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Sample records for classical trajectory model

  1. Classical models for Regge trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Van Dam, H.; Marmo, G.; Morandi, G.; Mukunda, N.; Samuel, J.; Sudarshan, E.C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Two classical models for particles with internal structure and which describe Regge trajectories are developed. The remarkable geometric and other properties of the two internal spaces are highlighted. It is shown that the conditions of positive time-like four-velocity and energy momentum for the classical system imply strong and physically reasonable conditions on the Regge mass-spin relationship

  2. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  3. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields. Semiclassical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with timely and interesting issues in strong laser physics. Illustrates complex strong field atomic ionization with the simple semiclassical model of classical trajectory perspective for the first time. Provides a theoretical model that can be used to account for recent experiments. The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers in the field of laser physics, atom molecule physics and theoretical physics. Dr. Jie Liu is a professor of Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, China and Peking University.

  4. Vectorization of a classical trajectory code on a floating point systems, Inc. Model 164 attached processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Wayne A; Wagner, Albert F

    1986-04-01

    A triatomic classical trajectory code has been modified by extensive vectorization of the algorithms to achieve much improved performance on an FPS 164 attached processor. Extensive timings on both the FPS 164 and a VAX 11/780 with floating point accelerator are presented as a function of the number of trajectories simultaneously run. The timing tests involve a potential energy surface of the LEPS variety and trajectories with 1000 time steps. The results indicate that vectorization results in timing improvements on both the VAX and the FPS. For larger numbers of trajectories run simultaneously, up to a factor of 25 improvement in speed occurs between VAX and FPS vectorized code. Copyright © 1986 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Classical trajectory methods in molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.N.; Raff, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of classical trajectory methods in molecular collisions includes classical dynamics, Hamiltonian mechanics, classical scattering cross sections and rate coefficients, statistical averaging, the selection of initial states, integration of equations of motion, analysis of final states, consecutive collisions, and the prognosis for classical molecular scattering calculations. 61 references

  6. A simple model for correcting the zero point energy problem in classical trajectory simulations of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.; Hase, W.L.; Darling, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple model is proposed for correcting problems with zero point energy in classical trajectory simulations of dynamical processes in polyatomic molecules. The ''problems'' referred to are that classical mechanics allows the vibrational energy in a mode to decrease below its quantum zero point value, and since the total energy is conserved classically this can allow too much energy to pool in other modes. The proposed model introduces hard sphere-like terms in action--angle variables that prevent the vibrational energy in any mode from falling below its zero point value. The algorithm which results is quite simple in terms of the cartesian normal modes of the system: if the energy in a mode k, say, decreases below its zero point value at time t, then at this time the momentum P k for that mode has its sign changed, and the trajectory continues. This is essentially a time reversal for mode k (only exclamation point), and it conserves the total energy of the system. One can think of the model as supplying impulsive ''quantum kicks'' to a mode whose energy attempts to fall below its zero point value, a kind of ''Planck demon'' analogous to a Brownian-like random force. The model is illustrated by application to a model of CH overtone relaxation

  7. Simulation of molecular transitions using classical trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, A.; Martens, C. C. [University of California, California (United States)

    2001-03-01

    In the present work, we describe the implementation of a semiclassical method to study physical-chemical processes in molecular systems where electronic state transitions and quantum coherence play a dominant role. The method is based on classical trajectory propagation on the underlying coupled electronic surfaces and is derived from the semiclassical limit of the quantum Liouville equation. Unlike previous classical trajectory-based methods, quantum electronic coherence are treated naturally within this approach as complex weighted trajectory ensembles propagating on the average electronic surfaces. The method is tested on a model problem consisting of one-dimensional motion on two crossing electronic surfaces. Excellent agreement is obtained when compared to the exact results obtained by wave packet propagation. The method is applied to model quantum wave packet interferometry, where two wave packets, differing only in a relative phase, collide in the region where the two electronic surfaces cross. The dependence of the resulting population transfer on the initial relative phase of the wave packets is perfectly captured by our classical trajectory method. Comparison with an alternative method, surface hopping, shows that our approach is appropriate for modelling quantum interference phenomena. [Spanish] En este trabajo se describe la implementacion de un metodo semiclasico para estudiar procesos fisicos-quimicos en sistemas moleculares donde las transiciones entre estados electronicos y las coherencias cuanticas juegan un papel predominante. El metodo se basa en la propagacion de trayectorias clasicas sobre las correspondientes superficies electronicas acopladas y se deriva a partir del limite semiclasico de la ecuacion cuantica de Liouville. A diferencia de metodos previos basados en trayectoria clasica, dentro de este esquema, las coherencias electronicas cuanticas son tratadas de manera natural como ensamble de trayectorias con pesos complejos, moviendose en

  8. Complex trajectories in a classical periodic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Alexander G; Bender, Carl M

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the complex trajectories of a classical particle in the potential V(x) = −cos (x). Almost all the trajectories describe a particle that hops from one well to another in an erratic fashion. However, it is shown analytically that there are two special classes of trajectories x(t) determined only by the energy of the particle and not by the initial position of the particle. The first class consists of periodic trajectories; that is, trajectories that return to their initial position x(0) after some real time T. The second class consists of trajectories for which there exists a real time T such that x(t + T) = x(t) ± 2π. These two classes of classical trajectories are analogous to valence and conduction bands in quantum mechanics, where the quantum particle either remains localized or else tunnels resonantly (conducts) through a crystal lattice. These two special types of trajectories are associated with sets of energies of measure 0. For other energies, it is shown that for long times the average velocity of the particle becomes a fractal-like function of energy. (paper)

  9. Complex trajectories in a classical periodic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alexander G.; Bender, Carl M.

    2012-11-01

    This paper examines the complex trajectories of a classical particle in the potential V(x) = -cos (x). Almost all the trajectories describe a particle that hops from one well to another in an erratic fashion. However, it is shown analytically that there are two special classes of trajectories x(t) determined only by the energy of the particle and not by the initial position of the particle. The first class consists of periodic trajectories; that is, trajectories that return to their initial position x(0) after some real time T. The second class consists of trajectories for which there exists a real time T such that x(t + T) = x(t) ± 2π. These two classes of classical trajectories are analogous to valence and conduction bands in quantum mechanics, where the quantum particle either remains localized or else tunnels resonantly (conducts) through a crystal lattice. These two special types of trajectories are associated with sets of energies of measure 0. For other energies, it is shown that for long times the average velocity of the particle becomes a fractal-like function of energy.

  10. Classical trajectories and quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitiello, Giuseppe; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Salerno

    2005-01-01

    The density matrix and the Wigner function formalism requires the doubling of the degrees of freedom in quantum mechanics (QM) and quantum field theory (QFT). The doubled degrees of freedom play the role of the thermal bath or environment degrees of freedom and are entangled with the system degrees of freedom. They also account for quantum noise in the fluctuating random forces in the system-environment coupling. The algebraic structure of QFT turns out to be the one of the deformed Hopf algebra. In such a frame, the trajectories in the space of the unitarily inequivalent representations of the canonical commutation relations turn out to be classical trajectories and, under convenient conditions, they may exhibit properties typical of classical chaotic trajectories in nonlinear dynamics. The quantum Brownian motion and the two-slit experiment in QM are discussed in connection with the doubling of the degrees of freedom. (author)

  11. Quantum models of classical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hájíček, P

    2015-01-01

    Quantum statistical methods that are commonly used for the derivation of classical thermodynamic properties are extended to classical mechanical properties. The usual assumption that every real motion of a classical mechanical system is represented by a sharp trajectory is not testable and is replaced by a class of fuzzy models, the so-called maximum entropy (ME) packets. The fuzzier are the compared classical and quantum ME packets, the better seems to be the match between their dynamical trajectories. Classical and quantum models of a stiff rod will be constructed to illustrate the resulting unified quantum theory of thermodynamic and mechanical properties. (paper)

  12. Classical trajectory in non-relativistic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    With the statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics as a guide, the classical trajectory is incorporated into quantum scattering theory. The Feynman path integral formalism is used as a starting point, and classical transformation theory is applied to the phase of the wave function so derived. This approach is then used to derive an expression for the scattering amplitude for potential scattering. It is found that the amplitude can be expressed in an impact parameter representation similar to the Glauber formalism. Connections are then made to the Glauber approximation and to semiclassical approximations derived from the Feynman path integral formalism. In extending this analysis to projectile-nucleus scattering, an approximation scheme is given with the first term being the same as in Glauber's multiple scattering theory. Higher-order approximations, thus, are found to give corrections to the fixed scatterer form of the impulse approximation inherent in the Glauber theory

  13. Classical descriptions of the electron trajectories in the He atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miko, A.; Toekesi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method (CTMC) treats the atomic systems as small solar-systems, where the electrons are moving around the nucleus in properly chosen Kepler-orbits. It is also well known that the multi-electron classical atomic systems are instable due to the autoionization through electron-electron interactions. Therefore most of the classical descriptions use the so called independent particle approach, i.e. they neclect the electron-electron interactions. In the quasiclassical trajectory Monte Carlo method (QCTMC) appears a qualitative improvement of the classical description of the multi-electron atoms namely the electron-electron interaction is entirely taken into account by the help of the extra potentials providing the validations of the Pauli exclusion principle and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. The extra potentials ensure that the multi electron atoms are stable even if all electron-electron interactions are taken into account. The extra potentials - representing the constrains - can be written in the following form [1] V τ -2 f(τp; ξ); where f is the monotonic decreasing function of the relative distance τ and momentum p and ξ is the constant characterized the given atomic state. Figure 1. shows the typical electron trajectories in the helium atom. The calculations were carried out using CTMC model when the electron-electron interaction is neglected (Fig. 1a). In this case the He atom is stable and the electron orbits are closed. However, when the electron-electron interaction is taken into account in the CTMC model the electron trajectories in the He atom show chaotic behavior and after a few cycles autoionization occurs (Fig. 1b). In the QCTMC model the electron trajectories are also closed and stable (Fig. 1c). (author)

  14. Photon trajectories, anomalous velocities and weak measurements: a classical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Kofman, Abraham G; Nori, Franco; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Kocsis et al (2011 Science 332 1170) reported the observation of ‘average trajectories of single photons’ in a two-slit interference experiment. This was possible by using the quantum weak-measurement method, which implies averaging over many events, i.e. in fact, a multi-photon limit of classical linear optics. We give a classical-optics interpretation of this experiment and other related problems. It appears that weak measurements of the local momentum of photons made by Kocsis et al represent measurements of the Poynting vector in an optical field. We consider both the real and imaginary parts of the local momentum and show that their measurements have been realized in classical optics using small-probe particles. We also examine the appearance of ‘anomalous’ values of the local momentum: either negative (backflow) or exceeding the wavenumber (superluminal propagation). These features appear to be closely related to vortices and evanescent waves. Finally, we revisit a number of older works and find examples of photon trajectories and anomalous-momentum measurements in various optical experiments. (paper)

  15. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2009-01-01

    This third volume completes the Work Mechanical Systems, Classical Models. The first two volumes dealt with particle dynamics and with discrete and continuous mechanical systems. The present volume studies analytical mechanics. Topics like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the Hamilton-Jacobi method, and a study of systems with separate variables are thoroughly discussed. Also included are variational principles and canonical transformations, integral invariants and exterior differential calculus, and particular attention is given to non-holonomic mechanical systems. The author explains in detail all important aspects of the science of mechanics, regarded as a natural science, and shows how they are useful in understanding important natural phenomena and solving problems of interest in applied and engineering sciences. Professor Teodorescu has spent more than fifty years as a Professor of Mechanics at the University of Bucharest and this book relies on the extensive literature on the subject as well as th...

  16. Analysis of the Forward-Backward Trajectory Solution for the Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Mixed quantum-classical methods provide powerful algorithms for the simulation of quantum processes in large and complex systems. The forward-backward trajectory solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation in the mapping basis [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A507 (2012)] is one such scheme. It simulates the dynamics via the propagation of forward and backward trajectories of quantum coherent state variables, and the propagation of bath trajectories on a mean-field potential determined j...

  17. Trajectory-based understanding of the quantum-classical transition for barrier scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2018-06-01

    The quantum-classical transition of wave packet barrier scattering is investigated using a hydrodynamic description in the framework of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The nonlinear equation provides a continuous description for the quantum-classical transition of physical systems by introducing a degree of quantumness. Based on the transition equation, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to establish the connection between classical and quantum trajectories. The quantum-classical transition is then analyzed for the scattering of a Gaussian wave packet from an Eckart barrier and the decay of a metastable state. Computational results for the evolution of the wave packet and the transmission probabilities indicate that classical results are recovered when the degree of quantumness tends to zero. Classical trajectories are in excellent agreement with the transition trajectories in the classical limit, except in some regions where transition trajectories cannot cross because of the single-valuedness of the transition wave function. As the computational results demonstrate, the process that the Planck constant tends to zero is equivalent to the gradual removal of quantum effects originating from the quantum potential. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum-classical transition of wave packet barrier scattering.

  18. Fractional dynamics using an ensemble of classical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Dong, Hao; Zheng, Yujun

    2018-01-01

    A trajectory-based formulation for fractional dynamics is presented and the trajectories are generated deterministically. In this theoretical framework, we derive a new class of estimators in terms of confluent hypergeometric function (F11) to represent the Riesz fractional derivative. Using this method, the simulation of free and confined Lévy flight are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical and analytical results. In addition, the barrier crossing in a bistable potential driven by Lévy noise of index α is investigated. In phase space, the behavior of trajectories reveal the feature of Lévy flight in a better perspective.

  19. Trajectory description of the quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: ccchou@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-08-15

    The quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum–classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum–classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference.

  20. Quantum-classical correspondence for the Fourier spectrum of a trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    Using a displaced localized wavepacket (coherent state) as a quantum analog to a classical trajectory, we examine the Fourier spectrum of the expectation value of position Xsub(t)sup(Q), and compare it with the classical Fourier spectrum of position Xsub(t). In both the quasiperiodic and chaotic regimes, a strong classical-quantum correspondence exists in the Fourier spectrum. However, the quantum spectrum has certain interesting features not present in the classical case. (orig.)

  1. Effects of complex parameters on classical trajectories of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Permanent address: Department of Mathematics, University of Jaffna, Jaffna, Sri Lanka. ∗ ... is complex and k = 1 or 2) are closed and periodic only for a discrete set of parameter curves in the complex b-plane. ... are periodic for a discrete set of real energies (i.e., classical energy gets discretized or quantized by imposing ...

  2. Zero-point energy conservation in classical trajectory simulations: Application to H2CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kin Long Kelvin; Quinn, Mitchell S.; Kolmann, Stephen J.; Kable, Scott H.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2018-05-01

    A new approach for preventing zero-point energy (ZPE) violation in quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) simulations is presented and applied to H2CO "roaming" reactions. Zero-point energy may be problematic in roaming reactions because they occur at or near bond dissociation thresholds and these channels may be incorrectly open or closed depending on if, or how, ZPE has been treated. Here we run QCT simulations on a "ZPE-corrected" potential energy surface defined as the sum of the molecular potential energy surface (PES) and the global harmonic ZPE surface. Five different harmonic ZPE estimates are examined with four, on average, giving values within 4 kJ/mol—chemical accuracy—for H2CO. The local harmonic ZPE, at arbitrary molecular configurations, is subsequently defined in terms of "projected" Cartesian coordinates and a global ZPE "surface" is constructed using Shepard interpolation. This, combined with a second-order modified Shepard interpolated PES, V, allows us to construct a proof-of-concept ZPE-corrected PES for H2CO, Veff, at no additional computational cost to the PES itself. Both V and Veff are used to model product state distributions from the H + HCO → H2 + CO abstraction reaction, which are shown to reproduce the literature roaming product state distributions. Our ZPE-corrected PES allows all trajectories to be analysed, whereas, in previous simulations, a significant proportion was discarded because of ZPE violation. We find ZPE has little effect on product rotational distributions, validating previous QCT simulations. Running trajectories on V, however, shifts the product kinetic energy release to higher energy than on Veff and classical simulations of kinetic energy release should therefore be viewed with caution.

  3. Symmetrical Windowing for Quantum States in Quasi-Classical Trajectory Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Stephen Joshua

    An approach has been developed for extracting approximate quantum state-to-state information from classical trajectory simulations which "quantizes" symmetrically both the initial and final classical actions associated with the degrees of freedom of interest using quantum number bins (or "window functions") which are significantly narrower than unit-width. This approach thus imposes a more stringent quantization condition on classical trajectory simulations than has been traditionally employed, while doing so in a manner that is time-symmetric and microscopically reversible. To demonstrate this "symmetric quasi-classical" (SQC) approach for a simple real system, collinear H + H2 reactive scattering calculations were performed [S.J. Cotton and W.H. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7190 (2013)] with SQC-quantization applied to the H 2 vibrational degree of freedom (DOF). It was seen that the use of window functions of approximately 1/2-unit width led to calculated reaction probabilities in very good agreement with quantum mechanical results over the threshold energy region, representing a significant improvement over what is obtained using the traditional quasi-classical procedure. The SQC approach was then applied [S.J. Cotton and W.H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234112 (2013)] to the much more interesting and challenging problem of incorporating non-adiabatic effects into what would otherwise be standard classical trajectory simulations. To do this, the classical Meyer-Miller (MM) Hamiltonian was used to model the electronic DOFs, with SQC-quantization applied to the classical "electronic" actions of the MM model---representing the occupations of the electronic states---in order to extract the electronic state population dynamics. It was demonstrated that if one ties the zero-point energy (ZPE) of the electronic DOFs to the SQC windowing function's width parameter this very simple SQC/MM approach is capable of quantitatively reproducing quantum mechanical results for

  4. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations of particle confinement using dual levitated coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Lane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The particle confinement properties of plasma confinement systems that employ dual levitated magnetic coils are investigated using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. Two model systems are examined. In one, two identical current-carrying loops are coaxial and separated axially. In the second, two concentric and coplanar loops have different radii and carry equal currents. In both systems, a magnetic null circle is present between the current loops. Simulations are carried out for seven current loop separations for each system and at numerous values of magnetic field strength. Particle confinement is investigated at three locations between the loops at different distances from the magnetic null circle. Each simulated particle that did not escape the system exhibited one of four modes of confinement. Reduced results are given for both systems as the lowest magnetic field strength that exhibits complete confinement of all simulated particles for a particular loop separation.

  5. Gaussian elimination methods for calculating classical periodic trajectories in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.T.R.

    1991-08-01

    A Gaussian-elimination method for calculating classical periodic trajectories is formulated for a two-dimensional system. Two variants of the theory are obtained, one assuming that the period of the motion is fixed and the other assuming that the total energy is fixed. Comparisons are made between various approaches. 14 refs

  6. Zero-point energy constraint in quasi-classical trajectory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhen; Bowman, Joel M

    2006-04-27

    A method to constrain the zero-point energy in quasi-classical trajectory calculations is proposed and applied to the Henon-Heiles system. The main idea of this method is to smoothly eliminate the coupling terms in the Hamiltonian as the energy of any mode falls below a specified value.

  7. Comment on the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method for ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the procedure described by Olson and Salop for classical-trajectory Monte Carlo treatment of ion-atom collisions does not provide a uniform statistical distribution of all the parameters defining the initial conditions of a trajectory. Impact-ionization and charge-transfer cross sections for collisions of H + with H at H energies between 25 and 600 keV are recalculated eliminating this failing and compared with those obtained using the procedure of Olson and Salop and with experimental results

  8. Quantum theory of single events: Localized de Broglie-wavelets, Schroedinger waves and classical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.

    1990-06-01

    For an arbitrary potential V with classical trajectories x-vector=g-vector(t) we construct localized oscillating three-dimensional wave lumps ψ(x-vector,t,g-vector) representing a single quantum particle. The crest of the envelope of the ripple follows the classical orbit g-vector(t) slightly modified due to potential V and ψ(x-vector,t;g-vector) satisfies the Schroedinger equation. The field energy, momentum and angular momentum calculated as integrals over all space are equal to particle energy, momentum and angular momentum. The relation to coherent states and to Schroedinger waves are also discussed. (author). 6 refs

  9. Bifurcations and chaos of classical trajectories in a deformed nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Arvieu, R.

    1983-01-01

    The organization of the phase space of a classical nucleon in an axially symmetric deformed potential with the restriction Lsub(z)=0 is studied by drawing the Poincare surfaces of section. In the limit of small deformations three simple limits help to understand this organization. Moreover important bifurcations of periodic trajectories occur. At higher deformations multifurcations and chaos are observed. Chaos is developed to a larger extent in the heavier nuclei. (author)

  10. Classical model of intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniadakis, G.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we present a classical kinetic model of intermediate statistics. In the case of Brownian particles we show that the Fermi-Dirac (FD) and Bose-Einstein (BE) distributions can be obtained, just as the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MD) distribution, as steady states of a classical kinetic equation that intrinsically takes into account an exclusion-inclusion principle. In our model the intermediate statistics are obtained as steady states of a system of coupled nonlinear kinetic equations, where the coupling constants are the transmutational potentials η κκ' . We show that, besides the FD-BE intermediate statistics extensively studied from the quantum point of view, we can also study the MB-FD and MB-BE ones. Moreover, our model allows us to treat the three-state mixing FD-MB-BE intermediate statistics. For boson and fermion mixing in a D-dimensional space, we obtain a family of FD-BE intermediate statistics by varying the transmutational potential η BF . This family contains, as a particular case when η BF =0, the quantum statistics recently proposed by L. Wu, Z. Wu, and J. Sun [Phys. Lett. A 170, 280 (1992)]. When we consider the two-dimensional FD-BE statistics, we derive an analytic expression of the fraction of fermions. When the temperature T→∞, the system is composed by an equal number of bosons and fermions, regardless of the value of η BF . On the contrary, when T=0, η BF becomes important and, according to its value, the system can be completely bosonic or fermionic, or composed both by bosons and fermions

  11. Pseudoclassical fermionic model and classical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailagic, A.

    1981-08-01

    We study classical limit of fermionic fields seen as Grassmann variables and deduce the proper quantization prescription using Dirac's method for constrained systems and investigate quantum meaning of classical solutions for the Thirring model. (author)

  12. Technical description of the RIVM trajectory model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Waal, E.S.; Van Pul, W.A.J.

    1995-12-01

    The RIVM trajectory model, described in this report, enables calculation of a backward or forward trajectory. These trajectories are used to `follow` previous released air pollution in a backward mode or to `find` the origin of air pollution in a forward mode. The trajectories are used in the smog forecasting and in the TREND model for the distribution of materials in Europe. Presently 6-hourly ECMWF wind fields at 1000 and 850 hPa, with 3 deg x 3 deg latitude-longitude resolution are used. Wind fields with a different resolution in latitude-longitude can also be used after simple adjustments. An iterative method, described elsewhere, is applied to calculate the trajectories. Within limits, the user is free to choose the time step (1, 2 or 6-hour), transport height, length, starting or arrival date and starting or arrival position of the trajectory. The differences between the trajectories calculated with time steps of 1, 2 and 6 h were small. For the 96-hour trajectories at 1000 and 850 hPa the deviations were generally within 1 deg latitude and longitude, i.e. 100-200 km. The trajectory calculated with the 6-hour time step could be used without a great loss in accuracy compared to the calculations with the 1-hour time step. A typical error in the trajectory path at 1000 and 850 hPa was 500 km, which is about 30% of a typical travel distance. However, close to quickly changing weather systems, such as cyclones, the error can be as large as the travel distance and makes the calculations unreliable. The error in the forecasted trajectory was found to be larger than the above error estimation due to larger uncertainties in the forecasted compared to the analyzed wind fields. A manual on how to run the model is also given. 5 figs., 3 tabs., 5 refs., 6 appendices

  13. Bifurcations and chaos of classical trajectories in a deformed nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Arvieu, R.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose is to describe the general organization of the trajectories of a nucleon in a deformed potential both in phase space and in configuration space. This question gives rise to a very complex problem in a deformed potential. There one is in the frame of the theory of nonintegrable systems. Many very important mathematical theorems (like K.A.M. theorem) are needed as well as any results of bifurcation theory and also of numerical experiments. This work belongs entirely to classical mechanics. The main problems to be treated are: the organization of phase space, the connection with simple known limiting cases and bifurcation theory, and the occurrence of chaotic trajectories in a nuclear field. These problems must be solved as functions of the size, the deformation of the potential and the excitation energy of the particle

  14. Bifurcations and chaos of classical trajectories in a deformed nuclear potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, J; Arvieu, R

    1982-10-01

    The purpose is to describe the general organization of the trajectories of a nucleon in a deformed potential both in phase space and in configuration space. This question gives rise to a very complex problem in a deformed potential. There one is in the frame of the theory of nonintegrable systems. Many very important mathematical theorems (like K.A.M. theorem) are needed as well as any results of bifurcation theory and also of numerical experiments. This work belongs entirely to classical mechanics. The main problems to be treated are: the organization of phase space, the connection with simple known limiting cases and bifurcation theory, and the occurrence of chaotic trajectories in a nuclear field. These problems must be solved as functions of the size, the deformation of the potential and the excitation energy of the particle.

  15. Classical-trajectory simulation of accelerating neutral atoms with polarized intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Q. Z.; Fu, L. B.; Liu, J.

    2013-03-01

    In the present paper, we perform the classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation of the complex dynamics of accelerating neutral atoms with linearly or circularly polarized intense laser pulses. Our simulations involve the ion motion as well as the tunneling ionization and the scattering dynamics of valence electron in the combined Coulomb and electromagnetic fields, for both helium (He) and magnesium (Mg). We show that for He atoms, only linearly polarized lasers can effectively accelerate the atoms, while for Mg atoms, we find that both linearly and circularly polarized lasers can successively accelerate the atoms. The underlying mechanism is discussed and the subcycle dynamics of accelerating trajectories is investigated. We have compared our theoretical results with a recent experiment [Eichmann Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08481 461, 1261 (2009)].

  16. From a quantum to a classical description of intense laser-atom physics with Bohmian trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, X Y; Cai Qingyu; Zhan, M S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Bohmian mechanics is applied to intense laser-atom physics. The motion of an atomic electron in an intense laser field is obtained from the Bohm-Newton equation. We find that the quantum potential that dominates the quantum effect of a physical system becomes negligible as the electron is driven far from the parent ion by the intense laser field, i.e. the behavior of the electron smoothly tends towards classical soon after the electron is ionized. Our numerical calculations present direct positive evidence for semiclassical trajectory methods in intense laser-atom physics where the motion of the ionized electron is treated by classical mechanics, while quantum mechanics is needed before the ionization.

  17. UAV Trajectory Modeling Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Min

    2017-01-01

    Massive small unmanned aerial vehicles are envisioned to operate in the near future. While there are lots of research problems need to be addressed before dense operations can happen, trajectory modeling remains as one of the keys to understand and develop policies, regulations, and requirements for safe and efficient unmanned aerial vehicle operations. The fidelity requirement of a small unmanned vehicle trajectory model is high because these vehicles are sensitive to winds due to their small size and low operational altitude. Both vehicle control systems and dynamic models are needed for trajectory modeling, which makes the modeling a great challenge, especially considering the fact that manufactures are not willing to share their control systems. This work proposed to use a neural network approach for modelling small unmanned vehicle's trajectory without knowing its control system and bypassing exhaustive efforts for aerodynamic parameter identification. As a proof of concept, instead of collecting data from flight tests, this work used the trajectory data generated by a mathematical vehicle model for training and testing the neural network. The results showed great promise because the trained neural network can predict 4D trajectories accurately, and prediction errors were less than 2:0 meters in both temporal and spatial dimensions.

  18. Formaldehyde roaming dynamics: Comparison of quasi-classical trajectory calculations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Wang, Xiaohong; Ghosh, Aryya; Bowman, Joel M; Quinn, Mitchell S; Kable, Scott H

    2017-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of roaming in formaldehyde are studied by comparing quasi-classical trajectory calculations performed on a new potential energy surface (PES) to new and detailed experimental results detailing the CO + H 2 product state distributions and their correlations. The new PES proves to be a significant improvement over the past one, now more than a decade old. The new experiments probe both the CO and H 2 products of the formaldehyde dissociation. The experimental and trajectory data offer unprecedented detail about the correlations between internal states of the CO and H 2 dissociation products as well as information on how these distributions are different for the roaming and transition-state pathways. The data investigated include, for dissociation on the formaldehyde 2 1 4 3 band, (a) the speed distributions for individual vibrational/rotational states of the CO products, providing information about the correlated internal energy distributions of the H 2 product, and (b) the rotational and vibrational distributions for the CO and H 2 products as well as the contributions to each from both the transition state and roaming channels. The agreement between the trajectory and experimental data is quite satisfactory, although minor differences are noted. The general agreement provides support for future use of the experimental techniques and the new PES in understanding the dynamics of photodissociative processes.

  19. Classical kinematic model for direct reactions of oriented reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, I.; Prisant, M.G.; Levine, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A simple kinematic model based on the concept of an orientation-dependent critical configuration for reaction is introduced and applied. The model serves two complementary purposes. In the predictive mode the model provides an easily implemented procedure for computing the reactivity of oriented reagents (including those actually amenable to measure) from a given potential energy surface. The predictions of the model are compared against classical trajectory results for the H + D 2 reaction. By use of realistic potential energy surfaces the model is applied to the Li + HF and O + HCl reactions where the HX molecules are pumped by a polarized laser. A given classical trajectory is deemed reactive or not according to whether it can surmount the barrier at that particular orientation. The essential difference with the model of Levine and Bernstein is that the averaging over initial conditions is performed by using a Monte Carlo integration. One can therefore use the correct orientation-dependent shape (and not only height) of the barrier to reaction and, furthermore, use oriented or aligned reagents. Since the only numerical step is a Monte Carlo sampling of initial conditions, very many trajectories can be run. This suffices to determine the reaction cross section for different initial conditions. To probe the products, they have employed the kinematic approach of Elsum and Gordon. The result is a model where, under varying initial conditions, examining final-state distributions or screening different potential energy surfaces can be efficiently carried out

  20. Quantum Models of Classical World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hájíček

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of our recent work on three notorious problems of non-relativistic quantum mechanics: realist interpretation, quantum theory of classical properties, and the problem of quantum measurement. A considerable progress has been achieved, based on four distinct new ideas. First, objective properties are associated with states rather than with values of observables. Second, all classical properties are selected properties of certain high entropy quantum states of macroscopic systems. Third, registration of a quantum system is strongly disturbed by systems of the same type in the environment. Fourth, detectors must be distinguished from ancillas and the states of registered systems are partially dissipated and lost in the detectors. The paper has two aims: a clear explanation of all new results and a coherent and contradiction-free account of the whole quantum mechanics including all necessary changes of its current textbook version.

  1. Trajectory phases of a quantum dot model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genway, Sam; Hickey, James M; Garrahan, Juan P; Armour, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    We present a thermodynamic formalism to study the trajectories of charge transport through a quantum dot coupled to two leads in the resonant-level model. We show that a close analogue of equilibrium phase transitions exists for the statistics of transferred charge; by tuning an appropriate ‘counting field’, crossovers to different trajectory phases are possible. Our description reveals a mapping between the statistics of a given device and current measurements over a range of devices with different dot–lead coupling strengths. Furthermore insight into features of the trajectory phases are found by studying the occupation of the dot conditioned on the transported charge between the leads; this is calculated from first principles using a trajectory biased two-point projective measurement scheme. (paper)

  2. UAV Trajectory Modeling Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Min

    2017-01-01

    Large amount of small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (sUAVs) are projected to operate in the near future. Potential sUAV applications include, but not limited to, search and rescue, inspection and surveillance, aerial photography and video, precision agriculture, and parcel delivery. sUAVs are expected to operate in the uncontrolled Class G airspace, which is at or below 500 feet above ground level (AGL), where many static and dynamic constraints exist, such as ground properties and terrains, restricted areas, various winds, manned helicopters, and conflict avoidance among sUAVs. How to enable safe, efficient, and massive sUAV operations at the low altitude airspace remains a great challenge. NASA's Unmanned aircraft system Traffic Management (UTM) research initiative works on establishing infrastructure and developing policies, requirement, and rules to enable safe and efficient sUAVs' operations. To achieve this goal, it is important to gain insights of future UTM traffic operations through simulations, where the accurate trajectory model plays an extremely important role. On the other hand, like what happens in current aviation development, trajectory modeling should also serve as the foundation for any advanced concepts and tools in UTM. Accurate models of sUAV dynamics and control systems are very important considering the requirement of the meter level precision in UTM operations. The vehicle dynamics are relatively easy to derive and model, however, vehicle control systems remain unknown as they are usually kept by manufactures as a part of intellectual properties. That brings challenges to trajectory modeling for sUAVs. How to model the vehicle's trajectories with unknown control system? This work proposes to use a neural network to model a vehicle's trajectory. The neural network is first trained to learn the vehicle's responses at numerous conditions. Once being fully trained, given current vehicle states, winds, and desired future trajectory, the neural

  3. A classical model for the electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, M.

    1989-01-01

    The construction of classical and semi-classical models for the electron has had a long and distinguished history. Such models are useful more for what they teach us about field theory than what they teach us about the electron. In this Letter I exhibit a classical model of the electron consisting of ordinary electromagnetism coupled with a self-interacting version of Newtonian gravity. The gravitational binding energy of the system balances the electrostatic energy in such a manner that the total rest mass of the electron is finite. (orig.)

  4. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, C; Mucciolo, E R; Ruckenstein, A E; Yang, Z-C

    2017-05-12

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without 'learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  5. Improved transition models for cepstral trajectories

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Badenhorst, J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We improve on a piece-wise linear model of the trajectories of Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients, which are commonly used as features in Automatic Speech Recognition. For this purpose, we have created a very clean single-speaker corpus, which...

  6. Adatom Bond Dissociation in the Collision Between an Adsorbed Atom and Incident Diatomic Molecule: A Classical Trajectory Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayhan, U.

    2004-01-01

    The collisional dissociation of the Atom-Surface bond in the diatomic molecule (gas) / atom (ads) collision taking place on a bcc-structure surface have been studied by classical trajectory methods over the collision energy ranges and the attractive well depth of the diatomic molecule (gas) / atom (ads) interactions

  7. Classical and quasi-classical trajectory calculations of isotope exchange and ozone formation proceeding through O+O2 collision complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas A.; Gellene, Gregory I.

    2002-10-01

    The isotope exchange reaction, and the three-body ozone formation rate proceeding through an ozone complex, have been studied by classical and quasi-classical trajectory techniques. The exchange rate studies indicate that the rate of this reaction is dominantly sensitive to the O+O2 entrance channel characteristics of the potential energy surface. A detailed consideration of the dynamics of the intermediate ozone complex reveals three important classes. In one class, the complex adopts an ozonelike geometry, largely undergoing asymmetric stretchinglike motion until it dissociates. In a second class, the oxygen atom and molecule never visit the ozonelike geometry but rather remain separated by relatively large distances trapped near the angular momentum barrier in the entrance channel of a pseudo-effective potential. These complexes, which cannot undergo exchange, are, nevertheless, found to contribute significantly to ozone formation at high density of the third body suggesting that the association of the high-density effective formation rate constant with twice the exchange rate may not be valid. The third class can be considered a hybrid of the first two, spending some time as an ozonelike complex and some time as a large atom-diatomic complex. This third class provides a mechanism for rearranging atom locations in the complex (e.g., end and middle position swapping) and, consequently, would not be well accounted for by statistical treatments of the ozone complex based on a single ozonelike reference geometry. In general, the survival time distributions of the complexes are found to be nonexponential. However, when the detailed survival time distributions are coupled with a Lennard-Jones collision model for the stabilization step, the experimental ozone formation rate can be adequately modeled over a broad range of temperature and density.

  8. Integrable models in classical and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurco, B.

    1991-01-01

    Integrable systems are investigated, especially the rational and trigonometric Gaudin models. The Gaudin models are diagonalized for the case of classical Lie algebras. Their relation to the other integrable models and to the quantum inverse scattering method is investigated. Applications in quantum optics and plasma physics are discussed. (author). 94 refs

  9. Investigation of oxygen vibrational relaxation by quasi-classical trajectory method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrienko, Daniil; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Importance of attraction for the O 2 –O energy exchange in hypersonic flows. • O 2 –O vibrational relaxation time cannot be described by the Millikan–White equation. • Weak dependence of exothermic transition rates on translational temperature. • Multiquantum jumps in molecular oxygen occur mostly via the exchange reaction. - Abstract: O 2 –O collisions are studied by the quasi-classical trajectory method. A full set of cross sections for the vibrational ladder is obtained utilizing an accurate O 3 potential energy surface. Vibrational relaxation is investigated at temperatures between 1000 and 10,000 K, that are relevant to hypersonic flows. The relaxation time is derived based on the removal rate for the first excited vibrational level. A significant deviation from the formula by Millikan and White is observed for temperatures beyond those reported in experimental work. Relaxation becomes less efficient at high temperatures, suggesting that the efficiency of the energy randomization is strongly to the attractive component of the O 3 potential energy surface. These results are explained by analyzing the microscopic parameter of collisions that reflects the number of exchanges in the shortest interatomic distance. The rates of exothermic transitions are found to be nearly independent of the translational temperature in the range of interest.

  10. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(A-tilde) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode ν 2 with n 2 =0,...,6 quanta of vibration) in the A-tilde electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTU/SD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTU/SD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH 2 internal energy distributions obtained for n 2 =0 and n 2 >1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n 2 =1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n 2 values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH 2 internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n 2 =0 and n 2 =6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching

  11. Intersection of separatrices of periodical trajectories and non-integrability of the classical Yang-Mills equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaevskij, E.S.; Shchur, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    A perticular case of the Yang-Mills (YM) equations has been studied. For this system a transversal intersection of separatrices of unstable periodical trajectories is discovered, hence, it follows that there are no first real-analytical integrals of motion additional to the Hamiltonian. As a result, a complete set of integrals does not exist for the system describing the classical YM fields. Numerical methods of constructing separatrices, double-asymptotical solutions and of determining the angles between separatrices have been described

  12. Model predictive control classical, robust and stochastic

    CERN Document Server

    Kouvaritakis, Basil

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a textbook that brings together classical predictive control with treatment of up-to-date robust and stochastic techniques. Model Predictive Control describes the development of tractable algorithms for uncertain, stochastic, constrained systems. The starting point is classical predictive control and the appropriate formulation of performance objectives and constraints to provide guarantees of closed-loop stability and performance. Moving on to robust predictive control, the text explains how similar guarantees may be obtained for cases in which the model describing the system dynamics is subject to additive disturbances and parametric uncertainties. Open- and closed-loop optimization are considered and the state of the art in computationally tractable methods based on uncertainty tubes presented for systems with additive model uncertainty. Finally, the tube framework is also applied to model predictive control problems involving hard or probabilistic constraints for the cases of multiplic...

  13. Regularities in hadron systematics, Regge trajectories and a string quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.V.; Levchenko, B.B.

    2006-08-01

    An empirical principle for the construction of a linear relationship between the total angular momentum and squared-mass of baryons is proposed. In order to examine linearity of the trajectories, a rigorous least-squares regression analysis was performed. Unlike the standard Regge-Chew-Frautschi approach, the constructed trajectories do not have non-linear behaviour. A similar regularity may exist for lowest-mass mesons. The linear baryonic trajectories are well described by a semi-classical picture based on a spinning relativistic string with tension. The obtained numerical solution of this model was used to extract the (di)quark masses. (orig.)

  14. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  15. Classical Electron Model with QED Corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Lenk, Ron

    2010-01-01

    In this article we build a metric for a classical general relativistic electron model with QED corrections. We calculate the stress-energy tensor for the radiative corrections to the Coulomb potential in both the near-field and far-field approximations. We solve the three field equations in both cases by using a perturbative expansion to first order in alpha (the fine-structure constant) while insisting that the usual (+, +, -, -) structure of the stress-energy tensor is maintained. The resul...

  16. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  17. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(A) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode nu(2) with n(2)=0,[ellipsis (horizontal)],6 quanta of vibration) in the A electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTUSD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTUSD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH(2) internal energy distributions obtained for n(2)=0 and n(2)>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n(2)=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n(2) values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH(2) internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n(2)=0 and n(2)=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  18. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(Ã) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode ν2 with n2=0,…,6 quanta of vibration) in the à electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTU /SD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTU /SD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH2 internal energy distributions obtained for n2=0 and n2>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n2=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n2 values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH2 internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n2=0 and n2=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  19. VOTERS DECIDE. CLASSICAL MODELS OF ELECTORAL BEHAVIOR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is a extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decide becomes a central concern. In this paper we intend to locate the determinants of the vote decision in the electoral behavior classical theoretical models developed over time. After doing synthesis of classical schools of thought on electoral behavior we conclude that it has been made a journey through the mind, soul and cheek, as follows: the mind as reason in theory developed by Downs, soul as preferably for an actor in Campbell's theory, etc. and cheek as an expression of the impossibility of detachment from social groups to which we belong in Lazarsfeld's theory.

  20. Two simple models of classical heat pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, Rahul; Jayannavar, A M; Dhar, Abhishek

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by recent studies of models of particle and heat quantum pumps, we study similar simple classical models and examine the possibility of heat pumping. Unlike many of the usual ratchet models of molecular engines, the models we study do not have particle transport. We consider a two-spin system and a coupled oscillator system which exchange heat with multiple heat reservoirs and which are acted upon by periodic forces. The simplicity of our models allows accurate numerical and exact solutions and unambiguous interpretation of results. We demonstrate that while both our models seem to be built on similar principles, one is able to function as a heat pump (or engine) while the other is not.

  1. The simplest classical models of topological transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, M.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that simplest classical models of topologigal transitions possess scalar singularity of curvature with a point carrier being a source of space-time incompleteness. It is also shown that the condition of energy dominance is broken near the topological transition, asymptotic behaviour of the curvature tensor (growth of curvature at approximation to the topological transition) and energy-momentum tensor of (breaking the condition of energy dominance) being a common property of the considered models and being completely determined by the type of topological transition

  2. Trajectories and models of individual growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseniy Karkach

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognized that the patterns of growth play an important role in the evolution of age trajectories of fertility and mortality (Williams, 1957. Life history studies would benefit from a better understanding of strategies and mechanisms of growth, but still no comparative research on individual growth strategies has been conducted. Growth patterns and methods have been shaped by evolution and a great variety of them are observed. Two distinct patterns - determinate and indeterminate growth - are of a special interest for these studies since they present qualitatively different outcomes of evolution. We attempt to draw together studies covering growth in plant and animal species across a wide range of phyla focusing primarily on the noted qualitative features. We also review mathematical descriptions of growth, namely empirical growth curves and growth models, and discuss the directions of future research.

  3. Quantum Vertex Model for Reversible Classical Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo; Ruckenstein, Andrei; Yang, Zhicheng

    We present a planar vertex model that encodes the result of a universal reversible classical computation in its ground state. The approach involves Boolean variables (spins) placed on links of a two-dimensional lattice, with vertices representing logic gates. Large short-ranged interactions between at most two spins implement the operation of each gate. The lattice is anisotropic with one direction corresponding to computational time, and with transverse boundaries storing the computation's input and output. The model displays no finite temperature phase transitions, including no glass transitions, independent of circuit. The computational complexity is encoded in the scaling of the relaxation rate into the ground state with the system size. We use thermal annealing and a novel and more efficient heuristic \\x9Dannealing with learning to study various computational problems. To explore faster relaxation routes, we construct an explicit mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating a novel approach to reversible classical computation based on quantum annealing.

  4. X-ray Modeling of Classical Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Peter

    2010-01-01

    It has been observed and theoretically supported in the last decade that the peak of the spectral energy distribution of classical novae gradually shifts to higher energies at constant bolometric luminosity after a nova event. For this reason, comprehensive evolutionary studies require spectral analysis in multiple spectral bands. After a nova explosion, the white dwarf can maintain stable surface hydrogen burning, the duration of which strongly correlates with the white dwarf mass. During this stage the peak of the luminosity is in the soft X-ray band (15 - 60 Angstroms). By extending the modeling range of TLUSTY/SYNSPEC, I analyse the luminosity and abundance evolution of classical novae. Model atoms required for this work were built using atomic data from NIST/ASD and TOPBASE. The accurate but incomplete set of energy levels and radiative transitions in NIST were completed with calculated data from TOPBASE. Synthetic spectra were then compared to observed data to derive stellar parameters. I show the capabilities and validity of this project on the example of V4743 Sgr. This nova was observed with both Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories and has already been modeled by several scientific groups (PHOENIX, TMAP).

  5. Migration and spatial assimilation among U.S. Latinos: classical versus segmented trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Scott J; Crowder, Kyle; Chavez, Erick

    2005-08-01

    We used merged data from the Latino National Political Survey, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and the U.S. census to examine patterns and determinants of interneighborhood residential mobility between 1990 and 1995 for 2,074 U.S. residents of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban ethnicity. In several respects, our findings confirm the central tenets of spatial assimilation theory: Latino residential mobility into neighborhoods that are inhabited by greater percentages of non-Hispanic whites (i.e., Anglos) increases with human and financial capital and English-language use. However, these results also point to variations in the residential mobility process among Latinos that are broadly consistent with the segmented assimilation perspective on ethnic and immigrant incorporation. Net of controls, Puerto Ricans are less likely than Mexicans to move to neighborhoods with relatively large Anglo populations, and the generational and socioeconomic differences that are anticipated by the classical assimilation model emerge more strongly for Mexicans than for Puerto Ricans or Cubans. Among Puerto Ricans and Cubans, darker skin color inhibits mobility into Anglo neighborhoods.

  6. Semiclassical approach to mesoscopic systems classical trajectory correlations and wave interference

    CERN Document Server

    Waltner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This volume describes mesoscopic systems with classically chaotic dynamics using semiclassical methods which combine elements of classical dynamics and quantum interference effects. Experiments and numerical studies show that Random Matrix Theory (RMT) explains physical properties of these systems well. This was conjectured more than 25 years ago by Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit for the spectral properties. Since then, it has been a challenge to understand this connection analytically.  The author offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. He extends previous semiclassical approaches that treated spectral and conductance properties. He shows that RMT results can in general only be obtained semiclassically when taking into account classical configurations not considered previously, for example those containing multiply traversed periodic orbits. Furthermore, semiclassics is capable of describing effects beyond RMT. In this context he studies the effect of a non-zero Eh...

  7. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Caitlin R; Balsor, Justin L; Jones, David G; Murphy, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, myelin is viewed as insulation around axons, however, more recent studies have shown it also plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism, and neuroimmune signaling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T-cells. Furthermore, Golli-MBP has been called a "molecular link" between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex specifically, myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan. Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging. Golli-MBP has early developmental changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, and gradually increases into aging. There are three stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition, the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  8. Comparison Of Quantum Mechanical And Classical Trajectory Calculations Of Cross Sections For Ion-Atom Impact Ionization of Negative - And Positive -Ions For Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2GeV I - and Cs + ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of six, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stripping cross sections at high energies for electron orbitals with low ionization potential

  9. Model-based segmentation and classification of trajectories (Extended abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Buchin, K.; Buchin, M.; Sijben, S.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    We present efficient algorithms for segmenting and classifying a trajectory based on a parameterized movement model like the Brownian bridge movement model. Segmentation is the problem of subdividing a trajectory into parts such that each art is homogeneous in its movement characteristics. We

  10. Riemann surfaces of complex classical trajectories and tunnelling splitting in one-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hiromitsu; Mouchet, Amaury; Shudo, Akira

    2017-10-01

    The topology of complex classical paths is investigated to discuss quantum tunnelling splittings in one-dimensional systems. Here the Hamiltonian is assumed to be given as polynomial functions, so the fundamental group for the Riemann surface provides complete information on the topology of complex paths, which allows us to enumerate all the possible candidates contributing to the semiclassical sum formula for tunnelling splittings. This naturally leads to action relations among classically disjoined regions, revealing entirely non-local nature in the quantization condition. The importance of the proper treatment of Stokes phenomena is also discussed in Hamiltonians in the normal form.

  11. Quantum dynamics modeled by interacting trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Rodríguez, L.; Uranga-Piña, L.; Martínez-Mesa, A.; Meier, C.

    2018-03-01

    We present quantum dynamical simulations based on the propagation of interacting trajectories where the effect of the quantum potential is mimicked by effective pseudo-particle interactions. The method is applied to several quantum systems, both for bound and scattering problems. For the bound systems, the quantum ground state density and zero point energy are shown to be perfectly obtained by the interacting trajectories. In the case of time-dependent quantum scattering, the Eckart barrier and uphill ramp are considered, with transmission coefficients in very good agreement with standard quantum calculations. Finally, we show that via wave function synthesis along the trajectories, correlation functions and energy spectra can be obtained based on the dynamics of interacting trajectories.

  12. Mobility Modelling through Trajectory Decomposition and Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Faghihi, Farbod

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquity of mobile devices with positioning sensors make it possible to derive user's location at any time. However, constantly sensing the position in order to track the user's movement is not feasible, either due to the unavailability of sensors, or computational and storage burdens. In this thesis, we present and evaluate a novel approach for efficiently tracking user's movement trajectories using decomposition and prediction of trajectories. We facilitate tracking by taking advantage ...

  13. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-11

    Nov 11, 2013 ... Polanyi's classic paper, co-authored by Henry Eyring, reproduced in this ... spatial conf guration of the atoms in terms of the energy function of the diatomic .... The present communication deals with the construction of such .... These three contributions are complemented by a fourth term if one takes into.

  14. The importance of trajectory modelling in accident consequence assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.A.; Williams, J.A.; Hill, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Most atmospheric dispersion models used at present or probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) are linear: they take account of the wind speed but not the direction after the first hour. Therefore, the trajectory model is a more realistic description of the cloud's behaviour. However, the extra complexity means that the computing costs increase. This is an important factor for the MARIA code which is intended to be run on computers of varying power. The numbers of early effects predicted by a linear model and a trajectory model in a probabilistic risk assessment were compared to see which model should be preferred. The trajectory model predicted about 25% fewer expected early deaths and 30% more people evacuated than the linear model. However, the trajectory model took about ten times longer to calculate its results. The choice between the two models may depend on the speed of the computer available

  15. Construction of a coarse-grain quasi-classical trajectory method. II. Comparison against the direct molecular simulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R. L.; Grover, M. S.; Schwartzentruber, T. E.; Panesi, M.

    2018-02-01

    This work presents the analysis of non-equilibrium energy transfer and dissociation of nitrogen molecules (N2(g+1Σ) ) using two different approaches: the direct molecular simulation (DMS) method and the coarse-grain quasi-classical trajectory (CG-QCT) method. The two methods are used to study thermochemical relaxation in a zero-dimensional isochoric and isothermal reactor in which the nitrogen molecules are heated to several thousand degrees Kelvin, forcing the system into strong non-equilibrium. The analysis considers thermochemical relaxation for temperatures ranging from 10 000 to 25 000 K. Both methods make use of the same potential energy surface for the N2(g+1Σ ) -N2(g+1Σ ) system taken from the NASA Ames quantum chemistry database. Within the CG-QCT method, the rovibrational energy levels of the electronic ground state of the nitrogen molecule are lumped into a reduced number of bins. Two different grouping strategies are used: the more conventional vibrational-based grouping, widely used in the literature, and energy-based grouping. The analysis of both the internal state populations and concentration profiles show excellent agreement between the energy-based grouping and the DMS solutions. During the energy transfer process, discrepancies arise between the energy-based grouping and DMS solution due to the increased importance of mode separation for low energy states. By contrast, the vibrational grouping, traditionally considered state-of-the-art, captures well the behavior of the energy relaxation but fails to consistently predict the dissociation process. The deficiency of the vibrational grouping model is due to the assumption of strict mode separation and equilibrium of rotational energy states. These assumptions result in errors predicting the energy contribution to dissociation from the rotational and vibrational modes, with rotational energy actually contributing 30%-40% of the energy required to dissociate a molecule. This work confirms the

  16. BALCO 6/7-DoF trajectory model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wey, P.; Corriveau, D.; Saitz, T.A.; Ruijter, W. de; Strömbäck, P.

    2016-01-01

    BALCO is a six- and seven-degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation program based on the mathematical model defined by the NATO Standardization Recommendation 4618. The primary goal of BALCO is to compute high-fidelity trajectories for both conventional and precision-guided projectiles. The 6-DoF

  17. Classical model for nuclear collisions including the meson degree of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinet, R.; Kunz, J.; Mosel, U.; Wilets, L.

    1980-01-01

    Many different approaches have been taken to describe high energy heavy ion collisions. L. Wilets et al proposed a classical treatment of the problem. In his model non-relativistic nucleons move on classical trajectories. However, the Pauli-principle is simulated by a momentum dependent potential acting between the nucleons. This model is extended in two ways. The nucleons are coupled to a pionfield, which enables us to describe inelastic processes. Nucleons and pionfiled are treated completely relativistically, this also assures Lorentz invariance. We aim at a set of classical equations of motion describing the interacting system of nucleons and pionfield. These classical equations should have a quantum mechanical basis. Further, they should contain such fundamental properties of the pion-nucleon system as the Δ(3,3)-resonance, at least in a qualitative manner. (orig./FKS)

  18. Analysis of a classical chiral bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, H.

    1985-01-01

    The author studies a classical chiral bag model with a Mexican hat-type potential for the self-coupling of the pion fields. He assumes a static spherical bag of radius R, the hedgehog ansatz for the chiral fields and that the quarks are all in the lowest lying s state. The author has considered three classes of models, the cloudy or pantopionic bags, the little or exopionic bags and the endopionic bags, where the pions are allowed all through space, only outside the bag and only inside the bag respectively. In all cases, the quarks are confined in the interior. He calculates the bag radius R, the bag constant B and the total ground state energy R for wide ranges of the two free parameters of the theory, namely the coupling constant λ and the quark frequency omega. The author focuses the study on the endopionic bags, the least known class, and compares the results with the familiar ones of other classes

  19. Mode specific dynamics of the H2 + CH3 → H + CH4 reaction studied using quasi-classical trajectory and eight-dimensional quantum dynamics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua; Chen, Liuyang; Yang, Minghui; Lu, Yunpeng

    2015-01-01

    An eight-dimensional quantum dynamical model is proposed and applied to the title reaction. The reaction probabilities and integral cross sections have been determined for both the ground and excited vibrational states of the two reactants. The results indicate that the H 2 stretching and CH 3 umbrella modes, along with the translational energy, strongly promote the reactivity, while the CH 3 symmetric stretching mode has a negligible effect. The observed mode specificity is confirmed by full-dimensional quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The mode specificity can be interpreted by the recently proposed sudden vector projection model, which attributes the enhancement effects of the reactant modes to their strong couplings with the reaction coordinate at the transition state

  20. Foot trajectory approximation using the pendulum model of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Juan; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Galen, Sujay; Conway, Bernard A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Generating a natural foot trajectory is an important objective in robotic systems for rehabilitation of walking. Human walking has pendular properties, so the pendulum model of walking has been used in bipedal robots which produce rhythmic gait patterns. Whether natural foot trajectories can be produced by the pendulum model needs to be addressed as a first step towards applying the pendulum concept in gait orthosis design. This study investigated circle approximation of the foot trajectories, with focus on the geometry of the pendulum model of walking. Three able-bodied subjects walked overground at various speeds, and foot trajectories relative to the hip were analysed. Four circle approximation approaches were developed, and best-fit circle algorithms were derived to fit the trajectories of the ankle, heel and toe. The study confirmed that the ankle and heel trajectories during stance and the toe trajectory in both the stance and the swing phases during walking at various speeds could be well modelled by a rigid pendulum. All the pendulum models were centred around the hip with pendular lengths approximately equal to the segment distances from the hip. This observation provides a new approach for using the pendulum model of walking in gait orthosis design.

  1. Cluster dynamics: A classical trajectory study of A + A/sub n/arrow-right-leftA*/sub n/+1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, J.W.; Doll, J.D.; Thompson, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics of the collision of an atom A with a small cluster of atoms, A/sub n/, leading to the formation of a quasibound A*/sub n/+1 complex, which subsequently decays, has been studied using classical trajectories. Pairwise Lennard-Jones potentials (with parameters appropriate for argon) were used to describe the identical point masses (Ar). The results illustrate the feasibility of direct calculations of microscopic rates for nucleation processes. The dissociation of collisionally formed A*/sub n/+1 (n=3,4, and 5) occurs by first-order exponential decay. Furthermore the energy dependence of the dissociation rate constants appears to be well described by the RRK functional form

  2. Probabilistic Modeling of Aircraft Trajectories for Dynamic Separation Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    With a proliferation of new and unconventional vehicles and operations expected in the future, the ab initio airspace design will require new approaches to trajectory prediction for separation assurance and other air traffic management functions. This paper presents an approach to probabilistic modeling of the trajectory of an aircraft when its intent is unknown. The approach uses a set of feature functions to constrain a maximum entropy probability distribution based on a set of observed aircraft trajectories. This model can be used to sample new aircraft trajectories to form an ensemble reflecting the variability in an aircraft's intent. The model learning process ensures that the variability in this ensemble reflects the behavior observed in the original data set. Computational examples are presented.

  3. Galileo's Trajectory with Mild Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of Galileo's classical trajectory that persists in a simple resistance model is noted. The resistive model provides a case study for the classroom analysis of limiting behaviour of an implicitly defined function. (Contains 1 note.)

  4. A classical statistical model of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Teichert, J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the computer code TRAJEC which represents the numerical realization of a classical statistical model for heavy ion collisions is described. The code calculates the results of a classical friction model as well as various multi-differential cross sections for heavy ion collisions. INPUT and OUTPUT information of the code are described. Two examples of data sets are given [ru

  5. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Zipf exponent of trajectory distribution in the hidden Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V. V.; Lerner, E. Yu

    2014-03-01

    This paper is the first step of generalization of the previously obtained full classification of the asymptotic behavior of the probability for Markov chain trajectories for the case of hidden Markov models. The main goal is to study the power (Zipf) and nonpower asymptotics of the frequency list of trajectories of hidden Markov frequencys and to obtain explicit formulae for the exponent of the power asymptotics. We consider several simple classes of hidden Markov models. We prove that the asymptotics for a hidden Markov model and for the corresponding Markov chain can be essentially different.

  7. Zipf exponent of trajectory distribution in the hidden Markov model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkarev, V V; Lerner, E Yu

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first step of generalization of the previously obtained full classification of the asymptotic behavior of the probability for Markov chain trajectories for the case of hidden Markov models. The main goal is to study the power (Zipf) and nonpower asymptotics of the frequency list of trajectories of hidden Markov frequencys and to obtain explicit formulae for the exponent of the power asymptotics. We consider several simple classes of hidden Markov models. We prove that the asymptotics for a hidden Markov model and for the corresponding Markov chain can be essentially different

  8. Pomeron models and exchange degeneracy of the Regge trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontros, J.; Kontros, K.; Lengyel, A.

    2000-01-01

    Two models for the Pomeron, supplemented by exchange-degenerate sub-leading Regge trajectories, are fitted to the forward scattering data for a number of reactions. By considering new Pomeron models, we extend the recent results of the COMPAS group, being consistent with our predecessors

  9. Classical probability model for Bell inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We show that by taking into account randomness of realization of experimental contexts it is possible to construct common Kolmogorov space for data collected for these contexts, although they can be incompatible. We call such a construction 'Kolmogorovization' of contextuality. This construction of common probability space is applied to Bell's inequality. It is well known that its violation is a consequence of collecting statistical data in a few incompatible experiments. In experiments performed in quantum optics contexts are determined by selections of pairs of angles (θ i ,θ ' j ) fixing orientations of polarization beam splitters. Opposite to the common opinion, we show that statistical data corresponding to measurements of polarizations of photons in the singlet state, e.g., in the form of correlations, can be described in the classical probabilistic framework. The crucial point is that in constructing the common probability space one has to take into account not only randomness of the source (as Bell did), but also randomness of context-realizations (in particular, realizations of pairs of angles (θ i , θ ' j )). One may (but need not) say that randomness of 'free will' has to be accounted for.

  10. The effect of zero-point energy differences on the isotope dependence of the formation of ozone: a classical trajectory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Reinhard; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The effect of zero-point energy differences (DeltaZPE) between the possible fragmentation channels of highly excited O(3) complexes on the isotope dependence of the formation of ozone is investigated by means of classical trajectory calculations and a strong-collision model. DeltaZPE is incorporated in the calculations in a phenomenological way by adjusting the potential energy surface in the product channels so that the correct exothermicities and endothermicities are matched. The model contains two parameters, the frequency of stabilizing collisions omega and an energy dependent parameter Delta(damp), which favors the lower energies in the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. The stabilization frequency is used to adjust the pressure dependence of the absolute formation rate while Delta(damp) is utilized to control its isotope dependence. The calculations for several isotope combinations of oxygen atoms show a clear dependence of relative formation rates on DeltaZPE. The results are similar to those of Gao and Marcus [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 137 (2002)] obtained within a statistical model. In particular, like in the statistical approach an ad hoc parameter eta approximately 1.14, which effectively reduces the formation rates of the symmetric ABA ozone molecules, has to be introduced in order to obtain good agreement with the measured relative rates of Janssen et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 3, 4718 (2001)]. The temperature dependence of the recombination rate is also addressed.

  11. Wind field and trajectory models for tornado-propelled objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    1978-01-01

    This report contains the results of the second phase of a research program which has as its objective the development of a mathematical model to predict the trajectory of tornado-borne objects postulated to be in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. An improved tornado wind field model satisfies the no-slip ground boundary condition of fluid mechanics and includes the functional dependence of eddy viscosity with altitude. Sub-scale wind tunnel data are obtained for all of the missiles currently specified for nuclear plant design. Confirmatory full-scale data are obtained for a 12-inch pipe and automobile. The original six-degree-of-freedom trajectory model is modified to include the improved wind field and increased capability as to body shapes and inertial characteristics that can be handled. The improved trajectory model is used to calculate maximum credible speeds, which for all of the heavy missiles are considerably less than those currently specified for design. Equivalent coefficients for use in three-degree-of-freedom models are developed and the sensitivity of range and speed to various trajectory parameters for the 12-inch diameter pipe is examined

  12. Puff-trajectory modelling for long-duration releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, B.Y.

    1988-01-01

    This investigation considers some aspects of the interpretation and application of the puff-trajectory technique which is increasingly being considered for use in accident consequence assessment. It firsthigh lights the problems of applying the straight-line Gaussian model to releases of many hours duration and the drawbacks of using the ad hoc technique of multiple straight-line plumes, thereby pointing to the advantages of allowing curved trajectories. A number of fundamental questions are asked about the conventional puff-trajectory approach such as: what is the justification for using ensemble-average spread parameters (σ values) in constructing particular realizations of the concentration field and to what sampling time should these σ values correspond. These questions are answered in the present work by returning to basics: an interpretation of the puff-trajectory method is developed which establishes a correspondence between the omission of wind-field fluctuations with period below a given value in the generation of trajectories and the achievable spatial resolution of the estimates of time-integrated concentration. In application to accident consequence assessment, this focusses attention on what spatial resolution is necessary for particular consequence types or is implicit in the computational discretization employed

  13. A Model of Organizational Trajectories to Innovation Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvair Silveira Torres Jr.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The multiple-case study research in three industrial companies - located in Brazil- about organizational changing, comparing cases of lean production system implementation, revealed a suggested interpretation of the determinants and directions of organizational innovation. The model tries to account for both continuous changes and discontinuities in organizational innovation. Continuous changes are related to secondary innovation, which doesn’t break an organizational paradigm, while discontinuities are associated with a new trajectory, since a primary innovation adopted by the whole organization. Then, the innovative lean process associated with secondary innovation was inadequate to change the organizational trajectory and it explains the cyclical decisions. On the other hand, the lean production system related to primary innovation, assumes the role as a new trajectory, influencing changes in total organization. The greatest difference found in the companies for innovative diffusion process, was the aspect of spread the organizational principles or a simple set of management’s tools.

  14. Crack trajectory near a weld: Modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, M.M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2008-01-01

    A 2D computational model of ductile fracture, in which arbitrary crack extension through the mesh is accommodated without mesh bias, is used to study ductile fracture near the weld line in welded aluminum plates. Comparisons of the calculated toughness behavior and crack trajectory are made...

  15. An aircraft noise pollution model for trajectory optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkana, A.; Cook, G.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the generation of aircraft noise is developed with the ultimate purpose of reducing noise (noise-optimizing landing trajectories) in terminal areas. While the model is for a specific aircraft (Boeing 737), the methodology would be applicable to a wide variety of aircraft. The model is used to obtain a footprint on the ground inside of which the noise level is at or above 70 dB.

  16. Classical anisotropies in models of open inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga, J.; Mukhanov, V.F.

    1997-01-01

    In the simplest model of open inflation there are two inflaton fields decoupled from each other. One of them, the tunneling field, produces a first stage of inflation which prepares the ground for the nucleation of a highly symmetric bubble. The other, a free field, drives a second period of slow-roll inflation inside the bubble. However, the second field also evolves during the first stage of inflation, which to some extent breaks the needed symmetry. We show that this generates large supercurvature anisotropies which, together with the results of Tanaka and Sasaki, rule out this class of simple models (unless, of course, Ω 0 is sufficiently close to 1). The problem does not arise in modified models where the second field does not evolve in the first stage of inflation. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Classical solutions of some field theoretic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewski, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to simpler fields theories, so chosen that they possess several properties of nonabelian gauge theories. They preserve the conformal invariance of the action and one can define the topological charge for them. They possess nontrivial solutions to the equations of motion. The perturbation theory based on the fluctuations around each solution is characterized by asymptotic freedom. A model called CP sup(n-1) is presented and some models which are its natural generalizations are discussed. (M.F.W.)

  18. Models Supporting Trajectory Planning in Autonomous Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles have the potential to drastically improve the safety, efficiency and cost of transportation. Instead of a driver, an autonomous vehicle is controlled by an algorithm, offering improved consistency and the potential to eliminate human error from driving: by far the most common cause of accidents. Data collected from different types of sensors, along with prior information such as maps, are used to build models of the surrounding traffic scene, encoding relevant aspects of t...

  19. Chemical reaction dynamics of Rydberg atoms with neutral molecules: A comparison of molecular-beam and classical trajectory results for the H(n)+D2→HD+D(n') reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hui; Dai Dongxu; Wu Guorong; Wang, C.-C.; Harich, Steven A.; Hayes, Michael Y.; Wang Xiuyan; Gerlich, Dieter; Yang Xueming; Skodje, Rex T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent molecular-beam experiments have probed the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom reaction, H(n)+D 2 →HD+D(n) at low collision energies. It was discovered that the rotationally resolved product distribution was remarkably similar to a much more limited data set obtained at a single scattering angle for the ion-molecule reaction H + +D 2 →D + +HD. The equivalence of these two problems would be consistent with the Fermi-independent-collider model (electron acting as a spectator) and would provide an important new avenue for the study of ion-molecule reactions. In this work, we employ a classical trajectory calculation on the ion-molecule reaction to facilitate a more extensive comparison between the two systems. The trajectory simulations tend to confirm the equivalence of the ion+molecule dynamics to that for the Rydberg-atom+molecule system. The theory reproduces the close relationship of the two experimental observations made previously. However, some differences between the Rydberg-atom experiments and the trajectory simulations are seen when comparisons are made to a broader data set. In particular, the angular distribution of the differential cross section exhibits more asymmetry in the experiment than in the theory. The potential breakdown of the classical model is discussed. The role of the 'spectator' Rydberg electron is addressed and several crucial issues for future theoretical work are brought out

  20. ARTISTIC VISUALIZATION OF TRAJECTORY DATA USING CLOUD MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advance of location acquisition technologies boosts the generation of trajectory data, which track the traces of moving objects. A trajectory is typically represented by a sequence of timestamped geographical locations. Data visualization is an efficient means to represent distributions and structures of datasets and reveal hidden patterns in the data. In this paper, we explore a cloud model-based method for the generation of stylized renderings of trajectory data. The artistic visualizations of the proposed method do not have the goal to allow for data mining tasks or others but instead show the aesthetic effect of the traces of moving objects in a distorted manner. The techniques used to create the images of traces of moving objects include the uncertain line using extended cloud model, stroke-based rendering of geolocation in varying styles, and stylistic shading with aesthetic effects for print or electronic displays, as well as various parameters to be further personalized. The influence of different parameters on the aesthetic qualities of various painted images is investigated, including step size, types of strokes, colour modes, and quantitative comparisons using four aesthetic measures are also involved into the experiment. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method is with advantages of uncertainty, simplicity and effectiveness, and it would inspire professional graphic designers and amateur users who may be interested in playful and creative exploration of artistic visualization of trajectory data.

  1. Artistic Visualization of Trajectory Data Using Cloud Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.; Zhou, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2017-09-01

    Rapid advance of location acquisition technologies boosts the generation of trajectory data, which track the traces of moving objects. A trajectory is typically represented by a sequence of timestamped geographical locations. Data visualization is an efficient means to represent distributions and structures of datasets and reveal hidden patterns in the data. In this paper, we explore a cloud model-based method for the generation of stylized renderings of trajectory data. The artistic visualizations of the proposed method do not have the goal to allow for data mining tasks or others but instead show the aesthetic effect of the traces of moving objects in a distorted manner. The techniques used to create the images of traces of moving objects include the uncertain line using extended cloud model, stroke-based rendering of geolocation in varying styles, and stylistic shading with aesthetic effects for print or electronic displays, as well as various parameters to be further personalized. The influence of different parameters on the aesthetic qualities of various painted images is investigated, including step size, types of strokes, colour modes, and quantitative comparisons using four aesthetic measures are also involved into the experiment. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method is with advantages of uncertainty, simplicity and effectiveness, and it would inspire professional graphic designers and amateur users who may be interested in playful and creative exploration of artistic visualization of trajectory data.

  2. A classical trajectory study of the photodissociation of T1 acetaldehyde: The transition from impulsive to statistical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Keiran C.; Crittenden, Deborah L.; Kable, Scott H.; Jordan, Meredith J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies of the radical dissociation channel of T 1 acetaldehyde show conflicting behavior in the HCO and CH 3 product distributions. To resolve these conflicts, a full-dimensional potential-energy surface for the dissociation of CH 3 CHO into HCO and CH 3 fragments over the barrier on the T 1 surface is developed based on RO-CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ(DZ) ab initio calculations. 20 000 classical trajectories are calculated on this surface at each of five initial excess energies, spanning the excitation energies used in previous experimental studies, and translational, vibrational, and rotational distributions of the radical products are determined. For excess energies near the dissociation threshold, both the HCO and CH 3 products are vibrationally cold; there is a small amount of HCO rotational excitation and little CH 3 rotational excitation, and the reaction energy is partitioned dominantly (>90% at threshold) into relative translational motion. Close to threshold the HCO and CH 3 rotational distributions are symmetrically shaped, resembling a Gaussian function, in agreement with observed experimental HCO rotational distributions. As the excess energy increases the calculated HCO and CH 3 rotational distributions are observed to change from a Gaussian shape at threshold to one more resembling a Boltzmann distribution, a behavior also seen by various experimental groups. Thus the distribution of energy in these rotational degrees of freedom is observed to change from nonstatistical to apparently statistical, as excess energy increases. As the energy above threshold increases all the internal and external degrees of freedom are observed to gain population at a similar rate, broadly consistent with equipartitioning of the available energy at the transition state. These observations generally support the practice of separating the reaction dynamics into two reservoirs: an impulsive reservoir, fed by the exit channel dynamics, and a

  3. Critical properties of the classical XY and classical Heisenberg models: A renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, J. Ricardo; de Albuquerque, Douglas F.

    1997-02-01

    By using two approaches of renormalization group (RG), mean field RG (MFRG) and effective field RG (EFRG), we study the critical properties of the simple cubic lattice classical XY and classical Heisenberg models. The methods are illustrated by employing its simplest approximation version in which small clusters with one ( N‧ = 1) and two ( N = 2) spins are used. The thermal and magnetic critical exponents, Yt and Yh, and the critical parameter Kc are numerically obtained and are compared with more accurate methods (Monte Carlo, series expansion and ε-expansion). The results presented in this work are in excellent agreement with these sophisticated methods. We have also shown that the exponent Yh does not depend on the symmetry n of the Hamiltonian, hence the criteria of universality for this exponent is only a function of the dimension d.

  4. An hydrodynamic model for the calculation of oil spills trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paladino, Emilio Ernesto; Maliska, Clovis Raimundo [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Dinamica dos Fluidos Computacionais]. E-mails: emilio@sinmec.ufsc.br; maliska@sinmec.ufsc.br

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a mathematical model and its numerical treatment to forecast oil spills trajectories in the sea. The knowledge of the trajectory followed by an oil slick spilled on the sea is of fundamental importance in the estimation of potential risks for pipeline and tankers route selection, and in combating the pollution using floating barriers, detergents, etc. In order to estimate these slicks trajectories a new model, based on the mass and momentum conservation equations is presented. The model considers the spreading in the regimes when the inertial and viscous forces counterbalance gravity and takes into account the effects of winds and water currents. The inertial forces are considered for the spreading and the displacement of the oil slick, i.e., is considered its effects on the movement of the mass center of the slick. The mass loss caused by oil evaporation is also taken into account. The numerical model is developed in generalized coordinates, making the model easily applicable to complex coastal geographies. (author)

  5. Developmental trajectories of adolescent popularity: a growth curve modelling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillessen, Antonius H N; Borch, Casey

    2006-12-01

    Growth curve modelling was used to examine developmental trajectories of sociometric and perceived popularity across eight years in adolescence, and the effects of gender, overt aggression, and relational aggression on these trajectories. Participants were 303 initially popular students (167 girls, 136 boys) for whom sociometric data were available in Grades 5-12. The popularity and aggression constructs were stable but non-overlapping developmental dimensions. Growth curve models were run with SAS MIXED in the framework of the multilevel model for change [Singer, J. D., & Willett, J. B. (2003). Applied longitudinal data analysis. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press]. Sociometric popularity showed a linear change trajectory; perceived popularity showed nonlinear change. Overt aggression predicted low sociometric popularity but an increase in perceived popularity in the second half of the study. Relational aggression predicted a decrease in sociometric popularity, especially for girls, and continued high-perceived popularity for both genders. The effect of relational aggression on perceived popularity was the strongest around the transition from middle to high school. The importance of growth curve models for understanding adolescent social development was discussed, as well as specific issues and challenges of growth curve analyses with sociometric data.

  6. A classical model explaining the OPERA velocity paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Broda, Boguslaw

    2011-01-01

    In the context of the paradoxical results of the OPERA Collaboration, we have proposed a classical mechanics model yielding the statistically measured velocity of a beam higher than the velocity of the particles constituting the beam. Ingredients of our model necessary to obtain this curious result are a non-constant fraction function and the method of the maximum-likelihood estimation.

  7. An artificial neural network model for periodic trajectory generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, S.; Gander, R. E.; Wood, H. C.

    A neural network model based on biological systems was developed for potential robotic application. The model consists of three interconnected layers of artificial neurons or units: an input layer subdivided into state and plan units, an output layer, and a hidden layer between the two outer layers which serves to implement nonlinear mappings between the input and output activation vectors. Weighted connections are created between the three layers, and learning is effected by modifying these weights. Feedback connections between the output and the input state serve to make the network operate as a finite state machine. The activation vector of the plan units of the input layer emulates the supraspinal commands in biological central pattern generators in that different plan activation vectors correspond to different sequences or trajectories being recalled, even with different frequencies. Three trajectories were chosen for implementation, and learning was accomplished in 10,000 trials. The fault tolerant behavior, adaptiveness, and phase maintenance of the implemented network are discussed.

  8. Entropy in the classical and quantum polymer black hole models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livine, Etera R; Terno, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the entropy counting for black hole horizons in loop quantum gravity (LQG). We argue that the space of 3D closed polyhedra is the classical counterpart of the space of SU(2) intertwiners at the quantum level. Then computing the entropy for the boundary horizon amounts to calculating the density of polyhedra or the number of intertwiners at fixed total area. Following the previous work (Bianchi 2011 Class. Quantum Grav. 28 114006) we dub these the classical and quantum polymer models for isolated horizons in LQG. We provide exact micro-canonical calculations for both models and we show that the classical counting of polyhedra accounts for most of the features of the intertwiner counting (leading order entropy and log-correction), thus providing us with a simpler model to further investigate correlations and dynamics. To illustrate this, we also produce an exact formula for the dimension of the intertwiner space as a density of ‘almost-closed polyhedra’. (paper)

  9. Augmenting Parametric Optimal Ascent Trajectory Modeling with Graph Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Patrick D.; Zwack, Matthew R.; Edwards, Stephen; Steffens, Michael

    2016-01-01

    into Conceptual and Pre-Conceptual design, knowledge of the effects originating from changes to the vehicle must be calculated. In order to do this, a model capable of quantitatively describing any vehicle within the entire design space under consideration must be constructed. This model must be based upon analysis of acceptable fidelity, which in this work comes from POST. Design space interrogation can be achieved with surrogate modeling, a parametric, polynomial equation representing a tool. A surrogate model must be informed by data from the tool with enough points to represent the solution space for the chosen number of variables with an acceptable level of error. Therefore, Design Of Experiments (DOE) is used to select points within the design space to maximize information gained on the design space while minimizing number of data points required. To represent a design space with a non-trivial number of variable parameters the number of points required still represent an amount of work which would take an inordinate amount of time via the current paradigm of manual analysis, and so an automated method was developed. The best practices of expert trajectory analysts working within NASA Marshall's Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) were implemented within a tool called multiPOST. These practices include how to use the output data from a previous run of POST to inform the next, determining whether a trajectory solution is feasible from a real-world perspective, and how to handle program execution errors. The tool was then augmented with multiprocessing capability to enable analysis on multiple trajectories simultaneously, allowing throughput to scale with available computational resources. In this update to the previous work the authors discuss issues with the method and solutions.

  10. Bukhvostov–Lipatov model and quantum-classical duality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Bazhanov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bukhvostov–Lipatov model is an exactly soluble model of two interacting Dirac fermions in 1+1 dimensions. The model describes weakly interacting instantons and anti-instantons in the O(3 non-linear sigma model. In our previous work [arXiv:1607.04839] we have proposed an exact formula for the vacuum energy of the Bukhvostov–Lipatov model in terms of special solutions of the classical sinh-Gordon equation, which can be viewed as an example of a remarkable duality between integrable quantum field theories and integrable classical field theories in two dimensions. Here we present a complete derivation of this duality based on the classical inverse scattering transform method, traditional Bethe ansatz techniques and analytic theory of ordinary differential equations. In particular, we show that the Bethe ansatz equations defining the vacuum state of the quantum theory also define connection coefficients of an auxiliary linear problem for the classical sinh-Gordon equation. Moreover, we also present details of the derivation of the non-linear integral equations determining the vacuum energy and other spectral characteristics of the model in the case when the vacuum state is filled by 2-string solutions of the Bethe ansatz equations.

  11. Bukhvostov-Lipatov model and quantum-classical duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhanov, Vladimir V.; Lukyanov, Sergei L.; Runov, Boris A.

    2018-02-01

    The Bukhvostov-Lipatov model is an exactly soluble model of two interacting Dirac fermions in 1 + 1 dimensions. The model describes weakly interacting instantons and anti-instantons in the O (3) non-linear sigma model. In our previous work [arxiv:arXiv:1607.04839] we have proposed an exact formula for the vacuum energy of the Bukhvostov-Lipatov model in terms of special solutions of the classical sinh-Gordon equation, which can be viewed as an example of a remarkable duality between integrable quantum field theories and integrable classical field theories in two dimensions. Here we present a complete derivation of this duality based on the classical inverse scattering transform method, traditional Bethe ansatz techniques and analytic theory of ordinary differential equations. In particular, we show that the Bethe ansatz equations defining the vacuum state of the quantum theory also define connection coefficients of an auxiliary linear problem for the classical sinh-Gordon equation. Moreover, we also present details of the derivation of the non-linear integral equations determining the vacuum energy and other spectral characteristics of the model in the case when the vacuum state is filled by 2-string solutions of the Bethe ansatz equations.

  12. A model for helicopter guidance on spiral trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, S.; Slater, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    A point mass model is developed for helicopter guidance on spiral trajectories. A fully coupled set of state equations is developed and perturbation equations suitable for 3-D and 4-D guidance are derived and shown to be amenable to conventional state variable feedback methods. Control variables are chosen to be the magnitude and orientation of the net rotor thrust. Using these variables reference controls for nonlevel accelerating trajectories are easily determined. The effects of constant wind are shown to require significant feedforward correction to some of the reference controls and to the time. Although not easily measured themselves, the controls variables chosen are shown to be easily related to the physical variables available in the cockpit.

  13. Current algebra of classical non-linear sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forger, M.; Laartz, J.; Schaeper, U.

    1992-01-01

    The current algebra of classical non-linear sigma models on arbitrary Riemannian manifolds is analyzed. It is found that introducing, in addition to the Noether current j μ associated with the global symmetry of the theory, a composite scalar field j, the algebra closes under Poisson brackets. (orig.)

  14. Classical solutions for a one phase osmosis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lippoth, F.; Prokert, G.

    2011-01-01

    For a moving boundary problem modelling the motion of a semipermeable membrane by osmotic pressure and surface tension we prove the existence and uniqueness of classical solutions on small time intervals. Moreover, we construct solutions existing on arbitrary long time intervals, provided the

  15. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CPN-1 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Jack, I.; Jones, D.R.T.

    2002-01-01

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP N-1 model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied

  16. Rotating fluid models in classical and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvieu, R.; Troudet, T.

    1979-01-01

    To describe the behavior of high-spin nuclei it is necessary to refer back to the classical mechanics of fluids in rotation where some results are general enough to apply to the rotational nuclear fluid. It is then shown that the quantum model of rotational oscillator gives a simple classification of rotating configurations [fr

  17. Classical model of the Dirac electron in curved space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Pavsic, M.

    1987-01-01

    The action for the classical model of the electron exhibiting Zitterbewegung is generalized to curved space by introducing a spin connection. The dynamical equations and the symplectic structure are given for several different choices of the variables. In particular, we obtain the equation of motion for spin and compare it with the Papapetrou equation. (author)

  18. Modeling the quantum to classical crossover in topologically disordered networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schijven, P; Kohlberger, J; Blumen, A; Mülken, O

    2012-01-01

    We model transport in topologically disordered networks that are subjected to an environment that induces classical diffusion. The dynamics is phenomenologically described within the framework of the recently introduced quantum stochastic walk, allowing study of the crossover between coherent transport and purely classical diffusion. To study the transport efficiency, we connect our system with a source and a drain and provide a detailed analysis of their effects. We find that the coupling to the environment removes all effects of localization and quickly leads to classical transport. Furthermore, we find that on the level of the transport efficiency, the system can be well described by reducing it to a two-node network (a dimer). (paper)

  19. Quasi-classical trajectory approach to the O(1D)+HBr→OH+Br reaction stereo-dynamics on X1A' potential energy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Zheng Bin; Yin Ji-Qing; Meng Qing-Tian

    2011-01-01

    The vector properties of reaction O( 1 D)+HBr→OH+Br on the potential energy surface (PES) of X 1 A' ground singlet state are studied by using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) theory. The polarization-dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs), the average rotational alignment factor 2 (j' · k)>, as well as the distributions reflecting vector correlations are also computed. The analysis of the results shows that the alignment and the orientation distribution of the rotation angular momentum vector of product molecule OH is influenced by both the effect of heavy—light—heavy (HLH) type mass combination and the deep well of PES. (atomic and molecular physics)

  20. A classical trajectory study of the adatom -surface bond dissociation in the collision reaction between an adsorbed H atom and an N2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayhan, U.

    2005-01-01

    The collisionnal dissociation of the Adatom-Surface bond in the diatomic molecule N2(gas)/H(ads) collision taking place on a W(100) bcc-structure surface have been studied by classical trajectory method over the collision energy ranges (0.1-2.0 eV ) and the attractive well depth (0.19-4.0 eV). of the N2 molecule (gas)/H(ads) interactions. When the energy accumulate into the adatom bond, thus leading to a a large dissociation probability

  1. Modelling Behaviour Patterns of Pedestrians for Mobile Robot Trajectory Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Tamura

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Robots are expected to be operated in environments where they coexist with humans, such as shopping malls and offices. Both the safety and efficiency of a robot are necessary in such environments. To achieve this, pedestrian behaviour should be accurately predicted. However, the behaviour is uncertain and cannot be easily predicted. This paper proposes a probabilistic method of determining pedestrian trajectory based on an estimation of pedestrian behaviour patterns. The proposed method focuses on the specific behaviour of pedestrians around the robot. The proposed model classifies the behaviours of pedestrians into definite patterns. The behaviour patterns, distribution of the positions of the pedestrians, and the direction of each behaviour pattern are determined by learning through observation. The behaviour pattern of a pedestrian can be estimated correctly by a likelihood calculation. A robot decides to move with an emphasis on either safety or efficiency depending on the result of the pattern estimation. If the pedestrian trajectory follows a known behaviour pattern, the robot would move with an emphasis on efficiency because the pedestrian trajectory can be predicted. Otherwise, the robot would move with an emphasis on safety because the behaviour of the pedestrian cannot be predicted. Experimental results show that robots can move efficiently and safely when passing by a pedestrian by applying the proposed method.

  2. Single electron ionization and electron capture cross sections for (C{sup 6+}, H{sub 2}O) interaction within the Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, H.N., E-mail: tranngochoang@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Dao, D.D. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Incerti, S. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Karamitros, M. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Nhan Hao, T.V. [Center of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, K7/25 Quang Trung, Danang (Viet Nam); Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, College of Education, Hue University, 34 Le Loi Street, Hue City (Viet Nam); Dang, T.M. [VNUHCM-University of Science (Viet Nam); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Beyrouth (Lebanon)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a derivation of cross sections for single ionization and electron capture processes within the Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) approach. Specifically, we have used a potential stemming from an ab initio calculation in Green et al.’s framework to describe the dynamics of the water molecule system. Proposing a modified version of the Classical Over-Barrier (COB) potential, we have found that a cut-off of roughly 28 a.u. on the initial distance of the projectile produced a reasonable accuracy. A global agreement has been obtained in our calculations compared to experimental and other theoretical results for C{sup 6+} ion energies ranging from 10 keV/u to 10 MeV/u.

  3. Curved-space classical solutions of a massive supermatrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Takehiro; Bagnoud, Maxime

    2003-01-01

    We investigate here a supermatrix model with a mass term and a cubic interaction. It is based on the super Lie algebra osp(1 vertical bar 32,R), which could play a role in the construction of the eleven-dimensional M-theory. This model contains a massive version of the IIB matrix model, where some fields have a tachyonic mass term. Therefore, the trivial vacuum of this theory is unstable. However, this model possesses several classical solutions where these fields build noncommutative curved spaces and these solutions are shown to be energetically more favorable than the trivial vacuum. In particular, we describe in details two cases, the SO(3)xSO(3)xSO(3) (three fuzzy 2-spheres) and the SO(9) (fuzzy 8-sphere) classical backgrounds

  4. Classical solutions for the 4-dimensional σ-nonlinear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tataru-Mihai, P.

    1979-01-01

    By interpreting the σ-nonlinear model as describing the Gauss map associated to a certain immersion, several classes of classical solutions for the 4-dimensional model are derived. As by-products one points out i) an intimate connection between the energy-momentum tensor of the solution and the second differential form of the immersion associated to it and ii) a connection between self- (antiself-)duality of the solution and the minimality of the associated immersion. (author)

  5. Classical and Weak Solutions for Two Models in Mathematical Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulov, Tihomir B.; Valkov, Radoslav L.

    2011-12-01

    We study two mathematical models, arising in financial mathematics. These models are one-dimensional analogues of the famous Black-Scholes equation on finite interval. The main difficulty is the degeneration at the both ends of the space interval. First, classical solutions are studied. Positivity and convexity properties of the solutions are discussed. Variational formulation in weighted Sobolev spaces is introduced and existence and uniqueness of the weak solution is proved. Maximum principle for weak solution is discussed.

  6. Comparison of Trajectories Generated by the NOAA Oil Spill Model to Trajectories Produced Using HF Radar-Derived Curents in Monterey Bay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    .... Trajectories produced by the NOAA/HAZMAT On-Scene Spill Model, using different combinations of surface currents and winds, were compared to trajectories generated using HF radar-derived surface currents...

  7. Rock shape, restitution coefficients and rockfall trajectory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, James; Christen, Marc; Bühler, Yves; Bartelt, Perry

    2014-05-01

    Restitution coefficients are used in rockfall trajectory modelling to describe the ratio between incident and rebound velocities during ground impact. They are central to the problem of rockfall hazard analysis as they link rock mass characteristics to terrain properties. Using laboratory experiments as a guide, we first show that restitution coefficients exhibit a wide range of scatter, although the material properties of the rock and ground are constant. This leads us to the conclusion that restitution coefficients are poor descriptors of rock-ground interaction. The primary problem is that "apparent" restitution coefficients are applied at the rock's centre-of-mass and do not account for rock shape. An accurate description of the rock-ground interaction requires the contact forces to be applied at the rock surface with consideration of the momentary rock position and spin. This leads to a variety of rock motions including bouncing, sliding, skipping and rolling. Depending on the impact configuration a wide range of motions is possible. This explains the large scatter of apparent restitution coefficients. We present a rockfall model based on newly developed hard-contact algorithms which includes the effects of rock shape and therefore is able to reproduce the results of different impact configurations. We simulate the laboratory experiments to show that it is possible to reproduce run-out and dispersion of different rock shapes using parameters obtained from independent tests. Although this is a step forward in rockfall trajectory modelling, the problem of parametersing real terrain remains.

  8. Modelling Of Flotation Processes By Classical Mathematical Methods - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Ivana; Miljanović, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Flotation process modelling is not a simple task, mostly because of the process complexity, i.e. the presence of a large number of variables that (to a lesser or a greater extent) affect the final outcome of the mineral particles separation based on the differences in their surface properties. The attempts toward the development of the quantitative predictive model that would fully describe the operation of an industrial flotation plant started in the middle of past century and it lasts to this day. This paper gives a review of published research activities directed toward the development of flotation models based on the classical mathematical rules. The description and systematization of classical flotation models were performed according to the available references, with emphasize exclusively given to the flotation process modelling, regardless of the model application in a certain control system. In accordance with the contemporary considerations, models were classified as the empirical, probabilistic, kinetic and population balance types. Each model type is presented through the aspects of flotation modelling at the macro and micro process levels.

  9. Quantum–classical transition in the Caldeira–Leggett model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovács, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 5, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary); Institute of Nuclear Research, P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Fazekas, B. [Institute of Mathematics, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 12, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary); Nagy, S., E-mail: nagys@phys.unideb.hu [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 5, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary); Sailer, K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 5, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary)

    2017-01-15

    The quantum–classical transition in the Caldeira–Leggett model is investigated in the framework of the functional renormalization group method. It is shown that a divergent quadratic term arises in the action due to the heat bath in the model. By removing the divergence with a frequency cutoff we considered the critical behavior of the model. The critical exponents belonging to the susceptibility and the correlation length are determined and their independence of the frequency cutoff and the renormalization scheme is shown.

  10. Classically integrable boundary conditions for symmetric-space sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKay, N.J.; Young, C.A.S.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate boundary conditions for the non-linear sigma model on the compact symmetric space G/H. The Poisson brackets and the classical local conserved charges necessary for integrability are preserved by boundary conditions which correspond to involutions which commute with the involution defining H. Applied to SO(3)/SO(2), the non-linear sigma model on S 2 , these yield the great circles as boundary submanifolds. Applied to GxG/G, they reproduce known results for the principal chiral model

  11. Quasi-classical trajectory study of the role of vibrational and translational energy in the Cl(2P) + NH3 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Palacios, M; Corchado, J C; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2012-05-28

    A detailed state-to-state dynamics study was performed to analyze the effects of vibrational excitation and translational energy on the dynamics of the Cl((2)P) + NH(3)(v) gas-phase reaction, effects which are connected to such issues as mode selectivity and Polanyi's rules. This reaction evolves along two deep wells in the entry and exit channels. At low and high collision energies quasi-classical trajectory calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface previously developed by our group, together with a simplified model surface in which the reactant well is removed to analyze the influence of this well. While at high energy the independent vibrational excitation of all NH(3)(v) modes increases the reactivity by a factor ≈1.1-2.9 with respect to the vibrational ground-state, at low energy the opposite behaviour is found (factor ≈ 0.4-0.9). However, when the simplified model surface is used at low energy the independent vibrational excitation of all NH(3)(v) modes increases the reactivity, showing that the behaviour at low energies is a direct consequence of the existence of the reactant well. Moreover, we find that this reaction exhibits negligible mode selectivity, first because the independent excitation of the N-H symmetric and asymmetric stretch modes, which lie within 200 cm(-1) of each other, leads to reactions with similar reaction probabilities, and second because the vibrational excitation of the reactive N-H stretch mode is only partially retained in the products. For this "late transition-state" reaction, we also find that vibrational energy is more effective in driving the reaction than an equivalent amount of energy in translation, consistent with an extension of Polanyi's rules. Finally, we find that the non-reactive events, Cl((2)P)+NH(3)(v) → Cl((2)P) + NH(3)(v'), lead to a great number of populated vibrational states in the NH(3)(v') product, even starting from the NH(3)(v = 0) vibrational ground state at low energies

  12. Completeness of classical spin models and universal quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De las Cuevas, Gemma; Dür, Wolfgang; Briegel, Hans J; Van den Nest, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    We study mappings between different classical spin systems that leave the partition function invariant. As recently shown in Van den Nest et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 110501), the partition function of the 2D square lattice Ising model in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field can specialize to the partition function of any Ising system on an arbitrary graph. In this sense the 2D Ising model is said to be 'complete'. However, in order to obtain the above result, the coupling strengths on the 2D lattice must assume complex values, and thus do not allow for a physical interpretation. Here we show how a complete model with real—and, hence, 'physical'—couplings can be obtained if the 3D Ising model is considered. We furthermore show how to map general q-state systems with possibly many-body interactions to the 2D Ising model with complex parameters, and give completeness results for these models with real parameters. We also demonstrate that the computational overhead in these constructions is in all relevant cases polynomial. These results are proved by invoking a recently found cross-connection between statistical mechanics and quantum information theory, where partition functions are expressed as quantum mechanical amplitudes. Within this framework, there exists a natural correspondence between many-body quantum states that allow for universal quantum computation via local measurements only, and complete classical spin systems

  13. Macroeconomic Forecasts in Models with Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Białowolski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to construct a forecasting model oriented on predicting basic macroeconomic variables, namely: the GDP growth rate, the unemployment rate, and the consumer price inflation. In order to select the set of the best regressors, Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimators (BACE is employed. The models are atheoretical (i.e. they do not reflect causal relationships postulated by the macroeconomic theory and the role of regressors is played by business and consumer tendency survey-based indicators. Additionally, survey-based indicators are included with a lag that enables to forecast the variables of interest (GDP, unemployment, and inflation for the four forthcoming quarters without the need to make any additional assumptions concerning the values of predictor variables in the forecast period.  Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimators is a method allowing for full and controlled overview of all econometric models which can be obtained out of a particular set of regressors. In this paper authors describe the method of generating a family of econometric models and the procedure for selection of a final forecasting model. Verification of the procedure is performed by means of out-of-sample forecasts of main economic variables for the quarters of 2011. The accuracy of the forecasts implies that there is still a need to search for new solutions in the atheoretical modelling.

  14. Trajectory modeling of gestational weight: A functional principal component analysis approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglu Che

    Full Text Available Suboptimal gestational weight gain (GWG, which is linked to increased risk of adverse outcomes for a pregnant woman and her infant, is prevalent. In the study of a large cohort of Canadian pregnant women, our goals are to estimate the individual weight growth trajectory using sparsely collected bodyweight data, and to identify the factors affecting the weight change during pregnancy, such as prepregnancy body mass index (BMI, dietary intakes and physical activity. The first goal was achieved through functional principal component analysis (FPCA by conditional expectation. For the second goal, we used linear regression with the total weight gain as the response variable. The trajectory modeling through FPCA had a significantly smaller root mean square error (RMSE and improved adaptability than the classic nonlinear mixed-effect models, demonstrating a novel tool that can be used to facilitate real time monitoring and interventions of GWG. Our regression analysis showed that prepregnancy BMI had a high predictive value for the weight changes during pregnancy, which agrees with the published weight gain guideline.

  15. A possibilistic uncertainty model in classical reliability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cooman, G.; Capelle, B.

    1994-01-01

    The authors argue that a possibilistic uncertainty model can be used to represent linguistic uncertainty about the states of a system and of its components. Furthermore, the basic properties of the application of this model to classical reliability theory are studied. The notion of the possibilistic reliability of a system or a component is defined. Based on the concept of a binary structure function, the important notion of a possibilistic function is introduced. It allows to calculate the possibilistic reliability of a system in terms of the possibilistic reliabilities of its components

  16. A model of curved saccade trajectories: spike rate adaptation in the brainstem as the cause of deviation away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijne, Wouter; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Meeter, Martijn

    2014-03-01

    The trajectory of saccades to a target is often affected whenever there is a distractor in the visual field. Distractors can cause a saccade to deviate towards their location or away from it. The oculomotor mechanisms that produce deviation towards distractors have been thoroughly explored in behavioral, neurophysiological and computational studies. The mechanisms underlying deviation away, on the other hand, remain unclear. Behavioral findings suggest a mechanism of spatially focused, top-down inhibition in a saccade map, and deviation away has become a tool to investigate such inhibition. However, this inhibition hypothesis has little neuroanatomical or neurophysiological support, and recent findings go against it. Here, we propose that deviation away results from an unbalanced saccade drive from the brainstem, caused by spike rate adaptation in brainstem long-lead burst neurons. Adaptation to stimulation in the direction of the distractor results in an unbalanced drive away from it. An existing model of the saccade system was extended with this theory. The resulting model simulates a wide range of findings on saccade trajectories, including findings that have classically been interpreted to support inhibition views. Furthermore, the model replicated the effect of saccade latency on deviation away, but predicted this effect would be absent with large (400 ms) distractor-target onset asynchrony. This prediction was confirmed in an experiment, which demonstrates that the theory both explains classical findings on saccade trajectories and predicts new findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Semi-classical analysis of optical model ambiguities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuer, M.

    1979-01-01

    The ambiguities in the inverse problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics are analyzed in the framework of the JWKB method. When the classical turning point is unique for all values of the impact parameter (high energies region), the ambiguities proceed only from the quantization of the angular momentum. In the asymptotic region the difference between two particular equivalent potentials changes sign infinitely often. In addition, the set of equivalent potentials which have a given asymptotic form is bounded (except perhaps at the origin). When there are several turning points for small values of the impact parameter (low-energy region), new ambiguities arise from the fact that the parts of the potential that are located between turning points are not ''visible'' in the classical limit. The set of equivalent potentials wich have a given asymptotic form is then not bounded. Mumerical examples (of real and complex equivalent potentials) are given. The optical model ambiguities are studied. The potential depth ambiguities also appear in classical mechanics, but their discrete nature is a quantum property. The VR/sup p//sup( V/)=constant ambiguities can be explained by the quantum corrections to the spiral scattering phenomenon. An attempt to explain why ambiguities arise only with heavy particles scattering is also given

  18. Partitioning of the nonfixed excess energy and the reverse critical energy in CH2OH + --> CHO + +H2: A classical trajectory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Kim, Myung Soo; Park, Seung C.

    1996-04-01

    Dynamics of the four-centered elimination reaction CH2OH+→CHO++H2 has been investigated over the internal energy range 4.6-5.9 eV using the classical trajectory method. A realistic semiempirical potential reported previously [J. Chem. Phys. (in press, 1996)] has been used for the calculation. It has been found that the disposal of the nonfixed excess energy at the transition state and of the reverse critical energy can be considered independently as manifest in the sum rule analysis. The former is determined statistically while the latter dynamically. Based on the above idea, a method to determine the kinetic energy release distribution originating only from the reverse critical energy has been developed.

  19. Semi classical model of the neutron resonance compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Makio

    1995-01-01

    A Semi-classical model of compound nucleus is developed, where time evolution and recurrence for many degrees of freedom (oscillators) excited simultaneously are explicitly considered. The effective number of oscillators plays the role in the compound nucleus, and the nuclear temperatures are derived, which are in good agreement with the traditional values. Time structures of the compound nucleus at resonance are considered, from which equidistant level series with an envelope of strength function of giant resonance nature is obtained. S-matrix formulation for fine structure resonance is derived. (author)

  20. MESOILT2, a Lagrangian trajectory climatological dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Burk, K.W.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) directs the project, which is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The TSP directed PNL to demonstrate that its recommended approach for dose reconstruction is technically feasible and practical. This demonstration was Phase 1 of the project. This report is specifically concerned with the approach that PNL recommends for dealing with the atmospheric pathway. The TSP established a model domain for the atmospheric pathway for Phase 1 that includes 10 counties in Washington and Oregon and covers several thousand square miles. It is unrealistic to assume that atmospheric models which estimate transport and diffusion based on the meteorological conditions near the point of release of material at the time of release are adequate for a region this large. As a result, PNL recommended use of a Lagrangian trajectory, puff dispersion model for the Phase I study. This report describes the MESOILT2 computer code and the atmospheric transport, diffusion, deposition, and depletion models used in Phase I. The contents of the report include a technical description of the models, a user's guide for the codes, and descriptions of the individual code elements. 53 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Reaction dynamics of the four-centered elimination CH2OH + --> CHO + +H2: Measurement of kinetic energy release distribution and classical trajectory calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Seung C.; Kim, Myung Soo

    1996-03-01

    Mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy (MIKE) spectrum of CHO+ generated in the unimolecular dissociation of CH2OH+ was measured. Kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) was evaluated by analyzing the spectrum according to the algorithm developed previously. The average kinetic energy release evaluated from the distribution was extraordinarily large, 1.63 eV, corresponding to 75% of the reverse barrier of the reaction. A global analytical potential energy surface was constructed such that the experimental energetics was represented and that various features in the ab initio potential energy surface were closely reproduced. Classical trajectory calculation was carried out with the global analytical potential energy surface to investigate the causes for the extraordinarily large kinetic energy release. Based on the detailed dynamical calculations, it was found that the strained bending forces at the transition state and strengthening of the CO bond from double to triple bond character were mainly responsible for such a significant kinetic energy release. In addition, the dissociation products H2 and CHO+ ion were found to be rotationally excited in the trajectory calculations. This was attributed to the asymmetry of the transition state and the release of asymmetric bending forces. Also, the bending vibrational modes of CHO+ and the H2 stretching mode, which are coupled with the bending coordinates, were found to be moderately excited.

  2. Classic and New Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Blesa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders can be modeled in animals so as to recreate specific pathogenic events and behavioral outcomes. Parkinson’s Disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease of an aging population, and although there have been several significant findings about the PD disease process, much of this process still remains a mystery. Breakthroughs in the last two decades using animal models have offered insights into the understanding of the PD disease process, its etiology, pathology, and molecular mechanisms. Furthermore, while cellular models have helped to identify specific events, animal models, both toxic and genetic, have replicated almost all of the hallmarks of PD and are useful for testing new neuroprotective or neurorestorative strategies. Moreover, significant advances in the modeling of additional PD features have come to light in both classic and newer models. In this review, we try to provide an updated summary of the main characteristics of these models as well as the strengths and weaknesses of what we believe to be the most popular PD animal models. These models include those produced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropiridine (MPTP, rotenone, and paraquat, as well as several genetic models like those related to alpha-synuclein, PINK1, Parkin and LRRK2 alterations.

  3. Improvements on Semi-Classical Distorted-Wave model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Weili; Watanabe, Y.; Kuwata, R. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kohno, M.; Ogata, K.; Kawai, M.

    1998-03-01

    A method of improving the Semi-Classical Distorted Wave (SCDW) model in terms of the Wigner transform of the one-body density matrix is presented. Finite size effect of atomic nuclei can be taken into account by using the single particle wave functions for harmonic oscillator or Wood-Saxon potential, instead of those based on the local Fermi-gas model which were incorporated into previous SCDW model. We carried out a preliminary SCDW calculation of 160 MeV (p,p`x) reaction on {sup 90}Zr with the Wigner transform of harmonic oscillator wave functions. It is shown that the present calculation of angular distributions increase remarkably at backward angles than the previous ones and the agreement with the experimental data is improved. (author)

  4. An incremental DPMM-based method for trajectory clustering, modeling, and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Li, Xi; Tian, Guodong; Maybank, Stephen; Zhang, Zhongfei

    2013-05-01

    Trajectory analysis is the basis for many applications, such as indexing of motion events in videos, activity recognition, and surveillance. In this paper, the Dirichlet process mixture model (DPMM) is applied to trajectory clustering, modeling, and retrieval. We propose an incremental version of a DPMM-based clustering algorithm and apply it to cluster trajectories. An appropriate number of trajectory clusters is determined automatically. When trajectories belonging to new clusters arrive, the new clusters can be identified online and added to the model without any retraining using the previous data. A time-sensitive Dirichlet process mixture model (tDPMM) is applied to each trajectory cluster for learning the trajectory pattern which represents the time-series characteristics of the trajectories in the cluster. Then, a parameterized index is constructed for each cluster. A novel likelihood estimation algorithm for the tDPMM is proposed, and a trajectory-based video retrieval model is developed. The tDPMM-based probabilistic matching method and the DPMM-based model growing method are combined to make the retrieval model scalable and adaptable. Experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  5. Optimal Hankel Norm Model Reduction by Truncation of Trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, B.; Weiland, S.

    2000-01-01

    We show how optimal Hankel-norm approximations of dynamical systems allow for a straightforward interpretation in terms of system trajectories. It is shown that for discrete time single-input systems optimal reductions are obtained by cutting 'balanced trajectories', i.e., by disconnecting the past

  6. Hybrid quantum-classical modeling of quantum dot devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, Markus; Mittnenzweig, Markus; Koprucki, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The design of electrically driven quantum dot devices for quantum optical applications asks for modeling approaches combining classical device physics with quantum mechanics. We connect the well-established fields of semiclassical semiconductor transport theory and the theory of open quantum systems to meet this requirement. By coupling the van Roosbroeck system with a quantum master equation in Lindblad form, we introduce a new hybrid quantum-classical modeling approach, which provides a comprehensive description of quantum dot devices on multiple scales: it enables the calculation of quantum optical figures of merit and the spatially resolved simulation of the current flow in realistic semiconductor device geometries in a unified way. We construct the interface between both theories in such a way, that the resulting hybrid system obeys the fundamental axioms of (non)equilibrium thermodynamics. We show that our approach guarantees the conservation of charge, consistency with the thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by numerical simulations of an electrically driven single-photon source based on a single quantum dot in the stationary and transient operation regime.

  7. Continuing research on the classical spiraling photon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongrui

    2014-11-01

    Based no the classical spiraling photon model proposed by Hongrui Li, the laws of reflection, refraction of a single photon can be derived. Moreover, the polarization, total reflection, evanescent wave and Goos-Hanchen shift of a single photon can be elucidated. However, this photon model is still unfinished. Especially, the spiraling diameter of a photon is not definite. In this paper, the continuous research works on this new theory are reported. According to the facts that the diffraction limit of light and the smallest diameter of the focal spot of lenses are all equal to the wavelength λ of the light, we can get that the spiraling diameter of a photon equals to the wavelength λ, so we gain that the angle between the linear velocity of the spiraling photon υ and the component of the linear velocity in the forward direction υb is 45°, and the energy of a classical spiraling photon E = (1/2)mυ2 = (1/2)m2c2 = mc2. This coincides with Einstein's mass-energy relation. While it is obtained that the velocity of the evanescent wave in the vacuum is slower than the velocity of light in glass in straight line. In such a way, the optical fiber can slow the light down. In addition, the force analysis of a single photon in optical tweezers system is discussed. And the reason that the laser beam can capture the particle slightly downstream from the focal point can be explained.

  8. Classical symmetries of some two-dimensional models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well-known that principal chiral models and symmetric space models in two-dimensional Minkowski space have an infinite-dimensional algebra of hidden symmetries. Because of the relevance of symmetric space models to duality symmetries in string theory, the hidden symmetries of these models are explored in some detail. The string theory application requires including coupling to gravity, supersymmetrization, and quantum effects. However, as a first step, this paper only considers classical bosonic theories in flat space-time. Even though the algebra of hidden symmetries of principal chiral models is confirmed to include a Kac-Moody algebra (or a current algebra on a circle), it is argued that a better interpretation is provided by a doubled current algebra on a semi-circle (or line segment). Neither the circle nor the semi-circle bears any apparent relationship to the physical space. For symmetric space models the line segment viewpoint is shown to be essential, and special boundary conditions need to be imposed at the ends. The algebra of hidden symmetries also includes Virasoro-like generators. For both principal chiral models and symmetric space models, the hidden symmetry stress tensor is singular at the ends of the line segment. (orig.)

  9. Three-dimensional classical-ensemble modeling of non-sequential double ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, S.L.; Breen, L.; Tannor, D.; Panfili, R.; Ho, Phay J.; Eberly, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We have been using 1d ensembles of classical two-electron atoms to simulate helium atoms that are exposed to pulses of intense laser radiation. In this talk we discuss the challenges in setting up a 3d classical ensemble that can mimic the quantum ground state of helium. We then report studies in which each one of 500,000 two-electron trajectories is followed in 3d through a ten-cycle (25 fs) 780 nm laser pulse. We examine double-ionization yield for various intensities, finding the familiar knee structure. We consider the momentum spread of outcoming electrons in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of laser polarization, and find results that are consistent with experiment. We examine individual trajectories and recollision processes that lead to double ionization, considering the best phases of the laser cycle for recollision events and looking at the possible time delay between recollision and emergence. We consider also the number of recollision events, and find that multiple recollisions are common in the classical ensemble. We investigate which collisional processes lead to various final electron momenta. We conclude with comments regarding the ability of classical mechanics to describe non-sequential double ionization, and a quick summary of similarities and differences between 1d and 3d classical double ionization using energy-trajectory comparisons. Refs. 3 (author)

  10. Simple classical model for Fano statistics in radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Security Division - Radiological and Chemical Sciences Group PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)], E-mail: David.Jordan@pnl.gov; Renholds, Andrea S.; Jaffe, John E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Rene Corrales, L.; Peurrung, Anthony J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Security Division - Radiological and Chemical Sciences Group PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    A simple classical model that captures the essential statistics of energy partitioning processes involved in the creation of information carriers (ICs) in radiation detectors is presented. The model pictures IC formation from a fixed amount of deposited energy in terms of the statistically analogous process of successively sampling water from a large, finite-volume container ('bathtub') with a small dipping implement ('shot or whiskey glass'). The model exhibits sub-Poisson variance in the distribution of the number of ICs generated (the 'Fano effect'). Elementary statistical analysis of the model clarifies the role of energy conservation in producing the Fano effect and yields Fano's prescription for computing the relative variance of the IC number distribution in terms of the mean and variance of the underlying, single-IC energy distribution. The partitioning model is applied to the development of the impact ionization cascade in semiconductor radiation detectors. It is shown that, in tandem with simple assumptions regarding the distribution of energies required to create an (electron, hole) pair, the model yields an energy-independent Fano factor of 0.083, in accord with the lower end of the range of literature values reported for silicon and high-purity germanium. The utility of this simple picture as a diagnostic tool for guiding or constraining more detailed, 'microscopic' physical models of detector material response to ionizing radiation is discussed.

  11. Three-stage classical molecular dynamics model for simulation of heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godre Subodh S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage Classical Molecular Dynamics (3S-CMD approach for heavy-ion fusion is developed. In this approach the Classical Rigid-Body Dynamics simulation for heavy-ion collision involving light deformed nucleus is initiated on their Rutherford trajectories at very large initial separation. Collision simulation is then followed by relaxation of the rigid-body constrains for one or both the colliding nuclei at distances close to the barrier when the trajectories of all the nucleons are obtained in a Classical Molecular Dynamics approach. This 3S-CMD approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but also the internal vibrational excitations of one or both the nuclei at distances close to the barrier. The results of the dynamical simulation for 24Mg+208Pb collision show significant modification of the fusion barrier and calculated fusion cross sections due to internal excitations.

  12. High Altitude Venus Operations Concept Trajectory Design, Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Rafael A.; Ozoroski, Thomas A.; Van Norman, John W.; Arney, Dale C.; Dec, John A.; Jones, Christopher A.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.

    2015-01-01

    A trajectory design and analysis that describes aerocapture, entry, descent, and inflation of manned and unmanned High Altitude Venus Operation Concept (HAVOC) lighter-than-air missions is presented. Mission motivation, concept of operations, and notional entry vehicle designs are presented. The initial trajectory design space is analyzed and discussed before investigating specific trajectories that are deemed representative of a feasible Venus mission. Under the project assumptions, while the high-mass crewed mission will require further research into aerodynamic decelerator technology, it was determined that the unmanned robotic mission is feasible using current technology.

  13. Classical nucleation theory in the phase-field crystal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jreidini, Paul; Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2018-04-01

    A full understanding of polycrystalline materials requires studying the process of nucleation, a thermally activated phase transition that typically occurs at atomistic scales. The numerical modeling of this process is problematic for traditional numerical techniques: commonly used phase-field methods' resolution does not extend to the atomic scales at which nucleation takes places, while atomistic methods such as molecular dynamics are incapable of scaling to the mesoscale regime where late-stage growth and structure formation takes place following earlier nucleation. Consequently, it is of interest to examine nucleation in the more recently proposed phase-field crystal (PFC) model, which attempts to bridge the atomic and mesoscale regimes in microstructure simulations. In this work, we numerically calculate homogeneous liquid-to-solid nucleation rates and incubation times in the simplest version of the PFC model, for various parameter choices. We show that the model naturally exhibits qualitative agreement with the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT) despite a lack of some explicit atomistic features presumed in CNT. We also examine the early appearance of lattice structure in nucleating grains, finding disagreement with some basic assumptions of CNT. We then argue that a quantitatively correct nucleation theory for the PFC model would require extending CNT to a multivariable theory.

  14. Coherent states and classical limit of algebraic quantum models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutaru, H.

    1983-01-01

    The algebraic models for collective motion in nuclear physics belong to a class of theories the basic observables of which generate selfadjoint representations of finite dimensional, real Lie algebras, or of the enveloping algebras of these Lie algebras. The simplest and most used for illustrations model of this kind is the Lipkin model, which is associated with the Lie algebra of the three dimensional rotations group, and which presents all characteristic features of an algebraic model. The Lipkin Hamiltonian is the image, of an element of the enveloping algebra of the algebra SO under a representation. In order to understand the structure of the algebraic models the author remarks that in both classical and quantum mechanics the dynamics is associated to a typical algebraic structure which we shall call a dynamical algebra. In this paper he shows how the constructions can be made in the case of the algebraic quantum systems. The construction of the symplectic manifold M can be made in this case using a quantum analog of the momentum map which he defines

  15. Classical nucleation theory in the phase-field crystal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jreidini, Paul; Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2018-04-01

    A full understanding of polycrystalline materials requires studying the process of nucleation, a thermally activated phase transition that typically occurs at atomistic scales. The numerical modeling of this process is problematic for traditional numerical techniques: commonly used phase-field methods' resolution does not extend to the atomic scales at which nucleation takes places, while atomistic methods such as molecular dynamics are incapable of scaling to the mesoscale regime where late-stage growth and structure formation takes place following earlier nucleation. Consequently, it is of interest to examine nucleation in the more recently proposed phase-field crystal (PFC) model, which attempts to bridge the atomic and mesoscale regimes in microstructure simulations. In this work, we numerically calculate homogeneous liquid-to-solid nucleation rates and incubation times in the simplest version of the PFC model, for various parameter choices. We show that the model naturally exhibits qualitative agreement with the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT) despite a lack of some explicit atomistic features presumed in CNT. We also examine the early appearance of lattice structure in nucleating grains, finding disagreement with some basic assumptions of CNT. We then argue that a quantitatively correct nucleation theory for the PFC model would require extending CNT to a multivariable theory.

  16. A classical-quantum coupling strategy for a hierarchy of one dimensional models for semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Jourdana, Clément; Pietra, Paola; Vauchelet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We consider one dimensional coupled classical-quantum models for quantum semiconductor device simulations. The coupling occurs in the space variable : the domain of the device is divided into a region with strong quantum effects (quantum zone) and a region where quantum effects are negligible (classical zone). In the classical zone, transport in diffusive approximation is modeled through diffusive limits of the Boltzmann transport equation. This leads to a hierarchy of classical model. The qu...

  17. Neural network versus classical time series forecasting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Maria Elena; Safuan, Hamizah Mohd; Shab, Noorzehan Fazahiyah Md; Asrul, Mohd; Abdullah, Affendi; Mohamad, Nurul Asmaa Izzati; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam

    2017-05-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) has advantage in time series forecasting as it has potential to solve complex forecasting problems. This is because ANN is data driven approach which able to be trained to map past values of a time series. In this study the forecast performance between neural network and classical time series forecasting method namely seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average models was being compared by utilizing gold price data. Moreover, the effect of different data preprocessing on the forecast performance of neural network being examined. The forecast accuracy was evaluated using mean absolute deviation, root mean square error and mean absolute percentage error. It was found that ANN produced the most accurate forecast when Box-Cox transformation was used as data preprocessing.

  18. Windfield and trajectory models for tornado-propelled objects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmann, G.H.; Radbill, J.R.; Marte, J.E.; Dergarabedian, P.; Fendell, F.E.

    1983-03-01

    This is the final report of a three-phased research project to develop a six-degree-of-freedom mathematical model to predict the trajectories of tornado-propelled objects. The model is based on the meteorological, aerodynamic, and dynamic processes that govern the trajectories of missiles in a tornadic windfield. The aerodynamic coefficients for the postulated missiles were obtained from full-scale wind tunnel tests on a 12-inch pipe and car and from drop tests. Rocket sled tests were run whereby the 12-inch pipe and car were injected into a worst-case tornado windfield in order to verify the trajectory model. To simplify and facilitate the use of the trajectory model for design applications without having to run the computer program, this report gives the trajectory data for NRC-postulated missiles in tables based on given variables of initial conditions of injection and tornado windfield. Complete descriptions of the tornado windfield and trajectory models are presented. The trajectory model computer program is also included for those desiring to perform trajectory or sensitivity analyses beyond those included in the report or for those wishing to examine other missiles and use other variables

  19. Trajectory control sensor engineering model detailed test objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekome, Kent; Barr, Joseph Martin

    1991-01-01

    The concept employed in an existing Trajectory Control Sensor (TCS) breadboard is being developed into an engineering model to be considered for flight on the Shuttle as a Detailed Test Objective (DTO). The sensor design addresses the needs of Shuttle/SSF docking/berthing by providing relative range and range rate to 1500 meters as well as the perceived needs of AR&C by relative attitude measurement over the last 100 meters. Range measurement is determined using a four-tone ranging technique. The Doppler shift on the highest frequency tone will be used to provide direct measurement of range rate. Bearing rate and attitude rates will be determined through back differencing of bearing and attitude, respectively. The target consists of an isosceles triangle configuration of three optical retroreflectors, roughly one meter and one-half meter in size. After target acquisition, the sensor continually updates the positions of the three retros at a rate of about one hertz. The engineering model is expected to weigh about 25 pounds, consume 25-30 watts, and have an envelope of about 1.25 cubic feet. The following concerns were addressed during the presentation: are there any concerns with differentiating attitude and bearing to get attitude and bearing rates? Since the docking scenario has low data bandwidth, back differencing is a sufficient approximation of a perfect differentiator for this application. Could range data be obtained if there were no retroreflectors on the target vehicle? Possibly, but only at close range. It would be dependent on target characteristics.

  20. Classical and Quantum Consistency of the DGP Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, A; Nicolis, Alberto; Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    We study the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model by the method of the boundary effective action. The truncation of this action to the bending mode \\pi consistently describes physics in a wide range of regimes both at the classical and at the quantum level. The Vainshtein effect, which restores agreement with precise tests of general relativity, follows straightforwardly. We give a simple and general proof of stability, i.e. absence of ghosts in the fluctuations, valid for most of the relevant cases, like for instance the spherical source in asymptotically flat space. However we confirm that around certain interesting self-accelerating cosmological solutions there is a ghost. We consider the issue of quantum corrections. Around flat space \\pi becomes strongly coupled below a macroscopic length of 1000 km, thus impairing the predictivity of the model. Indeed the tower of higher dimensional operators which is expected by a generic UV completion of the model limits predictivity at even larger length scales. We outline ...

  1. Van der Waals coefficients beyond the classical shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Jianmin, E-mail: jianmint@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Fang, Yuan; Hao, Pan [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Scuseria, G. E. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892, USA and Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Van der Waals (vdW) coefficients can be accurately generated and understood by modelling the dynamic multipole polarizability of each interacting object. Accurate static polarizabilities are the key to accurate dynamic polarizabilities and vdW coefficients. In this work, we present and study in detail a hollow-sphere model for the dynamic multipole polarizability proposed recently by two of the present authors (JT and JPP) to simulate the vdW coefficients for inhomogeneous systems that allow for a cavity. The inputs to this model are the accurate static multipole polarizabilities and the electron density. A simplification of the full hollow-sphere model, the single-frequency approximation (SFA), circumvents the need for a detailed electron density and for a double numerical integration over space. We find that the hollow-sphere model in SFA is not only accurate for nanoclusters and cage molecules (e.g., fullerenes) but also yields vdW coefficients among atoms, fullerenes, and small clusters in good agreement with expensive time-dependent density functional calculations. However, the classical shell model (CSM), which inputs the static dipole polarizabilities and estimates the static higher-order multipole polarizabilities therefrom, is accurate for the higher-order vdW coefficients only when the interacting objects are large. For the lowest-order vdW coefficient C{sub 6}, SFA and CSM are exactly the same. The higher-order (C{sub 8} and C{sub 10}) terms of the vdW expansion can be almost as important as the C{sub 6} term in molecular crystals. Application to a variety of clusters shows that there is strong non-additivity of the long-range vdW interactions between nanoclusters.

  2. Computer modeling of oil spill trajectories with a high accuracy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Martinez, Reinaldo; Flores-Tovar, Henry

    1999-01-01

    This paper proposes a high accuracy numerical method to model oil spill trajectories using a particle-tracking algorithm. The Euler method, used to calculate oil trajectories, can give adequate solutions in most open ocean applications. However, this method may not predict accurate particle trajectories in certain highly non-uniform velocity fields near coastal zones or in river problems. Simple numerical experiments show that the Euler method may also introduce artificial numerical dispersion that could lead to overestimation of spill areas. This article proposes a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with fourth-order velocity interpolation to calculate oil trajectories that minimise these problems. The algorithm is implemented in the OilTrack model to predict oil trajectories following the 'Nissos Amorgos' oil spill accident that occurred in the Gulf of Venezuela in 1997. Despite lack of adequate field information, model results compare well with observations in the impacted area. (Author)

  3. Fully differential cross sections for the single ionization of helium by fast ions: Classical model calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2018-04-01

    Fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) have been calculated for the single ionization of helium by 1- and 3-MeV proton and 100-MeV/u C6 + ion impact using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method in the nonrelativistic, three-body approximation. The calculations were made employing a Wigner-type model in which the quantum-mechanical position distribution of the electron is approximated by a weighted integral of the microcanonical distribution over a range of the binding energy of the electron. In the scattering plane, the model satisfactorily reproduces the observed shape of the binary peak. In the region of the peak the calculated FDCSs agree well with the results of continuum-distorted-wave calculations for all the investigated collisions. For 1-MeV proton impact the experimentally observed shift of the binary peak with respect to the first Born approximation is compared with the shifts obtained by different higher-order quantum-mechanical theories and the present CTMC method. The best result was achieved by CTMC, but still a large part of the shift remained unexplained. Furthermore, it was found that the classical theory failed to reproduce the shape of the recoil peak observed in the experiments, it predicts a much narrower peak. This indicates that the formation of the recoil peak is dominated by quantum-mechanical effects. For 100-MeV/u C6 + ion impact the present CTMC calculations confirmed the existence of the "double-peak" structure of the angular distribution of the electron in the plane perpendicular to the momentum transfer, in accordance with the observation, the prediction of an incoherent semiclassical model, and previous CTMC results. This finding together with wave-packet calculations suggests that the "C6 + puzzle" may be solved by considering the loss of the projectile coherence. Experiments to be conducted using ion beams of anisotropic coherence are proposed for a more differential investigation of the ionization dynamics.

  4. Comparing Classical Water Models Using Molecular Dynamics to Find Bulk Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaman, Laura J.; Roller, Rachel M.; Miller, Carrie S.

    2018-01-01

    A computational chemistry exercise for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described. In this exercise, students use the molecular dynamics package Amber to generate trajectories of bulk liquid water for 4 different water models (TIP3P, OPC, SPC/E, and TIP4Pew). Students then process the trajectory to calculate structural (radial…

  5. Cross validation for the classical model of structured expert judgment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, Abigail R.; Cooke, Roger M.

    2017-01-01

    We update the 2008 TU Delft structured expert judgment database with data from 33 professionally contracted Classical Model studies conducted between 2006 and March 2015 to evaluate its performance relative to other expert aggregation models. We briefly review alternative mathematical aggregation schemes, including harmonic weighting, before focusing on linear pooling of expert judgments with equal weights and performance-based weights. Performance weighting outperforms equal weighting in all but 1 of the 33 studies in-sample. True out-of-sample validation is rarely possible for Classical Model studies, and cross validation techniques that split calibration questions into a training and test set are used instead. Performance weighting incurs an “out-of-sample penalty” and its statistical accuracy out-of-sample is lower than that of equal weighting. However, as a function of training set size, the statistical accuracy of performance-based combinations reaches 75% of the equal weight value when the training set includes 80% of calibration variables. At this point the training set is sufficiently powerful to resolve differences in individual expert performance. The information of performance-based combinations is double that of equal weighting when the training set is at least 50% of the set of calibration variables. Previous out-of-sample validation work used a Total Out-of-Sample Validity Index based on all splits of the calibration questions into training and test subsets, which is expensive to compute and includes small training sets of dubious value. As an alternative, we propose an Out-of-Sample Validity Index based on averaging the product of statistical accuracy and information over all training sets sized at 80% of the calibration set. Performance weighting outperforms equal weighting on this Out-of-Sample Validity Index in 26 of the 33 post-2006 studies; the probability of 26 or more successes on 33 trials if there were no difference between performance

  6. Production of 232,233Pa in 6Li+232Th Collisions in the Classical Trajectory Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    The semiclassical model of nuclear reactions with loosely bound projectiles (V.P. Aleshin, B.I. Sidorenko, Acta Phys. Pol. B29, 325 (1998)) is refined and compared with experimental data of Rama Rao et al. on the excitation function for the production of 232,233 Pa in 6 Li+ 232 Th collisions at E = 30-50 MeV. The main contribution to the production of 232 Pa is the 2 neutron emission from excited states of 234 Pa formed in the ( 6 Li,α) reaction. The main source of 233 Pa is the ( 6 Li,αp) reaction followed by γ transitions from excited states of 233 Th to 233 Th (g.s.) which transforms to 233 Pa through β - decay. The ground state of 6 Li regarded as a combination of n+p+α is modeled with the K=2, l x =l y =0 hyperspherical function. The calculation underpredicts the excitation function of 232 Pa by a factor of 0.6 and overpredicts the excitation function of 233 Pa by a factor of 2.3, on the average. With the more realistic wave function of 6 Li both factors are expected to be closer to 1. (author)

  7. Adaptive robust motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders with LuGre model-based friction compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Deyuan; Tao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Zhu, Xiaocong

    2014-07-01

    Friction compensation is particularly important for motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders at low speed movement. However, most of the existing model-based friction compensation schemes use simple classical models, which are not enough to address applications with high-accuracy position requirements. Furthermore, the friction force in the cylinder is time-varying, and there exist rather severe unmodelled dynamics and unknown disturbances in the pneumatic system. To deal with these problems effectively, an adaptive robust controller with LuGre model-based dynamic friction compensation is constructed. The proposed controller employs on-line recursive least squares estimation (RLSE) to reduce the extent of parametric uncertainties, and utilizes the sliding mode control method to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodelled dynamics and disturbances. In addition, in order to realize LuGre model-based friction compensation, the modified dual-observer structure for estimating immeasurable friction internal state is developed. Therefore, a prescribed motion tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy can be guaranteed. Since the system model uncertainties are unmatched, the recursive backstepping design technology is applied. In order to solve the conflicts between the sliding mode control design and the adaptive control design, the projection mapping is used to condition the RLSE algorithm so that the parameter estimates are kept within a known bounded convex set. Finally, the proposed controller is tested for tracking sinusoidal trajectories and smooth square trajectory under different loads and sudden disturbance. The testing results demonstrate that the achievable performance of the proposed controller is excellent and is much better than most other studies in literature. Especially when a 0.5 Hz sinusoidal trajectory is tracked, the maximum tracking error is 0.96 mm and the average tracking error is 0.45 mm. This

  8. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2012-09-04

    This paper constitutes the first steps in our work concerning isogeometric shell analysis. An isogeometric shell model of the Reissner-Mindlin type is introduced and a study of its accuracy in the classical pinched cylinder benchmark problem presented. In contrast to earlier works [1,2,3,4], the formulation is based on a shell model where the displacement, strain and stress fields are defined in terms of a curvilinear coordinate system arising from the NURBS description of the shell middle surface. The isogeometric shell formulation is implemented using the PetIGA and igakit software packages developed by the authors. The igakit package is a Python package used to generate NURBS representations of geometries that can be utilised by the PetIGA finite element framework. The latter utilises data structures and routines of the portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc), [5,6]. The current shell implementation is valid for static, linear problems only, but the software package is well suited for future extensions to geometrically and materially nonlinear regime as well as to dynamic problems. The accuracy of the approach in the pinched cylinder benchmark problem and present comparisons against the h-version of the finite element method with bilinear elements. Quadratic, cubic and quartic NURBS discretizations are compared against the isoparametric bilinear discretization introduced in [7]. The results show that the quadratic and cubic NURBS approximations exhibit notably slower convergence under uniform mesh refinement as the thickness decreases but the quartic approximation converges relatively quickly within the standard variational framework. The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  9. Fluctuation theorems and atypical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, M; Lahiri, S; Jayannavar, A M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have studied simple models that can be solved analytically to illustrate various fluctuation theorems. These fluctuation theorems provide symmetries individually to the distributions of physical quantities such as the classical work (W c ), thermodynamic work (W), total entropy (Δs tot ) and dissipated heat (Q), when the system is driven arbitrarily out of equilibrium. All these quantities can be defined for individual trajectories. We have studied the number of trajectories which exhibit behaviour unexpected at the macroscopic level. As the time of observation increases, the fraction of such atypical trajectories decreases, as expected at the macroscale. The distributions for the thermodynamic work and entropy production in nonlinear models may exhibit a peak (most probable value) in the atypical regime without violating the expected average behaviour. However, dissipated heat and classical work exhibit a peak in the regime of typical behaviour only.

  10. Reliability assessment using degradation models: bayesian and classical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Afonso Freitas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reliability assessment of devices has been based on (accelerated life tests. However, for highly reliable products, little information about reliability is provided by life tests in which few or no failures are typically observed. Since most failures arise from a degradation mechanism at work for which there are characteristics that degrade over time, one alternative is monitor the device for a period of time and assess its reliability from the changes in performance (degradation observed during that period. The goal of this article is to illustrate how degradation data can be modeled and analyzed by using "classical" and Bayesian approaches. Four methods of data analysis based on classical inference are presented. Next we show how Bayesian methods can also be used to provide a natural approach to analyzing degradation data. The approaches are applied to a real data set regarding train wheels degradation.Tradicionalmente, o acesso à confiabilidade de dispositivos tem sido baseado em testes de vida (acelerados. Entretanto, para produtos altamente confiáveis, pouca informação a respeito de sua confiabilidade é fornecida por testes de vida no quais poucas ou nenhumas falhas são observadas. Uma vez que boa parte das falhas é induzida por mecanismos de degradação, uma alternativa é monitorar o dispositivo por um período de tempo e acessar sua confiabilidade através das mudanças em desempenho (degradação observadas durante aquele período. O objetivo deste artigo é ilustrar como dados de degradação podem ser modelados e analisados utilizando-se abordagens "clássicas" e Bayesiana. Quatro métodos de análise de dados baseados em inferência clássica são apresentados. A seguir, mostramos como os métodos Bayesianos podem também ser aplicados para proporcionar uma abordagem natural à análise de dados de degradação. As abordagens são aplicadas a um banco de dados real relacionado à degradação de rodas de trens.

  11. Renormalized trajectory for non-linear sigma model and improved scaling behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, A.; Okawa, M.; Zuber, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    We apply the block-spin renormalization group method to the O(N) Heisenberg spin model. Extending a previous work of Hirsch and Shenker, we find the renormalized trajectory for O(infinite) in two dimensions. Four finite N models, we choose a four-parameter action near the large-N renormalized trajectory and demonstrate a remarkable improvement in the approach to continuum limit by performing Monte Carlo simulation of O(3) and O(4) models. (orig.)

  12. Characterizing long-term patterns of weight change in China using latent class trajectory modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Paynter

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, obesity-related diseases have increased tremendously in China, and are now the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Patterns of weight change can be used to predict risk of obesity-related diseases, increase understanding of etiology of disease risk, identify groups at particularly high risk, and shape prevention strategies.Latent class trajectory modeling was used to compute weight change trajectories for adults aged 18 to 66 using the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS data (n = 12,611. Weight change trajectories were computed separately for males and females by age group at baseline due to differential age-related patterns of weight gain in China with urbanization. Generalized linear mixed effects models examined the association between weight change trajectories and baseline characteristics including urbanicity, BMI category, age, and year of study entry.Trajectory classes were identified for each of six age-sex subgroups corresponding to various degrees of weight loss, maintenance and weight gain. Baseline BMI status was a significant predictor of trajectory membership for all age-sex subgroups. Baseline overweight/obesity increased odds of following 'initial loss with maintenance' trajectories. We found no significant association between baseline urbanization and trajectory membership after controlling for other covariates.Trajectory analysis identified patterns of weight change for age by gender groups. Lack of association between baseline urbanization status and trajectory membership suggests that living in a rural environment at baseline was not protective. Analyses identified age-specific nuances in weight change patterns, pointing to the importance of subgroup analyses in future research.

  13. Semi-Automated Processing of Trajectory Simulator Output Files for Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ARL-TR-8284 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Semi-Automated Processing of Trajectory Simulator Output Files for Model...Semi-Automated Processing of Trajectory Simulator Output Files for Model Evaluation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...although some minor changes may be needed. The program processes a GTRAJ output text file that contains results from 2 or more simulations , where each

  14. THE DYNAMIC MODEL FOR CONTROL OF STUDENT’S LEARNING INDIVIDUAL TRAJECTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Mitsel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In connection with the transition of the educational system to a competence-oriented approach, the problem of learning outcomes assessment and creating an individual learning trajectory of a student has become relevant. Its solution requires the application of modern information technologies. The third generation of Federal state educational standards of higher professional education (FSES HPE defines the requirements for the results of Mastering the basic educational programs (BEP. According to FSES HPE up to 50% of subjects have a variable character, i.e. depend on the choice of a student. It significantly influences on the results of developing various competencies. The problem of forming student’s learning trajectory is analyzed in general and the choice of an individual direction was studied in details. Various methods, models and algorithms of the student’s individual learning trajectory formation were described. The analysis of the model of educational process organization in terms of individual approach makes it possible to develop a decision support system (DSS. DSS is a set of interrelated programs and data used for analysis of situation, development of alternative solutions and selection of the most acceptable alternative. DSSs are often used when building individual learning path, because this task can be considered as a discrete multi-criteria problem, creating a significant burden on the decision maker. A new method of controlling the learning trajectory has been developed. The article discusses problem statement and solution of determining student’s optimal individual educational trajectory as a dynamic model of learning trajectory control, which uses score assessment to construct a sequence of studied subjects. A new model of management learning trajectory is based on dynamic models for tracking the reference trajectory. The task can be converted to an equivalent model of linear programming, for which a reliable solution

  15. Enabling Parametric Optimal Ascent Trajectory Modeling During Early Phases of Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, James B.; Dees, Patrick D.; Diaz, Manuel J.

    2015-01-01

    -modal due to the interaction of various constraints. Additionally, when these obstacles are coupled with The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories [1] (POST), an industry standard program to optimize ascent trajectories that is difficult to use, it requires expert trajectory analysts to effectively optimize a vehicle's ascent trajectory. As it has been pointed out, the paradigm of trajectory optimization is still a very manual one because using modern computational resources on POST is still a challenging problem. The nuances and difficulties involved in correctly utilizing, and therefore automating, the program presents a large problem. In order to address these issues, the authors will discuss a methodology that has been developed. The methodology is two-fold: first, a set of heuristics will be introduced and discussed that were captured while working with expert analysts to replicate the current state-of-the-art; secondly, leveraging the power of modern computing to evaluate multiple trajectories simultaneously, and therefore, enable the exploration of the trajectory's design space early during the pre-conceptual and conceptual phases of design. When this methodology is coupled with design of experiments in order to train surrogate models, the authors were able to visualize the trajectory design space, enabling parametric optimal ascent trajectory information to be introduced with other pre-conceptual and conceptual design tools. The potential impact of this methodology's success would be a fully automated POST evaluation suite for the purpose of conceptual and preliminary design trade studies. This will enable engineers to characterize the ascent trajectory's sensitivity to design changes in an arbitrary number of dimensions and for finding settings for trajectory specific variables, which result in optimal performance for a "dialed-in" launch vehicle design. The effort described in this paper was developed for the Advanced Concepts Office [2] at NASA Marshall

  16. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Manti, S. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-02-21

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  17. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Manti, S.

    2013-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  18. Comment on ''a classical model of EPR experiment with quantum mechanical correlations and Bell inequalities''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspect, A.

    1986-01-01

    The author states that ''It is impossible to mimick the quantum mechanical predictions for the EPR correlations, with a reasonable classical-looking model, in the spirit of Einstein's ideas''. The author feels that if he is wrong somebody could make a classical model (i.e. following the laws of classical physics) mimicking all the quantum mechanical predictions for the EPR correlations. He attempts to show that it is not the case for Barut's model for the following reasons: the first version of his model is classical, but doesn't mimick at all an EPR type experiment; and by reinterpretation one can get a model that does mimick the experiment, but this model is no longer ''reasonably classical looking'' since it involves negative probabilities. The claim is put in the form of a challenge. It is shown that the model under discussion can be reinterpreted by adding a chip converting the continuous outputs into two-valved outputs

  19. A new method to calibrate Lagrangian model with ASAR images for oil slick trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Siyu; Huang, Xiaoxia; Li, Hongga

    2017-03-15

    Since Lagrangian model coefficients vary with different conditions, it is necessary to calibrate the model to obtain optimal coefficient combination for special oil spill accident. This paper focuses on proposing a new method to calibrate Lagrangian model with time series of Envisat ASAR images. Oil slicks extracted from time series images form a detected trajectory of special oil slick. Lagrangian model is calibrated by minimizing the difference between simulated trajectory and detected trajectory. mean center position distance difference (MCPD) and rotation difference (RD) of Oil slicks' or particles' standard deviational ellipses (SDEs) are calculated as two evaluations. The two parameters are taken to evaluate the performance of Lagrangian transport model with different coefficient combinations. This method is applied to Penglai 19-3 oil spill accident. The simulation result with calibrated model agrees well with related satellite observations. It is suggested the new method is effective to calibrate Lagrangian model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Estimating trajectories of energy intake through childhood and adolescence using linear-spline multilevel models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emma L; Tilling, Kate; Fraser, Abigail; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Emmett, Pauline; Cribb, Victoria; Northstone, Kate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Howe, Laura D

    2013-07-01

    Methods for the assessment of changes in dietary intake across the life course are underdeveloped. We demonstrate the use of linear-spline multilevel models to summarize energy-intake trajectories through childhood and adolescence and their application as exposures, outcomes, or mediators. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children assessed children's dietary intake several times between ages 3 and 13 years, using both food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and 3-day food diaries. We estimated energy-intake trajectories for 12,032 children using linear-spline multilevel models. We then assessed the associations of these trajectories with maternal body mass index (BMI), and later offspring BMI, and also their role in mediating the relation between maternal and offspring BMIs. Models estimated average and individual energy intake at 3 years, and linear changes in energy intake from age 3 to 7 years and from age 7 to 13 years. By including the exposure (in this example, maternal BMI) in the multilevel model, we were able to estimate the average energy-intake trajectories across levels of the exposure. When energy-intake trajectories are the exposure for a later outcome (in this case offspring BMI) or a mediator (between maternal and offspring BMI), results were similar, whether using a two-step process (exporting individual-level intercepts and slopes from multilevel models and using these in linear regression/path analysis), or a single-step process (multivariate multilevel models). Trajectories were similar when FFQs and food diaries were assessed either separately, or when combined into one model. Linear-spline multilevel models provide useful summaries of trajectories of dietary intake that can be used as an exposure, outcome, or mediator.

  1. The classical Stefan problem basic concepts, modelling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, SC

    2003-01-01

    This volume emphasises studies related toclassical Stefan problems. The term "Stefan problem" isgenerally used for heat transfer problems with phase-changes suchas from the liquid to the solid. Stefan problems have somecharacteristics that are typical of them, but certain problemsarising in fields such as mathematical physics and engineeringalso exhibit characteristics similar to them. The term``classical" distinguishes the formulation of these problems fromtheir weak formulation, in which the solution need not possessclassical derivatives. Under suitable assumptions, a weak solutioncould be as good as a classical solution. In hyperbolic Stefanproblems, the characteristic features of Stefan problems arepresent but unlike in Stefan problems, discontinuous solutions areallowed because of the hyperbolic nature of the heat equation. Thenumerical solutions of inverse Stefan problems, and the analysis ofdirect Stefan problems are so integrated that it is difficult todiscuss one without referring to the other. So no...

  2. On q-deformed supersymmetric classical mechanical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colatto, L.P.; Matheus Valle, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    Based on the idea of quantum groups and paragrassmann variables, we present a generalization of supersymmetric classical mechanics with a deformation parameter q=exp 2πi/k dealing with the k=3 case. The coordinates of the q-superspace are a commuting parameter t and a paragrassmann variable θ, where θ 3 =0. The generator and covariant derivative are obtained, as well as the action for some possible superfields. (author). 13 refs

  3. Aspects of modelling classical or synchronous modelling with Solid Edge ST 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goanta Adrian Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current situation of the design activity is dependent on both the level of training of the human resources and the financial resources of companies required purchasing the design software packages and complex calculation equipment. Consequently, the situation is very diverse in the sense that there are design cases using only drawing software but also classical 3D or synchronous modelling situations, simple or integrated into software packages that meet the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM principles. The natural tendency in modelling and design is primarily to the high computing power integrated software or somewhat simplified versions that, however, allow at least FEA modelling, simulation and the related 2D documentation. The paper presents some aspects of modernity in synchronous modelling as compared to the classic one, made with 2016 version of Solid Edge software from SIEMENS. Basically there were studied and analysed aspects of modelling ease, speed of changes and also optimization of commands in the modelling process of the same piece in the two versions mentioned: classic and synchronous. It is also presented the alternative path from one method to another within the same process of piece modelling, depending on the advantages provided by each method. In other words, the work is based on a case study of modelling a piece under the two modelling versions of which some aspects were highlighted and conclusions were drawn.

  4. Film models for transport phenomena with fog formation: The classical film model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Jos; Chesters, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    In the present analysis the classical film model (or film theory) is reviewed and extended. First, on the basis of a thorough analysis, the governing equations of diffusion, energy and momentum of a stagnant film are derived and solved. Subsequently, the well-known correction factors for the effect

  5. Film models for transport phenomena with fog formation: the classical film model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.J.H.; Chesters, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    In the present analysis the classical film model (or film theory) is reviewed and extended. First, on the basis of a thorough analysis, the governing equations of diffusion, energy and momentum of a stagnant film are derived and solved. Subsequently, the well-known correction factors for the effect

  6. A study of quadrupole dynamics: quantification of classical motion chaos, and new features of the coherent states model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, V.

    1995-01-01

    The thesis has three main parts. In the first part a fourth order quadrupole boson Hamiltonian is semi classically treated through a time-dependent variational principle (TDVP), the variational states being of coherent type for the boson operators b 20 + and 1/√2 (b 22 + + b 2-2 + ). The static ground state is studied as a function of the parameters involved in the model Hamiltonian. Linearizing the classical equations of motion one obtains the RPA approach for the many boson correlations. There are two RPA roots which describe the beta and gamma vibrations, respectively. Several quantization procedures for both small and large amplitude regimes are discussed. The quantized Hamiltonians are compared with some others which were previously obtained by using different methods. A special attention is paid to the quantal states associated to some of the peaks appearing in the Fourier spectrum of the classical action density. Some of the quantal states exhibit a pronounced anharmonic structure. Therefore the procedure may be used for a unified description of small and large amplitude regimes. In the next part the semiclassical foundations of the Coherent State Model are established using the formalism elaborated in the previous section. In the third part the semiclassical treatment through a time-dependent variational principle (TDVP) of the fourth order quadrupole boson Hamiltonian H is continued. In the parameter space of H there are regions, conventionally called as 'nuclear phases', determining specific static properties. Several ground states corresponding to different equilibrium shapes are found as static solutions of classical equations of motion. The non-integrable system may follow a chaotic trajectory. The mechanism of destroying the tori bearing regular orbits and the onset of chaos may depend on nuclear phase. The regular and chaotic motions are analyzed in terms of Poincare sections and Lyapunov largest exponent. Specific features of various phases are

  7. Pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions: An introduction to classical and quantum-mechanical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Akkermans, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In studies of light-ion induced nuclear reactions one distinguishes three different mechanisms: direct, compound and pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. These reaction processes can be subdivided according to time scales or, equivalently, the number of intranuclear collisions taking place before emission. Furthermore, each mechanism preferably excites certain parts of the nuclear level spectrum and is characterized by different types of angular distributions. This presentation includes description of the classical, exciton model, semi-classical models, with some selected results, and quantum mechanical models. A survey of classical versus quantum-mechanical pre-equilibrium reaction theory is presented including practical applications

  8. Surface modeling of workpiece and tool trajectory planning for spray painting robot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tang

    Full Text Available Automated tool trajectory planning for spray-painting robots is still a challenging problem, especially for a large free-form surface. A grid approximation of a free-form surface is adopted in CAD modeling in this paper. A free-form surface model is approximated by a set of flat patches. We describe here an efficient and flexible tool trajectory optimization scheme using T-Bézier curves calculated in a new way from trigonometrical bases. The distance between the spray gun and the free-form surface along the normal vector is varied. Automotive body parts, which are large free-form surfaces, are used to test the scheme. The experimental results show that the trajectory planning algorithm achieves satisfactory performance. This algorithm can also be extended to other applications.

  9. Model-Free Trajectory Optimisation for Unmanned Aircraft Serving as Data Ferries for Widespread Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Pearre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Given multiple widespread stationary data sources such as ground-based sensors, an unmanned aircraft can fly over the sensors and gather the data via a wireless link. Performance criteria for such a network may incorporate costs such as trajectory length for the aircraft or the energy required by the sensors for radio transmission. Planning is hampered by the complex vehicle and communication dynamics and by uncertainty in the locations of sensors, so we develop a technique based on model-free learning. We present a stochastic optimisation method that allows the data-ferrying aircraft to optimise data collection trajectories through an unknown environment in situ, obviating the need for system identification. We compare two trajectory representations, one that learns near-optimal trajectories at low data requirements but that fails at high requirements, and one that gives up some performance in exchange for a data collection guarantee. With either encoding the ferry is able to learn significantly improved trajectories compared with alternative heuristics. To demonstrate the versatility of the model-free learning approach, we also learn a policy to minimise the radio transmission energy required by the sensor nodes, allowing prolonged network lifetime.

  10. Rodent Models of Non-classical Progesterone Action Regulating Ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Mittelman-Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that steroid hormones act not only by binding to nuclear receptors that associate with specific response elements in the nucleus but also by binding to receptors on the cell membrane. In this newly discovered manner, steroid hormones can initiate intracellular signaling cascades which elicit rapid effects such as release of internal calcium stores and activation of kinases. We have learned much about the translocation and signaling of steroid hormone receptors from investigations into estrogen receptor α, which can be trafficked to, and signal from, the cell membrane. It is now clear that progesterone (P4 can also elicit effects that cannot be exclusively explained by transcriptional changes. Similar to E2 and its receptors, P4 can initiate signaling at the cell membrane, both through progesterone receptor and via a host of newly discovered membrane receptors (e.g., membrane progesterone receptors, progesterone receptor membrane components. This review discusses the parallels between neurotransmitter-like E2 action and the more recently investigated non-classical P4 signaling, in the context of reproductive behaviors in the rodent.

  11. Relation between quantum phase transitions and classical instability points in the pairing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Mauricio; Terra Cunha, M.O.; Oliveira, Adelcio C.; Nemes, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    A quantum phase transition, characterized by an accumulation of energy levels in the espectrum of the model, is associated with a qualitative change in the corresponding classical dynamic obtained upon generalized coherent states of angular momentum

  12. Exact symplectic structures and a classical model for the Dirac electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawnsley, J.

    1992-01-01

    We show how the classical model for the Dirac electron of Barut and coworkers can be obtained as a Hamiltonian theory by constructing an exact symplectic form on the total space of the spin bundle over spacetime. (orig.)

  13. Modelling life trajectories and mode choice using Bayesian belief networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, M.

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, transport mode choice was primarily examined as a stand alone problem. Given a purpose and destination, the choice of transport mode was modelled as a function of the various attributes of the transport mode alternatives. Later, transport mode choice decisions were modelled as part of

  14. Criticism of the Classical Theory of Macroeconomic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin K. Kumehov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Current approaches and methods of modeling of macroeconomic systems do not allow to generate research ideas that could be used in applications. This is largely due to the fact that the dominant economic schools and research directions are building their theories on misconceptions about the economic system as object modeling, and have no common methodological approaches in the design of macroeconomic models. All of them are focused on building a model aimed at establishing equilibrium parameters of supply and demand, production and consumption. At the same time as the underlying factors are not considered resource potential and the needs of society in material and other benefits. In addition, there is no unity in the choice of elements and mechanisms of interaction between them. Not installed, what are the criteria to determine the elements of the model: whether it is the institutions, whether the industry is whether the population, or banks, or classes, etc. From the methodological point of view, the design of the model all the most well-known authors extrapolated to the new models of the past state or past events. As a result, every time the model is ready by the time the situation changes, the last parameters underlying the model are losing relevance, so at best, the researcher may have to interpret the events and parameters that are not feasible in the future. In this paper, based on analysis of the works of famous authors, belonging to different schools and areas revealed weaknesses of their proposed macroeconomic models that do not allow you to use them to solve applied problems of economic development. A fundamentally new approaches and methods by which it is possible the construction of macroeconomic models that take into account the theoretical and applied aspects of modeling, as well as formulated the basic methodological requirements.

  15. Generalized continua as models for classical and advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This volume is devoted to an actual topic which is the focus world-wide of various research groups. It contains contributions describing the material behavior on different scales, new existence and uniqueness theorems, the formulation of constitutive equations for advanced materials. The main emphasis of the contributions is directed on the following items - Modelling and simulation of natural and artificial materials with significant microstructure, - Generalized continua as a result of multi-scale models, - Multi-field actions on materials resulting in generalized material models, - Theories including higher gradients, and - Comparison with discrete modelling approaches.

  16. Application of Back Trajectory Model to Predict Long Range Transport of Pollutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Mohd Suhaimi Elias

    2011-01-01

    Trans-boundary haze pollution in Malaysia has become an issue that created a public attention over the past several years. The presence of haze not only caused by internal and external sources but it sometime coincided with the El Nino phenomenon which prolonged the dry season during the southwest monsoon in May to September. In this study fine particulate data (PM 2.5) of Klang Valley region covering the period from 1997 to 2008 were used to investigate the source location that responsible for the long range transport of pollutant. Back trajectory model the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) was used to calculate the air mass backward trajectories up to 120 hours (5 days) for the days when fine particle were sampled. (author)

  17. Trajectories of Attentional Development: An Exploration with the Master Activation Map Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, George A.; Lete, Bernard; Ducrot, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The developmental trajectories of several attention components, such as orienting, inhibition, and the guidance of selection by relevance (i.e., advance knowledge relevant to the task) were investigated in 498 participants (ages 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 20). The paradigm was based on Michael et al.'s (2006) master activation map model and consisted of…

  18. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti; Collier, Nathan; Dalcí n, Lisandro D.; Ghommem, Mehdi; Calo, Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  19. Classical Logic and Quantum Logic with Multiple and Common Lattice Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Pavičić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a proper propositional quantum logic and show that it has multiple disjoint lattice models, only one of which is an orthomodular lattice (algebra underlying Hilbert (quantum space. We give an equivalent proof for the classical logic which turns out to have disjoint distributive and nondistributive ortholattices. In particular, we prove that both classical logic and quantum logic are sound and complete with respect to each of these lattices. We also show that there is one common nonorthomodular lattice that is a model of both quantum and classical logic. In technical terms, that enables us to run the same classical logic on both a digital (standard, two-subset, 0-1-bit computer and a nondigital (say, a six-subset computer (with appropriate chips and circuits. With quantum logic, the same six-element common lattice can serve us as a benchmark for an efficient evaluation of equations of bigger lattice models or theorems of the logic.

  20. Verification of Simulation Results Using Scale Model Flight Test Trajectories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obermark, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    .... A second compromise scaling law was investigated as a possible improvement. For ejector-driven events at minimum sideslip, the most important variables for scale model construction are the mass moment of inertia and ejector...

  1. Dynamic Universe Model Predicts the Trajectory of New Horizons Satellite Going to Pluto.......

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2012-07-01

    New Horizons is NASA's artificial satellite now going towards to the dwarf planet Pluto. It has crossed Jupiter. It is expected to be the rst spacecraft to go near and study Pluto and its moons, Charon, Nix, and Hydra. These are the predictions for New Horizons (NH) space craft as on A.D. 2009-Aug-09 00:00:00.0000 hrs. The behavior of NH is similar to Pioneer Space craft as NH traveling is alike to Pioneer. NH is supposed to reach Pluto in 2015 AD. There was a gravity assist taken at Jupiter about a year back. As Dynamic universe model explains Pioneer anomaly and the higher gravitational attraction forces experienced towards SUN, It can explain NH also in a similar fashion. I am giving the predictions for NH by Dynamic Universe Model in the following Table 4. Here first two rows give Dynamic Universe Model predictions based on 02-01-2009 00:00 hrs data with Daily time step and hourly time step. Third row gives Ephemeris from Jet propulsion lab.Dynamic Universe Model can predict further to 9-Aug-2009. These Ephemeris data is from their web as on 28th June 2009 Any new data can be calculated..... For finding trajectories of Pioneer satellite (Anomaly), New Horizons satellite going to Pluto, the Calculations of Dynamic Universe model can be successfully applied. No dark matter is assumed within solar system radius. The effect on the masses around SUN shows as though there is extra gravitation pull toward SUN. It solves the Dynamics of Extra-solar planets like Planet X, satellite like Pioneer and NH for 3-Position, 3-velocity 3-acceleration for their masses,considering the complex situation of Multiple planets, Stars, Galaxy parts and Galaxy center and other Galaxies Using simple Newtonian Physics. It already solved problems Missing mass in Galaxies observed by galaxy circular velocity curves successfully. `SITA Simulations' software was developed about 18 years back for Dynamic Universe Model of Cosmology. It is based on Newtonian physics. It is Classical singularity

  2. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700 064, India .... above models takes only two different forms: rational or trigonometric ..... parameters c, α, μ, which for different continuum choices for these parameters allows to. 910.

  3. UAV-based mapping, back analysis and trajectory modeling of a coseismic rockfall in Lefkada island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroglou, Charalampos; Asteriou, Pavlos; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Tsiambaos, George; Clark, Marin; Manousakis, John

    2018-01-01

    We present field evidence and a kinematic study of a rock block mobilized in the Ponti area by a Mw = 6.5 earthquake near the island of Lefkada on 17 November 2015. A detailed survey was conducted using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with an ultrahigh definition (UHD) camera, which produced a high-resolution orthophoto and a digital terrain model (DTM). The sequence of impact marks from the rock trajectory on the ground surface was identified from the orthophoto and field verified. Earthquake characteristics were used to estimate the acceleration of the rock slope and the initial condition of the detached block. Using the impact points from the measured rockfall trajectory, an analytical reconstruction of the trajectory was undertaken, which led to insights on the coefficients of restitution (CORs). The measured trajectory was compared with modeled rockfall trajectories using recommended parameters. However, the actual trajectory could not be accurately predicted, revealing limitations of existing rockfall analysis software used in engineering practice.

  4. MODELING THE FLIGHT TRAJECTORY OF OPERATIONAL-TACTICAL BALLISTIC MISSILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Filipchenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the basic approaches to updating the systems of combat operations modeling in the part of enemy missile attack simulation taking into account the possibility of tactical ballistic missile maneuvering during the flight. The results of simulation of combat tactical missile defense operations are given. 

  5. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, S; Castelletto, S; Aruldoss, C; Scholten, R E; Roberts, A

    2007-01-01

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres

  6. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, S; Castelletto, S; Aruldoss, C; Scholten, R E; Roberts, A [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia)

    2007-08-15

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres.

  7. Leading-order classical Lagrangians for the nonminimal standard-model extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, J. A. A. S.; Schreck, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we derive the general leading-order classical Lagrangian covering all fermion operators of the nonminimal standard-model extension (SME). Such a Lagrangian is considered to be the point-particle analog of the effective field theory description of Lorentz violation that is provided by the SME. At leading order in Lorentz violation, the Lagrangian obtained satisfies the set of five nonlinear equations that govern the map from the field theory to the classical description. This result can be of use for phenomenological studies of classical bodies in gravitational fields.

  8. Modeling smog along the Los Angeles-Palm Springs trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of smog concentrations and wind patterns during the summer of 1973 in Los Angeles, Pomona, Riverside, Banning, and Palm Springs, California are presented which show that high oxidant concentrations at Banning and Palm Springs are often due to advection of smog from source regions in the more densely populated western part of the Los Angeles basin. At Pomona and Riverside, advection from upwind source regions combines with the effects of local emissions to cause long durations of high oxidant concentrations with peak times in the mid afternoon. An empirical model for the diurnal oxidant variation is suggested which satisfactorily simulates observed concentrations. More complex models which include chemical kinetics systems do not perform very satisfactorily at the rural stations of Banning and Palm Springs, especially at night when observed oxidant concentrations remain high

  9. Modelling cosmic ray intensities along the Ulysses trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Ndiitwani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Time dependent cosmic ray modulation in the inner heliosphere is studied by comparing results from a 2-D, time-dependent cosmic ray transport model with Ulysses observations. A compound approach, which combines the effects of the global changes in the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude with drifts to establish a realistic time-dependence, in the diffusion and drift coefficients, are used. We show that this model results in realistic cosmic ray modulation from the Ulysses launch (1990 until recently (2004 when compared to 2.5-GV electron and proton and 1.2-GV electron and Helium observations from this spacecraft. This approach is also applied to compute radial gradients present in 2.5-GV cosmic ray electron and protons in the inner heliosphere. The observed latitude dependence for both positive and negative charged particles during both the fast latitude scan periods, corresponding to different solar activity conditions, could also be realistically computed. For this an additional reduction in particle drifts (compared to diffusion toward solar maximum is needed. This results in a realistic charge-sign dependent modulation at solar maximum and the model is also applied to predict charge-sign dependent modulation up to the next expected solar minimum.

  10. Online identification of wind model for improving quadcopter trajectory monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniak, Ryszard; Gudzenko, Oleksandr

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we consider a problem of quadcopter control in severe weather conditions. One type of such weather conditions is a strong variable wind. In this paper, we ponder deterministic and stochastic models of winds at low altitudes with the quadcopter performing aggressive maneuvers. We choose an adaptive algorithm as our control algorithm. This algorithm might seem suitable one to solve the given problem, as it is able to adjust quickly to changing conditions. However, as shown in the paper, this algorithm is not applicable to rapidly changing winds and requires additional filters to smooth the impulse streams, so as not to lose the stability of the object.

  11. Online identification of wind model for improving quadcopter trajectory monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beniak Ryszard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a problem of quadcopter control in severe weather conditions. One type of such weather conditions is a strong variable wind. In this paper, we ponder deterministic and stochastic models of winds at low altitudes with the quadcopter performing aggressive maneuvers. We choose an adaptive algorithm as our control algorithm. This algorithm might seem suitable one to solve the given problem, as it is able to adjust quickly to changing conditions. However, as shown in the paper, this algorithm is not applicable to rapidly changing winds and requires additional filters to smooth the impulse streams, so as not to lose the stability of the object.

  12. Optimizing Cruising Routes for Taxi Drivers Using a Spatio-Temporal Trajectory Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the taxi route-planning literature has focused on driver strategies for finding passengers and determining the hot spot pick-up locations using historical global positioning system (GPS trajectories of taxis based on driver experience, distance from the passenger drop-off location to the next passenger pick-up location and the waiting times at recommended locations for the next passenger. The present work, however, considers the average taxi travel speed mined from historical taxi GPS trajectory data and the allocation of cruising routes to more than one taxi driver in a small-scale region to neighboring pick-up locations. A spatio-temporal trajectory model with load balancing allocations is presented to not only explore pick-up/drop-off information but also provide taxi drivers with cruising routes to the recommended pick-up locations. In simulation experiments, our study shows that taxi drivers using cruising routes recommended by our spatio-temporal trajectory model can significantly reduce the average waiting time and travel less distance to quickly find their next passengers, and the load balancing strategy significantly alleviates road loads. These objective measures can help us better understand spatio-temporal traffic patterns and guide taxi navigation.

  13. Quadrotor Trajectory Tracking Based on Quasi-LPV System and Internal Model Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZeFang He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal model control (IMC design method based on quasi-LPV (Linear Parameter Varying system is proposed. In this method, the nonlinear model is firstly transformed to the linear model based on quasi-LPV method; then, the quadrotor nonlinear motion function is transformed to transfer function matrix based on the transformation model from the state space to the transfer function; further, IMC is designed to control the controlled object represented by transfer function matrix and realize quadrotor trajectory tracking. The performance of the controller proposed in this paper is tested by tracking for three reference trajectories with drastic changes. The simulation results indicate that the control method proposed in this paper has stronger robustness to parameters uncertainty and disturbance rejection performance.

  14. General classical solutions of the complex Grassmannian and CP sub(N-1) sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Ryu.

    1983-05-01

    General classical solutions are constructed for the complex Grassmannian non-linear sigma models in two euclidean dimensions in terms of holomorphic functions. The Grassmannian sigma models are a simple generalization of the well known CP sup(N-1) model in two dimensions and they share various interesting properties; existence of (anti-) instantons, an infinite number of conserved quantities and complete integrability. (author)

  15. Modelling Systems of Classical/Quantum Identical Particles by Focusing on Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Ivan; Fazio, Claudio; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria

    2012-01-01

    A procedure modelling ideal classical and quantum gases is discussed. The proposed approach is mainly based on the idea that modelling and algorithm analysis can provide a deeper understanding of particularly complex physical systems. Appropriate representations and physical models able to mimic possible pseudo-mechanisms of functioning and having…

  16. New classical r-matrices from integrable non-linear sigma-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laartz, J.; Bordemann, M.; Forger, M.; Schaper, U.

    1993-01-01

    Non-linear sigma models on Riemannian symmetric spaces constitute the most general class of classical non-linear sigma models which are known to be integrable. Using the current algebra structure of these models their canonical structure is analyzed and it is shown that their non-ultralocal fundamental Poisson bracket relation is governed by a field dependent non antisymmetric r-matrix obeying a dynamical Yang Baxter equation. The fundamental Poisson bracket relations and the r-matrix are derived explicitly and a new kind of algebra is found that is supposed to replace the classical Yang Baxter algebra governing the canonical structure of ultralocal models. (Author) 9 refs

  17. Detection of Diffusion Heterogeneity in Single Particle Tracking Trajectories Using a Hidden Markov Model with Measurement Noise Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slator, Paddy J.; Cairo, Christopher W.; Burroughs, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian analysis framework to detect heterogeneity in the diffusive behaviour of single particle trajectories on cells, implementing model selection to classify trajectories as either consistent with Brownian motion or with a two-state (diffusion coefficient) switching model. The incorporation of localisation accuracy is essential, as otherwise false detection of switching within a trajectory was observed and diffusion coefficient estimates were inflated. Since our analysis is on a single trajectory basis, we are able to examine heterogeneity between trajectories in a quantitative manner. Applying our method to the lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) receptor tagged with latex beads (4 s trajectories at 1000 frames s−1), both intra- and inter-trajectory heterogeneity were detected; 12–26% of trajectories display clear switching between diffusive states dependent on condition, whilst the inter-trajectory variability is highly structured with the diffusion coefficients being related by D 1 = 0.68D 0 − 1.5 × 104 nm2 s−1, suggestive that on these time scales we are detecting switching due to a single process. Further, the inter-trajectory variability of the diffusion coefficient estimates (1.6 × 102 − 2.6 × 105 nm2 s−1) is very much larger than the measurement uncertainty within trajectories, suggesting that LFA-1 aggregation and cytoskeletal interactions are significantly affecting mobility, whilst the timescales of these processes are distinctly different giving rise to inter- and intra-trajectory variability. There is also an ‘immobile’ state (defined as D models within membranes incorporating aggregation, binding to the cytoskeleton, or traversing membrane microdomains. PMID:26473352

  18. The Lie-Poisson structure of integrable classical non-linear sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordemann, M.; Forger, M.; Schaeper, U.; Laartz, J.

    1993-01-01

    The canonical structure of classical non-linear sigma models on Riemannian symmetric spaces, which constitute the most general class of classical non-linear sigma models known to be integrable, is shown to be governed by a fundamental Poisson bracket relation that fits into the r-s-matrix formalism for non-ultralocal integrable models first discussed by Maillet. The matrices r and s are computed explicitly and, being field dependent, satisfy fundamental Poisson bracket relations of their own, which can be expressed in terms of a new numerical matrix c. It is proposed that all these Poisson brackets taken together are representation conditions for a new kind of algebra which, for this class of models, replaces the classical Yang-Baxter algebra governing the canonical structure of ultralocal models. The Poisson brackets for the transition matrices are also computed, and the notorious regularization problem associated with the definition of the Poisson brackets for the monodromy matrices is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Visual Trajectory-Tracking Model-Based Control for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Zdešar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a visual-control algorithm for driving a mobile robot along the reference trajectory. The configuration of the system consists of a two-wheeled differentially driven mobile robot that is observed by an overhead camera, which can be placed at arbitrary, but reasonable, inclination with respect to the ground plane. The controller must be capable of generating appropriate tangential and angular control velocities for the trajectory-tracking problem, based on the information received about the robot position obtained in the image. To be able to track the position of the robot through a sequence of images in real-time, the robot is marked with an artificial marker that can be distinguishably recognized by the image recognition subsystem. Using the property of differential flatness, a dynamic feedback compensator can be designed for the system, thereby extending the system into a linear form. The presented control algorithm for reference tracking combines a feedforward and a feedback loop, the structure also known as a two DOF control scheme. The feedforward part should drive the system to the vicinity of the reference trajectory and the feedback part should eliminate any errors that occur due to noise and other disturbances etc. The feedforward control can never achieve accurate reference following, but this deficiency can be eliminated with the introduction of the feedback loop. The design of the model predictive control is based on the linear error model. The model predictive control is given in analytical form, so the computational burden is kept at a reasonable level for real-time implementation. The control algorithm requires that a reference trajectory is at least twice differentiable function. A suitable approach to design such a trajectory is by exploiting some useful properties of the Bernstein-Bézier parametric curves. The simulation experiments as well as real system experiments on a robot normally used in the

  20. Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory is participating in an Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) project with an industry partner to modify a commercial off-the-shelf simulation software product to treat the electrodynamics of particulate systems. Discrete element modeling (DEM) is a numerical technique that can track the dynamics of particle systems. This technique, which was introduced in 1979 for analysis of rock mechanics, was recently refined to include the contact force interaction of particles with arbitrary surfaces and moving machinery. In our work, we endeavor to incorporate electrostatic forces into the DEM calculations to enhance the fidelity of the software and its applicability to (1) particle processes, such as electrophotography, that are greatly affected by electrostatic forces, (2) grain and dust transport, and (3) the study of lunar and Martian regoliths.

  1. TRADOS - an air trajectory dose model for long range transport of radioactive release to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, J.; Valkama, I.

    1985-01-01

    A model for estimating radiation doses resulting from long range atmospheric transport of released radionuclides in accidents is precented. The model (TRADOS) is able to treat changing diffusion conditions. For example the plume can be exposed to temporary rain, changes in turbulence and mixing depth. This can result in considerable changes in individual doses. The method is applied to an example trajectory and the doses caused by a serious reactor accident are calculated

  2. Classical and quantum stochastic models of resistive and memristive circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, John E.; Zhang, Guofeng

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine stochastic Markovian models for circuits in phase space for which the drift term is equivalent to the standard circuit equations. In particular, we include dissipative components corresponding to both a resistor and a memristor in series. We obtain a dilation of the problem which is canonical in the sense that the underlying Poisson bracket structure is preserved under the stochastic flow. We do this first of all for standard Wiener noise but also treat the problem using a new concept of symplectic noise, where the Poisson structure is extended to the noise as well as the circuit variables, and in particular where we have canonically conjugate noises. Finally, we construct a dilation which describes the quantum mechanical analogue.

  3. Classical and quantum models of strong cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncrief, V.E.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmic censorship conjecture states that naked singularities should not evolve from regular initial conditions in general relativity. In its strong form the conjecture asserts that space-times with Cauchy horizons must always be unstable and thus that the generic solution of Einstein's equations must be inextendible beyond its maximal Cauchy development. In this paper it is shown that one can construct an infinite-dimensional family of extendible cosmological solutions similar to Taub-NUT space-time; however, each of these solutions is unstable in precisely the way demanded by strong cosmic censorship. Finally it is shown that quantum fluctuations in the metric always provide (though in an unexpectedly subtle way) the ''generic perturbations'' which destroy the Cauchy horizons in these models. (author)

  4. Classical and quantum models of strong cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncrief, V.E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1983-04-01

    The cosmic censorship conjecture states that naked singularities should not evolve from regular initial conditions in general relativity. In its strong form the conjecture asserts that space-times with Cauchy horizons must always be unstable and thus that the generic solution of Einstein's equations must be inextendible beyond its maximal Cauchy development. In this paper it is shown that one can construct an infinite-dimensional family of extendible cosmological solutions similar to Taub-NUT space-time; however, each of these solutions is unstable in precisely the way demanded by strong cosmic censorship. Finally it is shown that quantum fluctuations in the metric always provide (though in an unexpectedly subtle way) the ''generic perturbations'' which destroy the Cauchy horizons in these models.

  5. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danziger, Michael M., E-mail: michael.danziger@biu.ac.il; Havlin, Shlomo [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya, 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Politehnicheskaya, 77, Saratov 410054 (Russian Federation); Zhang, Xiyun [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Boccaletti, Stefano [CNR-Institute of Complex Systems, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); The Italian Embassy in Israel, 25 Hamered Street, 68125 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10{sup 6}) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  6. An oilspill trajectory analysis model with a variable wind deflection angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, W.B.; Huang, N.E.; Amstutz, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The oilspill trajectory movement algorithm consists of a vector sum of the surface drift component due to wind and the surface current component. In the U.S. Geological Survey oilspill trajectory analysis model, the surface drift component is assumed to be 3.5% of the wind speed and is rotated 20 degrees clockwise to account for Coriolis effects in the Northern Hemisphere. Field and laboratory data suggest, however, that the deflection angle of the surface drift current can be highly variable. An empirical formula, based on field observations and theoretical arguments relating wind speed to deflection angle, was used to calculate a new deflection angle at each time step in the model. Comparisons of oilspill contact probabilities to coastal areas calculated for constant and variable deflection angles showed that the model is insensitive to this changing angle at low wind speeds. At high wind speeds, some statistically significant differences in contact probabilities did appear. ?? 1982.

  7. Characterization of bead trajectories through the draft tube of a turbine physical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, M. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deng, Z. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McKinstry, C. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) makes extensive use of 1:25 scale Plexiglass models of hydroelectric turbines along the Columbia River to study turbine hydraulic performance and to identify potential hazards for fish passing through the turbines. Plastic beads are sent through the models and imaging has been done with laser Doppler velocimetry and high-speed videography to measure flow field variables and to study the probable paths of fish through the turbine units. Understanding has been limited by the lack of data showing actual bead trajectories in three dimensions (3-D) and the lack of quantified velocity, acceleration, and other kinematics describing the trajectories of beads as they pass through the physical models.

  8. Quantum dynamics in transverse-field Ising models from classical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schmitt, Markus Heyl

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficient representation of quantum many-body states with classical resources is a key challenge in quantum many-body theory. In this work we analytically construct classical networks for the description of the quantum dynamics in transverse-field Ising models that can be solved efficiently using Monte Carlo techniques. Our perturbative construction encodes time-evolved quantum states of spin-1/2 systems in a network of classical spins with local couplings and can be directly generalized to other spin systems and higher spins. Using this construction we compute the transient dynamics in one, two, and three dimensions including local observables, entanglement production, and Loschmidt amplitudes using Monte Carlo algorithms and demonstrate the accuracy of this approach by comparisons to exact results. We include a mapping to equivalent artificial neural networks, which were recently introduced to provide a universal structure for classical network wave functions.

  9. Microscopic Model of Automobile Lane-changing Virtual Desire Trajectory by Spline Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Pei

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available With the development of microscopic traffic simulation models, they have increasingly become an important tool for transport system analysis and management, which assist the traffic engineer to investigate and evaluate the performance of transport network systems. Lane-changing model is a vital component in any traffic simulation model, which could improve road capacity and reduce vehicles delay so as to reduce the likelihood of congestion occurrence. Therefore, this paper addresses the virtual desire trajectory, a vital part to investigate the behaviour divided into four phases. Based on the boundary conditions, β-spline curves and the corresponding reverse algorithm are introduced firstly. Thus, the relation between the velocity and length of lane-changing is constructed, restricted by the curvature, steering velocity and driving behaviour. Then the virtual desire trajectory curves are presented by Matlab and the error analysis results prove that this proposed description model has higher precision in automobile lane-changing process reconstruction, compared with the surveyed result. KEY WORDS: traffic simulation, lane-changing model, virtual desire trajectory, β-spline curves, driving behaviour

  10. Classical-driving-assisted entanglement dynamics control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying-Jie, E-mail: yingjiezhang@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Han, Wei [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Xia, Yun-Jie, E-mail: yjxia@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2017-04-15

    We propose a scheme of controlling entanglement dynamics of a quantum system by applying the external classical driving field for two atoms separately located in a single-mode photon cavity. It is shown that, with a judicious choice of the classical-driving strength and the atom–photon detuning, the effective atom–photon interaction Hamiltonian can be switched from Jaynes–Cummings model to anti-Jaynes–Cummings model. By tuning the controllable atom–photon interaction induced by the classical field, we illustrate that the evolution trajectory of the Bell-like entanglement states can be manipulated from entanglement-sudden-death to no-entanglement-sudden-death, from no-entanglement-invariant to entanglement-invariant. Furthermore, the robustness of the initial Bell-like entanglement can be improved by the classical driving field in the leaky cavities. This classical-driving-assisted architecture can be easily extensible to multi-atom quantum system for scalability.

  11. Trajectory-based morphological operators: a model for efficient image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno-Morenilla, Antonio; Pujol, Francisco A; Molina-Carmona, Rafael; Sánchez-Romero, José L; Pujol, Mar

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical morphology has been an area of intensive research over the last few years. Although many remarkable advances have been achieved throughout these years, there is still a great interest in accelerating morphological operations in order for them to be implemented in real-time systems. In this work, we present a new model for computing mathematical morphology operations, the so-called morphological trajectory model (MTM), in which a morphological filter will be divided into a sequence of basic operations. Then, a trajectory-based morphological operation (such as dilation, and erosion) is defined as the set of points resulting from the ordered application of the instant basic operations. The MTM approach allows working with different structuring elements, such as disks, and from the experiments, it can be extracted that our method is independent of the structuring element size and can be easily applied to industrial systems and high-resolution images.

  12. Exact solution of gyration radius of individual's trajectory for a simplified human mobility model

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiao-Yong; Han, Xiao-Pu; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Gyration radius of individual's trajectory plays a key role in quantifying human mobility patterns. Of particular interests, empirical analyses suggest that the growth of gyration radius is slow versus time except the very early stage and may eventually arrive to a steady value. However, up to now, the underlying mechanism leading to such a possibly steady value has not been well understood. In this Letter, we propose a simplified human mobility model to simulate individual's daily travel wit...

  13. A Mixed Integer Linear Programming Model for the North Atlantic Aircraft Trajectory Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Sbihi , Mohammed; Rodionova , Olga; Delahaye , Daniel; Mongeau , Marcel

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper discusses the trajectory planning problem for ights in the North Atlantic oceanic airspace (NAT). We develop a mathematical optimization framework in view of better utilizing available capacity by re-routing aircraft. The model is constructed by discretizing the problem parameters. A Mixed integer linear program (MILP) is proposed. Based on the MILP a heuristic to solve real-size instances is also introduced

  14. Classical model with pionic degrees of freedom for the description of high energetic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the classical model is extended in order to regard the inelastic processes important in the heavy ion collisions of the considered energy range. For this a classical pion field was coupled to the nucleons via the pseudo-scalar #betta# 5 -interactions. Nucleon and pion fields were treated in a completely relativistic way. The equations of motion were analytically studied for the one-nucleon system. From the statical solution the bare mass of the nucleon was determined, and its dependence on both parameters of this modell, the coupling constant and the cut-off momentum of the form factor, was considered. (orig./HSI) [de

  15. Classical solutions of non-linear sigma-models and their quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Din, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    I study the properties of O(N) and CPsup(n-1) non-linear sigma-models in the two dimensional Euclidean space. All classical solutions of the equations of motion can be characterized and in the CPsup(n-1) model they can be expressed in a simple and explicit way in terms of holomorphic vectors. The topological winding number and the action of the general CPsup(n-1) solution can be evaluated and the latter turns out always to be a integer multiple of 2π. I further discuss the stability of the solutions and the problem of one-loop calculations of quantum fluctuations around classical solutions

  16. Stiefel-Skyrem-Higgs models, their classical static solutions and Yang-Mills-Higgs monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, V.K.

    1981-07-01

    A new series of models is introduced by adding Higgs fields to the earlier proposed euclidean four-dimensional Skyrme-like models with Yang-Mills composite fields constructed from Stiefel manifold-valued fields. The classical static versions of these models are discussed. The connection with the monopole solutions of the Yang-Mills-Higgs models in the Prasad-Sommerfield limit is pointed out and the BPS monopole is reobtained as an example. (author)

  17. Optimizing Likelihood Models for Particle Trajectory Segmentation in Multi-State Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Dylan Christopher; Scrimgeour, Jan

    2018-06-19

    Particle tracking offers significant insight into the molecular mechanics that govern the behav- ior of living cells. The analysis of molecular trajectories that transition between different motive states, such as diffusive, driven and tethered modes, is of considerable importance, with even single trajectories containing significant amounts of information about a molecule's environment and its interactions with cellular structures. Hidden Markov models (HMM) have been widely adopted to perform the segmentation of such complex tracks. In this paper, we show that extensive analysis of hidden Markov model outputs using data derived from multi-state Brownian dynamics simulations can be used both for the optimization of the likelihood models used to describe the states of the system and for characterization of the technique's failure mechanisms. This analysis was made pos- sible by the implementation of parallelized adaptive direct search algorithm on a Nvidia graphics processing unit. This approach provides critical information for the visualization of HMM failure and successful design of particle tracking experiments where trajectories contain multiple mobile states. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. Unconventional Constraints on Nitrogen Chemistry using DC3 Observations and Trajectory-based Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q.; Henderson, B. H.

    2017-12-01

    Chemical transport models underestimate nitrogen dioxide observations in the upper troposphere (UT). Previous research in the UT succeeded in combining model predictions with field campaign measurements to demonstrate that the nitric acid formation rate (HO + NO2 → HNO3 (R1)) is overestimated by 22% (Henderson et al., 2012). A subsequent publication (Seltzer et al., 2015) demonstrated that single chemical constraint alters ozone and aerosol formation/composition. This work attempts to replicate previous chemical constraints with newer observations and a different modeling framework. We apply the previously successful constraint framework to Deep Convection Clouds and Chemistry (DC3). DC3 is a more recent field campaign where simulated nitrogen imbalances still exist. Freshly convected air parcels, identified in the DC3 dataset, as initial coordinates to initiate Lagrangian trajectories. Along each trajectory, we simulate the air parcel chemical state. Samples along the trajectories will form ensembles that represent possible realizations of UT air parcels. We then apply Bayesian inference to constrain nitrogen chemistry and compare results to the existing literature. Our anticipated results will confirm overestimation of HNO3 formation rate in previous work and provide further constraints on other nitrogen reaction rate coefficients that affect terminal products from NOx. We will particularly focus on organic nitrate chemistry that laboratory literature has yet to fully address. The results will provide useful insights into nitrogen chemistry that affects climate and human health.

  19. The impact of covariance misspecification in group-based trajectory models for longitudinal data with non-stationary covariance structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christopher E; Glonek, Gary Fv; Giles, Lynne C

    2017-08-01

    One purpose of a longitudinal study is to gain a better understanding of how an outcome of interest changes among a given population over time. In what follows, a trajectory will be taken to mean the series of measurements of the outcome variable for an individual. Group-based trajectory modelling methods seek to identify subgroups of trajectories within a population, such that trajectories that are grouped together are more similar to each other than to trajectories in distinct groups. Group-based trajectory models generally assume a certain structure in the covariances between measurements, for example conditional independence, homogeneous variance between groups or stationary variance over time. Violations of these assumptions could be expected to result in poor model performance. We used simulation to investigate the effect of covariance misspecification on misclassification of trajectories in commonly used models under a range of scenarios. To do this we defined a measure of performance relative to the ideal Bayesian correct classification rate. We found that the more complex models generally performed better over a range of scenarios. In particular, incorrectly specified covariance matrices could significantly bias the results but using models with a correct but more complicated than necessary covariance matrix incurred little cost.

  20. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Riede

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M, the photochemistry submodel JVAL (J, and the new trajectory submodel TRAJECT (T, to simulate chemistry along atmospheric trajectories, which are provided offline. With the same chemistry submodels coupled to the 3-D EMAC model and consistent initial conditions and physical parameters, a unique consistency between the two models is achieved. Since only mixing processes within the 3-D model are excluded from the model consistency, comparisons of results from the two models allow to separate and quantify contributions of transport, chemistry, and mixing along the trajectory pathways. Consistency of transport between the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the 3-D EMAC model is achieved via calculation of kinematic trajectories based on 3-D wind fields from EMAC using the trajectory model LAGRANTO. The combination of the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the trajectory model LAGRANTO can be considered as a Lagrangian chemistry-transport model (CTM moving isolated air parcels. The procedure for obtaining the necessary statistical basis for the quantification method is described as well as the comprehensive diagnostics with respect to chemistry.

    The quantification method presented here allows to investigate the characteristics of transport, chemistry, and mixing in a grid-based 3-D model. The analysis of chemical processes within the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT is easily extendable to include, for example, the impact of different transport pathways or of mixing processes onto

  1. Understanding Random Effects in Group-Based Trajectory Modeling: An Application of Moffitt’s Developmental Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, Jessica M.

    2010-01-01

    The group-based trajectory modeling approach is a systematic way of categorizing subjects into different groups based on their developmental trajectories using formal and objective statistical criteria. With the recent advancement in methods and statistical software, modeling possibilities are almost limitless; however, parallel advances in theory development have not kept pace. This paper examines some of the modeling options that are becoming more widespread and how they impact both empiric...

  2. Accuracy of topographic index models at identifying ephemeral gully trajectories on agricultural fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshukov, Aleksey Y.; Sekaluvu, Lawrence; Hutchinson, Stacy L.

    2018-04-01

    Topographic index (TI) models have been widely used to predict trajectories and initiation points of ephemeral gullies (EGs) in agricultural landscapes. Prediction of EGs strongly relies on the selected value of critical TI threshold, and the accuracy depends on topographic features, agricultural management, and datasets of observed EGs. This study statistically evaluated the predictions by TI models in two paired watersheds in Central Kansas that had different levels of structural disturbances due to implemented conservation practices. Four TI models with sole dependency on topographic factors of slope, contributing area, and planform curvature were used in this study. The observed EGs were obtained by field reconnaissance and through the process of hydrological reconditioning of digital elevation models (DEMs). The Kernel Density Estimation analysis was used to evaluate TI distribution within a 10-m buffer of the observed EG trajectories. The EG occurrence within catchments was analyzed using kappa statistics of the error matrix approach, while the lengths of predicted EGs were compared with the observed dataset using the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) statistics. The TI frequency analysis produced bi-modal distribution of topographic indexes with the pixels within the EG trajectory having a higher peak. The graphs of kappa and NSE versus critical TI threshold showed similar profile for all four TI models and both watersheds with the maximum value representing the best comparison with the observed data. The Compound Topographic Index (CTI) model presented the overall best accuracy with NSE of 0.55 and kappa of 0.32. The statistics for the disturbed watershed showed higher best critical TI threshold values than for the undisturbed watershed. Structural conservation practices implemented in the disturbed watershed reduced ephemeral channels in headwater catchments, thus producing less variability in catchments with EGs. The variation in critical thresholds for all

  3. Modeling and Robust Trajectory Tracking Control for a Novel Six-Rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengshun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and trajectory tracking control of a novel six-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV is concerned to solve problems such as smaller payload capacity and lack of both hardware redundancy and anticrosswind capability for quad-rotor. The mathematical modeling for the six-rotor UAV is developed on the basis of the Newton-Euler formalism, and a second-order sliding-mode disturbance observer (SOSMDO is proposed to reconstruct the disturbances of the rotational dynamics. In consideration of the under-actuated and strong coupling properties of the six-rotor UAV, a nested double loops trajectory tracking control strategy is adopted. In the outer loop, a position error PID controller is designed, of which the task is to compare the desired trajectory with real position of the six-rotor UAV and export the desired attitude angles to the inner loop. In the inner loop, a rapid-convergent nonlinear differentiator (RCND is proposed to calculate the derivatives of the virtual control signal, instead of using the analytical differentiation, to avoid “differential expansion” in the procedure of the attitude controller design. Finally, the validity and effectiveness of the proposed technique are demonstrated by the simulation results.

  4. Encoding Time in Feedforward Trajectories of a Recurrent Neural Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, N F; Buonomano, Dean V

    2018-02-01

    Brain activity evolves through time, creating trajectories of activity that underlie sensorimotor processing, behavior, and learning and memory. Therefore, understanding the temporal nature of neural dynamics is essential to understanding brain function and behavior. In vivo studies have demonstrated that sequential transient activation of neurons can encode time. However, it remains unclear whether these patterns emerge from feedforward network architectures or from recurrent networks and, furthermore, what role network structure plays in timing. We address these issues using a recurrent neural network (RNN) model with distinct populations of excitatory and inhibitory units. Consistent with experimental data, a single RNN could autonomously produce multiple functionally feedforward trajectories, thus potentially encoding multiple timed motor patterns lasting up to several seconds. Importantly, the model accounted for Weber's law, a hallmark of timing behavior. Analysis of network connectivity revealed that efficiency-a measure of network interconnectedness-decreased as the number of stored trajectories increased. Additionally, the balance of excitation (E) and inhibition (I) shifted toward excitation during each unit's activation time, generating the prediction that observed sequential activity relies on dynamic control of the E/I balance. Our results establish for the first time that the same RNN can generate multiple functionally feedforward patterns of activity as a result of dynamic shifts in the E/I balance imposed by the connectome of the RNN. We conclude that recurrent network architectures account for sequential neural activity, as well as for a fundamental signature of timing behavior: Weber's law.

  5. Robust Trajectory Option Set planning in CTOP based on Bayesian game model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lichun; Clarke, John-Paul; Feron, Eric; Shamma, Jeff S.

    2017-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rations capacity to reduce en route delay, especially those caused by bad weather. This is accomplished via Collaborative Trajectory Options Program (CTOP) which has been recently developed to provide a mechanism for flight operators to communicate their route preferences for each flight via a Trajectory Option Set (TOS), as well as a mechanism for the FAA to assign the best possible route within the set of trajectories in the TOS for a given flight, i.e. the route with the lowest adjusted cost after consideration of system constraints and the requirements of all flights. The routes assigned to an airline depend not only on the TOS's for its own flights but also on the TOS's of all other flights in the CTOP, which are unknown. This paper aims to provide a detailed algorithm for the airline to design its TOS plan which is robust to the uncertainties of its competitors' TOS's. To this purpose, we model the CTOP problem as a Bayesian game, and use Linear Program (LP) to compute the security strategy in the Bayesian game model. This security strategy guarantees the airline an upper bound on the sum of the assigned times. The numerical results demonstrate the robustness of the strategy, which is not achieved by any other tested strategy.

  6. Robust Trajectory Option Set planning in CTOP based on Bayesian game model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lichun

    2017-07-10

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rations capacity to reduce en route delay, especially those caused by bad weather. This is accomplished via Collaborative Trajectory Options Program (CTOP) which has been recently developed to provide a mechanism for flight operators to communicate their route preferences for each flight via a Trajectory Option Set (TOS), as well as a mechanism for the FAA to assign the best possible route within the set of trajectories in the TOS for a given flight, i.e. the route with the lowest adjusted cost after consideration of system constraints and the requirements of all flights. The routes assigned to an airline depend not only on the TOS\\'s for its own flights but also on the TOS\\'s of all other flights in the CTOP, which are unknown. This paper aims to provide a detailed algorithm for the airline to design its TOS plan which is robust to the uncertainties of its competitors\\' TOS\\'s. To this purpose, we model the CTOP problem as a Bayesian game, and use Linear Program (LP) to compute the security strategy in the Bayesian game model. This security strategy guarantees the airline an upper bound on the sum of the assigned times. The numerical results demonstrate the robustness of the strategy, which is not achieved by any other tested strategy.

  7. Using the classical linear regression model in analysis of the dependences of conveyor belt life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Andrejiová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the classical linear regression model of the dependence of conveyor belt life on some selected parameters: thickness of paint layer, width and length of the belt, conveyor speed and quantity of transported material. The first part of the article is about regression model design, point and interval estimation of parameters, verification of statistical significance of the model, and about the parameters of the proposed regression model. The second part of the article deals with identification of influential and extreme values that can have an impact on estimation of regression model parameters. The third part focuses on assumptions of the classical regression model, i.e. on verification of independence assumptions, normality and homoscedasticity of residuals.

  8. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CP{sup N-1} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.; Jack, I.; Jones, D.R.T

    2002-10-31

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP{sup N-1} model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied.

  9. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  10. O método das trajectórias clássicas: colisões coplanares do tipo A+BC Classical trajectory method: A+BC coplanar collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M. C. Marques

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The general methodology of classical trajectories as applied to elementary chemical reactions of the A+BC type is presented. The goal is to elucidate students about the main theoretical features and potentialities in applying this versatile method to calculate the dynamical properties of reactive systems. Only the methodology for two-dimensional (2D case is described, from which the general theory for 3D follows straightforwardly. The adopted point of view is, as much as possible, that of allowing a direct translation of the concepts into a working program. An application to the reaction O(¹D+H2->O+OH with relevance in atmospheric chemistry is also presented. The FORTRAN codes used are available through the web page www.qqesc.qui.uc.pt.

  11. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of "quantum physical brain" reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a variety of concrete images given by temporal realizations of the corresponding (Gaussian) random signal. This signal has the covariance operator coinciding with the density operator encoding the abstract concept under consideration. The presence of various temporal scales in the brain plays the crucial role in creation of QLR in the brain. Moreover, in our model electromagnetic noise produced by neurons is a source of superstrong QL correlations between processes in different spatial domains in the brain; the binding problem is solved on the QL level, but with the aid of the classical background fluctuations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H 2 C 2 → HC 2 H, HNC → HCN, and H 2 CO → H 2 + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I → Na + + I - is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features

  13. Classical and quantum theories of the polarization bremsstrahlung in the local electron density model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapenko, V.A.; Bureeva, L.A.; Lisitsa, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    Classical and quantum theories of polarization bremsstrahlung in a statistical (Thomas-Fermi) potential of complex atoms and ions are developed. The basic assumptions of the theories correspond to the approximations employed earlier in classical and quantum calculations of ordinary bremsstrahlung in a static potential. This makes it possible to study on a unified basis the contribution of both channels in the radiation taking account of their interference. The classical model makes it possible to obtain simple universal formulas for the spectral characteristics of the radiation. The theory is applied to electrons with moderate energies, which are characteristic for plasma applications, specifically, radiation from electrons on the argon-like ion KII at frequencies close to its ionization potential. The computational results show the importance of taking account of the polarization channel of the radiation for plasma with heavy ions

  14. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyekyun; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul J.; Cho, Seungryong; Cho, Byungchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  15. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyekyun [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, South Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cho, Seungryong [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Byungchul, E-mail: cho.byungchul@gmail.com, E-mail: bcho@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  16. Comparability of results from pair and classical model formulations for different sexually transmitted infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Boon Som Ong

    Full Text Available The "classical model" for sexually transmitted infections treats partnerships as instantaneous events summarized by partner change rates, while individual-based and pair models explicitly account for time within partnerships and gaps between partnerships. We compared predictions from the classical and pair models over a range of partnership and gap combinations. While the former predicted similar or marginally higher prevalence at the shortest partnership lengths, the latter predicted self-sustaining transmission for gonorrhoea (GC and Chlamydia (CT over much broader partnership and gap combinations. Predictions on the critical level of condom use (C(c required to prevent transmission also differed substantially when using the same parameters. When calibrated to give the same disease prevalence as the pair model by adjusting the infectious duration for GC and CT, and by adjusting transmission probabilities for HIV, the classical model then predicted much higher C(c values for GC and CT, while C(c predictions for HIV were fairly close. In conclusion, the two approaches give different predictions over potentially important combinations of partnership and gap lengths. Assuming that it is more correct to explicitly model partnerships and gaps, then pair or individual-based models may be needed for GC and CT since model calibration does not resolve the differences.

  17. Modeling the Nature of Grammar and Vocabulary Trajectories From Prekindergarten to Third Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Logan, Jessica A; Jia, Rongfang

    2018-04-17

    This study investigated the longitudinal development of 2 important contributors to reading comprehension, grammar, and vocabulary skills. The primary interest was to examine the trajectories of the 2 skill areas from preschool to 3rd grade. The study involved a longitudinal sample of 420 children from 4 sites. Language skills, including grammar and vocabulary, were assessed annually with multiple measures. Multivariate latent growth curve modeling was used to examine the developmental trajectories of grammar and vocabulary, to test the correlation between the 2 domains, and to investigate the effects of demographic predictors on language growth. Results showed that both grammar and vocabulary exhibited decelerating growth from preschool to Grade 2. In Grade 3, grammar growth further flattened, whereas vocabulary continued to grow stably. Growth of vocabulary and grammar were positively correlated. Demographic characteristics, such as child gender and family socioeconomic status, were found to predict the intercept but not the slope of the growth trajectories. Children's growth in grammar skills is differentiated in a number of important ways from their growth in vocabulary skills. Results of this study suggest the need to differentiate these dimensions of language when seeking to closely examine growth from preschool to primary grades.

  18. Classical Causal Models for Bell and Kochen-Specker Inequality Violations Require Fine-Tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Cavalcanti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonlocality and contextuality are at the root of conceptual puzzles in quantum mechanics, and they are key resources for quantum advantage in information-processing tasks. Bell nonlocality is best understood as the incompatibility between quantum correlations and the classical theory of causality, applied to relativistic causal structure. Contextuality, on the other hand, is on a more controversial foundation. In this work, I provide a common conceptual ground between nonlocality and contextuality as violations of classical causality. First, I show that Bell inequalities can be derived solely from the assumptions of no signaling and no fine-tuning of the causal model. This removes two extra assumptions from a recent result from Wood and Spekkens and, remarkably, does not require any assumption related to independence of measurement settings—unlike all other derivations of Bell inequalities. I then introduce a formalism to represent contextuality scenarios within causal models and show that all classical causal models for violations of a Kochen-Specker inequality require fine-tuning. Thus, the quantum violation of classical causality goes beyond the case of spacelike-separated systems and already manifests in scenarios involving single systems.

  19. On convergence of trajectory attractors of the 3D Navier-Stokes-α model as α approaches 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishik, M I; Chepyzhov, V V; Titi, E S

    2007-01-01

    We study the relations between the long-time dynamics of the Navier-Stokes-α model and the exact 3D Navier-Stokes system. We prove that bounded sets of solutions of the Navier-Stokes-α model converge to the trajectory attractor A 0 of the 3D Navier-Stokes system as the time approaches infinity and α approaches zero. In particular, we show that the trajectory attractor A α of the Navier-Stokes-α model converges to the trajectory attractor A 0 of the 3D Navier-Stokes system as α→0+. We also construct the minimal limit A min (subset or equal A 0 ) of the trajectory attractor A α as α→0+ and prove that the set A min is connected and strictly invariant. Bibliography: 35 titles.

  20. On Lie point symmetry of classical Wess-Zumino-Witten model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maharana, Karmadeva

    2001-06-01

    We perform the group analysis of Witten's equations of motion for a particle moving in the presence of a magnetic monopole, and also when constrained to move on the surface of a sphere, which is the classical example of Wess-Zumino-Witten model. We also consider variations of this model. Our analysis gives the generators of the corresponding Lie point symmetries. The Lie symmetry corresponding to Kepler's third law is obtained in two related examples. (author)

  1. From classical to quantum models: the regularising role of integrals, symmetry and probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Gazeau, Jean-Pierre

    2018-01-01

    In physics, one is often misled in thinking that the mathematical model of a system is part of or is that system itself. Think of expressions commonly used in physics like "point" particle, motion "on the line", "smooth" observables, wave function, and even "going to infinity", without forgetting perplexing phrases like "classical world" versus "quantum world".... On the other hand, when a mathematical model becomes really inoperative with regard to correct predictions, one is forced to repla...

  2. Non-classic multiscale modeling of manipulation based on AFM, in aqueous and humid ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, M. H.; Homayooni, A.; Hefzabad, R. N.

    2018-05-01

    To achieve a precise manipulation, it is important that an accurate model consisting the size effect and environmental conditions be employed. In this paper, the non-classical multiscale modeling is developed to investigate the manipulation in a vacuum, aqueous and humid ambient. The manipulation structure is considered into two parts as a macro-field (MF) and a nano-field (NF). The governing equations of the AFM components (consist of the cantilever and tip) in the MF are derived based on the modified couple stress theory. The material length scale parameter is used to study the size effect. The fluid flow in the MF is assumed as the Couette and Creeping flows. Moreover, the NF is modeled using the molecular dynamics. The Electro-Based (ELBA) model is considered to model the ambient condition in the NF. The nanoparticle in the different conditions is taken into account to study the manipulation. The results of the manipulation indicate that the predicted deflection of the non-classical model is less than the classical one. Comparison of the nanoparticle travelled distance on substrate shows that the manipulation in the submerged condition is close to the ideal manipulation. The results of humid condition illustrate that by increasing the relative humidity (RH) the manipulation force decreases. Furthermore, Root Mean Square (RMS) as a criterion of damage demonstrates that the submerged nanoparticle has the minimum damage, however, the minimum manipulation force occurs in superlative humid ambient.

  3. The OH + D2 --> HOD + D angle-velocity distribution: quasi-classical trajectory calculations on the YZCL2 and WSLFH potential energy surfaces and comparison with experiments at ET = 0.28 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, José Daniel; Martínez, Rodrigo; Hernando, Jordi; González, Miguel

    2009-12-28

    The angle-velocity distribution (HOD) of the OH + D(2) reaction at a relative translational energy of 0.28 eV has been calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method on the two most recent potential energy surfaces available (YZCL2 and WSLFH PESs), widely extending a previous investigation of our group. Comparison with the high resolution experiments of Davis and co-workers (Science, 2000, 290, 958) shows that the structures (peaks) found in the relative translational energy distributions of products could not be satisfactorily reproduced in the calculations, probably due to the classical nature of the QCT method and the importance of quantum effects. The calculations, however, worked quite well for other properties. Overall, both surfaces led to similar results, although the YZCL2 surface is more accurate to describe the H(3)O PES, as derived from comparison with high level ab initio results. The differences observed in the QCT calculations were interpreted considering the somewhat larger anisotropy of the YZCL2 PES when compared with the WSLFH PES.

  4. Knee medial and lateral contact forces in a musculoskeletal model with subject-specific contact point trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, A; Aissaoui, R; Dumas, R

    2018-03-01

    Contact point (CP) trajectory is a crucial parameter in estimating medial/lateral tibio-femoral contact forces from the musculoskeletal (MSK) models. The objective of the present study was to develop a method to incorporate the subject-specific CP trajectories into the MSK model. Ten healthy subjects performed 45 s treadmill gait trials. The subject-specific CP trajectories were constructed on the tibia and femur as a function of extension-flexion using low-dose bi-plane X-ray images during a quasi-static squat. At each extension-flexion position, the tibia and femur CPs were superimposed in the three directions on the medial side, and in the anterior-posterior and proximal-distal directions on the lateral side to form the five kinematic constraints of the knee joint. The Lagrange multipliers associated to these constraints directly yielded the medial/lateral contact forces. The results from the personalized CP trajectory model were compared against the linear CP trajectory and sphere-on-plane CP trajectory models which were adapted from the commonly used MSK models. Changing the CP trajectory had a remarkable impact on the knee kinematics and changed the medial and lateral contact forces by 1.03 BW and 0.65 BW respectively, in certain subjects. The direction and magnitude of the medial/lateral contact force were highly variable among the subjects and the medial-lateral shift of the CPs alone could not determine the increase/decrease pattern of the contact forces. The suggested kinematic constraints are adaptable to the CP trajectories derived from a variety of joint models and those experimentally measured from the 3D imaging techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro A. De-Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast, which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  6. [Application of classical isothermal adsorption models in heavy metal ions/ diatomite system and related problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Wu, Qing-Ding; Wang, Ping; Li, Ke-Lin; Lei, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2013-11-01

    In order to fully understand adsorption nature of Cu2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite, and to find problems of classical isothermal adsorption models' application in liquid/solid system, a series of isothermal adsorption tests were conducted. As results indicate, the most suitable isotherm models for describing adsorption of Pb2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite are Tenkin, Tenkin, Langmuir, Tenkin, Freundlich and Freundlich, respectively, the adsorption of each ion onto natural diatomite is mainly a physical process, and the adsorption reaction is favorable. It also can be found that, when using classical isothermal adsorption models to fit the experimental data in liquid/solid system, the equilibrium adsorption amount q(e) is not a single function of ion equilibrium concentration c(e), while is a function of two variables, namely c(e) and the adsorbent concentration W0, q(e) only depends on c(e)/W(0). Results also show that the classical isothermal adsorption models have a significant adsorbent effect, and their parameter values are unstable, the simulation values of parameter differ greatly from the measured values, which is unhelpful for practical use. The tests prove that four-adsorption-components model can be used for describing adsorption behavior of single ion in nature diatomite-liquid system, its parameters k and q(m) have constant values, which is favorable for practical quantitative calculation in a given system.

  7. NOAA-MMS joint Langmuir circulation and oil spill trajectory models workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simecek-Beatty, D.; Lehr, W.

    2000-01-01

    An NOAA/HAZMAT workshop was held in October 1999 which provided an opportunity for 14 spill response officials to discuss the scientific theory of Langmuir Circulation (LC) and to determine ways that it affects oil spreading, dispersion and transport. The workshop helped identify potential modifications to existing oil spill trajectory models. LC is a result of the interaction between wind-driven surface currents and waves. This interaction causes vortices in the surface mixed layer of the water body. The vortices are aligned in the general direction of the wind. The surface water between the vortices either diverges or converges. For cleanup purposes and remote sensing it is necessary to incorporate LC into most oil and spill trajectory and behavior models. It was determined it should be possible to build simple models to predict the intensity of LC since current knowledge suggests that LC is forced by wind and waves. A prediction equation would be of tremendous use to oil spill response personnel. 39 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  8. Development of a Quadrotor Test Bed — Modelling, Parameter Identification, Controller Design and Trajectory Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a quadrotor test bed is developed. The technical approach for this test bed is firstly proposed by utilizing a commercial quadrotor, a Vicon motion capture system and a ground station. Then, the mathematical model of the quadrotor is formulated considering aerodynamic effects, and the parameter identification approaches for this model are provided accordingly. Based on the developed model and identified parameters, a simulation environment that is consistent with the real system is developed. Subsequently, a flight control strategy and a trajectory generation method, both of which are conceptually and computationally lightweight, are developed and tested in the simulation environment. The developed algorithms are then directly transplanted to the real system, and the experimental results show that their responses in the real-time flights match well with those from the simulations. This indicates that the control algorithms developed for the quadrotor can be preliminarily verified and refined though simulations, and then directly implemented to the real system, which could significantly reduce the experimental risks and costs. Meanwhile, real-time experiments show that the developed flight controller can efficiently stabilize the quadrotor when external disturbances exist, and the trajectory generation approach can provide safe guidance for the quadrotor to fly smoothly through cluttered environments with obstacle rings. All of these features are valuable for real applications, thus demonstrating the feasibility of further development.

  9. Trajectory Planning and Optimized Adaptive Control for a Class of Wheeled Inverted Pendulum Vehicle Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenguang; Li, Zhijun; Li, Jing

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate optimized adaptive control and trajectory generation for a class of wheeled inverted pendulum (WIP) models of vehicle systems. Aiming at shaping the controlled vehicle dynamics to be of minimized motion tracking errors as well as angular accelerations, we employ the linear quadratic regulation optimization technique to obtain an optimal reference model. Adaptive control has then been developed using variable structure method to ensure the reference model to be exactly matched in a finite-time horizon, even in the presence of various internal and external uncertainties. The minimized yaw and tilt angular accelerations help to enhance the vehicle rider's comfort. In addition, due to the underactuated mechanism of WIP, the vehicle forward velocity dynamics cannot be controlled separately from the pendulum tilt angle dynamics. Inspired by the control strategy of human drivers, who usually manipulate the tilt angle to control the forward velocity, we design a neural-network-based adaptive generator of implicit control trajectory (AGICT) of the tilt angle which indirectly "controls" the forward velocity such that it tracks the desired velocity asymptotically. The stability and optimal tracking performance have been rigorously established by theoretic analysis. In addition, simulation studies have been carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed AGICT and optimized adaptive controller.

  10. Modeling intensive longitudinal data with mixtures of nonparametric trajectories and time-varying effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziak, John J; Li, Runze; Tan, Xianming; Shiffman, Saul; Shiyko, Mariya P

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral scientists increasingly collect intensive longitudinal data (ILD), in which phenomena are measured at high frequency and in real time. In many such studies, it is of interest to describe the pattern of change over time in important variables as well as the changing nature of the relationship between variables. Individuals' trajectories on variables of interest may be far from linear, and the predictive relationship between variables of interest and related covariates may also change over time in a nonlinear way. Time-varying effect models (TVEMs; see Tan, Shiyko, Li, Li, & Dierker, 2012) address these needs by allowing regression coefficients to be smooth, nonlinear functions of time rather than constants. However, it is possible that not only observed covariates but also unknown, latent variables may be related to the outcome. That is, regression coefficients may change over time and also vary for different kinds of individuals. Therefore, we describe a finite mixture version of TVEM for situations in which the population is heterogeneous and in which a single trajectory would conceal important, interindividual differences. This extended approach, MixTVEM, combines finite mixture modeling with non- or semiparametric regression modeling, to describe a complex pattern of change over time for distinct latent classes of individuals. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated in an empirical example from a smoking cessation study. We provide a versatile SAS macro and R function for fitting MixTVEMs. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Trajectory Reconstruction and Uncertainty Analysis Using Mars Science Laboratory Pre-Flight Scale Model Aeroballistic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Rafael A.; Tolson, Robert H.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) trajectory reconstruction effort at NASA Langley Research Center, free-flight aeroballistic experiments of instrumented MSL scale models was conducted at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. The models carried an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a flush air data system (FADS) similar to the MSL Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) that provided data types similar to those from the MSL entry. Multiple sources of redundant data were available, including tracking radar and on-board magnetometers. These experimental data enabled the testing and validation of the various tools and methodologies that will be used for MSL trajectory reconstruction. The aerodynamic parameters Mach number, angle of attack, and sideslip angle were estimated using minimum variance with a priori to combine the pressure data and pre-flight computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data. Both linear and non-linear pressure model terms were also estimated for each pressure transducer as a measure of the errors introduced by CFD and transducer calibration. Parameter uncertainties were estimated using a "consider parameters" approach.

  12. Variable trajectory model for regional assessments of air pollution from sulfur compounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, D.C.; McNaughton, D.J.; Wendell, L.L.; Drake, R.L.

    1979-02-01

    This report describes a sulfur oxides atmospheric pollution model that calculates trajectories using single-layer historical wind data as well as chemical transformation and deposition following discrete contaminant air masses. Vertical diffusion under constraints is calculated, but all horizontal dispersion is a funcion of trajectory variation. The ground-level air concentrations and deposition are calculated in a rectangular area comprising the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. Calculations for a 29-day assessment period in April 1974 are presented along with a limited verification. Results for the studies were calculated using a source inventory comprising 61% of the anthropogenic SO/sub 2/ emissions. Using current model parameterization levels, predicted concentration values are most sensitive to variations in dry deposition of SO/sub 2/, wet deposition of sulfate, and transformation of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate. Replacing the variable mixed-layer depth and variable stability features of the model with constant definitions of each results in increased ground-level concentration predicions for SO/sub 2/ and particularly for sulfate.

  13. Smoke plume trajectory from in-situ burning of crude oil: complex terrain modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrattan, K.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical models have been used to predict the concentration of particulate matter or other combustion products downwind from a proposed in- situ burning of an oil spill. One of the models used was the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) model, ALOFT (A Large Outdoor Fire plume Trajectory), which is based on the conservation equations that govern the introduction of hot gases and particulate matter into the atmosphere. By using a model based on fundamental equations, it becomes a relatively simple matter to simulate smoke dispersal flow patterns, and to compute the solution to the equations of motion that govern the transport of pollutants in the lower atmosphere at a resolution that is comparable to that of the underlying terrain data. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  14. Quasi-Classical Trajectory Dynamics Study of the Cl(2P) + C2H6 → HCl(v,j) + C2H5 Reaction. Comparison with Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin; Martinez-Nuñez, Emilio; Rangel, Cipriano

    2018-03-15

    To understand and simulate the dynamics behavior of the title reaction, QCT calculations were performed on a recently developed global analytical potential energy surface, PES-2017. These calculations combine the classical description of the dynamics with pseudoquantization in the reactants and products to perform a theoretical/experimental comparison on the same footing. Thus, in the products a series of constraints are included to analyze the HCl(v = 0,j) product, which is experimentally detected. At collision energies of 5.5 and 6.7 kcal mol -1 the largest fraction of available energy is deposited as translation, 67%, while the ethyl radical shows significant internal energy, 27%, and so it does not act as a spectator of the reaction, thus reproducing recent experimental evidence. The HCl(v=0, j) rotational distribution is cold, peaking at j = 2, only one unit hotter than experiment, which represents an error of 0.12 kcal mol -1 . At a collision energy of 5.5 kcal mol -1 product translational distribution is slightly hotter than experiment, but at 6.7 kcal mol -1 agreement with recent experiments is practically quantitative, suggesting that the first experiments should be revised. In addition, we observe that the HCl(v=0, j) scattering distribution shifts from isotropic at low values of j to backward at high values of j, which is in agreement with experimental data. Finally, no evidence was found for the "chattering" mechanism suggested to explain the low translational energy of the HCl product in the backward scattering region. In sum, agreement with experiments of a series of sensible dynamic properties permits us to be optimistic on the quality and accuracy of the theoretical tools used in the present work, QCT and PES-2017.

  15. Modeling Math Growth Trajectory--An Application of Conventional Growth Curve Model and Growth Mixture Model to ECLS K-5 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    To model students' math growth trajectory, three conventional growth curve models and three growth mixture models are applied to the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Kindergarten-Fifth grade (ECLS K-5) dataset in this study. The results of conventional growth curve model show gender differences on math IRT scores. When holding socio-economic…

  16. Direct detection of singlet dark matter in classically scale-invariant standard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Endo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical scale invariance is one of the possible solutions to explain the origin of the electroweak scale. The simplest extension is the classically scale-invariant standard model augmented by a multiplet of gauge singlet real scalar. In the previous study it was shown that the properties of the Higgs potential deviate substantially, which can be observed in the International Linear Collider. On the other hand, since the multiplet does not acquire vacuum expectation value, the singlet components are stable and can be dark matter. In this letter we study the detectability of the real singlet scalar bosons in the experiment of the direct detection of dark matter. It is shown that a part of this model has already been excluded and the rest of the parameter space is within the reach of the future experiment.

  17. An update of the classical Bokhman’s dualistic model of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz Wilczyński

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the classical dualistic model introduced by Bokhman in 1983, endometrial cancer (EC is divided into two basic types. The prototypical histological type for type I and type II of EC is endometrioid carcinoma and serous carcinoma, respectively. The traditional classification is based on clinical, endocrine and histopathological features, however, it sometimes does not reflect the full heterogeneity of EC. New molecular evidence, supported by clinical diversity of the cancer, indicates that the classical dualistic model is valid only to some extent. The review updates a mutational diversity of EC, introducing a new molecular classification of the tumour in regard to data presented by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network (TGCA.

  18. Comparison Analysis of Model Predictive Controller with Classical PID Controller For pH Control Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Balaji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available pH control plays a important role in any chemical plant and process industries. For the past four decades the classical PID controller has been occupied by the industries. Due to the faster computing   technology in the industry demands a tighter advanced control strategy. To fulfill the needs and requirements Model Predictive Control (MPC is the best among all the advanced control algorithms available in the present scenario. The study and analysis has been done for First Order plus Delay Time (FOPDT model controlled by Proportional Integral Derivative (PID and MPC using the Matlab software. This paper explores the capability of the MPC strategy, analyze and compare the control effects with conventional control strategy in pH control. A comparison results between the PID and MPC is plotted using the software. The results clearly show that MPC provide better performance than the classical controller.

  19. Legendre condition and the stabilization problem for classical soliton solutions in generalized Skyrme models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiknadze, N.A.; Khelashvili, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem on stability of classical soliton solutions is studied from the unique point of view: the Legendre condition - necessary condition of existence of weak local minimum for energy functional (term soliton is used here in the wide sense) is used. Limits to parameters of the model Lagrangians are obtained; it is shown that there is no soliton stabilization in some of them despite the phenomenological achievements. The Jacoby sufficient condition is discussed

  20. Stability, convergence and Hopf bifurcation analyses of the classical car-following model

    OpenAIRE

    Kamath, Gopal Krishna; Jagannathan, Krishna; Raina, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Reaction delays play an important role in determining the qualitative dynamical properties of a platoon of vehicles traversing a straight road. In this paper, we investigate the impact of delayed feedback on the dynamics of the Classical Car-Following Model (CCFM). Specifically, we analyze the CCFM in no delay, small delay and arbitrary delay regimes. First, we derive a sufficient condition for local stability of the CCFM in no-delay and small-delay regimes using. Next, we derive the necessar...

  1. Learning probabilistic models of hydrogen bond stability from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-02-15

    Background: Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. They form and break while a protein deforms, for instance during the transition from a non-functional to a functional state. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor.Methods: This paper describes inductive learning methods to train protein-independent probabilistic models of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories of various proteins. The training data contains 32 input attributes (predictors) that describe an H-bond and its local environment in a conformation c and the output attribute is the probability that the H-bond will be present in an arbitrary conformation of this protein achievable from c within a time duration ?. We model dependence of the output variable on the predictors by a regression tree.Results: Several models are built using 6 MD simulation trajectories containing over 4000 distinct H-bonds (millions of occurrences). Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. They perform roughly 20% better than models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a conformation. In most tests, about 80% of the 10% H-bonds predicted as the least stable are actually among the 10% truly least stable. The important attributes identified during the tree construction are consistent with previous findings.Conclusions: We use inductive learning methods to build protein-independent probabilistic models to study H-bond stability, and demonstrate that the models perform better than H-bond energy alone. 2011 Chikalov et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. TALENT DEVELOPMENT IN THE WORLD OF CLASSICAL MUSIC AND VISUAL ARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Jarvin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose to explore the developmental trajectories of children displaying gifts and abilities in the domains of (classical music and in visual arts. A developmental model for talent development that was developed in the domain of classical music will be briefly presented and its applicability in the field of visual arts will be discussed.

  3. The Application of Classical and Neural Regression Models for the Valuation of Residential Real Estate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mach Łukasz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The research process aimed at building regression models, which helps to valuate residential real estate, is presented in the following article. Two widely used computational tools i.e. the classical multiple regression and regression models of artificial neural networks were used in order to build models. An attempt to define the utilitarian usefulness of the above-mentioned tools and comparative analysis of them is the aim of the conducted research. Data used for conducting analyses refers to the secondary transactional residential real estate market.

  4. ALOFT-PC a smoke plume trajectory model for personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, W.D.; McGrattan, K.B.; Mullin, J.V.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model, named ALOFT-PC, was developed for use during in-situ burning of oil spills to predict smoke plume trajectory. The downwind distribution of smoke particulate is a complex function of fire parameters, meteorological conditions, and topographic features. Experimental burns have shown that the downwind distribution of smoke is not Gaussian and simple smoke plume models do not capture the observed plume features. ALOFT-PC consists of the Navier-Stokes equations using an eddy viscosity over a uniform grid that spans the smoke plume and its surroundings. The model inputs are wind speed and variability, atmospheric temperature profile, and fire parameters and the output is the average of the plume. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  5. Impossibility of Classically Simulating One-Clean-Qubit Model with Multiplicative Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Hirotada; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Nishimura, Harumichi; Tamate, Shuhei; Tani, Seiichiro

    2018-05-01

    The one-clean-qubit model (or the deterministic quantum computation with one quantum bit model) is a restricted model of quantum computing where all but a single input qubits are maximally mixed. It is known that the probability distribution of measurement results on three output qubits of the one-clean-qubit model cannot be classically efficiently sampled within a constant multiplicative error unless the polynomial-time hierarchy collapses to the third level [T. Morimae, K. Fujii, and J. F. Fitzsimons, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 130502 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.130502]. It was open whether we can keep the no-go result while reducing the number of output qubits from three to one. Here, we solve the open problem affirmatively. We also show that the third-level collapse of the polynomial-time hierarchy can be strengthened to the second-level one. The strengthening of the collapse level from the third to the second also holds for other subuniversal models such as the instantaneous quantum polynomial model [M. Bremner, R. Jozsa, and D. J. Shepherd, Proc. R. Soc. A 467, 459 (2011), 10.1098/rspa.2010.0301] and the boson sampling model [S. Aaronson and A. Arkhipov, STOC 2011, p. 333]. We additionally study the classical simulatability of the one-clean-qubit model with further restrictions on the circuit depth or the gate types.

  6. Introducing the fit-criteria assessment plot - A visualisation tool to assist class enumeration in group-based trajectory modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klijn, Sven L; Weijenberg, Matty P; Lemmens, Paul; van den Brandt, Piet A; Lima Passos, Valéria

    2017-10-01

    Background and objective Group-based trajectory modelling is a model-based clustering technique applied for the identification of latent patterns of temporal changes. Despite its manifold applications in clinical and health sciences, potential problems of the model selection procedure are often overlooked. The choice of the number of latent trajectories (class-enumeration), for instance, is to a large degree based on statistical criteria that are not fail-safe. Moreover, the process as a whole is not transparent. To facilitate class enumeration, we introduce a graphical summary display of several fit and model adequacy criteria, the fit-criteria assessment plot. Methods An R-code that accepts universal data input is presented. The programme condenses relevant group-based trajectory modelling output information of model fit indices in automated graphical displays. Examples based on real and simulated data are provided to illustrate, assess and validate fit-criteria assessment plot's utility. Results Fit-criteria assessment plot provides an overview of fit criteria on a single page, placing users in an informed position to make a decision. Fit-criteria assessment plot does not automatically select the most appropriate model but eases the model assessment procedure. Conclusions Fit-criteria assessment plot is an exploratory, visualisation tool that can be employed to assist decisions in the initial and decisive phase of group-based trajectory modelling analysis. Considering group-based trajectory modelling's widespread resonance in medical and epidemiological sciences, a more comprehensive, easily interpretable and transparent display of the iterative process of class enumeration may foster group-based trajectory modelling's adequate use.

  7. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia P. Jumbo-Lucioni

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT. Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and, by

  8. Modeling of nuclear glasses by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganster, P.

    2004-01-01

    A calcium aluminosilicate glass of molar composition 67 % SiO 2 - 12 % Al 2 O 3 - 21 % CaO was modelled by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics. The size effect study in classical MD shows that the systems of 100 atoms are more ordered than the larger ones. These effects are mainly due to the 3-body terms in the empirical potentials. Nevertheless, these effects are small and the structures generated are in agreement with experimental data. In such kind of glass, we denote an aluminium avoidance and an excess of non bridging oxygens which can be compensated by tri-coordinated oxygens. When the dynamics of systems of 100 and 200 atoms is followed by ab initio MD, some local arrangements occurs (bond length, angular distributions). Thus, more realistic vibrational properties are obtained in ab initio MD. The modelling of thin films shows that aluminum atoms extend to the most external part of the surface and they are all tri-coordinated. Calcium atoms are set in the sub layer part of the surface and they produce a depolymerization of the network. In classical MD, tri-coordinated aluminium atoms produce an important electric field above the surface. With non bridging oxygens, they constitute attractive sites for single water molecules. (author) [fr

  9. Modelling of nuclear glasses by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganster, P.

    2004-10-01

    A calcium aluminosilicate glass of molar composition 67 % SiO 2 - 12 % Al 2 O 3 - 21 % CaO was modelled by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics. The size effect study in classical MD shows that the systems of 100 atoms are more ordered than the larger ones. These effects are mainly due to the 3-body terms in the empirical potentials. Nevertheless, these effects are small and the structures generated are in agreement with experimental data. In such kind of glass, we denote an aluminium avoidance and an excess of non bridging oxygens which can be compensated by tri coordinated oxygens. When the dynamics of systems of 100 and 200 atoms is followed by ab initio MD, some local arrangements occurs (bond length, angular distributions). Thus, more realistic vibrational properties are obtained in ab initio MD. The modelling of thin films shows that aluminium atoms extend to the most external part of the surface and they are all tri-coordinated. Calcium atoms are set in the sub layer part of the surface and they produce a depolymerization of the network. In classical MD, tri-coordinated aluminium atoms produce an important electric field above the surface. With non bridging oxygens, they constitute attractive sites for single water molecules. (author)

  10. Effect Sizes for Growth-Modeling Analysis for Controlled Clinical Trials in the Same Metric as for Classical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The use of growth-modeling analysis (GMA)--including hierarchical linear models, latent growth models, and general estimating equations--to evaluate interventions in psychology, psychiatry, and prevention science has grown rapidly over the last decade. However, an effect size associated with the difference between the trajectories of the…

  11. Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: Application to the double-Anderson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H. [Department of Chemistry and Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, University of California, and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Levy, Tal J.; Rabani, Eran [School of Chemistry, The Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-05-28

    A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis-à-vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures.

  12. Multi-Body Ski Jumper Model with Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Muscle Control for Trajectory Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Piprek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to model a ski jumper as a multi-body system for an optimal control application. The modeling is based on the constrained Newton-Euler-Equations. Within this paper the complete multi-body modeling methodology as well as the musculoskeletal modeling is considered. For the musculoskeletal modeling and its incorporation in the optimization model, we choose a nonlinear dynamic inversion control approach. This approach uses the muscle models as nonlinear reference models and links them to the ski jumper movement by a control law. This strategy yields a linearized input-output behavior, which makes the optimal control problem easier to solve. The resulting model of the ski jumper can then be used for trajectory optimization whose results are compared to literature jumps. Ultimately, this enables the jumper to get a very detailed feedback of the flight. To achieve the maximal jump length, exact positioning of his body with respect to the air can be displayed.

  13. CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago; Hoover Inst.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.

  14. A study of quadrupole dynamics: quantification of classical motion chaos, and new features of the coherent states model. Resume of Ph.D thesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, V.

    1995-01-01

    This resume of the Ph.D. thesis has three main parts. In the first part a fourth order quadrupole boson Hamiltonian is semi classically treated through a time-dependent variational principle (TDVP), the variational states being of coherent type for the boson operators b 20 + and 1/√2 (b 22 + + b 2-2 + ). The static ground state is studied as a function of the parameters involved in the model Hamiltonian. Linearizing the classical equations of motion one obtains the RPA approach for the many boson correlations. There are two RPA roots which describe the beta and gamma vibrations, respectively. Several quantization procedures for both small and large amplitude regimes are discussed. The quantized Hamiltonians are compared with some others which were previously obtained by using different methods. A special attention is paid to the quantal states associated to some of the peaks appearing in the Fourier spectrum of the classical action density. Some of the quantal states exhibit a pronounced anharmonic structure. Therefore the procedure may be used for a unified description of small and large amplitude regimes. In the next part the semiclassical foundations of the Coherent State Model are established using the formalism elaborated in the previous section. In the third part the semiclassical treatment through a time-dependent variational principle (TDVP) of the fourth order quadrupole boson Hamiltonian H is continued. In the parameter space of H there are regions, conventionally called as 'nuclear phases', determining specific static properties. Several ground states corresponding to different equilibrium shapes are found as static solutions of classical equations of motion. The non-integrable system may follow a chaotic trajectory. The mechanism of destroying the tori bearing regular orbits and the onset of chaos may depend on nuclear phase. The regular and chaotic motions are analyzed in terms of Poincare sections and Lyapunov largest exponent. Specific features of

  15. A study of quantum mechanical probabilities in the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, N; Scholkmann, F; Salari, V

    2015-03-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is a powerful model to explain different aspects of spike generation in excitable cells. However, the HH model was proposed in 1952 when the real structure of the ion channel was unknown. It is now common knowledge that in many ion-channel proteins the flow of ions through the pore is governed by a gate, comprising a so-called "selectivity filter" inside the ion channel, which can be controlled by electrical interactions. The selectivity filter (SF) is believed to be responsible for the selection and fast conduction of particular ions across the membrane of an excitable cell. Other (generally larger) parts of the molecule such as the pore-domain gate control the access of ions to the channel protein. In fact, two types of gates are considered here for ion channels: the "external gate", which is the voltage sensitive gate, and the "internal gate" which is the selectivity filter gate (SFG). Some quantum effects are expected in the SFG due to its small dimensions, which may play an important role in the operation of an ion channel. Here, we examine parameters in a generalized model of HH to see whether any parameter affects the spike generation. Our results indicate that the previously suggested semi-quantum-classical equation proposed by Bernroider and Summhammer (BS) agrees strongly with the HH equation under different conditions and may even provide a better explanation in some cases. We conclude that the BS model can refine the classical HH model substantially.

  16. Local and omnibus goodness-of-fit tests in classical measurement error models

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanyuan

    2010-09-14

    We consider functional measurement error models, i.e. models where covariates are measured with error and yet no distributional assumptions are made about the mismeasured variable. We propose and study a score-type local test and an orthogonal series-based, omnibus goodness-of-fit test in this context, where no likelihood function is available or calculated-i.e. all the tests are proposed in the semiparametric model framework. We demonstrate that our tests have optimality properties and computational advantages that are similar to those of the classical score tests in the parametric model framework. The test procedures are applicable to several semiparametric extensions of measurement error models, including when the measurement error distribution is estimated non-parametrically as well as for generalized partially linear models. The performance of the local score-type and omnibus goodness-of-fit tests is demonstrated through simulation studies and analysis of a nutrition data set.

  17. A classical Master equation approach to modeling an artificial protein motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwada, Nathan J.; Blab, Gerhard A.; Linke, Heiner

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by biomolecular motors, as well as by theoretical concepts for chemically driven nanomotors, there is significant interest in constructing artificial molecular motors. One driving force is the opportunity to create well-controlled model systems that are simple enough to be modeled in detail. A remaining challenge is the fact that such models need to take into account processes on many different time scales. Here we describe use of a classical Master equation approach, integrated with input from Langevin and molecular dynamics modeling, to stochastically model an existing artificial molecular motor concept, the Tumbleweed, across many time scales. This enables us to study how interdependencies between motor processes, such as center-of-mass diffusion and track binding/unbinding, affect motor performance. Results from our model help guide the experimental realization of the proposed motor, and potentially lead to insights that apply to a wider class of molecular motors.

  18. Non-classical solutions of a continuum model for rock descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Guzev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The strain-gradient and non-Euclidean continuum theories are employed for construction of non-classical solutions of continuum models. The linear approximation of both models' results in identical structures in terms of their kinematic and stress characteristics. The solutions obtained in this study exhibit a critical behaviour with respect to the external loading parameter. The conclusions are obtained based on an investigation of the solution for the scalar curvature in the non-Euclidean continuum theory. The proposed analysis enables us to use different theoretical approaches for description of rock critical behaviour under different loading conditions.

  19. Learning Probabilistic Models of Hydrogen Bond Stability from Molecular Dynamics Simulation Trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-04-02

    Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. H-bonds involving atoms from residues that are close to each other in the main-chain sequence stabilize secondary structure elements. H-bonds between atoms from distant residues stabilize a protein’s tertiary structure. However, H-bonds greatly vary in stability. They form and break while a protein deforms. For instance, the transition of a protein from a nonfunctional to a functional state may require some H-bonds to break and others to form. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor. Other local interactions may reinforce (or weaken) an H-bond. This paper describes inductive learning methods to train a protein-independent probabilistic model of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories. The training data describes H-bond occurrences at successive times along these trajectories by the values of attributes called predictors. A trained model is constructed in the form of a regression tree in which each non-leaf node is a Boolean test (split) on a predictor. Each occurrence of an H-bond maps to a path in this tree from the root to a leaf node. Its predicted stability is associated with the leaf node. Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. In particular, their performance is roughly 20% better than that of models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a given conformation. The paper discusses several extensions that may yield further improvements.

  20. A Lagrangian model of air-mass photochemistry and mixing using a trajectory ensemble: the Cambridge Tropospheric Trajectory model of Chemistry And Transport (CiTTyCAT version 4.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. M. Pugh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Lagrangian model of photochemistry and mixing is described (CiTTyCAT, stemming from the Cambridge Tropospheric Trajectory model of Chemistry And Transport, which is suitable for transport and chemistry studies throughout the troposphere. Over the last five years, the model has been developed in parallel at several different institutions and here those developments have been incorporated into one "community" model and documented for the first time. The key photochemical developments include a new scheme for biogenic volatile organic compounds and updated emissions schemes. The key physical development is to evolve composition following an ensemble of trajectories within neighbouring air-masses, including a simple scheme for mixing between them via an evolving "background profile", both within the boundary layer and free troposphere. The model runs along trajectories pre-calculated using winds and temperature from meteorological analyses. In addition, boundary layer height and precipitation rates, output from the analysis model, are interpolated to trajectory points and used as inputs to the mixing and wet deposition schemes. The model is most suitable in regimes when the effects of small-scale turbulent mixing are slow relative to advection by the resolved winds so that coherent air-masses form with distinct composition and strong gradients between them. Such air-masses can persist for many days while stretching, folding and thinning. Lagrangian models offer a useful framework for picking apart the processes of air-mass evolution over inter-continental distances, without being hindered by the numerical diffusion inherent to global Eulerian models. The model, including different box and trajectory modes, is described and some output for each of the modes is presented for evaluation. The model is available for download from a Subversion-controlled repository by contacting the corresponding authors.

  1. Theoretical study of silicon carbide under irradiation at the nano scale: classical and ab initio modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, G.

    2006-10-01

    The behaviour of silicon carbide under irradiation has been studied using classical and ab initio simulations, focusing on the nano scale elementary processes. First, we have been interested in the calculation of threshold displacement energies, which are difficult to determine both experimentally and theoretically, and also the associated Frenkel pairs. In the framework of this thesis, we have carried out simulations in classical and ab initio molecular dynamics. For the classical approach, two types of potentials have been used: the Tersoff potential, which led to non satisfactory results, and a new one which has been developed during this thesis. This potential allows a better modelling of SiC under irradiation than most of the empirical potentials available for SiC. It is based on the EDIP potential, initially developed to describe defects in silicon, that we have generalized to SiC. For the ab initio approach, the feasibility of the calculations has been validated and average energies of 19 eV for the C and 38 eV for the Si sublattices have been determined, close to the values empirically used in the fusion community. The results obtained with the new potential EDIP are globally in agreement with those values. Finally, the elementary processes involved in the crystal recovery have been studied by calculating the stability of the created Frenkel pairs and determining possible recombination mechanisms with the nudged elastic band method. (author)

  2. An investigation of bimodal jet trajectory in flow through scaled models of the human vocal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W. [Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Indiana (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Pulsatile two-dimensional flow through static divergent models of the human vocal folds is investigated. Although the motivation for this study is speech production, the results are generally applicable to a variety of engineering flows involving pulsatile flow through diffusers. Model glottal divergence angles of 10, 20, and 40 represent various geometries encountered in one phonation cycle. Frequency and amplitude of the flow oscillations are scaled with physiological Reynolds and Strouhal numbers typical of human phonation. Glottal velocity trajectories are measured along the anterior-posterior midline by using phase-averaged particle image velocimetry to acquire 1,000 realizations at ten discrete instances in the phonation cycle. The angular deflection of the glottal jet from the streamwise direction (symmetric configuration) is quantified for each realization. A bimodal flow configuration is observed for divergence angles of 10 and 20 , with the flow eventually skewing and attaching to the vocal fold walls. The deflection of the flow toward the vocal fold walls occurs when the forcing function reaches maximum velocity and zero acceleration. For a divergence angle of 40 , the flow never attaches to the vocal fold walls; however, there is increased variability in the glottal jet after the forcing function reaches maximum velocity and zero acceleration. The variation in the jet trajectory as a function of divergence angle is explained by performance maps of diffuser flow regimes. The smaller angle cases are in the unstable transitory stall regime while the 40 divergent case is in the fully developed two-dimensional stall regime. Very small geometric variations in model size and surface finish significantly affect the flow behavior. The bimodal, or flip-flopping, glottal jet behavior is expected to influence the dipole contribution to sound production. (orig.)

  3. Mathematical modelling for trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Shashi; Katiyar, V.K.; Singh, Uaday

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of a cluster of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel for the application of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a blood vessel upstream from a malignant tissue and are captured at the tumour site with help of an applied magnetic field. The applied field is produced by a rare earth cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body. All forces expected to significantly affect the transport of nanoparticles were incorporated, including magnetization force, drag force and buoyancy force. The results show that particles are slow down and captured under the influence of magnetic force, which is responsible to attract the magnetic particles towards the magnet. It is optimized that all particles are captured either before or at the centre of the magnet (z≤0) when blood vessel is very close proximity to the magnet (d=2.5 cm). However, as the distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) increases (above 4.5 cm), the magnetic nanoparticles particles become free and they flow away down the blood vessel. Further, the present model results are validated by the simulations performed using the finite element based COMSOL software. - Highlights: • A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles. • The dominant magnetic, drag and buoyancy forces are considered. • All particles are captured when distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) is up to 4.5 cm. • Further increase in d value (above 4.5 cm) results the free movement of magnetic particles

  4. Dissociation of acetone radical cation (CH3COCH3(+*) --> CH3CO(+) + CH3(*)): an ab initio direct classical trajectory study of the energy dependence of the branching ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2008-12-18

    The nonstatistical dissociation of acetone radical cation has been studied by ab initio direct classical trajectory calculations at the MP2/6-31G(d) level of theory. A bond additivity correction has been used to improve the MP2 potential energy surface (BAC-MP2). The energy dependence of the branching ratio, dissociation kinetics, and translational energy distribution for the two types of methyl groups have been investigated using microcanonical ensembles and specific mode excitation. In each case, the dissociation favors the loss of the newly formed methyl group, in agreement with the experiments. For microcanonical ensembles, the branching ratios for methyl loss are calculated to be 1.43, 1.88, 1.70, and 1.50 for 1, 2, 10, and 18 kcal/mol of excess energy, respectively. The energy dependence of the branching ratio is seen more dramatically in the excitation of individual modes involving C-C-O bending. For modes 3 and 6, the branching ratio rises to 1.6 and 1.8-2.3 when 1 or 2 kcal/mol are added, respectively, but falls off when more energy is added. For mode 8, the branching ratio continues to rise monotonically from 1.5 to 2.76 when 1-8 kcal/mol of excess energy are added.

  5. The trajectory model tranco as applied to the Chernobyl accident using E.C.M.W.F. meteorological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarimpas, N.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the TRANCO (trajectory analysis) code and discusses its application to model atmospheric transport during and after the Chernobyl accident. The archived-processed meteorological information from the ECMWF, which is used for the purposes of this study, is also described. Finally, results are discussed and compared with those produced by similar models

  6. Development of three-dimensional trajectory model for detecting source region of the radioactive materials released into the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kyung Suk; Park, Ki Hyun; Min, Byung Il; Kim, Sora; Yang, Byung Mo [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is necessary to consider the overall countermeasure for analysis of nuclear activities according to the increase of the nuclear facilities like nuclear power and reprocessing plants in the neighboring countries including China, Taiwan, North Korea, Japan and South Korea. South Korea and comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty organization (CTBTO) are now operating the monitoring instruments to detect radionuclides released into the air. It is important to estimate the origin of radionuclides measured using the detection technology as well as the monitoring analysis in aspects of investigation and security of the nuclear activities in neighboring countries. A three-dimensional forward/backward trajectory model has been developed to estimate the origin of radionuclides for a covert nuclear activity. The developed trajectory model was composed of forward and backward modules to track the particle positions using finite difference method. A three-dimensional trajectory model was validated using the measured data at Chernobyl accident. The calculated results showed a good agreement by using the high concentration measurements and the locations where was near a release point. The three-dimensional trajectory model had some uncertainty according to the release time, release height and time interval of the trajectory at each release points. An atmospheric dispersion model called long-range accident dose assessment system (LADAS), based on the fields of regards (FOR) technique, was applied to reduce the uncertainties of the trajectory model and to improve the detective technology for estimating the radioisotopes emission area. The detective technology developed in this study can evaluate in release area and origin for covert nuclear activities based on measured radioisotopes at monitoring stations, and it might play critical tool to improve the ability of the nuclear safety field.

  7. A uniform semi-classical approach to the Coulomb fission problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levit, S.; Smilansky, U.

    1978-01-01

    A semi-classical theory based on the path integral formalism is applied to the description of Coulomb fission. Complex classical trajectories are used to compute the classically forbidden transitions from the target's ground state to fission. In a simple model the energy spectrum and angular distributions of the fragments are calculated for the Coulomb fission in the Xe + U collision. Theoretical predictions are made which may be checked experimentally. (author)

  8. Electroweak vacuum stability in classically conformal B - L extension of the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Arindam; Okada, Nobuchika; Papapietro, Nathan [University of Alabama, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alabama (United States)

    2017-02-15

    We consider the minimal U(1){sub B-L} extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1){sub B-L} gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1){sub B-L} Higgs field. Because of the classically conformal symmetry, all dimensional parameters are forbidden. The B - L gauge symmetry is radiatively broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass for the U(1){sub B-L} gauge boson (Z{sup '} boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a small negative coupling between the SM Higgs doublet and the B - L Higgs field, the negative mass term for the SM Higgs doublet is generated and the electroweak symmetry is broken. In this model context, we investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. It is well known that in the classically conformal U(1){sub B-L} extension of the SM, the electroweak vacuum remains unstable in the renormalization group analysis at the one-loop level. In this paper, we extend the analysis to the two-loop level, and perform parameter scans. We identify a parameter region which not only solve the vacuum instability problem, but also satisfy the recent ATLAS and CMS bounds from search for Z{sup '} boson resonance at the LHC Run-2. Considering self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet through the right-handed neutrinos and the Z{sup '} boson, we derive the naturalness bound on the model parameters to realize the electroweak scale without fine-tunings. (orig.)

  9. Time-Dependent Toroidal Compactification Proposals and the Bianchi Type I Model: Classical and Quantum Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Toledo Sesma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type I model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Under this approach, we present an isotropization mechanism for the Bianchi I cosmological model through the analysis of the ratio between the anisotropic parameters and the volume of the Universe which in general keeps constant or runs into zero for late times. We also find that the presence of extra dimensions in this model can accelerate the isotropization process depending on the momenta moduli values. Finally, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW equation in the context of standard quantum cosmology.

  10. Modeling of delays in PKPD: classical approaches and a tutorial for delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gilbert; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Pérez-Ruixo, Juan Jose; Schropp, Johannes

    2014-08-01

    In pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PKPD) the measured response is often delayed relative to drug administration, individuals in a population have a certain lifespan until they maturate or the change of biomarkers does not immediately affects the primary endpoint. The classical approach in PKPD is to apply transit compartment models (TCM) based on ordinary differential equations to handle such delays. However, an alternative approach to deal with delays are delay differential equations (DDE). DDEs feature additional flexibility and properties, realize more complex dynamics and can complementary be used together with TCMs. We introduce several delay based PKPD models and investigate mathematical properties of general DDE based models, which serve as subunits in order to build larger PKPD models. Finally, we review current PKPD software with respect to the implementation of DDEs for PKPD analysis.

  11. Bayesian and Classical Estimation of Stress-Strength Reliability for Inverse Weibull Lifetime Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixuan Bi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the problem of estimating stress-strength reliability for inverse Weibull lifetime models having the same shape parameters but different scale parameters. We obtain the maximum likelihood estimator and its asymptotic distribution. Since the classical estimator doesn’t hold explicit forms, we propose an approximate maximum likelihood estimator. The asymptotic confidence interval and two bootstrap intervals are obtained. Using the Gibbs sampling technique, Bayesian estimator and the corresponding credible interval are obtained. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is used to generate random variates. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to compare the proposed methods. Analysis of a real dataset is performed.

  12. Mathematical modeling improves EC50 estimations from classical dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Elin; Lindgren, Isa; Lövfors, William; Lundengård, Karin; Cervin, Ida; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Altimiras, Jordi; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    The β-adrenergic response is impaired in failing hearts. When studying β-adrenergic function in vitro, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 ) is an important measure of ligand response. We previously measured the in vitro contraction force response of chicken heart tissue to increasing concentrations of adrenaline, and observed a decreasing response at high concentrations. The classical interpretation of such data is to assume a maximal response before the decrease, and to fit a sigmoid curve to the remaining data to determine EC50 . Instead, we have applied a mathematical modeling approach to interpret the full dose-response curve in a new way. The developed model predicts a non-steady-state caused by a short resting time between increased concentrations of agonist, which affect the dose-response characterization. Therefore, an improved estimate of EC50 may be calculated using steady-state simulations of the model. The model-based estimation of EC50 is further refined using additional time-resolved data to decrease the uncertainty of the prediction. The resulting model-based EC50 (180-525 nm) is higher than the classically interpreted EC50 (46-191 nm). Mathematical modeling thus makes it possible to re-interpret previously obtained datasets, and to make accurate estimates of EC50 even when steady-state measurements are not experimentally feasible. The mathematical models described here have been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database, and may be accessed at http://jjj.bio.vu.nl/database/nyman. © 2015 FEBS.

  13. The effect of the number of seed variables on the performance of Cooke′s classical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggstaff, Justin W.; Mazzuchi, Thomas A.; Sarkani, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    In risk analysis, Cooke′s classical model for aggregating expert judgment has been widely used for over 20 years. However, the validity of this model has been the subject of much debate. Critics assert that this model′s scoring rule may unintentionally reward experts who manipulate their quantile estimates in order to receive a greater weight. In addition, the question of the number of seed variables required to ensure adequate performance of Cooke′s classical model remains unanswered. In this study, we conduct a comprehensive examination of the model through an iterative, cross validation test to perform an out-of-sample comparison between Cooke′s classical model and the equal-weight linear opinion pool method on almost all of the expert judgment studies compiled by Cooke and colleagues to date. Our results indicate that Cooke′s classical model significantly outperforms equally weighting expert judgment, regardless of the number of seed variables used; however, there may, in fact, be a maximum number of seed variables beyond which Cooke′s model cannot outperform an equally-weighted panel. - Highlights: • We examine Cooke′s classical model through an iterative, cross validation test. • The performance-based and equally weighted decision makers are compared. • Results strengthen Cooke′s argument for a two-fold cross-validation approach. • Accuracy test results show strong support in favor of Cooke′s classical method. • There may be a maximum number of seed variables that ensures model performance

  14. Flowing states and vortices in the classical XY model in an external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Shigeo; Aoki, Toshizumi; Takeno, Shozo.

    1981-01-01

    Uniformly flowing states and vortices in the classical XY model in an external field are studied. This is done by using a continuum approximation and by paying attention to particular solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations for two angles theta and phi of rotation of spins for which phi satisfies the Laplace equation. For these two states equations for theta have forms similar to that in the classical Ising model in a transverse field. The uniformly flowing states are therefore described by kink-type excitations identical to those in the two-dimensional Ising model. Phonon modes associated with the uniformly flowing states are also studied, which are similar to Bogoliubov phonons. Vortex solutions and vortex formation energy are studied in close similarity to the case of liquid He 4 . By comparing the energies of these two states, an expression for critical velocity is obtained. By making correspondence to the case of liquid He 4 , numerical values of the critical velocity and of the velocity of phonons around the uniformly flowing states are estimated. For the former the numerical value is in fair agreement with experimental data. (author)

  15. Classical and quantum analysis of a hetero-triatomic molecular Bose-Einstein condensate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonel, A.P.; Kuhn, C.C.N.; Foerster, A.; Santos, G.; Roditi, I.; Santos, Z.V.T.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate an integrable Hamiltonian modelling a hetero-triatomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. This model describes a mixture of two species of atoms in different proportions, which can combine to form a triatomic molecule. Beginning with a classical analysis, we determine the fixed points of the system. Bifurcations of these points separate the parameter space into different regions. Three distinct scenarios are found, varying with the atomic population imbalance. This result suggests the ground state properties of the quantum model exhibits a sensitivity on the atomic population imbalance, which is confirmed by a quantum analysis using different approaches, such as the ground-state expectation values, the behaviour of the quantum dynamics, the energy gap and the ground state fidelity. (author)

  16. Optimal classical-communication-assisted local model of n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessier, Tracey E.; Caves, Carlton M.; Deutsch, Ivan H.; Eastin, Bryan; Bacon, Dave

    2005-01-01

    We present a model, motivated by the criterion of reality put forward by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen and supplemented by classical communication, which correctly reproduces the quantum-mechanical predictions for measurements of all products of Pauli operators on an n-qubit GHZ state (or 'cat state'). The n-2 bits employed by our model are shown to be optimal for the allowed set of measurements, demonstrating that the required communication overhead scales linearly with n. We formulate a connection between the generation of the local values utilized by our model and the stabilizer formalism, which leads us to conjecture that a generalization of this method will shed light on the content of the Gottesman-Knill theorem

  17. Empiric model for mean generation time adjustment factor for classic point kinetics equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goes, David A.B.V. de; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Goncalves, Alessandro da C., E-mail: david.goes@poli.ufrj.br, E-mail: aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: alessandro@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    Point reactor kinetics equations are the easiest way to observe the neutron production time behavior in a nuclear reactor. These equations are derived from the neutron transport equation using an approximation called Fick's law leading to a set of first order differential equations. The main objective of this study is to review classic point kinetics equation in order to approximate its results to the case when it is considered the time variation of the neutron currents. The computational modeling used for the calculations is based on the finite difference method. The results obtained with this model are compared with the reference model and then it is determined an empirical adjustment factor that modifies the point reactor kinetics equation to the real scenario. (author)

  18. Empiric model for mean generation time adjustment factor for classic point kinetics equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes, David A.B.V. de; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Goncalves, Alessandro da C.

    2017-01-01

    Point reactor kinetics equations are the easiest way to observe the neutron production time behavior in a nuclear reactor. These equations are derived from the neutron transport equation using an approximation called Fick's law leading to a set of first order differential equations. The main objective of this study is to review classic point kinetics equation in order to approximate its results to the case when it is considered the time variation of the neutron currents. The computational modeling used for the calculations is based on the finite difference method. The results obtained with this model are compared with the reference model and then it is determined an empirical adjustment factor that modifies the point reactor kinetics equation to the real scenario. (author)

  19. OpenDrift - an open source framework for ocean trajectory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Breivik, Øyvind; Ådlandsvik, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    We will present a new, open source tool for modeling the trajectories and fate of particles or substances (Lagrangian Elements) drifting in the ocean, or even in the atmosphere. The software is named OpenDrift, and has been developed at Norwegian Meteorological Institute in cooperation with Institute of Marine Research. OpenDrift is a generic framework written in Python, and is openly available at https://github.com/knutfrode/opendrift/. The framework is modular with respect to three aspects: (1) obtaining input data, (2) the transport/morphological processes, and (3) exporting of results to file. Modularity is achieved through well defined interfaces between components, and use of a consistent vocabulary (CF conventions) for naming of variables. Modular input implies that it is not necessary to preprocess input data (e.g. currents, wind and waves from Eulerian models) to a particular file format. Instead "reader modules" can be written/used to obtain data directly from any original source, including files or through web based protocols (e.g. OPeNDAP/Thredds). Modularity of processes implies that a model developer may focus on the geophysical processes relevant for the application of interest, without needing to consider technical tasks such as reading, reprojecting, and colocating input data, rotation and scaling of vectors and model output. We will show a few example applications of using OpenDrift for predicting drifters, oil spills, and search and rescue objects.

  20. Learning from Your Network of Friends: A Trajectory Representation Learning Model Based on Online Social Ties

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Basma Mohammed

    2017-02-07

    Location-Based Social Networks (LBSNs) capture individuals whereabouts for a large portion of the population. To utilize this data for user (location)-similarity based tasks, one must map the raw data into a low-dimensional uniform feature space. However, due to the nature of LBSNs, many users have sparse and incomplete check-ins. In this work, we propose to overcome this issue by leveraging the network of friends, when learning the new feature space. We first analyze the impact of friends on individuals\\'s mobility, and show that individuals trajectories are correlated with thoseof their friends and friends of friends (2-hop friends) in an online setting. Based on our observation, we propose a mixed-membership model that infers global mobility patterns from users\\' check-ins and their network of friends, without impairing the model\\'s complexity. Our proposed model infers global patterns and learns new representations for both usersand locations simultaneously. We evaluate the inferred patterns and compare the quality of the new user representation against baseline methods on a social link prediction problem.

  1. Personality and trajectories of posttraumatic psychopathology: A latent change modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Susan; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Forbes, David

    2016-08-01

    Survivors of traumatic events may develop a range of psychopathology, across the internalizing and externalizing dimensions of disorder and associated personality traits. However, research into personality-based internalizing and externalizing trauma responses has been limited to cross-sectional investigations of PTSD comorbidity. Personality typologies may present an opportunity to identify and selectively intervene with survivors at risk of posttraumatic disorder. Therefore this study examined whether personality prospectively influences the trajectory of disorder in a broader trauma-exposed sample. During hospitalization for a physical injury, 323 Australian adults completed the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire-Brief Form and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, with the latter readministered 3 and 12 months later. Latent profile analysis conducted on baseline personality scores identified subgroups of participants, while latent change modelling examined differences in disorder trajectories. Three classes (internalizing, externalizing, and normal personality) were identified. The internalizing class showed a high risk of developing all disorders. Unexpectedly, however, the normal personality class was not always at lowest risk of disorder. Rather, the externalizing class, while more likely than the normal personality class to develop substance use disorders, were less likely to develop PTSD and depression. Results suggest that personality is an important mechanism in influencing the development and form of psychopathology after trauma, with internalizing and externalizing subtypes identifiable in the early aftermath of injury. These findings suggest that early intervention using a personality-based transdiagnostic approach may be an effective method of predicting and ultimately preventing much of the burden of posttraumatic disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. How to connect time-lapse recorded trajectories of motile microorganisms with dynamical models in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Li, Liang; Gradinaru, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    We provide a tool for data-driven modeling of motility, data being time-lapse recorded trajectories. Several mathematical properties of a model to be found can be gleaned from appropriate model-independent experimental statistics, if one understands how such statistics are distorted by the finite...... of these effects that are valid for any reasonable model for persistent random motion. Our findings are illustrated with experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations....

  3. A Time-Regularized, Multiple Gravity-Assist Low-Thrust, Bounded-Impulse Model for Trajectory Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Donald H.; Englander, Jacob A.; Conway, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    The multiple gravity assist low-thrust (MGALT) trajectory model combines the medium-fidelity Sims-Flanagan bounded-impulse transcription with a patched-conics flyby model and is an important tool for preliminary trajectory design. While this model features fast state propagation via Keplers equation and provides a pleasingly accurate estimation of the total mass budget for the eventual flight suitable integrated trajectory it does suffer from one major drawback, namely its temporal spacing of the control nodes. We introduce a variant of the MGALT transcription that utilizes the generalized anomaly from the universal formulation of Keplers equation as a decision variable in addition to the trajectory phase propagation time. This results in two improvements over the traditional model. The first is that the maneuver locations are equally spaced in generalized anomaly about the orbit rather than time. The second is that the Kepler propagator now has the generalized anomaly as its independent variable instead of time and thus becomes an iteration-free propagation method. The new algorithm is outlined, including the impact that this has on the computation of Jacobian entries for numerical optimization, and a motivating application problem is presented that illustrates the improvements that this model has over the traditional MGALT transcription.

  4. A Classical Potential to Model the Adsorption of Biological Molecules on Oxidized Titanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julian; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi

    2011-02-08

    The behavior of titanium implants in physiological environments is governed by the thin oxide layer that forms spontaneously on the metal surface and mediates the interactions with adsorbate molecules. In order to study the adsorption of biomolecules on titanium in a realistic fashion, we first build up a model of an oxidized Ti surface in contact with liquid water by means of extensive first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Taking the obtained structure as reference, we then develop a classical potential to model the Ti/TiOx/water interface. This is based on the mapping with Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials of the adsorption energy landscape of single water and ammonia molecules on the rutile TiO2(110) surface. The interactions with arbitrary organic molecules are obtained via standard combination rules to established biomolecular force fields. The transferability of our potential to the case of organic molecules adsorbing on the oxidized Ti surface is checked by comparing the classical potential energy surfaces of representative systems to quantum mechanical results at the level of density functional theory. Moreover, we calculate the heat of immersion of the TiO2 rutile surface and the detachment force of a single tyrosine residue from steered molecular dynamics simulations, finding good agreement with experimental reference data in both cases. As a first application, we study the adsorption behavior of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide on the oxidized titanium surface, focusing particularly on the calculation of the free energy of desorption.

  5. A model of chemical etching of olivine in the vicinity of the trajectory of a swift heavy ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbunov, S.A., E-mail: s.a.gorbunov@mail.ru [Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rymzhanov, R.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Starkov, N.I. [Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Volkov, A.E. [Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Kurchatov Sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Malakhov, A.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Searching of superheavy elements, the charge spectra of heavy nuclei in Galactic Cosmic Rays was investigated within the OLYMPIA experiment using the database of etched ion tracks in meteorite olivine. Etching results in the formation of hollow syringe-like channels with diameters of 1–10 μm along the trajectories of these swift heavy ions (SHI). According to the activated complex theory, the local chemical activity is determined by an increase of the specific Gibbs energy of the lattice stimulated by structure transformations, long-range elastic fields, and interatomic bonds breaking generated in the vicinity of the ion trajectory. To determine the dependencies of the Gibbs free energy increase in SHI tracks in olivine on the mass, energy and charge of a projectile, we apply a multiscale model of excitation and relaxation of materials in the vicinity of the SHI trajectory (SHI tracks). Effect of spreading of fast electrons from the ion trajectory causing neutralization of metallic atoms resulting in an increase of the chemical activity of olivine at long distances from the ion trajectory (up to 5 μm) is estimated and discussed.

  6. Trajectories of adolescent substance use development and the influence of healthy leisure: A growth mixture modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weybright, Elizabeth H; Caldwell, Linda L; Ram, Nilam; Smith, Edward A; Wegner, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Considerable heterogeneity exists in adolescent substance use development. To most effectively prevent use, distinct trajectories of use must be identified as well as differential associations with predictors of use, such as leisure experience. The current study used a person-centered approach to identify distinct substance use trajectories and how leisure is associated with trajectory classes. Data came from a larger efficacy trial of 2.249 South African high school students who reported substance use at any time across 8 waves. Growth mixture modeling was used to identify developmental trajectories of substance use and the influence of healthy leisure. Results identified three increasing and one stable substance use trajectory and subjective healthy leisure served to protect against use. This study is the first of its kind to focus on a sample of South African adolescents and serves to develop a richer understanding of substance use development and the role of healthy leisure. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Learning from Your Network of Friends: A Trajectory Representation Learning Model Based on Online Social Ties

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Basma Mohammed; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2017-01-01

    Location-Based Social Networks (LBSNs) capture individuals whereabouts for a large portion of the population. To utilize this data for user (location)-similarity based tasks, one must map the raw data into a low-dimensional uniform feature space. However, due to the nature of LBSNs, many users have sparse and incomplete check-ins. In this work, we propose to overcome this issue by leveraging the network of friends, when learning the new feature space. We first analyze the impact of friends on individuals's mobility, and show that individuals trajectories are correlated with thoseof their friends and friends of friends (2-hop friends) in an online setting. Based on our observation, we propose a mixed-membership model that infers global mobility patterns from users' check-ins and their network of friends, without impairing the model's complexity. Our proposed model infers global patterns and learns new representations for both usersand locations simultaneously. We evaluate the inferred patterns and compare the quality of the new user representation against baseline methods on a social link prediction problem.

  8. Longitudinal Modeling of Depressive Trajectories Among HIV-Infected Men Using Cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerji, Shibani; Haghighat, Roxanna; Misra, Vikas; Lorenz, David R; Holman, Alex; Dutta, Anupriya; Gabuzda, Dana

    2017-07-01

    Cocaine use is prevalent among HIV-infected individuals. While cross-sectional studies suggest that cocaine users may be at increased risk for depression, long-term effects of cocaine on depressive symptoms remain unclear. This is a longitudinal study of 341 HIV-infected and uninfected men (135 cocaine users and 206 controls) ages 30-60 enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study during 1996-2009. The median baseline age was 41; 73% were African-American. In mixed-effects models over a median of 4.8 years of observation, cocaine use was associated with higher depressive symptoms independent of age, education level, and smoking (n = 288; p = 0.02); HIV infection modified this association (p = 0.03). Latent class mixed models were used to empirically identify distinct depressive trajectories (n = 160). In adjusted models, cocaine use was associated with threefold increased odds of membership in the class with persistent high depressive symptoms (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-6.69) and eightfold increased odds (95% CI (2.73-25.83) when tested among HIV-infected subjects only. Cocaine use is a risk factor for chronic depressive symptoms, particularly among HIV-infected men, highlighting the importance of integrating mental health and substance use treatments to address barriers to well-being and successful HIV-care.

  9. Trajectories of Heroin Addiction: Growth Mixture Modeling Results Based on a 33-Year Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Huang, David; Chou, Chih-Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates trajectories of heroin use and subsequent consequences in a sample of 471 male heroin addicts who were admitted to the California Civil Addict Program in 1964-1965 and followed over 33 years. Applying a two-part growth mixture modeling strategy to heroin use level during the first 16 years of the addiction careers since…

  10. Quantum flesh on classical bones: Semiclassical bridges across the quantum-classical divide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokulich, Alisa [Center for Philosophy and History of Science, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally quantum mechanics is viewed as having made a sharp break from classical mechanics, and the concepts and methods of these two theories are viewed as incommensurable with one another. A closer examination of the history of quantum mechanics, however, reveals that there is a strong sense in which quantum mechanics was built on the backbone of classical mechanics. As a result, there is a considerable structural continuity between these two theories, despite their important differences. These structural continuities provide a ground for semiclassical methods in which classical structures, such as trajectories, are used to investigate and model quantum phenomena. After briefly tracing the history of semiclassical approaches, I show how current research in semiclassical mechanics is revealing new bridges across the quantum-classical divide.

  11. Reversal permanent charge and reversal potential: case studies via classical Poisson–Nernst–Planck models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, Bob; Liu, Weishi; Xu, Hongguo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we are interested in effects of a simple profile of permanent charges on ionic flows. We determine when a permanent charge produces current reversal. We adopt the classical Poisson–Nernst–Planck (PNP) models of ionic flows for this study. The starting point of our analysis is the recently developed geometric singular perturbation approach for PNP models. Under the setting in the paper for case studies, we are able to identify a single governing equation for the existence and the value of the permanent charge for a current reversal. A number of interesting features are established. The related topic on reversal potential can be viewed as a dual problem and is briefly examined in this work too. (paper)

  12. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B−L symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B−L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B−L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman–Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ→eγ, the current bound on the Z′ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  13. Classical density functional theory & simulations on a coarse-grained model of aromatic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turesson, Martin; Szparaga, Ryan; Ma, Ke; Woodward, Clifford E; Forsman, Jan

    2014-05-14

    A new classical density functional approach is developed to accurately treat a coarse-grained model of room temperature aromatic ionic liquids. Our major innovation is the introduction of charge-charge correlations, which are treated in a simple phenomenological way. We test this theory on a generic coarse-grained model for aromatic RTILs with oligomeric forms for both cations and anions, approximating 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazoliums and BF₄⁻, respectively. We find that predictions by the new density functional theory for fluid structures at charged surfaces are very accurate, as compared with molecular dynamics simulations, across a range of surface charge densities and lengths of the alkyl chain. Predictions of interactions between charged surfaces are also presented.

  14. Extracting surface diffusion coefficients from batch adsorption measurement data: application of the classic Langmuir kinetics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Khim Hoong

    2017-11-09

    Surface diffusion coefficients may be estimated by fitting solutions of a diffusion model to batch kinetic data. For non-linear systems, a numerical solution of the diffusion model's governing equations is generally required. We report here the application of the classic Langmuir kinetics model to extract surface diffusion coefficients from batch kinetic data. The use of the Langmuir kinetics model in lieu of the conventional surface diffusion model allows derivation of an analytical expression. The parameter estimation procedure requires determining the Langmuir rate coefficient from which the pertinent surface diffusion coefficient is calculated. Surface diffusion coefficients within the 10 -9 to 10 -6  cm 2 /s range obtained by fitting the Langmuir kinetics model to experimental kinetic data taken from the literature are found to be consistent with the corresponding values obtained from the traditional surface diffusion model. The virtue of this simplified parameter estimation method is that it reduces the computational complexity as the analytical expression involves only an algebraic equation in closed form which is easily evaluated by spreadsheet computation.

  15. All-Atom Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting QM data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude force field yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100 ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduces (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII sub-states of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive force field, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  16. Modeling the classical nova outburst. I. Exploring the physics of a new mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutter, G.S.; Sparks, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Model calculations were performed to describe a mechanism that produces classical nova outbursts on white dwarfs of 1 solar mass or less and for accretion rates of 4 x 10 to the -10th solar mass/yr or greater, i.e., the parameters corresponding to observed data of nova systems. Calculations point to four factors that can induce nuclear runaways of sufficient strength to eject about 0.0001 solar mass at speeds of several hundred to a few thousand km per second, as is observed in classical novae. These are (1) the effects of storage of angular momentum in the star's envelope during the accretion phase; (2) the reduction of centrifugal forces in the star's outer layers during the early nuclear runaway phase, through the inward transport of angular momentum; (3) the inward movement of the zone of peak nuclear burning through the convectively induced shear instability during the runaway phase; and (4) the mixing of original CO stellar matter and H-rich matter, also through the convectively induced shear instability. 58 refs

  17. A population-feedback control based algorithm for well trajectory optimization using proxy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Kasravi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wellbore instability is one of the concerns in the field of drilling engineering. This phenomenon is affected by several factors such as azimuth, inclination angle, in-situ stress, mud weight, and rock strength parameters. Among these factors, azimuth, inclination angle, and mud weight are controllable. The objective of this paper is to introduce a new procedure based on elastoplastic theory in wellbore stability solution to determine the optimum well trajectory and global minimum mud pressure required (GMMPR. Genetic algorithm (GA was applied as a main optimization engine that employs proportional feedback controller to obtain the minimum mud pressure required (MMPR. The feedback function repeatedly calculated and updated the error between the simulated and set point of normalized yielded zone area (NYZA. To reduce computation expenses, an artificial neural network (ANN was used as a proxy (surrogate model to approximate the behavior of the actual wellbore model. The methodology was applied to a directional well in southwestern Iranian oilfield. The results demonstrated that the error between the predicted GMMPR and practical safe mud pressure was 4% for elastoplastic method, and 22% for conventional elastic solution.

  18. Prediction of human gait trajectories during the SSP using a neuromusculoskeletal modeling: A challenge for parametric optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed, Mohammadali Rahmati; Mostafa, Rostami; Borhan, Beigzadeh

    2018-04-27

    The parametric optimization techniques have been widely employed to predict human gait trajectories; however, their applications to reveal the other aspects of gait are questionable. The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not the gait prediction model is able to justify the movement trajectories for the higher average velocities. A planar, seven-segment model with sixteen muscle groups was used to represent human neuro-musculoskeletal dynamics. At first, the joint angles, ground reaction forces (GRFs) and muscle activations were predicted and validated for normal average velocity (1.55 m/s) in the single support phase (SSP) by minimizing energy expenditure, which is subject to the non-linear constraints of the gait. The unconstrained system dynamics of extended inverse dynamics (USDEID) approach was used to estimate muscle activations. Then by scaling time and applying the same procedure, the movement trajectories were predicted for higher average velocities (from 2.07 m/s to 4.07 m/s) and compared to the pattern of movement with fast walking speed. The comparison indicated a high level of compatibility between the experimental and predicted results, except for the vertical position of the center of gravity (COG). It was concluded that the gait prediction model can be effectively used to predict gait trajectories for higher average velocities.

  19. Constructing seasonal LAI trajectory by data-model fusion for global evergreen needle-leaf forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Chen, J.; Mo, G.

    2010-12-01

    For decades, advancements in optical remote sensors made it possible to produce maps of a biophysical parameter--the Leaf Area Index (LAI), which is critically necessary in regional and global modeling of exchanges of carbon, water, energy and other substances, across large areas in a fast way. Quite a few global LAI products have been generated since 2000, e.g. GLOBCARBON (Deng et al., 2006), MODIS Collection 5 (Shabanov et al., 2007), CYCLOPES (Baret et al., 2007), etc. Albeit these progresses, the basic physics behind the technology restrains it from accurate estimation of LAI in winter, especially for northern high-latitude evergreen needle-leaf forests. Underestimation of winter LAI in these regions has been reported in literature (Yang et al., 2000; Cohen et al., 2003; Tian et al., 2004; Weiss et al., 2007; Pisek et al., 2007), and the distortion is usually attributed to the variations of canopy reflectance caused by understory change (Weiss et al., 2007) as well as by the presence of ice and snow on leaves and ground (Cohen, 2003; Tian et al., 2004). Seasonal changes in leaf pigments can also be another reason for low LAI retrieved in winter. Low conifer LAI values in winter retrieved from remote sensing make them unusable for surface energy budget calculations. To avoid these drawbacks of remote sensing approaches, we attempt to reconstruct the seasonal LAI trajectory through model-data fusion. A 1-degree LAI map of global evergreen needle-leaf forests at 10-day interval is produced based on the carbon allocation principle in trees. With net primary productivity (NPP) calculated by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) (Chen et al., 1999), carbon allocated to needles is quantitatively evaluated and then can be further transformed into LAI using the specific leaf area (SLA). A leaf-fall scheme is developed to mimic the carbon loss caused by falling needles throughout the year. The seasonally maximum LAI from remote sensing data for each pixel

  20. Trajectory attractors of equations of mathematical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishik, Marko I; Chepyzhov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    In this survey the method of trajectory dynamical systems and trajectory attractors is described, and is applied in the study of the limiting asymptotic behaviour of solutions of non-linear evolution equations. This method is especially useful in the study of dissipative equations of mathematical physics for which the corresponding Cauchy initial-value problem has a global (weak) solution with respect to the time but the uniqueness of this solution either has not been established or does not hold. An important example of such an equation is the 3D Navier-Stokes system in a bounded domain. In such a situation one cannot use directly the classical scheme of construction of a dynamical system in the phase space of initial conditions of the Cauchy problem of a given equation and find a global attractor of this dynamical system. Nevertheless, for such equations it is possible to construct a trajectory dynamical system and investigate a trajectory attractor of the corresponding translation semigroup. This universal method is applied for various types of equations arising in mathematical physics: for general dissipative reaction-diffusion systems, for the 3D Navier-Stokes system, for dissipative wave equations, for non-linear elliptic equations in cylindrical domains, and for other equations and systems. Special attention is given to using the method of trajectory attractors in approximation and perturbation problems arising in complicated models of mathematical physics. Bibliography: 96 titles.

  1. Macroscopic models for vehicular flows and crowd dynamics theory and applications classical and non–classical advanced mathematics for real life applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rosini, Massimiliano Daniele

    2013-01-01

    This monograph  presents a systematic treatment of the theory for hyperbolic conservation laws and their applications to vehicular traffics and crowd dynamics. In the first part of the book, the author presents very basic considerations and gradually introduces the mathematical tools necessary to describe and understand the mathematical models developed in the following parts focusing on vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The book is a self-contained valuable resource for advanced courses in mathematical modeling, physics and civil engineering. A number of examples and figures facilitate a better understanding of the underlying concepts and motivations for the students. Important new techniques are presented, in particular the wave front tracking algorithm, the operator splitting approach, the non-classical theory of conservation laws and the constrained problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive account of these fundamental new mathematical advances.  

  2. How to interpret the results of medical time series data analysis: Classical statistical approaches versus dynamic Bayesian network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, Agnieszka; Druzdzel, Marek J; Austin, R Marshall

    2016-01-01

    Classical statistics is a well-established approach in the analysis of medical data. While the medical community seems to be familiar with the concept of a statistical analysis and its interpretation, the Bayesian approach, argued by many of its proponents to be superior to the classical frequentist approach, is still not well-recognized in the analysis of medical data. The goal of this study is to encourage data analysts to use the Bayesian approach, such as modeling with graphical probabilistic networks, as an insightful alternative to classical statistical analysis of medical data. This paper offers a comparison of two approaches to analysis of medical time series data: (1) classical statistical approach, such as the Kaplan-Meier estimator and the Cox proportional hazards regression model, and (2) dynamic Bayesian network modeling. Our comparison is based on time series cervical cancer screening data collected at Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center over 10 years. The main outcomes of our comparison are cervical cancer risk assessments produced by the three approaches. However, our analysis discusses also several aspects of the comparison, such as modeling assumptions, model building, dealing with incomplete data, individualized risk assessment, results interpretation, and model validation. Our study shows that the Bayesian approach is (1) much more flexible in terms of modeling effort, and (2) it offers an individualized risk assessment, which is more cumbersome for classical statistical approaches.

  3. Master-slave control with trajectory planning and Bouc-Wen model for tracking control of piezo-driven stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaojun; Liu, Changli; Chen, Lei

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a redundant Piezo-driven stage having 3RRR compliant mechanism is introduced, we propose the master-slave control with trajectory planning (MSCTP) strategy and Bouc-Wen model to improve its micro-motion tracking performance. The advantage of the proposed controller lies in that its implementation only requires a simple control strategy without the complexity of modeling to avoid the master PEA's tracking error. The dynamic model of slave PEA system with Bouc-Wen hysteresis is established and identified via particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach. The Piezo-driven stage with operating period T=1s and 2s is implemented to track a prescribed circle. The simulation results show that MSCTP with Bouc-Wen model reduces the trajectory tracking errors to the range of the accuracy of our available measurement.

  4. The effect of spin in swing bowling in cricket: model trajectories for spin alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2015-02-01

    In ‘swing’ bowling, as employed by fast and fast-medium bowlers in cricket, back-spin along the line of the seam is normally applied in order to keep the seam vertical and to provide stability against ‘wobble’ of the seam. Whilst spin is normally thought of as primarily being the slow bowler's domain, the spin applied by the swing bowler has the side-effect of generating a lift or Magnus force. This force, depending on the orientation of the seam and hence that of the back-spin, can have a side-ways component as well as the expected vertical ‘lift’ component. The effect of the spin itself, in influencing the trajectory of the fast bowler's delivery, is normally not considered, presumably being thought of as negligible. The purpose of this paper is to investigate, using calculated model trajectories, the amount of side-ways movement due to the spin and to see how this predicted movement compares with the total observed side-ways movement. The size of the vertical lift component is also estimated. It is found that, although the spin is an essential part of the successful swing bowler's delivery, the amount of side-ways movement due to the spin itself amounts to a few centimetres or so, and is therefore small, but perhaps not negligible, compared to the total amount of side-ways movement observed. The spin does, however, provide a considerable amount of lift compared to the equivalent delivery bowled without spin, altering the point of pitching by up to 3 m, a very large amount indeed. Thus, for example, bowling a ball with the seam pointing directly down the pitch and not designed to swing side-ways at all, but with the amount of back-spin varied, could provide a very powerful additional weapon in the fast bowler's arsenal. So-called ‘sling bowlers’, who use a very low arm action, can take advantage of spin since effectively they can apply side-spin to the ball, giving rise to a large side-ways movement, ˜ 20{}^\\circ cm or more, which certainly is

  5. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Ryan

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  6. Can representational trajectory reveal the nature of an internal model of gravity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sá Teixeira, Nuno; Hecht, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    The memory for the vanishing location of a horizontally moving target is usually displaced forward in the direction of motion (representational momentum) and downward in the direction of gravity (representational gravity). Moreover, this downward displacement has been shown to increase with time (representational trajectory). However, the degree to which different kinematic events change the temporal profile of these displacements remains to be determined. The present article attempts to fill this gap. In the first experiment, we replicate the finding that representational momentum for downward-moving targets is bigger than for upward motions, showing, moreover, that it increases rapidly during the first 300 ms, stabilizing afterward. This temporal profile, but not the increased error for descending targets, is shown to be disrupted when eye movements are not allowed. In the second experiment, we show that the downward drift with time emerges even for static targets. Finally, in the third experiment, we report an increased error for upward-moving targets, as compared with downward movements, when the display is compatible with a downward ego-motion by including vection cues. Thus, the errors in the direction of gravity are compatible with the perceived event and do not merely reflect a retinotopic bias. Overall, these results provide further evidence for an internal model of gravity in the visual representational system.

  7. Monitoring the trajectory of urban nighttime light hotspots using a Gaussian volume model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiming; Jiang, Ruowei; Wang, Ke; Huang, Lingyan; Ye, Ziran; Gan, Muye; Ji, Biyong

    2018-03-01

    Urban nighttime light hotspot is an ideal representation of the spatial heterogeneity of human activities within a city, which is sensitive to regional urban expansion pattern. However, most of previous studies related to nighttime light imageries focused on extracting urban extent, leaving the spatial variation of radiance intensity insufficiently explored. With the help of global radiance calibrated DMSP-OLS datasets (NTLgrc), we proposed an innovative framework to explore the spatio-temporal trajectory of polycentric urban nighttime light hotspots. Firstly, NTLgrc was inter-annually calibrated to improve the consistency. Secondly, multi-resolution segmentation and region-growing SVM classification were employed to remove blooming effect and to extract potential clusters. At last, the urban hotspots were identified by a Gaussian volume model, and the resulting parameters were used to quantitatively depict hotspot features (i.e., intensity, morphology and centroid dynamics). The result shows that our framework successfully captures hotspots in polycentric urban area, whose Ra2 are over 0.9. Meanwhile, the spatio-temporal dynamics of the hotspot features intuitively reveal the impact of the regional urban growth pattern and planning strategies on human activities. Compared to previous studies, our framework is more robust and offers an effective way to describe hotspot pattern. Also, it provides a more comprehensive and spatial-explicit understanding regarding the interaction between urbanization pattern and human activities. Our findings are expected to be beneficial to governors in term of sustainable urban planning and decision making.

  8. BIM-based Modeling and Data Enrichment of Classical Architectural Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Ivan Apollonio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available EnIn this paper we presented a BIM-based approach for the documentation of Architectural Heritage. Knowledge of classical architecture is first extracted from the treatises for parametric modeling in object level. Then we established a profile library based on semantic studies to sweep out different objects. Variants grow out from the parametric models by editing or regrouping parameters based on grammars. Multiple data including material, structure and real-life state are enriched with respect to different research motivations. The BIM models are expected to ease the modeling process and provide comprehensive data shared among different platforms for further simulations.ItIn questo articolo è presentata una procedura definita nell'ambito dei sistemi BIM con l'obiettivo di documentare il Patrimonio Architettonico. I dati conoscitivi relativi all'architettura classica sono, in una prima fase, ottenuti dai trattati al fine di modellare in maniera parametrica a livello di oggetti. Successivamente è stata definita una libreria di profili, basata su principi semantici, dalla quale è possibile ottenere oggetti differenti. Dati di natura differente, relativi ad esempio ai materiali, alle strutture, allo stato di fatto, sono implementati in funzione delle differenti esigenze. I modelli BIM hanno la potenzialità di facilitare le procedure di modellazione e di fornire informazioni e dati completi che possono essere condivisi tra piattaforme differenti per ulteriori simulazioni ed analisi.

  9. Machine learning of frustrated classical spin models. I. Principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ce; Zhai, Hui

    2017-10-01

    This work aims at determining whether artificial intelligence can recognize a phase transition without prior human knowledge. If this were successful, it could be applied to, for instance, analyzing data from the quantum simulation of unsolved physical models. Toward this goal, we first need to apply the machine learning algorithm to well-understood models and see whether the outputs are consistent with our prior knowledge, which serves as the benchmark for this approach. In this work, we feed the computer data generated by the classical Monte Carlo simulation for the X Y model in frustrated triangular and union jack lattices, which has two order parameters and exhibits two phase transitions. We show that the outputs of the principal component analysis agree very well with our understanding of different orders in different phases, and the temperature dependences of the major components detect the nature and the locations of the phase transitions. Our work offers promise for using machine learning techniques to study sophisticated statistical models, and our results can be further improved by using principal component analysis with kernel tricks and the neural network method.

  10. Zero-Point Energy Constraint for Unimolecular Dissociation Reactions. Giving Trajectories Multiple Chances To Dissociate Correctly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Amit K; Hase, William L

    2016-01-28

    A zero-point energy (ZPE) constraint model is proposed for classical trajectory simulations of unimolecular decomposition and applied to CH4* → H + CH3 decomposition. With this model trajectories are not allowed to dissociate unless they have ZPE in the CH3 product. If not, they are returned to the CH4* region of phase space and, if necessary, given additional opportunities to dissociate with ZPE. The lifetime for dissociation of an individual trajectory is the time it takes to dissociate with ZPE in CH3, including multiple possible returns to CH4*. With this ZPE constraint the dissociation of CH4* is exponential in time as expected for intrinsic RRKM dynamics and the resulting rate constant is in good agreement with the harmonic quantum value of RRKM theory. In contrast, a model that discards trajectories without ZPE in the reaction products gives a CH4* → H + CH3 rate constant that agrees with the classical and not quantum RRKM value. The rate constant for the purely classical simulation indicates that anharmonicity may be important and the rate constant from the ZPE constrained classical trajectory simulation may not represent the complete anharmonicity of the RRKM quantum dynamics. The ZPE constraint model proposed here is compared with previous models for restricting ZPE flow in intramolecular dynamics, and connecting product and reactant/product quantum energy levels in chemical dynamics simulations.

  11. A model predictive control approach combined unscented Kalman filter vehicle state estimation in intelligent vehicle trajectory tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiao Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Trajectory tracking and state estimation are significant in the motion planning and intelligent vehicle control. This article focuses on the model predictive control approach for the trajectory tracking of the intelligent vehicles and state estimation of the nonlinear vehicle system. The constraints of the system states are considered when applying the model predictive control method to the practical problem, while 4-degree-of-freedom vehicle model and unscented Kalman filter are proposed to estimate the vehicle states. The estimated states of the vehicle are used to provide model predictive control with real-time control and judge vehicle stability. Furthermore, in order to decrease the cost of solving the nonlinear optimization, the linear time-varying model predictive control is used at each time step. The effectiveness of the proposed vehicle state estimation and model predictive control method is tested by driving simulator. The results of simulations and experiments show that great and robust performance is achieved for trajectory tracking and state estimation in different scenarios.

  12. Kalman filter application to mitigate the errors in the trajectory simulations due to the lunar gravitational model uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, L D; Rocco, E M; De Moraes, R V; Kuga, H K

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to simulate part of the orbital trajectory of Lunar Prospector mission to analyze the relevance of using a Kalman filter to estimate the trajectory. For this study it is considered the disturbance due to the lunar gravitational potential using one of the most recent models, the LP100K model, which is based on spherical harmonics, and considers the maximum degree and order up to the value 100. In order to simplify the expression of the gravitational potential and, consequently, to reduce the computational effort required in the simulation, in some cases, lower values for degree and order are used. Following this aim, it is made an analysis of the inserted error in the simulations when using such values of degree and order to propagate the spacecraft trajectory and control. This analysis was done using the standard deviation that characterizes the uncertainty for each one of the values of the degree and order used in LP100K model for the satellite orbit. With knowledge of the uncertainty of the gravity model adopted, lunar orbital trajectory simulations may be accomplished considering these values of uncertainty. Furthermore, it was also used a Kalman filter, where is considered the sensor's uncertainty that defines the satellite position at each step of the simulation and the uncertainty of the model, by means of the characteristic variance of the truncated gravity model. Thus, this procedure represents an effort to approximate the results obtained using lower values for the degree and order of the spherical harmonics, to the results that would be attained if the maximum accuracy of the model LP100K were adopted. Also a comparison is made between the error in the satellite position in the situation in which the Kalman filter is used and the situation in which the filter is not used. The data for the comparison were obtained from the standard deviation in the velocity increment of the space vehicle. (paper)

  13. How far can radiation from atoms be represented by classical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haar, D. Ter; Wergeland, H.

    1978-01-01

    In recent years some phenomena currently assumed to be essentially quantal have found an accurate description in classical terms. An example is Lamb's semiclassical theory of the laser. Consequently many physicists are discussing in how far a full quantum mechanical treatment is necessary. A good many of the formulae for the radiation from atoms can certainly be obtained by classical methods. But these methods fail already at the question of the line profiles. Even though the damping is a simple mechanism - classically speaking. It seems inevitible that the semi-classical formulae must be limited to those phenomena which essentially only involve the averages of photon numbers. (JIW)

  14. Improved CORF model of simple cell combined with non-classical receptive field and its application on edge detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Chai, Guobei; Liu, Wei; Bao, Wenzhuo; Zhao, Xiaoning; Ming, Delie

    2018-02-01

    Simple cells in primary visual cortex are believed to extract local edge information from a visual scene. In this paper, inspired by different receptive field properties and visual information flow paths of neurons, an improved Combination of Receptive Fields (CORF) model combined with non-classical receptive fields was proposed to simulate the responses of simple cell's receptive fields. Compared to the classical model, the proposed model is able to better imitate simple cell's physiologic structure with consideration of facilitation and suppression of non-classical receptive fields. And on this base, an edge detection algorithm as an application of the improved CORF model was proposed. Experimental results validate the robustness of the proposed algorithm to noise and background interference.

  15. On modeling of statistical properties of classical 3D spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorkyan, A.S.; Abajyan, H.G.; Ayryan, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    We study statistical properties of 3D classical spin glass layer of certain width and infinite length. The 3D spin glass is represented as an ensemble of disordered 1D spatial spin chains (SSC) where interactions are random between spin chains (nonideal ensemble of 1D SSCs). It is proved that in the limit of Birkhoff's ergodic hypothesis performance, 3D spin glasses can be generated by Hamiltonian of disordered 1D SSC with random environment. Disordered 1D SSC is defined on a regular lattice where one randomly oriented spin is put on each node of lattice. Also, it is supposed that each spin randomly interacts with six nearest-neighboring spins (two spins on lattice and four in the environment). The recurrent transcendental equations are obtained on the nodes of spin-chain lattice. These equations, combined with the Silvester conditions, allow step-by-step construction of spin chain in the ground state of energy where all spins are in the minimal energy of a classical Hamiltonian. On the basis of these equations an original high-performance parallel algorithm is developed for 3D spin glasses simulation. Distributions of different parameters of unperturbed spin glass are calculated. In particular, it is analytically proved and numerical calculations show that the distribution of spin-spin interaction constant in Heisenberg nearest-neighboring Hamiltonian model, as opposed to widely used Gauss-Edwards-Anderson distribution, satisfies the Levy alpha-stable distribution law which does not have variance. A new formula is proposed for construction of partition function in the form of a one-dimensional integral on the energy distribution of 1D SSCs

  16. Direct Observation of Long-Range Transport Using Continuously Sounding Balloons and Near-Real-Time Trajectory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, P. B.; Zaveri, R. A.; Berkowitz, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    Controlled Meteorological (CMET) balloons have been used in several recent studies to measure long-range transport over periods as long as 30 hours and distances up to 1000 kilometers. By repeatedly performing shallow soundings as they drift, CMET balloons can quantify evolving atmospheric structure, mixing events, shear advection, and dispersion during transport. In addition, the quasi-Lagrangian wind profiles can be used to drive a multi-layer trajectory model in which the advected air parcels follow the underlying terrain, or are constrained by altitude, potential temperature, or tracer concentration. Data from a coordinated balloon-aircraft study of long range transport over Texas (SETTS 2005) show that the reconstructed trajectories accurately track residual-layer urban outflow (and at times even its fine-scale structure) over distances of many hundreds of kilometers. The reconstructed trajectories and evolving profile visualizations are increasingly being made available in near-real time during balloon flights, supporting data-driven flight planning and sophisticated process studies relevant to atmospheric chemistry and climate. Multilayer trajectories (black grids) derived from CMET balloon flight paths (grey lines) for a transport event across Texas in 2005.

  17. Classically scale-invariant B–L model and conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    We consider a coupling of conformal gravity to the classically scale-invariant B–L extended standard model which has been recently proposed as a phenomenologically viable model realizing the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism of breakdown of the electroweak symmetry. As in a globally scale-invariant dilaton gravity, it is also shown in a locally scale-invariant conformal gravity that without recourse to the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism, the B–L gauge symmetry is broken in the process of spontaneous symmetry breakdown of the local scale invariance (Weyl invariance) at the tree level and as a result the B–L gauge field becomes massive via the Higgs mechanism. As a bonus of conformal gravity, the massless dilaton field does not appear and the parameters in front of the non-minimal coupling of gravity are completely fixed in the present model. This observation clearly shows that the conformal gravity has a practical application even if the scalar field does not possess any dynamical degree of freedom owing to the local scale symmetry

  18. Affine q-deformed symmetry and the classical Yang-Baxter σ-model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delduc, F.; Kameyama, T.; Magro, M. [Université de Lyon, ENS de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique,F-69342 Lyon (France); Vicedo, B. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire,College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-23

    The Yang-Baxter σ-model is an integrable deformation of the principal chiral model on a Lie group G. The deformation breaks the G×G symmetry to U(1){sup rank(G)}×G. It is known that there exist non-local conserved charges which, together with the unbroken U(1){sup rank(G)} local charges, form a Poisson algebra U{sub q}(g), which is the semiclassical limit of the quantum group U{sub q}(g), with g the Lie algebra of G. For a general Lie group G with rank(G)>1, we extend the previous result by constructing local and non-local conserved charges satisfying all the defining relations of the infinite-dimensional Poisson algebra U{sub q}(Lg), the classical analogue of the quantum loop algebra U{sub q}(Lg), where Lg is the loop algebra of g. Quite unexpectedly, these defining relations are proved without encountering any ambiguity related to the non-ultralocality of this integrable σ-model.

  19. A classical regression framework for mediation analysis: fitting one model to estimate mediation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Christina T; Blume, Jeffrey D

    2017-10-26

    Mediation analysis explores the degree to which an exposure's effect on an outcome is diverted through a mediating variable. We describe a classical regression framework for conducting mediation analyses in which estimates of causal mediation effects and their variance are obtained from the fit of a single regression model. The vector of changes in exposure pathway coefficients, which we named the essential mediation components (EMCs), is used to estimate standard causal mediation effects. Because these effects are often simple functions of the EMCs, an analytical expression for their model-based variance follows directly. Given this formula, it is instructive to revisit the performance of routinely used variance approximations (e.g., delta method and resampling methods). Requiring the fit of only one model reduces the computation time required for complex mediation analyses and permits the use of a rich suite of regression tools that are not easily implemented on a system of three equations, as would be required in the Baron-Kenny framework. Using data from the BRAIN-ICU study, we provide examples to illustrate the advantages of this framework and compare it with the existing approaches. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Embedding inflation into the Standard Model — More evidence for classical scale invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannike, Kristjan; Racioppi, Antonio; Raidal, Martti

    2014-01-01

    If cosmological inflation is due to a slowly rolling single inflation field taking trans-Planckian values as suggested by the BICEP2 measurement of primordial tensor modes in CMB, embedding inflation into the Standard Model challenges standard paradigm of effective field theories. Together with an apparent absence of Planck scale contributions to the Higgs mass and to the cosmological constant, BICEP2 provides further experimental evidence for the absence of large M_P induced operators. We show that classical scale invariance — the paradigm that all fundamental scales in Nature are induced by quantum effects — solves the problem and allows for a remarkably simple scale-free Standard Model extension with inflaton without extending the gauge group. Due to trans-Planckian inflaton values and vevs, a dynamically induced Coleman-Weinberg-type inflaton potential of the model can predict tensor-to-scalar ratio r in a large range, converging around the prediction of chaotic m"2ϕ"2 inflation for a large trans-Planckian value of the inflaton vev. Precise determination of r in future experiments will single out a unique scale-free inflation potential, allowing to test the proposed field-theoretic framework.

  1. A hybrid classical-quantum approach for ultra-scaled confined nanostructures : modeling and simulation*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietra Paola

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hybrid classical-quantum model to study the motion of electrons in ultra-scaled confined nanostructures. The transport of charged particles, considered as one dimensional, is described by a quantum effective mass model in the active zone coupled directly to a drift-diffusion problem in the rest of the device. We explain how this hybrid model takes into account the peculiarities due to the strong confinement and we present numerical simulations for a simplified carbon nanotube. Nous proposons un modèle hybride classique-quantique pour décrire le mouvement des électrons dans des nanostructures très fortement confinées. Le transport des particules, consideré unidimensionel, est décrit par un modèle quantique avec masse effective dans la zone active couplé à un problème de dérive-diffusion dans le reste du domaine. Nous expliquons comment ce modèle hybride prend en compte les spécificités de ce très fort confinement et nous présentons des résultats numériques pour un nanotube de carbone simplifié.

  2. Classical antiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors)

  3. Incorporating classic adsorption isotherms into modern surface complexation models: implications for sorption of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulik, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Computer-aided surface complexation models (SCM) tend to replace the classic adsorption isotherm (AI) analysis in describing mineral-water interface reactions such as radionuclide sorption onto (hydr) oxides and clays. Any site-binding SCM based on the mole balance of surface sites, in fact, reproduces the (competitive) Langmuir isotherm, optionally amended with electrostatic Coulomb's non-ideal term. In most SCM implementations, it is difficult to incorporate real-surface phenomena (site heterogeneity, lateral interactions, surface condensation) described in classic AI approaches other than Langmuir's. Thermodynamic relations between SCMs and AIs that remained obscure in the past have been recently clarified using new definitions of standard and reference states of surface species [1,2]. On this basis, a method for separating the Langmuir AI into ideal (linear) and non-ideal parts [2] was applied to multi-dentate Langmuir, Frumkin, and BET isotherms. The aim of this work was to obtain the surface activity coefficient terms that make the SCM site mole balance constraints obsolete and, in this way, extend thermodynamic SCMs to cover sorption phenomena described by the respective AIs. The multi-dentate Langmuir term accounts for the site saturation with n-dentate surface species, as illustrated on modeling bi-dentate U VI complexes on goethite or SiO 2 surfaces. The Frumkin term corrects for the lateral interactions of the mono-dentate surface species; in particular, it has the same form as the Coulombic term of the constant-capacitance EDL combined with the Langmuir term. The BET term (three parameters) accounts for more than a monolayer adsorption up to the surface condensation; it can potentially describe the surface precipitation of nickel and other cations on hydroxides and clay minerals. All three non-ideal terms (in GEM SCMs implementation [1,2]) by now are used for non-competing surface species only. Upon 'surface dilution

  4. An Analysis of Cross Racial Identity Scale Scores Using Classical Test Theory and Rasch Item Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joshua; Beaujean, A. Alexander; Worrell, Frank C.; Watson, Stevie

    2013-01-01

    Item response models (IRMs) were used to analyze Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores. Rasch analysis scores were compared with classical test theory (CTT) scores. The partial credit model demonstrated a high goodness of fit and correlations between Rasch and CTT scores ranged from 0.91 to 0.99. CRIS scores are supported by both methods.…

  5. The potential of agent-based modelling for verification of people trajectories based on smartphone sensor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillen, F; Ehlers, M; Höfle, B; Reinartz, P

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the potential of smartphone sensor data for verification of people trajectories derived from airborne remote sensing data are investigated and discussed based on simulated test recordings in the city of Osnabrueck, Germany. For this purpose, the airborne imagery is simulated by images taken from a high building with a typical single lens reflex camera. The smartphone data required for the analysis of the potential is simultaneously recorded by test persons on the ground. In a second step, the quality of the smartphone sensor data is evaluated regarding the integration into simulation and modelling approaches. In this context we studied the potential of the agent-based modelling technique concerning the verification of people trajectories

  6. Upscaling of dilution and mixing using a trajectory based Spatial Markov random walk model in a periodic flow domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, Nicole L.; Porta, Giovanni M.; Bolster, Diogo

    2017-05-01

    The Spatial Markov Model (SMM) is an upscaled model that has been used successfully to predict effective mean transport across a broad range of hydrologic settings. Here we propose a novel variant of the SMM, applicable to spatially periodic systems. This SMM is built using particle trajectories, rather than travel times. By applying the proposed SMM to a simple benchmark problem we demonstrate that it can predict mean effective transport, when compared to data from fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Next we propose a methodology for using this SMM framework to predict measures of mixing and dilution, that do not just depend on mean concentrations, but are strongly impacted by pore-scale concentration fluctuations. We use information from trajectories of particles to downscale and reconstruct pore-scale approximate concentration fields from which mixing and dilution measures are then calculated. The comparison between measurements from fully resolved simulations and predictions with the SMM agree very favorably.

  7. Eyeblink Classical Conditioning and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – A Model Systems Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard G Schreurs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment.

  8. Nonminimal quartic inflation in classically conformal U(1 ) X extended standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Raut, Digesh; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2018-03-01

    We propose quartic inflation with nonminimal gravitational coupling in the context of the classically conformal U(1 ) X extension of the standard model (SM). In this model, the U(1 ) X gauge symmetry is radiatively broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, by which the U(1 ) X gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed Majorana neutrinos acquire their masses. We consider their masses in the range of O (10 GeV )-O (10 TeV ) , which are accessible to high-energy collider experiments. The radiative U(1 ) X gauge symmetry breaking also generates a negative mass squared for the SM Higgs doublet, and the electroweak symmetry breaking occurs subsequently. We identify the U(1 ) X Higgs field with inflaton and calculate the inflationary predictions. Because of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, the inflaton quartic coupling during inflation, which determines the inflationary predictions, is correlated to the U(1 ) X gauge coupling. With this correlation, we investigate complementarities between the inflationary predictions and the current constraint from the Z' boson resonance search at the LHC Run 2 as well as the prospect of the search for the Z' boson and the right-handed neutrinos at the future collider experiments.

  9. Eyeblink classical conditioning and post-traumatic stress disorder - a model systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Burhans, Lauren B

    2015-01-01

    Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment.

  10. A classical model wind turbine wake “blind test” revisited by remote sensing lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nikolas; Nielsen, Morten Busk

    2017-01-01

    One of the classical model wind turbine wake “blind test” experiments1 conducted in the boundary-layer wind tunnel at NTNU in Trondheim and used for benchmarking of numerical flow models has been revisited by remote sensing lidars in a joint experiment called “Lidars For Wind Tunnels” (L4WT) under...... was D=0.894 m and it was designed for a tip speed ratio (TSR) of 6. However, the TSRs used were 3, 6, and 10 at a free-stream velocity of 10 m/s. Due to geometrical constraints imposed by for instance the locations of the wind tunnel windows, all measurements were performed in the very same vertical...... cross-section of the tunnel and the various down-stream distances of the wake, i.e. 1D, 3D, and 5D were achieved by re-positioning the turbine. The approach used allows for unique studies of the influence of the inherent lidar spatial filtering on previously both experimentally and numerically well...

  11. Renormalization of the new trajectory in the unitarized conventional dual model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiros, M.

    1978-08-01

    The contribution of one-loop planar diagrams to the two-reggeon two-particle amplitude is derived. Its regge limit splits into two separate contributions which must be interpreted as renormalization effects, to order g 2 , of the α and β trajectories. It is shown that the Neveu-Scherk renormalization prescription is able to render finite both contributions. The intercept of the β trajectory is shifted from its bare value by the renormalization procedure, whereas that of the α trajectrory is not renormalized as it was required by the gauge invariance of dual theories

  12. An alternative approach to modelling HbA1c trajectories in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Phil; Bennett, Hayley; Qin, Lei; Bergenheim, Klas; Gordon, Jason; Evans, Marc

    2017-05-01

    Time-dependent HbA1c trajectories in health economic models of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are typically informed by the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS). However, this approach may not accurately predict HbA1c progression in patients who do not conform to the demographic profile of the original UKPDS cohort. This study aimed to develop an alternative mathematical model (MM) to simulate HbA1c progression in T2DM. A systematic literature review identified studies, published between 2005 and 2015, that reported HbA1c in adult T2DM patients over a minimum duration of 18 months. Pooled data from eligible studies were used to develop an alternative MM equation for HbA1c progression, which was then contrasted with the UKPDS 68 progression equation in illustrative scenarios. A total of 68 studies were eligible for data extraction (mean follow-up time 4.1 years). HbA1c progression was highly heterogeneous across studies, varying with baseline HbA1c, treatment group and patient age. The MM equation was fitted with parameters for mean baseline HbA1c (8.3%), initial change in HbA1c (-0.62%) and upper quartile of maximum observed HbA1c (9.3%). Differences in HbA1c trajectories between the MM and UKPDS approaches altered the timing of therapy escalation in illustrative scenarios. The MM represents an alternative approach to simulate HbA1c trajectories in T2DM models, as UKPDS data may not adequately reflect the heterogeneity of HbA1c profiles observed in clinical studies. However, the choice of approach should ultimately be determined by the characteristics of individual patients under consideration and the clinical face validity of the modelled trajectories. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration during transport from clean areas. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  14. Quantum mean-field approximation for lattice quantum models: Truncating quantum correlations and retaining classical ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpetti, Daniele; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The mean-field approximation is at the heart of our understanding of complex systems, despite its fundamental limitation of completely neglecting correlations between the elementary constituents. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 130401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.130401], we have shown that in quantum many-body systems at finite temperature, two-point correlations can be formally separated into a thermal part and a quantum part and that quantum correlations are generically found to decay exponentially at finite temperature, with a characteristic, temperature-dependent quantum coherence length. The existence of these two different forms of correlation in quantum many-body systems suggests the possibility of formulating an approximation, which affects quantum correlations only, without preventing the correct description of classical fluctuations at all length scales. Focusing on lattice boson and quantum Ising models, we make use of the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics to introduce such an approximation, which we dub quantum mean-field (QMF) approach, and which can be readily generalized to a cluster form (cluster QMF or cQMF). The cQMF approximation reduces to cluster mean-field theory at T =0 , while at any finite temperature it produces a family of systematically improved, semi-classical approximations to the quantum statistical mechanics of the lattice theory at hand. Contrary to standard MF approximations, the correct nature of thermal critical phenomena is captured by any cluster size. In the two exemplary cases of the two-dimensional quantum Ising model and of two-dimensional quantum rotors, we study systematically the convergence of the cQMF approximation towards the exact result, and show that the convergence is typically linear or sublinear in the boundary-to-bulk ratio of the clusters as T →0 , while it becomes faster than linear as T grows. These results pave the way towards the development of semiclassical numerical

  15. The role of spatial topology in a toy model of classical electrodynamics in (1+1) dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.D.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the role of spatial topology in a toy model of classical electrodynamics in (1+1) dimensions. The model describes a collection of Newtonian point particles coupled to a pair of scalar fields E(t,x) and B(t,x), which mediate forces between the particles and support freely propagating radiation. We formulate the model on both a line and a circle, and show that the behavior of the model strongly depends on the choice of spatial topology.

  16. Measuring and Modeling the Effects of Alternate Post-Fire Successional Trajectories on Boreal Forest Carbon Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranty, M. M.; Goetz, S. J.; Mack, M. C.; Alexander, H. D.; Beck, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    High latitude ecosystems are experiencing amplified climate warming, and recent evidence suggests concurrent intensification of fire disturbance regimes. In central Alaskan boreal forests, severe burns consume more of the soil organic layer, resulting in increased establishment of deciduous seedlings and altered post-fire stand composition with increased deciduous dominance. Quantifying differences in ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics between forest successional trajectories in response to burn severity is essential for understanding potential changes in regional or global feedbacks between boreal forests and climate. We used the Biome BioGeochemical Cycling model (Biome-BGC) to quantify differences in C stocks and fluxes associated with alternate post-fire successional trajectories related to fire severity. A version of Biome-BGC that allows alternate competing vegetation types was calibrated against a series of aboveground biomass observations from chronosequences of stands with differing post-fire successional trajectories characterized by the proportion of deciduous biomass. The model was able to reproduce observed patterns of biomass accumulation after fire, with stands dominated by deciduous species sequestering more C at a faster rate than stands dominated by conifers. Modeled C fluxes suggest that stands dominated by deciduous species are a stronger sink of atmospheric C soon after disturbance than coniferous stands. These results agree with the few available C flux observations. We use a historic database in conjunction with a map of deciduous canopy cover to explore the consequences of ongoing and potential future changes in the fire regime on central Alaskan C balance.

  17. Refining Markov state models for conformational dynamics using ensemble-averaged data and time-series trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Y.; Sugita, Y.

    2018-06-01

    A data-driven modeling scheme is proposed for conformational dynamics of biomolecules based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental measurements. In this scheme, an initial Markov State Model (MSM) is constructed from MD simulation trajectories, and then, the MSM parameters are refined using experimental measurements through machine learning techniques. The second step can reduce the bias of MD simulation results due to inaccurate force-field parameters. Either time-series trajectories or ensemble-averaged data are available as a training data set in the scheme. Using a coarse-grained model of a dye-labeled polyproline-20, we compare the performance of machine learning estimations from the two types of training data sets. Machine learning from time-series data could provide the equilibrium populations of conformational states as well as their transition probabilities. It estimates hidden conformational states in more robust ways compared to that from ensemble-averaged data although there are limitations in estimating the transition probabilities between minor states. We discuss how to use the machine learning scheme for various experimental measurements including single-molecule time-series trajectories.

  18. Uncertainty in predictions of oil spill trajectories in a coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastião, P.; Guedes Soares, C.

    2006-12-01

    A method is introduced to determine the uncertainties in the predictions of oil spill trajectories using a classic oil spill model. The method considers the output of the oil spill model as a function of random variables, which are the input parameters, and calculates the standard deviation of the output results which provides a measure of the uncertainty of the model as a result of the uncertainties of the input parameters. In addition to a single trajectory that is calculated by the oil spill model using the mean values of the parameters, a band of trajectories can be defined when various simulations are done taking into account the uncertainties of the input parameters. This band of trajectories defines envelopes of the trajectories that are likely to be followed by the spill given the uncertainties of the input. The method was applied to an oil spill that occurred in 1989 near Sines in the southwestern coast of Portugal. This model represented well the distinction between a wind driven part that remained offshore, and a tide driven part that went ashore. For both parts, the method defined two trajectory envelopes, one calculated exclusively with the wind fields, and the other using wind and tidal currents. In both cases reasonable approximation to the observed results was obtained. The envelope of likely trajectories that is obtained with the uncertainty modelling proved to give a better interpretation of the trajectories that were simulated by the oil spill model.

  19. A classical density functional theory for the asymmetric restricted primitive model of ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongduo; Nordholm, Sture; Woodward, Clifford E.; Forsman, Jan

    2018-05-01

    A new three-parameter (valency, ion size, and charge asymmetry) model, the asymmetric restricted primitive model (ARPM) of ionic liquids, has recently been proposed. Given that ionic liquids generally are composed of monovalent species, the ARPM effectively reduces to a two-parameter model. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have demonstrated that the ARPM is able to reproduce key properties of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in bulk and at charged surfaces. The relatively modest complexity of the model raises the possibility, which is explored here, that a classical density functional theory (DFT) could resolve its properties. This is relevant because it might generate great improvements in terms of both numerical efficiency and understanding in the continued research of RTILs and their applications. In this report, a DFT for rod-like molecules is proposed as an approximate theoretical tool for an ARPM fluid. Borrowing data on the ion pair fraction from a single bulk simulation, the ARPM is modelled as a mixture of dissociated ions and connected ion pairs. We have specifically studied an ARPM where the hard-sphere diameter is 5 Å, with the charge located 1 Å from the hard-sphere centre. We focus on fluid structure and electrochemical behaviour of this ARPM fluid, into which a model electrode is immersed. The latter is modelled as a perfect conductor, and surface polarization is handled by the method of image charges. Approximate methods, which were developed in an earlier study, to take image interactions into account, are also incorporated in the DFT. We make direct numerical comparisons between DFT predictions and corresponding simulation data. The DFT theory is implemented both in the normal mean field form with respect to the electrostatic interactions and in a correlated form based on hole formation by both steric repulsions and ion-ion Coulomb interactions. The results clearly show that ion-ion correlations play a very important role in the screening of

  20. Structural plasticity in the dentate gyrus- revisiting a classic injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Perederiy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The adult brain is in a continuous state of remodeling. This is nowhere more true than in the dentate gyrus, where competing forces such as neurodegeneration and neurogenesis dynamically modify neuronal connectivity, and can occur simultaneously. This plasticity of the adult nervous system is particularly important in the context of traumatic brain injury or deafferentation. In this review, we summarize a classic injury model, lesioning of the perforant path, which removes the main extrahippocampal input to the dentate gyrus. Early studies revealed that in response to deafferentation, axons of remaining fiber systems and dendrites of mature granule cells undergo lamina-specific changes, providing one of the first examples of structural plasticity in the adult brain. Given the increasing role of adult-generated new neurons in the function of the dentate gyrus, we also compare the response of newborn and mature granule cells following lesioning of the perforant path. These studies provide insights not only to plasticity in the dentate gyrus, but also to the response of neural circuits to brain injury.

  1. Applications of generalizability theory and their relations to classical test theory and structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vispoel, Walter P; Morris, Carrie A; Kilinc, Murat

    2018-03-01

    Although widely recognized as a comprehensive framework for representing score reliability, generalizability theory (G-theory), despite its potential benefits, has been used sparingly in reporting of results for measures of individual differences. In this article, we highlight many valuable ways that G-theory can be used to quantify, evaluate, and improve psychometric properties of scores. Our illustrations encompass assessment of overall reliability, percentages of score variation accounted for by individual sources of measurement error, dependability of cut-scores for decision making, estimation of reliability and dependability for changes made to measurement procedures, disattenuation of validity coefficients for measurement error, and linkages of G-theory with classical test theory and structural equation modeling. We also identify computer packages for performing G-theory analyses, most of which can be obtained free of charge, and describe how they compare with regard to data input requirements, ease of use, complexity of designs supported, and output produced. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Classical tachyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.

    1984-01-01

    A review of tachyons, with particular attention to their classical theory, is presented. The extension of Special Relativity to tachyons in two dimensional is first presented, an elegant model-theory which allows a better understanding also of ordinary physics. Then, the results are extended to the four-dimensional case (particular on tachyon mechanics) that can be derived without assuming the existence of Super-luminal reference-frames. Localizability and the unexpected apparent shape of tachyonic objects are discussed, and it is shown (on the basis of tachyon kinematics) how to solve the common causal paradoxes. In connection with General Relativity, particularly the problem of the apparent superluminal expansions in astrophysics is reviewed. The problem (still open) of the extension of relativitic theories to tachyons in four dimensions is tackled, and the electromagnetic theory of tachyons, a topic that can be relevant also for the experimental side, is reviewed. (Author) [pt

  3. Spatial and Temporal Extrapolation of Disdrometer Size Distributions Based on a Lagrangian Trajectory Model of Falling Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Jones, W. Linwood; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-01-01

    Methodologies to improve disdrometer processing, loosely based on mathematical techniques common to the field of particle flow and fluid mechanics, are examined and tested. The inclusion of advection and vertical wind field estimates appear to produce significantly improved results in a Lagrangian hydrometeor trajectory model, in spite of very strict assumptions of noninteracting hydrometeors, constant vertical air velocity, and time independent advection during the scan time interval. Wind field data can be extracted from each radar elevation scan by plotting and analyzing reflectivity contours over the disdrometer site and by collecting the radar radial velocity data to obtain estimates of advection. Specific regions of disdrometer spectra (drop size versus time) often exhibit strong gravitational sorting signatures, from which estimates of vertical velocity can be extracted. These independent wind field estimates become inputs and initial conditions to the Lagrangian trajectory simulation of falling hydrometeors.

  4. Phenomenological analysis of quantum level correlations and classical repulsion effects in SU(3) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Shigeyasu; Sakata, Fumihiko

    2003-01-01

    The quantum level fluctuation in various systems has been shown to be characterized by the random matrix theory, and to be related to a regular-to-chaos transition in classical system. We present a new qualitative analysis of quantum and classical fluctuation properties by exploiting correlation coefficients and variances. It is shown that the correlation coefficient of quantum level density is inversely proportional to the variance of consecutive phase-space point spacings on the Poincare section plane. (author)

  5. (Re)evaluating the Implications of the Autoregressive Latent Trajectory Model Through Likelihood Ratio Tests of Its Initial Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Lu; Chow, Sy-Miin; Ji, Linying; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    The autoregressive latent trajectory (ALT) model synthesizes the autoregressive model and the latent growth curve model. The ALT model is flexible enough to produce a variety of discrepant model-implied change trajectories. While some researchers consider this a virtue, others have cautioned that this may confound interpretations of the model's parameters. In this article, we show that some-but not all-of these interpretational difficulties may be clarified mathematically and tested explicitly via likelihood ratio tests (LRTs) imposed on the initial conditions of the model. We show analytically the nested relations among three variants of the ALT model and the constraints needed to establish equivalences. A Monte Carlo simulation study indicated that LRTs, particularly when used in combination with information criterion measures, can allow researchers to test targeted hypotheses about the functional forms of the change process under study. We further demonstrate when and how such tests may justifiably be used to facilitate our understanding of the underlying process of change using a subsample (N = 3,995) of longitudinal family income data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.

  6. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Jumbo-Lucioni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia (CG is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT, which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP–N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP–N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG, showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG co-receptor and Wnt

  7. Branching trajectory continual integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.P.; Chebotarev, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Heuristic definition of the Feynman continual integral over branching trajectories is suggested which makes it possible to obtain in the closed form the solution of the Cauchy problem for the model Hartree equation. A number of properties of the solution is derived from an integral representation. In particular, the quasiclassical asymptotics, exact solution in the gaussian case and perturbation theory series are described. The existence theorem for the simpliest continual integral over branching trajectories is proved [ru

  8. Mass number dependence of total neutron cross section; a discussion based on the semi-classical optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, Istvan

    1990-01-01

    The dependence of total neutron cross section on mass number can be calculated by the black nucleus formula, according to the optical model. The fine structure of mass number dependence is studied, and a correction factor formula is given on the basis of a semi-classical optical model. Yielding results in good agreement with experimental data. In addition to the mass number dependence, the neutron-energy dependence can also be calculated using this model. (K.A.)

  9. Reimagining the past - use of counterfactual trajectories in socio-hydrological modelling: the case of Chennai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V.

    2015-02-01

    The developing world is rapidly urbanizing. One of the challenges associated with this growth will be to supply water to growing cities of the developing world. Traditional planning tools fare poorly over 30-50 year time horizons because these systems are changing so rapidly. Models that hold land use, economic patterns, governance systems or technology static over a long planning horizon could result in inaccurate predictions leading to sub-optimal or paradoxical outcomes. Most models fail to account for adaptive responses by humans that in turn influence water resource availability, resulting in coevolution of the human-water system. Is a particular trajectory inevitable given a city's natural resource endowment, is the trajectory purely driven by policy or are there tipping points in the evolution of a city's growth that shift it from one trajectory onto another? Socio-hydrology has been defined as a new science of water and people that will explicitly account for such bi-directional feedbacks. However, a particular challenge in incorporating such feedbacks is imagining technological, social and political futures that could fundamentally alter future water demand, allocation and use. This paper offers an alternative approach - the use of counterfactual trajectories - that allows policy insights to be gleaned without having to predict social futures. The approach allows us to "reimagine the past"; to observe how outcomes would differ if different decisions had been made. The paper presents a "socio-hydrological" model that simulates the feedbacks between the human, engineered and hydrological systems in Chennai, India over a 40-year period. The model offers several interesting insights. First, the study demonstrates that urban household water security goes beyond piped water supply. When piped supply fails, users turn to their own wells. If the wells dry up, consumers purchase expensive tanker water or curtail water use and thus become water insecure. Second

  10. GOE-TYPE ENERGY-LEVEL STATISTICS AND REGULAR CLASSICAL DYNAMICS FOR ROTATIONAL NUCLEI IN THE INTERACTING BOSON MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAAR, [No Value; VORKAPIC, D; DIERPERINK, AEL

    1992-01-01

    We study the fluctuation properties of 0+ levels in rotational nuclei using the framework of SU(3) dynamical symmetry of the interacting boson model. Computations of Poincare sections for SU(3) dynamical symmetry and its breaking confirm the expected relation between dynamical symmetry and classical

  11. Killing scalar of non-linear σ-model on G/H realizing the classical exchange algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    The Poisson brackets for non-linear σ-models on G/H are set up on the light-like plane. A quantity which transforms irreducibly by the Killing vectors, called Killing scalar, is constructed in an arbitrary representation of G. It is shown to satisfy the classical exchange algebra

  12. Time Series Analysis of Non-Gaussian Observations Based on State Space Models from Both Classical and Bayesian Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durbin, J.; Koopman, S.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The analysis of non-Gaussian time series using state space models is considered from both classical and Bayesian perspectives. The treatment in both cases is based on simulation using importance sampling and antithetic variables; Monte Carlo Markov chain methods are not employed. Non-Gaussian

  13. Vegetation coupling to global climate: Trajectories of vegetation change and phenology modeling from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeremy Isaac

    Important systematic shifts in ecosystem function are often masked by natural variability. The rich legacy of over two decades of continuous satellite observations provides an important database for distinguishing climatological and anthropogenic ecosystem changes. Examples from semi-arid Sudanian West Africa and New England (USA) illustrate the response of vegetation to climate and land-use. In Burkina Faso, West Africa, pastoral and agricultural practices compete for land area, while degradation may follow intensification. The Nouhao Valley is a natural experiment in which pastoral and agricultural land uses were allocated separate, coherent reserves. Trajectories of annual net primary productivity were derived from 18 years of coarse-grain (AVHRR) satellite data. Trends suggested that pastoral lands had responded rigorously to increasing rainfall after the 1980's droughts. A detailed analysis at Landsat resolution (30m) indicated that the increased vegetative cover was concentrated in the river basins of the pastoral region, implying a riparian wood expansion. In comparison, riparian cover was reduced in agricultural regions. We suggest that broad-scale patterns of increasing semi-arid West African greenness may be indicative of climate variability, whereas local losses may be anthropogenic in nature. The contiguous deciduous forests, ocean proximity, topography, and dense urban developments of New England provide an ideal landscape to examine influences of climate variability and the impact of urban development vegetation response. Spatial and temporal patterns of interannual climate variability were examined via green leaf phenology. Phenology, or seasonal growth and senescence, is driven by deficits of light, temperature, and water. In temperate environments, phenology variability is driven by interannual temperature and precipitation shifts. Average and interannual phenology analyses across southern New England were conducted at resolutions of 30m (Landsat

  14. Estimates of Surface Drifter Trajectories in the Equatorial Atlantic: A Multi-model Ensemble Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Physique des Oceans UMR6523 (CNRS. I B(). IFREMER. IRD). Brest , France C. N. Barron E. Joseph Metzger Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space...AF447 flight from Rio to Paris . The airplane disappeared on June 1st 2009 near 3° N and 31° W, and a large international effort was organized to...to Runge-Kutta trajectory integration. The low- pass filter was accomplished by convolving the original (XiCM velocity fields at each time step and

  15. Thermal Decomposition of 1,5-Dinitrobiuret (DNB): Direct Dynamics Trajectory Simulations and Statistical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    Vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies ( ZPE ) were scaled by a factor of 0.955 and 0.981,20 respectively. The corrected ZPE were added to the...PE) during the trajectory. The oscillations in the PE reflect the vibration of the DNB molecule and the products, including ZPE . The time scale of...Energetics of complexes, TSs, and products are derived from B3LYP/6-31++G** calculations, including ZPE . For TSs, vibrational modes corresponding

  16. Influence of Asthma on the Longitudinal Trajectories of Cigarette Use Behaviors From Adolescence to Adulthood Using Latent Growth Curve Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisuk Bae

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: While epidemiologic research indicates that the prevalence of risk-taking behaviors including cigarette smoking among young people with asthma is substantial, the longitudinal patterns of cigarette smoking in this vulnerable population have received little attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in the longitudinal trajectories of cigarette use behaviors from adolescence to adulthood between young people with and without asthma. Methods: Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health during the years 1994 to 1995 (Wave I, adolescence, 2001 to 2002 (Wave III, young adulthood, and 2007 to 2008 (Wave IV, adulthood were analyzed (n=12 244. Latent growth curve models were used to examine the longitudinal trajectories of cigarette use behaviors during the transition to adulthood according to asthma status. Results: Regardless of asthma status, the trajectory means of cigarette use behaviors were found to increase, and then slightly decrease from adolescence to adulthood. In total participants, there were no statistically significant differences in initial levels and changes in cigarette use behaviors according to asthma status. However, in select sex and race subgroups (i.e., females and non-whites, former asthmatics showed greater escalation in cigarette use behaviors than did non-asthmatics or current asthmatics. Conclusions: This study indicated that the changing patterns of cigarette use behaviors during the transition to adulthood among young people with asthma are comparable to or even more drastic than those among young people without asthma.

  17. Identifying Latent Trajectories of Personality Disorder Symptom Change: Growth Mixture Modeling in the Longitudinal Study of Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Michael N.; Lenzenweger, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    Although previous reports have documented mean-level declines in personality disorder (PD) symptoms over time, little is known about whether personality pathology sometimes emerges among nonsymptomatic adults, or whether rates of change differ qualitatively among symptomatic persons. Our study sought to characterize heterogeneity in the longitudinal course of PD symptoms with the goal of testing for and describing latent trajectories. Participants were 250 young adults selected into two groups using a PD screening measure: those who met diagnostic criteria for a DSM-III-R PD (PPD, n = 129), and those with few PD symptoms (NoPD, n = 121). PD symptoms were assessed three times over a four-year study using semistructured interviews. Total PD symptom counts and symptoms of each DSM-III-R PD were analyzed using growth mixture modeling. In the NoPD group, latent trajectories were characterized by stable, minor symptoms; the rapid or gradual remission of subclinical symptoms; or the emergence of symptoms of Avoidant, Obsessive-Compulsive, or Paranoid PD. In the PPD group, three latent trajectories were evident: rapid symptom remission, slow symptom decline, or a relative absence of symptoms. Rapid remission of PD symptoms was associated with fewer comorbid disorders, lower negative emotionality, and greater positive emotionality and constraint, whereas emergent personality dysfunction was associated with comorbid PD symptoms and lower positive emotionality. In most cases, symptom change for one PD was associated with concomitant changes in other PDs, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. These results indicate that the longitudinal course of PD symptoms is heterogeneous, with distinct trajectories evident for both symptomatic and nonsymptomatic individuals. The prognosis of PD symptoms may be informed by an assessment of personality and comorbid psychopathology. PMID:23231459

  18. Lagrangian Investigation of Auto-ignition in a Hydrogen Jet Flame in a Vitiated Co-flow: Animations of Particle Trajectories in Composition Space from PDF Model Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haifeng; Pope, Stephen B.

    2007-01-01

    PDF model calculations have been performed of the Cabra lifted hydrogen flame in a vitiated co-flow. Particle trajectories are extracted from the Lagrangian particle method used to solve the modeled PDF equation. The particle trajectories in the mixture fraction-temperature plane reveal (at successive downstream locations): essentially inert mixing between the cold fuel jet and the hot co-flow; the auto-ignition of very lean particles; and, subsequent mixing and reaction, leading to near-equi...

  19. Classical analog for electronic degrees of freedom in nonadiabatic collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Miller, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how a formally exact classical analog can be defined for a finite dimensional (in Hilbert space) quantum mechanical system. This approach is then used to obtain a classical model for the electronic degrees of freedom in a molecular collision system, and the combination of this with the usual classical description of the heavy particle (i.e., nuclear) motion provides a completely classical model for the electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom. The resulting equations of motion are shown to be equivalent to describing the electronic degrees of freedom by the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, the time dependence arising from the classical motion of the nuclei, the trajectory of which is determined by the quantum mechanical average (i.e., Ehrenfest) force on the nuclei. Quantizing the system via classical S-matrix theory is shown to provide a dynamically consistent description of nonadiabatic collision processes; i.e., different electronic transitions have different heavy particle trajectories and, for example, the total energy of the electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom is conserved. Application of this classical model for the electronic degrees of freedom (plus classical S-matrix theory) to the two-state model problem shows that the approach provides a good description of the electronic dynamics

  20. Classical and quantum transport through entropic barriers modeled by hardwall hyperboloidal constrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, R.; Waalkens, H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the quantum transport through entropic barriers induced by hardwall constrictions of hyperboloidal shape in two and three spatial dimensions. Using the separability of the Schroedinger equation and the classical equations of motion for these geometries, we study in detail the quantum transmission probabilities and the associated quantum resonances, and relate them to the classical phase structures which govern the transport through the constrictions. These classical phase structures are compared to the analogous structures which, as has been shown only recently, govern reaction type dynamics in smooth systems. Although the systems studied in this paper are special due their separability they can be taken as a guide to study entropic barriers resulting from constriction geometries that lead to non-separable dynamics.

  1. Correlation analysis of quantum fluctuations and repulsion effects of classical dynamics in SU(3) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Shigeyasu; Sakata, Fumihiko

    2003-01-01

    In many quantum systems, random matrix theory has been used to characterize quantum level fluctuations, which is known to be a quantum correspondent to a regular-to-chaos transition in classical systems. We present a new qualitative analysis of quantum and classical fluctuation properties by exploiting correlation coefficients and variances. It is shown that the correlation coefficient of the quantum level density is roughly inversely proportional relation to the variance of consecutive phase-space point spacings on the Poincare section plane. (author)

  2. Exponentially long Equilibration times in a 1-D Collisional Model of a classical gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul; Benettin, G.

    1999-01-01

    to the specific heat. Hence, the observed `freezing out' of the vibrational degrees of freedom could in principle be explained in terms of classical mechanics. We discuss the phenomenon analytically, on the basis of an approximation introduced by Landau and Teller (1936) for a related phenomenon, and estimate...

  3. Relationships among Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory Frameworks via Factor Analytic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nidhi; Koran, Jennifer; Henn, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    There are well-defined theoretical differences between the classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) frameworks. It is understood that in the CTT framework, person and item statistics are test- and sample-dependent. This is not the perception with IRT. For this reason, the IRT framework is considered to be theoretically superior…

  4. TNOs are Cool: Thermophysical modeling of a sample of 20 classical KBOs using Herschel/PACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilenius, E.; Müller, T.; Pal, A.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Rengel, M.; Hartogh, P.; Protopapa, S.; Mueller, M.; Mommert, M.; Stansberry, J.; Lellouch, E.; Böhnhardt, H.; Ortiz, J. L.; Thirouin, A.; Henry, F.; Delsanti, A.; Fornasier, S.; Hestroffer, D.; Dotto, E.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the sizes and albedos of 20 classical Kuiper belt objects. Our observations with the PACS instrument on-board Herschel Space Observatory cover the wavelength range where the thermal emission from trans-Neptunian objects has its maximum. We use a consistent method for data reduction and

  5. OPTIMAL AIRCRAFT TRAJECTORIES FOR SPECIFIED RANGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.

    1994-01-01

    For an aircraft operating over a fixed range, the operating costs are basically a sum of fuel cost and time cost. While minimum fuel and minimum time trajectories are relatively easy to calculate, the determination of a minimum cost trajectory can be a complex undertaking. This computer program was developed to optimize trajectories with respect to a cost function based on a weighted sum of fuel cost and time cost. As a research tool, the program could be used to study various characteristics of optimum trajectories and their comparison to standard trajectories. It might also be used to generate a model for the development of an airborne trajectory optimization system. The program could be incorporated into an airline flight planning system, with optimum flight plans determined at takeoff time for the prevailing flight conditions. The use of trajectory optimization could significantly reduce the cost for a given aircraft mission. The algorithm incorporated in the program assumes that a trajectory consists of climb, cruise, and descent segments. The optimization of each segment is not done independently, as in classical procedures, but is performed in a manner which accounts for interaction between the segments. This is accomplished by the application of optimal control theory. The climb and descent profiles are generated by integrating a set of kinematic and dynamic equations, where the total energy of the aircraft is the independent variable. At each energy level of the climb and descent profiles, the air speed and power setting necessary for an optimal trajectory are determined. The variational Hamiltonian of the problem consists of the rate of change of cost with respect to total energy and a term dependent on the adjoint variable, which is identical to the optimum cruise cost at a specified altitude. This variable uniquely specifies the optimal cruise energy, cruise altitude, cruise Mach number, and, indirectly, the climb and descent profiles. If the optimum

  6. Forward and Inverse Predictive Model for the Trajectory Tracking Control of a Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Gait Rehabilitation: Simulation modelling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, M. A.; Majeed, A. P. P. A.; Taha, Z.; Alim, M. M.; Baarath, K.

    2018-03-01

    The movement of a lower limb exoskeleton requires a reasonably accurate control method to allow for an effective gait therapy session to transpire. Trajectory tracking is a nontrivial means of passive rehabilitation technique to correct the motion of the patients’ impaired limb. This paper proposes an inverse predictive model that is coupled together with the forward kinematics of the exoskeleton to estimate the behaviour of the system. A conventional PID control system is used to converge the required joint angles based on the desired input from the inverse predictive model. It was demonstrated through the present study, that the inverse predictive model is capable of meeting the trajectory demand with acceptable error tolerance. The findings further suggest the ability of the predictive model of the exoskeleton to predict a correct joint angle command to the system.

  7. The OPALS Plan for Operations: Use of ISS Trajectory and Attitude Models in the OPALS Pointing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Oaida, Bogdan; Erkmen, Baris

    2013-01-01

    This paper will discuss the OPALS pointing strategy, focusing on incorporation of ISS trajectory and attitude models to build pointing predictions. Methods to extrapolate an ISS prediction based on past data will be discussed and will be compared to periodically published ISS predictions and Two-Line Element (TLE) predictions. The prediction performance will also be measured against GPS states available in telemetry. The performance of the pointing products will be compared to the allocated values in the OPALS pointing budget to assess compliance with requirements.

  8. Estimating Jupiter’s Gravity Field Using Juno Measurements, Trajectory Estimation Analysis, and a Flow Model Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai; Durante, Daniele; Finocchiaro, Stefano; Iess, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming Juno spacecraft measurements have the potential of improving our knowledge of Jupiter’s gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spatial gravity variations, but these measurements will be very accurate only over a limited latitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially regarding the Jovian flow structure and its depth, which can influence the measured gravity field. In this study we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using a simulated Juno trajectory, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint-based inverse model for the flow dynamics. We test this method both for zonal harmonics only and with a full gravity field including tesseral harmonics. The results show that this method can fit some of the gravitational harmonics better to the “measured” harmonics, mainly because of the added information from the dynamical model, which includes the flow structure. Thus, it is suggested that the method presented here has the potential of improving the accuracy of the expected gravity harmonics estimated from the Juno and Cassini radio science experiments.

  9. Estimating Jupiter’s Gravity Field Using Juno Measurements, Trajectory Estimation Analysis, and a Flow Model Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Durante, Daniele; Finocchiaro, Stefano; Iess, Luciano, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    The upcoming Juno spacecraft measurements have the potential of improving our knowledge of Jupiter’s gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spatial gravity variations, but these measurements will be very accurate only over a limited latitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially regarding the Jovian flow structure and its depth, which can influence the measured gravity field. In this study we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using a simulated Juno trajectory, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint-based inverse model for the flow dynamics. We test this method both for zonal harmonics only and with a full gravity field including tesseral harmonics. The results show that this method can fit some of the gravitational harmonics better to the “measured” harmonics, mainly because of the added information from the dynamical model, which includes the flow structure. Thus, it is suggested that the method presented here has the potential of improving the accuracy of the expected gravity harmonics estimated from the Juno and Cassini radio science experiments.

  10. Classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Benacquista, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to classical mechanics at a level intermediate between the typical undergraduate and advanced graduate level. This text describes the background and tools for use in the fields of modern physics, such as quantum mechanics, astrophysics, particle physics, and relativity. Students who have had basic undergraduate classical mechanics or who have a good understanding of the mathematical methods of physics will benefit from this book.

  11. Path integrals and geometry of trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, M.; Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Niemi, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    A geometrical interpretation of path integrals is developed in the space of trajectories. This yields a supersymmetric formulation of a generic path integral, with the supersymmetry resembling the BRST supersymmetry of a first class constrained system. If the classical equation of motion is a Killing vector field in the space of trajectories, the supersymmetry localizes the path integral to classical trajectories and the WKB approximation becomes exact. This can be viewed as a path integral generalization of the Duistermaat-Heckman theorem, which states the conditions for the exactness of the WKB approximation for integrals in a compact phase space. (orig.)

  12. Why the coastal plain of Paraiba do Sul river not be denominated the classical model of wave dominated delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.

    1987-01-01

    Existing coastal sedimentation models have not properly incorporated the fundamental role of Holocene sea-level history in the development of modern coastal regions. For example the classical work by COLEMAN and WRIGHT (1975), although analyzing the influence of as many as 400 parameters on the geometry of deltaic sand bodies, did not address the effects of Holocene sea-level oscillations. Previous work on the central portion of the Brazilian coastline indicated that the relative construction of the coastal plains. Detailed mapping and radiocarbon dating have allowed us to establish the different phases involved in the depositional history of the plain situated at the Paraiba do Sul river mouth. This history is not in keeping with the classical model of wave dominated delta. (author)

  13. Transport of particles by surface waves: a modification of the classical bouncer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragulskis, M; Sanjuan, M A F

    2008-01-01

    We consider a ball under the influence of gravity on a platform. A propagating surface wave travels on the surface of the platform, while the platform remains motionless. This is a modification of the classical bouncing ball problem and describes the transport of particles by surface waves. Phase and velocity maps cannot be expressed in an explicit form owing to implicit formulations, and no formal analytical analysis is possible. Numerical analysis shows that the transition to chaos is produced via a period doubling route, which is a common property for classical bouncers. The bouncing process can be sensitive to the initial conditions, which can build the ground for control techniques that can dramatically increase the effectiveness of particle transport in practical applications

  14. Classical ethical positions and their relevance in justifying behavior: A model of prescriptive attribution.

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, E.H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper separates empirical research on ethics from classical research on morality and relates it to other central questions of social psychology and sociology, e.g., values, culture, justice, attribution. In addition, reference is made to some founding studies of ethical research and its historical development. Based on this line of tradition the development of prescriptive attribution research is introduced, which concentrates on the justification of actions by weighting the importance o...

  15. Critical behavior in a random field classical Heisenberg model for amorphous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Douglas F. de; Alves, Sandro Roberto L.; Arruda, Alberto S. de

    2005-01-01

    By using the differential operator technique and the effective field theory scheme, the critical behavior of amorphous classical Heisenberg ferromagnet of spin-1/2 in a random field is studied. The phase diagram in the T-H and T-α planes on a simple cubic lattice for a cluster with two spins is obtained. Tricritical points, reentrant phenomena and influence of the random field and amorphization on the transition temperature are discussed

  16. Semi-classical precompound decay models for heavy ion reactions of 10-100 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1986-01-01

    The hybrid and Boltzmann master equation, which predict heavy ion precompound decay phenomena, are investigated. These are both semi-classical approaches. The physical concepts of these two models are discussed, and their numerical formulations are summarized. Their success in reproducing experimentally measured (HI,n) spectra and in estimating limits on beam momentum transfer due to the precompound nucleon emission cascade are summarized. Results of calculations for subthreshold pion production are presented and compared with experimental yields. 19 refs., 5 figs

  17. Developing a New Integrated Model to improve the using of Classical Approach in Designing Management Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad M M Abu Omar; Khairul Anuar Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Management information system (MIS) is used to solve management problems in the practical life, the designing and building of the management information systems is done by using one of the systems development methodologies. Classical approach is one of these methodologies which still suffer from some critical problems when it is used in designing and building the management information systems, it consumes more time and cost during its life cycle. This paper develops a new integrated model to...

  18. Quantifying kinematics of purposeful movements to real, imagined, or absent functional objects: implications for modelling trajectories for robot-assisted ADL tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisneski, Kimberly J; Johnson, Michelle J

    2007-03-23

    Robotic therapy is at the forefront of stroke rehabilitation. The Activities of Daily Living Exercise Robot (ADLER) was developed to improve carryover of gains after training by combining the benefits of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) training (motivation and functional task practice with real objects), with the benefits of robot mediated therapy (repeatability and reliability). In combining these two therapy techniques, we seek to develop a new model for trajectory generation that will support functional movements to real objects during robot training. We studied natural movements to real objects and report on how initial reaching movements are affected by real objects and how these movements deviate from the straight line paths predicted by the minimum jerk model, typically used to generate trajectories in robot training environments. We highlight key issues that to be considered in modelling natural trajectories. Movement data was collected as eight normal subjects completed ADLs such as drinking and eating. Three conditions were considered: object absent, imagined, and present. This data was compared to predicted trajectories generated from implementing the minimum jerk model. The deviations in both the plane of the table (XY) and the sagittal plane of torso (XZ) were examined for both reaches to a cup and to a spoon. Velocity profiles and curvature were also quantified for all trajectories. We hypothesized that movements performed with functional task constraints and objects would deviate from the minimum jerk trajectory model more than those performed under imaginary or object absent conditions. Trajectory deviations from the predicted minimum jerk model for these reaches were shown to depend on three variables: object presence, object orientation, and plane of movement. When subjects completed the cup reach their movements were more curved than for the spoon reach. The object present condition for the cup reach showed more curvature than in the object

  19. Quantifying kinematics of purposeful movements to real, imagined, or absent functional objects: Implications for modelling trajectories for robot-assisted ADL tasks**

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisneski Kimberly J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robotic therapy is at the forefront of stroke rehabilitation. The Activities of Daily Living Exercise Robot (ADLER was developed to improve carryover of gains after training by combining the benefits of Activities of Daily Living (ADL training (motivation and functional task practice with real objects, with the benefits of robot mediated therapy (repeatability and reliability. In combining these two therapy techniques, we seek to develop a new model for trajectory generation that will support functional movements to real objects during robot training. We studied natural movements to real objects and report on how initial reaching movements are affected by real objects and how these movements deviate from the straight line paths predicted by the minimum jerk model, typically used to generate trajectories in robot training environments. We highlight key issues that to be considered in modelling natural trajectories. Methods Movement data was collected as eight normal subjects completed ADLs such as drinking and eating. Three conditions were considered: object absent, imagined, and present. This data was compared to predicted trajectories generated from implementing the minimum jerk model. The deviations in both the plane of the table (XY and the saggital plane of torso (XZ were examined for both reaches to a cup and to a spoon. Velocity profiles and curvature were also quantified for all trajectories. Results We hypothesized that movements performed with functional task constraints and objects would deviate from the minimum jerk trajectory model more than those performed under imaginary or object absent conditions. Trajectory deviations from the predicted minimum jerk model for these reaches were shown to depend on three variables: object presence, object orientation, and plane of movement. When subjects completed the cup reach their movements were more curved than for the spoon reach. The object present condition for the cup

  20. Linking community, parenting, and depressive symptom trajectories: testing resilience models of adolescent agency based on race/ethnicity and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda L; Merten, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Family stress models illustrate how communities affect youth outcomes through effects on parents and studies consistently show the enduring effects of early community context. The present study takes a different approach identifying human agency during adolescence as a potentially significant promotive factor mediating the relationship between community, parenting, and mental health. While agency is an important part of resilience, its longitudinal effects are unknown, particularly based on gender and race/ethnicity. The purpose of this research was to model the long-term effects of community structural adversity and social resources as predictors of adolescent depressive symptom trajectories via indirect effects of parental happiness, parent-child relationships, and human agency. Latent growth analyses were conducted with 1,796 participants (53% female; 56% White) across four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health spanning adolescence (Wave 1) through adulthood (Wave 4). The results identified agency as an important promotive factor during adolescence with long-term mental health benefits, but only for White and male participants. For these individuals, community social resources and the quality of the parent-child relationship were related to higher levels of agency and more positive mental health trajectories. Although community social resources similarly benefitted parenting and agency among females and non-White participants, there were no significant links between agency and depressive symptoms for these youth. The results suggest that agency remains an important, but poorly understood concept and additional work is necessary to continue unpacking its meaning for diverse groups of youth.

  1. Heterogeneity in Trajectories of Child Maltreatment Severity: A Two-Part Growth Mixture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Armstrong, Mary I.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the trajectories of maltreatment severity and substantiation over a 24-month period among children (N = 82,396) with repeated maltreatment reports. Findings revealed two different longitudinal patterns. The first pattern, Elevated Severity, showed a higher level of maltreatment during the initial incident and increased maltreatment severity during subsequent incidents but the substantiation rates for this class decreased over time. The second pattern, Lowered Severity, showed a much lower level of severity, but the likelihood of substantiation increased over time. The Elevated Severity class was comprised of children with an elevated risk profile due to both individual and contextual risk factors including older age, female gender, caregivers’ substance use problems, and a higher number of previous maltreatment reports. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:26300381

  2. Moyal dynamics and trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunss, G.

    2010-01-01

    We give first an approximation of the operator δh: f → δhf := h*planckf - f*planckh in terms of planck2n, n >= 0, where h\\equiv h(p,q), (p,q)\\in {\\mathbb R}^{2 n} , is a Hamilton function and *planck denotes the star product. The operator, which is the generator of time translations in a *planck-algebra, can be considered as a canonical extension of the Liouville operator Lh: f → Lhf := {h, f}Poisson. Using this operator we investigate the dynamics and trajectories of some examples with a scheme that extends the Hamilton-Jacobi method for classical dynamics to Moyal dynamics. The examples we have chosen are Hamiltonians with a one-dimensional quartic potential and two-dimensional radially symmetric nonrelativistic and relativistic Coulomb potentials, and the Hamiltonian for a Schwarzschild metric. We further state a conjecture concerning an extension of the Bohr-Sommerfeld formula for the calculation of the exact eigenvalues for systems with classically periodic trajectories.

  3. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Geeter, N; Crevecoeur, G; Dupré, L; Leemans, A

    2015-01-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically, it is the component of this field parallel to the neuron’s local orientation, the so-called effective electric field, that can initiate neuronal stimulation. Deeper insights on the stimulation mechanisms can be acquired through extensive TMS modelling. Most models study simple representations of neurons with assumed geometries, whereas we embed realistic neural trajectories computed using tractography based on diffusion tensor images. This way of modelling ensures a more accurate spatial distribution of the effective electric field that is in addition patient and case specific. The case study of this paper focuses on the single pulse stimulation of the left primary motor cortex with a standard figure-of-eight coil. Including realistic neural geometry in the model demonstrates the strong and localized variations of the effective electric field between the tracts themselves and along them due to the interplay of factors such as the tract’s position and orientation in relation to the TMS coil, the neural trajectory and its course along the white and grey matter interface. Furthermore, the influence of changes in the coil orientation is studied. Investigating the impact of tissue anisotropy confirms that its contribution is not negligible. Moreover, assuming isotropic tissues lead to errors of the same size as rotating or tilting the coil with 10 degrees. In contrast, the model proves to be less sensitive towards the not well-known tissue conductivity values. (paper)

  4. Baryon string model. II. Special solutions of classical three-string equations of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, S.V.; Kochin, V.N.; Plyushchai, M.S.; Pron'ko, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The authors consider special solutions of the classical threestring equations of motion. The basic results needed for construction and analysis of the special solutions are examined. The authors consider very simple solutions in which the three-string node moves with the velocity of light. Singlemode solutions are studied. The graphical packet Atom is used to study and visualize the string dynamics. A new procedure was developed within the packet for graphical representation of many parameter functions. The distinctive feature of these procedures is the large class of functions (including explicit, implicit, and parametric functions) that can be represented by means of parametric, coordinate, and functional isolines

  5. The algebra of the energy-momentum tensor and the Noether currents in classical non-linear sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forger, M.; Mannheim Univ.; Laartz, J.; Schaeper, U.

    1994-01-01

    The recently derived current algrbra of classical non-linear sigma models on arbitrary Riemannian manifolds is extended to include the energy-momentum tensor. It is found that in two dimensions the energy-momentum tensor θ μv , the Noether current j μ associated with the global symmetry of the theory and the composite field j appearing as the coefficient of the Schwinger term in the current algebra, together with the derivatives of j μ and j, generte a closed algebra. The subalgebra generated by the light-cone components of the energy-momentum tensor consists of two commuting copies of the Virasoro algebra, with central charge c=0, reflecting the classical conformal invariance of the theory, but the current algebra part and the semidirect product structure are quite different from the usual Kac-Moody/Sugawara type contruction. (orig.)

  6. Investigating the sensitivity of hurricane intensity and trajectory to sea surface temperatures using the regional model WRF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevahir Kilic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sea surface temperature (SST anomalies on the hurricane characteristics are investigated in a set of sensitivity experiments employing the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The idealised experiments are performed for the case of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The first set of sensitivity experiments with basin-wide changes of the SST magnitude shows that the intensity goes along with changes in the SST, i.e., an increase in SST leads to an intensification of Katrina. Additionally, the trajectory is shifted to the west (east, with increasing (decreasing SSTs. The main reason is a strengthening of the background flow. The second set of experiments investigates the influence of Loop Current eddies idealised by localised SST anomalies. The intensity of Hurricane Katrina is enhanced with increasing SSTs close to the core of a tropical cyclone. Negative nearby SST anomalies reduce the intensity. The trajectory only changes if positive SST anomalies are located west or north of the hurricane centre. In this case the hurricane is attracted by the SST anomaly which causes an additional moisture source and increased vertical winds.

  7. Investigation of Schottky-Barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor by an efficient semi-classical numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changxin; Zhang Wei; Zhao Bo; Zhang Yafei

    2009-01-01

    An efficient semi-classical numerical modeling approach has been developed to simulate the coaxial Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (SB-CNTFET). In the modeling, the electrostatic potential of the CNT is obtained by self-consistently solving the analytic expression of CNT carrier distribution and the cylindrical Poisson equation, which significantly enhances the computational efficiency and simultaneously present a result in good agreement to that obtained from the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism based on the first principle. With this method, the effects of the CNT diameter, power supply voltage, thickness and dielectric constant of gate insulator on the device performance are investigated.

  8. Local hidden variable modelling, classicality, quantum separability and the original Bell inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loubenets, Elena R

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a general condition sufficient for the validity of the original Bell inequality (1964) in a local hidden variable (LHV) frame. This condition can be checked experimentally and incorporates only as a particular case the assumption on perfect correlations or anticorrelations usually argued for this inequality in the literature. Specifying this general condition for a quantum bipartite case, we introduce the whole class of bipartite quantum states, separable and nonseparable, that (i) admit an LHV description under any bipartite measurements with two settings per site; (ii) do not necessarily exhibit perfect correlations and may even have a negative correlation function if the same quantum observable is measured at both sites, but (iii) satisfy the 'perfect correlation' version of the original Bell inequality for any three bounded quantum observables A 1 , A 2 = B 1 , B 2 at sites 'A' and 'B', respectively. Analysing the validity of this general LHV condition under classical and quantum correlation scenarios with the same physical context, we stress that, unlike the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality, the original Bell inequality distinguishes between classicality and quantum separability.

  9. Fermions from classical statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe fermions in terms of a classical statistical ensemble. The states τ of this ensemble are characterized by a sequence of values one or zero or a corresponding set of two-level observables. Every classical probability distribution can be associated to a quantum state for fermions. If the time evolution of the classical probabilities p τ amounts to a rotation of the wave function q τ (t)=±√(p τ (t)), we infer the unitary time evolution of a quantum system of fermions according to a Schroedinger equation. We establish how such classical statistical ensembles can be mapped to Grassmann functional integrals. Quantum field theories for fermions arise for a suitable time evolution of classical probabilities for generalized Ising models.

  10. 3-D trajectory model for MDT using micro-spheres implanted within large blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2016-09-01

    Implant assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets implanted within large blood vessels and subjected to a uniform externally applied magnetic field (H0) has been investigated and reported for the first time. The capture areas (As) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) were determined from the analysis of particle trajectories simulated from equations of motion. Then, the effects of various parameters, such as types of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the strength of H0 on the As were obtained. Furthermore, the effects of saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic materials in the MDCPs and within the targets on the As were analyzed. After this, the suitable strengths of H0 and Rp for IA-MDT designs were reported. Dimensionless As, ranging from 2 to 7, was obtained with Rp ranging from 500 to 2500 nm, μ0H0 less than 0.8 T and a blood flow rate of 0.1 m s-1. The target-MDCP materials considered are iron-iron, iron-magnetite and SS409-magnetite, respectively.

  11. Methods for control over learning individual trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsel, A. A.; Cherniaeva, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    The article discusses models, methods and algorithms of determining student's optimal individual educational trajectory. A new method of controlling the learning trajectory has been developed as a dynamic model of learning trajectory control, which uses score assessment to construct a sequence of studied subjects.

  12. Scale-lengths and instabilities in magnetized classical and relativistic plasma fluid models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diver, D A; Laing, E W

    2015-01-01

    The validity of the traditional plasma continuum is predicated on a hierarchy of scale-lengths, with the Debye length being considered to be effectively unresolvable in the continuum limit. In this article, we revisit the strong magnetic field case in which the Larmor radius is comparable or smaller than the Debye length in the classical plasma, and also for a relativistic plasma. Fresh insight into the validity of the continuum assumption in each case is offered, including a fluid limit on the Alfvén speed that may impose restrictions on the validity of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in some solar and fusion contexts. Additional implications concerning the role of the firehose instability are also explored. (paper)

  13. Survival of classical models in Bartolomeo Facio's description of battles. Some considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Abbamonte

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Facio's work, entitled Rerum gestarum Alphonsi regis libri decem, mainly describes the conquest of the Kingdom of Naples by the Aragonese king Alphonso the Magnanimous. However, the historical events are not only narrated on the basis of contemporary documents, but they are also shaped according to the various patterns provided by classical authors. Thus, in Alphonso's speech to the troops we can find a direct quotation of Cicero, or in Facio's preface there is a blend of arguments taken from Livy's praefatio and Cicero's well-known opinion on Caesar's style. Finally, in the episode on the siege of Gerba and the return of the fleet to Trapani, Facio depicts Alphonso's Tunisian enemies as if they were old Carthaginians, whilst the forced stop of the Aragonese fleet in Trapani allows the historian to establish a wisely disguised comparison with Aeneas' stop at Trapani/Drepanum in the 5th book of the Aeneid.

  14. On a model of a classical relativistic particle of constant and universal mass and spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassandrov, V; Markova, N [Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Russian Peoples' Friendship University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schaefer, G; Wipf, A [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany)

    2009-08-07

    The deformation of the classical action for a point-like particle recently suggested by Staruszkiewicz gives rise to a spin structure which constrains the values of the invariant mass and the invariant spin to be the same for any solution of the equations of motion. Both these Casimir invariants, the square of the 4-momentum vector and the square of the Pauli-Lubanski vector, are shown to preserve the same fixed values also in the presence of an arbitrary external electromagnetic field. In the 'free' case, in the centre-of-mass reference frame, the particle moves along a circle of fixed radius with arbitrary varying frequency. In a homogeneous magnetic field, a number of rotational 'states' are possible with frequencies slightly different from the cyclotron frequency, and 'phase-like' transitions with spin flops occur at some critical values of the particle's 3-momentum.

  15. Multinomial Bayesian learning for modeling classical and nonclassical receptive field properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Haruo

    2012-08-01

    We study the interplay of Bayesian inference and natural image learning in a hierarchical vision system, in relation to the response properties of early visual cortex. We particularly focus on a Bayesian network with multinomial variables that can represent discrete feature spaces similar to hypercolumns combining minicolumns, enforce sparsity of activation to learn efficient representations, and explain divisive normalization. We demonstrate that maximal-likelihood learning using sampling-based Bayesian inference gives rise to classical receptive field properties similar to V1 simple cells and V2 cells, while inference performed on the trained network yields nonclassical context-dependent response properties such as cross-orientation suppression and filling in. Comparison with known physiological properties reveals some qualitative and quantitative similarities.

  16. The Effects of the Green House Nursing Home Model on ADL Function Trajectory: A Retrospective Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    YOON, Ju Young; BROWN, Roger L.; BOWERS, Barbara J.; SHARKEY, Siobhan S.; HORN, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing attention in the past few decades has focused on improving care quality and quality of life for nursing home residents. Many traditional nursing homes have attempted to transform themselves to become more homelike emphasizing individualized care. This trend is referred to as nursing home culture change in the U.S. A promising culture change nursing home model, the Green House (GH) nursing home model, has shown positive psychological outcomes. However, little is known about whether the GH nursing home model has positive effects on physical function compared to traditional nursing homes. Objectives To examine the longitudinal effects of the GH nursing home model by comparing change patterns of ADL function over time between GH home residents and traditional nursing home residents. Design A retrospective longitudinal study. Settings Four GH organizations (nine GH units and four traditional units). Participants A total of 242 residents (93 GH residents and 149 traditional home residents) who had stayed in the nursing home at least six months from admission. Methods The outcome was ADL function, and the main independent variable was the facility type in which the resident stayed: a GH or traditional unit. Age, gender, comorbidity score, cognitive function, and depressive symptoms at baseline were controlled. All of these measures were from a minimum dataset. Growth curve modeling and growth mixture modeling were employed in this study for longitudinal analyses. Results The mean ADL function showed deterioration over time, and the rates of deterioration between GH and traditional home residents were not different over time. Four different ADL function trajectories were identified for 18 months, but there was no statistical difference in the likelihood of being in one of the four trajectory classes between the two groups. Conclusions Although GH nursing homes are considered to represent an innovative model changing the nursing home environment into more

  17. The effects of the Green House nursing home model on ADL function trajectory: A retrospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ju Young; Brown, Roger L; Bowers, Barbara J; Sharkey, Siobhan S; Horn, Susan D

    2016-01-01

    Growing attention in the past few decades has focused on improving care quality and quality of life for nursing home residents. Many traditional nursing homes have attempted to transform themselves to become more homelike emphasizing individualized care. This trend is referred to as nursing home culture change in the U.S. A promising culture change nursing home model, the Green House nursing home model, has shown positive psychological outcomes. However, little is known about whether the Green House nursing home model has positive effects on physical function compared to traditional nursing homes. To examine the longitudinal effects of the Green House nursing home model by comparing change patterns of activities of daily living function over time between Green House home residents and traditional nursing home residents. A retrospective longitudinal study. Four Green House organizations (nine Green House units and four traditional units). A total of 242 residents (93 Green House residents and 149 traditional home residents) who had stayed in the nursing home at least 6 months from admission. The outcome was activities of daily living function, and the main independent variable was the facility type in which the resident stayed: a Green House or traditional unit. Age, gender, comorbidity score, cognitive function, and depressive symptoms at baseline were controlled. All of these measures were from a minimum dataset. Growth curve modeling and growth mixture modeling were employed in this study for longitudinal analyses. The mean activities of daily living function showed deterioration over time, and the rates of deterioration between Green House and traditional home residents were not different over time. Four different activities of daily living function trajectories were identified for 18 months, but there was no statistical difference in the likelihood of being in one of the four trajectory classes between the two groups. Although Green House nursing homes are

  18. Identifying developmental trajectories of body mass index in childhood using latent class growth (mixture modelling: associations with dietary, sedentary and physical activity behaviors: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Koning

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, many epidemiologic studies examining associations between obesity and dietary and sedentary/physical activity behaviors have focused on assessing Body Mass Index (BMI at one point in time. Recent developments in statistical techniques make it possible to study the potential heterogeneity in the development of BMI during childhood by identifying distinct subpopulations characterized by distinct developmental trajectories. Using Latent Class Growth (Mixture Modelling (LCGMM techniques we aimed to identify BMI trajectories in childhood and to examine associations between these distinct trajectories and dietary, sedentary and physical activity behaviors. Methods This longitudinal study explored BMI standard deviation score (SDS trajectories in a sample of 613 children from 4 to 12 years of age. In 2006, 2009 and 2012 information on children’s health related behaviors was obtained by parental questionnaires, and children’s height and weight were measured. Associations with behaviors were investigated with logistic regression models. Results We identified two BMI SDS trajectories; a decreasing BMI SDS trajectory (n = 416; 68 % and an increasing BMI SDS trajectory (n = 197; 32 %. The increasing BMI SDS trajectory consisted of more participants of lower socio-economic status (SES and of non-western ethnicity. Maternal overweight status was associated with being in the increasing BMI SDS trajectory at both baseline and follow-up six years later (2006: Odds Ratio (OR, 2.9; 95 % confidence interval (CI 1.9 to 4.3; 2012 OR, 1.8; 95 % CI 1.2 to 2.6. The increasing BMI SDS trajectory was associated with the following behaviors; drinking sugared drinks > 3 glasses per day, participation in organized sports  2 h per day, though participation in organized sports at follow-up was the only significant result. Conclusions Our results indicate the importance of healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age, and

  19. Using Urban Landscape Trajectories to Develop a Multi-Temporal Land Cover Database to Support Ecological Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Alberti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization and the resulting changes in land cover have myriad impacts on ecological systems. Monitoring these changes across large spatial extents and long time spans requires synoptic remotely sensed data with an appropriate temporal sequence. We developed a multi-temporal land cover dataset for a six-county area surrounding the Seattle, Washington State, USA, metropolitan region. Land cover maps for 1986, 1991, 1995, 1999, and 2002 were developed from Landsat TM images through a combination of spectral unmixing, image segmentation, multi-season imagery, and supervised classification approaches to differentiate an initial nine land cover classes. We then used ancillary GIS layers and temporal information to define trajectories of land cover change through multiple updating and backdating rules and refined our land cover classification for each date into 14 classes. We compared the accuracy of the initial approach with the landscape trajectory modifications and determined that the use of landscape trajectory rules increased our ability to differentiate several classes including bare soil (separated into cleared for development, agriculture, and clearcut forest and three intensities of urban. Using the temporal dataset, we found that between 1986 and 2002, urban land cover increased from 8 to 18% of our study area, while lowland deciduous and mixed forests decreased from 21 to 14%, and grass and agriculture decreased from 11 to 8%. The intensity of urban land cover increased with 252 km2 in Heavy Urban in 1986 increasing to 629 km2 by 2002. The ecological systems that are present in this region were likely significantly altered by these changes in land cover. Our results suggest that multi-temporal (i.e., multiple years and multiple seasons within years Landsat data are an economical means to quantify land cover and land cover change across large and highly heterogeneous urbanizing landscapes. Our data, and similar temporal land cover change

  20. Analytical model for the effects of wetting on thermal boundary conductance across solid/classical liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, Matthew E.; Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    We develop an analytical model for the thermal boundary conductance between a solid and a liquid. By infusing recent developments in the phonon theory of liquid thermodynamics with diffuse mismatch theory, we derive a closed form model that can predict the effects of wetting on the thermal boundary conductance across an interface between a solid and a classical liquid. We account for the complete wetting (hydrophilicity), or lack thereof (hydrophobicity), of the liquid to the solid by considering varying contributions of transverse mode interactions between the solid and liquid interfacial layers; this transverse coupling relationship is determined with local density of states calculations from molecular dynamics simulations between Lennard-Jones solids and a liquids with different interfacial interaction energies. We present example calculations for the thermal boundary conductance between both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces of Al/water and Au/water, which show excellent agreement with measured values reported by Ge et al. [Z. Ge, D. G. Cahill, and P. V. Braun, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 186101 (2006)]. Our model does not require any fitting parameters and is appropriate to model heat flow across any planar interface between a solid and a classical liquid.

  1. Linear spline multilevel models for summarising childhood growth trajectories: A guide to their application using examples from five birth cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Laura D; Tilling, Kate; Matijasevich, Alicia; Petherick, Emily S; Santos, Ana Cristina; Fairley, Lesley; Wright, John; Santos, Iná S; Barros, Aluísio Jd; Martin, Richard M; Kramer, Michael S; Bogdanovich, Natalia; Matush, Lidia; Barros, Henrique; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2016-10-01

    Childhood growth is of interest in medical research concerned with determinants and consequences of variation from healthy growth and development. Linear spline multilevel modelling is a useful approach for deriving individual summary measures of growth, which overcomes several data issues (co-linearity of repeat measures, the requirement for all individuals to be measured at the same ages and bias due to missing data). Here, we outline the application of this methodology to model individual trajectories of length/height and weight, drawing on examples from five cohorts from different generations and different geographical regions with varying levels of economic development. We describe the unique features of the data within each cohort that have implications for the application of linear spline multilevel models, for example, differences in the density and inter-individual variation in measurement occasions, and multiple sources of measurement with varying measurement error. After providing example Stata syntax and a suggested workflow for the implementation of linear spline multilevel models, we conclude with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the linear spline approach compared with other growth modelling methods such as fractional polynomials, more complex spline functions and other non-linear models. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Specification Search for Identifying the Correct Mean Trajectory in Polynomial Latent Growth Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-Man; Yoon, Myeongsun; Willson, Victor; Lai, Mark H. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the optimal strategy for model specification search under the latent growth modeling (LGM) framework, specifically on searching for the correct polynomial mean or average growth model when there is no a priori hypothesized model in the absence of theory. In this simulation study, the effectiveness of different starting…

  3. Classical Exchange Algebra of the Nonlinear Sigma Model on a Supercoset Target with Z2n Grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke San-Min; Li Xin-Ying; Wang Chun; Yue Rui-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The classical exchange algebra satisfied by the monodromy matrix of the nonlinear sigma model on a supercoset target with Z 2n grading is derived using a first-order Hamiltonian formulation and by adding to the Lax connection terms proportional to constraints. This enables us to show that the conserved charges of the theory are in involution. When n = 2, our results coincide with the results given by Magro for the pure spinor description of AdS 5 × S 5 string theory (when the ghost terms are omitted). (the physics of elementary particles and fields)

  4. Global classical solvability and stabilization in a two-dimensional chemotaxis-Navier-Stokes system modeling coral fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Elio; Winkler, Michael

    2018-04-01

    The interplay of chemotaxis, convection and reaction terms is studied in the particular framework of a refined model for coral broadcast spawning, consisting of three equations describing the population densities of unfertilized sperms and eggs and the concentration of a chemical released by the latter, coupled to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Under mild assumptions on the initial data, global existence of classical solutions to an associated initial-boundary value problem in bounded planar domains is established. Moreover, all these solutions are shown to approach a spatially homogeneous equilibrium in the large time limit.

  5. Monte Carlo particle-trajectory models for neutral cometary gases. I. Models and equations. II. The spatial morphology of the Lyman-alpha coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combi, M.R.; Smyth, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical derivations of various methods employed in the Monte Carlo particle-trajectory model (MCPTM) are presented, and the application of the MCPTM to the calculation of the photochemical heating of the inner coma through the partial thermalization of cometary hydrogen atoms produced by the photodissociation of water is discussed. This model is then used to explain the observed morphology of the spatially extended Ly-alpha comas of comets. The rocket and Skylab images of the Ly-alpha coma of Comet Kohoutek are examined. 90 references

  6. A semi-classical model for the description of angular distribution of light particles emitted in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingshang

    1990-04-01

    A semi-classical model of multi-step direct and compound nuclear reactions has been proposed to describe the angular distributions of light particles emitted in reaction processes induced by nucleons with energies of several tens of MeV. The exact closed solution for the time-dependent master equation of the exciton model is applied. Based on the Fermi gas model, the scattering kernel for two-nucleon collisions includes the influence of the Fermi motion and the Pauli exclusion principle, which give a significant improvement in the description of the rise of the backward distributions. The angle-energy correlation for the first few steps of the collision process (multi-step direct process) yields further improvements in the description of the angular distribution. The pick-up mechanism is employed to describe the composite particle emission. This reasonable physical picture reproduces the experimental data of the energy spectra of composite particles satisfactorily. The angular distribution of the emitted composite particles is determined by an angular factor in terms of the momentum conservation of the nucleons forming the composite cluster. The generalized master equation is employed for the multi-step compound process. Thus a classical approach has been established to calculate the double differential cross sections for all kinds of particles emitted in multi-step nuclear reaction processes. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  7. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowled, Brendan D; Garner, M Graeme; Negus, Katherine; Ward, Michael P

    2012-01-16

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain and eradicate some wildlife disease epidemics.

  8. Non-Gaussian statistics, classical field theory, and realizable Langevin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    The direct-interaction approximation (DIA) to the fourth-order statistic Z ∼ left-angle λψ 2 ) 2 right-angle, where λ is a specified operator and ψ is a random field, is discussed from several points of view distinct from that of Chen et al. [Phys. Fluids A 1, 1844 (1989)]. It is shown that the formula for Z DIA already appeared in the seminal work of Martin, Siggia, and Rose (Phys. Rev. A 8, 423 (1973)] on the functional approach to classical statistical dynamics. It does not follow from the original generalized Langevin equation (GLE) of Leith [J. Atmos. Sd. 28, 145 (1971)] and Kraichnan [J. Fluid Mech. 41, 189 (1970)] (frequently described as an amplitude representation for the DIA), in which the random forcing is realized by a particular superposition of products of random variables. The relationship of that GLE to renormalized field theories with non-Gaussian corrections (''spurious vertices'') is described. It is shown how to derive an improved representation, that realizes cumulants through O(ψ 4 ), by adding to the GLE a particular non-Gaussian correction. A Markovian approximation Z DIA M to Z DIA is derived. Both Z DIA and Z DIA M incorrectly predict a Gaussian kurtosis for the steady state of a solvable three-mode example

  9. Mathematical Modelling and the Learning Trajectory: Tools to Support the Teaching of Linear Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo Bahamonde, Andrea Dorila; Fortuny Aymemí, Josep Maria; Gómez i Urgellés, Joan Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present a didactic proposal for teaching linear algebra based on two compatible theoretical models: emergent models and mathematical modelling. This proposal begins with a problematic situation related to the creation and use of secure passwords, which leads students toward the construction of the concepts of spanning set and…

  10. Local and omnibus goodness-of-fit tests in classical measurement error models

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanyuan; Hart, Jeffrey D.; Janicki, Ryan; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider functional measurement error models, i.e. models where covariates are measured with error and yet no distributional assumptions are made about the mismeasured variable. We propose and study a score-type local test and an orthogonal

  11. The classical Starling resistor model often does not predict inspiratory airflow patterns in the human upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Butler, James P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2014-04-15

    The upper airway is often modeled as a classical Starling resistor, featuring a constant inspiratory airflow, or plateau, over a range of downstream pressures. However, airflow tracings from clinical sleep studies often show an initial peak before the plateau. To conform to the Starling model, the initial peak must be of small magnitude or dismissed as a transient. We developed a method to simulate fast or slow inspirations through the human upper airway, to test the hypothesis that this initial peak is a transient. Eight subjects [4 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 4 controls] slept in an "iron lung" and wore a nasal mask connected to a continuous/bilevel positive airway pressure machine. Downstream pressure was measured using an epiglottic catheter. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, subjects were hyperventilated to produce a central apnea, then extrathoracic pressure was decreased slowly (∼2-4 s) or abruptly (resistor model, the upper airway exhibits marked NED in some subjects.

  12. A unified computational model of the development of object unity, object permanence, and occluded object trajectory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, A; Triesch, J

    2010-12-01

    The perception of the unity of objects, their permanence when out of sight, and the ability to perceive continuous object trajectories even during occlusion belong to the first and most important capacities that infants have to acquire. Despite much research a unified model of the development of these abilities is still missing. Here we make an attempt to provide such a unified model. We present a recurrent artificial neural network that learns to predict the motion of stimuli occluding each other and that develops representations of occluded object parts. It represents completely occluded, moving objects for several time steps and successfully predicts their reappearance after occlusion. This framework allows us to account for a broad range of experimental data. Specifically, the model explains how the perception of object unity develops, the role of the width of the occluders, and it also accounts for differences between data for moving and stationary stimuli. We demonstrate that these abilities can be acquired by learning to predict the sensory input. The model makes specific predictions and provides a unifying framework that has the potential to be extended to other visual event categories. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The utility of estimating population-level trajectories of terminal wellbeing decline within a growth mixture modelling framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R A; Byles, J; Magliano, D J; Mitchell, P; Anstey, K J

    2015-03-01

    Mortality-related decline has been identified across multiple domains of human functioning, including mental health and wellbeing. The current study utilised a growth mixture modelling framework to establish whether a single population-level trajectory best describes mortality-related changes in both wellbeing and mental health, or whether subpopulations report quite different mortality-related changes. Participants were older-aged (M = 69.59 years; SD = 8.08 years) deceased females (N = 1,862) from the dynamic analyses to optimise ageing (DYNOPTA) project. Growth mixture models analysed participants' responses on measures of mental health and wellbeing for up to 16 years from death. Multi-level models confirmed overall terminal decline and terminal drop in both mental health and wellbeing. However, modelling data from the same participants within a latent class growth mixture framework indicated that most participants reported stability in mental health (90.3 %) and wellbeing (89.0 %) in the years preceding death. Whilst confirming other population-level analyses which support terminal decline and drop hypotheses in both mental health and wellbeing, we subsequently identified that most of this effect is driven by a small, but significant minority of the population. Instead, most individuals report stable levels of mental health and wellbeing in the years preceding death.

  14. Modeling control of eye orientation in three dimensions. I. Role of muscle pulleys in determining saccadic trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphan, T

    1998-05-01

    This study evaluates the effects of muscle axis shifts on the performance of a vector velocity-position integrator in the CNS. Earlier models of the oculomotor plant assumed that the muscle axes remained fixed relative to the head as the eye rotated into secondary and tertiary eye positions. Under this assumption, the vector integrator model generates torsional transients as the eye moves from secondary to tertiary positions of fixation. The torsional transient represents an eye movement response to a spatial mismatch between the torque axes that remain fixed in the head and the displacement plane that changes by half the angle of the change in eye orientation. When muscle axis shifts were incorporated into the model, the torque axes were closer to the displacement plane at each eye orientation throughout the trajectory, and torsional transients were reduced dramatically. Their size and dynamics were close to reported data. It was also shown that when the muscle torque axes were rotated by 50% of the eye rotation, there was no torsional transient and Listing's law was perfectly obeyed. When muscle torque axes rotated >50%, torsional transients reversed direction compared with what occurred for muscle axis shifts of law is implemented by the oculomotor plant subject to a two-dimensional command signal that is confined to the pitch-yaw plane, having zero torsion. Saccades that bring the eye to orientations outside Listing's plane could easily be corrected by a roll pulse that resets the roll state of the velocity-position integrator to zero. This would be a simple implementation of the corrective controller suggested by Van Opstal and colleagues. The model further indicates that muscle axis shifts together with the torque orientation relationship for tissue surrounding the eye and Newton's laws of motion form a sufficient plant model to explain saccadic trajectories and periods of fixation when driven by a vector command confined to the pitch-yaw plane. This implies

  15. Bell trajectories for revealing quantum control mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, Eric; Rabitz, Herschel

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics induced while controlling quantum systems by optimally shaped laser pulses have often been difficult to understand in detail. A method is presented for quantifying the importance of specific sequences of quantum transitions involved in the control process. The method is based on a ''beable'' formulation of quantum mechanics due to John Bell that rigorously maps the quantum evolution onto an ensemble of stochastic trajectories over a classical state space. Detailed mechanism identification is illustrated with a model seven-level system. A general procedure is presented to extract mechanism information directly from closed-loop control experiments. Application to simulated experimental data for the model system proves robust with up to 25% noise

  16. Incorporation of oxygen contribution by plant roots into classical dissolved oxygen deficit model for a subsurface flow treatment wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezbaruah, Achintya N; Zhang, Tian C

    2009-01-01

    It has been long established that plants play major roles in a treatment wetland. However, the role of plants has not been incorporated into wetland models. This study tries to incorporate wetland plants into a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) model so that the relative contributions of the aerobic and anaerobic processes to meeting BOD can be quantitatively determined. The classical dissolved oxygen (DO) deficit model has been modified to simulate the DO curve for a field subsurface flow constructed wetland (SFCW) treating municipal wastewater. Sensitivities of model parameters have been analyzed. Based on the model it is predicted that in the SFCW under study about 64% BOD are degraded through aerobic routes and 36% is degraded anaerobically. While not exhaustive, this preliminary work should serve as a pointer for further research in wetland model development and to determine the values of some of the parameters used in the modified DO deficit and associated BOD model. It should be noted that nitrogen cycle and effects of temperature have not been addressed in these models for simplicity of model formulation. This paper should be read with this caveat in mind.

  17. Classic experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Franklin, M

    2001-01-01

    These will be a set of lectures on classic particle physics experiments, with emphasis on how the emasurements are made. I will discuss experiments made to measure the electric charge distribution of particles, to measure the symmetries of the weak decays, to measure the magnetic moment of the muon. As well as experiments performed which discovered new particles or resonances, like the tAU2and the J/Psi. The coverage will be general and should be understandable to someone knowing little particle physics.

  18. Classical and quantum mechanical studies of HF in an intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardi, P.S.; Gray, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of an HF molecule in an intense laser field is investigated with both classical trajectories and quantum dynamics. Vibration-rotation transition probabilities and energy absorption as a function of laser pulse time are calculated for the diatomic initially in its ground state. For comparison, results are also reported for a model nonrotating HF molecule. It is found that classical mechanics does not predict the correct time behavior of the system, nor does it predict the correct rotational state distributions. Classical mechanics does, however, predict pulse time averaged quantities to be the correct order of magnitude. There is also a correct general trend of increased multiphoton excitation for laser frequencies red-shifted from the one-photon resonance, although multiphoton resonance peaks are not observed in the classical results and far too little multiphoton excitation is predicted. The effect of laser phase has also been investigated and shown to be relatively unimportant in both the classical and quantum dynamics

  19. Singularity of classical and quantum correlations at critical points of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model in bipartition and tripartition of spins

    OpenAIRE

    Xiu-Xing, Zhang; Fu-Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    We study the classical correlation (CC) and quantum discord (QD) between two spin subgroups of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model in both binary and trinary decompositions of spins. In the case of bipartition, we find that the classical correlations and all the quantum correlations including the QD, the entanglement of formation (EoF) and the logarithmic negativity (LN) are divergent in the same singular behavior at the critical point of the LMG model. In the case of tripartition, however, ...

  20. Trajectory grouping structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Buchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The collective motion of a set of moving entities like people, birds, or other animals, is characterized by groups arising, merging, splitting, and ending. Given the trajectories of these entities, we define and model a structure that captures all of such changes using the Reeb graph, a concept from topology. The trajectory grouping structure has three natural parameters that allow more global views of the data in group size, group duration, and entity inter-distance. We prove complexity bounds on the maximum number of maximal groups that can be present, and give algorithms to compute the grouping structure efficiently. We also study how the trajectory grouping structure can be made robust, that is, how brief interruptions of groups can be disregarded in the global structure, adding a notion of persistence to the structure. Furthermore, we showcase the results of experiments using data generated by the NetLogo flocking model and from the Starkey project. The Starkey data describe the movement of elk, deer, and cattle. Although there is no ground truth for the grouping structure in this data, the experiments show that the trajectory grouping structure is plausible and has the desired effects when changing the essential parameters. Our research provides the first complete study of trajectory group evolvement, including combinatorial,algorithmic, and experimental results.

  1. A minimal unified model of disease trajectories captures hallmarks of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Kannan, Venkateshan

    2017-03-29

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease targeting the central nervous system (CNS) causing demyelination and neurodegeneration leading to accumulation of neurological disability. Here we present a minimal, computational model involving the immune system and CNS that generates the principal subtypes of the disease observed in patients. The model captures several key features of MS, especially those that distinguish the chronic progressive phase from that of the relapse-remitting. In addition, a rare subtype of the disease, progressive relapsing MS naturally emerges from the model. The model posits the existence of two key thresholds, one in the immune system and the other in the CNS, that separate dynamically distinct behavior of the model. Exploring the two-dimensional space of these thresholds, we obtain multiple phases of disease evolution and these shows greater variation than the clinical classification of MS, thus capturing the heterogeneity that is manifested in patients.

  2. Wireless Positioning Based on a Segment-Wise Linear Approach for Modeling the Target Trajectory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Joao; Pedersen, Troels; Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Positioning solutions in infrastructure-based wireless networks generally operate by exploiting the channel information of the links between the Wireless Devices and fixed networking Access Points. The major challenge of such solutions is the modeling of both the noise properties of the channel...... measurements and the user mobility patterns. One class of typical human being movement patterns is the segment-wise linear approach, which is studied in this paper. Current tracking solutions, such as the Constant Velocity model, hardly handle such segment-wise linear patterns. In this paper we propose...... a segment-wise linear model, called the Drifting Points model. The model results in an increased performance when compared with traditional solutions....

  3. Risk analysis for rumor propagation in metropolises based on improved 8-state ICSAR model and dynamic personal activity trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Huang, H.; Duarte, M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Social media has developed extremely fast in metropolises in recent years resulting in more and more rumors disturbing our daily lives. Knowing the characteristics of rumor propagation in metropolises can help the government make efficient rumor refutation plans. In this paper, we established a dynamic spatio-temporal comprehensive risk assessment model for rumor propagation based on an improved 8-state ICSAR model (Ignorant, Information Carrier, Information Spreader, Advocate, Removal), large personal activity trajectory data, and governmental rumor refutation (anti-rumor) scenarios. Combining these relevant data with the 'big' traffic data on the use of subways, buses, and taxis, we simulated daily oral communications among inhabitants in Beijing. In order to analyze rumor and anti-rumor competition in the actual social network, personal resistance, personal preference, conformity, rumor intensity, government rumor refutation and other influencing factors were considered. Based on the developed risk assessment model, a long-term dynamic rumor propagation simulation for a seven day period was conducted and a comprehensive rumor propagation risk distribution map was obtained. A set of the sensitivity analyses were conducted for different social media and propagation routes. We assessed different anti-rumor coverage ratios and the rumor-spreading thresholds at which the government started to launch anti-rumor actions. The results we obtained provide worthwhile references useful for governmental decision making towards control of social-disrupting rumors.

  4. Quantum-classical correspondence for the inverted oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamache, Mustapha; Ryeol Choi, Jeong

    2017-11-01

    While quantum-classical correspondence for a system is a very fundamental problem in modern physics, the understanding of its mechanism is often elusive, so the methods used and the results of detailed theoretical analysis have been accompanied by active debate. In this study, the differences and similarities between quantum and classical behavior for an inverted oscillator have been analyzed based on the description of a complete generalized Airy function-type quantum wave solution. The inverted oscillator model plays an important role in several branches of cosmology and particle physics. The quantum wave packet of the system is composed of many sub-packets that are localized at different positions with regular intervals between them. It is shown from illustrations of the probability density that, although the quantum trajectory of the wave propagation is somewhat different from the corresponding classical one, the difference becomes relatively small when the classical excitation is sufficiently high. We have confirmed that a quantum wave packet moving along a positive or negative direction accelerates over time like a classical wave. From these main interpretations and others in the text, we conclude that our theory exquisitely illustrates quantum and classical correspondence for the system, which is a crucial concept in quantum mechanics. Supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1A09919503)

  5. Modeling parenting stress trajectories among low-income young mothers across the child's second and third years: Factors accounting for stability and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yiting; Fine, Mark A

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated parenting stress trajectories among low-income young mothers and the factors that are associated with change and stability of parenting stress as children aged from 14 to 36 months old. With a sample of 580 young mothers who applied to the Early Head Start Program, growth mixture modeling identified 3 trajectory classes of parenting stress: a chronically high group (7% of the sample), an increasing group (10% of the sample), and a decreasing group (83% of the sample). Maternal personal resources distinguished between the increasing and decreasing classes, whereas maternal personal resources, child characteristics, and contextual influences explained differences between the chronically high and decreasing trajectory classes. Findings suggest that for interventions to be effective, programs need to assess maternal, child, and contextual factors to better address the particular unique needs of young mothers.

  6. The classical r-matrix method for nonlinear sigma-model

    OpenAIRE

    Sevostyanov, Alexey

    1995-01-01

    The canonical Poisson structure of nonlinear sigma-model is presented as a Lie-Poisson r-matrix bracket on coadjoint orbits. It is shown that the Poisson structure of this model is determined by some `hidden singularities' of the Lax matrix.

  7. Handbook of nature-inspired and innovative computing integrating classical models with emerging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    As computing devices proliferate, demand increases for an understanding of emerging computing paradigms and models based on natural phenomena. This handbook explores the connection between nature-inspired and traditional computational paradigms. It presents computing paradigms and models based on natural phenomena.

  8. INVESTIGATION INTO ACCOUNT OF A TIME VALUE OF MONEY IN CLASSICAL MULTITOPIC INVENTORY MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Chernyaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes two types of models. The first is a traditional multitopic inventory model with constant demand and the second is a model based on the average cost of inventory in optimizing inventory management system. The authors taking into account the time value of money in the models study three possible schemes for the payment of costs: «prenumerando» (at the time of the general batch order delivery, «postnumerando» (at the time of the general next batch order delivery and the scheme of payment of costs in the mid-term.Maximization of the total intensity of revenue for outgoing and incoming cash flows occurring in the inventory management system that characterize the analyzed models was adopted as the criterion of optimization of inventory control strategy.

  9. Seven steps towards the classical world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allori, Valia; Duerr, Detlef; Goldstein, Shelly; Zanghi, Nino

    2002-01-01

    Classical physics is about real objects, like apples falling from trees, whose motion is governed by Newtonian laws. In standard quantum mechanics only the wavefunctions or the results of measurements exist, and to answer the question of how the classical world can be part of the quantum world is a rather formidable task. However, this is not the case for Bohmian mechanics which, like classical mechanics, is a theory about real objects. In Bohmian terms, the problem of the classical limit becomes very simple: when do the Bohmian trajectories look Newtonian?

  10. USING OF MOUSE MODEL TO ANALYZE IMMUNE RESPONSE TO INFECTIOUS PATHOGENS BY THE METHODS OF CLASSICAL GENETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Poltorak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Identification and studying of numerous functions of all genes of the human beings is one of the main objects of modern biological science. Due to high level of homology between mouse and human genomes the important role to reach above mentioned goal belongs to the mouse model which using in the classical genetics increase in connection with appearance of different inbred mouse lines. For instance, the differences in immune response to infectious pathogens in various mouse lines were used many times to determine immunologically competent genes. That is why the contribution of mouse model in understanding of the mechanisms of immune response to infectious pathogens is difficult to overestimate. In the current review some of the most successful and well known examples of mouse using in studies of anti-infectious response are described.

  11. A Framework for Validating Traffic Simulation Models at the Vehicle Trajectory Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Based on current practices, traffic simulation models are calibrated and validated using macroscopic measures such as 15-minute averages of traffic counts or average point-to-point travel times. For an emerging number of applications, including conne...

  12. A minimal unified model of disease trajectories captures hallmarks of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Kannan, Venkateshan; Kiani, Narsis A.; Piehl, Fredrik; Tegner, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease targeting the central nervous system (CNS) causing demyelination and neurodegeneration leading to accumulation of neurological disability. Here we present a minimal, computational model involving

  13. Dynamic neural network modeling of HF radar current maps for forecasting oil spill trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, P.; Perez, J.; Kelly, F.J.; Bonner, J.; Michaud, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper examined the concept of dynamic neural network (NN) modeling for short-term forecasts of coastal high-frequency (HF) radar current maps offshore of Galveston Texas. HF radar technology is emerging as a viable and affordable way to measure surface currents in real time and the number of users applying the technology is increasing. A 25 megahertz, two site, Seasonde HF radar system was used to map ocean and bay surface currents along the coast of Texas where wind and river discharge create complex and rapidly changing current patters that override the weaker tidal flow component. The HF radar system is particularly useful in this type of setting because its mobility makes it a good marine spill response tool that could provide hourly current maps. This capability helps improve deployment of response resources. In addition, the NN model recently developed by the Conrad Blucher Institute can be used to forecast water levels during storm events. Forecasted currents are based on time series of current vectors from HF radar plus wind speed, wind direction, and water levels, as well as tidal forecasts. The dynamic NN model was tested to evaluate its performance and the results were compared with a baseline model which assumes the currents do not change from the time of the forecast up to the forecasted time. The NN model showed improvements over the baseline model for forecasting time equal or greater than 3 hours, but the difference was relatively small. The test demonstrated the ability of the dynamic NN model to link meteorological forcing functions with HF radar current maps. Development of the dynamic NN modeling is still ongoing. 18 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  14. Age structure and capital dilution effects in neo-classical growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, D

    1988-01-01

    Economists often over estimate capital dilution effects when applying neoclassical growth models which use age structured population and depreciation of capital stock. This occurs because capital stock is improperly characterized. A standard model which assumes a constant depreciation of capital intimates that a population growth rate equal to a negative constant savings ratio is preferable to any higher growth rate. Growth rates which are lower than a negative constant savings ratio suggest an ever growing capital/labor ratio and an ever growing standard of living, even if people do not save. This is suggested because the natural reduction of the capital stock through depreciation is slower than the population decrease which is simply unrealistic. This model overlooks the fact that low or negative growth rates result in an ageing of the capital stock, and this ageing subsequently results in an increase of the overall rate of capital depreciation. In that overly simplistic model, depreciation was assumed independent of the age of the captial stock. Incorporating depreciation as a variable into a model allows a more symmetric treatment of capital. Using models with heterogenous capital, this article explores what occurs when more than 1 kind of capital good is involved in production and when these various captial goods have different lengths of life. Applying economic models, it also examines what occurs when the length of life of capital may vary. These variations correct the negative impact that population growth can have on per capital production and consumption.

  15. Classical, Semi-classical and Quantum Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, H; Scully, Marlan

    2012-01-01

    David Middleton was a towering figure of 20th Century engineering and science and one of the founders of statistical communication theory. During the second World War, the young David Middleton, working with Van Fleck, devised the notion of the matched filter, which is the most basic method used for detecting signals in noise. Over the intervening six decades, the contributions of Middleton have become classics. This collection of essays by leading scientists, engineers and colleagues of David are in his honor and reflect the wide  influence that he has had on many fields. Also included is the introduction by Middleton to his forthcoming book, which gives a wonderful view of the field of communication, its history and his own views on the field that he developed over the past 60 years. Focusing on classical noise modeling and applications, Classical, Semi-Classical and Quantum Noise includes coverage of statistical communication theory, non-stationary noise, molecular footprints, noise suppression, Quantum e...

  16. The high-temperature expansion of the classical Ising model with Sz2 term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Thomaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We derive the high-temperature expansion of the Helmholtz free energy up to order β17 of the one-dimensional spin-S Ising model, with single-ion anisotropy term, in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field. We show that the values of some thermodynamical functions for the ferromagnetic models, in the presence of a weak magnetic field, are not small corrections to their values with h=0. This model with S=3 was applied by Kishine et al. [J.-i. Kishine et al., Phys. Rev. B, 2006, 74, 224419] to analyze experimental data of the single-chain magnet [Mn (saltmen]2 [Ni(pac2 (py2] (PF62 for T<40 K. We show that for T<35 K the thermodynamic functions of the large-spin limit model are poor approximations to their analogous spin-3 functions.

  17. CIM-EARTH: Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, I.; Elliott, J.; Munson, T.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E. J.; Sanstad, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    We report here on the development of an open source software framework termed CIM-EARTH that is intended to aid decision-making in climate and energy policy. Numerical modeling in support of evaluating policies to address climate change is difficult not only because of inherent uncertainties but because of the differences in scale and modeling approach required for various subcomponents of the system. Economic and climate models are structured quite differently, and while climate forcing can be assumed to be roughly global, climate impacts and the human response to them occur on small spatial scales. Mitigation policies likewise can be applied on scales ranging from the better part of a continent (e.g. a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S.) to a few hundred km (e.g. statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes). Both spatial and time resolution requirements can be challenging for global economic models. CIM-EARTH is a modular framework based around dynamic general equilibrium models. It is designed as a community tool that will enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of both mitigation policies and unchecked climate change. Modularity enables both integration of highly resolved component sub-models for energy and other key systems and also user-directed choice of tradeoffs between e.g. spatial, sectoral, and time resolution. This poster describes the framework architecture, the current realized version, and plans for future releases. As with other open-source models familiar to the climate community (e.g. CCSM), deliverables will be made publicly available on a regular schedule, and community input is solicited for development of new features and modules.

  18. Estimation of energetic efficiency of heat supply in front of the aircraft at supersonic accelerated flight. Part II. Mathematical model of the trajectory boost part and computational results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2009-03-01

    The fuel economy was estimated at boost trajectory of aerospace plane during energy supply to the free stream. Initial and final velocities of the flight were given. A model of planning flight above cold air in infinite isobaric thermal wake was used. The comparison of fuel consumption was done at optimal trajectories. The calculations were done using a combined power plant consisting of ramjet and liquid-propellant engine. An exergy model was constructed in the first part of the paper for estimating the ramjet thrust and specific impulse. To estimate the aerodynamic drag of aircraft a quadratic dependence on aerodynamic lift is used. The energy for flow heating is obtained at the sacrifice of an equivalent decrease of exergy of combustion products. The dependencies are obtained for increasing the range coefficient of cruise flight at different Mach numbers. In the second part of the paper, a mathematical model is presented for the boost part of the flight trajectory of the flying vehicle and computational results for reducing the fuel expenses at the boost trajectory at a given value of the energy supplied in front of the aircraft.

  19. Classical Michaelis-Menten and system theory approach to modeling metabolite formation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Jovan

    2004-01-01

    When single doses of drug are administered and kinetics are linear, techniques, which are based on the compartment approach and the linear system theory approach, in modeling the formation of the metabolite from the parent drug are proposed. Unlike the purpose-specific compartment approach, the methodical, conceptual and computational uniformity in modeling various linear biomedical systems is the dominant characteristic of the linear system approach technology. Saturation of the metabolic reaction results in nonlinear kinetics according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The two compartment open model with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics is theorethicaly basic when single doses of drug are administered. To simulate data or to fit real data using this model, one must resort to numerical integration. A biomathematical model for multiple dosage regimen calculations of nonlinear metabolic systems in steady-state and a working example with phenytoin are presented. High correlation between phenytoin steady-state serum levels calculated from individual Km and Vmax values in the 15 adult epileptic outpatients and the observed levels at the third adjustment of phenytoin daily dose (r=0.961, p<0.01) were found.

  20. OpenDrift v1.0: a generic framework for trajectory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Röhrs, Johannes; Breivik, Øyvind; Ådlandsvik, Bjørn

    2018-04-01

    OpenDrift is an open-source Python-based framework for Lagrangian particle modelling under development at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute with contributions from the wider scientific community. The framework is highly generic and modular, and is designed to be used for any type of drift calculations in the ocean or atmosphere. A specific module within the OpenDrift framework corresponds to a Lagrangian particle model in the traditional sense. A number of modules have already been developed, including an oil drift module, a stochastic search-and-rescue module, a pelagic egg module, and a basic module for atmospheric drift. The framework allows for the ingestion of an unspecified number of forcing fields (scalar and vectorial) from various sources, including Eulerian ocean, atmosphere and wave models, but also measurements or a priori values for the same variables. A basic backtracking mechanism is inherent, using sign reversal of the total displacement vector and negative time stepping. OpenDrift is fast and simple to set up and use on Linux, Mac and Windows environments, and can be used with minimal or no Python experience. It is designed for flexibility, and researchers may easily adapt or write modules for their specific purpose. OpenDrift is also designed for performance, and simulations with millions of particles may be performed on a laptop. Further, OpenDrift is designed for robustness and is in daily operational use for emergency preparedness modelling (oil drift, search and rescue, and drifting ships) at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute.

  1. Learning probabilistic models of hydrogen bond stability from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor; Yao, Peggy; Moshkov, Mikhail; Latombe, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    . The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor.Methods: This paper describes inductive learning methods to train protein-independent probabilistic models of H

  2. Numerical considerations for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion models: Eliminating rogue trajectories, and the importance of numerical accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behavior in the numerical solution. This paper discusses numerical considerations when solving the Langevin-based particle velo...

  3. Information about the model's unconditioned stimulus and response in vicarious classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygge, S

    1976-06-01

    Four groups with 16 observers each participated in a differential, vicarious conditioning experiment with skin conductance responses as the dependent variable. The information available to the observer about the model's unconditioned stimulus and response was varied in a 2 X 2 factorial design. Results clearly showed that information about the model's unconditioned stimulus (a high or low dB level) was not necessary for vicarious instigation, but that information about the unconditioned response (a high or low emotional aversiveness) was necessary. Data for conditioning of responses showed almost identical patterns to those for vicarious instigation. To explain the results, a distinction between factors necessary for the development and elicitation of vicariously instigated responses was introduced, and the effectiveness of information about the model's response on the elicitation of vicariously instigated responses was considered in terms of an expansion of Bandura's social learning theory.

  4. On low rank classical groups in string theory, gauge theory and matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intriligator, Ken; Kraus, Per; Ryzhov, Anton V.; Shigemori, Masaki; Vafa, Cumrun

    2004-01-01

    We consider N=1 supersymmetric U(N), SO(N), and Sp(N) gauge theories, with two-index tensor matter and added tree-level superpotential, for general breaking patterns of the gauge group. By considering the string theory realization and geometric transitions, we clarify when glueball superfields should be included and extremized, or rather set to zero; this issue arises for unbroken group factors of low rank. The string theory results, which are equivalent to those of the matrix model, refer to a particular UV completion of the gauge theory, which could differ from conventional gauge theory results by residual instanton effects. Often, however, these effects exhibit miraculous cancellations, and the string theory or matrix model results end up agreeing with standard gauge theory. In particular, these string theory considerations explain and remove some apparent discrepancies between gauge theories and matrix models in the literature

  5. Higher-Order Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics for Classical Polarizable Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Alex; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2018-02-13

    Generalized extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (XLBOMD) methods provide a framework for fast iteration-free simulations of models that normally require expensive electronic ground state optimizations prior to the force evaluations at every time step. XLBOMD uses dynamically driven auxiliary degrees of freedom that fluctuate about a variationally optimized ground state of an approximate "shadow" potential which approximates the true reference potential. While the requirements for such shadow potentials are well understood, constructing such potentials in practice has previously been ad hoc, and in this work, we present a systematic development of XLBOMD shadow potentials that match the reference potential to any order. We also introduce a framework for combining friction-like dissipation for the auxiliary degrees of freedom with general-order integration, a combination that was not previously possible. These developments are demonstrated with a simple fluctuating charge model and point induced dipole polarization models.

  6. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon Variation Along Climatic and Topographic Trajectories in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, C.; Grunwald, S.; Quiroz, R.; Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Andes represent the largest and highest mountain range in the tropics. Geological and climatic differentiation favored landscape and soil diversity, resulting in ecosystems adapted to very different climatic patterns. Although several studies support the fact that the Andes are a vast sink of soil organic carbon (SOC) only few have quantified this variable in situ. Estimating the spatial distribution of SOC stocks in data-poor and/or poorly accessible areas, like the Andean region, is challenging due to the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution and the wide range of coexistent ecosystems. Thus, the sampling strategy is vital in order to ensure the whole range of environmental covariates (EC) controlling SOC dynamics is represented. This approach allows grasping the variability of the area, which leads to more efficient statistical estimates and improves the modeling process. The objectives of this study were to i) characterize and model the spatial distribution of SOC stocks in the Central Andean region using soil-landscape modeling techniques, and to ii) validate and evaluate the model for predicting SOC content in the area. For that purpose, three representative study areas were identified and a suite of variables including elevation, mean annual temperature, annual precipitation and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), among others, was selected as EC. A stratified random sampling (namely conditioned Latin Hypercube) was implemented and a total of 400 sampling locations were identified. At all sites, four composite topsoil samples (0-30 cm) were collected within a 2 m radius. SOC content was measured using dry combustion and SOC stocks were estimated using bulk density measurements. Regression Kriging was used to map the spatial variation of SOC stocks. The accuracy, fit and bias of SOC models was assessed using a rigorous validation assessment. This study produced the first comprehensive, geospatial SOC stock assessment in this

  7. Classical mechanics on the GL(n, R) group and Euler-Calogero-Sutherland model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvedelidze, A.M.; Mladenov, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    Relations between free motion on the GL + (n, R) group manifold and the dynamics of an n-particle system with spin degrees of freedom on a line interacting with a pairwise 1/sinh 2 x 'potential' (Euler-Calogero-Sutherland model) are discussed within a Hamiltonian reduction. Two kinds of reductions of the degrees of freedom are considered: that which is due to continuous invariance and that which is due to discrete symmetry. It is shown that, upon projecting onto the corresponding invariant manifolds, the resulting Hamiltonian system represents the Euler-Calogero-Sutherland model in both cases

  8. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  9. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, John Eric [Department of Physics, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Carre, Matt J, E-mail: goff@lynchburg.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  10. Detection of epistatic effects with logic regression and a classical linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Magdalena; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger; Posch, Martin; Bogdan, Małgorzata

    2014-02-01

    To locate multiple interacting quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing a trait of interest within experimental populations, usually methods as the Cockerham's model are applied. Within this framework, interactions are understood as the part of the joined effect of several genes which cannot be explained as the sum of their additive effects. However, if a change in the phenotype (as disease) is caused by Boolean combinations of genotypes of several QTLs, this Cockerham's approach is often not capable to identify them properly. To detect such interactions more efficiently, we propose a logic regression framework. Even though with the logic regression approach a larger number of models has to be considered (requiring more stringent multiple testing correction) the efficient representation of higher order logic interactions in logic regression models leads to a significant increase of power to detect such interactions as compared to a Cockerham's approach. The increase in power is demonstrated analytically for a simple two-way interaction model and illustrated in more complex settings with simulation study and real data analysis.

  11. The classic European hyperinflations revisited : testing the Cagan model using a cointegrated VAR approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    1994-01-01

    I tidligere studier af de klassiske Europæiske hyperinflationer antages det at stød til pengeefterspørgslen er ikke-stationære. I artiklen vises det v.h.a. kointegrationstests at denne antagelse er fejlagtig. Med udgangspunkt i en kointegreret VAR model findes det, at der under de Europæiske hype...

  12. The love equation: Computational modeling of romantic relationships in French classical drama

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.; Kestemont, M.; Schöch, C.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den; Finlayson, M.; Miller, B.; Lieto, A.; Ronfard, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report on building a computational model of romantic relationships in a corpus of historical literary texts. We frame this task as a ranking problem in which, for a given character, we try to assign the highest rank to the character with whom (s)he is most likely to be romantically involved. As

  13. The Love Equation : Computational Modeling of Romantic Relationships in French Classical Drama

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.B.; Kestemont, Mike; Schöch, Christof; van den Bosch, Antal; Finlayson, Mark; Miller, Ben; Lieto, Antonio; Ronfard, Remi

    We report on building a computational model of romantic relationships in a corpus of historical literary texts. We frame this task as a ranking problem in which, for a given character, we try to assign the highest rank to the character with whom (s)he is most likely to be romantically involved. As

  14. Simple Models for Airport Delays During Transition to a Trajectory-Based Air Traffic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Peter

    It is now widely recognised that a paradigm shift in air traffic control concepts is needed. This requires state-of-the-art innovative technologies, making much better use of the information in the air traffic management (ATM) system. These paradigm shifts go under the names of NextGen in the USA and SESAR in Europe, which inter alia will make dramatic changes to the nature of airport operations. A vital part of moving from an existing system to a new paradigm is the operational implications of the transition process. There would be business incentives for early aircraft fitment, it is generally safer to introduce new technologies gradually, and researchers are already proposing potential transition steps to the new system. Simple queuing theory models are used to establish rough quantitative estimates of the impact of the transition to a more efficient time-based navigational and ATM system. Such models are approximate, but they do offer insight into the broad implications of system change and its significant features. 4D-equipped aircraft in essence have a contract with the airport runway and, in return, they would get priority over any other aircraft waiting for use of the runway. The main operational feature examined here is the queuing delays affecting non-4D-equipped arrivals. These get a reasonable service if the proportion of 4D-equipped aircraft is low, but this can deteriorate markedly for high proportions, and be economically unviable. Preventative measures would be to limit the additional growth of 4D-equipped flights and/or to modify their contracts to provide sufficient space for the non-4D-equipped flights to operate without excessive delays. There is a potential for non-Poisson models, for which there is little in the literature, and for more complex models, e.g. grouping a succession of 4D-equipped aircraft as a batch.

  15. OpenDrift v1.0: a generic framework for trajectory modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-F. Dagestad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available OpenDrift is an open-source Python-based framework for Lagrangian particle modelling under development at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute with contributions from the wider scientific community. The framework is highly generic and modular, and is designed to be used for any type of drift calculations in the ocean or atmosphere. A specific module within the OpenDrift framework corresponds to a Lagrangian particle model in the traditional sense. A number of modules have already been developed, including an oil drift module, a stochastic search-and-rescue module, a pelagic egg module, and a basic module for atmospheric drift. The framework allows for the ingestion of an unspecified number of forcing fields (scalar and vectorial from various sources, including Eulerian ocean, atmosphere and wave models, but also measurements or a priori values for the same variables. A basic backtracking mechanism is inherent, using sign reversal of the total displacement vector and negative time stepping. OpenDrift is fast and simple to set up and use on Linux, Mac and Windows environments, and can be used with minimal or no Python experience. It is designed for flexibility, and researchers may easily adapt or write modules for their specific purpose. OpenDrift is also designed for performance, and simulations with millions of particles may be performed on a laptop. Further, OpenDrift is designed for robustness and is in daily operational use for emergency preparedness modelling (oil drift, search and rescue, and drifting ships at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute.

  16. Comparison of a new expert elicitation model with the Classical Model, equal weights and single experts, using a cross-validation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flandoli, F. [Dip.to di Matematica Applicata, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Giorgi, E. [Dip.to di Matematica Applicata, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Pisa, via della Faggiola 32, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Aspinall, W.P. [Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, and Aspinall and Associates, Tisbury (United Kingdom); Neri, A., E-mail: neri@pi.ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Pisa, via della Faggiola 32, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ranking and weighting experts' performances when quantitative judgments are being elicited for decision support is considered. A new scoring model, the Expected Relative Frequency model, is presented, based on the closeness between central values provided by the expert and known values used for calibration. Using responses from experts in five different elicitation datasets, a cross-validation technique is used to compare this new approach with the Cooke Classical Model, the Equal Weights model, and individual experts. The analysis is performed using alternative reward schemes designed to capture proficiency either in quantifying uncertainty, or in estimating true central values. Results show that although there is only a limited probability that one approach is consistently better than another, the Cooke Classical Model is generally the most suitable for assessing uncertainties, whereas the new ERF model should be preferred if the goal is central value estimation accuracy. - Highlights: > A new expert elicitation model, named Expected Relative Frequency (ERF), is presented. > A cross-validation approach to evaluate the performance of different elicitation models is applied. > The new ERF model shows the best performance with respect to the point-wise estimates.

  17. Different developmental trajectories across feature types support a dynamic field model of visual working memory development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmering, Vanessa R; Miller, Hilary E; Bohache, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Research on visual working memory has focused on characterizing the nature of capacity limits as "slots" or "resources" based almost exclusively on adults' performance with little consideration for developmental change. Here we argue that understanding how visual working memory develops can shed new light onto the nature of representations. We present an alternative model, the Dynamic Field Theory (DFT), which can capture effects that have been previously attributed either to "slot" or "resource" explanations. The DFT includes a specific developmental mechanism to account for improvements in both resolution and capacity of visual working memory throughout childhood. Here we show how development in the DFT can account for different capacity estimates across feature types (i.e., color and shape). The current paper tests this account by comparing children's (3, 5, and 7 years of age) performance across different feature types. Results showed that capacity for colors increased faster over development than capacity for shapes. A second experiment confirmed this difference across feature types within subjects, but also showed that the difference can be attenuated by testing memory for less familiar colors. Model simulations demonstrate how developmental changes in connectivity within the model-purportedly arising through experience-can capture differences across feature types.

  18. Analysis of the trajectory surface hopping method from the Markov state model perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, Alexey V.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Trivedi, Dhara

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the applicability of the seminal fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) method of Tully to modeling quantum transitions between electronic states that are not coupled directly, in the processes such as Auger recombination. We address the known deficiency of the method to describe such transitions by introducing an alternative definition for the surface hopping probabilities, as derived from the Markov state model perspective. We show that the resulting transition probabilities simplify to the quantum state populations derived from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, reducing to the rapidly switching surface hopping approach of Tully and Preston. The resulting surface hopping scheme is simple and appeals to the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. The computational approach is similar to the FSSH method of Tully, yet it leads to a notably different performance. We demonstrate that the method is particularly accurate when applied to superexchange modeling. We further show improved accuracy of the method, when applied to one of the standard test problems. Finally, we adapt the derived scheme to atomistic simulation, combine it with the time-domain density functional theory, and show that it provides the Auger energy transfer timescales which are in good agreement with experiment, significantly improving upon other considered techniques. (author)

  19. Longitudinal hopping in intervehicle communication: Theory and simulations on modeled and empirical trajectory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Christian; Treiber, Martin; Kesting, Arne

    2008-09-01

    Intervehicle communication enables vehicles to exchange messages within a limited broadcast range and thus self-organize into dynamical and geographically embedded wireless ad hoc networks. We study the longitudinal hopping mode in which messages are transported using equipped vehicles driving in the same direction as a relay. Given a finite communication range, we investigate the conditions where messages can percolate through the network, i.e., a linked chain of relay vehicles exists between the sender and receiver. We simulate message propagation in different traffic scenarios and for different fractions of equipped vehicles. Simulations are done with both, modeled and empirical traffic data. These results are used to test the limits of applicability of an analytical model assuming a Poissonian distance distribution between the relays. We found a good agreement for homogeneous traffic scenarios and sufficiently low percentages of equipped vehicles. For higher percentages, the observed connectivity was higher than that of the model while in stop-and-go traffic situations it was lower. We explain these results in terms of correlations of the distances between the relay vehicles. Finally, we introduce variable transmission ranges and found that this additional stochastic component generally increased connectivity compared to a deterministic transmission with the same mean.

  20. Research on Three-dimensional Motion History Image Model and Extreme Learning Machine for Human Body Movement Trajectory Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the traditional machine vision recognition technology and traditional artificial neural networks about body movement trajectory, this paper finds out the shortcomings of the traditional recognition technology. By combining the invariant moments of the three-dimensional motion history image (computed as the eigenvector of body movements and the extreme learning machine (constructed as the classification artificial neural network of body movements, the paper applies the method to the machine vision of the body movement trajectory. In detail, the paper gives a detailed introduction about the algorithm and realization scheme of the body movement trajectory recognition based on the three-dimensional motion history image and the extreme learning machine. Finally, by comparing with the results of the recognition experiments, it attempts to verify that the method of body movement trajectory recognition technology based on the three-dimensional motion history image and extreme learning machine has a more accurate recognition rate and better robustness.