory study of the reaction H' + HS on a new ab initio potential energy surface H2S (3A")

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jinghan Zou; Shuhui Yin; Dan Wu; Mingxing Guo; Xuesong Xu; Hong Gao; Lei Li; Li Che

    2013-09-01

    Theoretical study on the dynamics of reactions H' + HS( = 0, = 0)→H2 + S and H' + HS( =0, = 0)→ H + H'S is performed with quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method on a new ab initio potential energy surface for the lowest triplet state of H2S (3A") constructed in 2012 by Lv et al. The QCT-calculated reaction integral cross-sections are in good agreement with previous quantum wave packet results over the collision energy range of 0-50 kcal/mol. Both the abstraction and exchange reactions are governed by direct reaction dynamics and the trajectories follow the minimum energy path. The rotational angular momentum vector ' of products in the two reaction channels are not only aligned perpendicular to scattering plane but also oriented along the negative direction of the axis perpendicular to the scattering plane. With the increase in collision energy, the variation trends of product polarization in the two reaction channels are different and that may be attributed to the obviously different characteristic of the two channels on the potential energy surface.

  12. Steady Glide Dynamic Modeling and Trajectory Optimization for High Lift-to-Drag Ratio Reentry Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady glide trajectory optimization for high lift-to-drag ratio reentry vehicle is a challenge because of weakly damped trajectory oscillation. This paper aims at providing a steady glide trajectory using numerical optimal method. A new steady glide dynamic modeling is formulated via extending a trajectory-oscillation suppressing scheme into the three-dimensional reentry dynamics with a spherical and rotating Earth. This scheme comprehensively considers all factors acting on the flight path angle and suppresses the trajectory oscillation by regulating the vertical acceleration in negative feedback form and keeping the lateral acceleration invariant. Then, a study on steady glide trajectory optimization is carried out based on this modeling and pseudospectral method. Two examples with and without bank reversal are taken to evaluate the performance and applicability of the new method. A comparison with the traditional method is also provided to demonstrate its superior performance. Finally, the feasibility of the pseudospectral solution is verified by comparing the optimal trajectory with integral trajectory. The results show that this method not only is capable of addressing the case which the traditional method cannot solve but also significantly improves the computational efficiency. More importantly, it provides more stable and safe optimal steady glide trajectory with high precision.

  13. Modelling Of Flotation Processes By Classical Mathematical Methods - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Ivana; Miljanović, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Flotation process modelling is not a simple task, mostly because of the process complexity, i.e. the presence of a large number of variables that (to a lesser or a greater extent) affect the final outcome of the mineral particles separation based on the differences in their surface properties. The attempts toward the development of the quantitative predictive model that would fully describe the operation of an industrial flotation plant started in the middle of past century and it lasts to this day. This paper gives a review of published research activities directed toward the development of flotation models based on the classical mathematical rules. The description and systematization of classical flotation models were performed according to the available references, with emphasize exclusively given to the flotation process modelling, regardless of the model application in a certain control system. In accordance with the contemporary considerations, models were classified as the empirical, probabilistic, kinetic and population balance types. Each model type is presented through the aspects of flotation modelling at the macro and micro process levels.

  14. Modeling Classical Swine Fever Outbreak-Related Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Shankar; Olynk Widmar, Nicole J.; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak-related outcomes, such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. These scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (...

  15. Modeling classical swine fever outbreak-related outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar eYadav; Olynk Widmar, Nicole J.; HSIN-YI eWENG

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak-related outcomes such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. The scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e...

  16. Simulating the classical XY model with a laser network

    CERN Document Server

    Tamate, Shuhei; Marandi, Alireza; McMahon, Peter; Utsunomiya, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    Drawing fair samples from the Boltzmann distribution of a statistical model is a challenging task for modern digital computers. We propose a physical implementation of a Boltzmann sampler for the classical XY model by using a laser network. The XY spins are mapped onto the phases of multiple laser pulses in a fiber ring cavity and the steady-state distribution of phases naturally realizes the Boltzmann distribution of the corresponding XY model. We experimentally implement the laser network by using an actively mode-locked fiber laser with optical delay lines, and demonstrate Boltzmann sampling for a one-dimensional XY ring.

  17. Classical mutual information in mean-field spin glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Vincenzo; Inglis, Stephen; Pollet, Lode

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the classical Rényi entropy Sn and the associated mutual information In in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (S-K) model, which is the paradigm model of mean-field spin glasses. Using classical Monte Carlo simulations and analytical tools we investigate the S-K model in the n -sheet booklet. This is achieved by gluing together n independent copies of the model, and it is the main ingredient for constructing the Rényi entanglement-related quantities. We find a glassy phase at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures the model exhibits paramagnetic behavior, consistent with the regular S-K model. The temperature of the paramagnetic-glassy transition depends nontrivially on the geometry of the booklet. At high temperatures we provide the exact solution of the model by exploiting the replica symmetry. This is the permutation symmetry among the fictitious replicas that are used to perform disorder averages (via the replica trick). In the glassy phase the replica symmetry has to be broken. Using a generalization of the Parisi solution, we provide analytical results for Sn and In and for standard thermodynamic quantities. Both Sn and In exhibit a volume law in the whole phase diagram. We characterize the behavior of the corresponding densities, Sn/N and In/N , in the thermodynamic limit. Interestingly, at the critical point the mutual information does not exhibit any crossing for different system sizes, in contrast with local spin models.

  18. Measuring thrust and predicting trajectory in model rocketry

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Methods are presented for measuring thrust using common force sensors and data acquisition to construct a dynamic force plate. A spreadsheet can be used to compute trajectory by integrating the equations of motion numerically. These techniques can be used in college physics courses, and have also been used with high school students concurrently enrolled in algebra 2.

  19. Adaptive robust motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders with LuGre model-based friction compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Deyuan; Tao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Zhu, Xiaocong

    2014-07-01

    Friction compensation is particularly important for motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders at low speed movement. However, most of the existing model-based friction compensation schemes use simple classical models, which are not enough to address applications with high-accuracy position requirements. Furthermore, the friction force in the cylinder is time-varying, and there exist rather severe unmodelled dynamics and unknown disturbances in the pneumatic system. To deal with these problems effectively, an adaptive robust controller with LuGre model-based dynamic friction compensation is constructed. The proposed controller employs on-line recursive least squares estimation (RLSE) to reduce the extent of parametric uncertainties, and utilizes the sliding mode control method to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodelled dynamics and disturbances. In addition, in order to realize LuGre model-based friction compensation, the modified dual-observer structure for estimating immeasurable friction internal state is developed. Therefore, a prescribed motion tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy can be guaranteed. Since the system model uncertainties are unmatched, the recursive backstepping design technology is applied. In order to solve the conflicts between the sliding mode control design and the adaptive control design, the projection mapping is used to condition the RLSE algorithm so that the parameter estimates are kept within a known bounded convex set. Finally, the proposed controller is tested for tracking sinusoidal trajectories and smooth square trajectory under different loads and sudden disturbance. The testing results demonstrate that the achievable performance of the proposed controller is excellent and is much better than most other studies in literature. Especially when a 0.5 Hz sinusoidal trajectory is tracked, the maximum tracking error is 0.96 mm and the average tracking error is 0.45 mm. This

  20. A Trajectory-Oriented Carriageway-Based Road Network Data Model, Part 1: Background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This is the first of a three-part series of papers which introduces a general background of building trajectory-oriented road network data models, including motivation, related works, and basic concepts. The purpose of the series is to develop a trajectory-oriented road network data model, namely carriageway-based road network data model (CRNM). Part 1 deals with the modeling background. Part 2 proposes the principle and architecture of the CRNM. Part 3 investigates the implementation of the CRNM in a case study. In the present paper, the challenges of managing trajectory data are discussed. Then, developing trajectory-oriented road network data models is proposed as a solution and existing road network data models are reviewed. Basic representation approaches of a road network are introduced as well as its constitution.

  1. Transference in view of a classical conditioning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Merav; Kacen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative metasynthetic study, addressing 33 transference case studies, that investigates the interrelationship of the transference concept from psychoanalysis and cognitive-behavioral concepts in an attempt to construct a theoretical platform for clinical integration. Relationship between categories analysis was used to compare Luborsky's (1998) transference components (wish, response from other, and response of self) and cognitive-behavioral ones. Results showed reciprocal relations between transference and classical conditioning. Furthermore, explicit occurrences of distorted thinking due to overgeneralization were found in more than 90% of the cases. A conceptual model describes transference as a conditioned response activated by thematic conditioning, a particular case of classical conditioning that repeatedly pairs a given interpersonal situation with internal thematic stimuli, thus shaping the person's narrative. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed as well.

  2. Completeness of classical spin models and universal quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study mappings between different classical spin systems that leave the partition function invariant. As recently shown in Van den Nest et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 110501), the partition function of the 2D square lattice Ising model in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field can specialize to the partition function of any Ising system on an arbitrary graph. In this sense the 2D Ising model is said to be 'complete'. However, in order to obtain the above result, the coupling strengths on the 2D lattice must assume complex values, and thus do not allow for a physical interpretation. Here we show how a complete model with real—and, hence, 'physical'—couplings can be obtained if the 3D Ising model is considered. We furthermore show how to map general q-state systems with possibly many-body interactions to the 2D Ising model with complex parameters, and give completeness results for these models with real parameters. We also demonstrate that the computational overhead in these constructions is in all relevant cases polynomial. These results are proved by invoking a recently found cross-connection between statistical mechanics and quantum information theory, where partition functions are expressed as quantum mechanical amplitudes. Within this framework, there exists a natural correspondence between many-body quantum states that allow for universal quantum computation via local measurements only, and complete classical spin systems

  3. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B - L symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B - L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B - L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman-Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ → eγ), the current bound on the Z‧ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  4. On classical meteor light curves and utilitarian model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, M.; Hargrove, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a series of classical meteor light curve profiles based upon a set of simplified analytic atmospheric models. The model atmospheres specifically express the density variation as a power law in atmospheric height, and are derived under a variety of assumptions relating to the atmospheric temperature profile and the variation of the acceleration due to gravity. We find that the light curve profiles show only small differences with respect to any variation in the temperature profile and the geometry imposed upon the atmospheres.

  5. Quantum trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to many-particle systems has been an active area of research in recent years as researchers have looked for ways to tackle difficult problems in this area. The quantum trajectory method provides an efficient computational technique for solving both stationary and time-evolving states, encompassing a large area of quantum mechanics. Quantum Trajectories brings the expertise of an international panel of experts who focus on the epistemological significance of quantum mechanics through the quantum theory of motion.Emphasizing a classical interpretation of quan

  6. Modeling and Characterization of Charged Particle Trajectories in an Oscillating Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Irawan, Dani; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar; Novitrian,

    2015-01-01

    A constant magnetic field has frequently been discussed and has been known that it can cause a charged particle to form interesting trajectories such as cycloid and helix in presence of electric field, but a changing magnetic field is rarely discussed. In this work, modeling and characterization of charged particle trajectories in oscillating magnetic field is reported. The modeling is performed using Euler method with speed corrector. The result shows that there are two types of trajectory patterns that will recur for every $180 n T_0$ ($n = 0, 1, 2, ..$) in increasing of magnetic field oscillation period, where $T_0$ is about $6.25\\times10^{-7}$ s.

  7. Characterizing long-term patterns of weight change in China using latent class trajectory modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Paynter

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, obesity-related diseases have increased tremendously in China, and are now the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Patterns of weight change can be used to predict risk of obesity-related diseases, increase understanding of etiology of disease risk, identify groups at particularly high risk, and shape prevention strategies.Latent class trajectory modeling was used to compute weight change trajectories for adults aged 18 to 66 using the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS data (n = 12,611. Weight change trajectories were computed separately for males and females by age group at baseline due to differential age-related patterns of weight gain in China with urbanization. Generalized linear mixed effects models examined the association between weight change trajectories and baseline characteristics including urbanicity, BMI category, age, and year of study entry.Trajectory classes were identified for each of six age-sex subgroups corresponding to various degrees of weight loss, maintenance and weight gain. Baseline BMI status was a significant predictor of trajectory membership for all age-sex subgroups. Baseline overweight/obesity increased odds of following 'initial loss with maintenance' trajectories. We found no significant association between baseline urbanization and trajectory membership after controlling for other covariates.Trajectory analysis identified patterns of weight change for age by gender groups. Lack of association between baseline urbanization status and trajectory membership suggests that living in a rural environment at baseline was not protective. Analyses identified age-specific nuances in weight change patterns, pointing to the importance of subgroup analyses in future research.

  8. Group-Based Trajectory Modeling of Caregiver Psychological Distress Over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Roslyn A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Ren, Dianxu; Schulz, Richard; Given, Charles W.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Competing theories of adaptation and wear-and-tear describe psychological distress patterns among family caregivers. Purpose This study seeks to characterize psychological distress patterns in family caregivers and identify predictors. Methods One hundred three caregivers of care recipients with primary malignant brain tumors were interviewed within 1, 4, 8, and 12 months post-diagnosis regarding psychological distress; care recipients were interviewed regarding clinical/functional characteristics. Group-based trajectory modeling identified longitudinal distress patterns, and weighted logistic/multinomial regression models identified predictors of distress trajectories. Results Group-based trajectory modeling identified high-decreasing (51.1 % of caregivers) and consistently low (48.9 %) depressive symptom trajectories, high-decreasing (75.5 %) and low-decreasing (24.5 %) anxiety trajectories, and high (37.5 %), moderate (40.9 %), and low-decreasing (21.6 %) caregiver burden trajectories. High depressive symptoms were associated with high trajectories for both anxiety and burden, lower caregivers age, income, and social support, and lower care recipient functioning. Conclusions Our data support the adaptation hypothesis; interventions should target those at risk for persistent distress. PMID:22585179

  9. Using Markov models to simulate electron spin resonance spectra from molecular dynamics trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer, Deniz; Freed, Jack H.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Simulating electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra directly from molecular dynamics simulations of a spin labeled protein necessitates a large number (hundreds or thousands) of relatively long (hundreds of ns) trajectories. To meet this challenge, we explore the possibility of constructing accurate stochastic models of the spin label dynamics from atomistic trajectories. A systematic, two-step procedure, based on the probabilistic framework of hidden Markov models, is developed to build a discr...

  10. Penalized Spline: a General Robust Trajectory Model for ZIYUAN-3 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H.; Zou, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the dynamic imaging system, the trajectory model plays a very important role in the geometric processing of high resolution satellite imagery. However, establishing a trajectory model is difficult when only discrete and noisy data are available. In this manuscript, we proposed a general robust trajectory model, the penalized spline model, which could fit trajectory data well and smooth noise. The penalized parameter λ controlling the smooth and fitting accuracy could be estimated by generalized cross-validation. Five other trajectory models, including third-order polynomials, Chebyshev polynomials, linear interpolation, Lagrange interpolation and cubic spline, are compared with the penalized spline model. Both the sophisticated ephemeris and on-board ephemeris are used to compare the orbit models. The penalized spline model could smooth part of noise, and accuracy would decrease as the orbit length increases. The band-to-band misregistration of ZiYuan-3 Dengfeng and Faizabad multispectral images is used to evaluate the proposed method. With the Dengfeng dataset, the third-order polynomials and Chebyshev approximation could not model the oscillation, and introduce misregistration of 0.57 pixels misregistration in across-track direction and 0.33 pixels in along-track direction. With the Faizabad dataset, the linear interpolation, Lagrange interpolation and cubic spline model suffer from noise, introducing larger misregistration than the approximation models. Experimental results suggest the penalized spline model could model the oscillation and smooth noise.

  11. Trajectory model simulations of ozone and carbon monoxide in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Randel, W. J.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2014-03-01

    A domain-filling, forward trajectory model originally developed for simulating stratospheric water vapor is used to simulate ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). Trajectories are initialized in the upper troposphere, and the circulation is based on reanalysis wind fields. In addition, chemical production and loss rates along trajectories are included using calculations from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The trajectory model results show good overall agreement with satellite observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) in terms of spatial structure and seasonal variability. The trajectory model results also agree well with the Eulerian WACCM simulations. Analysis of the simulated tracers shows that seasonal variations in tropical upwelling exerts strong influence on O3 and CO in the tropical lower stratosphere, and the coupled seasonal cycles provide a useful test of the transport simulations. Interannual variations in the tracers are also closely coupled to changes in upwelling, and the trajectory model can accurately capture and explain observed changes during 2005-2011. This demonstrates the importance of variability in tropical upwelling in forcing chemical changes in the tropical UTLS.

  12. Trajectory model simulations of ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Randel, W. J.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2014-07-01

    A domain-filling, forward trajectory model originally developed for simulating stratospheric water vapor is used to simulate ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the lower stratosphere. Trajectories are initialized in the upper troposphere, and the circulation is based on reanalysis wind fields. In addition, chemical production and loss rates along trajectories are included using calculations from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The trajectory model results show good overall agreement with satellite observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) in terms of spatial structure and seasonal variability. The trajectory model results also agree well with the Eulerian WACCM simulations. Analysis of the simulated tracers shows that seasonal variations in tropical upwelling exerts strong influence on O3 and CO in the tropical lower stratosphere, and the coupled seasonal cycles provide a useful test of the transport simulations. Interannual variations in the tracers are also closely coupled to changes in upwelling, and the trajectory model can accurately capture and explain observed changes during 2005-2011. This demonstrates the importance of variability in tropical upwelling in forcing chemical changes in the tropical lower stratosphere.

  13. Improvements on Semi-Classical Distorted-Wave model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Weili; Watanabe, Y.; Kuwata, R. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kohno, M.; Ogata, K.; Kawai, M.

    1998-03-01

    A method of improving the Semi-Classical Distorted Wave (SCDW) model in terms of the Wigner transform of the one-body density matrix is presented. Finite size effect of atomic nuclei can be taken into account by using the single particle wave functions for harmonic oscillator or Wood-Saxon potential, instead of those based on the local Fermi-gas model which were incorporated into previous SCDW model. We carried out a preliminary SCDW calculation of 160 MeV (p,p`x) reaction on {sup 90}Zr with the Wigner transform of harmonic oscillator wave functions. It is shown that the present calculation of angular distributions increase remarkably at backward angles than the previous ones and the agreement with the experimental data is improved. (author)

  14. Classical color field modified minijet model for $pp$ and $\\bar{p} p$ total cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Man-Fung

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper, we have evaluated the $gg\\rightarrow gg$ scattering amplitude in the presence of classical color field generated by the colliding protons in the leading order approximation within the pQCD. In this work, we show that this amplitude can be resumed to obtain the classical color field modified $gg \\rightarrow gg$ elastic scattering amplitude. This modified amplitude is suppressed when the longitudinal momentum fraction, $x$, of the incident gluon is small. Minijet cross section is calculated using the modified amplitude. We show that the $pp$ and $\\bar{p} p$ cross section from $\\sqrt{s} = 5$ GeV to 30 TeV can be described as a sum of a hard component contributed by the modified minijet model and a soft component due to the exchange of the pomeron and of the I=0 exchange-degenerate $\\omega$ and $f$ trajectories. The predicted cross section has a $\\ln^2 s$ asymptotic behavior which satisfies Froissart bound.

  15. Quasi-Classical Trajectory Study of Atom-Diatomic Molecule Collisions in Symmetric Hyperspherical Coordinates: The F + HCl Reaction as a Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas-Lemus, Victor Manuel; Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Uranga-Piña, Llinersy

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reactive dynamics of the triatomic system F + HCl → HF + Cl for total angular momentum equal zero and for different low-lying rovibrational states of the diatomic molecule. For each of the initial vibrational quantum numbers, the time evolution of the atom-diatom collision process is investigated for a wide range of impact angles and collision energies. To this purpose, the Quasi-Classical Trajectories (QCT) method was implemented in a hyperspherical configuration space. The Hamilton equations of motion are solved numerically in an intermediate effective Cartesian space to exploit the relative simplicity of this intermediate representation. Interatomic interactions are described by a London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential energy surface, specifically developed for the title reaction, and the results of the QCT simulations are discussed in terms of the time-evolution of the hyperangles. The analysis of the collision dynamics using symmetric hyperspherical coordinates provides, in addition to the description in terms of a natural reaction coordinate (the hyperradius), a more striking representation of the exchange dynamics, in terms of the time-dependent probability distribution along the kinematic rotation hyperangle, and a precise distinction between direct and indirect mechanisms of the reaction. PMID:27002240

  16. Pair-correlated product speed and angular distributions for the OH+CH4/CD4 reactions: Further remarks on their classical trajectory calculations in a quantum spirit

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, L; Corchado, J

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, Liu and co-workers measured pair-correlated product speed and angular distributions for the OH+CH4/CD4 reactions at the collision energy of ~ 10 kcal/mol [B. Zhang, W. Shiu, J. J. Lin and K. Liu, J. Chem. Phys 122, 131102 (2005); B. Zhang, W. Shiu and K. Liu, J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 8989]. Recently, two of us could semi-quantitatively reproduce these measurements by performing full-dimensional classical trajectory calculations in a quantum spirit on an ab-initio potential energy surface of their own [J. Espinosa-Garcia and J. C. Corchado, Theor Chem Acc, 2015, 134, 6 ; J. Phys. Chem. B, Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcb.5b04290]. The goal of the present work is to show that these calculations can be significantly improved by adding a few more constraints to better comply with the experimental conditions. Overall, the level of agreement between theory and experiment is remarkable considering the large dimensionality of the processes under scrutiny.

  17. Quasi-Classical Trajectory Study of Atom-Diatomic Molecule Collisions in Symmetric Hyperspherical Coordinates: The F + HCl Reaction as a Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas-Lemus, Victor Manuel; Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Uranga-Piña, Llinersy

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reactive dynamics of the triatomic system F + HCl → HF + Cl for total angular momentum equal zero and for different low-lying rovibrational states of the diatomic molecule. For each of the initial vibrational quantum numbers, the time evolution of the atom-diatom collision process is investigated for a wide range of impact angles and collision energies. To this purpose, the Quasi-Classical Trajectories (QCT) method was implemented in a hyperspherical configuration space. The Hamilton equations of motion are solved numerically in an intermediate effective Cartesian space to exploit the relative simplicity of this intermediate representation. Interatomic interactions are described by a London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential energy surface, specifically developed for the title reaction, and the results of the QCT simulations are discussed in terms of the time-evolution of the hyperangles. The analysis of the collision dynamics using symmetric hyperspherical coordinates provides, in addition to the description in terms of a natural reaction coordinate (the hyperradius), a more striking representation of the exchange dynamics, in terms of the time-dependent probability distribution along the kinematic rotation hyperangle, and a precise distinction between direct and indirect mechanisms of the reaction.

  18. Three-stage classical molecular dynamics model for simulation of heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godre Subodh S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage Classical Molecular Dynamics (3S-CMD approach for heavy-ion fusion is developed. In this approach the Classical Rigid-Body Dynamics simulation for heavy-ion collision involving light deformed nucleus is initiated on their Rutherford trajectories at very large initial separation. Collision simulation is then followed by relaxation of the rigid-body constrains for one or both the colliding nuclei at distances close to the barrier when the trajectories of all the nucleons are obtained in a Classical Molecular Dynamics approach. This 3S-CMD approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but also the internal vibrational excitations of one or both the nuclei at distances close to the barrier. The results of the dynamical simulation for 24Mg+208Pb collision show significant modification of the fusion barrier and calculated fusion cross sections due to internal excitations.

  19. Mixed Membership Trajectory Models of Cognitive Impairment in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsberry, Samantha A.; Lecci, Fabrizio; Kingsley, Lawrence; Junker, Brian; Reynolds, Sandra; Goodkin, Karl; Levine, Andrew J.; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned; Becker, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The longitudinal trajectories that individuals may take from a state of normal cognition to HIV-associated dementia are unknown. We applied a novel statistical methodology to identify trajectories to cognitive impairment, and factors that affected the “closeness” of an individual to one of the canonical trajectories. Design The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) is a four-site longitudinal study of the natural and treated history of HIV Disease among gay and bisexual men. Methods Using data from 3,892 men (both HIV-infected and uninfected) enrolled in the neuropsychology substudy of the MACS, a Mixed Membership Trajectory Model (MMTM) was applied to capture the pathways from normal cognitive function to mild impairment to severe impairment. MMTMs allow the data to identify canonical pathways and to model the effects of risk factors on an individual’s “closeness” to these trajectories. Results We identified three distinct trajectories to cognitive impairment – one “normal aging” (low probability of mild impairment until age 60), one “premature aging” (mild impairment starting at age 45–50), and one “unhealthy” (mild impairment in 20s and 30s) profile. Second, clinically defined AIDS and not simply HIV Disease, was associated with closeness to the premature aging trajectory. And, third, Hepatitis-C infection, Depression, Race, Recruitment Cohort and Confounding Conditions all affected individual’s closeness to these trajectories. Conclusions These results provide new insight into the natural history of cognitive dysfunction in HIV disease and provide evidence for a potential difference in the pathophysiology of the development of cognitive impairment based on trajectories to impairment. PMID:25565498

  20. A model of episodic memory: mental time travel along encoded trajectories using grid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmo, Michael E

    2009-11-01

    The definition of episodic memory includes the concept of mental time travel: the ability to re-experience a previously experienced trajectory through continuous dimensions of space and time, and to recall specific events or stimuli along this trajectory. Lesions of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex impair human episodic memory function and impair rat performance in tasks that could be solved by retrieval of trajectories. Recent physiological data suggests a novel model for encoding and retrieval of trajectories, and for associating specific stimuli with specific positions along the trajectory. During encoding in the model, external input drives the activity of head direction cells. Entorhinal grid cells integrate the head direction input to update an internal representation of location, and drive hippocampal place cells. Trajectories are encoded by Hebbian modification of excitatory synaptic connections between hippocampal place cells and head direction cells driven by external action. Associations are also formed between hippocampal cells and sensory stimuli. During retrieval, a sensory input cue activates hippocampal cells that drive head direction activity via previously modified synapses. Persistent spiking of head direction cells maintains the direction and speed of the action, updating the activity of entorhinal grid cells that thereby further update place cell activity. Additional cells, termed arc length cells, provide coding of trajectory segments based on the one-dimensional arc length from the context of prior actions or states, overcoming ambiguity where the overlap of trajectory segments causes multiple head directions to be associated with one place. These mechanisms allow retrieval of complex, self-crossing trajectories as continuous curves through space and time. PMID:19615456

  1. Probing classically conformal $B-L$ model with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jinno, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    We study the cosmological history of the classical conformal $B-L$ gauge extension of the standard model, in which the physical scales are generated via the Coleman-Weinberg-type symmetry breaking. Especially, we consider the thermal phase transition of the U$(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry in the early universe and resulting gravitational-wave production. Due to the classical conformal invariance, the phase transition tends to be a first-order one with ultra-supercooling, which enhances the strength of the produced gravitational waves. We show that, requiring (1) U$(1)_{B-L}$ is broken after the reheating, (2) the $B-L$ gauge coupling does not blow up below the Planck scale, (3) the thermal phase transition completes in almost all the patches in the universe, the gravitational wave spectrum can be as large as $\\Omega_{\\rm GW} \\sim 10^{-8}$ at the frequency $f \\sim 0.01$-$1$Hz for some model parameters, and a vast parameter region can be tested by future interferometer experiments such as eLISA, LISA, BBO and DECIGO.

  2. Wind models for the NSTS ascent trajectory biasing for wind load alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, O. E.; Adelfang, S. I.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    New concepts are presented for aerospace vehicle ascent wind profile biasing. The purpose for wind biasing the ascent trajectory is to provide ascent wind loads relief and thus decrease the probability for launch delays due to wind loads exceeding critical limits. Wind biasing trajectories to the the profile of monthly mean winds have been widely used for this purpose. The wind profile models presented give additional alternatives for wind biased trajectories. They are derived from the properties of the bivariate normal probability function using the available wind statistical parameters for the launch site. The analytical expressions are presented to permit generalizations. Specific examples are given to illustrate the procedures. The wind profile models can be used to establish the ascent trajectory steering commands to guide the vehicle through the first stage. For the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) program these steering commands are called I-loads.

  3. The ortho-to-para ratio of interstellar NH$_2$: Quasi-classical trajectory calculations and new simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, Romane Le; Xie, Changjian; Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Based on recent $Herschel$ results, the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of NH$_2$ has been measured towards the following high-mass star-forming regions: W31C (G10.6-0.4), W49N (G43.2-0.1), W51 (G49.5-0.4), and G34.3+0.1. The OPR at thermal equilibrium ranges from the statistical limit of three at high temperatures to infinity as the temperature tends toward zero, unlike the case of H$_{2}$. Depending on the position observed along the lines-of-sight, the OPR was found to lie either slightly below the high temperature limit of three (in the range $2.2-2.9$) or above this limit ($\\sim3.5$, $\\gtrsim 4.2$, and $\\gtrsim 5.0$). In low temperature interstellar gas, where the H$_{2}$ is para-enriched, our nearly pure gas-phase astrochemical models with nuclear-spin chemistry can account for anomalously low observed NH$_2$-OPR values. We have tentatively explained OPR values larger than three by assuming that spin thermalization of NH$_2$ can proceed at least partially by H-atom exchange collisions with atomic hydrogen, th...

  4. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2009-01-01

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models. Hence Solar System tests represent very convenient and efficient tools to test the viability of the different black hole solutions in brane worl...

  5. Intermediate time scaling in classical continuous-spin models

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, S K; Chung, J S

    1999-01-01

    The time-dependent total spin correlation functions of the two- and the three-dimensional classical XY models seem to have a very narrow first dynamic scaling interval and, after this interval, a much broader anomalous second dynamic scaling interval appears. In this paper, this intriguing feature found in our previous work is re-examined. By introducing a phenomenological characteristic time for this intermediate time interval, the second dynamic scaling behavior can be explained. Moreover, the dynamic critical exponent found from this novel characteristic time is found to be identical to that found from the usual dynamic scaling theory developed in the wave vector and frequency domain. For continuous spin models, in which the spin variable related to a long-range order parameter is not a constant of motion, our method yielded the dynamic critical exponent with less computational efforts.

  6. A Study of Classics-Reading Curriculum, Classics-Reading Promotion, and Classics-Reading Effect Modeling Exploration in Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuen-An Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study are to test reliabilities and validities of classics-reading curriculum (CRC scale, classics-reading promotion (CRP scale, and classics-reading effect (CRE scale and to examine the relationships between CRC, CRP, and CRE in elementary schools through applying CORPS framework. The pilot sample and formal sample contain 141 and 500 participants from elementary school faculties and classics-reading volunteers in the north, central, south, and east regions of Taiwan. The findings indicate that Cronbach α coefficients of curriculum cognition (CC, curriculum teaching (CT, inside-school promotion (IP, outside-school promotion (EP, learning effect (LE, and class management effect (CME subscales are .88, .85, .93, .91, .91, .94, respectively, through exploratory factor analysis and they have good internal reliabilities and construct validities, respectively, through confirmatory factor analysis. Moreover, CC, CT, IP, and EP have positive influences on LE (standardized coefficients .34, .25, .14, and .22 and on CME (standardized coefficients .41, .14, .14, and .20, respectively. CC, CT, IP, and EP can explain 69% of LE and 61% of CME. The model is supported by the data. Lastly, this study proposes some suggestions regarding the classics-reading education for elementary schools.

  7. Modelling of bubble trajectories in a pump impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupoiron, Marine; Linden, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A vertical rotating flow in an annulus gap with an increasing diameter is used to approximate the flow in a pump impeller. We study a spherical gas bubble released at the flow inlet, subject to turbulent drag and added mass forces. Bubbles trajectories have been computed for different geometries, rotation speeds and bubble size, showing a deviation from the liquid streamlines in the angular and radial directions. This effect is related to the pump performance in multiphase conditions: the velocity difference between the gas and the liquid phases changes the final pressure rise produced by the impeller. In some extreme cases, the centrifugal force can be large enough to prevent bubbles from exiting the impeller at all, leading to an unwanted gas accumulation and the blockage of the pump. We eventually quantify the effects of geometrical and operational parameters on the pump behaviour. Work done in collaboration with Schlumberger Gould Research, Cambridge.

  8. A mixture model for the joint analysis of latent developmental trajectories and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Entink, R.H.; Fox, J.P.; Hout, A. van den

    2011-01-01

    A general joint modeling framework is proposed that includes a parametric stratified survival component for continuous time survival data, and a mixture multilevel item response component to model latent developmental trajectories given mixed discrete response data. The joint model is illustrated in

  9. Modeling classic attenuation regulation of gene expression in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetsky, Vassily A; Pirogov, Sergey A; Rubanov, Lev I; Seliverstov, Alexander V

    2007-02-01

    A model is proposed primarily for the classical RNA attenuation regulation of gene expression through premature transcription termination. The model is based on the concept of the RNA secondary structure macrostate within the regulatory region between the ribosome and RNA-polymerase, on hypothetical equation describing deceleration of RNA-polymerase by a macrostate and on views of transcription and translation initiation and elongation, under different values of the four basic model parameters which were varied. A special effort was made to select adequate model parameters. We first discuss kinetics of RNA folding and define the concept of the macrostate as a specific parentheses structure used to construct a conventional set of hairpins. The originally developed software that realizes the proposed model offers functionality to fully model RNA secondary folding kinetics. Its performance is compared to that of a public server described in Ref. 1. We then describe the delay in RNA-polymerase shifting to the next base or its premature termination caused by an RNA secondary structure or, herefrom, a macrostate. In this description, essential concepts are the basic and excited states of the polymerase first introduced in Ref. 2: the polymerase shifting to the next base can occur only in the basic state, and its detachment from DNA strand - only in excited state. As to the authors' knowledge, such a model incorporating the above-mentioned attenuation characteristics is not published elsewhere. The model was implemented in an application with command line interface for running in batch mode in Windows and Linux environments, as well as a public web server.(3) The model was tested with a conventional Monte Carlo procedure. In these simulations, the estimate of correlation between the premature transcription termination probability p and concentration c of charged amino acyl-tRNA was obtained as function p(c) for many regulatory regions in many bacterial genomes, as well as

  10. Modelling individual routines and spatio-temporal trajectories in human mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Pappalardo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility modelling is of fundamental importance in a wide range of applications, such as the developing of protocols for mobile ad hoc networks or for what-if analysis and simulation in urban ecosystems. Current generative models generally fail in accurately reproducing the individuals' recurrent daily schedules and at the same time in accounting for the possibility that individuals may break the routine and modify their habits during periods of unpredictability of variable duration. In this article we present DITRAS (DIary-based TRAjectory Simulator), a framework to simulate the spatio-temporal patterns of human mobility in a realistic way. DITRAS operates in two steps: the generation of a mobility diary and the translation of the mobility diary into a mobility trajectory. The mobility diary is constructed by a Markov model which captures the tendency of individuals to follow or break their routine. The mobility trajectory is produced by a model based on the concept of preferential exploration and pref...

  11. A Coupled Model Between Robot Trajectories and Thermal History of the Workpiece During Thermal Spray Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolot, Rodolphe; Deng, Sihao; Cai, Zhenhua; Liao, Hanlin; Montavon, Ghislain

    2014-02-01

    Offline robot trajectory generation is now often used for thermal spray applications, especially for complex design parts, requiring enhanced trajectories. This technique allows decreasing the downtime of the thermal spray cell and insures the generation of optimized trajectories. Heat transfers caused by thermal spray increase the workpiece temperature during the coating application. This temperature acts directly on the resulting thermal stresses after cooling of the part down to the ambient temperature. In this study, a coupling was developed between the robot trajectory and computation of the thermal history of the workpiece during the spray operation. The method is based on the storage of the real robot trajectory (i.e., accurate in time) in a text file, and reading of this file with a C programming performed with ANSYS/FLUENT commercial code which allows computing the displacement of the thermal sources according to the trajectory and solving the transient heat conservation equation during the torch displacement. The contributions of the impinging plasma jet and the molten particle jet are taken into account in the model.

  12. Trajectory modeling of O3 and CO transport in the UTLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Randel, W. J.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    A domain-filling, forward trajectory model developed originally for simulating stratospheric water vapor (H2O) is further used to simulate ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). Trajectories are initialized in the upper troposphere, and the circulation is based on reanalysis wind fields. In addition, chemical production and loss rates along trajectories are included using calculations from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The trajectory model results show good overall agreement with satellite observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) in terms of spatial structure and seasonal variability. The trajectory model results also agree well with the Eulerian WACCM simulations. Analysis of the simulated tracers shows that tropical upwelling exerts strong influence on O3 and CO in the tropical lower stratosphere for both seasonal cycle and interannual variations. This demonstrates the importance of tropical upwelling in forcing the chemical variability in this region.

  13. Classical scale invariance in the inert doublet model

    CERN Document Server

    Plascencia, Alexis D

    2015-01-01

    The inert doublet model (IDM) is a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM) that can account for the dark matter in the universe. Naturalness arguments motivate us to study whether the model can be embedded into a theory with dynamically generated scales. In this work we study a classically scale invariant version of the IDM with a minimal hidden sector, which has a $U(1)_{\\text{CW}}$ gauge symmetry and a complex scalar $\\Phi$. The mass scale is generated in the hidden sector via the Coleman-Weinberg (CW) mechanism and communicated to the two Higgs doublets via portal couplings. Since the CW scalar remains light, acquires a vacuum expectation value and mixes with the SM Higgs boson, the phenomenology of this construction can be modified with respect to the traditional IDM. We analyze the impact of adding this CW scalar and the $Z'$ gauge boson on the calculation of the dark matter relic density and on the spin-independent nucleon cross section for direct detection experiments. Finally, by studying the RG ...

  14. Classical and Quantum Consistency of the DGP Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, A; Nicolis, Alberto; Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    We study the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model by the method of the boundary effective action. The truncation of this action to the bending mode \\pi consistently describes physics in a wide range of regimes both at the classical and at the quantum level. The Vainshtein effect, which restores agreement with precise tests of general relativity, follows straightforwardly. We give a simple and general proof of stability, i.e. absence of ghosts in the fluctuations, valid for most of the relevant cases, like for instance the spherical source in asymptotically flat space. However we confirm that around certain interesting self-accelerating cosmological solutions there is a ghost. We consider the issue of quantum corrections. Around flat space \\pi becomes strongly coupled below a macroscopic length of 1000 km, thus impairing the predictivity of the model. Indeed the tower of higher dimensional operators which is expected by a generic UV completion of the model limits predictivity at even larger length scales. We outline ...

  15. A modelling and experimental study of the bubble trajectory in a non-Newtonian crystal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, N M S [Process Engineering and Light Metals (PELM) Centre, Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health, CQUniversity, Rockhampton, QLD 4702 (Australia); Khan, M M K; Rasul, M G, E-mail: m.rasul@cqu.edu.a [School of Engineering and Built Environment, Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health, CQUniversity, Rockhampton, QLD 4702 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of air bubbles rising in a massecuite-equivalent non-Newtonian crystal suspension. The bubble trajectory inside the stagnant liquid of a 0.05% xanthan gum crystal suspension was investigated and modelled using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to gain an insight into the bubble flow characteristics. The CFD code FLUENT was used for numerical simulation, and the bubble trajectory calculations were performed through a volume of fluid (VOF) model. The influences of the Reynolds number (Re), the Weber number (We) and the bubble aspect ratio (E) on the bubble trajectory are discussed. The conditions for the bubbles' path oscillations are identified. The experimental results showed that the path instability for the crystal suspension was less rapid than in water. The trajectory analysis indicated that 5.76 mm diameter bubbles followed a zigzag motion in the crystal suspension. Conversely, the smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) followed a path of least horizontal movement and larger bubbles (21.21 mm) produced more spiral motion within the crystal suspension. Path instability occurred for bubbles of 15.63 and 21.21 mm diameter, and they induced both zigzag and spiral trajectories within the crystal suspension. At low Re and We, smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) produced a zigzag trajectory, whereas larger bubbles (15.63 and 21.21 mm) showed both zigzag and spiral trajectories at intermediate and moderately high Re and We in the crystal suspension. The simulation results illustrated that a repeating pattern of swirling vortices was created for smaller bubbles due to the unstable wake and unsteady flow of these bubbles. This is the cause of the smaller bubbles moving in a zigzag way. Larger bubbles showed two counter-rotating trailing vortices at the back of the bubble. These vortices induced a velocity component to the gas-liquid interface and caused a deformation. Hence, the larger bubbles produced a path

  16. A modelling and experimental study of the bubble trajectory in a non-Newtonian crystal suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of air bubbles rising in a massecuite-equivalent non-Newtonian crystal suspension. The bubble trajectory inside the stagnant liquid of a 0.05% xanthan gum crystal suspension was investigated and modelled using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to gain an insight into the bubble flow characteristics. The CFD code FLUENT was used for numerical simulation, and the bubble trajectory calculations were performed through a volume of fluid (VOF) model. The influences of the Reynolds number (Re), the Weber number (We) and the bubble aspect ratio (E) on the bubble trajectory are discussed. The conditions for the bubbles' path oscillations are identified. The experimental results showed that the path instability for the crystal suspension was less rapid than in water. The trajectory analysis indicated that 5.76 mm diameter bubbles followed a zigzag motion in the crystal suspension. Conversely, the smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) followed a path of least horizontal movement and larger bubbles (21.21 mm) produced more spiral motion within the crystal suspension. Path instability occurred for bubbles of 15.63 and 21.21 mm diameter, and they induced both zigzag and spiral trajectories within the crystal suspension. At low Re and We, smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) produced a zigzag trajectory, whereas larger bubbles (15.63 and 21.21 mm) showed both zigzag and spiral trajectories at intermediate and moderately high Re and We in the crystal suspension. The simulation results illustrated that a repeating pattern of swirling vortices was created for smaller bubbles due to the unstable wake and unsteady flow of these bubbles. This is the cause of the smaller bubbles moving in a zigzag way. Larger bubbles showed two counter-rotating trailing vortices at the back of the bubble. These vortices induced a velocity component to the gas-liquid interface and caused a deformation. Hence, the larger bubbles produced a path transition.

  17. Classical Wave Model of Quantum-Like Processing in Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the conjecture on quantum-like (QL) processing of information in the brain. It is not based on the physical quantum brain (e.g., Penrose) - quantum physical carriers of information. In our approach the brain created the QL representation (QLR) of information in Hilbert space. It uses quantum information rules in decision making. The existence of such QLR was (at least preliminary) confirmed by experimental data from cognitive psychology. The violation of the law of total probability in these experiments is an important sign of nonclassicality of data. In so called "constructive wave function approach" such data can be represented by complex amplitudes. We presented 1,2 the QL model of decision making. In this paper we speculate on a possible physical realization of QLR in the brain: a classical wave model producing QLR . It is based on variety of time scales in the brain. Each pair of scales (fine - the background fluctuations of electromagnetic field and rough - the cognitive image scale) induces the QL representation. The background field plays the crucial role in creation of "superstrong QL correlations" in the brain.

  18. An analytic model for tool trajectory error in 5-axis machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. So

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper proposes an analytical method of evaluating the maximum error by modeling the exact toolpath when the tool traverses singular region in five-axis machining.Design/methodology/approach: It is known that the Numerical Control (NC data obtained from the inversekinematic transformation can generate singular positions, which have incoherent movements on the rotary axes.Such movements cause unexpected errors and abrupt operations, resulting in scoring on the machined surface.To resolve this problem, previous methods have calculated several tool positions during a singular operation,using inverse kinematic equations to predict tool trajectory and approximate the maximum error. This type ofnumerical approach, configuring the tool trajectory, requires a lot of computational time to obtain a sufficientnumber of tool positions in the singular region. We have derived an analytical equation for the tool trajectoryin the singular area by modeling the tool operation, by considering linear and nonlinear parts that are a generalform of the tool trajectory in the singular area and that are suitable for all types of five-axis machine tools. Inaddition, evaluation of the maximum tool-path error shows high accuracy, using our analytical model.Findings: : In this study, we have separated the linear components of the tool trajectory from the nonlinear ones,to propose a tool trajectory model that is applicable to any kind of 5-axis machine. We have also proposed amethod to calculate the maximum deviation error based on the proposed tool trajectory model.Practical implications: The algorithms proposed in this work can be used for evaluating NC data and forlinearization of NC data with singularity.Originality/value: Our algorithm can be used to modify NC data, making the operation smoother and reducingany errors within tolerance.

  19. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2012-09-04

    This paper constitutes the first steps in our work concerning isogeometric shell analysis. An isogeometric shell model of the Reissner-Mindlin type is introduced and a study of its accuracy in the classical pinched cylinder benchmark problem presented. In contrast to earlier works [1,2,3,4], the formulation is based on a shell model where the displacement, strain and stress fields are defined in terms of a curvilinear coordinate system arising from the NURBS description of the shell middle surface. The isogeometric shell formulation is implemented using the PetIGA and igakit software packages developed by the authors. The igakit package is a Python package used to generate NURBS representations of geometries that can be utilised by the PetIGA finite element framework. The latter utilises data structures and routines of the portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc), [5,6]. The current shell implementation is valid for static, linear problems only, but the software package is well suited for future extensions to geometrically and materially nonlinear regime as well as to dynamic problems. The accuracy of the approach in the pinched cylinder benchmark problem and present comparisons against the h-version of the finite element method with bilinear elements. Quadratic, cubic and quartic NURBS discretizations are compared against the isoparametric bilinear discretization introduced in [7]. The results show that the quadratic and cubic NURBS approximations exhibit notably slower convergence under uniform mesh refinement as the thickness decreases but the quartic approximation converges relatively quickly within the standard variational framework. The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  20. Model-Free Trajectory Optimisation for Unmanned Aircraft Serving as Data Ferries for Widespread Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Pearre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Given multiple widespread stationary data sources such as ground-based sensors, an unmanned aircraft can fly over the sensors and gather the data via a wireless link. Performance criteria for such a network may incorporate costs such as trajectory length for the aircraft or the energy required by the sensors for radio transmission. Planning is hampered by the complex vehicle and communication dynamics and by uncertainty in the locations of sensors, so we develop a technique based on model-free learning. We present a stochastic optimisation method that allows the data-ferrying aircraft to optimise data collection trajectories through an unknown environment in situ, obviating the need for system identification. We compare two trajectory representations, one that learns near-optimal trajectories at low data requirements but that fails at high requirements, and one that gives up some performance in exchange for a data collection guarantee. With either encoding the ferry is able to learn significantly improved trajectories compared with alternative heuristics. To demonstrate the versatility of the model-free learning approach, we also learn a policy to minimise the radio transmission energy required by the sensor nodes, allowing prolonged network lifetime.

  1. Preduction of transport properties of gases using classical nonspherical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlin, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The general formulation of the classical kinetic theory, which is needed to predict transport properties of gases in situations where the hydrodynamic equations are valid, is reviewed. A rigid convex model of tetrahedral symmetry is used to predict the Senftleben-Beenakker effect of a static magnetic field on the thermal conductivity and viscosity of pure CH/sub 4/, CD/sub 4/ and CF/sub 4/. The parameters of the model are optimized and are found to assume physically reasonable values. The calculations agree with experiment to a degree comparable to that of similar work on diatomic molecules. A generalized scattering cross section, ..gamma.., is defined which can be evaluated exactly for the limiting cases of a spherical soft potential and rigid ovaloids. For a general soft nonspherical interaction of the Kihara type, a suitable approximation for the momentum dependence is made with the following attributes: ..gamma.. reduces to the form for soft sphere and rigid ovaloid in the limits and the resulting matrix elements of the collision operator can be written in terms of the familiar ..cap omega..* integrals. This formulation is used to investigate thermal diffusion in binary isotopic mixtures of CO. Calculations are made in an 80/sup 0/K to 300/sup 0/K range which includes the inversion temperatures for all mixtures studied. Thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficients of CO are also calculated. The parameters of the model can be adjusted to account for the major features of the experimental data. The physical significance of the parameters is discussed. (auth)

  2. The shape of the renormalized trajectory in the two-dimensional O(n) non-linear sigma model

    CERN Document Server

    Kuti, Julius; Kuti, Julius; Bock, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    The renormalized trajectory in the multi-dimensional coupling parameter space of the two-dimensional O(3) non-linear sigma model is determined numerically under delta-function block spin transformations using two different Monte Carlo renormalization group techniques. The renormalized trajectory is compared with the straight line of the fixed point trajectory (fixed point action) which leaves the asymptotically free ultraviolet fixed point of the critical surface in the orthogonal direction. Our results show that the renormalized trajectory breaks away from the fixed point trajectory at a correlation length of approximately 3-5, flowing into the high temperature fixed point at zero correlation length. The analytic large N calculation of the renormalized trajectory is also presented in the coupling parameter space of the most general bilinear Hamiltonians. The renormalized trajectory in the large N approximation exhibits a similar shape as in the N=3 case, with the sharp break occurring at a somewhat smaller c...

  3. Non-classical method of modelling of vibrating mechatronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, K.; Buchacz, A.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents non-classical method of modelling of mechatronic systems by using polar graphs. The use of such a method enables the analysis and synthesis of mechatronic systems irrespective of the type and number of the elements of such a system. The method id connected with algebra of structural numbers. The purpose of this paper is also introduces synthesis of mechatronic system which is the reverse task of dynamics. The result of synthesis is obtaining system meeting the defined requirements. This approach is understood as design of mechatronic systems. The synthesis may also be applied to modify the already existing systems in order to achieve a desired result. The system was consisted from mechanical and electrical elements. Electrical elements were used as subsystem reducing unwanted vibration of mechanical system. The majority of vibration occurring in devices and machines is harmful and has a disadvantageous effect on their condition. Harmful impact of vibration is caused by the occurrence of increased stresses and the loss of energy, which results in faster wear machinery. Vibration, particularly low-frequency vibration, also has a negative influence on the human organism. For this reason many scientists in various research centres conduct research aimed at the reduction or total elimination of vibration.

  4. Reliability assessment using degradation models: bayesian and classical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Afonso Freitas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reliability assessment of devices has been based on (accelerated life tests. However, for highly reliable products, little information about reliability is provided by life tests in which few or no failures are typically observed. Since most failures arise from a degradation mechanism at work for which there are characteristics that degrade over time, one alternative is monitor the device for a period of time and assess its reliability from the changes in performance (degradation observed during that period. The goal of this article is to illustrate how degradation data can be modeled and analyzed by using "classical" and Bayesian approaches. Four methods of data analysis based on classical inference are presented. Next we show how Bayesian methods can also be used to provide a natural approach to analyzing degradation data. The approaches are applied to a real data set regarding train wheels degradation.Tradicionalmente, o acesso à confiabilidade de dispositivos tem sido baseado em testes de vida (acelerados. Entretanto, para produtos altamente confiáveis, pouca informação a respeito de sua confiabilidade é fornecida por testes de vida no quais poucas ou nenhumas falhas são observadas. Uma vez que boa parte das falhas é induzida por mecanismos de degradação, uma alternativa é monitorar o dispositivo por um período de tempo e acessar sua confiabilidade através das mudanças em desempenho (degradação observadas durante aquele período. O objetivo deste artigo é ilustrar como dados de degradação podem ser modelados e analisados utilizando-se abordagens "clássicas" e Bayesiana. Quatro métodos de análise de dados baseados em inferência clássica são apresentados. A seguir, mostramos como os métodos Bayesianos podem também ser aplicados para proporcionar uma abordagem natural à análise de dados de degradação. As abordagens são aplicadas a um banco de dados real relacionado à degradação de rodas de trens.

  5. Wind field and trajectory models for tornado-propelled objects. Final report 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains the results of the second phase of a research program which has as its objective the development of a mathematical model to predict the trajectory of tornado-borne objects postulated to be in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. An improved tornado wind field model satisfies the no-slip ground boundary condition of fluid mechanics and includes the functional dependence of eddy viscosity with altitude. Sub-scale wind tunnel data are obtained for all of the missiles currently specified for nuclear plant design. Confirmatory full-scale data are obtained for a 12-inch pipe and automobile. The original six-degree-of-freedom trajectory model is modified to include the improved wind field and increased capability as to body shapes and inertial characteristics that can be handled. The improved trajectory model is used to calculate maximum credible speeds, which for all of the heavy missiles are considerably less than those currently specified for design. Equivalent coefficients for use in three-degree-of-freedom models are developed and the sensitivity of range and speed to various trajectory parameters for the 12-inch diameter pipe is examined

  6. Flora-Writing Exemplified by Classical, Conservational and Unconventional Models

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Kit

    2004-01-01

    There are many ways to compile a Flora. The Flora of Turkey is a remarkable 10-volume work completed within a quarter-century of its inception. A review of the factors contributing to the Flora's success is provided. The Flora of Turkey is a classical Flora with an additional supplement recently produced by Turkish botanists. Flora Hellenica is another example of a classical Flora. Some aspects of its background and production are briefly mentioned. Conservationists consider the endemic ...

  7. Modeling atmospheric drag effect on Mangalyaan Mars orbiter during geocentric, heliocentric and areocentric trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Interplanetary missions are susceptible to gravitational and non-gravitational perturbing forces at every trajectory phase, assuming that the man made rockets and thrusters work as expected. These forces are mainly due to planetary and solar-forcing-induced perturbations during geocentric, heliocentric and Martian trajectories, and before orbit insertion. In this study, we analyzed perturbing forces and their possible effects on interplanetary and/or Mars mission satellites, before Orbit Insertion. We also model the significance of atmospheric drag force on Mangalyaan Mars orbiter mission, as a function of appropriate space environmental parameters during its 28 days in Earth's orbit (around and during perigee passage), 300 days of heliocentric and 100 days of Martian trajectory based on Earth-Mars atmosphere density ratio.

  8. Application of Back Trajectory Model to Predict Long Range Transport of Pollutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trans-boundary haze pollution in Malaysia has become an issue that created a public attention over the past several years. The presence of haze not only caused by internal and external sources but it sometime coincided with the El Nino phenomenon which prolonged the dry season during the southwest monsoon in May to September. In this study fine particulate data (PM 2.5) of Klang Valley region covering the period from 1997 to 2008 were used to investigate the source location that responsible for the long range transport of pollutant. Back trajectory model the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) was used to calculate the air mass backward trajectories up to 120 hours (5 days) for the days when fine particle were sampled. (author)

  9. Trajectories of Attentional Development: An Exploration with the Master Activation Map Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, George A.; Lete, Bernard; Ducrot, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The developmental trajectories of several attention components, such as orienting, inhibition, and the guidance of selection by relevance (i.e., advance knowledge relevant to the task) were investigated in 498 participants (ages 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 20). The paradigm was based on Michael et al.'s (2006) master activation map model and consisted of…

  10. Lock-in and break-out from technological trajectories : Modeling and policy implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfsma, W.A.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing models explaining how technologies develop along a specific trajectory largely focus on the circumstances that lead to technological lock-in. We contribute substantially to this area of research by investigating the circumstances under which technological development may break-out of

  11. Modelling cosmic ray intensities along the Ulysses trajectory

    OpenAIRE

    Ndiitwani, D. C.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S.; Heber, B.

    2005-01-01

    International audience Time dependent cosmic ray modulation in the inner heliosphere is studied by comparing results from a 2-D, time-dependent cosmic ray transport model with Ulysses observations. A compound approach, which combines the effects of the global changes in the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude with drifts to establish a realistic time-dependence, in the diffusion and drift coefficients, are used. We show that this model results in realistic cosmic ray modulation from the ...

  12. Trajectory Tracking Control of Mobile Robot by Fluid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Junichi; Murakami, Toshiyuki

    This paper describes a fluid model based path planning of mobile robot. In the previous research, the authors have already proposed TBSA (Time Based Spline Approach) for smooth motion of industrial robots(1). The TBSA is a powerful method in industrial applications, but the future position and velocity commands must be known to use it. In the general applications of repeat motion, this assumption is acceptable. In the path planning of mobile robot, however, the future position and velocity commands are unknown. To address the above issue, a strategy to generate the path of mobile robot based on fluid model is proposed in this paper. The combination of the TBSA and the generated path by fluid model brings a smooth motion of mobile robots.

  13. Effects of Alcohol on Trajectories of Physical Aggression among Urban Youth: An Application of Latent Trajectory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Jennings, Wesley G.; Komro, Kelli A.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have investigated factors associated with physical aggression during adolescence. Yet, little is known about the longitudinal relationship between drug use, particularly alcohol use, and physical aggression among minority youth. The present study examined the effects of alcohol and substance use at age 11 on trajectories of…

  14. Corrections to TDHF trajectories in a simple model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expectation values of one and two body operators are compared in the exact and TDHF wave function in the Lipkin model. A ''linear response'' correction to the evolution of two body operators, in particular dispersions, is proposed. The correction is not small and it improves substantially the agreement of two body quantities with exact results. (Auth.)

  15. Adaptive surrogate model based multi-objective transfer trajectory optimization between different libration points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haijun; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    An adaptive surrogate model-based multi-objective optimization strategy that combines the benefits of invariant manifolds and low-thrust control toward developing a low-computational-cost transfer trajectory between libration orbits around the L1 and L2 libration points in the Sun-Earth system has been proposed in this paper. A new structure for a multi-objective transfer trajectory optimization model that divides the transfer trajectory into several segments and gives the dominations for invariant manifolds and low-thrust control in different segments has been established. To reduce the computational cost of multi-objective transfer trajectory optimization, a mixed sampling strategy-based adaptive surrogate model has been proposed. Numerical simulations show that the results obtained from the adaptive surrogate-based multi-objective optimization are in agreement with the results obtained using direct multi-objective optimization methods, and the computational workload of the adaptive surrogate-based multi-objective optimization is only approximately 10% of that of direct multi-objective optimization. Furthermore, the generating efficiency of the Pareto points of the adaptive surrogate-based multi-objective optimization is approximately 8 times that of the direct multi-objective optimization. Therefore, the proposed adaptive surrogate-based multi-objective optimization provides obvious advantages over direct multi-objective optimization methods.

  16. Approximate pre-classical solutions to models of loop quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connors, Seth; Khanna, Gaurav [Physics Department, University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02747 (United States)

    2006-05-07

    In this paper we introduce a numerical approximation technique to obtain pre-classical solutions to models of loop quantum gravity. In particular, we apply the technique to vacuum Bianchi I cosmological models and recover known solutions. We also present pre-classical solutions to the Schwarzschild interior geometry and the Bianchi I LRS model with cosmological constant, which have not appeared elsewhere.

  17. Modelling cosmic ray intensities along the Ulysses trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Ndiitwani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Time dependent cosmic ray modulation in the inner heliosphere is studied by comparing results from a 2-D, time-dependent cosmic ray transport model with Ulysses observations. A compound approach, which combines the effects of the global changes in the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude with drifts to establish a realistic time-dependence, in the diffusion and drift coefficients, are used. We show that this model results in realistic cosmic ray modulation from the Ulysses launch (1990 until recently (2004 when compared to 2.5-GV electron and proton and 1.2-GV electron and Helium observations from this spacecraft. This approach is also applied to compute radial gradients present in 2.5-GV cosmic ray electron and protons in the inner heliosphere. The observed latitude dependence for both positive and negative charged particles during both the fast latitude scan periods, corresponding to different solar activity conditions, could also be realistically computed. For this an additional reduction in particle drifts (compared to diffusion toward solar maximum is needed. This results in a realistic charge-sign dependent modulation at solar maximum and the model is also applied to predict charge-sign dependent modulation up to the next expected solar minimum.

  18. Modeling Classical Swine Fever Outbreak-Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shankar; Olynk Widmar, Nicole J; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak-related outcomes, such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. These scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N = 6) and non-clustered (N = 9) groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles) epidemic duration (days) was 224 (24, 343) in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251) and 210 (167, 302) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles) number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488) in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662) and 465 (295, 640) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distributions of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak's characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on the management of swine operations and continuity of business, so that potential losses could

  19. Modeling classical swine fever outbreak-related outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar eYadav

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF outbreak-related outcomes such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. The scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with a single-index premises at the onset of an outbreak and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N=6 and non-clustered (N=9 groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles epidemic duration (days was 224 (24, 343 in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251 and 210 (167, 302 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488 in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662 and 465 (295, 640 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distribution of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak’s characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on management of swine operations and continuity of business so that potential losses could be

  20. A Non-Classical Linear Xenomorph as a Model for Quantum Causal Space

    OpenAIRE

    Raptis, Ioannis

    1999-01-01

    A quantum picture of the causal structure of Minkowski space M is presented. The mathematical model employed to this end is a non-classical version of the classical topos {H} of real quaternion algebras used elsewhere to organize the perceptions of spacetime events of a Boolean observer into M. Certain key properties of this new quantum topos are highlighted by contrast against the corresponding ones of its classical counterpart {H} modelling M and are seen to accord with some key features of...

  1. Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory is participating in an Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) project with an industry partner to modify a commercial off-the-shelf simulation software product to treat the electrodynamics of particulate systems. Discrete element modeling (DEM) is a numerical technique that can track the dynamics of particle systems. This technique, which was introduced in 1979 for analysis of rock mechanics, was recently refined to include the contact force interaction of particles with arbitrary surfaces and moving machinery. In our work, we endeavor to incorporate electrostatic forces into the DEM calculations to enhance the fidelity of the software and its applicability to (1) particle processes, such as electrophotography, that are greatly affected by electrostatic forces, (2) grain and dust transport, and (3) the study of lunar and Martian regoliths.

  2. Modeling and Robust Trajectory Tracking Control for a Novel Six-Rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Chengshun Yang; Zhong Yang; Xiaoning Huang; Shaobin Li; Qiang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and trajectory tracking control of a novel six-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is concerned to solve problems such as smaller payload capacity and lack of both hardware redundancy and anticrosswind capability for quad-rotor. The mathematical modeling for the six-rotor UAV is developed on the basis of the Newton-Euler formalism, and a second-order sliding-mode disturbance observer (SOSMDO) is proposed to reconstruct the disturbances of the rotational dynamics. In consideration of ...

  3. Effects of Alcohol on Trajectories of Physical Aggression Among Urban Youth: An Application of Latent Trajectory Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Jennings, Wesley G.; Komro, Kelli A.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have investigated factors associated with physical aggression during adolescence. Yet, little is known about the longitudinal relationship between drug use, particularly alcohol use, and physical aggression among minority youth. The present study examined the effects of alcohol and substance use at age 11 on trajectories of physical aggression over time (ages 12–14) among urban adolescents from Chicago, IL. Data from the Project Northland Chicago (n = 3038, 49.4% female) was u...

  4. Meteorological and Back Trajectory Modeling for the Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A. Gebhart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS II study with field operations during November 2008 through November 2009 was designed to evaluate the composition and sources of reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. As part of RoMANS II, a mesoscale meteorological model was utilized to provide input for back trajectory and chemical transport models. Evaluation of the model's ability to capture important transport patterns in this region of complex terrain is discussed. Previous source-receptor studies of nitrogen in this region are also reviewed. Finally, results of several back trajectory analyses for RoMANS II are presented. The trajectory mass balance (TrMB model, a receptor-based linear regression technique, was used to estimate mean source attributions of airborne ammonia concentrations during RoMANS II. Though ammonia concentrations are usually higher when there is transport from the east, the TrMB model estimates that, on average, areas to the west contribute a larger mean fraction of the ammonia. Possible reasons for this are discussed and include the greater frequency of westerly versus easterly winds, the possibility that ammonia is transported long distances as ammonium nitrate, and the difficulty of correctly modeling the transport winds in this area.

  5. Characterization of bead trajectories through the draft tube of a turbine physical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, M. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deng, Z. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McKinstry, C. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) makes extensive use of 1:25 scale Plexiglass models of hydroelectric turbines along the Columbia River to study turbine hydraulic performance and to identify potential hazards for fish passing through the turbines. Plastic beads are sent through the models and imaging has been done with laser Doppler velocimetry and high-speed videography to measure flow field variables and to study the probable paths of fish through the turbine units. Understanding has been limited by the lack of data showing actual bead trajectories in three dimensions (3-D) and the lack of quantified velocity, acceleration, and other kinematics describing the trajectories of beads as they pass through the physical models.

  6. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models unravelling hidden possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anjan Kundu

    2015-11-01

    Reviewing briefly the concept of classical and quantum integrable systems, we propose an alternative Lax operator approach, leading to quasi-higher-dimensional integrable model, unravelling some hidden dimensions in integrable systems. As an example, we construct a novel integrable quasi-two-dimensional NLS equation at the classical and the quantum levels with intriguing application in rogue wave modelling.

  7. The classical Stefan problem basic concepts, modelling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, SC

    2003-01-01

    This volume emphasises studies related toclassical Stefan problems. The term "Stefan problem" isgenerally used for heat transfer problems with phase-changes suchas from the liquid to the solid. Stefan problems have somecharacteristics that are typical of them, but certain problemsarising in fields such as mathematical physics and engineeringalso exhibit characteristics similar to them. The term``classical" distinguishes the formulation of these problems fromtheir weak formulation, in which the solution need not possessclassical derivatives. Under suitable assumptions, a weak solutioncould be as good as a classical solution. In hyperbolic Stefanproblems, the characteristic features of Stefan problems arepresent but unlike in Stefan problems, discontinuous solutions areallowed because of the hyperbolic nature of the heat equation. Thenumerical solutions of inverse Stefan problems, and the analysis ofdirect Stefan problems are so integrated that it is difficult todiscuss one without referring to the other. So no...

  8. Comment on "Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.; Baidakov, Vladimir G.

    2016-08-01

    A critical analysis of several statements concerning experimental studies, molecular dynamics simulations, and the theoretical interpretation of bubble nucleation processes is performed. In particular, it is shown that the Tolman equation does not supply us, in general, with a satisfactory theoretically founded description of the curvature dependence of the surface tension and the dependence of the steady-state nucleation rate of bubbles and droplets on supersaturation in the framework of classical nucleation theory.

  9. Group-based trajectory modeling (GBMT) of citations in scholarly literature: dynamic qualities of "transient" and "sticky knowledge claims"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Baumgartner; L. Leydesdorff

    2013-01-01

    Group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM) is applied to the citation curves of articles in six journals and to all citable items in a single field of science (virology, 24 journals) to distinguish among the developmental trajectories in subpopulations. Can citation patterns of highly-cited papers be di

  10. Ballistic Model and Simulation of a Light Anti-tank Missile Replication Hitting on Top of Tank at Terminal Trajectory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhen-duo; XU Wen-xu; DIAO Qing

    2006-01-01

    Puts forward a design project of light anti-tank missile controlled by gesture replication at the terminal trajectory, and it can hit the top of tank. The paper studies the closed-loop control rigid ballistic model and simulation for the straight and fleeting flight and terminal replication trajectory for both fixed and moving targets. Simulation results show the program to be practicable.

  11. Trajectory-Based Morphological Operators: A Model for Efficient Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno-Morenilla, Antonio; Pujol, Francisco A.; Molina-Carmona, Rafael; Sánchez-Romero, José L.; Pujol, Mar

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical morphology has been an area of intensive research over the last few years. Although many remarkable advances have been achieved throughout these years, there is still a great interest in accelerating morphological operations in order for them to be implemented in real-time systems. In this work, we present a new model for computing mathematical morphology operations, the so-called morphological trajectory model (MTM), in which a morphological filter will be divided into a sequence of basic operations. Then, a trajectory-based morphological operation (such as dilation, and erosion) is defined as the set of points resulting from the ordered application of the instant basic operations. The MTM approach allows working with different structuring elements, such as disks, and from the experiments, it can be extracted that our method is independent of the structuring element size and can be easily applied to industrial systems and high-resolution images. PMID:24892091

  12. A Trajectory-Oriented, Carriageway-Based Road Network Data Model, Part 2: Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang; LIN Hui

    2006-01-01

    This is the second of a three-part series of papers which presents the principle and architecture of the CRNM, a trajectory-oriented, carriageway-based road network data model. The first part of the series has introduced a general background of building trajectory-oriented road network data models, including motivation, related works, and basic concepts. Based on it, this paper describs the CRNM in detail. At first, the notion of basic roadway entity is proposed and discussed. Secondly, carriageway is selected as the basic roadway entity after compared with other kinds of roadway, and approaches to representing other roadways with carriageways are introduced. At last, an overall architecture of the CRNM is proposed.

  13. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    OpenAIRE

    H. Riede; Jöckel, P.; Sander, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D) global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M), the photochemistry submodel...

  14. Aspects of integrability in a classical model for non-interacting fermionic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse-Holz, Simon; Richter, Klaus; Urbina, Juan Diego

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the issue of integrability in a classical model for noninteracting fermionic fields. This model is constructed via classical-quantum correspondence obtained from the semiclassical treatment of the quantum system. Our main finding is that the classical system, contrary to the quantum system, is not integrablein general. Regarding this contrast it is clear that in general classical models for fermionic quantum systems have to be handled with care. Further numerical investigation of the system showed that there may be islands of stability in the phase space. We also investigated a similar model that is used in theoretical chemistry and found this one to be most probably integrable, although also here the integrability is not assured by the quantum-classical correspondence principle.

  15. Quasi-bound complexes in collisions of different linear molecules: Classical trajectory study of their manifestations in rotational relaxation and spectral line broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    Stable bimolecular complexes (tightly bound dimers) in the gas phase are usually created during third body stabilization of their unstable precursors-quasi-bound complexes (QCs). The latter can arise under the condition that at least one of the colliding partners has an internal degree of freedom. In this article, the principal difference between "orbitings" and QCs is demonstrated in the classical nonreactive scattering picture. Additionally, fractions of QCs in binary collisions of different linear molecules are compared. Also in the article the influence of QCs on rotational R-T relaxation and on vibration-rotational spectral line broadening is discussed. Explicit formulae shedding light on the QCs contribution to the R-T relaxation cross section and the line width and shift are presented. The obtained results emphasize the need for including QCs in every theoretical modeling of spectroscopic manifestation of intermolecular interactions. Besides the topics above, the possible manifestation of non-impact effects in the central regions of spectral lines due to QCs is stated. And finally, special consideration is given to the problem of adequate simulation of QCs formation at different pressures.

  16. Modeling spatial trajectories in dynamics testing using basis splines: application to tracking human volunteers in low-speed frontal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Marina A; Reed, Matthew P; Arbogast, Kristy B; Seacrist, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Designing motor vehicle safety systems requires knowledge of whole body kinematics during dynamic loading for occupants of varying size and age, often obtained from sled tests with postmortem human subjects and human volunteers. Recently, we reported pediatric and adult responses in low-speed (<4 g) automotive-like impacts, noting reductions in maximum excursion with increasing age. Since the time-based trajectory shape is also relevant for restraint design, this study quantified the time-series trajectories using basis splines and developed a statistical model for predicting trajectories as a function of body dimension or age. Previously collected trajectories of the head, spine, and pelvis were modeled using cubic basis splines with eight control points. A principal component analysis was conducted on the control points and related to erect seated height using a linear regression model. The resulting statistical model quantified how trajectories became shorter and flatter with increasing body size, corresponding to the validation data-set. Trajectories were then predicted for erect seated heights corresponding to pediatric and adult anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs), thus generating performance criteria for the ATDs based on human response. This statistical model can be used to predict trajectories for a subject of specified anthropometry and utilized in subject-specific computational models of occupant response.

  17. Classical Anthropic Everett model: indeterminacy in a preordained multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Although ultimately motivated by quantum theoretical considerations, Everett's many-world idea remains valid, as an approximation, in the classical limit. However to be applicable it must in any case be applied in conjunction with an appropriate anthropic principle, whose precise formulation involves an anthropic quotient that can be normalised to unity for adult humans but that would be lower for infants and other animals. The outcome is a deterministic multiverse in which the only function of chance is the specification of one's particular identity.

  18. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Riede

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M, the photochemistry submodel JVAL (J, and the new trajectory submodel TRAJECT (T, to simulate chemistry along atmospheric trajectories, which are provided offline. With the same chemistry submodels coupled to the 3-D EMAC model and consistent initial conditions and physical parameters, a unique consistency between the two models is achieved. Since only mixing processes within the 3-D model are excluded from the model consistency, comparisons of results from the two models allow to separate and quantify contributions of transport, chemistry, and mixing along the trajectory pathways. Consistency of transport between the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the 3-D EMAC model is achieved via calculation of kinematic trajectories based on 3-D wind fields from EMAC using the trajectory model LAGRANTO. The combination of the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the trajectory model LAGRANTO can be considered as a Lagrangian chemistry-transport model (CTM moving isolated air parcels. The procedure for obtaining the necessary statistical basis for the quantification method is described as well as the comprehensive diagnostics with respect to chemistry.

    The quantification method presented here allows to investigate the characteristics of transport, chemistry, and mixing in a grid-based 3-D model. The analysis of chemical processes within the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT is easily extendable to include, for example, the impact of different transport pathways or of mixing processes onto

  19. The Symmetrical Quasi-Classical Model for Electronically Non-Adiabatic Processes Applied to Energy Transfer Dynamics in Site-Exciton Models of Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Stephen J; Miller, William H

    2016-03-01

    In a recent series of papers, it has been illustrated that a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model applied to the Meyer-Miller (MM) classical vibronic Hamiltonian provides an excellent description of a variety of electronically non-adiabatic benchmark model systems for which exact quantum results are available for comparison. In this paper, the SQC/MM approach is used to treat energy transfer dynamics in site-exciton models of light-harvesting complexes, and in particular, the well-known 7-state Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) complex. Again, numerically "exact" results are available for comparison, here via the hierarchical equation of motion (HEOM) approach of Ishizaki and Fleming, and it is seen that the simple SQC/MM approach provides very reasonable agreement with the previous HEOM results. It is noted, however, that unlike most (if not all) simple approaches for treating these systems, because the SQC/MM approach presents a fully atomistic simulation based on classical trajectory simulation, it places no restrictions on the characteristics of the thermal baths coupled to each two-level site, e.g., bath spectral densities (SD) of any analytic functional form may be employed as well as discrete SD determined experimentally or from MD simulation (nor is there any restriction that the baths be harmonic), opening up the possibility of simulating more realistic variations on the basic site-exciton framework for describing the non-adiabatic dynamics of photosynthetic pigment complexes. PMID:26761191

  20. Spin-flux phase in the Kondo lattice model with classical localized spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterberg, DF; Yunoki, S

    2000-01-01

    We provide numerical evidence that a spin-flux phase exists as a ground state of the Kondo lattice model with classical local spins on a square lattice. This state manifests itself as a double-e magnetic order in the classical spins with spin density at both (0, pi) and (pi ,0) and further exhibits

  1. Study of Mechanical Model of Sports Ball’S Flight Trajectory and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Yu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to resolve the controversy of ball games the placement problem fined on the other hand, to promote the teaching and training ball flight trajectory. Tennis is the main object of study, use of literature, mathematical statistics and experimental research methods and to establish an appropriate mathematical model, using MATLAB software to accurately determine the trajectory and impact point of the ball's flight, used in teaching, training and competition in. The conclusions show that the law, accurate data analysis using MATLAB software can simulate the flight of the ball moving on sports development has a very good help provide a new way of thinking for the in-depth study the pattern of winning ball games and similar sports teaching, training and selection of athletes is an important complementary and valuable.

  2. Modeling and Robust Trajectory Tracking Control for a Novel Six-Rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengshun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and trajectory tracking control of a novel six-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV is concerned to solve problems such as smaller payload capacity and lack of both hardware redundancy and anticrosswind capability for quad-rotor. The mathematical modeling for the six-rotor UAV is developed on the basis of the Newton-Euler formalism, and a second-order sliding-mode disturbance observer (SOSMDO is proposed to reconstruct the disturbances of the rotational dynamics. In consideration of the under-actuated and strong coupling properties of the six-rotor UAV, a nested double loops trajectory tracking control strategy is adopted. In the outer loop, a position error PID controller is designed, of which the task is to compare the desired trajectory with real position of the six-rotor UAV and export the desired attitude angles to the inner loop. In the inner loop, a rapid-convergent nonlinear differentiator (RCND is proposed to calculate the derivatives of the virtual control signal, instead of using the analytical differentiation, to avoid “differential expansion” in the procedure of the attitude controller design. Finally, the validity and effectiveness of the proposed technique are demonstrated by the simulation results.

  3. Properties of Regge Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, A; Tang, Alfred; Norbury, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Early Chew-Frautschi plots show that meson and baryon Regge trajectoies are approximately linear and non-intersecting. In this paper, we reconstruct all Regge trajectories from the most recent data. Our plots show that meson trajectories are non-linear and intersecting. We also show that all current meson Regge trajectories models are ruled out by data.

  4. Origin of the Turkwel delta trajectory (Lake Turkana, Kenya): insights from numerical modeling (DIONISOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexis, Nutz; Pierre, Dietrich; Vafe, Soumahoro; Mathieu, Schuster; Jean-François, Ghienne

    2016-04-01

    Deltas simultaneously respond to modifications in parameters such as water discharge, sediment supply and base-level change. Those parameters are driven by a number of potential external forcing processes, nevertheless mainly corresponding to tectonism and climate. In this study, geomorphology and numerical modeling are coupled in order to provide analysis of the delta complex of the Turkwel River (Lake Turkana, Kenya). The Turkwel delta complex is 35 km long, forming one of the major deltaic systems that has fringed Lake Turkana during the Holocene. It developed during the lake level regression at the end of the holocene African Humid Period and correspond to a typical forced-regressive delta. Trajectory analysis was performed on three transects cross-cutting the deltaic complex. Transects consistently display five slightly descending (slope gradient: >0° to 0.4°) plateaus separated by four abrupt steps of higher slope gradients (1° to 3.8°). Conventional interpretations presume that the deltaic trajectory results from either (1) four abrupt accelerations in lake level fall during the continuous regression, (2) four abrupt declines in sediment supply and/or water discharge during a steady lake level fall or (3) a combination of both. We used numerical stratigraphic modeling (Dionisos) in order to test the aforementioned hypotheses as the origin of observed trajectories. We concluded that causal relationships between sediment supply, lake level change and progradation trajectory are not as straightforward as recurrently envisioned. We think that this contribution brings new lights on the relationships between deltaic architectures and controlling factors.

  5. The impact of temperature resolution on trajectory modeling of stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Randel, W. J.; Kim, J.-E.

    2014-11-01

    Lagrangian trajectories driven by reanalysis meteorological fields are frequently used to study water vapour (H2O) in the stratosphere, in which the tropical cold-point temperatures regulate H2O amount entering the stratosphere. Therefore, the accuracy of temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is of great importance for trajectory studies. Currently, most reanalyses, such as the NASA MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications), only provide temperatures with ~1.2 km vertical resolution in the TTL, which has been argued to introduce uncertainties in the simulations. In this paper, we quantify this uncertainty by comparing the trajectory results using MERRA temperatures on model levels (traj.MER-T) to those using temperatures in finite resolutions, including GPS temperatures (traj.GPS-T) and MERRA temperatures adjusted to recover wave-induced variability underrepresented by the current ~1.2 km vertical resolution (traj.MER-Twave). Comparing with traj.MER-T, traj.GPS-T has little impact on simulated stratospheric H2O (changes ~0.1 ppmv), whereas traj.MER-Twave tends to dry air by 0.2-0.3 ppmv. The bimodal dehydration peaks in traj.MER-T due to limited vertical resolution disappear in traj.GPS-T and traj.MER-Twave by allowing the cold-point tropopause to be found at finer vertical levels. Despite these differences in absolute values of predicted H2O and vertical dehydration patterns, there is virtually no difference in the interannual variability in different runs. Overall, we find that the finite resolution of temperature has limited impact on predicted H2O in the trajectory model.

  6. The impact of temperature resolution on trajectory modeling of stratospheric water vapour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lagrangian trajectories driven by reanalysis meteorological fields are frequently used to study water vapour (H2O in the stratosphere, in which the tropical cold-point temperatures regulate H2O amount entering the stratosphere. Therefore, the accuracy of temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL is of great importance for trajectory studies. Currently, most reanalyses, such as the NASA MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications, only provide temperatures with ~1.2 km vertical resolution in the TTL, which has been argued to introduce uncertainties in the simulations. In this paper, we quantify this uncertainty by comparing the trajectory results using MERRA temperatures on model levels (traj.MER-T to those using temperatures in finite resolutions, including GPS temperatures (traj.GPS-T and MERRA temperatures adjusted to recover wave-induced variability underrepresented by the current ~1.2 km vertical resolution (traj.MER-Twave. Comparing with traj.MER-T, traj.GPS-T has little impact on simulated stratospheric H2O (changes ~0.1 ppmv, whereas traj.MER-Twave tends to dry air by 0.2–0.3 ppmv. The bimodal dehydration peaks in traj.MER-T due to limited vertical resolution disappear in traj.GPS-T and traj.MER-Twave by allowing the cold-point tropopause to be found at finer vertical levels. Despite these differences in absolute values of predicted H2O and vertical dehydration patterns, there is virtually no difference in the interannual variability in different runs. Overall, we find that the finite resolution of temperature has limited impact on predicted H2O in the trajectory model.

  7. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    OpenAIRE

    Kamenshchik, Alexander Y.; Manti, Serena

    2012-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical ...

  8. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    OpenAIRE

    Kamenshchik, A.; Manti, S.

    2013-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical ...

  9. The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms for the classical relativistic electrodynamics models revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Bogolubov, N.N.; Prykarpatsky, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The work is devoted to studying some new classical electrodynamics models of interacting charged point particles and the aspects of the quantization via the Dirac procedure related to them. Based on the vacuum field theory no-geometry approach developed in [6,7,9], the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian reformulations of some alternative classical electrodynamics models are devised. The Dirac-type quantization procedure for the considered alternative electrodynamics models, based on the obtained cano...

  10. Optimum Trajectory of Dynamic Input-Output Balance Model for Open Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Lyashenko, Igor; Lyashenko, Olena

    2006-01-01

    When export and import is connected with output of basic production, and criterion functional represents a final state of economy, the generalization of classical qualitative results of the main-line theory on a case of dynamic input-output balance optimization model for open economy is given.

  11. Classical conformality in the Standard Model from Coleman’s theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2016-09-01

    The classical conformality (CC) is one of the possible candidates for explaining the gauge hierarchy of the Standard Model (SM). We show that it is naturally obtained from the Coleman’s theory on baby universe.

  12. A Non-Classical Linear Xenomorph as a Model for Quantum Causal Space

    CERN Document Server

    Raptis, I

    1999-01-01

    A quantum picture of the causal structure of Minkowski space M is presented. The mathematical model employed to this end is a non-classical version of the classical topos {H} of real quaternion algebras used elsewhere to organize the perceptions of spacetime events of a Boolean observer into M. Certain key properties of this new quantum topos are highlighted by contrast against the corresponding ones of its classical counterpart {H} modelling M and are seen to accord with some key features of the algebraically quantized causal set structure.

  13. Satellite observations and modeling of oil spill trajectories in the Bohai Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qing; Li, Xiaofeng; Wei, Yongliang;

    2013-01-01

    On June 4 and 17, 2011, separate oil spill accidents occurred at two oil platforms in the Bohai Sea, China. The oil spills were subsequently observed on different types of satellite images including SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar), Chinese HJ-1-B CCD and NASA MODIS. To illustrate the fate of the oil...... spills, we performed two numerical simulations to simulate the trajectories of the oil spills with the GNOME (General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment) model. For the first time, we drive the GNOME with currents obtained from an operational ocean model (NCOM, Navy Coastal Ocean Model) and surface...... winds from operational scatterometer measurements (ASCAT, the Advanced Scatterometer). Both data sets are freely and openly available. The initial oil spill location inputs to the model are based on the detected oil spill locations from the SAR images acquired on June 11 and 14. Three oil slicks...

  14. Generalized continua as models for classical and advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This volume is devoted to an actual topic which is the focus world-wide of various research groups. It contains contributions describing the material behavior on different scales, new existence and uniqueness theorems, the formulation of constitutive equations for advanced materials. The main emphasis of the contributions is directed on the following items - Modelling and simulation of natural and artificial materials with significant microstructure, - Generalized continua as a result of multi-scale models, - Multi-field actions on materials resulting in generalized material models, - Theories including higher gradients, and - Comparison with discrete modelling approaches.

  15. Special issue on computational models of classical conditioning guest editors' introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Eduardo; Schmajuk, Nestor

    2012-09-01

    In the present special issue, the performance of current computational models of classical conditioning was evaluated under three requirements: (1) Models were to be tested against a list of previously agreed-upon phenomena; (2) the parameters were fixed across simulations; and (3) the simulations used to test the models had to be made available. These requirements resulted in three major products: (a) a list of fundamental classical-conditioning results for which there is a consensus about their reliability; (b) the necessary information to evaluate each of the models on the basis of its ordinal successes in accounting for the experimental data; and (c) a repository of computational models ready to generate simulations. We believe that the contents of this issue represent the 2012 state of the art in computational modeling of classical conditioning and provide a way to find promising avenues for future model development.

  16. Comparisons of classical and quantum dynamics for initially localized states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare the dynamics of quantum wave packets with the dynamics of classical trajectory ensembles. The wave packets are Gaussian with expectation values of position and momenta which centers them in phase space. The classical trajectory ensembles are generated directly from the quantum wave packets via the Wigner transform. Quantum and classical dynamics are then compared using several quantum measures and the analogous classical ones derived from the Wigner equivalent formalism. Comparisons are made for several model potentials and it is found that there is generally excellent classical--quantum correspondence except for certain specific cases of tunneling and interference. In general, this correspondence is also very good in regions of phase space where there is classical chaos

  17. Formal Relationships Between Geometrical and Classical Models for Concurrency

    CERN Document Server

    Goubault, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of models for concurrent programs has been proposed during the past decades, each one focusing on various aspects of computations: trace equivalence, causality between events, conflicts and schedules due to resource accesses, etc. More recently, models with a geometrical flavor have been introduced, based on the notion of cubical set. These models are very rich and expressive since they can represent commutation between any bunch of events, thus generalizing the principle of true concurrency. While they seem to be very promising - because they make possible the use of techniques from algebraic topology in order to study concurrent computations - they have not yet been precisely related to the previous models, and the purpose of this paper is to fill this gap. In particular, we describe an adjunction between Petri nets and cubical sets which extends the previously known adjunction between Petri nets and asynchronous transition systems by Nielsen and Winskel.

  18. A drifting trajectory prediction model based on object shape and stochastic mo-tion features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王胜正; 聂皓冰; 施朝健

    2014-01-01

    There is a huge demand to develop a method for marine search and rescue (SAR) operators automatically predicting the most probable searching area of the drifting object. This paper presents a novel drifting prediction model to improve the accuracy of the drifting trajectory computation of the sea-surface objects. First, a new drifting kinetic model based on the geometry characteristics of the objects is proposed that involves the effects of the object shape and stochastic motion features in addition to the traditional factors of wind and currents. Then, a computer simulation-based method is employed to analyze the stochastic motion features of the drifting objects, which is applied to estimate the uncertainty parameters of the stochastic factors of the drifting objects. Finally, the accuracy of the model is evaluated by comparison with the flume experimental results. It is shown that the proposed method can be used for various shape objects in the drifting trajectory prediction and the maritime search and rescue decision-making system.

  19. Where do diaspores come from? Reverse wind modelling unveils plant colonization trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In alpine habitats, wind is the predominant dispersal vector of diaspores (seeds and spores. The wind flow field in mountain areas depends on the interaction of wind with topography which creates very complex patterns for both wind directions and speeds. Most alpine species utilize wind transport for diaspore dispersal, and more than 90% are anemochorous. The transport of diaspores is to date considered a forward (ahead in time problem, i.e. from actual diaspore locations to future ones. I argue here that, using appropriate reverse mathematical modelling, the problem can be reversed: starting from actual locations of plants and diaspores, one can evince the trajectories that led to actual positions. So doing, one can reconstruct the trajectories followed by plant species to reach actual niches. A particular application of this approach is the individuation of corridors followed by exotic plant species. The ad-hoc software Wind-Lab has been realized which incorporates both forward and backward wind modelling. The model described here might be of importance in geobotany, climatic ecology and plant conservation biology.

  20. Confined turbulent fluid-particle flow modeling using multiple-realization particle trajectory schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.

    1988-07-01

    A multiple-realization particle trajectory scheme has been developed and applied to the numerical prediction of confined turbulent fluid-particle flows. The example flows investigated include the vertical pipe upflow experimental data of Tsuji et al. and the experimental data of Leavitt for a coaxial jet flow, comprising a particle-laden central jet and a clean annular jet, into a large recirculation chamber. The results obtained from the numerical scheme agree well with the experimental data, lending confidence to the modeling approach. The multiple-realization particle trajectory turbulent flow modeling scheme is believed to be a more elegant and accurate approach to the extension of single-particle hydrodynamics to dilute multi-particle systems than the more commonly employed two-fluid modeling approach. It is also better able to incorporate additional force items such as lift, virtual mass and Bassett history terms directly into the particle equation of motion as appropriate. This makes it a suitable candidate for particle migration studies and an extension to situations involving liquid particulate phases with possible propulsion applications, such as in spray combustion, follows naturally.

  1. NOAA-MMS joint Langmuir circulation and oil spill trajectory models workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An NOAA/HAZMAT workshop was held in October 1999 which provided an opportunity for 14 spill response officials to discuss the scientific theory of Langmuir Circulation (LC) and to determine ways that it affects oil spreading, dispersion and transport. The workshop helped identify potential modifications to existing oil spill trajectory models. LC is a result of the interaction between wind-driven surface currents and waves. This interaction causes vortices in the surface mixed layer of the water body. The vortices are aligned in the general direction of the wind. The surface water between the vortices either diverges or converges. For cleanup purposes and remote sensing it is necessary to incorporate LC into most oil and spill trajectory and behavior models. It was determined it should be possible to build simple models to predict the intensity of LC since current knowledge suggests that LC is forced by wind and waves. A prediction equation would be of tremendous use to oil spill response personnel. 39 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  2. The impact of temperature vertical structure on trajectory modeling of stratospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Randel, W. J.; Kim, J.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Lagrangian trajectories driven by reanalysis meteorological fields are frequently used to study water vapor (H2O) in the stratosphere, in which the tropical cold-point temperatures regulate the amount of H2O entering the stratosphere. Therefore, the accuracy of temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is of great importance for understanding stratospheric H2O abundances. Currently, most reanalyses, such as the NASA MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective - analysis for Research and Applications), only provide temperatures with ~ 1.2 km vertical resolution in the TTL, which has been argued to miss finer vertical structure in the tropopause and therefore introduce uncertainties in our understanding of stratospheric H2O. In this paper, we quantify this uncertainty by comparing the Lagrangian trajectory prediction of H2O using MERRA temperatures on standard model levels (traj.MER-T) to those using GPS temperatures at finer vertical resolution (traj.GPS-T), and those using adjusted MERRA temperatures with finer vertical structures induced by waves (traj.MER-Twave). It turns out that by using temperatures with finer vertical structure in the tropopause, the trajectory model more realistically simulates the dehydration of air entering the stratosphere. But the effect on H2O abundances is relatively minor: compared with traj.MER-T, traj.GPS-T tends to dry air by ~ 0.1 ppmv, while traj.MER-Twave tends to dry air by 0.2-0.3 ppmv. Despite these differences in absolute values of predicted H2O and vertical dehydration patterns, there is virtually no difference in the interannual variability in different runs. Overall, we find that a tropopause temperature with finer vertical structure has limited impact on predicted stratospheric H2O.

  3. Quasi-classical trajectory study of the reaction N(4S) + H2 and its reverse reaction: Role of initial vibrational and rotational excitations in chemical stereodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Juan Zhang; Shunle Dong

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effects of reagent vibrational and rotational states on the stereodynamical properties of the N(4S) + H2(, )→NH + H reaction and its reverse reaction of H(2S) + NH(, )→N(4S) + H2, we reported a detailed quasiclassical trajectory study using the 4A" double many-body expansion potential energy surface and at the collision energy of 35 kcal/mol. The density distribution of (r) as a function of the angle between and ', and that of (r) as a function of the dihedral angle between the plane containing -' and the plane containing '- ', the normal differential cross-sections as well as the averaged product rotational alignment parameter 〈 2('.) 〉 are calculated and reported. Comparison between the two reactions has showed that the degrees of alignment and orientation of products related to reagent rovibrational state have marked differences for the two reactive systems.

  4. Quantum integrable models of interacting bosons and classical r-matrices with spectral parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2015-11-01

    Using the technique of classical r-matrices with spectral parameters we construct a general form of quantum Lax operators of interacting boson systems corresponding to an arbitrary simple (or reductive) Lie algebra. We prove quantum integrability of these models in the physically important case of g = gl(n) and "diagonal" in the root basis classical r-matrices. We consider in detail two classes of non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices with spectral parameters and obtain the corresponding quantum Lax operators and quantum integrable many-boson hamiltonians that generalize Bose-Hubbard dimer hamiltonians.

  5. Nonlinear time reversal of classical waves: experiment and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Matthew; Taddese, Biniyam; Xiao, Bo; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-12-01

    We consider time reversal of electromagnetic waves in a closed, wave-chaotic system containing a discrete, passive, harmonic-generating nonlinearity. An experimental system is constructed as a time-reversal mirror, in which excitations generated by the nonlinearity are gathered, time-reversed, transmitted, and directed exclusively to the location of the nonlinearity. Here we show that such nonlinear objects can be purely passive (as opposed to the active nonlinearities used in previous work), and we develop a higher data rate exclusive communication system based on nonlinear time reversal. A model of the experimental system is developed, using a star-graph network of transmission lines, with one of the lines terminated by a model diode. The model simulates time reversal of linear and nonlinear signals, demonstrates features seen in the experimental system, and supports our interpretation of the experimental results.

  6. The smallest matrix black hole model in the classical limit

    CERN Document Server

    Berenstein, David

    2016-01-01

    We study the smallest non-trivial matrix model that can be considered to be a (toy) model of a black hole. The model consists of a pair of $2\\times 2$ traceless hermitian matrices with a commutator squared potential and an $SU(2)$ gauge symmetry, plus an $SO(2)$ rotation symmetry. We show that using the symmetries of the system, all but two of the variables can be separated. The two variables that remain display chaos and a transition from chaos to integrability when a parameter related to an $SO(2)$ angular momentum is tuned to a critical value. We compute the Lyapunov exponents near this transition and study the critical exponent of the Lyapunov exponents near the critical point. We compare this transition to extremal rotating black holes.

  7. Learning probabilistic models of hydrogen bond stability from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-02-15

    Background: Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. They form and break while a protein deforms, for instance during the transition from a non-functional to a functional state. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor.Methods: This paper describes inductive learning methods to train protein-independent probabilistic models of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories of various proteins. The training data contains 32 input attributes (predictors) that describe an H-bond and its local environment in a conformation c and the output attribute is the probability that the H-bond will be present in an arbitrary conformation of this protein achievable from c within a time duration ?. We model dependence of the output variable on the predictors by a regression tree.Results: Several models are built using 6 MD simulation trajectories containing over 4000 distinct H-bonds (millions of occurrences). Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. They perform roughly 20% better than models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a conformation. In most tests, about 80% of the 10% H-bonds predicted as the least stable are actually among the 10% truly least stable. The important attributes identified during the tree construction are consistent with previous findings.Conclusions: We use inductive learning methods to build protein-independent probabilistic models to study H-bond stability, and demonstrate that the models perform better than H-bond energy alone. 2011 Chikalov et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. Epidemiological and economic modelling of classical swine fever: application to the 1997/1998 Dutch epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangen, M.J.J.; Burrell, A.M.; Mourits, M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a modelling system developed to simulate the epidemiological and economic effects of a classical swine fever (CSF) epidemic in the Netherlands. The system consists of four interlinked models plus a spreadsheet. The models are characterised by different levels of spatial and temp

  9. General classical solutions of the complex Grassmannian and CP sub(N-1) sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General classical solutions are constructed for the complex Grassmannian non-linear sigma models in two euclidean dimensions in terms of holomorphic functions. The Grassmannian sigma models are a simple generalization of the well known CP sup(N-1) model in two dimensions and they share various interesting properties; existence of (anti-) instantons, an infinite number of conserved quantities and complete integrability. (author)

  10. Modelling Systems of Classical/Quantum Identical Particles by Focusing on Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Ivan; Fazio, Claudio; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria

    2012-01-01

    A procedure modelling ideal classical and quantum gases is discussed. The proposed approach is mainly based on the idea that modelling and algorithm analysis can provide a deeper understanding of particularly complex physical systems. Appropriate representations and physical models able to mimic possible pseudo-mechanisms of functioning and having…

  11. Estimates of surface methane emissions over Europe using observed surface concentrations and the FLEXPART trajectory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C. J.; Kiemle, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Aalto, T.; Necki, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Arduini, J.; Apadula, F.; Berkhout, H.; Hatakka, J.; O'Doherty, S.

    2013-12-01

    We use surface methane observations from nine European ground stations, and the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport model to obtain surface methane emissions for 2010. Our inversion shows the strongest emissions from the Netherlands and the coal mines in Upper Silesia Poland. This is qualitatively consistent with the EDGAR surface flux inventory. We also report significant surface fluxes from wetlands in southern Finland during July and August and reduced wetland fluxes later in the year. Our simulated methane surface concentration captures at least half of the daily variability in the observations, suggesting that the transport model is correctly simulating the regional transport pathways over Europe. We also use our trajectory model to determine whether future space-based remote sensing instruments (MERLIN) will be able to detect both natural and anthropogenic changes in the surface flux strengths.

  12. O método das trajectórias clássicas: colisões coplanares do tipo A+BC Classical trajectory method: A+BC coplanar collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M. C. Marques

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The general methodology of classical trajectories as applied to elementary chemical reactions of the A+BC type is presented. The goal is to elucidate students about the main theoretical features and potentialities in applying this versatile method to calculate the dynamical properties of reactive systems. Only the methodology for two-dimensional (2D case is described, from which the general theory for 3D follows straightforwardly. The adopted point of view is, as much as possible, that of allowing a direct translation of the concepts into a working program. An application to the reaction O(¹D+H2->O+OH with relevance in atmospheric chemistry is also presented. The FORTRAN codes used are available through the web page www.qqesc.qui.uc.pt.

  13. A Refinement of the Classical Order Point Model

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Moeeni; Stephen Replogle; Zariff Chaudhury; Ahmad Syamil

    2012-01-01

    Factors such as demand volume and replenishment lead time that influence production and inventory control systems are random variables. Existing inventory models incorporate the parameters (e.g., mean and standard deviation) of these statistical quantities to formulate inventory policies. In practice, only sample estimates of these parameters are available. The estimates are subject to sampling variation and hence are random variables. Whereas the effect of sampling variability on estimates o...

  14. Status of semi-classical distorted wave (SCDW) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y.; Higashi, H.; Kuwata, R.; Kawai, M. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kohno, M.

    1997-05-01

    The SCDW model to describe the preequilibrium MSD reaction was extended so as to include the 3-step process. The MSD calculations of {sup 58}Ni(p,p`x) at energies of 65, 120 and 200 MeV and {sup 90}Zr(p,p`x) at 160 MeV were carried out using the extended SCDW model and compared with the experimental data. The calculations with no free parameter showed overall good agreement with the experiment, although underprediction is seen at very small and backward angles. We found that the 2- and 3-step contributions were not so large enough to compensate the difference between the 1-step cross sections and the experimental ones at backward angles. The discrepancies seen at very small and large angles is possibly responsible for the local Fermi-gas model which does not work well in the nuclear surface region. The comparisons of the SCDW calculations with the AMD, QMD and FKK calculations led to an interesting result that the differences in the shape of 1-step angular distributions are remarkable among the models, but the multistep components are rather similar in the shape of angular distributions and the step-wise contribution is not so much different. The in-medium N-N cross sections were calculated in the nonrelativistic Brueckner framework with the Paris potential, and were parametrized as a function of the incident energy and the nuclear density. The SCDW calculation with the in-medium N-N cross sections was not so different from that with the free ones. (J.P.N.)

  15. Coupled Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics and Trajectory Modeling for Higher Fidelity Launch Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ables, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Multi-stage launch vehicles with solid rocket motors (SRMs) face design optimization challenges, especially when the mission scope changes frequently. Significant performance benefits can be realized if the solid rocket motors are optimized to the changing requirements. While SRMs represent a fixed performance at launch, rapid design iterations enable flexibility at design time, yielding significant performance gains. The streamlining and integration of SRM design and analysis can be achieved with improved analysis tools. While powerful and versatile, the Solid Performance Program (SPP) is not conducive to rapid design iteration. Performing a design iteration with SPP and a trajectory solver is a labor intensive process. To enable a better workflow, SPP, the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and the interfaces between them have been improved and automated, and a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. The GUI enables real-time visual feedback of grain and nozzle design inputs, enforces parameter dependencies, removes redundancies, and simplifies manipulation of SPP and POST's numerous options. Automating the analysis also simplifies batch analyses and trade studies. Finally, the GUI provides post-processing, visualization, and comparison of results. Wrapping legacy high-fidelity analysis codes with modern software provides the improved interface necessary to enable rapid coupled SRM ballistics and vehicle trajectory analysis. Low cost trade studies demonstrate the sensitivities of flight performance metrics to propulsion characteristics. Incorporating high fidelity analysis from SPP into vehicle design reduces performance margins and improves reliability. By flying an SRM designed with the same assumptions as the rest of the vehicle, accurate comparisons can be made between competing architectures. In summary, this flexible workflow is a critical component to designing a versatile launch vehicle model that can accommodate a volatile

  16. On modeling of neutron in classical physics: a methodical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the given work it is shown that the question about the neutron as a non-elementary particle started recently by B.V.Vasiliev in JINR Communication P3-2014-77 (Dubna, 2014) demands to take into consideration the entire system of the logically relevant and experimentally confirmed knowledge which was found by M. Gryzinski in the deterministic atomic physics, and also the two interpretations declared in this communication are refuted: of an electron-like elementary particle in the neutron structure that has no magnetic properties and of the planetary-type model for a neutron with point objects

  17. Classical integrability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin–Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand–Levitan–Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  18. Classical Cepheid pulsation models --- VI. The Hertzsprung progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, G.; Marconi, M.; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2000-08-01

    We present the results of an extensive theoretical investigation on the pulsation behavior of Bump Cepheids. We constructed several sequences of full amplitude, nonlinear, convective models by adopting a chemical composition typical of Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheids (Y=0.25, Z=0.008) and stellar masses ranging from M/M⊙ =6.55 to 7.45. We find that theoretical light and velocity curves reproduce the HP, and indeed close to the blue edge the bump is located along the descending branch, toward longer periods it crosses at first the luminosity/velocity maximum and then it appears along the rising branch. In particular, we find that the predicted period at the HP center is PHP = 11.24∓0.46 d and that such a value is in very good agreement with the empirical value estimated by adopting the Fourier parameters of LMC Cepheid light curves i.e. PHP = 11.2 ∓ 0.8 d (Welch et al. 1997). Moreover, light and velocity amplitudes present a "double-peaked" distribution which is in good qualitative agreement with observational evidence on Bump Cepheids. It turns out that both the skewness and the acuteness typically show a well-defined minimum at the HP center and the periods range from PHP = 10.73 ∓ 0.97 d to PHP = 11.29 ∓ 0.53 d which are in good agreement with empirical estimates. We also find that the models at the HP center are located within the resonance region but not on the 2:1 resonance line (P2/P0 = 0.5), and indeed the P2/P0 ratios roughly range from 0.51 (cool models) to 0.52 (hot models). Interestingly enough, the predicted Bump Cepheid masses, based on a Mass-Luminosity (ML) relation which neglects the convective core overshooting, are in good agreement with the empirical masses of Galactic Cepheids estimated by adopting the Baade-Wesselink method (Gieren 1989). As a matter of fact, the observed mass at the HP center -P ≍ 11.2 d- is 6.9 ∓ 0.9 M⊙, while the predicted mass is 7.0 ∓ 0.45 M⊙. Even by accounting for the metallicity difference

  19. Development of a unified viscoplasticity constitutive model based on classical plasticity theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Ping; LIU ChangChun; L(U) HeXiang

    2009-01-01

    The traditional unified viscoplasticity constitutive model can be only applied to metal materials. The study of the unified constitutive theory for metal materials has discovered the correlation between the classical plasticity theory and the unified viscoplasticity constitutive model, thus leading to the con-cepts of the classic plastic potential and yield surface in the unified constitutive model. Moreover, this research has given the continuous expression of the classical plastic multiplier and presented the corresponding constructive method, which extends its physical significance and lays down a good foundation for the application of the unified constitutive theory to the material analysis in more fields.This paper also introduces the unified constitutive model for metal materials and geo-materials. The numerical simulation indicates that the construction should be both reasonable and practical.

  20. Development of a unified viscoplasticity constitutive model based on classical plasticity theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The traditional unified viscoplasticity constitutive model can be only applied to metal materials.The study of the unified constitutive theory for metal materials has discovered the correlation between the classical plasticity theory and the unified viscoplasticity constitutive model,thus leading to the con-cepts of the classic plastic potential and yield surface in the unified constitutive model.Moreover,this research has given the continuous expression of the classical plastic multiplier and presented the corresponding constructive method,which extends its physical significance and lays down a good foundation for the application of the unified constitutive theory to the material analysis in more fields.This paper also introduces the unified constitutive model for metal materials and geo-materials.The numerical simulation indicates that the construction should be both reasonable and practical.

  1. Typhoon eye trajectory based on a mathematical model: comparing with observational data

    CERN Document Server

    Rozanova, Olga S; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model based on the primitive system of the Navier-Stokes equations in a bidimensional framework as the $l$ - plane approximation, which allows us to explain the variety of tracks of tropical cyclones (typhoons). Our idea is to construct special analytical solutions with a linear velocity profile for the Navier-Stokes systems. The evidence of the structure of linear velocity near the center of vortex can be proven by the observational data. We study solutions with the linear-velocity property for both barotropic and baroclinic cases and show that they follow the same equations in describing the trajectories of the typhoon eye at the equilibrium state (that relates to the conservative phase of the typhoon dynamics). Moreover, at the equilibrium state, the trajectories can be viewed as a superposition of two circular motions: one has period $2\\pi/l,$ the other one has period $2\\pi/b_0,$ where $l$ is the Coriolis parameter and $b_0$ is the height-averaged vorticity at the center of cyclone. Also, we ...

  2. CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago; Hoover Inst.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.

  3. Modeling and Simulation on the Underwater Trajectory of Non-Powered Vehicle Discharged from the Broadside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijuan Ye; Hao Zhou; Xinye Wang

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the underwater trajectory of the non⁃powered vehicle discharged from the broadside of the underwater platform, the simulation on the ascent process of non⁃powered vehicle was realized based on the mathematical model including the movement of the vehicle on the slope plate and in the seawater, the air chamber underwater working process etc. The simulation results show that the outlet speed and attitude of the vehicle meet the requirements of missile launching, the non⁃powered vehicle discharged from the broadside of the underwater platform is feasible. The simulation results with varying parameters show that the negative buoyancy of the vehicle imposes great impacts on the security of its discharge and the floating process, and the vehicle discharge depth is proportional to the floating time. The models and simulation result can be used in further research on the broadside discharging technology of the underwater platform.

  4. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, Michael M.; Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A.; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ˜ 106) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  5. Learning Probabilistic Models of Hydrogen Bond Stability from Molecular Dynamics Simulation Trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-04-02

    Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. H-bonds involving atoms from residues that are close to each other in the main-chain sequence stabilize secondary structure elements. H-bonds between atoms from distant residues stabilize a protein’s tertiary structure. However, H-bonds greatly vary in stability. They form and break while a protein deforms. For instance, the transition of a protein from a nonfunctional to a functional state may require some H-bonds to break and others to form. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor. Other local interactions may reinforce (or weaken) an H-bond. This paper describes inductive learning methods to train a protein-independent probabilistic model of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories. The training data describes H-bond occurrences at successive times along these trajectories by the values of attributes called predictors. A trained model is constructed in the form of a regression tree in which each non-leaf node is a Boolean test (split) on a predictor. Each occurrence of an H-bond maps to a path in this tree from the root to a leaf node. Its predicted stability is associated with the leaf node. Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. In particular, their performance is roughly 20% better than that of models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a given conformation. The paper discusses several extensions that may yield further improvements.

  6. A Computational Model of Human-Robot Spatial Interactions Based on a Qualitative Trajectory Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dondrup

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a probabilistic sequential model of Human-Robot Spatial Interaction (HRSI using a well-established Qualitative Trajectory Calculus (QTC to encode HRSI between a human and a mobile robot in a meaningful, tractable, and systematic manner. Our key contribution is to utilise QTC as a state descriptor and model HRSI as a probabilistic sequence of such states. Apart from the sole direction of movements of human and robot modelled by QTC, attributes of HRSI like proxemics and velocity profiles play vital roles for the modelling and generation of HRSI behaviour. In this paper, we particularly present how the concept of proxemics can be embedded in QTC to facilitate richer models. To facilitate reasoning on HRSI with qualitative representations, we show how we can combine the representational power of QTC with the concept of proxemics in a concise framework, enriching our probabilistic representation by implicitly modelling distances. We show the appropriateness of our sequential model of QTC by encoding different HRSI behaviours observed in two spatial interaction experiments. We classify these encounters, creating a comparative measurement, showing the representational capabilities of the model.

  7. Extension of Some Classical Results on Ruin Probability to Delayed Renewal Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Su; Tao Jiang; Qi-he Tang

    2002-01-01

    Embrechts and Veraverbeke[2] investigated the renewal risk model and gave a tail equivalence relationship of the ruin probabilities ψ(x) under the assumption that the claim size is heavy-tailed, which is regarded as a classical result in the context of extremal value theory. In this note we extend this result to the delayed renewal risk model.

  8. Classical solutions for the supersymmetric Grassmannian sigma models in two dimensions, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supersymmetric version of the complex Grassmannian sigma models in two euclidean dimensions is studied. By adopting the newly found solutions of the bosonic Grassmannian sigma model as the background fields, We construct explicit fermion classical solutions for the supersymmetric Dirac equations. These fermion solutions are obtained in an elementary way just like their bosonic partners. (author)

  9. Harmonic oscillator in Snyder space: The classical case and the quantum case

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carlos Leiva

    2010-02-01

    The harmonic oscillator in Snyder space is investigated in its classical and quantum versions. The classical trajectory is obtained and the semiclassical quantization from the phase space trajectories is discussed. An effective cut-off to high frequencies is found. The quantum version is developed and an equivalent usual harmonic oscillator is obtained through an effective mass and an effective frequency introduced in the model. This modified parameters give us a modified energy spectrum also.

  10. Mathematical modelling for trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of a cluster of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel for the application of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a blood vessel upstream from a malignant tissue and are captured at the tumour site with help of an applied magnetic field. The applied field is produced by a rare earth cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body. All forces expected to significantly affect the transport of nanoparticles were incorporated, including magnetization force, drag force and buoyancy force. The results show that particles are slow down and captured under the influence of magnetic force, which is responsible to attract the magnetic particles towards the magnet. It is optimized that all particles are captured either before or at the centre of the magnet (z≤0) when blood vessel is very close proximity to the magnet (d=2.5 cm). However, as the distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) increases (above 4.5 cm), the magnetic nanoparticles particles become free and they flow away down the blood vessel. Further, the present model results are validated by the simulations performed using the finite element based COMSOL software. - Highlights: • A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles. • The dominant magnetic, drag and buoyancy forces are considered. • All particles are captured when distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) is up to 4.5 cm. • Further increase in d value (above 4.5 cm) results the free movement of magnetic particles

  11. Mathematical modelling for trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shashi, E-mail: shashisharma1984@gmail.com; Katiyar, V.K.; Singh, Uaday

    2015-04-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of a cluster of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel for the application of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a blood vessel upstream from a malignant tissue and are captured at the tumour site with help of an applied magnetic field. The applied field is produced by a rare earth cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body. All forces expected to significantly affect the transport of nanoparticles were incorporated, including magnetization force, drag force and buoyancy force. The results show that particles are slow down and captured under the influence of magnetic force, which is responsible to attract the magnetic particles towards the magnet. It is optimized that all particles are captured either before or at the centre of the magnet (z≤0) when blood vessel is very close proximity to the magnet (d=2.5 cm). However, as the distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) increases (above 4.5 cm), the magnetic nanoparticles particles become free and they flow away down the blood vessel. Further, the present model results are validated by the simulations performed using the finite element based COMSOL software. - Highlights: • A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles. • The dominant magnetic, drag and buoyancy forces are considered. • All particles are captured when distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) is up to 4.5 cm. • Further increase in d value (above 4.5 cm) results the free movement of magnetic particles.

  12. Quantization of Two Classical Models by Means of the BRST Quantization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Paul

    2008-12-01

    An elementary gauge-non-invariant model and the bosonized form of the chiral Schwinger model are introduced as classical theories. The constraint structure is then investigated. It is shown that by introducing a new field, these models can be made gauge-invariant. The BRST form of quantization is reviewed and applied to each of these models in turn such that gauge-invariance is not broken. Some consequences of this form of quantization are discussed.

  13. A velocity-dissipation stochastic trajectory model for dispersal of heavy particles inside canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, T.; Trakhtenbrot, A.; Poggi, D.; Cassiani, M.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    While the importance of dispersal of windborne heavy particles such as seeds or pollen inside canopies is rarely disputed, the details needed to describe turbulent fluctuations in such applications continue to draw significant research attention. Turbulence and heavy-particle dispersal within canopies are sensitive to interactions between meteorological conditions and canopy structure as well as on particle shape and mass. In many applications, dispersal of heavy particles is required over a broad range of time scales ranging from hours to several decades thereby frustrating any attempt to resolve all aspects of turbulence. In recent years, Lagrangian stochastic trajectory models have been favored for predicting seed dispersal and are viewed as an acceptable compromise between empirical models with their ad-hoc parameterizations and computationally intensive Large Eddy Simulations. Here, an important feature of turbulence, namely the intermittency in dissipation rate, is incorporated into such trajectory models. Adding this effect has been recently shown to alter scalar dispersion patterns, especially in the far field. This method is applied here to heavy particles, where the long distance dispersal is deemed significant for many applications. This modeling approach was first evaluated using controlled laboratory experiments, where uniform-sized spheres were released within a canopy comprised of uniform cylinders inside a flume (see figure). The extended model that includes intermittency effects, as well as inertial drag forces on the particles, was shown to provide superior fit with the measured dispersal kernel than simpler models that add a constant settling velocity for each particle and/or do not include intermittency. The extended model results captured short distance dispersal and the heavy tails. Next the extended model was evaluated against a field experiment, where plant seeds were manually released inside a hardwood forest canopy (see figure). This

  14. Comparison of classical heat stroke between conscious and unconscious rat models

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Yan; Fu, Wei; Liu, Ya-Nan; Na PENG; Yu-mei LEI; Su, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To reproduce conscious and unconscious classical heat stroke(CHS) models in conscious and unconscious rats, and the difference in heat stress response between the two models was investigated. Methods Thirty-two male SD rats were randomly and equally divided into conscious classic heatstroke(C-CHS), unconscious classi cheatstroke(N-CHS), conscious normal control(C-NC) and unconscious normal control(N-NC)groups.Rats of C-CHS and N-CHS groups were put into artificial climate chamber, a...

  15. Classical solutions of non-linear sigma-models and their quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I study the properties of O(N) and CPsup(n-1) non-linear sigma-models in the two dimensional Euclidean space. All classical solutions of the equations of motion can be characterized and in the CPsup(n-1) model they can be expressed in a simple and explicit way in terms of holomorphic vectors. The topological winding number and the action of the general CPsup(n-1) solution can be evaluated and the latter turns out always to be a integer multiple of 2π. I further discuss the stability of the solutions and the problem of one-loop calculations of quantum fluctuations around classical solutions

  16. Trajectory Generation Model-Based IMM Tracking for Safe Driving in Intersection Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Tingting Zhou; Ming Li; Xiaoming Mai; Qi Wang; Fang Liu; Qingquan Li

    2011-01-01

    Tracking the actions of vehicles at crossroads and planning safe trajectories will be an effective method to reduce the rate of traffic accident at intersections. It is to resolve the problem of the abrupt change because of the existence of drivers' voluntary choices. In this paper, we make approach of an improved IMM tracking method based on trajectory generation, abstracted by trajectory generation algorithm, to improve this situation. Because of the similarity between human-driving traject...

  17. Development of three-dimensional trajectory model for detecting source region of the radioactive materials released into the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kyung Suk; Park, Ki Hyun; Min, Byung Il; Kim, Sora; Yang, Byung Mo [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is necessary to consider the overall countermeasure for analysis of nuclear activities according to the increase of the nuclear facilities like nuclear power and reprocessing plants in the neighboring countries including China, Taiwan, North Korea, Japan and South Korea. South Korea and comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty organization (CTBTO) are now operating the monitoring instruments to detect radionuclides released into the air. It is important to estimate the origin of radionuclides measured using the detection technology as well as the monitoring analysis in aspects of investigation and security of the nuclear activities in neighboring countries. A three-dimensional forward/backward trajectory model has been developed to estimate the origin of radionuclides for a covert nuclear activity. The developed trajectory model was composed of forward and backward modules to track the particle positions using finite difference method. A three-dimensional trajectory model was validated using the measured data at Chernobyl accident. The calculated results showed a good agreement by using the high concentration measurements and the locations where was near a release point. The three-dimensional trajectory model had some uncertainty according to the release time, release height and time interval of the trajectory at each release points. An atmospheric dispersion model called long-range accident dose assessment system (LADAS), based on the fields of regards (FOR) technique, was applied to reduce the uncertainties of the trajectory model and to improve the detective technology for estimating the radioisotopes emission area. The detective technology developed in this study can evaluate in release area and origin for covert nuclear activities based on measured radioisotopes at monitoring stations, and it might play critical tool to improve the ability of the nuclear safety field.

  18. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H/sub 2/C/sub 2/ ..-->.. HC/sub 2/H, HNC ..-->.. HCN, and H/sub 2/CO ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I ..-->.. Na /sup +/ + I/sup -/ is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features. (WHM)

  19. Trajectory recognition as the basis for object individuation: A functional model of object file instantiation and object token encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eFields

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The perception of persisting visual objects is mediated by transient intermediate representations, object files, that are instantiated in response to some, but not all, visual trajectories. The standard object file concept does not, however, provide a mechanism sufficient to account for all experimental data on visual object persistence, object tracking, and the ability to perceive spatially-disconnected stimuli as continuously-existing objects. Based on relevant anatomical, functional, and developmental data, a functional model is constructed that bases visual object individuation on the recognition of temporal sequences of apparent center-of-mass positions that are specifically identified as trajectories by dedicated trajectory recognition networks downstream of the medial-temporal motion detection area. This model is shown to account for a wide range of data, and to generate a variety of testable predictions. Individual differences in the recognition, abstraction and encoding of trajectory information are expected to generate distinct object persistence judgments and object recognition abilities. Dominance of trajectory information over feature information in stored object tokens during early infancy, in particular, is expected to disrupt the ability to re-identify human and other individuals across perceptual episodes, and lead to developmental outcomes with characteristics of autism spectrum disorders.

  20. Trajectory Recognition as the Basis for Object Individuation: A Functional Model of Object File Instantiation and Object-Token Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The perception of persisting visual objects is mediated by transient intermediate representations, object files, that are instantiated in response to some, but not all, visual trajectories. The standard object file concept does not, however, provide a mechanism sufficient to account for all experimental data on visual object persistence, object tracking, and the ability to perceive spatially disconnected stimuli as continuously existing objects. Based on relevant anatomical, functional, and developmental data, a functional model is constructed that bases visual object individuation on the recognition of temporal sequences of apparent center-of-mass positions that are specifically identified as trajectories by dedicated “trajectory recognition networks” downstream of the medial–temporal motion-detection area. This model is shown to account for a wide range of data, and to generate a variety of testable predictions. Individual differences in the recognition, abstraction, and encoding of trajectory information are expected to generate distinct object persistence judgments and object recognition abilities. Dominance of trajectory information over feature information in stored object tokens during early infancy, in particular, is expected to disrupt the ability to re-identify human and other individuals across perceptual episodes, and lead to developmental outcomes with characteristics of autism spectrum disorders. PMID:21716599

  1. Trajectory P system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subbaiah Annadurai; Thiyagarajan Kalyani; Vincent Rajkumar Dare; Durairaj Gnanaraj Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Membrane computing is a branch of natural computing aiming to abstract computing ideas for the structure and the functioning of living cells as well as from the way the cells are organized in tissues or higher-order structures.Trajectories are used as a tool for modeling language operations and other related objects.A trajectory P system consists of a membrane structure in which the object in each membrane is a collection of words and the evolutionary rules are given in terms of trajectories.In this paper,we present some properties of trajectory P systems.

  2. A non-classical Kirchhoff plate model incorporating microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2016-03-01

    A new non-classical Kirchhoff plate model is developed using a modified couple stress theory, a surface elasticity theory and a two-parameter elastic foundation model. A variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle is employed, which leads to the simultaneous determination of the equations of motion and the complete boundary conditions and provides a unified treatment of the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects. The new plate model contains a material length scale parameter to account for the microstructure effect, three surface elastic constants to describe the surface energy effect, and two foundation moduli to represent the foundation effect. The current non-classical plate model reduces to its classical elasticity-based counterpart when the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are all suppressed. In addition, the newly developed plate model includes the models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect or the foundation influence alone as special cases and recovers the Bernoulli-Euler beam model incorporating the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects. To illustrate the new model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported rectangular plate are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulas derived. For the static bending problem, the numerical results reveal that the deflection of the simply supported plate with or without the elastic foundation predicted by the current model is smaller than that predicted by the classical model. Also, it is observed that the difference in the deflection predicted by the new and classical plate models is very large when the plate thickness is sufficiently small, but it is diminishing with the increase of the plate thickness. For the free vibration problem, it is found that the natural frequency predicted by the new plate model with or without the elastic foundation is higher than that predicted by the

  3. A non-classical Mindlin plate model incorporating microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2016-07-01

    A non-classical model for a Mindlin plate resting on an elastic foundation is developed in a general form using a modified couple stress theory, a surface elasticity theory and a two-parameter Winkler-Pasternak foundation model. It includes all five kinematic variables possible for a Mindlin plate. The equations of motion and the complete boundary conditions are obtained simultaneously through a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle, and the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are treated in a unified manner. The newly developed model contains one material length-scale parameter to describe the microstructure effect, three surface elastic constants to account for the surface energy effect, and two foundation parameters to capture the foundation effect. The current non-classical plate model reduces to its classical elasticity-based counterpart when the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are all suppressed. In addition, the new model includes the Mindlin plate models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect or the foundation influence alone as special cases, recovers the Kirchhoff plate model incorporating the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects, and degenerates to the Timoshenko beam model including the microstructure effect. To illustrate the new Mindlin plate model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported rectangular plate are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulae derived.

  4. OpenDrift - an open source framework for ocean trajectory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Breivik, Øyvind; Ådlandsvik, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    We will present a new, open source tool for modeling the trajectories and fate of particles or substances (Lagrangian Elements) drifting in the ocean, or even in the atmosphere. The software is named OpenDrift, and has been developed at Norwegian Meteorological Institute in cooperation with Institute of Marine Research. OpenDrift is a generic framework written in Python, and is openly available at https://github.com/knutfrode/opendrift/. The framework is modular with respect to three aspects: (1) obtaining input data, (2) the transport/morphological processes, and (3) exporting of results to file. Modularity is achieved through well defined interfaces between components, and use of a consistent vocabulary (CF conventions) for naming of variables. Modular input implies that it is not necessary to preprocess input data (e.g. currents, wind and waves from Eulerian models) to a particular file format. Instead "reader modules" can be written/used to obtain data directly from any original source, including files or through web based protocols (e.g. OPeNDAP/Thredds). Modularity of processes implies that a model developer may focus on the geophysical processes relevant for the application of interest, without needing to consider technical tasks such as reading, reprojecting, and colocating input data, rotation and scaling of vectors and model output. We will show a few example applications of using OpenDrift for predicting drifters, oil spills, and search and rescue objects.

  5. The effect of dynamics on damage spreading in the two-dimensional classical XY model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, J.; Teitel, S. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01

    The authors study damage spreading in the classical two-dimensional XY model, using a dynamics and distance measure which preserve the rotational variance of the Hamiltonian. They find only a high temperature random phase and a lower temperature ordered phase, consistent with equilibrium results. Their results contrast to previous results of Golinelli and Derrida.

  6. Classical integrability of the O(N) nonlinear $\\sigma$ model on a half-line

    CERN Document Server

    Corrigan, E

    1996-01-01

    The classical integrability the O(N) nonlinear sigma model on a half-line is examined, and the existence of an infinity of conserved charges in involution is established for the free boundary condition. For the case N=3 other possible boundary conditions are considered briefly.

  7. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  8. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CP{sup N-1} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.; Jack, I.; Jones, D.R.T

    2002-10-31

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP{sup N-1} model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied.

  9. Inhibition of classical complement activation attenuates liver ischaemia and reperfusion injury in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.H.M. Heijnen; I.H. Straatsburg; N.D. Padilla; G.J. Mierlo; C.E. Hack; T.M. van Gulik

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We evaluated inhibition of the classical pathway of complement using C1-inhibitor (C1-inh) in a model of 70% partial liver I/R injury in male Wistar rats (n = 35). C1-inh was administered at 10

  10. Lack of predictability of classical animal models for hypolipidemic activity: A good time for mice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, B.R.; Princen, H.M.G.

    1998-01-01

    Hypolipidemic drugs that are efficacious in man are not always active in classical animal models of dyslipidemia. Inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase (statins) do not lower plasma cholesterol in rats, but yet this species was alone in providing activity for fibrate-type drugs. Nicotinic acid possesses m

  11. THE POSITIVE SOLUTION OF CLASSICAL GELFAND MODEL WITH COEFFICIENT THAT CHANGE SIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚庆六

    2002-01-01

    The existence and iteration of positive solution for classical Gelfand models areconsidered, where the coefficient of nonlinear term is allowed to change sign in [ 0, 1 ]. Byusing the monotone iterative technique, an existence theorem of positive solution isobtained, corresponding iterative process and convergence rate are given. This iterativeprocess starts off with zero function, hence the process is simple, feasible and effective.

  12. Modeling and Real-Time Prediction of Classical Swine Fever Epidemics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meester, R.; Koning, de J.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Diekmann, O.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a new method to analyze outbreak data of an infectious disease such as classical swine fever. The underlying model is a two-type branching process. It is used to deduce information concerning the epidemic from detected cases. In particular, the method leads to prediction of the future cou

  13. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CP^(N-1) model

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O E; Jones, D R T

    2002-01-01

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP^(N-1) model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied.

  14. Applications of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Applications of Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamical Systems is a reference on the new field of relativistic optics, examining topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles. Based on 30 years of research, this unique book connects the properties of quantum equations to corresponding classical equations used to calculate the energetic values and the symmetry properties of atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems. In addition, it examines applications for these methods, and for the calculation of

  15. TNOs are Cool: Thermophysical modeling of a sample of 20 classical KBOs using Herschel/PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilenius, E.; Müller, T.; Pal, A.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Rengel, M.; Hartogh, P.; Protopapa, S.; Mueller, M.; Mommert, M.; Stansberry, J.; Lellouch, E.; Böhnhardt, H.; Ortiz, J. L.; Thirouin, A.; Henry, F.; Delsanti, A.; Fornasier, S.; Hestroffer, D.; Dotto, E.

    2011-10-01

    We determine the sizes and albedos of 20 classical Kuiper belt objects. Our observations with the PACS instrument on-board Herschel Space Observatory cover the wavelength range where the thermal emission from trans-Neptunian objects has its maximum. We use a consistent method for data reduction and aperture photometry of this sample, and determine sizes and albedos using thermophysical models. We compare the results to previous ground- and spacebased estimates. Our new results confirm the recent findings that there are very diverse albedos among the classical KBOs, which has important implications to their global properties, such as size distribution and the total mass of the belt. An increased average albedo would mean a decreased total mass of these targets. Almost all of the 20 targets have higher albedos than assumed. There are variations between the different groups within our sample: the cold classicals together with the two inner hot classicals have higher albedos than the hot classicals. Our refined sizes and albedos make an important contribution to the estimates of the fundamental properties of these objects.

  16. Models of dark matter halos based on statistical mechanics: I. The classical King model

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Méhats, Florian

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility that dark matter halos are described by the Fermi-Dirac distribution at finite temperature. This is the case if dark matter is a self-gravitating quantum gas made of massive neutrinos at statistical equilibrium. This is also the case if dark matter can be treated as a self-gravitating collisionless gas experiencing Lynden-Bell's type of violent relaxation. In order to avoid the infinite mass problem and carry out a rigorous stability analysis, we consider the fermionic King model. In this paper, we study the non-degenerate limit leading to the classical King model. This model was initially introduced to describe globular clusters. We propose to apply it also to large dark matter halos where quantum effects are negligible. We determine the caloric curve and study the thermodynamical stability of the different configurations. Equilibrium states exist only above a critical energy $E_c$ in the microcanonical ensemble and only above a critical temperature $T_c$ in the canonical ensemble...

  17. A model of chemical etching of olivine in the vicinity of the trajectory of a swift heavy ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, S. A.; Rymzhanov, R. A.; Starkov, N. I.; Volkov, A. E.; Malakhov, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Searching of superheavy elements, the charge spectra of heavy nuclei in Galactic Cosmic Rays was investigated within the OLYMPIA experiment using the database of etched ion tracks in meteorite olivine. Etching results in the formation of hollow syringe-like channels with diameters of 1-10 μm along the trajectories of these swift heavy ions (SHI). According to the activated complex theory, the local chemical activity is determined by an increase of the specific Gibbs energy of the lattice stimulated by structure transformations, long-range elastic fields, and interatomic bonds breaking generated in the vicinity of the ion trajectory. To determine the dependencies of the Gibbs free energy increase in SHI tracks in olivine on the mass, energy and charge of a projectile, we apply a multiscale model of excitation and relaxation of materials in the vicinity of the SHI trajectory (SHI tracks). Effect of spreading of fast electrons from the ion trajectory causing neutralization of metallic atoms resulting in an increase of the chemical activity of olivine at long distances from the ion trajectory (up to 5 μm) is estimated and discussed.

  18. An investigation of jet trajectory in flow through scaled vocal fold models with asymmetric glottal passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2006-11-01

    Pulsatile two-dimensional flow through asymmetric static divergent models of the human vocal folds is investigated. Included glottal divergence angles are varied between 10° and 30°, with asymmetry angles between the vocal fold pairs ranging from 5° to 15°. The model glottal configurations represent asymmetries that arise during a phonatory cycle due to voice disorders. The flow is scaled to physiological values of Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers. Data are acquired in the anterior posterior mid-plane of the vocal fold models using phase-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) acquired at ten discrete locations in a phonatory cycle. Glottal jet stability arising from the vocal fold asymmetries is investigated and compared to previously reported work for symmetric vocal fold passages. Jet stability is enhanced with an increase in the included divergence angle, and the glottal asymmetry. Concurrently, the bi-modal jet trajectory and flow unsteadiness diminishes. Consistent with previous findings, the flow attachment due to the Coanda effect occurs when the acceleration of the forcing function is zero.

  19. Bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Analyzing the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, we find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. We identify the regions of model parameters which satisfy ...

  20. Dynamics Modeling and Robust Trajectory Tracking Control for a Class of Hybrid Humanoid Arm Based on Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yueling; JIN Zhenlin

    2009-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of trajectory tracking for a class of novel serial-parallel hybrid humanoid arm(HHA), which has parameters uncertainty, frictions, disturbance, abrasion and pulse forces derived from motors, a multistep dynamics modeling strategy is proposed and a robust controller based on neural network(NN)-adaptive algorithm is designed. At the first step of dynamics modeling, the dynamics model of the reduced HHA is established by Lagrange method. At the second step of dynamics modeling, the parameter uncertain part resulting mainly from the idealization of the HHA is learned by adaptive algorithm. In the trajectory tracking controller, the radial basis function(RBF) NN, whose optimal weights are learned online by adaptive algorithm, is used to learn the upper limit function of the total uncertainties including frictions, disturbances, abrasion and pulse forces. To a great extent, the conservatism of this robust trajectory tracking controller is reduced, and by this controller the HHA can impersonate mostly human actions. The proof and simulation results testify the validity of the adaptive strategy for parameter learning and the neural network-adaptive strategy for the trajectory tracking control.

  1. On the geometry of classically integrable two-dimensional non-linear sigma models

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammedi, N.

    2008-01-01

    A master equation expressing the classical integrability of two-dimensional non-linear sigma models is found. The geometrical properties of this equation are outlined. In particular, a closer connection between integrability and T-duality transformations is emphasised. Finally, a whole new class of integrable non-linear sigma models is found and all their corresponding Lax pairs depend on a spectral parameter.

  2. Coupled-channel cavity QED model and Semi-classical solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Ling-hua; KONG Ling-bo; LIU Min; ZHAN Ming-sheng

    2004-01-01

    A semi-classical scheme is presented to solve the coupled-channel cavity QED (CQED) model. Such model exhibits remarkable characteristics as shown by numerical calculations. A relation between the swing or angular velocity of the detuning and the motion of the atoms is discussed. With the augmentation of the optical field intensity or frequency, the atoms are trapped firstly and then they move stochastically and finally chaos sets in.

  3. From individual behavior to metapopulation dynamics: unifying the patchy population and classic metapopulation models.

    OpenAIRE

    Ovaskainen, Otso; Hanski, Ilkka

    2004-01-01

    Spatially structured populations in patchy habitats show much variation in migration rate, from patchy populations in which individuals move repeatedly among habitat patches to classic metapopulations with infrequent migration among discrete populations. To establish a common framework for population dynamics in patchy habitats, we describe an individual-based model (IBM) involving a diffusion approximation of correlated random walk of individual movements. As an example, we apply the model t...

  4. Further insights in the ability of classical nonadditive potentials to model actinide ion-water interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Réal, Florent; Trumm, Michael; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Masella, Michel; Vallet, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Pursuing our efforts on the development of accurate classical models to simulate radionuclides in complex environments (Réal et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 15913; Trumm et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 044509), this article places a large emphasis on the discussion of the influence of models/parameters uncertainties on the computed structural, dynamical, and temporal properties. Two actinide test cases, trivalent curium and tetravalent thorium, have been studied with three different pote...

  5. Quantum and classical dynamics of water dissociation on Ni(111): A test of the site-averaging model in dissociative chemisorption of polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Bin [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Recently, we reported the first highly accurate nine-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for water interacting with a rigid Ni(111) surface, built on a large number of density functional theory points [B. Jiang and H. Guo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 166101 (2015)]. Here, we investigate site-specific reaction probabilities on this PES using a quasi-seven-dimensional quantum dynamical model. It is shown that the site-specific reactivity is largely controlled by the topography of the PES instead of the barrier height alone, underscoring the importance of multidimensional dynamics. In addition, the full-dimensional dissociation probability is estimated by averaging fixed-site reaction probabilities with appropriate weights. To validate this model and gain insights into the dynamics, additional quasi-classical trajectory calculations in both full and reduced dimensions have also been performed and important dynamical factors such as the steering effect are discussed.

  6. Quantum and classical dynamics of water dissociation on Ni(111): A test of the site-averaging model in dissociative chemisorption of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, we reported the first highly accurate nine-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for water interacting with a rigid Ni(111) surface, built on a large number of density functional theory points [B. Jiang and H. Guo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 166101 (2015)]. Here, we investigate site-specific reaction probabilities on this PES using a quasi-seven-dimensional quantum dynamical model. It is shown that the site-specific reactivity is largely controlled by the topography of the PES instead of the barrier height alone, underscoring the importance of multidimensional dynamics. In addition, the full-dimensional dissociation probability is estimated by averaging fixed-site reaction probabilities with appropriate weights. To validate this model and gain insights into the dynamics, additional quasi-classical trajectory calculations in both full and reduced dimensions have also been performed and important dynamical factors such as the steering effect are discussed

  7. Constructing seasonal LAI trajectory by data-model fusion for global evergreen needle-leaf forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Chen, J.; Mo, G.

    2010-12-01

    For decades, advancements in optical remote sensors made it possible to produce maps of a biophysical parameter--the Leaf Area Index (LAI), which is critically necessary in regional and global modeling of exchanges of carbon, water, energy and other substances, across large areas in a fast way. Quite a few global LAI products have been generated since 2000, e.g. GLOBCARBON (Deng et al., 2006), MODIS Collection 5 (Shabanov et al., 2007), CYCLOPES (Baret et al., 2007), etc. Albeit these progresses, the basic physics behind the technology restrains it from accurate estimation of LAI in winter, especially for northern high-latitude evergreen needle-leaf forests. Underestimation of winter LAI in these regions has been reported in literature (Yang et al., 2000; Cohen et al., 2003; Tian et al., 2004; Weiss et al., 2007; Pisek et al., 2007), and the distortion is usually attributed to the variations of canopy reflectance caused by understory change (Weiss et al., 2007) as well as by the presence of ice and snow on leaves and ground (Cohen, 2003; Tian et al., 2004). Seasonal changes in leaf pigments can also be another reason for low LAI retrieved in winter. Low conifer LAI values in winter retrieved from remote sensing make them unusable for surface energy budget calculations. To avoid these drawbacks of remote sensing approaches, we attempt to reconstruct the seasonal LAI trajectory through model-data fusion. A 1-degree LAI map of global evergreen needle-leaf forests at 10-day interval is produced based on the carbon allocation principle in trees. With net primary productivity (NPP) calculated by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) (Chen et al., 1999), carbon allocated to needles is quantitatively evaluated and then can be further transformed into LAI using the specific leaf area (SLA). A leaf-fall scheme is developed to mimic the carbon loss caused by falling needles throughout the year. The seasonally maximum LAI from remote sensing data for each pixel

  8. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro A. De-Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast, which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  9. Electroweak symmetry breaking through bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. We analyze the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, and find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. The requirements for the perturbativity of the running c...

  10. A behavioral stages model of classical (Pavlovian) conditioning: application to cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D A

    1999-01-01

    In the present article, it is argued that a five-stage sequential model of the behavioral and neurophysiological events that occur when organisms are exposed to signals predicting significant events suggests that classical conditioning produces multiple memory traces involving both excitatory and inhibitory processes. Further, these multiple brain structures and associated neurophysiological mechanisms are beginning to be understood; thus, using Pavlovian conditioning techniques to study aging and cognitive functions may provide insights into which brain structures or mechanisms are responsible for more general age-related declines in associative learning and memory. The evidence for this model is briefly reviewed and studies suggesting age-related effects on classical conditioning of various response systems are described within the context of the brain structures implicated by the model.

  11. Leptogenesis and Neutrino Oscillations in the Classically Conformal Standard Model with the Higgs Portal

    CERN Document Server

    Khoze, Valentin V

    2013-01-01

    The Standard Model with an added Higgs portal interaction and no explicit mass terms is a classically scale-invariant theory. In this case the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking can be induced radiatively by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism operational in a hidden sector, and then transmitted to the Standard Model through the Higgs portal. The smallness of the generated values for the Higgs vev and mass, compared to the UV cutoff of our classically scale-invariant effective theory, is naturally explained by this mechanism. We show how these classically conformal models can generate the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without the need of introducing mass scales by hand or their resonant fine-tuning. The minimal model we consider is the Standard Model coupled to the Coleman-Weinberg scalar field charged under the $U(1)_{B-L}$ gauge group. Anomaly cancellation requires automatic inclusion of three generations of right-handed neutrinos. Their GeV-scale Majorana masses are induced by the Coleman-Weinberg field ...

  12. A Modification and Analysis of Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling and Granular Dynamics of Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jason M.; Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.

    2008-01-01

    A previously developed mathematical model is amended to more accurately incorporate the effects of lift and drag on single dust particles in order to predict their behavior in the wake of high velocity gas flow. The model utilizes output from a CFD or DSMC simulation of exhaust from a rocket nozzle hot gas jet. An extension of the Saffman equation for lift based on the research of McLaughlin (1991) and Mei (1992) is used, while an equation for the Magnus force modeled after the work of Oesterle (1994) and Tsuji et al (1985) is applied. A relationship for drag utilizing a particle shape factor (phi = 0.8) is taken from the work of Haider and Levenspiel (1989) for application to non-spherical particle dynamics. The drag equation is further adjusted to account for rarefaction and compressibility effects in rarefied and high Mach number flows according to the work of Davies (1945) and Loth (2007) respectively. Simulations using a more accurate model with the correction factor (Epsilon = 0.8 in a 20% particle concentration gas flow) given by Richardson and Zaki (1954) and Rowe (1961) show that particles have lower ejection angles than those that were previously calculated. This is more prevalent in smaller particles, which are shown through velocity and trajectory comparison to be more influenced by the flow of the surrounding gas. It is shown that particles are more affected by minor changes to drag forces than larger adjustments to lift forces, demanding a closer analysis of the shape and behavior of lunar dust particles and the composition of the surrounding gas flow.

  13. A Hamiltonian theory of adaptive resolution simulations of classical and quantum models of nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Karsten; Donadio, Davide; Kremer, Kurt; Potestio, Raffaello

    2015-03-01

    Quantum delocalization of atomic nuclei strongly affects the physical properties of low temperature systems, such as superfluid helium. However, also at room temperature nuclear quantum effects can play an important role for molecules composed by light atoms. An accurate modeling of these effects is possible making use of the Path Integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics. In simulations, this numerically expensive description can be restricted to a small region of space, while modeling the remaining atoms as classical particles. In this way the computational resources required can be significantly reduced. In the present talk we demonstrate the derivation of a Hamiltonian formulation for a bottom-up, theoretically solid coupling between a classical model and a Path Integral description of the same system. The coupling between the two models is established with the so-called Hamiltonian Adaptive Resolution Scheme, resulting in a fully adaptive setup in which molecules can freely diffuse across the classical and the Path Integral regions by smoothly switching their description on the fly. Finally, we show the validation of the approach by means of adaptive resolution simulations of low temperature parahydrogen. Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

  14. Exact solution of gyration radius of individual's trajectory for a simplified human mobility model

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Xiao-Yong; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Gyration radius of individual's trajectory plays a key role in quantifying human mobility patterns. Of particular interests, empirical analyses suggest that the growth of gyration radius is slow versus time except the very early stage and may eventually arrive to a steady value. However, up to now, the underlying mechanism leading to such a possibly steady value has not been well understood. In this Letter, we propose a simplified human mobility model to simulate individual's daily travel with three sequential activities: commuting to workplace, going to do leisure activities and returning home. With the assumption that individual has constant travel speed and inferior limit of time at home and work, we prove that the daily moving area of an individual is an ellipse, and finally get an exact solution of the gyration radius. The analytical solution well captures the empirical observation reported in [M. C. Gonz`alez et al., Nature, 453 (2008) 779]. We also find that, in spite of the heterogeneous displacement ...

  15. Stochastic modeling for trajectories drift in the ocean: Application of Density Clustering Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Shchekinova, E Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to address the effects of wind-induced drift on a floating sea objects using high--resolution ocean forecast data and atmospheric data. Two applications of stochastic Leeway model for prediction of trajectories drift in the Mediterranean sea are presented: long-term simulation of sea drifters in the western Adriatic sea (21.06.2009-23.06.2009) and numerical reconstruction of the Elba accident (21.06.2009-23.06.2009). Long-term simulations in the western Adriatic sea are performed using wind data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and currents from the Adriatic Forecasting System (AFS). An algorithm of spatial clustering is proposed to identify the most probable search areas with a high density of drifters. The results are compared for different simulation scenarios using different categories of drifters and forcing fields. The reconstruction of sea object drift near to the Elba Island is performed using surface currents from the Mediterranean Forecastin...

  16. Can representational trajectory reveal the nature of an internal model of gravity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sá Teixeira, Nuno; Hecht, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    The memory for the vanishing location of a horizontally moving target is usually displaced forward in the direction of motion (representational momentum) and downward in the direction of gravity (representational gravity). Moreover, this downward displacement has been shown to increase with time (representational trajectory). However, the degree to which different kinematic events change the temporal profile of these displacements remains to be determined. The present article attempts to fill this gap. In the first experiment, we replicate the finding that representational momentum for downward-moving targets is bigger than for upward motions, showing, moreover, that it increases rapidly during the first 300 ms, stabilizing afterward. This temporal profile, but not the increased error for descending targets, is shown to be disrupted when eye movements are not allowed. In the second experiment, we show that the downward drift with time emerges even for static targets. Finally, in the third experiment, we report an increased error for upward-moving targets, as compared with downward movements, when the display is compatible with a downward ego-motion by including vection cues. Thus, the errors in the direction of gravity are compatible with the perceived event and do not merely reflect a retinotopic bias. Overall, these results provide further evidence for an internal model of gravity in the visual representational system.

  17. From classical genetics to quantitative genetics to systems biology: modeling epistasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Aylor

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression data has been used in lieu of phenotype in both classical and quantitative genetic settings. These two disciplines have separate approaches to measuring and interpreting epistasis, which is the interaction between alleles at different loci. We propose a framework for estimating and interpreting epistasis from a classical experiment that combines the strengths of each approach. A regression analysis step accommodates the quantitative nature of expression measurements by estimating the effect of gene deletions plus any interaction. Effects are selected by significance such that a reduced model describes each expression trait. We show how the resulting models correspond to specific hierarchical relationships between two regulator genes and a target gene. These relationships are the basic units of genetic pathways and genomic system diagrams. Our approach can be extended to analyze data from a variety of experiments, multiple loci, and multiple environments.

  18. Effective model hierarchies for dynamic and static classical density functional theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majaniemi, S [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PO Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Provatas, N [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S-4L7 (Canada); Nonomura, M, E-mail: maj@fyslab.hut.f [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The origin and methodology of deriving effective model hierarchies are presented with applications to solidification of crystalline solids. In particular, it is discussed how the form of the equations of motion and the effective parameters on larger scales can be obtained from the more microscopic models. It will be shown that tying together the dynamic structure of the projection operator formalism with static classical density functional theories can lead to incomplete (mass) transport properties even though the linearized hydrodynamics on large scales is correctly reproduced. To facilitate a more natural way of binding together the dynamics of the macrovariables and classical density functional theory, a dynamic generalization of density functional theory based on the nonequilibrium generating functional is suggested.

  19. Experimental challenges to theories of classical conditioning: application of an attentional model of storage and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmajuk, Nestor A; Larrauri, José A

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have recently challenged the accuracy of traditional models of classical conditioning that account for some experimental data in terms of a storage deficit. Among other results, it has been reported that extinction of the blocking or overshadowing stimulus results in the recovery of the response to the blocked or overshadowed stimulus, backward blocking shows spontaneous recovery, extinction of the training context results in the recovery from latent inhibition, interposing a delay between conditioning and testing in latent inhibition increases latent inhibition, and latent inhibition antagonizes overshadowing. An existing neural network model of classical conditioning (N. A. Schmajuk, Y. Lam, & J. A. Gray, 1996), which includes an attentional mechanism controlling both storage and retrieval of associations, is able to quantitatively describe these results.

  20. Direct detection of singlet dark matter in classically scale-invariant standard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Endo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical scale invariance is one of the possible solutions to explain the origin of the electroweak scale. The simplest extension is the classically scale-invariant standard model augmented by a multiplet of gauge singlet real scalar. In the previous study it was shown that the properties of the Higgs potential deviate substantially, which can be observed in the International Linear Collider. On the other hand, since the multiplet does not acquire vacuum expectation value, the singlet components are stable and can be dark matter. In this letter we study the detectability of the real singlet scalar bosons in the experiment of the direct detection of dark matter. It is shown that a part of this model has already been excluded and the rest of the parameter space is within the reach of the future experiment.

  1. The classical origin of quantum affine algebra in squashed sigma models

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Io; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2012-01-01

    We consider a quantum affine algebra realized in two-dimensional non-linear sigma models with target space three-dimensional squashed sphere. Its affine generators are explicitly constructed and the Poisson brackets are computed. The defining relations of quantum affine algebra in the sense of the Drinfeld first realization are satisfied at classical level. The relation to the Drinfeld second realization is also discussed including higher conserved charges. Finally we comment on a semiclassic...

  2. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    De-Souza, Evandro A.; Pimentel, Felipe S. A.; Caio M. Machado; Martins, Larissa S.; da-Silva, Wagner S.; Mónica Montero-Lomelí; Claudio A Masuda

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactoki...

  3. Classical XY model with conserved angular momentum is an archetypal non-Newtonian fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R M L; Hall, Craig A; Simha, R Aditi; Welsh, Tom S

    2015-04-01

    We find that the classical one-dimensional XY model, with angular-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics, mimics the non-Newtonian flow regimes characteristic of soft matter when subjected to counterrotating boundaries. An elaborate steady-state phase diagram has continuous and first-order transitions between states of uniform flow, shear-banding, solid-fluid coexistence and slip planes. Results of numerical studies and a concise mean-field constitutive relation offer a paradigm for diverse nonequilibrium complex fluids.

  4. Production of gluons in the classical field model for heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lappi, T

    2003-01-01

    The initial stages of relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied numerically in the framework of a 2+1 dimensional classical Yang-Mills theory. We calculate the energy and number densities and momentum spectra of the produced gluons. The model is also applied to non central collisions. The numerical results are discussed in the light of RHIC measurements of energy and multiplicity and other theoretical calculations. Some problems of the present approach are pointed out.

  5. Chaos And Quantum-classical Correspondence For Two- Coupled Spins

    CERN Document Server

    Emerson, J V

    2001-01-01

    Two approaches to quantum-classical correspondence are distinguished according to the classical dynamical theory with which quantum theory is compared. The first of these, Ehrenfest correspondence, defines a dynamical regime in which the quantum expectation values follow approximately a classical trajectory. The second of these, Liouville correspondence, applies when the quantum probability distributions remain well approximated by a density in the classical phase space. The former applies only for narrow states, whereas the latter may remain valid even for quantum states that have spread to the system size. A spin model is adopted for this correspondence study because the quantum state is discrete and finite- dimensional, and thus no artificial truncation of the Hilbert space is required. The quantum time-evolution is given by a discrete unitary mapping. The corresponding classical model is volume-preserving (non-dissipative) and the time-evolution is given by a symplectic map. In classically chaotic regimes...

  6. On the relationship between the classical Dicke-Jaynes-Cummings-Gaudin model and the nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Dianlou; Geng, Xue [Department of Mathematics, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, the relationship between the classical Dicke-Jaynes-Cummings-Gaudin (DJCG) model and the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation is studied. It is shown that the classical DJCG model is equivalent to a stationary NLS equation. Moreover, the standard NLS equation can be solved by the classical DJCG model and a suitably chosen higher order flow. Further, it is also shown that classical DJCG model can be transformed into the classical Gaudin spin model in an external magnetic field through a deformation of Lax matrix. Finally, the separated variables are constructed on the common level sets of Casimir functions and the generalized action-angle coordinates are introduced via the Hamilton-Jacobi equation.

  7. Frenkel-kontorova model: crossover from the classical to the quantum mechanical

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, B B

    1999-01-01

    The Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model describes a chain of atoms connected by springs subject to an external potential. This simple classical model exhibits a wealth of complex behavior. It has also found applications in many condensed matter systems such as charge density waves, magnetic spirals, modulated phases and tribology. However, an in-depth understanding of some of these problems, for example, tribology in the nano-regime, demands an understanding of its quantum mechanical behavior. To achieve this goal, we use a squeezed-state approach first used in quantum optics. We found that quantum fluctuations renormalize the standard map, which governs the classical behavior of the FK model, to a sawtooth map. This result is borne out by Monte-Carlo simulations. We also found that the ground state wave function changes from an extended state to a localized state when the coupling constant increases. Although quantum fluctuations largely smear the transition by breaking of analyticity observed in the classical case...

  8. Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a comparison of models for the variance of trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    We describe results from the second stage of a project to build a statistical model for hurricane tracks. In the first stage we modelled the unconditional mean track. We now attempt to model the unconditional variance of fluctuations around the mean. The variance models we describe use a semi-parametric nearest neighbours approach in which the optimal averaging length-scale is estimated using a jack-knife out-of-sample fitting procedure. We test three different models. These models consider the variance structure of the deviations from the unconditional mean track to be isotropic, anisotropic but uncorrelated, and anisotropic and correlated, respectively. The results show that, of these models, the anisotropic correlated model gives the best predictions of the distribution of future positions of hurricanes.

  9. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements thro...

  10. Properties of Martian winds as determined from trajectory modelling of jettisoned spacecraft parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Mark; Harri, Ari-Matti; Savijärvi, Hannu

    2016-10-01

    Knowing the properties of the Martian winds, i.e. speed, direction and structure, is important for understanding the global circulation of the atmosphere, dust and water transport and planning the landing of spacecraft. Measurements of wind speed and direction on Mars have previously been limited to near-surface measurements made by landers, imaging of atmospheric features such as clouds and dust and while the lander is on the parachute. The understanding of the Martian environment could therefore benefit from more determinations of wind speed and direction.The distribution of spacecraft hardware, such as heat shields, parachutes, backshells and landers, on the surface of Mars have been imaged by the HiRISE imager on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. We analyse these images, and other known properties of a spacecraft's descent, to reconstruct the trajectories of the jettisoned spacecraft components and further constrain wind properties at various lander sites. Interestingly this approach may allow wind property assessments at the landing sites of failed landers assuming their hardware components can be correctly identified in images.We assess the vertical structure of the wind at selected landing sites of successful spacecraft missions to Mars by comparing our results to mesoscale (MLAM) and 1-D column models of the Martian atmosphere that have been jointly developed by FMI and the University of Helsinki. In addition we compare our wind property findings to published meteorological measurements and modelling. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to slope and crater circulations. The feasibility of imaging spacecraft hardware from orbit of the MetNet vehicle (metnet.fmi.fi) is assessed with space flight visualisation software.

  11. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia P. Jumbo-Lucioni

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT. Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and, by

  12. Modeling of the Propagation of Seismic Waves in Non-Classical Media: Reduced Cosserat Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grekova, E.; Kulesh, M.; Herman, G.; Shardakov, I.

    2006-12-01

    In rock mechanics, elastic wave propagation is usually modeled in terms of classical elasticity. There are situations, however, when rock behaviour is still elastic but cannot be described by the classical model. In particular, current effective medium theories, based on classical elasticity, do not properly describe strong dispersive or attenuative behaviour of wave propagation observed sometimes. The approach we have taken to address this problem is to introduce supplementary and independent degrees of freedom of material particles, in our case rotational ones. Various models of this kind are widely used in continuum mechanics: Cosserat theory, micropolar model of Eringen, Cosserat pseudocontinuum, reduced Cosserat continuum etc. We have considered the reduced Cosserat medium where the couple stress is zero, while the rotation vector is independent of the translational displacement. In this model, the stress depends on the rotation of a particle relatively to the background continuum of mass centers, but it does not depend on the relative rotation of two neighboring particles. This model seems to be adequate for the description of granular media, consolidated soils, and rocks with inhomogeneous microstructure. A real inhomogeneous medium is considered as effective homogeneous enriched continuum, where proper rotational dynamics of inhomogeneities are taken into account by means of rotation of a particle of the enriched continuum. We have obtained and analyzed theoretical solutions for this model describing the propagation of body waves and surface waves. We have shown both the dispersive character of these waves in elastic space and half space, and the existence of forbidden frequency zones. These results can be used for the preparation, execution, and interpretation of seismic experiments, which would allow one to determine whether (and in which situations) polar theories are important in rock mechanics, and to help with the identification of material parameters

  13. Low dimensional state-space representations for classical unsteady aerodynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven L.; Rowley, Clarence W.

    2010-11-01

    This work develops reduced order models for the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a small wing in response to agile maneuvers and gusts. In particular, the classical unsteady models of Wagner and Theodorsen are cast into a low-dimensional state-space framework. Low order state-space models are more computationally efficient than the classical formulations, and are well suited for modification with nonlinear dynamics and the application of control techniques. Reduced order models are obtained using the eigensystem realization algorithm on force data from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a pitching or plunging 2D flat plate at Reynolds numbers between 100 and 1000. Models are tested on rapid pitch and plunge maneuvers with a range of effective angle-of-attack. We evaluate the performance of the models based on agreement with results from DNS, in particular, the ability to reproduce lift forces over a range of pitching and plunging frequencies. Bode plots of the reduced order models, Wagner's and Theodorsen's methods, and DNS provide a concise assessment.

  14. Multiscale modeling of light absorption in tissues: limitations of classical homogenization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottin, Stephane; Panasenko, Grigory; Ganesh, S Sivaji

    2010-12-31

    In biophotonics, the light absorption in a tissue is usually modeled by the Helmholtz equation with two constant parameters, the scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient. This classic approximation of "haemoglobin diluted everywhere" (constant absorption coefficient) corresponds to the classical homogenization approach. The paper discusses the limitations of this approach. The scattering coefficient is supposed to be constant (equal to one) while the absorption coefficient is equal to zero everywhere except for a periodic set of thin parallel strips simulating the blood vessels, where it is a large parameter ω. The problem contains two other parameters which are small: ε, the ratio of the distance between the axes of vessels to the characteristic macroscopic size, and δ, the ratio of the thickness of thin vessels and the period. We construct asymptotic expansion in two cases: ε --> 0, ω --> ∞, δ --> 0, ωδ --> ∞, ε2ωδ --> 0 and ε --> 0, ω --> ∞, δ --> 0, ε2ωδ --> ∞, and and prove that in the first case the classical homogenization (averaging) of the differential equation is true while in the second case it is wrong. This result may be applied in the biomedical optics, for instance, in the modeling of the skin and cosmetics.

  15. Electroweak vacuum stability in classically conformal $B-L$ extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Arindam; Papapietro, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)$_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly free U(1)$_{B-L}$ gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)$_{B-L}$ Higgs field. Because of the classically conformal symmetry, all dimensional parameters are forbidden. The $B-L$ gauge symmetry is radiatively broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass for the $U(1)_{B-L}$ gauge boson ($Z^\\prime$ boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a small negative coupling between the SM Higgs doublet and the $B-L$ Higgs field, the negative mass term for the SM Higgs doublet is generated and the electroweak symmetry is broken. In this model context, we investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. It is known that in the classically conformal U(1)$_{B-L}$ extension of the SM, the electroweak vacuum remains unstable in the renormalization group analysis at the one-loop level. In this pape...

  16. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout mos...

  17. A PSO-PID quaternion model based trajectory control of a hexarotor UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artale, Valeria; Milazzo, Cristina L. R.; Orlando, Calogero; Ricciardello, Angela

    2015-12-01

    A quaternion based trajectory controller for a prototype of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is discussed in this paper. The dynamics of the UAV, a hexarotor in details, is described in terms of quaternion instead of the usual Euler angle parameterization. As UAV flight management concerns, the method here implemented consists of two main steps: trajectory and attitude control via Proportional-Integrative-Derivative (PID) and Proportional-Derivative (PD) technique respectively and the application of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) method in order to tune the PID and PD parameters. The optimization is the consequence of the minimization of a objective function related to the error with the respect to a proper trajectory. Numerical simulations support and validate the proposed method.

  18. Intermediate-mass-ratio black hole binaries II: Modeling Trajectories and Gravitational Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Lousto, Carlos O; Campanelli, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the scenario of small-mass-ratio (q) black-hole binaries; performing new, more accurate, simulations of mass ratios 10:1 and 100:1 for initially nonspinning black holes. We propose fitting functions for the trajectories of the two black holes as a function of time and mass ratio (in the range 1/100 < q < 1/10$) that combine aspects of post-Newtonian trajectories at smaller orbital frequencies and plunging geodesics at larger frequencies. We then use these trajectories to compute waveforms via black hole perturbation theory. Using the advanced LIGO noise curve, we see a match of ~99.5% for the leading (l,m)=(2,2) mode between the numerical relativity and perturbative waveforms. Nonleading modes have similarly high matches. We thus prove the feasibility of efficiently generating a bank of gravitational waveforms in the intermediate-mass-ratio regime using only a sparse set of full numerical simulations.

  19. Intermediate-mass-ratio black hole binaries. II. Modeling trajectories and gravitational waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Zlochower, Yosef; Lousto, Carlos O.; Campanelli, Manuela

    2011-12-01

    We revisit the scenario of small-mass-ratio (q) black hole binaries; performing new, more accurate, simulations of mass ratios 10:1 and 100:1 for initially nonspinning black holes. We propose fitting functions for the trajectories of the two black holes as a function of time and mass ratio (in the range 1/100≤q≤1/10) that combine aspects of post-Newtonian trajectories at smaller orbital frequencies and plunging geodesics at larger frequencies. We then use these trajectories to compute waveforms via black hole perturbation theory. Using the advanced LIGO noise curve, we see a match of ˜99.5% for the leading (ℓ,m)=(2,2) mode between the numerical relativity and perturbative waveforms. Nonleading modes have similarly high matches. We thus prove the feasibility of efficiently generating a bank of gravitational waveforms in the intermediate-mass-ratio regime using only a sparse set of full numerical simulations.

  20. Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: application to the double-Anderson model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H; Levy, Tal J; Rabani, Eran

    2014-05-28

    A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis-à-vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures.

  1. Local and omnibus goodness-of-fit tests in classical measurement error models

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanyuan

    2010-09-14

    We consider functional measurement error models, i.e. models where covariates are measured with error and yet no distributional assumptions are made about the mismeasured variable. We propose and study a score-type local test and an orthogonal series-based, omnibus goodness-of-fit test in this context, where no likelihood function is available or calculated-i.e. all the tests are proposed in the semiparametric model framework. We demonstrate that our tests have optimality properties and computational advantages that are similar to those of the classical score tests in the parametric model framework. The test procedures are applicable to several semiparametric extensions of measurement error models, including when the measurement error distribution is estimated non-parametrically as well as for generalized partially linear models. The performance of the local score-type and omnibus goodness-of-fit tests is demonstrated through simulation studies and analysis of a nutrition data set.

  2. A classical Master equation approach to modeling an artificial protein motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspired by biomolecular motors, as well as by theoretical concepts for chemically driven nanomotors, there is significant interest in constructing artificial molecular motors. One driving force is the opportunity to create well-controlled model systems that are simple enough to be modeled in detail. A remaining challenge is the fact that such models need to take into account processes on many different time scales. Here we describe use of a classical Master equation approach, integrated with input from Langevin and molecular dynamics modeling, to stochastically model an existing artificial molecular motor concept, the Tumbleweed, across many time scales. This enables us to study how interdependencies between motor processes, such as center-of-mass diffusion and track binding/unbinding, affect motor performance. Results from our model help guide the experimental realization of the proposed motor, and potentially lead to insights that apply to a wider class of molecular motors.

  3. On Optimality of the Barrier Strategy for the Classical Risk Model with Interest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Fang; Rong Wu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the optimal dividend problem for a classical risk model with a constant force of interest. For such a risk model, a sufficient condition under which a barrier strategy is the optimal strategy is presented for general claim distributions. When claim sizes are exponentially distributed, it is shown that the optimal dividend policy is a barrier strategy and the maximal dividend-value function is a concave function. Finally, some known results relating to the distribution of aggregate dividends before ruin are extended.

  4. Theory of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamic Systems is intended for scientists and graduate students interested in the foundations of quantum mechanics and applied scientists interested in accurate atomic and molecular models. This is a reference to those working in the new field of relativistic optics, in topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles, and is based on 30 years of research. The novelty of this work consists of accurate connections between the properties of quantum equations and correspon

  5. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration during transport from clean areas. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  6. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration while transport from clean areas takes place. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  7. Modelling molecule-surface interactions--an automated quantum-classical approach using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbers, Claudia R; Johnston, Karen; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2011-06-14

    We present an automated and efficient method to develop force fields for molecule-surface interactions. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to parameterise a classical force field so that the classical adsorption energy landscape of a molecule on a surface matches the corresponding landscape from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The procedure performs a sophisticated search in the parameter phase space and converges very quickly. The method is capable of fitting a significant number of structures and corresponding adsorption energies. Water on a ZnO(0001) surface was chosen as a benchmark system but the method is implemented in a flexible way and can be applied to any system of interest. In the present case, pairwise Lennard Jones (LJ) and Coulomb potentials are used to describe the molecule-surface interactions. In the course of the fitting procedure, the LJ parameters are refined in order to reproduce the adsorption energy landscape. The classical model is capable of describing a wide range of energies, which is essential for a realistic description of a fluid-solid interface. PMID:21594260

  8. Comparison of classical heat stroke between conscious and unconscious rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan GENG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce conscious and unconscious classical heat stroke(CHS models in conscious and unconscious rats, and the difference in heat stress response between the two models was investigated. Methods Thirty-two male SD rats were randomly and equally divided into conscious classic heatstroke(C-CHS, unconscious classi cheatstroke(N-CHS, conscious normal control(C-NC and unconscious normal control(N-NCgroups.Rats of C-CHS and N-CHS groups were put into artificial climate chamber, and exposed to 39℃ heat stress.Core temperature and systolic blood pressure(SBP of rats were monitored via rectal thermal couple and by both invasive and non-invasive arterial blood pressure monitor instrument respectively. Heat stress responses of C-CHS and N-CHS rats were quantitatively analyzed and compared, and the survival time was also compared by K-M survival analysis. Results There was a significant difference in regulatory features of the core temperature and SBP betweenC-CHS and N-CHS rats. Although no difference in maximum core temperature has been observed between N-CHS and C-CHS rats, but in comparison with C-CHS rats,N-CHS rats had significantly faster rise in core temperature(P<0.05, shorter heat stress time period,lighter total thermal load and severe thermal load(P<0.05.N-CHS rats had a poorer prognosis than C-CHS rats(P<0.05. Conclusion In comparison with traditional heatstroke in unconscious rats, heatstroke in conscious rats model is more suitable for the investigation of experimental heatstroke, and further investigation of this model may help understand the mechanism ofpathogenesis of classic heatstroke.

  9. Bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Haba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal U(1B−L extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The U(1B−L symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Analyzing the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, we find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. We identify the regions of model parameters which satisfy the perturbativity of the running couplings and the electroweak vacuum stability as well as the naturalness of the electroweak scale.

  10. Bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-03-01

    We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal U(1) B - L extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The U(1) B - L symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Analyzing the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, we find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. We identify the regions of model parameters which satisfy the perturbativity of the running couplings and the electroweak vacuum stability as well as the naturalness of the electroweak scale.

  11. Background Error Covariance Estimation Using Information from a Single Model Trajectory with Application to Ocean Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppenne, Christian L.; Rienecker, Michele; Kovach, Robin M.; Vernieres, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    An attractive property of ensemble data assimilation methods is that they provide flow dependent background error covariance estimates which can be used to update fields of observed variables as well as fields of unobserved model variables. Two methods to estimate background error covariances are introduced which share the above property with ensemble data assimilation methods but do not involve the integration of multiple model trajectories. Instead, all the necessary covariance information is obtained from a single model integration. The Space Adaptive Forecast error Estimation (SAFE) algorithm estimates error covariances from the spatial distribution of model variables within a single state vector. The Flow Adaptive error Statistics from a Time series (FAST) method constructs an ensemble sampled from a moving window along a model trajectory.SAFE and FAST are applied to the assimilation of Argo temperature profiles into version 4.1 of the Modular Ocean Model (MOM4.1) coupled to the GEOS-5 atmospheric model and to the CICE sea ice model. The results are validated against unassimilated Argo salinity data. They show that SAFE and FAST are competitive with the ensemble optimal interpolation (EnOI) used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) to produce its ocean analysis. Because of their reduced cost, SAFE and FAST hold promise for high-resolution data assimilation applications.

  12. Classicalization of Quantum Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, T

    2014-01-01

    A systematic procedure to extract classical degrees of freedom in quantum mechanics is formulated using the stochastic variational method. With this classicalization, a hybrid model constructed from quantum and classical variables (quantum-classical hybrids) is derived systematically. In this procedure, conservation laws such as energy are maintained, and Eherefest`s theorem is still satisfied with modification. The criterion for the applicability of quantum-classical hybrids is also investigated.

  13. Random exchange interaction effects on the phase transitions in frustrated classical Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, W. C.; Song, X.; Feng, J. J.; Zeng, M.; Gao, X. S.; Qin, M. H., E-mail: qinmh@scnu.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Materials and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jia, X. T. [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2015-07-07

    In this work, the effects of the random exchange interaction on the phase transitions and phase diagrams of classical frustrated Heisenberg model are investigated by Monte Carlo simulation in order to simulate the chemical doping effect in real materials. It is observed that the antiferromagnetic transitions shift toward low temperature with the increasing magnitude of the random exchange interaction, which can be qualitatively understood from the competitions among local spin states. This study is related to the magnetic properties in the doped iron-based superconductors.

  14. Relationship between core temperature change during recovery and prognosis in classic heat stroke rat models

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Geng, Yan; Fu, Wei; Na PENG; Zheng-tao GU; Su, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To construct classic heat stroke rat models, and observe the changes of body temperature in the recovery period after heat stress to explore its relationship with prognosis. Methods Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into heat stroke group (HS group, n=50) and control group (C group, n=10). Rats in HS group were exposed to 39℃ heat stress. Core temperature and systolic blood pressure (SBP) of rats were monitored until it reached diagnostic criteria of heat stroke. The core bod...

  15. Classically conformal U(1)' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Arindam; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-01-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)' extension of the Standard Model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly free U(1)' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1)' gauge symmetry is broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1)' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1)' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1)' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark ($m_t=173.34$ GeV) and the Higgs boson ($m_h=125.09$ GeV), we perform parameter scans t...

  16. Reimagining the past - use of counterfactual trajectories in socio-hydrological modelling: the case of Chennai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V.

    2015-02-01

    The developing world is rapidly urbanizing. One of the challenges associated with this growth will be to supply water to growing cities of the developing world. Traditional planning tools fare poorly over 30-50 year time horizons because these systems are changing so rapidly. Models that hold land use, economic patterns, governance systems or technology static over a long planning horizon could result in inaccurate predictions leading to sub-optimal or paradoxical outcomes. Most models fail to account for adaptive responses by humans that in turn influence water resource availability, resulting in coevolution of the human-water system. Is a particular trajectory inevitable given a city's natural resource endowment, is the trajectory purely driven by policy or are there tipping points in the evolution of a city's growth that shift it from one trajectory onto another? Socio-hydrology has been defined as a new science of water and people that will explicitly account for such bi-directional feedbacks. However, a particular challenge in incorporating such feedbacks is imagining technological, social and political futures that could fundamentally alter future water demand, allocation and use. This paper offers an alternative approach - the use of counterfactual trajectories - that allows policy insights to be gleaned without having to predict social futures. The approach allows us to "reimagine the past"; to observe how outcomes would differ if different decisions had been made. The paper presents a "socio-hydrological" model that simulates the feedbacks between the human, engineered and hydrological systems in Chennai, India over a 40-year period. The model offers several interesting insights. First, the study demonstrates that urban household water security goes beyond piped water supply. When piped supply fails, users turn to their own wells. If the wells dry up, consumers purchase expensive tanker water or curtail water use and thus become water insecure. Second

  17. Vegetation coupling to global climate: Trajectories of vegetation change and phenology modeling from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeremy Isaac

    Important systematic shifts in ecosystem function are often masked by natural variability. The rich legacy of over two decades of continuous satellite observations provides an important database for distinguishing climatological and anthropogenic ecosystem changes. Examples from semi-arid Sudanian West Africa and New England (USA) illustrate the response of vegetation to climate and land-use. In Burkina Faso, West Africa, pastoral and agricultural practices compete for land area, while degradation may follow intensification. The Nouhao Valley is a natural experiment in which pastoral and agricultural land uses were allocated separate, coherent reserves. Trajectories of annual net primary productivity were derived from 18 years of coarse-grain (AVHRR) satellite data. Trends suggested that pastoral lands had responded rigorously to increasing rainfall after the 1980's droughts. A detailed analysis at Landsat resolution (30m) indicated that the increased vegetative cover was concentrated in the river basins of the pastoral region, implying a riparian wood expansion. In comparison, riparian cover was reduced in agricultural regions. We suggest that broad-scale patterns of increasing semi-arid West African greenness may be indicative of climate variability, whereas local losses may be anthropogenic in nature. The contiguous deciduous forests, ocean proximity, topography, and dense urban developments of New England provide an ideal landscape to examine influences of climate variability and the impact of urban development vegetation response. Spatial and temporal patterns of interannual climate variability were examined via green leaf phenology. Phenology, or seasonal growth and senescence, is driven by deficits of light, temperature, and water. In temperate environments, phenology variability is driven by interannual temperature and precipitation shifts. Average and interannual phenology analyses across southern New England were conducted at resolutions of 30m (Landsat

  18. Spin-bowling in cricket re-visited: model trajectories for various spin-vector angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate, via the calculation of model trajectories appropriate to slow bowling in cricket, the effects on the flight path of the ball before pitching due to changes in the angle of the spin-vector. This was accomplished by allowing the spin-vector to vary in three ways. Firstly, from off-spin, where the spin-vector points horizontally and directly down the pitch, to top-spin where it points horizontally towards the off-side of the pitch. Secondly, from off-spin to side-spin where, for side-spin, the spin-vector points vertically upwards. Thirdly, where the spin-vector points horizontally and at 45° to the pitch (in the general direction of ‘point’, as viewed by the bowler), and is varied towards the vertical, while maintaining the 45° angle in the horizontal plane. It is found that, as is well known, top-spin causes the ball to dip in flight, side-spin causes the ball to move side-ways in flight and, perhaps most importantly, off-spin can cause the ball to drift to the off-side of the pitch late in its flight as it begins to fall. At a more subtle level it is found that, if the total spin is kept constant and a small amount of top-spin is added to the ball at the expense of some off-spin, there is little change in the side-ways drift. However, a considerable reduction in the length at which the ball pitches occurs, ∼25 cm, an amount that batsmen can ignore at their peril. On the other hand, a small amount of side-spin introduced to a top-spin delivery does not alter the point of pitching significantly, but produces a considerable amount of side-ways drift, ∼10 cm or more. For pure side-spin the side-ways drift is up to ∼30 cm. When a side-spin component is added to the spin of a ball bowled with a mixture of off-spin and top-spin in equal proportions, significant movement occurs in both the side-ways direction and in the point of pitching, of the order of a few tens of centimetres.

  19. Quantum flesh on classical bones: Semiclassical bridges across the quantum-classical divide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokulich, Alisa [Center for Philosophy and History of Science, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally quantum mechanics is viewed as having made a sharp break from classical mechanics, and the concepts and methods of these two theories are viewed as incommensurable with one another. A closer examination of the history of quantum mechanics, however, reveals that there is a strong sense in which quantum mechanics was built on the backbone of classical mechanics. As a result, there is a considerable structural continuity between these two theories, despite their important differences. These structural continuities provide a ground for semiclassical methods in which classical structures, such as trajectories, are used to investigate and model quantum phenomena. After briefly tracing the history of semiclassical approaches, I show how current research in semiclassical mechanics is revealing new bridges across the quantum-classical divide.

  20. Classical and quantum analysis of a hetero-triatomic molecular Bose-Einstein condensate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonel, A.P. [CCET da Universidade Federal do Pampa/Unipampa, Bag´e, RS (Brazil); Kuhn, C.C.N.; Foerster, A. [Instituto de F´ısica da UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, G. [Departamento de Físi a - UFS, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Roditi, I.; Santos, Z.V.T. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    We investigate an integrable Hamiltonian modelling a hetero-triatomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. This model describes a mixture of two species of atoms in different proportions, which can combine to form a triatomic molecule. Beginning with a classical analysis, we determine the fixed points of the system. Bifurcations of these points separate the parameter space into different regions. Three distinct scenarios are found, varying with the atomic population imbalance. This result suggests the ground state properties of the quantum model exhibits a sensitivity on the atomic population imbalance, which is confirmed by a quantum analysis using different approaches, such as the ground-state expectation values, the behaviour of the quantum dynamics, the energy gap and the ground state fidelity. (author)

  1. Modeling and simulation of torpedo acoustic homing trajectory with multiple targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Hao; KANG Feng-ju; NIE Wei-dong

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of a torpedo' s acoustic homing trajectory with multiple targets were studied. The differential equations of torpedo motion were presented based on hydrodynamics. The Fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve these equations. Derived from sonar equations and Snell's law, a simple virtual underwater acoustic environment was established for simulating the torpedo homing process. The Newton iteration method was used to calculate homing range and ray tracing was approximated by piecewise line, which takes into consideration distortions cause by temperature, pressure, and salinity in a given sea area. The influence of some acoustic warfare equipment disturb the torpedo homing process in certain circumstances, including decoys and jammers, was alsotaken into account in simulations. Relative target identification logic and homing control laws were presented. Equal consideration during research was given to the requirements of real-timeactivity as well as accuracy. Finally, a practical torpedo homing trajectory simulation program was developed and applied to certain projects.

  2. Trajectory-based modeling of fluid transport in a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasco, D. W.; Pride, Steven R.; Commer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Using an asymptotic methodology, valid in the presence of smoothly varying heterogeneity and prescribed boundaries, we derive a trajectory-based solution for tracer transport. The analysis produces a Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential equation for the phase of the propagating tracer front. The trajectories follow from the characteristic equations that are equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The paths are determined by the fluid velocity field, the total porosity, and the dispersion tensor. Due to their dependence upon the local hydrodynamic dispersion, they differ from conventional streamlines. This difference is borne out in numerical calculations for both uniform and dipole flow fields. In an application to the computational X-ray imaging of a saline tracer test, we illustrate that the trajectories may serve as the basis for a form of tracer tomography. In particular, we use the onset time of a change in attenuation for each volume element of the X-ray image as a measure of the arrival time of the saline tracer. The arrival times are used to image the spatial variation of the effective hydraulic conductivity within the laboratory sample.

  3. Radarsat observations and forecasting of oil slick trajectory movements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maged Marghany

    2004-01-01

    RADARSAT data have a potential role for coastal pollution monitoring. This study presents a new approach to detect and forecast oil slick trajectory movements. The oil slick trajectory movements is based on the tidal current effects and Fay's algorithm for oil slick spreading mechanisms. The oil spill trajectory model contains the integration between Doppler frequency shift model and Lagrangian model. Doppler frequency shift model implemented to simulate tidal current pattern from RADARSAT data while the Lagrangian model used to predict oil spill spreading pattern. The classical Fay's algorithm was implemented with the two models to simulate the oil spill trajectory movements.The study shows that the slick lengths are effected by tidal current V component with maximum velocity of 1.4 m/s. This indicates thatoil slick trajectory path is moved towards the north direction. The oil slick parcels are accumulated along the coastline after 48 h. Theanalysis indicated that tidal current V components were the dominant forcing for oil slick spreading.

  4. Identifying latent trajectories of personality disorder symptom change: growth mixture modeling in the longitudinal study of personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Michael N; Lenzenweger, Mark F

    2013-02-01

    Although previous reports have documented mean-level declines in personality disorder (PD) symptoms over time, little is known about whether personality pathology sometimes emerges among nonsymptomatic adults, or whether rates of change differ qualitatively among symptomatic persons. Our study sought to characterize heterogeneity in the longitudinal course of PD symptoms with the goal of testing for and describing latent trajectories. Participants were 250 young adults selected into two groups using a PD screening measure: those who met diagnostic criteria for a DSM-III-R PD (PPD, n = 129), and those with few PD symptoms (NoPD, n = 121). PD symptoms were assessed three times over a 4-year study using semistructured interviews. Total PD symptom counts and symptoms of each DSM-III-R PD were analyzed using growth mixture modeling. In the NoPD group, latent trajectories were characterized by stable, minor symptoms; the rapid or gradual remission of subclinical symptoms; or the emergence of symptoms of avoidant, obsessive-compulsive, or paranoid PD. In the PPD group, three latent trajectories were evident: rapid symptom remission, slow symptom decline, or a relative absence of symptoms. Rapid remission of PD symptoms was associated with fewer comorbid disorders, lower Negative Emotionality, and greater Positive Emotionality and Constraint, whereas emergent personality dysfunction was associated with comorbid PD symptoms and lower Positive Emotionality. In most cases, symptom change for one PD was associated with concomitant changes in other PDs, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. These results indicate that the longitudinal course of PD symptoms is heterogeneous, with distinct trajectories evident for both symptomatic and nonsymptomatic individuals. The prognosis of PD symptoms may be informed by an assessment of personality and comorbid psychopathology.

  5. Trajectory study of energy partition in CF 3CN → CF 3 + CN dissociation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Gunnar; Rynefors, Kjell; Hase, William L.

    1986-12-01

    The classical trajectory method has been used to study the internal dynamics and unimolecular dissociation of CF 3CN at energies consistent with infrared multiphoton excitation conditions. A model potential energy function consisting of Morse stretches and attenuated bending terms is used in the trajectory study. At an excitation energy of 150 kcal/mol the CN K. The vibrational and rotational distributions are approximately Boltzmann. This energy partitioning is in good agreement with recent experimental results. The trajectory unimolecular rate constants and lifetime distributions for CF 3CN dissociation are consistent with intrinsic RRKM behaviour.

  6. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Benzekry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1 to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2 to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3 to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80% extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70% beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  7. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B−L symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B−L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B−L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman–Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ→eγ, the current bound on the Z′ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  8. Classical density functional theory & simulations on a coarse-grained model of aromatic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turesson, Martin; Szparaga, Ryan; Ma, Ke; Woodward, Clifford E; Forsman, Jan

    2014-05-14

    A new classical density functional approach is developed to accurately treat a coarse-grained model of room temperature aromatic ionic liquids. Our major innovation is the introduction of charge-charge correlations, which are treated in a simple phenomenological way. We test this theory on a generic coarse-grained model for aromatic RTILs with oligomeric forms for both cations and anions, approximating 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazoliums and BF₄⁻, respectively. We find that predictions by the new density functional theory for fluid structures at charged surfaces are very accurate, as compared with molecular dynamics simulations, across a range of surface charge densities and lengths of the alkyl chain. Predictions of interactions between charged surfaces are also presented. PMID:24718295

  9. Combining sigma-lognormal modeling and classical features for analyzing graphomotor performances in kindergarten children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Thérésa; Rémi, Céline; Plamondon, Réjean; Vaillant, Jean; O'Reilly, Christian

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the advantage of using the kinematic theory of rapid human movements as a complementary approach to those based on classical dynamical features to characterize and analyze kindergarten children's ability to engage in graphomotor activities as a preparation for handwriting learning. This study analyzes nine different movements taken from 48 children evenly distributed among three different school grades corresponding to pupils aged 3, 4, and 5 years. On the one hand, our results show that the ability to perform graphomotor activities depends on kindergarten grades. More importantly, this study shows which performance criteria, from sophisticated neuromotor modeling as well as more classical kinematic parameters, can differentiate children of different school grades. These criteria provide a valuable tool for studying children's graphomotor control learning strategies. On the other hand, from a practical point of view, it is observed that school grades do not clearly reflect pupils' graphomotor performances. This calls for a large-scale investigation, using a more efficient experimental design based on the various observations made throughout this study regarding the choice of the graphic shapes, the number of repetitions and the features to analyze. PMID:25944267

  10. Combining sigma-lognormal modeling and classical features for analyzing graphomotor performances in kindergarten children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Thérésa; Rémi, Céline; Plamondon, Réjean; Vaillant, Jean; O'Reilly, Christian

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the advantage of using the kinematic theory of rapid human movements as a complementary approach to those based on classical dynamical features to characterize and analyze kindergarten children's ability to engage in graphomotor activities as a preparation for handwriting learning. This study analyzes nine different movements taken from 48 children evenly distributed among three different school grades corresponding to pupils aged 3, 4, and 5 years. On the one hand, our results show that the ability to perform graphomotor activities depends on kindergarten grades. More importantly, this study shows which performance criteria, from sophisticated neuromotor modeling as well as more classical kinematic parameters, can differentiate children of different school grades. These criteria provide a valuable tool for studying children's graphomotor control learning strategies. On the other hand, from a practical point of view, it is observed that school grades do not clearly reflect pupils' graphomotor performances. This calls for a large-scale investigation, using a more efficient experimental design based on the various observations made throughout this study regarding the choice of the graphic shapes, the number of repetitions and the features to analyze.

  11. From classical Lagrangians to Hamilton operators in the Standard-Model Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In this article we investigate whether a theory based on a classical Lagrangian for the minimal Standard-Model Extension (SME) can be quantized such that the result is equal to the corresponding low-energy Hamilton operator obtained from the field-theory description. This analysis is carried out for the whole collection of minimal Lagrangians found in the literature. The upshot is that first quantization can be performed consistently. The unexpected observation is made that at first order in Lorentz violation and at second order in the velocity the Lagrangians are related to the Hamilton functions by a simple transformation. Under mild assumptions, it is shown that this holds universally. This result is used successfully to obtain classical Lagrangians for two complicated sectors of the minimal SME that have not been considered in the literature so far. Therefore, it will not be an obstacle anymore to derive such Lagrangians even for involved sets of coefficients - at least to the level of approximation state...

  12. From classical Lagrangians to Hamilton operators in the standard model extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we investigate whether a theory based on a classical Lagrangian for the minimal Standard Model Extension (SME) can be quantized such that the result is equal to the corresponding low-energy Hamilton operator obtained from the field-theory description. This analysis is carried out for the whole collection of minimal Lagrangians found in the literature. The upshot is that the first quantization can be performed consistently. The unexpected observation is made that at first order in Lorentz violation and at second order in the velocity, the Lagrangians are related to the Hamilton functions by a simple transformation. Under mild assumptions, it is shown that this holds universally. That result is used successfully to obtain classical Lagrangians for two complicated sectors of the minimal SME that have not been considered in the literature so far. Therefore, it will not be an obstacle anymore to derive such Lagrangians even for involved sets of coefficients—at least to the level of approximation stated above.

  13. Inhibition of classical complement activation attenuates liver ischaemia and reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, B H M; Straatsburg, I H; Padilla, N D; Van Mierlo, G J; Hack, C E; Van Gulik, T M

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We evaluated inhibition of the classical pathway of complement using C1-inhibitor (C1-inh) in a model of 70% partial liver I/R injury in male Wistar rats (n = 35). C1-inh was administered at 100, 200 or 400 IU/kg bodyweight, 5 min before 60 min ischaemia (pre-I) or 5 min before 24 h reperfusion (end-I). One hundred IU/kg bodyweight significantly reduced the increase of plasma levels of activated C4 as compared to albumin-treated control rats and attenuated the increase of alanine aminotransferase (ALT). These effects were not better with higher doses of C1-inh. Administration of C1-inh pre-I resulted in lower ALT levels and higher bile secretion after 24 h of reperfusion than administration at end-I. Immunohistochemical assessment indicated that activated C3, the membrane attack complex C5b9 and C-reactive protein (CRP) colocalized in hepatocytes within midzonal areas, suggesting CRP is a mediator of I/R-induced, classical complement activation in rats. Pre-ischaemic administration of C1-inh is an effective pharmacological intervention to protect against liver I/R injury.

  14. Wigner measures approach to the classical limit of the Nelson model: Convergence of dynamics and ground state energy

    OpenAIRE

    AMMARI, Zied; Falconi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We consider the classical limit of the Nelson model, a system of stable nucleons interacting with a meson field. We prove convergence of the quantum dynamics towards the evolution of the coupled Klein-Gordon-Schr\\"odinger equation. Also, we show that the ground state energy level of $N$ nucleons, when $N$ is large and the meson field approaches its classical value, is given by the infimum of the classical energy functional at a fixed density of particles. Our study relies on a recently elabor...

  15. Differentially Private Trajectory Data Publication

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Rui; Desai, Bipin C

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing prevalence of location-aware devices, trajectory data has been generated and collected in various application domains. Trajectory data carries rich information that is useful for many data analysis tasks. Yet, improper publishing and use of trajectory data could jeopardize individual privacy. However, it has been shown that existing privacy-preserving trajectory data publishing methods derived from partition-based privacy models, for example k-anonymity, are unable to provide sufficient privacy protection. In this paper, motivated by the data publishing scenario at the Societe de transport de Montreal (STM), the public transit agency in Montreal area, we study the problem of publishing trajectory data under the rigorous differential privacy model. We propose an efficient data-dependent yet differentially private sanitization algorithm, which is applicable to different types of trajectory data. The efficiency of our approach comes from adaptively narrowing down the output domain by building...

  16. Macroscopic models for vehicular flows and crowd dynamics theory and applications classical and non–classical advanced mathematics for real life applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rosini, Massimiliano Daniele

    2013-01-01

    This monograph  presents a systematic treatment of the theory for hyperbolic conservation laws and their applications to vehicular traffics and crowd dynamics. In the first part of the book, the author presents very basic considerations and gradually introduces the mathematical tools necessary to describe and understand the mathematical models developed in the following parts focusing on vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The book is a self-contained valuable resource for advanced courses in mathematical modeling, physics and civil engineering. A number of examples and figures facilitate a better understanding of the underlying concepts and motivations for the students. Important new techniques are presented, in particular the wave front tracking algorithm, the operator splitting approach, the non-classical theory of conservation laws and the constrained problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive account of these fundamental new mathematical advances.  

  17. On the classical limit of Bohmian mechanics for Hagedorn wave packets

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    We consider the classical limit of quantum mechanics in terms of Bohmian trajectories. For wave packets as defined by Hagedorn we show that the Bohmian trajectories converge to Newtonian trajectories in probability.

  18. Further insights in the ability of classical nonadditive potentials to model actinide ion-water interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réal, Florent; Trumm, Michael; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Masella, Michel; Vallet, Valérie

    2013-04-01

    Pursuing our efforts on the development of accurate classical models to simulate radionuclides in complex environments (Réal et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 15913; Trumm et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 044509), this article places a large emphasis on the discussion of the influence of models/parameters uncertainties on the computed structural, dynamical, and temporal properties. Two actinide test cases, trivalent curium and tetravalent thorium, have been studied with three different potential energy functions, which allow us to account for the polarization and charge-transfer effects occurring in hydrated actinide ion systems. The first type of models considers only an additive energy term for modeling ion/water charge-transfer effects, whereas the other two treat cooperative charge-transfer interactions with two different analytical expressions. Model parameters are assigned to reproduce high-level ab initio data concerning only hydrated ion species in gas phase. For the two types of cooperative charge-transfer models, we define two sets of parameters allowing or not to cancel out possible errors inherent to the force field used to model water/water interactions at the ion vicinity. We define thus five different models to characterize the solvation of each ion. For both ions, our cooperative charge-transfer models lead to close results in terms of structure in solution: the coordination number is included within 8 and 9, and the mean ion/water oxygen distances are 2.45 and 2.49 Å, respectively, for Th(IV) and Cm(III). PMID:23233426

  19. A Model for Integrating Computation in Undergraduate Physics: An example from middle-division classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, Marcos D

    2013-01-01

    Much of the research done by modern physicists would be impossible without the use of computation. And yet, while computation is a crucial tool of practicing physicists, physics curricula do not generally reflect its importance and utility. To more tightly connect undergraduate preparation with professional practice, we integrated computational instruction into middle-division classical mechanics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Our model for integration includes the construction of computational learning goals, the design of computational activities consistent with those goals, and the assessment of students' computational fluency. To assess students' computational fluency, we used open-ended computational projects in which students prepared reports describing a physical problem of their choosing. Many students chose projects from outside the domain of the course, and therefore, had to employ mathematical and computational techniques they had not yet been taught. After completing the project, most stud...

  20. Non-classical diffusion model for heat and mass transfer in laser drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiulan Huai; Guoxiang Wang; Renqiu Jiang; Bin Li

    2004-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the laser drying process by employing a generalized, Maxwell-Cattaneo equation to treat both heat and mass transfer was presented. Calculations were performed to illustrate the non-classical transport of heat and moisture. The effect of the heat flux density and the initial moisture content on water removal was also investigated. The results indicate that the nonequilibrium mass diffusion plays an important role during the very early stages of moisture removal, especially at the surface of the medium. Away from the surface, the non-Fickian model shows a delay in the reduction of the moisture content. The calculation resuits also show that the initial moisture content of the medium has a considerable effect on water removal.

  1. Focalization and phase models for classical extensions of non-associative Lambek calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bastenhof, Arno

    2011-01-01

    Lambek's non-associative syntactic calculus (NL) excels in its resource consciousness: the usual structural rules for weakening, contraction, exchange and even associativity are all dropped. Recently, there have been proposals for conservative extensions dispensing with NL's intuitionistic bias towards sequents with single conclusions: De Groote and Lamarche's classical non-associative Lambek calculus (CNL) and the Lambek-Grishin calculus (LG) of Moortgat and associates. We demonstrate Andreoli's focalization property for said proposals: a normalization result for Cut-free sequent derivations identifying to a large extent those differing only by trivial rule permutations. In doing so, we proceed from a `uniform' sequent presentation, deriving CNL from LG through the addition of structural rules. The normalization proof proceeds by the construction of syntactic phase models wherein every `truth' has a focused proof, similar to work of Okada and of Herbelin and Lee.

  2. Reply to "Comment on 'Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models' ".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the Comment by Schmelzer and Baidakov [Phys. Rev. E 94, 026801 (2016)].10.1103/PhysRevE.94.026801 They suggest that a more modern approach than the classic description by Tolman is necessary to model the surface tension of curved interfaces. Therefore we now consider the higher-order Helfrich correction, rather than the simpler first-order Tolman correction. Using a recent parametrization of the Helfrich correction provided by Wilhelmsen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064706 (2015)]JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.4907588, we test this description against measurements from our simulations, and find an agreement stronger than what the pure Tolman description offers. Our analyses suggest a necessary correction of order higher than the second for small bubbles with radius ≲1 nm. In addition, we respond to other minor criticism about our results.

  3. Construction of cytopathic PK-15 cell model of classical swine fever virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    No cytopathic effect (CPE) can be observed on classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infected cell culture in vitro. This brings an obstacle to the researches on reciprocity between CSFV and host cells. Based on the construction of full-length genomic infectious Cdna clone of Chinese CSFV standard virulent Shimen strain, partial deletion is intro- duced into genomic Cdna to obtain a 7.5 kb subgenomic Cdna. A new subgenomic CSFV is derived from transfection with the subgenomic Cdna on PK-15 cells pre-infected by CSFV Shimen virus. Typical CPE induced by this subgenomic virus is observed on PK-15 cells. Coexistence of wild- type and subgenomic virus in cytopathic cell culture is dem- onstrated by RT-PCR detection in cytopathic cells. For conclusion, the construction of cytopathic cell model exploited a new way for researches on the molecular mechanism of CSFV pathogenesis.

  4. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Ryan

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  5. Improved model of hydrated calcium ion for molecular dynamics simulations using classical biomolecular force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Wilson, James; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+) ) play key roles in various fundamental biological processes such as cell signaling and brain function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study such interactions, however, the accuracy of the Ca(2+) models provided by the standard MD force fields has not been rigorously tested. Here, we assess the performance of the Ca(2+) models from the most popular classical force fields AMBER and CHARMM by computing the osmotic pressure of model compounds and the free energy of DNA-DNA interactions. In the simulations performed using the two standard models, Ca(2+) ions are seen to form artificial clusters with chloride, acetate, and phosphate species; the osmotic pressure of CaAc2 and CaCl2 solutions is a small fraction of the experimental values for both force fields. Using the standard parameterization of Ca(2+) ions in the simulations of Ca(2+) -mediated DNA-DNA interactions leads to qualitatively wrong outcomes: both AMBER and CHARMM simulations suggest strong inter-DNA attraction whereas, in experiment, DNA molecules repel one another. The artificial attraction of Ca(2+) to DNA phosphate is strong enough to affect the direction of the electric field-driven translocation of DNA through a solid-state nanopore. To address these shortcomings of the standard Ca(2+) model, we introduce a custom model of a hydrated Ca(2+) ion and show that using our model brings the results of the above MD simulations in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our improved model of Ca(2+) can be readily applied to MD simulations of various biomolecular systems, including nucleic acids, proteins and lipid bilayer membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 752-763, 2016. PMID:27144470

  6. Wave scattering through classically chaotic cavities in the presence of absorption: A maximum-entropy model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pier A Mello; Eugene Kogan

    2002-02-01

    We present a maximum-entropy model for the transport of waves through a classically chaotic cavity in the presence of absorption. The entropy of the -matrix statistical distribution is maximized, with the constraint $\\langle {\\rm Tr}SS^{\\dagger}\\rangle = n: n$ is the dimensionality of , and 0 ≤ ≤ 1. For = 1 the -matrix distribution concentrates on the unitarity sphere and we have no absorption; for = 0 the distribution becomes a delta function at the origin and we have complete absorption. For strong absorption our result agrees with a number of analytical calculations already given in the literature. In that limit, the distribution of the individual (angular) transmission and reflection coefficients becomes exponential – Rayleigh statistics – even for = 1. For ≫ 1 Rayleigh statistics is attained even with no absorption; here we extend the study to < 1. The model is compared with random-matrix-theory numerical simulations: it describes the problem very well for strong absorption, but fails for moderate and weak absorptions. The success of the model for strong absorption is understood in the light of a central-limit theorem. For weak absorption, some important physical constraint is missing in the construction of the model.

  7. BIM-based Modeling and Data Enrichment of Classical Architectural Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Ivan Apollonio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available EnIn this paper we presented a BIM-based approach for the documentation of Architectural Heritage. Knowledge of classical architecture is first extracted from the treatises for parametric modeling in object level. Then we established a profile library based on semantic studies to sweep out different objects. Variants grow out from the parametric models by editing or regrouping parameters based on grammars. Multiple data including material, structure and real-life state are enriched with respect to different research motivations. The BIM models are expected to ease the modeling process and provide comprehensive data shared among different platforms for further simulations.ItIn questo articolo è presentata una procedura definita nell'ambito dei sistemi BIM con l'obiettivo di documentare il Patrimonio Architettonico. I dati conoscitivi relativi all'architettura classica sono, in una prima fase, ottenuti dai trattati al fine di modellare in maniera parametrica a livello di oggetti. Successivamente è stata definita una libreria di profili, basata su principi semantici, dalla quale è possibile ottenere oggetti differenti. Dati di natura differente, relativi ad esempio ai materiali, alle strutture, allo stato di fatto, sono implementati in funzione delle differenti esigenze. I modelli BIM hanno la potenzialità di facilitare le procedure di modellazione e di fornire informazioni e dati completi che possono essere condivisi tra piattaforme differenti per ulteriori simulazioni ed analisi.

  8. Quantum Trajectory Approach to Molecular Dynamics Simulation with Surface Hopping

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Wei; Li, Xin-Qi; Fang, Weihai

    2012-01-01

    The powerful molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is basically based on a picture that the atoms experience classical-like trajectories under the exertion of classical force field determined by the quantum mechanically solved electronic state. In this work we propose a quantum trajectory approach to the MD simulation with surface hopping, from an insight that an effective "observation" is actually implied in theMDsimulation through tracking the forces experienced, just like checking the meter's result in the quantum measurement process. This treatment can build the nonadiabatic surface hopping on a dynamical foundation, instead of the usual artificial and conceptually inconsistent hopping algorithms. The effects and advantages of the proposed scheme are preliminarily illustrated by a two-surface model system.

  9. Linking community, parenting, and depressive symptom trajectories: testing resilience models of adolescent agency based on race/ethnicity and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda L; Merten, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Family stress models illustrate how communities affect youth outcomes through effects on parents and studies consistently show the enduring effects of early community context. The present study takes a different approach identifying human agency during adolescence as a potentially significant promotive factor mediating the relationship between community, parenting, and mental health. While agency is an important part of resilience, its longitudinal effects are unknown, particularly based on gender and race/ethnicity. The purpose of this research was to model the long-term effects of community structural adversity and social resources as predictors of adolescent depressive symptom trajectories via indirect effects of parental happiness, parent-child relationships, and human agency. Latent growth analyses were conducted with 1,796 participants (53% female; 56% White) across four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health spanning adolescence (Wave 1) through adulthood (Wave 4). The results identified agency as an important promotive factor during adolescence with long-term mental health benefits, but only for White and male participants. For these individuals, community social resources and the quality of the parent-child relationship were related to higher levels of agency and more positive mental health trajectories. Although community social resources similarly benefitted parenting and agency among females and non-White participants, there were no significant links between agency and depressive symptoms for these youth. The results suggest that agency remains an important, but poorly understood concept and additional work is necessary to continue unpacking its meaning for diverse groups of youth. PMID:24907892

  10. Linking community, parenting, and depressive symptom trajectories: testing resilience models of adolescent agency based on race/ethnicity and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda L; Merten, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Family stress models illustrate how communities affect youth outcomes through effects on parents and studies consistently show the enduring effects of early community context. The present study takes a different approach identifying human agency during adolescence as a potentially significant promotive factor mediating the relationship between community, parenting, and mental health. While agency is an important part of resilience, its longitudinal effects are unknown, particularly based on gender and race/ethnicity. The purpose of this research was to model the long-term effects of community structural adversity and social resources as predictors of adolescent depressive symptom trajectories via indirect effects of parental happiness, parent-child relationships, and human agency. Latent growth analyses were conducted with 1,796 participants (53% female; 56% White) across four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health spanning adolescence (Wave 1) through adulthood (Wave 4). The results identified agency as an important promotive factor during adolescence with long-term mental health benefits, but only for White and male participants. For these individuals, community social resources and the quality of the parent-child relationship were related to higher levels of agency and more positive mental health trajectories. Although community social resources similarly benefitted parenting and agency among females and non-White participants, there were no significant links between agency and depressive symptoms for these youth. The results suggest that agency remains an important, but poorly understood concept and additional work is necessary to continue unpacking its meaning for diverse groups of youth.

  11. Quantifying kinematics of purposeful movements to real, imagined, or absent functional objects: Implications for modelling trajectories for robot-assisted ADL tasks**

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisneski Kimberly J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robotic therapy is at the forefront of stroke rehabilitation. The Activities of Daily Living Exercise Robot (ADLER was developed to improve carryover of gains after training by combining the benefits of Activities of Daily Living (ADL training (motivation and functional task practice with real objects, with the benefits of robot mediated therapy (repeatability and reliability. In combining these two therapy techniques, we seek to develop a new model for trajectory generation that will support functional movements to real objects during robot training. We studied natural movements to real objects and report on how initial reaching movements are affected by real objects and how these movements deviate from the straight line paths predicted by the minimum jerk model, typically used to generate trajectories in robot training environments. We highlight key issues that to be considered in modelling natural trajectories. Methods Movement data was collected as eight normal subjects completed ADLs such as drinking and eating. Three conditions were considered: object absent, imagined, and present. This data was compared to predicted trajectories generated from implementing the minimum jerk model. The deviations in both the plane of the table (XY and the saggital plane of torso (XZ were examined for both reaches to a cup and to a spoon. Velocity profiles and curvature were also quantified for all trajectories. Results We hypothesized that movements performed with functional task constraints and objects would deviate from the minimum jerk trajectory model more than those performed under imaginary or object absent conditions. Trajectory deviations from the predicted minimum jerk model for these reaches were shown to depend on three variables: object presence, object orientation, and plane of movement. When subjects completed the cup reach their movements were more curved than for the spoon reach. The object present condition for the cup

  12. Understanding the mathematics and science achievement and growth trajectories of high ability high school students using hierarchical linear modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belen-Ferrer, Bellasanta

    2009-12-01

    This study used longitudinal data and individual, family, and academic-related matriculation variables to examine trends in initial status and growth trajectories in overall academics, mathematics, and science achievement among 224 high ability high school Asian students. Results indicate that females have an advantage in both initial status and growth rates in overall academics and science. None of the family variables entered in the models were found to be significantly related to overall academics grade point average. All available matriculation variables entered into the models explained less than or at most about half the variance in initial achievement status and growth rate in overall academics and science but not in mathematics. These results strongly imply that other factors, notably family and school and/or classroom-related variables, not measured by the ones used in the models could explain the expected variance in initial status and growth rate of the students especially in Mathematics.

  13. Usage Intention Framework Model: A Fuzzy Logic Interpretation of the Classical Utaut Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandaire, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    A fuzzy conjoint analysis (FCA: Turksen, 1992) model for enhancing management decision in the technology adoption domain was implemented as an extension to the UTAUT model (Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003). Additionally, a UTAUT-based Usage Intention Framework Model (UIFM) introduced a closed-loop feedback system. The empirical evidence…

  14. SU(2)-Invariant Continuum Theory for an Unconventional Phase Transition in a Three-Dimensional Classical Dimer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Stephen; Chalker, J. T.

    2008-10-01

    We derive a continuum theory for the phase transition in a classical dimer model on the cubic lattice, observed in recent Monte Carlo simulations. Our derivation relies on the mapping from a three-dimensional classical problem to a two-dimensional quantum problem, by which the dimer model is related to a model of hard-core bosons on the kagome lattice. The dimer-ordering transition becomes a superfluid Mott insulator quantum phase transition at fractional filling, described by an SU(2)-invariant continuum theory.

  15. A hybrid classical-quantum approach for ultra-scaled confined nanostructures : modeling and simulation*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietra Paola

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hybrid classical-quantum model to study the motion of electrons in ultra-scaled confined nanostructures. The transport of charged particles, considered as one dimensional, is described by a quantum effective mass model in the active zone coupled directly to a drift-diffusion problem in the rest of the device. We explain how this hybrid model takes into account the peculiarities due to the strong confinement and we present numerical simulations for a simplified carbon nanotube. Nous proposons un modèle hybride classique-quantique pour décrire le mouvement des électrons dans des nanostructures très fortement confinées. Le transport des particules, consideré unidimensionel, est décrit par un modèle quantique avec masse effective dans la zone active couplé à un problème de dérive-diffusion dans le reste du domaine. Nous expliquons comment ce modèle hybride prend en compte les spécificités de ce très fort confinement et nous présentons des résultats numériques pour un nanotube de carbone simplifié.

  16. Quasi-classical modeling of molecular quantum-dot cellular automata multidriver gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ehsan; Nejad, Shahram Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (mQCA) has received considerable attention in nanoscience. Unlike the current-based molecular switches, where the digital data is represented by the on/off states of the switches, in mQCA devices, binary information is encoded in charge configuration within molecular redox centers. The mQCA paradigm allows high device density and ultra-low power consumption. Digital mQCA gates are the building blocks of circuits in this paradigm. Design and analysis of these gates require quantum chemical calculations, which are demanding in computer time and memory. Therefore, developing simple models to probe mQCA gates is of paramount importance. We derive a semi-classical model to study the steady-state output polarization of mQCA multidriver gates, directly from the two-state approximation in electron transfer theory. The accuracy and validity of this model are analyzed using full quantum chemistry calculations. A complete set of logic gates, including inverters and minority voters, are implemented to provide an appropriate test bench in the two-dot mQCA regime. We also briefly discuss how the QCADesigner tool could find its application in simulation of mQCA devices.

  17. Classically conformal U(1)$^\\prime$ extended Standard Model and Higgs vacuum stability

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Satsuki; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2015-01-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)$^\\prime$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) with conformal invariance at the classical level, where in addition to the SM particle contents, three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)$^\\prime$ Higgs field are introduced. In the presence of the three right-handed neutrinos, which are responsible for the seesaw mechanism, this model is free from all the gauge and gravitational anomalies. The U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, by which the U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge boson ($Z^\\prime$ boson) mass as well as the Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrinos are generated. The radiative U(1)$^\\prime$ symmetry breaking also induces a negative mass squared for the SM Higgs doublet to trigger the electroweak symmetry breaking. In this context, we investigate a possibility to solve the SM Higgs vacuum instability problem. The model includes only three free parameters (U(1)$^\\prime$ charge of the SM Higgs doublet, U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge ...

  18. Embedding inflation into the Standard Model - more evidence for classical scale invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Kannike, Kristjan; Raidal, Martti

    2014-01-01

    If cosmological inflation is due to a slowly rolling single inflation field taking trans-Planckian values as suggested by the BICEP2 measurement of primordial tensor modes in CMB, embedding inflation into the Standard Model challenges standard paradigm of effective field theories. Together with an apparent absence of Planck scale contributions to the Higgs mass and to the cosmological constant, BICEP2 provides further experimental evidence for the absence of large $M_{\\rm P}$ induced operators. We show that classical scale invariance, the paradigm that all fundamental scales in Nature are induced by quantum effects, solves the problem and allows for a remarkably simple scale-free Standard Model extension with inflaton without extending the gauge group. Due to trans-Planckian inflaton values and vevs, a dynamically induced Coleman-Weinberg-type inflaton potential of the model can predict tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ in a large range, converging around the prediction of chaotic $m^2\\phi^2$ inflation for a large t...

  19. Classically conformal U(1 ) ' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arindam; Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-06-01

    We consider the minimal U(1 ) ' extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1 ) ' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is broken by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1 ) ' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1 ) ' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark (mt=173.34 GeV ) and the Higgs boson (mh=125.09 GeV ), we perform parameter scans to identify the parameter region for resolving the electroweak vacuum instability problem. Next we interpret the recent ATLAS and CMS search limits at the LHC Run-2 for the sequential Z' boson to constrain the parameter region in our model. Combining the constraints from the electroweak vacuum stability and the LHC Run-2 results, we find a bound on the Z' boson mass as mZ'≳3.5 TeV . We also calculate self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet field through the heavy states, the right-handed neutrinos and the Z' boson, and find the naturalness bound as mZ'≲7 TeV , in order to reproduce the right electroweak scale for the fine-tuning level better than 10%. The resultant mass range of 3.5 TeV ≲mZ'≲7 TeV will be explored at the LHC Run-2 in the near future.

  20. Alternative interpretation of high-order harmonic generation using Bohmian trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, A S; Wu, J; Faria, C Figueira de Morisson

    2012-01-01

    A full quantum model of high-order harmonic generation is presented from a Bohmian-mechanical perspective. According to the three-step model, this phenomenon occurs due to the laser-induced recombination of an electron ejected by tunnel ionization with its parent ion. However, when revisited within the Bohmian scenario, we find that the high-harmonic spectrum is generated by those trajectories that reside well inside the core rather than by those that undergo excursions out of it. This agrees with the outcome of quantum mechanical studies, in which the spectrum is obtained through the dipole acceleration. Nevertheless, one may relate time-frequency maps from these central Bohmian trajectories to classical electrons behaving according to the three-step model. This happens because the quantum phase carried by each Bohmian trajectory is influenced by the whole wavefunction and, therefore, also by those trajectories that leave the core.

  1. An Analysis of Cross Racial Identity Scale Scores Using Classical Test Theory and Rasch Item Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joshua; Beaujean, A. Alexander; Worrell, Frank C.; Watson, Stevie

    2013-01-01

    Item response models (IRMs) were used to analyze Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores. Rasch analysis scores were compared with classical test theory (CTT) scores. The partial credit model demonstrated a high goodness of fit and correlations between Rasch and CTT scores ranged from 0.91 to 0.99. CRIS scores are supported by both methods.…

  2. Some reflections on the role of semi-classical atomic models in the teaching and learning of introductory quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Colm

    2016-03-01

    The role of "semi-classical" (Bohr-Sommerfeld) and "semi-quantum-mechanical" (atomic orbital) models in the context of the teaching of atomic theory is considered. It is suggested that an appropriate treatment of such models can serve as a useful adjunct to quantum mechanical study of atomic systems.

  3. Recent advances in the modelling of classical novae and type I X-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical nova outbursts and type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear stellar explosions driven by charged-particle reactions. Extensive numerical simulations of nova explosions have shown that the accreted envelopes attain peak temperatures between 0.1 and 0.4 GK, for about several hundred seconds, and therefore, their ejecta is expected to show signatures of significant nuclear activity. Indeed, it has been claimed that novae play some role in the enrichment of the interstellar medium through a number of intermediate-mass elements. This includes 17O, 15N, and 13C, systematically overproduced in huge amounts with respect to solar abundances, with a lower contribution to a number of species with A7Li, 19F, or 26Al. In this review, we present new 1-D hydrodynamic models of classical nova outbursts, from the onset of accretion up to the explosion and ejection phases. Special emphasis is put on their gross observational properties (including constraints from meteoritic presolar grains and potential gamma-ray signatures) and on their associated nucleosynthesis. Multidimensional models of mixing at the core-envelope interface during outbursts will also be presented. The impact of nuclear uncertainties on the final yields will be also outlined. Detailed analysis of the relevant reactions along the main nuclear path for type I X-ray bursts has only been scarcely addressed, mainly in the context of parameterized one-zone models. Here, we present a detailed study of the nucleosynthesis and nuclear processes powering type I X-ray bursts. The reported bursts have been computed by means of a spherically symmetric (1D), Lagrangian, hydrodynamic code, linked to a nuclear reaction network that contains 325 isotopes (from 1H to 107Te), and 1392 nuclear processes. These evolutionary sequences, followed from the onset of accretion up to the explosion and expansion stages, have been performed for two different metallicities to explore the dependence between the extension of the main

  4. Incorporating classic adsorption isotherms into modern surface complexation models: implications for sorption of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Computer-aided surface complexation models (SCM) tend to replace the classic adsorption isotherm (AI) analysis in describing mineral-water interface reactions such as radionuclide sorption onto (hydr) oxides and clays. Any site-binding SCM based on the mole balance of surface sites, in fact, reproduces the (competitive) Langmuir isotherm, optionally amended with electrostatic Coulomb's non-ideal term. In most SCM implementations, it is difficult to incorporate real-surface phenomena (site heterogeneity, lateral interactions, surface condensation) described in classic AI approaches other than Langmuir's. Thermodynamic relations between SCMs and AIs that remained obscure in the past have been recently clarified using new definitions of standard and reference states of surface species [1,2]. On this basis, a method for separating the Langmuir AI into ideal (linear) and non-ideal parts [2] was applied to multi-dentate Langmuir, Frumkin, and BET isotherms. The aim of this work was to obtain the surface activity coefficient terms that make the SCM site mole balance constraints obsolete and, in this way, extend thermodynamic SCMs to cover sorption phenomena described by the respective AIs. The multi-dentate Langmuir term accounts for the site saturation with n-dentate surface species, as illustrated on modeling bi-dentate UVI complexes on goethite or SiO2 surfaces. The Frumkin term corrects for the lateral interactions of the mono-dentate surface species; in particular, it has the same form as the Coulombic term of the constant-capacitance EDL combined with the Langmuir term. The BET term (three parameters) accounts for more than a monolayer adsorption up to the surface condensation; it can potentially describe the surface precipitation of nickel and other cations on hydroxides and clay minerals. All three non-ideal terms (in GEM SCMs implementation [1,2]) by now are used for non-competing surface species only. Upon 'surface dilution

  5. Optimal foraging on the roof of the world: Himalayan langurs and the classical prey model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Ken; Norconk, Marilyn A; Conklin-Brittain, Nancy L

    2010-03-01

    Optimal foraging theory has only been sporadically applied to nonhuman primates. The classical prey model, modified for patch choice, predicts a sliding "profitability threshold" for dropping patch types from the diet, preference for profitable foods, dietary niche breadth reduction as encounter rates increase, and that exploitation of a patch type is unrelated to its own abundance. We present results from a 1-year study testing these predictions with Himalayan langurs (Semnopithecus entellus) at Langtang National Park, Nepal. Behavioral data included continuous recording of feeding bouts and between-patch travel times. Encounter rates were estimated for 55 food types, which were analyzed for crude protein, lipid, free simple sugar, and fibers. Patch types were entered into the prey model algorithm for eight seasonal time periods and differing age-sex classes and nutritional currencies. Although the model consistently underestimated diet breadth, the majority of nonpredicted patch types represented rare foods. Profitability was positively related to annual/seasonal dietary contribution by organic matter estimates, whereas time estimates provided weaker relationships. Patch types utilized did not decrease with increasing encounter rates involving profitable foods, although low-ranking foods available year-round were taken predominantly when high-ranking foods were scarce. High-ranking foods were taken in close relation to encounter rates, while low-ranking foods were not. The utilization of an energetic currency generally resulted in closest conformation to model predictions, and it performed best when assumptions were most closely approximated. These results suggest that even simple models from foraging theory can provide a useful framework for the study of primate feeding behavior.

  6. Optimal foraging on the roof of the world: Himalayan langurs and the classical prey model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Ken; Norconk, Marilyn A.; Conklin-Brittain, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory has only been sporadically applied to nonhuman primates. The classical prey model, modified for patch choice, predicts a sliding “profitability threshold” for dropping patch types from the diet, preference for profitable foods, dietary niche breadth reduction as encounter rates increase, and that exploitation of a patch type is unrelated to its own abundance. We present results from a one-year study testing these predictions with Himalayan langurs (Semnopithecus entellus) at Langtang National Park, Nepal. Behavioral data included continuous recording of feeding bouts and between-patch travel times. Encounter rates were estimated for 55 food types, which were analyzed for crude protein, lipid, free simple sugar, and fibers. Patch types were entered into the prey model algorithm for eight seasonal time periods and differing age-sex classes and nutritional currencies. Although the model consistently underestimated diet breadth, the majority of non-predicted patch types represented rare foods. Profitability was positively related to annual/seasonal dietary contribution by organic matter estimates, while time estimates provided weaker relationships. Patch types utilized did not decrease with increasing encounter rates involving profitable foods, although low-ranking foods available year-round were taken predominantly when high-ranking foods were scarce. High-ranking foods were taken in close relation to encounter rates, while low-ranking foods were not. The utilization of an energetic currency generally resulted in closest conformation to model predictions, and it performed best when assumptions were most closely approximated. These results suggest that even simple models from foraging theory can provide a useful framework for the study of primate feeding behavior. PMID:19844998

  7. The role of rumination in illness trajectories in youth: linking trans-diagnostic processes with clinical staging models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, A B; Hickie, I B; Naismith, S L; Scott, J

    2016-09-01

    Research in developmental psychopathology and clinical staging models has increasingly sought to identify trans-diagnostic biomarkers or neurocognitive deficits that may play a role in the onset and trajectory of mental disorders and could represent modifiable treatment targets. Less attention has been directed at the potential role of cognitive-emotional regulation processes such as ruminative response style. Maladaptive rumination (toxic brooding) is a known mediator of the association between gender and internalizing disorders in adolescents and is increased in individuals with a history of early adversity. Furthermore, rumination shows moderate levels of genetic heritability and is linked to abnormalities in neural networks associated with emotional regulation and executive functioning. This review explores the potential role of rumination in exacerbating the symptoms of alcohol and substance misuse, and bipolar and psychotic disorders during the peak age range for illness onset. Evidence shows that rumination not only amplifies levels of distress and suicidal ideation, but also extends physiological responses to stress, which may partly explain the high prevalence of physical and mental co-morbidity in youth presenting to mental health services. In summary, the normative developmental trajectory of rumination and its role in the evolution of mental disorders and physical illness demonstrates that rumination presents a detectable, modifiable trans-diagnostic risk factor in youth. PMID:27352637

  8. Investigating the sensitivity of hurricane intensity and trajectory to sea surface temperatures using the regional model WRF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevahir Kilic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sea surface temperature (SST anomalies on the hurricane characteristics are investigated in a set of sensitivity experiments employing the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The idealised experiments are performed for the case of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The first set of sensitivity experiments with basin-wide changes of the SST magnitude shows that the intensity goes along with changes in the SST, i.e., an increase in SST leads to an intensification of Katrina. Additionally, the trajectory is shifted to the west (east, with increasing (decreasing SSTs. The main reason is a strengthening of the background flow. The second set of experiments investigates the influence of Loop Current eddies idealised by localised SST anomalies. The intensity of Hurricane Katrina is enhanced with increasing SSTs close to the core of a tropical cyclone. Negative nearby SST anomalies reduce the intensity. The trajectory only changes if positive SST anomalies are located west or north of the hurricane centre. In this case the hurricane is attracted by the SST anomaly which causes an additional moisture source and increased vertical winds.

  9. Reconstruction of the standard model with classical conformal invariance in noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Masaki J S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we derive the standard model with classical conformal invariance from the Yang--Mills--Higgs model in noncommutative geometry (NCG). In the ordinary context of the NCG, the {\\it distance matrix} $M_{nm}$ which corresponds to the vacuum expectation value of Higgs fields is taken to be finite. However, since $M_{nm}$ is arbitrary in this formulation, we can take all $M_{nm}$ to be zero. In the original composite scheme, the Higgs field itself vanishes with the condition $M_{nm} = 0$. Then, we adopt the elemental scheme, in which the gauge and the Higgs bosons are regarded as elemental fields. By these assumptions, all scalars do not have vevs at tree level. The symmetry breaking mechanism will be implemented by the Coleman--Weinberg mechanism. As a result, we show a possibility to solve the hierarchy problem in the context of NCG. Unfortunately, the Coleman--Weinberg mechanism does not work in the SM Higgs sector, because the Coleman--Weinberg effective potential becomes unbounded from below for ...

  10. Eyeblink Classical Conditioning and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – A Model Systems Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard G Schreurs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment.

  11. Ballistic trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    The only ballistic trajectory mode feasible for a close solar probe or for an orbit inclined approximately 90 degrees to the ecliptic is the Jupiter gravity assisted mode. A comparison of the trajectories of the Solar Polar and the Solar Probe Mission for 1983 launches is shown. The geometry of the solar encounter phase is practically the same for the 4.3 year orbit achieved by a Jupiter gravity assist and for a one year orbit. Data describing the geometry of an orbit with perihelion at 4 solar radii and aphelion at Jupiter are listed. The range of apparent directions of the solar wind if it is flowing radially outward from the Sun with a speed of either 150 or 300 km/sec is shown. The minimum sun-earth-probe angle during the solar encounter as a function of the earth-node angle and the orbital inclination is also shown. If the inclination is 60 degrees or more, the minimum SEP angle is not greatly different from the 90 degree value.

  12. Classical antiparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors). 13 refs., 1 tab.

  13. 3-D trajectory model for MDT using micro-spheres implanted within large blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2016-09-01

    Implant assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets implanted within large blood vessels and subjected to a uniform externally applied magnetic field (H0) has been investigated and reported for the first time. The capture areas (As) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) were determined from the analysis of particle trajectories simulated from equations of motion. Then, the effects of various parameters, such as types of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the strength of H0 on the As were obtained. Furthermore, the effects of saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic materials in the MDCPs and within the targets on the As were analyzed. After this, the suitable strengths of H0 and Rp for IA-MDT designs were reported. Dimensionless As, ranging from 2 to 7, was obtained with Rp ranging from 500 to 2500 nm, μ0H0 less than 0.8 T and a blood flow rate of 0.1 m s-1. The target-MDCP materials considered are iron-iron, iron-magnetite and SS409-magnetite, respectively.

  14. Trajectory of the harmonic oscillator in the Schreodinger wave

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    A trajectory of a harmonic oscillator obeying the Schreodinger wave equation is exactly derived and illustrated. The trajectory resembles well the classical orbit between the turning points, and also runs through the tunneling region. The dynamics of the `particle' motion and the wave function associated with the motion are proposed. The period of a round trip on the trajectory is exactly equal to that obtained in classical mechanics.

  15. Trajectory of the harmonic oscillator in the Schrodinger wave

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    A trajectory of a harmonic oscillator obeying the Schrodinger equation is exactly derived and illustrated. The trajectory resembles well the classical orbit between the turning points, and also runs through the tunneling region. The dynamics of the 'particle' motion and the wave function associated with the motion are proposed. The period of a round trip on the trajectory is exactly equal to that obtained in classical mechanics.

  16. Background Error Covariance Estimation using Information from a Single Model Trajectory with Application to Ocean Data Assimilation into the GEOS-5 Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppenne, Christian L.; Rienecker, Michele M.; Kovach, Robin M.; Vernieres, Guillaume; Koster, Randal D. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    An attractive property of ensemble data assimilation methods is that they provide flow dependent background error covariance estimates which can be used to update fields of observed variables as well as fields of unobserved model variables. Two methods to estimate background error covariances are introduced which share the above property with ensemble data assimilation methods but do not involve the integration of multiple model trajectories. Instead, all the necessary covariance information is obtained from a single model integration. The Space Adaptive Forecast error Estimation (SAFE) algorithm estimates error covariances from the spatial distribution of model variables within a single state vector. The Flow Adaptive error Statistics from a Time series (FAST) method constructs an ensemble sampled from a moving window along a model trajectory. SAFE and FAST are applied to the assimilation of Argo temperature profiles into version 4.1 of the Modular Ocean Model (MOM4.1) coupled to the GEOS-5 atmospheric model and to the CICE sea ice model. The results are validated against unassimilated Argo salinity data. They show that SAFE and FAST are competitive with the ensemble optimal interpolation (EnOI) used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) to produce its ocean analysis. Because of their reduced cost, SAFE and FAST hold promise for high-resolution data assimilation applications.

  17. Successful Aging: Multiple Trajectories and Population Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Following Rowe and Kahn¡¯s successful aging model, this study identified successful aging as a distinctive aging trajectory and examined gender differences in the aging process. Using the Health and Retirement Study data (2000-2008), this study applied group-based trajectory analysis to identify multiple aging trajectories in a sample of older Americans aged 65 and over (N=9,226). Six dimensions were analyzed in the multi-trajectory model: chronic disease, physical functional limitation, disa...

  18. DNA as a Model for Probing Polymer Entanglements: Circular Polymers and Non-Classical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Regan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded DNA offers a robust platform for investigating fundamental questions regarding the dynamics of entangled polymer solutions. The exceptional monodispersity and multiple naturally occurring topologies of DNA, as well as a wide range of tunable lengths and concentrations that encompass the entanglement regime, enable direct testing of molecular-level entanglement theories and corresponding scaling laws. DNA is also amenable to a wide range of techniques from passive to nonlinear measurements and from single-molecule to bulk macroscopic experiments. Over the past two decades, researchers have developed methods to directly visualize and manipulate single entangled DNA molecules in steady-state and stressed conditions using fluorescence microscopy, particle tracking and optical tweezers. Developments in microfluidics, microrheology and bulk rheology have also enabled characterization of the viscoelastic response of entangled DNA from molecular levels to macroscopic scales and over timescales that span from linear to nonlinear regimes. Experiments using DNA have uniquely elucidated the debated entanglement properties of circular polymers and blends of linear and circular polymers. Experiments have also revealed important lengthscale and timescale dependent entanglement dynamics not predicted by classical tube models, both validating and refuting new proposed extensions and alternatives to tube theory and motivating further theoretical work to describe the rich dynamics exhibited in entangled polymer systems.

  19. Transport Properties of a Classical One-Dimensional Kicked Billiard Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN He-Sheng; WANG Jiao; GU Yan

    2000-01-01

    We study a classical 1-dimenslonal kicked billiard model and investigate its transport behavior. The roles played by the two system parameters a and K, governing the direction and strength of the kick, respectively, are found to be quite crucial. For the perturbations which are not strong, i.e. K<1, we find that as the phase parameter α changes within its range of interest from -π/2 to π/2, the phase space is in turn characterized by the structure of a prevalently connected stochastic web (-π/2 ≤α<0), local stochastic webs surrounded by a stochastic sea(0<α<α/2 ) and the global stochastic sea (α=π/2). Extensive numerical investigations also indicate that the system's transport behavior in the irregular regions of the phase space for K<1 has a dependence on the system parameters and the transport coetticient D can be expressed as D≈D0(α)Kf(α).For strong kicks, i.e. K >1, the phase space is occupied by the stochastic sea, and the transport behavior of the system seems to be similar to that of the kicked rotor and independent of α.

  20. Using Urban Landscape Trajectories to Develop a Multi-Temporal Land Cover Database to Support Ecological Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Alberti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization and the resulting changes in land cover have myriad impacts on ecological systems. Monitoring these changes across large spatial extents and long time spans requires synoptic remotely sensed data with an appropriate temporal sequence. We developed a multi-temporal land cover dataset for a six-county area surrounding the Seattle, Washington State, USA, metropolitan region. Land cover maps for 1986, 1991, 1995, 1999, and 2002 were developed from Landsat TM images through a combination of spectral unmixing, image segmentation, multi-season imagery, and supervised classification approaches to differentiate an initial nine land cover classes. We then used ancillary GIS layers and temporal information to define trajectories of land cover change through multiple updating and backdating rules and refined our land cover classification for each date into 14 classes. We compared the accuracy of the initial approach with the landscape trajectory modifications and determined that the use of landscape trajectory rules increased our ability to differentiate several classes including bare soil (separated into cleared for development, agriculture, and clearcut forest and three intensities of urban. Using the temporal dataset, we found that between 1986 and 2002, urban land cover increased from 8 to 18% of our study area, while lowland deciduous and mixed forests decreased from 21 to 14%, and grass and agriculture decreased from 11 to 8%. The intensity of urban land cover increased with 252 km2 in Heavy Urban in 1986 increasing to 629 km2 by 2002. The ecological systems that are present in this region were likely significantly altered by these changes in land cover. Our results suggest that multi-temporal (i.e., multiple years and multiple seasons within years Landsat data are an economical means to quantify land cover and land cover change across large and highly heterogeneous urbanizing landscapes. Our data, and similar temporal land cover change

  1. Specification Search for Identifying the Correct Mean Trajectory in Polynomial Latent Growth Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-Man; Yoon, Myeongsun; Willson, Victor; Lai, Mark H. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the optimal strategy for model specification search under the latent growth modeling (LGM) framework, specifically on searching for the correct polynomial mean or average growth model when there is no a priori hypothesized model in the absence of theory. In this simulation study, the effectiveness of different starting…

  2. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P.; Hopson, Marquise L.; Darwin Hang; Yongliang Liang; Jones, Dean P.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT). Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear....

  3. Classical statistical mechanics of a few-body interacting spin model

    CERN Document Server

    Borgonovi, F

    1999-01-01

    We study the emergence of Boltzmann's law for the "single particle energy distribution" in a closed system of interacting classical spins. It is shown that for a large number of particles Boltzmann's law may occur, even if the interaction is very strong. Specific attention is paid to classical analogs of the average shape of quantum eigenstates and "local density of states", which are very important in quantum chaology. Analytical predictions are then compared with numerical data.

  4. Nonlocal signaling in the configuration space model of quantum-classical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Michael J W; Savage, C M

    2012-01-01

    When interactions are turned off, the theory of interacting quantum and classical ensembles due to Hall and Reginatto is shown to suffer from a nonlocal signaling effect that is effectively action at a distance. This limits the possible applicability of the theory. In its present form, it is restricted to those situations in which interactions are always on, such as classical gravity interacting with quantized matter.

  5. Working poor trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Joël Hellier

    2012-01-01

    To analyse in-work poverty, we build a model in which human capital and productivity varies over time with experience, time-related obsolescence and poverty. The model reveals four possible trajectories: poverty to exclusion; permanent poverty; the emergence from poverty; poverty to non-poor worker and back to poverty. It also generates the main traits of in-work poverty in terms of skill, age, duration, and family characteristics. Both skill-biased technical change and globalisation boost in...

  6. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Parkinson, William; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-12-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT) greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK) or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless) genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor and Wnt ligand levels

  7. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Jumbo-Lucioni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia (CG is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT, which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP–N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP–N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG, showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG co-receptor and Wnt

  8. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchese, Joseph J; Berry, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3-7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain-computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  9. Activated complement classical pathway in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying; Tao; Shi-Jie; Zheng; Bo; Lei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the complement system is involved in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy(OIR).METHODS: Forty C57BL/6J newborn mice were divided randomly into OIR group and control group. OIR was induced by exposing mice to 75% ±2% oxygen from postnatal 7d(P7) to P12 and then recovered in room air.For the control group, the litters were raised in room air.At the postnatal 17d(P17), gene expressions of the complement components of the classical pathway(CP),the mannose-binding lectin(MBL) pathway and the alternative pathway(AP) in the retina were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Retinal protein expressions of the key components in the CP were examined by Western blotting.· RESULTS: Whole mounted retina in the OIR mice showed area of central hypoperfusion in both superficial and deep layers and neovascular tufts in the periphery.The expressions of C1 qb and C4 b genes in the OIR retina were significantly higher than those of the controls. The expression of retinal complement factor B(CFB) gene in OIR mice was significantly lower than those of the controls. However, the expressions of C3 and complement factor H(CFH) genes were higher. The protein synthesis of the key components involved in the CP(C1q, C4 and C3) were also significantly higher in OIR mouse retina. Although MBL-associated serine protease 1(MASP1) and MASP2 were detected in both the OIR and the control groups, the expressions were weak and the difference between the two groups was not significant.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the complement system CP is activated during the pathogenesis of murine model of OIR.

  10. Killing scalar of non-linear σ-model on G/H realizing the classical exchange algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Aoyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Poisson brackets for non-linear σ-models on G/H are set up on the light-like plane. A quantity which transforms irreducibly by the Killing vectors, called Killing scalar, is constructed in an arbitrary representation of G. It is shown to satisfy the classical exchange algebra.

  11. Killing scalar of non-linear σ-model on G/H realizing the classical exchange algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Shogo, E-mail: spsaoya@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp

    2014-10-07

    The Poisson brackets for non-linear σ-models on G/H are set up on the light-like plane. A quantity which transforms irreducibly by the Killing vectors, called Killing scalar, is constructed in an arbitrary representation of G. It is shown to satisfy the classical exchange algebra.

  12. Classical tachyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of tachyons, with particular attention to their classical theory, is presented. The extension of Special Relativity to tachyons in two dimensional is first presented, an elegant model-theory which allows a better understanding also of ordinary physics. Then, the results are extended to the four-dimensional case (particular on tachyon mechanics) that can be derived without assuming the existence of Super-luminal reference-frames. Localizability and the unexpected apparent shape of tachyonic objects are discussed, and it is shown (on the basis of tachyon kinematics) how to solve the common causal paradoxes. In connection with General Relativity, particularly the problem of the apparent superluminal expansions in astrophysics is reviewed. The problem (still open) of the extension of relativitic theories to tachyons in four dimensions is tackled, and the electromagnetic theory of tachyons, a topic that can be relevant also for the experimental side, is reviewed. (Author)

  13. A dynamical model for hierarchy and modular organization: The trajectories en route to the attractor at the transition to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    We show that the full features of the dynamics towards the Feigenbaum attractor, present in all low-dimensional maps with a unimodal leading component, form a hierarchical construction with modular organization that leads to a clear-cut emergent property. This well-known nonlinear model system combines a simple and precise definition, an intricate nested hierarchical dynamical structure, and emergence of a power-law dynamical property absent in the exponential-law that governs the dynamics within the modules. This classic nonlinear system is put forward as a working example for complex collective behavior.

  14. Monte Carlo particle-trajectory models for neutral cometary gases. I. Models and equations. II. The spatial morphology of the Lyman-alpha coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical derivations of various methods employed in the Monte Carlo particle-trajectory model (MCPTM) are presented, and the application of the MCPTM to the calculation of the photochemical heating of the inner coma through the partial thermalization of cometary hydrogen atoms produced by the photodissociation of water is discussed. This model is then used to explain the observed morphology of the spatially extended Ly-alpha comas of comets. The rocket and Skylab images of the Ly-alpha coma of Comet Kohoutek are examined. 90 references

  15. Predicting the isotopic ratio of western European Precipitation using an isotope trajectory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Spatial and seasonal variations of isotopic ratios in precipitation across Western Europe are well documented. Locations of moisture uptake, transport pathways, condensation temperatures, and surface temperatures at source region and precipitation location all influence the water isotope cycle. Isotope cycle modelling has been included in Global Circulation Models (GCMs) in order to model all of the controlling factors. However, the relative importance of each of these processes remains unclear due to the difficulties in decoupling these processes in GCMs. A combination of a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model and an extended Rayleigh distillation theory model allows the effects of different atmospheric processes on isotopic fractionation to be investigated. This method has previously been used to model precipitation in Antarctica and Greenland with excellent results. However, there are added complications involved when modelling rainfall rather than snowfall, such as isotopic re-equilibration between falling raindrops and the surrounding water vapour. Lower latitude locations also experience more evaporation and re-evaporation along the path of a moist air parcel, increasing opportunities for fractionation. These models have been used to predict the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of rainfall in the U.K and Ireland. The model results have been compared with measured isotopic data from daily rainfall samples in order to test how the modelled processes interact. A case study is presented which incorporates observed data collected throughout November 2005 at stations in Norwich, Birmingham and Dublin, together with the corresponding temporal model predictions at these localities. (author)

  16. Group-Based Modeling of Time Spent in Structured Activity Trajectories from Middle Childhood into Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated trajectories of time spent in structured activities from middle childhood to early adolescence by using data from the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care. We used latent class growth analyses and identified five trajectories (stable low, increasing high, decreasing low,…

  17. Relationship between core temperature change during recovery and prognosis in classic heat stroke rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-nan LIU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct classic heat stroke rat models, and observe the changes of body temperature in the recovery period after heat stress to explore its relationship with prognosis. Methods Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into heat stroke group (HS group, n=50 and control group (C group, n=10. Rats in HS group were exposed to 39℃ heat stress. Core temperature and systolic blood pressure (SBP of rats were monitored until it reached diagnostic criteria of heat stroke. The core body temperature and survival were continuously monitored until 72h. The risk factors of survival were analyzed by univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results During the recovery, compared with the control group, the body temperature of the HS rats represented a biphasic change that consisted of an initial hypothermia and a delayed hyperthermia. Univariable analysis showed that both the highest and lowest core body temperatures were correlated with prognosis in the heat stroke rats (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis revealed that both the highest core body temperature (P=0.000, HR=102.386 and lowest core body temperature in the recovery period (P=0.001, HR=0.134 were the independent risk factors for heat stroke. Conclusion In heat stroke rats, the higher the core body temperature and the deeper the depth of hypothermia, the poorer the prognosis. Core body temperature in heat stress and recovery period could serve as prognostic indexes in heat stroke. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.10.007

  18. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Calculating Electron Capture Cross Sections and Sample Application for ENA Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate estimates of electron-capture cross sections at energies relevant to ENA modeling (approx. few MeV per nucleon) and for multi-electron ions must rely on detailed, but computationally expensive, quantummechanical description of the collision process. Kuang's semi-classical approach is an elegant and efficient way to arrive at these estimates. Motivated by ENA modeling efforts, we shall briefly present this approach along with sample applications and report on current progress.

  19. The models of "Man-Machine-Environment" systems with recovery at non-classic stream of events

    OpenAIRE

    Наумейко, Ігор Володимирович; Аль-Азава, Рази Джабурія

    2013-01-01

    The closed “Man-machine-environment” system is considered. It has either classic flow of events, or a flow of unstable of natural disasters with different densities, that are approximated by piecewise constant functions. The process of liquidation of the accident in all the models is held in several stages, with different intensities. The phases can be made repeatedly in the case of "multi-catastrophes". The Markovian model is presented, in which the probability of changes in health of the op...

  20. A Study on Decoding Models for the Reconstruction of Hand Trajectories from the Human Magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gi Yeom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decoding neural signals into control outputs has been a key to the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs. While many studies have identified neural correlates of kinematics or applied advanced machine learning algorithms to improve decoding performance, relatively less attention has been paid to optimal design of decoding models. For generating continuous movements from neural activity, design of decoding models should address how to incorporate movement dynamics into models and how to select a model given specific BCI objectives. Considering nonlinear and independent speed characteristics, we propose a hybrid Kalman filter to decode the hand direction and speed independently. We also investigate changes in performance of different decoding models (the linear and Kalman filters when they predict reaching movements only or predict both reach and rest. Our offline study on human magnetoencephalography (MEG during point-to-point arm movements shows that the performance of the linear filter or the Kalman filter is affected by including resting states for training and predicting movements. However, the hybrid Kalman filter consistently outperforms others regardless of movement states. The results demonstrate that better design of decoding models is achieved by incorporating movement dynamics into modeling or selecting a model according to decoding objectives.

  1. Abstracting and reasoning over ship trajectories and web data with the Simple Event Model (SEM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. van Hage; V. Malaisé; G.K.D. de Vries; A.Th. Schreiber; M.W. van Someren

    2012-01-01

    Bridging the gap between low-level features and semantics is a problem commonly acknowledged in the Multimedia community. Event modeling can fill this gap by representing knowledge about the data at different level of abstraction. In this paper we present the Simple Event Model (SEM) and its applica

  2. Combining ship trajectories and semantics with the simple event model (SEM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. van Hage; V. Malaisé; G. de Vries; G. Schreiber; M. van Someren

    2009-01-01

    Bridging the gap between low-level features and semantics is a problem commonly acknowledged in the Multimedia community. Event modeling can fill the gap. In this paper we present the Simple Event Model (SEM) and its application in a Maritime Safety and Security use case about Situational Awareness.

  3. Wireless Positioning Based on a Segment-Wise Linear Approach for Modeling the Target Trajectory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Joao; Pedersen, Troels; Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Positioning solutions in infrastructure-based wireless networks generally operate by exploiting the channel information of the links between the Wireless Devices and fixed networking Access Points. The major challenge of such solutions is the modeling of both the noise properties of the channel...... measurements and the user mobility patterns. One class of typical human being movement patterns is the segment-wise linear approach, which is studied in this paper. Current tracking solutions, such as the Constant Velocity model, hardly handle such segment-wise linear patterns. In this paper we propose a...... segment-wise linear model, called the Drifting Points model. The model results in an increased performance when compared with traditional solutions....

  4. Risk analysis for rumor propagation in metropolises based on improved 8-state ICSAR model and dynamic personal activity trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Huang, H.; Duarte, M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Social media has developed extremely fast in metropolises in recent years resulting in more and more rumors disturbing our daily lives. Knowing the characteristics of rumor propagation in metropolises can help the government make efficient rumor refutation plans. In this paper, we established a dynamic spatio-temporal comprehensive risk assessment model for rumor propagation based on an improved 8-state ICSAR model (Ignorant, Information Carrier, Information Spreader, Advocate, Removal), large personal activity trajectory data, and governmental rumor refutation (anti-rumor) scenarios. Combining these relevant data with the 'big' traffic data on the use of subways, buses, and taxis, we simulated daily oral communications among inhabitants in Beijing. In order to analyze rumor and anti-rumor competition in the actual social network, personal resistance, personal preference, conformity, rumor intensity, government rumor refutation and other influencing factors were considered. Based on the developed risk assessment model, a long-term dynamic rumor propagation simulation for a seven day period was conducted and a comprehensive rumor propagation risk distribution map was obtained. A set of the sensitivity analyses were conducted for different social media and propagation routes. We assessed different anti-rumor coverage ratios and the rumor-spreading thresholds at which the government started to launch anti-rumor actions. The results we obtained provide worthwhile references useful for governmental decision making towards control of social-disrupting rumors.

  5. WWC Review of the Report "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 study, "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-Up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies," examined the effects of "Technology-enhanced, Research-based, Instruction, Assessment, and professional Development (TRIAD)," a math intervention for preschoolers that combines a curriculum, a…

  6. Dynamic Modelling and Trajectory Tracking of Parallel Manipulator with Flexible Link

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zhengsheng; Kong Minxiu; Liu Ming; You Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on dynamic modelling and real‐time control for a parallel manipulator with flexible link. The Lagrange principle and assumed modes method (AMM) substructure technique is presented to formulate the dynamic modelling of a two‐degrees‐of‐freedom (DOF) parallel manipulator with flexible links. Then, the singular perturbation technique (SPT) is used to decompose the nonlinear dynamic system into slow time‐scale and fast time‐scale subsystems. Furthermore, the SPT is emplo...

  7. Dynamic neural network modeling of HF radar current maps for forecasting oil spill trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examined the concept of dynamic neural network (NN) modeling for short-term forecasts of coastal high-frequency (HF) radar current maps offshore of Galveston Texas. HF radar technology is emerging as a viable and affordable way to measure surface currents in real time and the number of users applying the technology is increasing. A 25 megahertz, two site, Seasonde HF radar system was used to map ocean and bay surface currents along the coast of Texas where wind and river discharge create complex and rapidly changing current patters that override the weaker tidal flow component. The HF radar system is particularly useful in this type of setting because its mobility makes it a good marine spill response tool that could provide hourly current maps. This capability helps improve deployment of response resources. In addition, the NN model recently developed by the Conrad Blucher Institute can be used to forecast water levels during storm events. Forecasted currents are based on time series of current vectors from HF radar plus wind speed, wind direction, and water levels, as well as tidal forecasts. The dynamic NN model was tested to evaluate its performance and the results were compared with a baseline model which assumes the currents do not change from the time of the forecast up to the forecasted time. The NN model showed improvements over the baseline model for forecasting time equal or greater than 3 hours, but the difference was relatively small. The test demonstrated the ability of the dynamic NN model to link meteorological forcing functions with HF radar current maps. Development of the dynamic NN modeling is still ongoing. 18 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  8. Classics Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Dee L.

    1995-01-01

    Appraises several databases devoted to classical literature. Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) contains the entire extant corpus of ancient Greek literature, including works on lexicography and historiography, extending into the 15th century. Other works awaiting completion are the Database of Classical Bibliography and a CD-ROM pictorial dictionary…

  9. Testing the Palma-Clary Reduced Dimensionality Model Using Classical Mechanics on the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikár, Anna; Nagy, Tibor; Lendvay, György

    2016-07-14

    Application of exact quantum scattering methods in theoretical reaction dynamics of bimolecular reactions is limited by the complexity of the equations of nuclear motion to be solved. Simplification is often achieved by reducing the number of degrees of freedom to be explicitly handled by freezing the less important spectator modes. The reaction cross sections obtained in reduced-dimensionality (RD) quantum scattering methods can be used in the calculation of rate coefficients, but their physical meaning is limited. The accurate test of the performance of a reduced-dimensionality method would be a comparison of the RD cross sections with those obtained in accurate full-dimensional (FD) calculations, which is not feasible because of the lack of complete full-dimensional results. However, classical mechanics allows one to perform reaction dynamics calculations using both the RD and the FD model. In this paper, an RD versus FD comparison is made for the 8-dimensional Palma-Clary model on the example of four isotopologs of the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 reaction, which has 12 internal dimensions. In the Palma-Clary model, the only restriction is that the methyl group is confined to maintain C3v symmetry. Both RD and FD opacity and excitation functions as well as differential cross sections were calculated using the quasiclassical trajectory method. The initial reactant separation has been handled according to our one-period averaging method [ Nagy et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 144, 014104 ]. The RD and FD excitation functions were found to be close to each other for some isotopologs, but in general, the RD reactivity parameters are lower than the FD reactivity parameters beyond statistical error, and for one of the isotopologs, the deviation is significant. This indicates that the goodness of RD cross sections cannot be taken for granted. PMID:26918703

  10. Sensitivity analysis as a general tool for model optimisation - examples for trajectory estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieger, Volker

    2007-05-01

    This paper outlines the general characteristics of variance-based sensitivity analysis and their advantages with respect to other concepts of sensitivity analysis. The main benefit are qualitative and quantitative correct results independent of the model characteristics. The author focuses on kinematic positioning as required for car navigation, driver assistance systems or machine guidance. The paper compares two different Kalman filter approaches using variance analysis and variance-based sensitivity analysis. The approaches differ with respect to their measurement quantities (input), their state quantities (output), as well as their dynamic vehicle model. The sensitivity analysis shows that each model has its different advantages and input-output relations. Furthermore it is shown that the variance-based sensitivity analysis is well suited to detect the share of the influence of the input quantities on the output quantities, here the estimated positions. Even more important, changes in deterministic and stochastic models lead to obvious effects in the respective variances and sensitivity measures. This emphasises the possibility to optimise the filter models by use of the variance-based sensitivity analysis.

  11. Dynamic Modelling and Trajectory Tracking of Parallel Manipulator with Flexible Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhengsheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly focuses on dynamic modelling and real‐time control for a parallel manipulator with flexible link. The Lagrange principle and assumed modes method (AMM substructure technique is presented to formulate the dynamic modelling of a two‐degrees‐of‐freedom (DOF parallel manipulator with flexible links. Then, the singular perturbation technique (SPT is used to decompose the nonlinear dynamic system into slow time‐scale and fast time‐scale subsystems. Furthermore, the SPT is employed to transform the differential algebraic equations (DAEs for kinematic constraints into explicit ordinary differential equations (ODEs, which makes real‐time control possible. In addition, a novel composite control scheme is presented; the computed torque control is applied for a slow subsystem and the H technique for the fast subsystem, taking account of the model uncertainty and outside disturbance. The simulation results show the composite control can effectively achieve fast and accurate tracking control.

  12. Excited State Mass spectra and Regge trajectories of Bottom Baryons in Hypercentral quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Thakkar, Kaushal; Rai, Ajay Kumar; Vinodkumar, P C

    2016-01-01

    We present the mass spectra of excited states of singly heavy baryons consist of a bottom quark and light quarks (u, d and s). The QCD motivated hypercentral quark model is employed for the three body description of baryons. The form of confinement potential is hyper coloumb plus power potential with potential index $\

  13. Numerical Considerations for Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Models: Eliminating Rogue Trajectories, and the Importance of Numerical Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brian N.

    2016-07-01

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex atmospheric flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behaviour in the numerical solution. Here we discuss numerical strategies for solving the non-linear Langevin-based particle velocity evolution equation that eliminate such unphysical behaviour in both Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulation applications. Extremely large or `rogue' particle velocities are caused when the numerical integration scheme becomes unstable. Such instabilities can be eliminated by using a sufficiently small integration timestep, or in cases where the required timestep is unrealistically small, an unconditionally stable implicit integration scheme can be used. When the generalized anisotropic turbulence model is used, it is critical that the input velocity covariance tensor be realizable, otherwise unphysical behaviour can become problematic regardless of the integration scheme or size of the timestep. A method is presented to ensure realizability, and thus eliminate such behaviour. It was also found that the numerical accuracy of the integration scheme determined the degree to which the second law of thermodynamics or `well-mixed condition' was satisfied. Perhaps more importantly, it also determined the degree to which modelled Eulerian particle velocity statistics matched the specified Eulerian distributions (which is the ultimate goal of the numerical solution). It is recommended that future models be verified by not only checking the well-mixed condition, but perhaps more importantly by checking that computed Eulerian statistics match the Eulerian statistics specified as inputs.

  14. Numerical considerations for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion models: Eliminating rogue trajectories, and the importance of numerical accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behavior in the numerical solution. This paper discusses numerical considerations when solving the Langevin-based particle velo...

  15. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  16. Sensory prediction or motor control? Application of marr-albus type models of cerebellar function to classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepora, Nathan F; Porrill, John; Yeo, Christopher H; Dean, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Marr-Albus adaptive filter models of the cerebellum have been applied successfully to a range of sensory and motor control problems. Here we analyze their properties when applied to classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in rabbits. We consider a system-level model of eyeblink conditioning based on the anatomy of the eyeblink circuitry, comprising an adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, a comparator model of the inferior olive and a linear dynamic model of the nictitating membrane plant. To our knowledge, this is the first model that explicitly includes all these principal components, in particular the motor plant that is vital for shaping and timing the behavioral response. Model assumptions and parameters were systematically investigated to disambiguate basic computational capacities of the model from features requiring tuning of properties and parameter values. Without such tuning, the model robustly reproduced a range of behaviors related to sensory prediction, by displaying appropriate trial-level associative learning effects for both single and multiple stimuli, including blocking and conditioned inhibition. In contrast, successful reproduction of the real-time motor behavior depended on appropriate specification of the plant, cerebellum and comparator models. Although some of these properties appear consistent with the system biology, fundamental questions remain about how the biological parameters are chosen if the cerebellar microcircuit applies a common computation to many distinct behavioral tasks. It is possible that the response profiles in classical conditioning of the eyeblink depend upon operant contingencies that have previously prevailed, for example in naturally occurring avoidance movements.

  17. Probabilities for classically forbidden transitions using classical and classical path methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limits are established for the applicability of purely classical methods for calculating nonreactive, inelastic transition probabilities in collinear collisions of a structureless atom and a harmonic oscillator. These limits, obtained by comparison with previous exact quantum mechanical results, indicate that such methods are inappropriate not only for ''classically forbidden'' but for many ''classically allowed'' transitions (in spite of the fact that they are widely used to calculate probabilities for such processes). A classical path method in the context of infinite-order time-dependent perturbation theory is described which yields extremely accurate transition probabilities even for the most classically forbidden transitions in the collinear atom--harmonic oscillator system. The essential features of this method are: (1) the use of the expectation value of the total interaction potential in determining the atom--oscillator (central force) trajectory, and (2) the use of the arithmetic mean of the initial and final velocities of relative motion in the (elastic) central force trajectory. This choice of interaction potential allows the relative motion to be coupled to changes in the internal state of the oscillator. The present classical method is further applied to three-dimensional atom-breathing sphere collisions, and exact quantum mechanical calculations are also carried out. Comparison of the classical path and exact quantum results shows excellent agreement both in the specific inelastic cross section and in the individual partial-wave contributions

  18. Simple Models for Airport Delays During Transition to a Trajectory-Based Air Traffic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Peter

    It is now widely recognised that a paradigm shift in air traffic control concepts is needed. This requires state-of-the-art innovative technologies, making much better use of the information in the air traffic management (ATM) system. These paradigm shifts go under the names of NextGen in the USA and SESAR in Europe, which inter alia will make dramatic changes to the nature of airport operations. A vital part of moving from an existing system to a new paradigm is the operational implications of the transition process. There would be business incentives for early aircraft fitment, it is generally safer to introduce new technologies gradually, and researchers are already proposing potential transition steps to the new system. Simple queuing theory models are used to establish rough quantitative estimates of the impact of the transition to a more efficient time-based navigational and ATM system. Such models are approximate, but they do offer insight into the broad implications of system change and its significant features. 4D-equipped aircraft in essence have a contract with the airport runway and, in return, they would get priority over any other aircraft waiting for use of the runway. The main operational feature examined here is the queuing delays affecting non-4D-equipped arrivals. These get a reasonable service if the proportion of 4D-equipped aircraft is low, but this can deteriorate markedly for high proportions, and be economically unviable. Preventative measures would be to limit the additional growth of 4D-equipped flights and/or to modify their contracts to provide sufficient space for the non-4D-equipped flights to operate without excessive delays. There is a potential for non-Poisson models, for which there is little in the literature, and for more complex models, e.g. grouping a succession of 4D-equipped aircraft as a batch.

  19. Longitudinal hopping in intervehicle communication: Theory and simulations on modeled and empirical trajectory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Christian; Treiber, Martin; Kesting, Arne

    2008-09-01

    Intervehicle communication enables vehicles to exchange messages within a limited broadcast range and thus self-organize into dynamical and geographically embedded wireless ad hoc networks. We study the longitudinal hopping mode in which messages are transported using equipped vehicles driving in the same direction as a relay. Given a finite communication range, we investigate the conditions where messages can percolate through the network, i.e., a linked chain of relay vehicles exists between the sender and receiver. We simulate message propagation in different traffic scenarios and for different fractions of equipped vehicles. Simulations are done with both, modeled and empirical traffic data. These results are used to test the limits of applicability of an analytical model assuming a Poissonian distance distribution between the relays. We found a good agreement for homogeneous traffic scenarios and sufficiently low percentages of equipped vehicles. For higher percentages, the observed connectivity was higher than that of the model while in stop-and-go traffic situations it was lower. We explain these results in terms of correlations of the distances between the relay vehicles. Finally, we introduce variable transmission ranges and found that this additional stochastic component generally increased connectivity compared to a deterministic transmission with the same mean.

  20. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, John Eric [Department of Physics, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Carre, Matt J, E-mail: goff@lynchburg.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  1. Research on Three-dimensional Motion History Image Model and Extreme Learning Machine for Human Body Movement Trajectory Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the traditional machine vision recognition technology and traditional artificial neural networks about body movement trajectory, this paper finds out the shortcomings of the traditional recognition technology. By combining the invariant moments of the three-dimensional motion history image (computed as the eigenvector of body movements and the extreme learning machine (constructed as the classification artificial neural network of body movements, the paper applies the method to the machine vision of the body movement trajectory. In detail, the paper gives a detailed introduction about the algorithm and realization scheme of the body movement trajectory recognition based on the three-dimensional motion history image and the extreme learning machine. Finally, by comparing with the results of the recognition experiments, it attempts to verify that the method of body movement trajectory recognition technology based on the three-dimensional motion history image and extreme learning machine has a more accurate recognition rate and better robustness.

  2. Developing a New Integrated Model to improve the using of Classical Approach in Designing Management Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad M M Abu Omar; Khairul Anuar Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Management information system (MIS) is used to solve management problems in the practical life, the designing and building of the management information systems is done by using one of the systems development methodologies. Classical approach is one of these methodologies which still suffer from some critical problems when it is used in designing and building the management information systems, it consumes more time and cost during its life cycle. This paper develops a new integrated model to...

  3. Ultrasonic wave propagation in reticulated foams saturated by different gases: High frequency limit of the classical models

    OpenAIRE

    Leclaire, Philippe; Kelders, Luc; Lauriks, Walter; Glorieux, Christ

    1996-01-01

    Transmission experiments are performed on high porosity reticulated polyurethane foams saturated by different gases at ultrasonic frequencies up to 800 kHz. An excess attenuation is observed at high frequencies, when the wavelength is not sufficiently large compared to the lateral dimensions of the fibers. At lower frequencies, these experiments lead by using classical models of equivalent fluids, to a fast and reliable method for determining the characteristic length $\\Lambda$.

  4. Ultrasonic wave propagation in reticulated foams saturated by different gases: High frequency limit of the classical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, Ph.; Kelders, L.; Lauriks, W.; Allard, J. F.; Glorieux, C.

    1996-10-01

    Transmission experiments are performed on high porosity reticulated polyurethane foams saturated by different gases at ultrasonic frequencies up to 800 kHz. An excess attenuation is observed at high frequencies, when the wavelength is not sufficiently large compared to the lateral dimensions of the fibers. At lower frequencies, these experiments lead by using classical models of equivalent fluids, to a fast and reliable method for determining the characteristic length Λ.

  5. Modeling and Non-Linear Self-Tuning Robust Trajectory Control of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thor Inge Fossen

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available A non-linear self-tuning algorithm is demonstrated for an autonomous underwater vehicle. Tighter control is achieved by a non-linear parameter identification algorithm which reduces the parameter uncertainty bounds. Expensive hydrodynamic tests for parameter determination can thus be avoided. Excellent tracking performance and robustness to parameter uncertainty are guaranteed through a robust control strategy based on the estimated parameters. The nonlinear control law is highly robust for imprecise models and the neglected dynamics. The non-linear self-tuning control strategy is simulated for the horizontal positioning of an underwater vehicle.

  6. Report of the Nordic dispersion-/trajectory model comparison with the ETEX-1 fullscale experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the 6th and 7th June 1995 a meeting was held at Risoe, where calculations of the atmospheric transportation and dispersion of the ETEX-1 release carried out by a number of institutions in the Nordic countries were presented. Also presented were the results of the measurements carried out by the National Environmental Research Institute of Denmark, information previously not known to the participants in the meeting. This provided not only an opportunity of intercomparing the models, but also of carrying out a validation exercise. The main points form the concluding discussions are also included in this report. (au) 7 tabs., 75 ills

  7. Transport of particles by surface waves: a modification of the classical bouncer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragulskis, M [Department of Mathematical Research in Systems, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50-222, 51638 Kaunas (Lithuania); Sanjuan, M A F [Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Group, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: minvydas.ragulskis@ktu.lt, E-mail: miguel.sanjuan@urjc.es

    2008-08-15

    We consider a ball under the influence of gravity on a platform. A propagating surface wave travels on the surface of the platform, while the platform remains motionless. This is a modification of the classical bouncing ball problem and describes the transport of particles by surface waves. Phase and velocity maps cannot be expressed in an explicit form owing to implicit formulations, and no formal analytical analysis is possible. Numerical analysis shows that the transition to chaos is produced via a period doubling route, which is a common property for classical bouncers. The bouncing process can be sensitive to the initial conditions, which can build the ground for control techniques that can dramatically increase the effectiveness of particle transport in practical applications.

  8. A supply side approach for estimating a Neo-classical fixed investment model for the South African economy

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerman Maarten

    2000-01-01

    Investment behaviour is influenced by a number of variables. A change in macro-econometric parameters can affect investment behaviour in a number of ways. The purpose of this study is to report the theory and estimation of an investment model for the South African economy. The model estimated in this study is mainly based on the neo-classical investment theory as part of the estimation of a consistent supply side, macro-econometric model for the South African economy. Equations for capital, f...

  9. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Emily L.; Brian DuBoff; Feany, Mel B; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begu...

  10. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Jumbo-Lucioni; William Parkinson; Kendal Broadie

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP–N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP–N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and ...

  11. Focalization and phase models for classical extensions of non-associative Lambek calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Bastenhof, Arno

    2011-01-01

    Lambek's non-associative syntactic calculus (NL) excels in its resource consciousness: the usual structural rules for weakening, contraction, exchange and even associativity are all dropped. Recently, there have been proposals for conservative extensions dispensing with NL's intuitionistic bias towards sequents with single conclusions: De Groote and Lamarche's classical non-associative Lambek calculus (CNL) and the Lambek-Grishin calculus (LG) of Moortgat and associates. We demonstrate Andreo...

  12. Hybrid trajectory spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general framework for describing and studying hybrid systems. We represent the trajectories of the system as functions on a hybrid time domain, and the system itself by its trajectory space, which is the set of all possible trajectories. The trajectory space is given a na

  13. Self-consistent one dimension in space and three dimension in velocity kinetic trajectory simulation model of magnetized plasma-wall transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalise, Roshan, E-mail: plasma.roshan@gmail.com; Khanal, Raju [Central Department of Physics, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu (Nepal)

    2015-11-15

    We have developed a self-consistent 1d3v (one dimension in space and three dimension in velocity) Kinetic Trajectory Simulation (KTS) model, which can be used for modeling various situations of interest and yields results of high accuracy. Exact ion trajectories are followed, to calculate along them the ion distribution function, assuming an arbitrary injection ion distribution. The electrons, on the other hand, are assumed to have a cut-off Maxwellian velocity distribution at injection and their density distribution is obtained analytically. Starting from an initial guess, the potential profile is iterated towards the final time-independent self-consistent state. We have used it to study plasma sheath region formed in presence of an oblique magnetic field. Our results agree well with previous works from other models, and hence, we expect our 1d3v KTS model to provide a basis for the studying of all types of magnetized plasmas, yielding more accurate results.

  14. Long Range Aircraft Trajectory Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Magister, Tone

    2009-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the improvement of the aircraft future trajectory prediction accuracy for long-range airborne separation assurance. The strategic planning of safe aircraft flights and effective conflict avoidance tactics demand timely and accurate conflict detection based upon future four–dimensional airborne traffic situation prediction which is as accurate as each aircraft flight trajectory prediction. The improved kinematics model of aircraft relative flight considering flight ...

  15. Mindfulness Training Promotes Upward Spirals of Positive Affect and Cognition: Multilevel and Autoregressive Latent Trajectory Modeling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L Garland

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent theory suggests that positive psychological processes integral to health may be energized through the self-reinforcing dynamics of an upward spiral to counter emotion dysregulation. The present study examined positive emotion-cognition interactions among individuals in partial remission from depression who had been randomly assigned to treatment with mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT; n = 64 or a wait-list control condition (n = 66. We hypothesized that MBCT stimulates upward spirals by increasing positive affect and positive cognition. Experience sampling assessed changes in affect and cognition during 6 days before and after treatment, which were analyzed with a series of multilevel and autoregressive latent trajectory models. Findings suggest that MBCT was associated with significant increases in trait positive affect and momentary positive cognition, which were preserved through autoregressive and cross-lagged effects driven by global emotional tone. Findings suggest that daily positive affect and cognition are maintained by an upward spiral that might be promoted by mindfulness training.

  16. Classical Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Mould, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    Preciously given rules allow conscious systems to be included in quantum mechanical systems. There rules are derived from the empirical experience of an observer who witnesses a quantum mechanical interaction leading to the capture of a single particle. In the present paper it is shown that purely classical changes experienced by an observer are consistent with these rules. Three different interactions are considered, two of which combine classical and quantum mechanical changes. The previous...

  17. Estimation of Transport Trajectory and Residence Time in Large River–Lake Systems: Application to Poyang Lake (China) Using a Combined Model Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Yunliang Li; Jing Yao

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical processes and associated water quality in many lakes mainly depend on their transport behaviors. Most existing methodologies for investigating transport behaviors are based on physically based numerical models. The pollutant transport trajectory and residence time of Poyang Lake are thought to have important implications for the steadily deteriorating water quality and the associated rapid environmental changes during the flood period. This study used a hydrodynamic model (MIK...

  18. Lectures on Classical Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the lectures consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schroedinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  19. Classical and quantum cosmology with York time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a solution to the problem of time in quantum gravity by deparameterization of the ADM action in terms of York time, a parameter proportional to the extrinsic curvature of a spatial hypersurface. We study a minisuperspace model together with a homogeneous scalar field, for which we can solve the Hamiltonian constraint exactly and arrive at an explicit expression for the physical (non-vanishing) Hamiltonian. The scale factor and associated momentum cease to be dynamical variables, leaving the scalar field as the only physical degree of freedom. We investigate the resulting classical theory, showing how the dynamics of the scale factor can be recovered via an appropriate interpretation of the Hamiltonian as a volume. We then quantize the system in the Schrödinger picture. In the quantum theory we recover the dynamics of the scale factor by interpreting the spectrum and expectation value of the Hamiltonian as being associated with volume rather than energy. If trajectories in the sense of de Broglie–Bohm are introduced in the quantum theory, these are found to match those of the classical theory. We suggest that these trajectories may provide the basis for a perturbation theory in which both background and perturbations are quantized. (paper)

  20. Periodic trajectories for two-dimensional nonintegrable Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I want to report on some calculations of classical periodic trajectories in a two-dimensional nonintegrable potential. After a brief introduction, I will present some details of the theory. The main part of this report will be devoted to showing pictures of the various families of trajectories and to discussing the topology (in E-τ space) and branching behavior of these families. Then I will demonstrate the connection between periodic trajectories and ''nearby'' nonperiodic trajectories, which nicely illustrates the relationship of this work to chaos. Finally, I will discuss very briefly how periodic trajectories can be used to calculate tori. 12 refs., 40 figs

  1. Classical and Quantum Formulations of S1xS2 and S3 Gowdy Models Coupled with Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Vergel, Daniel Gómez

    2009-01-01

    We explore the features of gravity in its quantum regime in a mathematically rigorous way by carrying out the classical and quantum formulations of some two-Killing symmetry reductions of general relativity which admit an exact Fock/Schr\\"{o}dinger quantization. Concretely, we analyze in depth the linearly polarized 3-handle (S1xS2) and 3-sphere (S3) Gowdy cosmological models coupled to massless scalar fields. Within the classical formulation, this study requires a careful application of modern differential geometry techniques and the Dirac-Bergmann theory of constrained systems. Regarding the quantization process, we analyze the construction of both Fock and Schr\\"{o}dinger representations, the unitarity of the time evolution, and the existence of semiclassical states for these systems by making use of the algebraic formalism of quantum theory and the theory of unitary implementation of symplectic transformations. Several appendices give additional information on the results attained in the main body of the ...

  2. GM(1,1)模型在轨迹聚类中的应用%Application of model GM(1, 1) in the trajectory clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江艺羡; 张岐山

    2015-01-01

    Moving objects trajectory data may become uncertainty because of being lost or delayed in transmission process.In this paper, using the superiority of Model GM(1, 1) in domain of forecasting or decision-making field, a new method of trajectory segmentation based on Model GM (1, 1)( TR_GMPR) was proposed within the limitations of fitting error threshold .Then, the DBSCAN algorithm was used to cluster the segmented trajectories , which produced the characteristic trajectories .The experiment indicated that these characteristic trajectories could be further accord with the practical situation , ompared to other clustering results adopted the line segmentation method .%针对移动对象轨迹数据在获取过程中可能存在延迟、缺失,使得轨迹数据存在不确定性的情况。利用GM(1,1)模型在预测、决策领域中的优势,在拟合误差阀值的限制下,提出一种基于GM(1,1)模型的轨迹分割方法( TR_GMPR)。之后,对分割后的轨迹段利用DBSCAN算法进行聚类。实验表明,生成的特征轨迹相比其他线段分割的轨迹聚类结果,更符合实际情况。

  3. Bohr's correspondence principle in quantum field theory and classical renormalization scheme: the Nelson model

    OpenAIRE

    AMMARI, Zied; Falconi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In the mid Sixties Edward Nelson proved the existence of a consistent quantum field theory that describes the Yukawa-like interaction of a non-relativistic nucleon field with a relativistic meson field. Since then it is thought, despite the renormalization procedure involved in the construction, that the quantum dynamics should be governed in the classical limit by a Schr\\"odinger-Klein-Gordon system with Yukawa coupling. In the present paper we prove this fact in the form of a Bohr correspon...

  4. A general quantum information model for the contextual dependent systems breaking the classical probability law

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Masanari; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Yamato, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    There exist several phenomena (systems) breaking the classical probability laws. Such systems are contextual dependent adaptive systems. In this paper, we present a new mathematical formula to compute the probability in those systems by using the concepts of the adaptive dynamics and quantum information theory -- quantum channels and the lifting. The basic examples of the contextual dependent phenomena can be found in quantum physics. And recently similar examples were found in biological and psychological sciences. Our novel approach is motivated by traditional quantum probability, but it is general enough to describe aforementioned phenomena outside of quantum physics.

  5. ARCH Effect in Classical Market-Timing Models with Lagged Market Variable: the Case of Polish Market

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Olbrys

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to present the regressions of the GARCH versions of classical market-timing models of Polish equity funds. We examine the models with lagged values of the market factor as an additional variable because of the Fisher’s effect in the case of the main Warsaw Stock Exchange indexes. The market-timing and selectivity abilities of fund managers are evaluated for the period Jan 2003 – June 2011. Results on both the HAC and the GARCH estimates are qualitatively similar...

  6. An improved model for computing the trajectories of conductive particles in roll-type electrostatic separator for recycling metals from WEEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2009-08-15

    Electrostatic separation presents an effective and environmentally friendly way for recycling metals and nonmetals from ground waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). For this process, the trajectory of conductive particle is significant and some models have been established. However, the results of previous researches are limited by some simplifying assumptions and lead to a notable discrepancy between the model prediction and the experimental results. In the present research, a roll-type corona-electrostatic separator and ground printed circuit board (PCB) wastes were used to investigate the trajectory of the conductive particle. Two factors, the air drag force and the different charging situation, were introduced into the improved model. Their effects were analyzed and an improved model for the theoretical trajectory of conductive particle was established. Compared with the previous one, the improved model shows a good agreement with the experimental results. It provides a positive guidance for designing of separator and makes a progress for recycling the metals and nonmetals from WEEE. PMID:19201534

  7. An improved model for computing the trajectories of conductive particles in roll-type electrostatic separator for recycling metals from WEEE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrostatic separation presents an effective and environmentally friendly way for recycling metals and nonmetals from ground waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). For this process, the trajectory of conductive particle is significant and some models have been established. However, the results of previous researches are limited by some simplifying assumptions and lead to a notable discrepancy between the model prediction and the experimental results. In the present research, a roll-type corona-electrostatic separator and ground printed circuit board (PCB) wastes were used to investigate the trajectory of the conductive particle. Two factors, the air drag force and the different charging situation, were introduced into the improved model. Their effects were analyzed and an improved model for the theoretical trajectory of conductive particle was established. Compared with the previous one, the improved model shows a good agreement with the experimental results. It provides a positive guidance for designing of separator and makes a progress for recycling the metals and nonmetals from WEEE.

  8. Classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schwinger, Julian Seymour; Milton, K A; Tsai, W Y

    1998-01-01

    This text for the graduate classical electrodynamics course was left unfinished upon Julian Schwinger's death in 1994, but was completed by his coauthors, who have brilliantly recreated the excitement of Schwinger's novel approach. Classical Electrodynamics captures Schwinger's inimitable lecturing style, in which everything flows inexorably from what has gone before. An essential resource for both physicists and their students, the book includes a "Reader's Guide", which describes the major themes in each chapter, suggests a possible path through the book, and identifies topics for inclusion

  9. Classical Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Mould, R A

    2003-01-01

    Preciously given rules allow conscious systems to be included in quantum mechanical systems. There rules are derived from the empirical experience of an observer who witnesses a quantum mechanical interaction leading to the capture of a single particle. In the present paper it is shown that purely classical changes experienced by an observer are consistent with these rules. Three different interactions are considered, two of which combine classical and quantum mechanical changes. The previously given rules support all of these cases. Key Words: brain states, conscious observer, detector, measurement, probability current, state reduction, von Neumann, wave collapse.

  10. Sensory prediction or motor control? Application of Marr-Albus type models of cerebellar function to classical conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan F Lepora

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marr-Albus adaptive filter models of the cerebellum have been applied successfully to a range of sensory and motor control problems. Here we analyze their properties when applied to classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in rabbits. We consider a system-level model of eyeblink conditioning based on the anatomy of the eyeblink circuitry, comprising an adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, a comparator model of the inferior olive and a linear dynamic model of the nictitating membrane plant. To our knowledge, this is the first model that explicitly includes all these principal components, in particular the motor plant that is vital for shaping and timing the behavioral response. Model assumptions and parameters were systematically investigated to disambiguate basic computational capacities of the model from features requiring tuning of properties and parameter values. Without such tuning, the model robustly reproduced a range of behaviors related to sensory prediction, by displaying appropriate trial-level associative learning effects for both single and multiple stimuli, including blocking and conditioned inhibition. In contrast, successful reproduction of the real-time motor behavior depended on appropriate specification of the plant, cerebellum and comparator models. Although some of these properties appear consistent with the system biology, fundamental questions remain about how the biological parameters are chosen if the cerebellar microcircuit applies a common computation to many distinct behavioral tasks. It is possible that the response profiles in classical conditioning of the eyeblink depend upon operant contingencies that have previously prevailed, for example in naturally occurring avoidance movements.

  11. Quantum trajectories based on the weak value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takuya; Tsutsui, Izumi

    2015-04-01

    The notion of the trajectory of an individual particle is strictly inhibited in quantum mechanics because of the uncertainty principle. Nonetheless, the weak value, which has been proposed as a novel and measurable quantity definable to any quantum observable, can offer a possible description of trajectory on account of its statistical nature. In this paper, we explore the physical significance provided by this "weak trajectory" by considering various situations where interference takes place simultaneously with the observation of particles, that is, in prototypical quantum situations for which no classical treatment is available. These include the double slit experiment and Lloyd's mirror, where in the former case it is argued that the real part of the weak trajectory describes an average over the possible classical trajectories involved in the process, and that the imaginary part is related to the variation of interference. It is shown that this average interpretation of the weak trajectory holds universally under the complex probability defined from the given transition process. These features remain essentially unaltered in the case of Lloyd's mirror where interference occurs with a single slit.

  12. Particle creation, classicality and related issues in quantum field theory: I. Formalism and toy models

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2007-01-01

    The quantum theory of a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent frequency arises in several important physical problems, especially in the study of quantum field theory in an external background. While the mathematics of this system is straightforward, several conceptual issues arise in such a study. We present a general formalism to address some of the conceptual issues like the emergence of classicality, definition of particle content, back reaction etc. In particular, we parametrize the wave function in terms of a complex number (which we call excitation parameter) and express all physically relevant quantities in terms it. Many of the notions -- like those of particle number density, effective Lagrangian etc., which are usually defined using asymptotic in-out states -- are generalized as time-dependent concepts and we show that these generalized definitions lead to useful and reasonable results. Having developed the general formalism we apply it to several examples. Exact analytic expressions are found ...

  13. Survival of classical models in Bartolomeo Facio's description of battles. Some considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Abbamonte

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Facio's work, entitled Rerum gestarum Alphonsi regis libri decem, mainly describes the conquest of the Kingdom of Naples by the Aragonese king Alphonso the Magnanimous. However, the historical events are not only narrated on the basis of contemporary documents, but they are also shaped according to the various patterns provided by classical authors. Thus, in Alphonso's speech to the troops we can find a direct quotation of Cicero, or in Facio's preface there is a blend of arguments taken from Livy's praefatio and Cicero's well-known opinion on Caesar's style. Finally, in the episode on the siege of Gerba and the return of the fleet to Trapani, Facio depicts Alphonso's Tunisian enemies as if they were old Carthaginians, whilst the forced stop of the Aragonese fleet in Trapani allows the historian to establish a wisely disguised comparison with Aeneas' stop at Trapani/Drepanum in the 5th book of the Aeneid.

  14. Scale-lengths and instabilities in magnetized classical and relativistic plasma fluid models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity of the traditional plasma continuum is predicated on a hierarchy of scale-lengths, with the Debye length being considered to be effectively unresolvable in the continuum limit. In this article, we revisit the strong magnetic field case in which the Larmor radius is comparable or smaller than the Debye length in the classical plasma, and also for a relativistic plasma. Fresh insight into the validity of the continuum assumption in each case is offered, including a fluid limit on the Alfvén speed that may impose restrictions on the validity of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in some solar and fusion contexts. Additional implications concerning the role of the firehose instability are also explored. (paper)

  15. Emergence of classical theories from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hajicek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Three problems stand in the way of deriving classical theories from quantum mechanics: those of realist interpretation, of classical properties and of quantum measurement. Recently, we have identified some tacit assumptions that lie at the roots of these problems. Thus, a realist interpretation is hindered by the assumption that the only properties of quantum systems are values of observables. If one simply postulates the properties to be objective that are uniquely defined by preparation then all difficulties disappear. As for classical properties, the wrong assumption is that there are arbitrarily sharp classical trajectories. It turns out that fuzzy classical trajectories can be obtained from quantum mechanics by taking the limit of high entropy. Finally, standard quantum mechanics implies that any registration on a quantum system is disturbed by all quantum systems of the same kind existing somewhere in the universe. If one works out systematically how quantum mechanics must be corrected so that there is ...

  16. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowled Brendan D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2 was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2, daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km, probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75 and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42% were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (

  17. Positive matrix factorization and trajectory modelling for source identification: A new look at Indian Ocean Experiment ship observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuprasad, S. G.; Venkataraman, Chandra; Bhushan, Mani

    The sources of aerosols on a regional scale over India have only recently received attention in studies using back trajectory analysis and chemical transport modelling. Receptor modelling approaches such as positive matrix factorization (PMF) and the potential source contribution function (PSCF) are effective tools in source identification of urban and regional-scale pollution. In this work, PMF and PSCF analysis is applied to identify categories and locations of sources that influenced surface concentrations of aerosols in the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) domain measured on-board the research vessel Ron Brown [Quinn, P.K., Coffman, D.J., Bates, T.S., Miller, T.L., Johnson, J.E., Welton, E.J., et al., 2002. Aerosol optical properties during INDOEX 1999: means, variability, and controlling factors. Journal of Geophysical Research 107, 8020, doi:10.1029/2000JD000037]. Emissions inventory information is used to identify sources co-located with probable source regions from PSCF. PMF analysis identified six factors influencing PM concentrations during the INDOEX cruise of the Ron Brown including a biomass combustion factor (35-40%), three industrial emissions factors (35-40%), primarily secondary sulphate-nitrate, balance trace elements and Zn, and two dust factors (20-30%) of Si- and Ca-dust. The identified factors effectively predict the measured submicron PM concentrations (slope of regression line=0.90±0.20; R2=0.76). Probable source regions shifted based on changes in surface and elevated flows during different times in the ship cruise. They were in India in the early part of the cruise, but in west Asia, south-east Asia and Africa, during later parts of the cruise. Co-located sources include coal-fired electric utilities, cement, metals and petroleum production in India and west Asia, biofuel combustion for energy and crop residue burning in India, woodland/forest burning in north sub-Saharan Africa and forest burning in south-east Asia. Significant findings

  18. Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics Based on Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Franco de Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Performing molecular dynamics in electronically excited states requires the inclusion of nonadiabatic effects to properly describe phenomena beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. This article provides a survey of selected nonadiabatic methods based on quantum or classical trajectories. Among these techniques, trajectory surface hopping constitutes an interesting compromise between accuracy and efficiency for the simulation of medium- to large-scale molecular systems. This approach is, however, based on non-rigorous approximations that could compromise, in some cases, the correct description of the nonadiabatic effects under consideration and hamper a systematic improvement of the theory. With the help of an in principle exact description of nonadiabatic dynamics based on Bohmian quantum trajectories, we will investigate the origin of the main approximations in trajectory surface hopping and illustrate some of the limits of this approach by means of a few simple examples.

  19. Deepwater Horizon MC252 - Oil Spill: Oil Trajectories Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Trajectory maps are produced using GNOME (General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment), which is an oil spill trajectory model developed by OR and...

  20. Classical Exchange Algebra of the Nonlinear Sigma Model on a Supercoset Target with Z2n Grading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE San-Min; LI Xin-Ying; WANG Chun; YUE Rui-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The classical exchange algebra satisfied by the monodromy matrix of the nonlinear sigma model on a supercoset target with Z2n grading is derived using a first-order Hamiltonian formulation and by adding to the Lax connection terms proportional to constraints. This enables us to show that the conserved charges of the theory are in involution. When n = 2, our results coincide with the results given by Magro for the pure spinor description of AdS5 × S5 string theory (when the ghost terms are omitted).%The classical exchange algebra satisfied by the monodromy matrix of the nonlinear sigma model on a supercoset target with Z2n grading is derived using a first-order Hamiltonian formulation and by adding to the Lax connection terms proportional to constraints.This enables us to show that the conserved charges of the theory are in involution.When n =2,our results coincide with the results given by Magro for the pure spinor description of AdS5 × S5 string theory (when the ghost terms are omitted).Bena,Polchinski and Roiban[1] found an infinite number of non-local classically conserved charges for the Grecn-Schwarz superstring in AdS5 × S5 background.[2] Similar results were obtained for some other strings[3-9] that propagate in AdS space-time,as discussed in Refs.[7 9].Vallilo[10] showed that such charges also exist in the pure-spinor formalism of the superstring in AdS5 × S5.Bianchi and Klǔson[11] gave the current algebra of the pure-spinor superstring.Berkovits[12] proved that the nonlocal charges in the string theory are BRST-invariant and physical.