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Sample records for classical effective field

  1. Classical Effective Field Theory and Caged Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kol, Barak

    2007-01-01

    Matched Asymptotic Expansion (MAE) is a useful technique in General Relativity and other fields whenever interaction takes place between physics at two different length scales. Here MAE is argued to be equivalent quite generally to Classical Effective Field Theory (ClEFT) where one (or more) of the zones is replaced by an effective theory whose terms are organized in order of increasing irrelevancy, as demonstrated by Goldberger and Rothstein in a certain gravitational context. The ClEFT perspective has advantages as the procedure is clearer, it allows a representation via Feynman diagrams, and divergences can be regularized and renormalized in standard field theoretic methods. As a side product we obtain a wide class of classical examples of regularization and renormalization, concepts which are usually associated with Quantum Field Theories. We demonstrate these ideas through the thermodynamics of caged black holes, both simplifying the non-rotating case, and computing the rotating case. In particular we ar...

  2. Classical-field description of the quantum effects in the light-atom interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I show that light-atom interaction can be described using purely classical field theory without any quantization. In particular, atom excitation by light that accounts for damping due to spontaneous emission is fully described in the framework of classical field theory. I show that three well-known laws of the photoelectric effect can also be derived and that all of its basic properties can be described within classical field theory.

  3. Advanced classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Giachetta, Giovanni; Sardanashvily, Gennadi

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary quantum field theory is mainly developed as quantization of classical fields. Therefore, classical field theory and its BRST extension is the necessary step towards quantum field theory. This book aims to provide a complete mathematical foundation of Lagrangian classical field theory and its BRST extension for the purpose of quantization. Based on the standard geometric formulation of theory of nonlinear differential operators, Lagrangian field theory is treated in a very general setting. Reducible degenerate Lagrangian theories of even and odd fields on an arbitrary smooth manifold are considered. The second Noether theorems generalized to these theories and formulated in the homology terms provide the strict mathematical formulation of BRST extended classical field theory

  4. Solving effective field theory of interacting QCD pomerons in the semi-classical approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenko, S; Bondarenko, Sergey; Motyka, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    Effective field theory of BFKL pomerons interacting by QCD triple pomeron vertices is investigated. Classical equations of motion for the effective pomeron fields are presented being a minimal extension of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation that incorporates both merging and splitting of the pomerons and that is self-dual. The equations are solved for symmetric boundary conditions. The solutions provide the dominant contribution to the scattering amplitudes in the semi-classical approximation. We find that for rapidities of the scattering larger than a critical value Y_c at least two classical solutions exist. Curiously, for each of the two classical solutions with the lowest action the symmetry between the projectile and the target is found to be spontaneously broken, being however preserved for the complete set of classical solutions. The solving configurations at rapidities Y>Y_c consist of a Gribov field being strongly suppressed even at very large gluon momenta and the complementary Gribov field that conver...

  5. Discrete Classical Electromagnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    1997-01-01

    The classical electromagnetic field of a spinless point electron is described in a formalism with extended causality by discrete finite transverse point-vector fields with discrete and localized point interactions. These fields are taken as a classical representation of photons, ``classical photons". They are all transversal photons; there are no scalar nor longitudinal photons as these are definitely eliminated by the gauge condition. The angular distribution of emitted photons coincides with the directions of maximum emission in the standard formalism. The Maxwell formalism and its standard field are retrieved by the replacement of these discrete fields by their space-time averages, and in this process scalar and longitudinal photons are necessarily created and added. Divergences and singularities are by-products of this averaging process. This formalism enlighten the meaning and the origin of the non-physical photons, the ones that violate the Lorentz condition in manifestly covariant quantization methods.

  6. Covariantizing Classical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    López, Marco Castrillón

    2010-01-01

    We show how to enlarge the covariance group of any classical field theory in such a way that the resulting "covariantized" theory is 'essentially equivalent' to the original. In particular, our technique will render any classical field theory generally covariant, that is, the covariantized theory will be spacetime diffeomorphism-covariant and free of absolute objects. Our results thus generalize the well-known parametrization technique of Dirac and Kucha\\v{r}. Our constructions apply equally well to internal covariance groups, in which context they produce natural derivations of both the Utiyama minimal coupling and St\\"uckelberg tricks.

  7. Dressing the Post-Newtonian two-body problem and Classical Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kol, Barak

    2009-01-01

    We apply a dressed perturbation theory to better organize and economize the computation of high orders of the 2-body effective action of an inspiralling Post-Newtonian gravitating binary. We use the effective field theory approach with the non-relativistic field decomposition (NRG fields). For that purpose we develop quite generally the dressing theory of a non-linear classical field theory coupled to point-like sources. We introduce dressed charges and propagators, but unlike the quantum theory there are no dressed bulk vertices. The dressed quantities are found to obey recursive integral equations which succinctly encode parts of the diagrammatic expansion, and are the classical version of the Schwinger-Dyson equations. Actually, the classical equations are somewhat stronger since they involve only finitely many quantities, unlike the quantum theory. Classical diagrams are shown to factorize exactly when they contain non-linear world-line vertices, and we classify all the possible topologies of irreducible ...

  8. Effective Simulation of Quantum Entanglement Based on Classical Fields Modulated with Pseudorandom Phase Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian; Xu, Yingying; Dong, Hongtao

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that n classical fields modulated with n different pseudorandom phase sequences can constitute a 2^n-dimensional Hilbert space that contains tensor product structure. By using classical fields modulated with pseudorandom phase sequences, we discuss effective simulation of Bell states and GHZ state, and apply both correlation analysis and von Neumann entropy to characterize the simulation. We obtain similar results with the cases in quantum mechanics and find that the conclusions can be easily generalized to n quantum particles. The research on simulation of quantum entanglement may be important, for it not only provides useful insights into fundamental features of quantum entanglement, but also yields new insights into quantum computation.

  9. Dressing the post-Newtonian two-body problem and classical effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, Barak; Smolkin, Michael

    2009-12-01

    We apply a dressed perturbation theory to better organize and economize the computation of high orders of the 2-body effective action of an inspiralling post-Newtonian (PN) gravitating binary. We use the effective field theory approach with the nonrelativistic field decomposition (NRG fields). For that purpose we develop quite generally the dressing theory of a nonlinear classical field theory coupled to pointlike sources. We introduce dressed charges and propagators, but unlike the quantum theory there are no dressed bulk vertices. The dressed quantities are found to obey recursive integral equations which succinctly encode parts of the diagrammatic expansion, and are the classical version of the Schwinger-Dyson equations. Actually, the classical equations are somewhat stronger since they involve only finitely many quantities, unlike the quantum theory. Classical diagrams are shown to factorize exactly when they contain nonlinear worldline vertices, and we classify all the possible topologies of irreducible diagrams for low loop numbers. We apply the dressing program to our post-Newtonian case of interest. The dressed charges consist of the dressed energy-momentum tensor after a nonrelativistic decomposition, and we compute all dressed charges (in the harmonic gauge) appearing up to 2PN in the 2-body effective action (and more). We determine the irreducible skeleton diagrams up to 3PN and we employ the dressed charges to compute several terms beyond 2PN.

  10. A generalisation of classical electrodynamics for the prediction of scalar field effects

    CERN Document Server

    van Vlaenderen, K J

    2003-01-01

    Within the framework of Classical Electrodynamics (CED) it is common practice to choose freely an arbitrary gauge condition with respect to a gauge transformation of the electromagnetic potentials. The Lorenz gauge condition allows for the derivation of the inhomogeneous potential wave equations (IPWE), but this also means that scalar derivatives of the electromagnetic potentials are considered to be \\emph{unphysical}. However, these scalar expressions might have the meaning of a new physical field, $\\mathsf S$. If this is the case, then a generalised CED is required such that scalar field effects are predicted and such that experiments can be performed in order to verify or falsify this generalised CED. The IPWE are viewed as a generalised Gauss law and a generalised Ampe\\`re law, that also contain derivatives of $\\mathsf S$, after reformulating the IPWE in terms of fields. Some recent experiment show positive results that are in qualitative agreement with the presented predictions of scalar field effects, b...

  11. Invariants from classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a method that generates invariant functions from classical field theories depending on external parameters. We apply our method to several field theories such as abelian BF, Chern-Simons and 2-dimensional Yang-Mills theory.

  12. Effects of Atomic Coherence and Injected Classical Field on Chaotic Dynamics of Non-degenerate Cascade Two-Photon Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the cascade two-photon laser dynamic equation derived with the technique of quantum Langevin operators with the considerations of coherently prepared three-level atoms and the classical field injected into the cavity, we numerically study the effects of atomic coherence and classical field on the chaotic dynamics of a two-photon laser. Lyapunov exponent and bifurcation diagram calculations show that the Lorenz chaos and hyperchaos can be induced or inhibited by the atomic coherence and the classical field via crisis or Hopf bifurcations.

  13. Effect of including torsional parameters for histidine-metal interactions in classical force fields for metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Sundholm, Dage; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-11-20

    Classical force-field parameters of the metal site of metalloproteins usually comprise only the partial charges of the involved atoms, as well as the bond-stretching and bending parameters of the metal-ligand interactions. Although for certain metal ligands such as histidine residues, the torsional motions at the metal site play an important role for the dynamics of the protein, no such terms have been considered to be crucial in the parametrization of the force fields, and they have therefore been omitted in the parametrization. In this work, we have optimized AMBER-compatible force-field parameters for the reduced state of the metal site of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and assessed the effect of including torsional parameters for the histidine-metal interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend that torsion parameters of the metal site are included when processes at the metal site are investigated or when free-energy calculations are performed. As the torsion parameters mainly affect the structure of the metal site, other kinds of structural studies can be performed without considering the torsional parameters of the metal site.

  14. Classical Gradual-Channel Modeling of Graphene Field-Effect Transistors (FETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    application of a high-powered many-body analysis of the electronic degrees of freedom, which, in turn, predicts ferromagnetism , superconductivity , charge...metal- oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), metal semiconductor field-effect transistors...V current versus voltage MESFET metal semiconductor field-effect transistor MOSFET metal- oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor RF radio

  15. Classic and Quantum Capacitances in Bernal Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene Field Effect Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Sadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our focus in this study is on characterizing the capacitance voltage (C-V behavior of Bernal stacking bilayer graphene (BG and trilayer graphene (TG as the channel of FET devices. The analytical models of quantum capacitance (QC of BG and TG are presented. Although QC is smaller than the classic capacitance in conventional devices, its contribution to the total metal oxide semiconductor capacitor in graphene-based FET devices becomes significant in the nanoscale. Our calculation shows that QC increases with gate voltage in both BG and TG and decreases with temperature with some fluctuations. However, in bilayer graphene the fluctuation is higher due to its tunable band structure with external electric fields. In similar temperature and size, QC in metal oxide BG is higher than metal oxide TG configuration. Moreover, in both BG and TG, total capacitance is more affected by classic capacitance as the distance between gate electrode and channel increases. However, QC is more dominant when the channel becomes thinner into the nanoscale, and therefore we mostly deal with quantum capacitance in top gate in contrast with bottom gate that the classic capacitance is dominant.

  16. Effects of classical and neo-classical cross-field transport of tungsten impurity in realistic tokamak geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamoto, S.; Inoue, H.; Sawada, Y.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama (Japan); Homma, Y.; Hoshino, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Bonnin, X. [ITER Organization, St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Coster, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Schneider, R. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The initial simulation study of the neoclassical perpendicular self-diffusion transport in the SOL/Divertor regions for a realistic tokamak geometry with the IMPGYRO code has been performed in this paper. One of the most unique features of the IMPGYRO code is calculating exact Larmor orbit of the test particle instead of assuming guiding center approximation. Therefore, effects of the magnetic drifts in realistic tokamaks are naturally taken into account in the IMPGYRO code. This feature makes it possible to calculate neoclassical transport processes, which possibly become large in the SOL/divertor plasma. Indeed, neoclassical self-diffusion process, the resultant effect of the combination of magnetic drift and Coulomb collisions with background ions, has already been included in the IMPGYRO model. In the present paper, prior to implementing the detailed model of neoclassical transport process into IMPGYRO, we have investigated the effect of neoclassical selfdiffusion in a realistic tokamak geometry with lower single null X-point. We also use a model with guiding center approximation in order to compare with the IMPGYRO full orbit model. The preliminary calculation results of each model have shown differences in the perpendicular average velocity of impurity ions at the top region of the SOL. The mechanism which leads to the difference has been discussed. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. From classical to quantum fields

    CERN Document Server

    Baulieu, Laurent; Sénéor, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Field Theory has become the universal language of most modern theoretical physics. This introductory textbook shows how this beautiful theory offers the correct mathematical framework to describe and understand the fundamental interactions of elementary particles. The book begins with a brief reminder of basic classical field theories, electrodynamics and general relativity, as well as their symmetry properties, and proceeds with the principles of quantisation following Feynman's path integral approach. Special care is used at every step to illustrate the correct mathematical formulation of the underlying assumptions. Gauge theories and the problems encountered in their quantisation are discussed in detail. The last chapters contain a full description of the Standard Model of particle physics and the attempts to go beyond it, such as grand unified theories and supersymmetry. Written for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in physics and mathematics, the book could also serve as a re...

  18. Quantum field theory from classical statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    2011-01-01

    An Ising-type classical statistical model is shown to describe quantum fermions. For a suitable time-evolution law for the probability distribution of the Ising-spins our model describes a quantum field theory for Dirac spinors in external electromagnetic fields, corresponding to a mean field approximation to quantum electrodynamics. All quantum features for the motion of an arbitrary number of electrons and positrons, including the characteristic interference effects for two-fermion states, are described by the classical statistical model. For one-particle states in the non-relativistic approximation we derive the Schr\\"odinger equation for a particle in a potential from the time evolution law for the probability distribution of the Ising-spins. Thus all characteristic quantum features, as interference in a double slit experiment, tunneling or discrete energy levels for stationary states, are derived from a classical statistical ensemble. Concerning the particle-wave-duality of quantum mechanics, the discret...

  19. Classical Simulation of Quantum Fields I

    CERN Document Server

    Hirayama, T

    2005-01-01

    We study classical field theories in a background field configuration where all modes of the theory are excited, matching the zero-point energy spectrum of quantum field theory. Our construction involves elements of a theory of classical electrodynamics by Wheeler-Feynman and the theory of stochastic electrodynamics of Boyer. The nonperturbative effects of interactions in these theories can be very efficiently studied on the lattice. In $\\lambda\\phi^{4}$ theory in 1+1 dimensions we find results, in particular for mass renormalization and the critical coupling for symmetry breaking, that are in agreement with their quantum counterparts. We then study the perturbative expansion of the $n$-point Green's functions and find a loop expansion very similar to that of quantum field theory. When compared to the usual Feynman rules, we find some differences associated with particular combinations of internal lines going on-shell simultaneously.

  20. Classical simulation of quantum fields I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, T.; Holdom, B.

    2006-10-01

    We study classical field theories in a background field configuration where all modes of the theory are excited, matching the zero-point energy spectrum of quantum field theory. Our construction involves elements of a theory of classical electrodynamics by Wheeler-Feynman and the theory of stochastic electrodynamics of Boyer. The nonperturbative effects of interactions in these theories can be very efficiently studied on the lattice. In lambda phi(4) theory in 1 + 1 dimensions, we find results, in particular, for mass renormalization and the critical coupling for symmetry breaking that are in agreement with their quantum counterparts. We then study the perturbative expansion of the n-point Green's functions and find a loop expansion very similar to that of quantum field theory. When compared to the usual Feynman rules, we find some differences associated with particular combinations of internal lines going on-shell simultaneously.

  1. Classical Fields and the Quantum Concept

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    1996-01-01

    We do a critical review of the Faraday-Maxwell concept of classical field and of its quantization process. With the hindsight knowledge of the essentially quantum character of the interactions, we use a naive classical model of field, based on exchange of classical massless particles, for a comparative and qualitative analysis of the physical content of the Coulomb's and Gauss's laws. It enlightens the physical meaning of a field singularity and of a static field. One can understand the problems on quantizing a classical field but not the hope of quantizing the gravitational field right from General Relativity.

  2. Semi-classical noise investigation for sub-40nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spathis, C., E-mail: cspathis@ece.upatras.gr; Birbas, A.; Georgakopoulou, K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Patras 26500 (Greece)

    2015-08-15

    Device white noise levels in short channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) dictate the performance and reliability of high-frequency circuits ranging from high-speed microprocessors to Low-Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and microwave circuits. Recent experimental noise measurements with very short devices demonstrate the existence of suppressed shot noise, contrary to the predictions of classical channel thermal noise models. In this work we show that, as the dimensions continue to shrink, shot noise has to be considered when the channel resistance becomes comparable to the barrier resistance at the source-channel junction. By adopting a semi-classical approach and taking retrospectively into account transport, short-channel and quantum effects, we investigate the partitioning between shot and thermal noise, and formulate a predictive model that describes the noise characteristics of modern devices.

  3. Classical spin glass system in external field with taking into account relaxation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, A. S.; Abajyan, H. G.

    2013-08-01

    We study statistical properties of disordered spin systems under the influence of an external field with taking into account relaxation effects. For description of system the spatial 1D Heisenberg spin-glass Hamiltonian is used. In addition, we suppose that interactions occur between nearest-neighboring spins and they are random. Exact solutions which define angular configuration of the spin in nodes were obtained from the equations of stationary points of Hamiltonian and the corresponding conditions for the energy local minimum. On the basis of these recurrent solutions an effective parallel algorithm is developed for simulation of stabile spin-chains of an arbitrary length. It is shown that by way of an independent order of N 2 numerical simulations (where N is number of spin in each chain) it is possible to generate ensemble of spin-chains, which is completely ergodic which is equivalent to full self-averaging of spin-chains' vector polarization. Distributions of different parameters (energy, average polarization by coordinates, and spin-spin interaction constant) of unperturbed system are calculated. In particular, analytically is proved and numerically is shown, that for the Heisenberg nearest-neighboring Hamiltonian model, the distribution of spin-spin interaction constants as opposed to widely used Gauss-Edwards-Anderson distribution satisfies Levy alpha-stable distribution law. This distribution is nonanalytic function and does not have variance. In the work we have in detail studied critical properties of an ensemble depending on value of external field parameters (from amplitude and frequency) and have shown that even at weak external fields the spin-glass systemis strongly frustrated. It is shown that frustrations have fractal behavior, they are selfsimilar and do not disappear at scale decreasing of area. By the numerical computation is shown that the average polarization of spin-glass on a different coordinates can have values which can lead to

  4. Electromagnetic Field Interaction With Transmission Lines From Classical Theory to HF Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachenko, Sergey V

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of the electromagnetic field coupling to transmission lines is an important problem in electromagnetic compatibility. The unabated increase in the operating frequency of electronic products and the emergence of sources of disturbances with higher frequency content (such as High Power Microwave and Ultra-Wide Band systems) have led to a breakdown of the TL approximation's basic assumptions for a number of applications. In the last decade or so, the generalization of the TL theory to take into account high frequency effects has emerged as an important topic of study in electromagn

  5. On the tomographic description of classical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ibort, A; Man'ko, V I; Marmo, G; Simoni, A; Sudarshan, E C G; Ventriglia, F

    2012-01-01

    After a general description of the tomographic picture for classical systems, a tomographic description of free classical scalar fields is proposed both in a finite cavity and the continuum. The tomographic description is constructed in analogy with the classical tomographic picture of an ensemble of harmonic oscillators. The tomograms of a number of relevant states such as the canonical distribution, the classical counterpart of quantum coherent states and a new family of so called Gauss--Laguerre states, are discussed. Finally the Liouville equation for field states is described in the tomographic picture offering an alternative description of the dynamics of the system that can be extended naturally to other fields.

  6. Classical stabilization of the hydrogen atom in a monochromatic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, F.; Casati, G. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Via Castelnuovo 7, 22100 Como (Italy)); Shepelyansky, D.L. (Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062, Toulouse (France))

    1993-02-01

    We report the results of analytical and numerical investigations on the ionization of a classical atom in a strong, linearly polarized, monochromatic field. We show that the ionization probability decreases with increasing field intensity at field amplitudes much larger than the classical chaos border. This effect should be observable in real laboratory experiments.

  7. Quasi-Classical Gravity Effect on Neutrino Oscillations in a Gravitational Field of a Heavy Astrophysical Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of quantum field theory, a graviton interacts locally with a quantum state having definite mass, that is, the gravitational mass eigenstate, while a weak boson interacts with a state having definite flavor, that is, the flavor eigenstate. An interaction of a neutrino with an energetic graviton may trigger the collapse of the neutrino to a definite mass eigenstate with probability expressed in terms of PMNS mixing matrix elements. Thus, gravitons would induce quantum decoherence of a coherent neutrino flavor state similarly to how weak bosons induce quantum decoherence of a neutrino in a definite mass state. We demonstrate that such an essentially quantum gravity effect may have strong consequences for neutrino oscillation phenomena in astrophysics due to relatively large scattering cross sections of relativistic neutrinos undergoing large angle radiation of energetic gravitons in gravitational field of a classical massive source (i.e., the quasi-classical case of gravitational Bethe-Heitler scattering. This graviton-induced decoherence is compared to decoherence due to propagation in the presence of the Earth matter effect. Based on this study, we propose a new technique for the indirect detection of energetic gravitons by measuring the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos.

  8. Effect of magnetic field on noncollinear magnetism in classical bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasrija, Kanika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of a bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional square lattice in the presence of an external magnetic field. The study is motivated by the relevance of this simple model to the non-collinear magnetism and the consequent ferroelectric behavior in the recently discovered high-temperature multiferroic, cupric oxide (CuO). We show that an external magnetic field stabilizes a non-coplanar magnetic phase, which is characterized by a finite ferromagnetic moment along the direction of the applied magnetic field and a spiral spin texture if projected in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Real-space analysis highlights a coexistence of non-collinear regions with ferromagnetic clusters. The results are also supported by simple variational calculations.

  9. Classical and quantum wormholes with tachyon field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高长军; 沈有根

    2003-01-01

    The wormhole equations are presented in the presence of tachyon field. Specializing at some values of ω (the ratio of pressure to energy density), we find a family of classical and quantum wormhole solutions.

  10. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  11. Equilibration properties of classical integrable field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Andrea; Mussardo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    We study the equilibration properties of classical integrable field theories at a finite energy density, with a time evolution that starts from initial conditions far from equilibrium. These classical field theories may be regarded as quantum field theories in the regime of high occupation numbers. This observation permits to recover the classical quantities from the quantum ones by taking a proper \\hslash \\to 0 limit. In particular, the time averages of the classical theories can be expressed in terms of a suitable version of the LeClair-Mussardo formula relative to the generalized Gibbs ensemble. For the purposes of handling time averages, our approach provides a solution of the problem of the infinite gap solutions of the inverse scattering method.

  12. Introducing quantum effects in classical theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fabris, J C; Rodrigues, D C; Daouda, M H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore two different ways of implementing quantum effects in a classical structure. The first one is through an external field. The other one is modifying the classical conservation laws. In both cases, the consequences for the description of the evolution of the universe are discussed.

  13. Classical Higgs fields on gauge gluon bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palese Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical Higgs fields and related canonical conserved quantities are defined by invariant variational problems on suitably defined gauge gluon bundles. We consider Lagrangian field theories which are assumed to be invariant with respect to the action of a gauge-natural group. As an illustrative example we exploit the ‘gluon Lagrangian’, i.e. a Yang-Mills Lagrangian on the (1, 1-order gauge-natural bundle of SU(3-principal connections. The kernel of the gauge-natural Jacobi morphism for such a Lagrangian, by inducing a reductive split structure, canonically defines a ‘gluon classical Higgs field’.

  14. The classical theory of fields electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Helrich, Carl S

    2012-01-01

    The study of classical electromagnetic fields is an adventure. The theory is complete mathematically and we are able to present it as an example of classical Newtonian experimental and mathematical philosophy. There is a set of foundational experiments, on which most of the theory is constructed. And then there is the bold theoretical proposal of a field-field interaction from James Clerk Maxwell. This textbook presents the theory of classical fields as a mathematical structure based solidly on laboratory experiments. Here the student is introduced to the beauty of classical field theory as a gem of theoretical physics. To keep the discussion fluid, the history is placed in a beginning chapter and some of the mathematical proofs in the appendices. Chapters on Green’s Functions and Laplace’s Equation and a discussion of Faraday’s Experiment further deepen the understanding. The chapter on Einstein’s relativity is an integral necessity to the text. Finally, chapters on particle motion and waves in a dis...

  15. Knot Invariants from Classical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Leal, L C

    1999-01-01

    We consider the Non-Abelian Chern-Simons term coupled to external particles, in a gauge and diffeomorphism invariant form. The classical equations of motion are perturbativelly studied, and the on-shell action is shown to produce knot-invariants associated with the sources. The first contributions are explicitly calculated, and the corresponding knot-invariants are recognized. We conclude that the interplay between Knot Theory and Topological Field Theories is manifested not only at the quantum level, but in a classical context as well.

  16. Chaos in effective classical and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Modugno, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Modugno, Michele

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum N-component phi^4 oscillators in presence of an external field. In the large N limit the effective dynamics is described by two-degree-of-freedom classical Hamiltonian systems. In the classical model we observe chaotic orbits for any value of the external field, while in the quantum case chaos is strongly suppressed. A simple explanation of this behaviour is found in the change in the structure of the orbits induced by quantum corrections. Consistently with Heisenberg's principle, quantum fluctuations are forced away from zero, removing in the effective quantum dynamics a hyperbolic fixed point that is a major source of chaos in the classical model.

  17. ClassSTRONG: Classical simulations of Strong Field processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Lewenstein, M

    2013-01-01

    A set of Mathematica functions is presented to model classically two of the most important processes in strong field physics, namely high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI). Our approach is based on the numerical solution of the Newton-Lorentz equation of an electron moving on an electric field and takes advantage of the symbolic languages features and graphical power of Mathematica. Similarly as in the Strong Field Approximation (SFA), the effects of atomic potential on the motion of electron in the laser field are neglected. The SFA has proven to be an essential tool in strong field physics in the sense that it is able to predict with great precision the harmonic (in the HHG) and energy (in the ATI) limits. We have extended substantially the conventional classical simulations, where the electric field is only dependent on time, including spatial nonhomogeneous fields and spatial and temporal synthesized fields. Spatial nonhomogeneous fields appear when metal nanosystems int...

  18. Energy conditions and classical scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S

    2002-01-01

    Attention has been recently called upon the fact that the weak and null energy conditions and the second law of thermodynamics are violated in wormhole solutions of Einstein's theory with classical, nonminimally coupled, scalar fields as material source. It is shown that the discussion is only meaningful when ambiguities in the definitions of stress-energy tensor and energy density of a nonminimally coupled scalar are resolved. The three possible approaches are discussed with emphasis on the positivity of the respective energy densities and covariant conservation laws. The root of the ambiguities is traced to the energy localization problem for the gravitational field.

  19. Prequantum Classical Statistical Field Theory: Schrödinger Dynamics of Entangled Systems as a Classical Stochastic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-03-01

    The idea that quantum randomness can be reduced to randomness of classical fields (fluctuating at time and space scales which are essentially finer than scales approachable in modern quantum experiments) is rather old. Various models have been proposed, e.g., stochastic electrodynamics or the semiclassical model. Recently a new model, so called prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), was developed. By this model a "quantum system" is just a label for (so to say "prequantum") classical random field. Quantum averages can be represented as classical field averages. Correlations between observables on subsystems of a composite system can be as well represented as classical correlations. In particular, it can be done for entangled systems. Creation of such classical field representation demystifies quantum entanglement. In this paper we show that quantum dynamics (given by Schrödinger's equation) of entangled systems can be represented as the stochastic dynamics of classical random fields. The "effect of entanglement" is produced by classical correlations which were present at the initial moment of time, cf. views of Albert Einstein.

  20. Effective dynamics of a classical point charges

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, Janos

    2013-01-01

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham-Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out.

  1. Effect of the radiation reaction in classical regimes of interaction of ultra-strong electromagnetic fields with plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdessus, R.; d'Humières, E.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2013-05-01

    Radiation energy losses of electrons in ultra-intense laser fields constitute a process of major importance when considering laser-matter interaction at intensities of the order of and above 1022 W/cm2. Radiation losses can strongly modify the electron (and ion) dynamics, and are associated with intense and directional emission of high energy photons. Accounting for such effects is therefore necessary for modeling of, electron and ion acceleration and creation of secondary photon on the forthcoming ultra-high power laser facilities. To account for radiation losses in the particle-in-cell code PICLS, we have introduced the radiation friction force using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model.10 Here, we present a study of the effect of radiation friction on the electron and photon energy distribution in a semi-infinite and overdense plasma. A possibillity to create a collisonless shock using an ultra intense laser field, in the context of laboratory astrophysics is discussed. The influence of the radiation reaction on the plasma dynamics is demonstrated.

  2. Exact Classical and Quantum Dynamics in Background Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzl, Tom; Ilderton, Anton

    2017-03-01

    Analytic results for (Q)ED processes in external fields are limited to a few special cases, such as plane waves. However, the strong focusing of intense laser fields implies a need to go beyond the plane wave model. By exploiting Poincaré symmetry and superintegrability we show how to construct, and solve without approximation, new models of laser-matter interactions. We illustrate the method with a model of a radially polarized (TM) laser beam, for which we exactly determine the classical orbits and quantum wave functions. Including in this way the effects of transverse field structure should improve predictions and analyses for experiments at intense laser facilities.

  3. Fisher information and quantum-classical field theory: classical statistics similarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syska, J. [Department of Field Theory and Particle Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2007-07-15

    The classical statistics indication for the impossibility to derive quantum mechanics from classical mechanics is proved. The formalism of the statistical Fisher information is used. Next the Fisher information as a tool of the construction of a self-consistent field theory, which joins the quantum theory and classical field theory, is proposed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Beyond Quantum Fields: A Classical Fields Approach to QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafin C.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A classical field theory is introduced that is defined on a tower of dimensionally in- creasing spaces and is argued to be equivalent to QED. The domain of dependence is discussed to show how an equal times picture of the many coordinate space gives QED results as part of a well posed initial value formalism. Identical particle symmetries are not, a priori, required but when introduced are clearly propagated. This construc- tion uses only classical fields to provide some explanation for why quantum fields and canonical commutation results have been successful. Some old and essential questions regarding causality of propagators are resolved. The problem of resummation, gener- ally forbidden for conditionally convergent series, is dis cussed from the standpoint of particular truncations of the infinite tower of functions an d a two step adiabatic turn on for scattering. As a result of this approach it is shown that the photon inherits its quantization ~ ω from the free lagrangian of the Dirac electrons despite the fact that the free electromagnetic lagrangian has no ~ in it. This provides a possible explanation for the canonical commutation relations for quantum operators , [ ˆ P , ˆ Q ] = i ~ , without ever needing to invoke such a quantum postulate. The form of the equal times conservation laws in this many particle field theory suggests a simplification of the radiation reaction process for fields that allows QED to arise from a sum of path integrals in the various particle time coordinates. A novel method of unifying this theory with gravity, but that has no obvious quantum field theoretic computational scheme , is introduced.

  5. PREFACE: Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asorey, M.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.

    2007-07-01

    This volume contains some of the contributions to the Conference Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum, which was held at Jaca (Spain) in September 2006 to honour George Sudarshan on his 75th birthday. Former and current students, associates and friends came to Jaca to share a few wonderful days with George and his family and to present some contributions of their present work as influenced by George's impressive achievements. This book summarizes those scientific contributions which are presented as a modest homage to the master, collaborator and friend. At the social ceremonies various speakers were able to recall instances of his life-long activity in India, the United States and Europe, adding colourful remarks on the friendly and intense atmosphere which surrounded those collaborations, some of which continued for several decades. This meeting would not have been possible without the financial support of several institutions. We are deeply indebted to Universidad de Zaragoza, Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia de España (CICYT), Departamento de Ciencia, Tecnología y Universidad del Gobierno de Aragón, Universitá di Napoli 'Federico II' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Finally, we would like to thank the participants, and particularly George's family, for their contribution to the wonderful atmosphere achieved during the Conference. We would like also to acknowledge the authors of the papers collected in the present volume, the members of the Scientific Committee for their guidance and support and the referees for their generous work. M Asorey, J Clemente-Gallardo and G Marmo The Local Organizing Committee George Sudarshan International Advisory Committee A. Ashtekhar (Pennsylvania State University, USA) L. J. Boya (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain) I. Cirac (Max Planck Institute, Garching, Germany) G. F. Dell Antonio (Universitá di Roma La Sapienza, Italy) A. Galindo (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain) S. L. Glashow (Boston University

  6. Variational principles for multisymplectic second-order classical field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Martínez, Pedro Daniel; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2015-06-01

    We state a unified geometrical version of the variational principles for second-order classical field theories. The standard Lagrangian and Hamiltonian variational principles and the corresponding field equations are recovered from this unified framework.

  7. Variational principles for multisymplectic second-order classical field theories

    OpenAIRE

    Román Roy, Narciso; Prieto Martínez, Pedro Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We state a unified geometrical version of the variational principles for second-order classical field theories. The standard Lagrangian and Hamiltonian variational principles and the corresponding field equations are recovered from this unified framework. Peer Reviewed

  8. Classical and Quantum Mechanical Motion in Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the motion of a particle in a particular magnetic field configuration both classically and quantum mechanically. For flux-free radially symmetric magnetic fields defined on circular regions, we establish that particle escape speeds depend, classically, on a gauge-fixed magnetic vector potential, and demonstrate some trajectories associated with this special type of magnetic field. Then we show that some of the geometric features of the classical trajectory (perpendicular exit from the field region, trapped and escape behavior) are reproduced quantum mechanically using a numerical method that extends the norm-preserving Crank-Nicolson method to problems involving magnetic fields. While there are similarities between the classical trajectory and the position expectation value of the quantum mechanical solution, there are also differences, and we demonstrate some of these.

  9. Classical and quantum electrodynamics and the B(3) field

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Myron W

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that classical electrodynamics is riddled with internal inconsistencies springing from the fact that it is a linear, Abelian theory in which the potentials are unphysical. This volume offers a self-consistent hypothesis which removes some of these problems, as well as builds a framework on which linear and nonlinear optics are treated as a non-Abelian gauge field theory based on the emergence of the fundamental magnetizing field of radiation, the B(3) field. Contents: Interaction of Electromagnetic Radiation with One Fermion; The Field Equations of Classical O (3) b Electrodyn

  10. Lectures on classical and quantum theory of fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arodz, Henryk; Hadasz, Leszek [Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. Physics

    2010-07-01

    This textbook on classical and quantum theory of fields addresses graduate students starting to specialize in theoretical physics. It provides didactic introductions to the main topics in the theory of fields, while taking into account the contemporary view of the subject. The student will find concise explanations of basic notions essential for applications of the theory of fields as well as for frontier research in theoretical physics. One third of the book is devoted to classical fields. Each chapter contains exercises of varying degree of difficulty with hints or solutions, plus summaries and worked examples as useful. The textbook is based on lectures delivered to students of theoretical physics at Jagiellonian University. It aims to deliver a unique combination of classical and quantum field theory in one compact course. (orig.)

  11. Lectures on Classical and Quantum Theory of Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Arodź, Henryk

    2010-01-01

    This textbook on classical and quantum theory of fields addresses graduate students starting to specialize in theoretical physics. It provides didactic introductions to the main topics in the theory of fields, while taking into account the contemporary view of the subject. The student will find concise explanations of basic notions essential for applications of the theory of fields as well as for frontier research in theoretical physics. One third of the book is devoted to classical fields. Each chapter contains exercises of varying degree of difficulty with hints or solutions, plus summaries and worked examples as useful. The textbook is based on lectures delivered to students of theoretical physics at Jagiellonian University. It aims to deliver a unique combination of classical and quantum field theory in one compact course.

  12. Shifting the Quantum-Classical Boundary: Theory and Experiment for Statistically Classical Optical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Xiao-Feng; Howell, John C; Eberly, J H

    2015-01-01

    The growing recognition that entanglement is not exclusively a quantum property, and does not even originate with Schr\\"odinger's famous remark about it [Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. {\\bf 31}, 555 (1935)], prompts examination of its role in marking the quantum-classical boundary. We have done this by subjecting correlations of classical optical fields to new Bell-analysis experiments, and report here values of the Bell parameter greater than ${\\cal B} = 2.54$. This is many standard deviations outside the limit ${\\cal B} = 2$ established by the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 23}, 880 (1969)], in agreement with our theoretical classical prediction, and not far from the Tsirelson limit ${\\cal B} = 2.828...$. These results cast a new light on the standard quantum-classical boundary description, and suggest a reinterpretation of it.

  13. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Manti, S. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-02-21

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  14. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenshchik, A

    2013-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  15. Classical and Quantum Big Brake Cosmology for Scalar Field and Tachyonic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenshchik, Alexander; Manti, Serena

    2015-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field. It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  16. Dynamics of classical and quantum fields an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Setlur, Girish S

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of Classical and Quantum Fields: An Introduction focuses on dynamical fields in non-relativistic physics. Written by a physicist for physicists, the book is designed to help readers develop analytical skills related to classical and quantum fields at the non-relativistic level, and think about the concepts and theory through numerous problems. In-depth yet accessible, the book presents new and conventional topics in a self-contained manner that beginners would find useful. A partial list of topics covered includes: Geometrical meaning of Legendre transformation in classical mechanics Dynamical symmetries in the context of Noether's theorem The derivation of the stress energy tensor of the electromagnetic field, the expression for strain energy in elastic bodies, and the Navier Stokes equation Concepts of right and left movers in case of a Fermi gas explained Functional integration is interpreted as a limit of a sequence of ordinary integrations Path integrals for one and two quantum particles and for...

  17. Classical chaos in one-dimensional hydrogen in strong dc electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humm, D.C.; Nayfeh, M.H. (Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (US))

    1989-10-01

    We analyze the effect of a dc electric field on classical chaos in one-dimensional hydrogen in a microwave field in the {ital n} nonmixing regime and also in the inter-{ital n}-mixing regime where significant dc field-induced ionization occurs. We study the ac field-induced nonlinear classical resonances, the threshold of chaos, and the number of states trapped in the resonances. In the strong-{ital n}-mixing and ionizing regime (unclamping dc field), we find the chaotic dynamics depend sharply on the dc field and the number of states trapped in the resonances, allowing the system to undergo a transition from a regime of classical behavior to a regime of uniquely quantum behavior as the dc field is changed. We show that ionization by classical chaos competes favorably with ionization by tunneling in the transition region, and that tunneling allows very sensitive spectroscopy of this region.

  18. A Classical Solution of Massive Yang-Mills Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mogami, Tsuguo

    2016-01-01

    Recent researches on the solution of Schwinger-Dyson equations, as well as lattice simulations of pure QCD, suggest that the gluon propagator is massive. In this letter, we assume that the classical counterpart of this massive gluon field may be represented with the equation of motion for Yang-Mills theory with a mass term added. A new classical solution is given for this equation. It is discussed that this solution may have some role in confinement.

  19. Modern Classical Electrodynamics and Electromagnetic Radiation - Vacuum Field Theory Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The work is devoted to studying some new classical electrodynamics models of interacting charged point particles and related with them physical aspects. Based on the vacuum field theory no-geometry approach, developed in \\cite{BPT,BPT1}, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian reformulations of some alternative classical electrodynamics models are devised. A problem closely related to the radiation reaction force is analyzed aiming to explain the Wheeler and Feynman reaction radiation mechanism, well ...

  20. Classical and quantum mechanics of diatomic molecules in tilted fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Carlos A; Kennerly, William W; Ezra, Gregory S

    2005-05-08

    We investigate the classical and quantum mechanics of diatomic molecules in noncollinear (tilted) static electric and nonresonant linearly polarized laser fields. The classical diatomic in tilted fields is a nonintegrable system, and we study the phase space structure for physically relevant parameter regimes for the molecule KCl. While exhibiting low-energy (pendular) and high-energy (free-rotor) integrable limits, the rotor in tilted fields shows chaotic dynamics at intermediate energies, and the degree of classical chaos can be tuned by changing the tilt angle. We examine the quantum mechanics of rotors in tilted fields. Energy-level correlation diagrams are computed, and the presence of avoided crossings quantified by the study of nearest-neighbor spacing distributions as a function of energy and tilting angle. Finally, we examine the influence of classical periodic orbits on rotor wave functions. Many wave functions in the tilted field case are found to be highly nonseparable in spherical polar coordinates. Localization of wave functions in the vicinity of classical periodic orbits, both stable and unstable, is observed for many states.

  1. Classical-field model of the hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics if instead of considering the electron to be a particle, we consider an electrically charged classical wave field—an "electron wave"—which is held by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered not as a theory of particles but as a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpretation of atomic phenomena is given. It is shown that this explanation is only a misinterpretation of continuous deterministic processes. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is obtained, which accounts for the inverse action of self-electromagnetic radiation of the electron wave and completely describes the spontaneous emissions of an atom.

  2. Effective Privacy Amplification for Secure Classical Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, Tamas; Scheuer, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We study the effectiveness of privacy amplification for classical key-distribution schemes. We find that, unlike quantum key distribution schemes, the high fidelity of the raw key in classical systems allow the users to always sift a secure shorter key, given that they have an upper bound of eavesdropper probability to correctly guess the exchanged key-bits. We establish the number of privacy amplification iterations needed to achieve information leak of 10^-8 in several classical systems and highlight the inherent tradeoff between the number of iterations and the security of the raw key.

  3. Escaping the crunch: gravitational effects in classical transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Matthew C

    2010-01-01

    During eternal inflation, a landscape of vacua can be populated by the nucleation of bubbles. These bubbles inevitably collide, and collisions sometimes displace the field into a new minimum in a process known as a classical transition. In this paper, we examine some new features of classical transitions that arise when gravitational effects are included. Using the junction condition formalism, we study the conditions for energy conservation in detail, and solve explicitly for the types of allowed classical transition geometries. We show that the repulsive nature of domain walls, and the de Sitter expansion associated with a positive energy minimum, can allow for classical transitions to vacua of higher energy than that of the colliding bubbles. Transitions can be made out of negative or zero energy (terminal) vacua to a de Sitter phase, re-starting eternal inflation, and populating new vacua. However, the classical transition cannot produce vacua with energy higher than the original parent vacuum, which agre...

  4. Classical electromagnetic field theory in the presence of magnetic sources

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, W J; Naón, C M; Chen, Wen-Jun; Li, Kang

    2001-01-01

    Using two new well defined 4-dimensional potential vectors, we formulate the classical Maxwell's field theory in a form which has manifest Lorentz covariance and SO(2) duality symmetry in the presence of magnetic sources. We set up a consistent Lagrangian for the theory. Then from the action principle we get both Maxwell's equation and the equation of motion of a dyon moving in the electro-magnetic field.

  5. Classical Electromagnetic Field Theory in the Presence of Magnetic Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kang(李康); CHEN Wen-Jun(陈文俊); NAON Carlos M.

    2003-01-01

    Using two new well-defined four-dimensional potential vectors, we formulate the classical Maxwell field theory in a form which has manifest Lorentz covariance and SO(2) duality symmetry in the presence of magnetic sources.We set up a consistent Lagrangian for the theory. Then from the action principle we obtain both Maxwell's equation and the equation of motion of a dyon moving in the electromagnetic field.

  6. Exact solutions for classical Yang-Mills fields

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We provide a set of exact solutions of the classical Yang-Mills equations. They have the property to satisfy a massive dispersion relation and hold in all gauges. These solutions can be used to describe the vacuum of the quantum Yang-Mills theory and so, they provide a general framework to build a quantum field theory. The components of the field become separated on a generic gauge but are all equal just in the Lorenz (Landau) gauge.

  7. Scalar Field Dynamics Classical, Quantum and in Between

    CERN Document Server

    Salle, M; Vink, Jeroen C

    2000-01-01

    Using a Hartree ensemble approximation, we investigate the dynamics of the \\phi^4 model in 1+1 dimensions. We find that the fields initially thermalize with a Bose-Einstein distribution for the fields. Gradually, however, the distribution changes towards classical equipartition. Using suitable initial conditions quantum thermalization is achieved much faster than the onset of this undesirable equipartition. We also show how the numerical efficiency of our method can be significantly improved.

  8. Classical Scalar Fields and Violations of the Second Law

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, L H; Roman, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    It has been recently shown that classical non-minimally coupled scalar fields can violate all of the standard energy conditions in general relativity. Violations of the null and averaged null energy conditions obtainable with such fields have been suggested as possible exotic matter candidates required for the maintenance of traversable wormholes. In this paper, we demonstrate that if such fields exist, they could be used to produce large negative energy fluxes and macroscopic violations of the generalized second law of thermodynamics. This would appear to present a serious problem, as such fields are widely used in many areas of modern theoretical physics.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Quantum field theory has evolved from its early beginnings as a tool for understanding the interaction of light with matter into a rather formidable technical paradigm, one that has successfully provided the mathematical underpinnings of all non-gravitational interactions. Over the eight decades since it was first contemplated the methods have become increasingly more streamlined and sophisticated, yielding new insights into our understanding of the subatomic world and our abilities to make clear and precise predictions. Some of the more elegant methods have to do with non-perturbative and semiclassical approaches to the subject. The chief players here are solitons, instantons, and anomalies. Over the past three decades there has been a steady rise in our understanding of these objects and of our ability to calculate their effects and implications for the rest of quantum field theory. This book is a welcome contribution to this subject. In 12 chapters it provides a clear synthesis of the key developments in these subjects at a level accessible to graduate students that have had an introductory course to quantum field theory. In the author's own words it provides both 'a survey and an overview of this field'. The first half of the book concentrates on solitons--kinks, vortices, and magnetic monopoles--and their implications for the subject. The reader is led first through the simplest models in one spatial dimension, into more sophisticated cases that required more advanced topological methods. The author does quite a nice job of introducing the various concepts as required, and beginning students should be able to get a good grasp of the subject directly from the text without having to first go through the primary literature. The middle part of the book deals with the implications of these solitons for both cosmology and for duality. While the cosmological discussion is quite nice, the discussion on BPS solitons, supersymmetry and duality is rather condensed. It is

  10. Noether symmetric classical and quantum scalar field cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vakili, Babak

    2011-01-01

    We study the evolution of a two dimensional minisuperspace cosmological model in classical and quantum levels by the Noether symmetry approach. The phase space variables turn out to correspond to the scale factor of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model and a scalar field with which the action of the model is augmented. It is shown that the minisuperspace of such a model is a two dimensional manifold with vanishing Ricci scalar. We present a coordinate transformation which cast the corresponding minisuper metric to a Minkowskian or Euclidean one according to the choices of an ordinary or phantom model for the scalar field. Then, the Noether symmetry of such a cosmological model is investigated by utilizing the behavior of the corresponding Lagrangian under the infinitesimal generators of the desired symmetry. We explicitly calculate the form of the scalar field potential functions for which such symmetries exist. For these potential functions, the exact classical and quantum solutions in the cases where th...

  11. Exact solutions for classical Yang-Mills fields

    CERN Document Server

    Frasca, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Some years ago we displayed a set of classical solutions for the classical Yang-Mills field theory having the property to satisfy a dispersion relation typical of a massive theory. But such solutions seemed to be exact only in the Landau gauge making all the argument an asymptotic one for the most general case of a generic gauge. These solutions can be used to describe the vacuum of the quantum Yang-Mills theory and so, to prove that they are always exact can grant a general framework to build a quantum field theory. Here we show that these solutions are always exact changing just the normalization factor. The components of the field become separated on a generic gauge being all equal just in the Landau gauge.

  12. Classical understanding of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yeong Deok; Choi, Taeseung

    2017-04-01

    Recently, interesting observations on electron vortex beams have been made. We propose a classical model that shows vortex-like motion due to suitably-synchronized motion of each electron's cyclotron motion in a uniform magnetic field. It is shown that some basic features of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field, such as azimuthal currents, the relation between energy and kinetic angular momentum, and the parallel-axis theorem are understandable by using this classical model. We also show that the time-dependence of kinetic angular momentum of electron vortex beams could be understood as an effect of a specific nonuniform distribution of classical electrons.

  13. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  14. Modern Classical Electrodynamics and Electromagnetic Radiation - Vacuum Field Theory Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Bogolubov, N N

    2012-01-01

    The work is devoted to studying some new classical electrodynamics models of interacting charged point particles and related with them physical aspects. Based on the vacuum field theory no-geometry approach, developed in \\cite{BPT,BPT1}, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian reformulations of some alternative classical electrodynamics models are devised. A problem closely related to the radiation reaction force is analyzed aiming to explain the Wheeler and Feynman reaction radiation mechanism, well known as the absorption radiation theory, and strongly dependent on the Mach type interaction of a charged point particle in an ambient vacuum electromagnetic medium. There are discussed some relationships between this problem and the one derived within the context of the vacuum field theory approach. The R. \\ Feynman's \\textquotedblleft heretical\\textquotedblright\\ approach \\cite{Dy1,Dy2} to deriving the Lorentz force based Maxwell electromagnetic equations is also revisited, its complete legacy is argued both by means o...

  15. Classical electromagnetic fields from quantum sources in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Robert; McCarty, Ryan; Peroutka, Balthazar; Tuchin, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields are generated in high energy nuclear collisions by spectator valence protons. These fields are traditionally computed by integrating the Maxwell equations with point sources. One might expect that such an approach is valid at distances much larger than the proton size and thus such a classical approach should work well for almost the entire interaction region in the case of heavy nuclei. We argue that, in fact, the contrary is true: due to the quantum diffusion of the proton wave function, the classical approximation breaks down at distances of the order of the system size. We compute the electromagnetic field created by a charged particle described initially as a Gaussian wave packet of width 1 fm and evolving in vacuum according to the Klein-Gordon equation. We completely neglect the medium effects. We show that the dynamics, magnitude and even sign of the electromagnetic field created by classical and quantum sources are different.

  16. Semi-Classical field theory as Decoherence Free Subspaces

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We formulate semi-classical field theory as an approximate decoherence-free-subspace of a finite-dimensional quantum-gravity hilbert space. A complementarity construction can be realized as a unitary transformation which changes the decoherence-free-subspace. This can be translated to signify that field theory on a global slice, in certain space-times, is the simultaneous examination of two different superselected sectors of a gauge theory. We posit that a correct course graining procedure of quantum gravity should be WKB states propagating in a curved background in which particles exiting a horizon have imaginary components to their phases. The field theory appears non-unitary, but it is due to the existence of approximate decoherence free sub-spaces. Furthermore, the importance of operator spaces in the course-graining procedure is discussed. We also briefly touch on Firewalls.

  17. Lie Groupoids in Classical Field Theory I: Noether's Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Bruno T; Pêgas, Luiz Henrique P

    2015-01-01

    In the two papers of this series, we initiate the development of a new approach to implementing the concept of symmetry in classical field theory, based on replacing Lie groups/algebras by Lie groupoids/algebroids, which are the appropriate mathematical tools to describe local symmetries when gauge transformations are combined with space-time transformations. Here, we outline the basis of the program and, as a first step, show how to (re)formulate Noether's theorem about the connection between symmetries and conservation laws in this approach.

  18. Conformal Field Theory Correlators from Classical Scalar Field Theory on $AdS_{d+1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Mück, W; Mueck, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    We use the correspondence between scalar field theory on $AdS_{d+1}$ and a conformal field theory on $R^d$ to calculate the 3- and 4-point functions of the latter. The classical scalar field theory action is evaluated at tree level.

  19. Latfield2: A c++ library for classical lattice field theory

    CERN Document Server

    David, Daverio; Bevis, Neil

    2015-01-01

    latfield2 is a C++ library designed to simplify writing parallel codes for solving partial differen- tial equations, developed for application to classical field theories in particle physics and cosmology. It is a significant rewrite of the latfield framework, moving from a slab domain decomposition to a rod decomposition, where the last two dimension of the lattice are scattered into a two dimensional process grid. Parallelism is implemented using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard, and hidden in the basic objects of grid-based simulations: Lattice, Site and Field. It comes with an integrated parallel fast Fourier transform, and I/O server class permitting computation to continue during the writing of large files to disk. latfield2 has been used for production runs on tens of thousands of processor elements, and is expected to be scalable to hundreds of thousands.

  20. Classical and quantum particle dynamics in univariate background fields

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzl, Thomas; King, Ben

    2016-01-01

    We investigate deviations from the plane wave model in the interaction of charged particles with strong electromagnetic fields. A general result is that integrability of the dynamics is lost when going from lightlike to timelike or spacelike field dependence. For a special scenario in the classical regime we show how the radiation spectrum in the spacelike (undulator) case becomes well-approximated by the plane wave model in the high energy limit, despite the two systems being Lorentz inequivalent. In the quantum problem, there is no analogue of the WKB-exact Volkov solution. Nevertheless, WKB and uniform-WKB approaches give good approximations in all cases considered. Other approaches that reduce the underlying differential equations from second to first order are found to miss the correct physics for situations corresponding to barrier transmission and wide-angle scattering.

  1. Geometry of Lagrangian First-order Classical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Echeverría-Enríquez, A; Román-Roy, N; Echeverr\\'ia-Enr\\'iquez, Arturo; Muñoz-Lecanda, Miguel C.; Román-Roy, Narciso

    1996-01-01

    We construct a lagrangian geometric formulation for first-order field theories using the canonical structures of first-order jet bundles, which are taken as the phase spaces of the systems in consideration. First of all, we construct all the geometric structures associated with a first-order jet bundle and, using them, we develop the lagrangian formalism, defining the canonical forms associated with a lagrangian density and the density of lagrangian energy, obtaining the {\\sl Euler-Lagrange equations} in two equivalent ways: as the result of a variational problem and developing the {\\sl jet field formalism} (which is a formulation more similar to the case of mechanical systems). A statement and proof of Noether's theorem is also given, using the latter formalism. Finally, some classical examples are briefly studied.

  2. Principles of physics from quantum field theory to classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Ni

    2014-01-01

    This book starts from a set of common basic principles to establish the formalisms in all areas of fundamental physics, including quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, general relativity, electromagnetic field, and classical mechanics. Instead of the traditional pedagogic way, the author arranges the subjects and formalisms in a logical-sequential way, i.e. all the formulas are derived from the formulas before them. The formalisms are also kept self-contained. Most of the required mathematical tools are also given in the appendices. Although this book covers all the disciplines of fundamental physics, the book is concise and can be treated as an integrated entity. This is consistent with the aphorism that simplicity is beauty, unification is beauty, and thus physics is beauty. The book may be used as an advanced textbook by graduate students. It is also suitable for physicists who wish to have an overview of fundamental physics. Readership: This is an advanced gradua...

  3. Rovibrational dynamics of the RbCs molecule in static electric fields. Classical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaiz, Pedro F.; Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logroño (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logroño (Spain)

    2012-04-02

    We study the classical dynamics of the RbCs molecule in the presence of a static electric field. Under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, we perform a rovibrational investigation which includes the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. The stability of the equilibrium points and the phase space structure of the system are explored in detail. We find that, for strong electric fields or for energies close to the dissociation threshold, the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics. -- Highlights: ► We study the classical rovibrational dynamics of the alkali polar dimer RbCs. ► In the model we consider the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. ► The potential energy surface is studied depending on the electric field strength. ► Using surfaces of section we study the phase space structure. ► We find that the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics.

  4. Wave Equations for Classical Two-Component Proca Fields in Curved Spacetimes with Torsionless Affinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Júnior, S. I.; Cardoso, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    The world formulation of the full theory of classical Proca fields in generally relativistic spacetimes is reviewed. Subsequently, the entire set of field equations is transcribed in a straightforward way into the framework of one of the Infeld-van der Waerden formalisms. Some well-known calculational techniques are then utilized for deriving the wave equations that control the propagation of the fields allowed for. It appears that no interaction couplings between such fields and electromagnetic curvatures are ultimately carried by the wave equations at issue. What results is, in effect, that the only interactions which occur in the theoretical context under consideration involve strictly Proca fields and wave functions for gravitons.

  5. Escaping the crunch: Gravitational effects in classical transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Yang, I.-Sheng

    2010-09-01

    During eternal inflation, a landscape of vacua can be populated by the nucleation of bubbles. These bubbles inevitably collide, and collisions sometimes displace the field into a new minimum in a process known as a classical transition. In this paper, we examine some new features of classical transitions that arise when gravitational effects are included. Using the junction condition formalism, we study the conditions for energy conservation in detail, and solve explicitly for the types of allowed classical transition geometries. We show that the repulsive nature of domain walls, and the de Sitter expansion associated with a positive energy minimum, can allow for classical transitions to vacua of higher energy than that of the colliding bubbles. Transitions can be made out of negative or zero energy (terminal) vacua to a de Sitter phase, restarting eternal inflation, and populating new vacua. However, the classical transition cannot produce vacua with energy higher than the original parent vacuum, which agrees with previous results on the construction of pockets of false vacuum. We briefly comment on the possible implications of these results for various measure proposals in eternal inflation.

  6. On the Casimir effect. Energy density of the free Klein-Gordon-field in front of static classical backgrounds; Zum Casimir-Effekt. Energiedichte des freien Klein-Gordon-Feldes vor statischen klassischen Hintergruenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.J.

    2008-01-15

    We study the Casimir energy density of the Klein-Gordon-field in the case of two static geometries. We model the effect by coupling the free quantum field to a static classical scalar field. We work out the dependence on the coupling {lambda}, including the limit {lambda}={infinity} (Dirichlet boundary condition). The chosen geometries are described by a {delta}-funktion ({sigma}(x)={delta}(x{sub 3})) and a step function of finite height ({sigma}(x)= (1)/(2{epsilon})1{sub [{epsilon},{epsilon}]}(x{sub 3})), respectively. In the area outside the support of the background the density energy converges; calculations for the distorted area lead to divergent surface terms. (orig.)

  7. Enhancing Quantum Discord in Cavity QED by Applying Classical Driving Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yi; XU Jing-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the quantum discord dynamics in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system, which consists of two noninteracting two-level atoms driven by independent optical Gelds and classical fields, and find that the quantum discord vanishes only asymptotically although entanglement disappears suddenly during the time evolution in the absence of classical fields. It is shown that the amount of quantum discord can be increased by adjusting the classical driving fields because the increasing degree of the amount of quantum mutual information is greater than classical correlation by applying the classical driving fields. Finally, the influence of the classical driving field on the fidelity of the system is also examined.%We investigate the quantum discord dynamics in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system,which consists of two noninteracting two-level atoms driven by independent optical fields and classical fields,and find that the quantum discord vanishes only asymptotically although entanglement disappears suddenly during the time evolution in the absence of classical fields.It is shown that the amount of quantum discord can be increased by adjusting the classical driving fields because the increasing degree of the amount of quantum mutual information is greater than classical correlation by applying the classical driving fields.Finally,the influence of the classical driving field on the fidelity of the system is also examined.

  8. On covariant Poisson brackets in classical field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forger, Michael [Instituto de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66281, BR–05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salles, Mário O. [Instituto de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66281, BR–05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário – Lagoa Nova, BR–59078-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    How to give a natural geometric definition of a covariant Poisson bracket in classical field theory has for a long time been an open problem—as testified by the extensive literature on “multisymplectic Poisson brackets,” together with the fact that all these proposals suffer from serious defects. On the other hand, the functional approach does provide a good candidate which has come to be known as the Peierls–De Witt bracket and whose construction in a geometrical setting is now well understood. Here, we show how the basic “multisymplectic Poisson bracket” already proposed in the 1970s can be derived from the Peierls–De Witt bracket, applied to a special class of functionals. This relation allows to trace back most (if not all) of the problems encountered in the past to ambiguities (the relation between differential forms on multiphase space and the functionals they define is not one-to-one) and also to the fact that this class of functionals does not form a Poisson subalgebra.

  9. Repeater-Assisted Zeno Effect in Classical Stochastic Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Shi-Jian; WANG Li-Gang; WANG Zhi-Guo; LIN Hai-Qing

    2012-01-01

    We address the possibility of the classical Zeno effect in classical stochastic processes as sampled by transferring a digitized image through a classical channel with surrounding noise. It is shown that the the classical state of the image decays inevitably with the distance of the channel due to the interference of the surroundings. However, if there are enough repeaters, which can both check and recover the state's information, the classical state's decay rate will be significantly suppressed, then a classical Zeno effect might occur.%We address the possibility of the classical Zeno effect in classical stochastic processes as sampled by transferring a digitized image through a classical channel with surrounding noise.It is shown that the the classical state of the image decays inevitably with the distance of the channel due to the interference of the surroundings.However,if there are enough repeaters,which can both check and recover the state's information,the classical state's decay rate will be significantly suppressed,then a classical Zeno effect might occur.

  10. Vaccinology of classical swine fever: from lab to field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.

    2003-01-01

    There are two types of classical swine fever vaccines available: the classical live and the recently developed E2 subunit vaccines. The live Chinese strain vaccine is the most widely used. After a single vaccination, it confers solid immunity within a few days that appears to persist lifelong. The E

  11. A Classical Theory of the Anomalous Zeeman Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, James; Woodyard, James

    2010-10-01

    Over a hundred years ago, it was discovered that spectral lines were shifted by magnetic fields. Lorentz was able to explain a small set of phenomena that was ironically called the normal Zeeman effect. It took more than twenty years for Lande to arrive at a vector model of the atom to explain the majority of shiftings called the anomalous Zeeman effect. Within a couple of years, Uhlenbeck and Goudsmit introduced the idea of a spinning electron that would give an underlying explanation of the vector model rules. It is generally taught that without the concept of spin there can be no explanation of all the spectral splittings caused by a magnetic field. We will present a purely classical model developed by Woldemar Voigt to describe the most famous anomalous splitting, the sodium D line. In addition, his theory correctly describes the transition from the weak field state to the strong one, called the Paschen-Back effect. We will show how his theory matches well with our classical picture of the atom.

  12. Effect of geometry on the classical entanglement in a chaotic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sijo K; Sabuco, Juan; Chew, Lock Yue; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2015-12-14

    The effect of boundary deformation on the classical entanglement which appears in the classical electromagnetic field is considered. A chaotic billiard geometry is used to explore the influence of the mechanical modification of the optical fiber cross-sectional geometry on the production of classical entanglement within the electromagnetic fields. For the experimental realization of our idea, we propose an optical fiber with a cross section that belongs to the family of Robnik chaotic billiards. Our results show that a modification of the fiber geometry from a regular to a chaotic regime can enhance the transverse mode classical entanglement.

  13. Exact classical Doppler effect derived from the photon emission process

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Chyi-Lung; Hsieh, Shang-Lin; Tsai, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The concept of photon is not necessary only applied to the relativistic Doppler theory. It may also work well for classical theory. As conservation of momentum and energy are physical laws, if applying these laws gives the exact relativistic Doppler effect, it should also give the exact classical Doppler effect. So far the classical Doppler effect is only obtained by using some approximation, as derived by Fermi in 1932. We show that the exact classical Doppler effect can be derived from the photon emission process in the exact treatment and reveal that these results are the same as those derived from the wave theory of light.

  14. Quantum averaging and resonances: two-level atom in a one-mode classical laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amniat-Talab

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available   We use a nonperturbative method based on quantum averaging and an adapted from of resonant transformations to treat the resonances of the Hamiltonian of a two-level atom interacting with a one-mode classical field in Floquet formalism. We illustrate this method by extraction of effective Hamiltonians of the system in two regimes of weak and strong coupling. The results obtained in the strong-coupling regime, are valid in the whole range of the coupling constant for the one-photon zero-field resonance.

  15. Efficient Simulation of Quantum States Based on Classical Fields Modulated with Pseudorandom Phase Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that a tensor product structure could be obtained by introducing pseudorandom phase sequences into classical fields with two orthogonal modes. Using classical fields modulated with pseudorandom phase sequences, we discuss efficient simulation of several typical quantum states, including product state, Bell states, GHZ state, and W state. By performing quadrature demodulation scheme, we could obtain the mode status matrix of the simulating classical fields, based on which we propose a sequence permutation mechanism to reconstruct the simulated quantum states. The research on classical simulation of quantum states is important, for it not only enables potential practical applications in quantum computation, but also provides useful insights into fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics.

  16. Field theory and weak Euler-Lagrange equation for classical particle-field systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Hong [PPPL; Burby, Joshua W [PPPL; Davidson, Ronald C [PPPL

    2014-10-01

    It is commonly believed that energy-momentum conservation is the result of space-time symmetry. However, for classical particle-field systems, e.g., Klimontovich-Maxwell and Klimontovich- Poisson systems, such a connection hasn't been formally established. The difficulty is due to the fact that particles and the electromagnetic fields reside on different manifolds. To establish the connection, the standard Euler-Lagrange equation needs to be generalized to a weak form. Using this technique, energy-momentum conservation laws that are difficult to find otherwise can be systematically derived.

  17. Force-Field Functor Theory: Classical Force-Fields which Reproduce Equilibrium Quantum Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eBabbush

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Feynman and Hibbs were the first to variationally determine an effective potential whose associated classical canonical ensemble approximates the exact quantum partition function. We examine the existence of a map between the local potential and an effective classical potential which matches the exact quantum equilibrium density and partition function. The usefulness of such a mapping rests in its ability to readily improve Born-Oppenheimer potentials for use with classical sampling. We show that such a map is unique and must exist. To explore the feasibility of using this result to improve classical molecular mechanics, we numerically produce a map from a library of randomly generated one-dimensional potential/effective potential pairs then evaluate its performance on independent test problems. We also apply the map to simulate liquid para-hydrogen, finding that the resulting radial pair distribution functions agree well with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The surprising accessibility and transferability of the technique suggest a quantitative route to adapting Born-Oppenheimer potentials, with a motivation similar in spirit to the powerful ideas and approximations of density functional theory.

  18. Force-field functor theory: classical force-fields which reproduce equilibrium quantum distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbush, Ryan; Parkhill, John; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Feynman and Hibbs were the first to variationally determine an effective potential whose associated classical canonical ensemble approximates the exact quantum partition function. We examine the existence of a map between the local potential and an effective classical potential which matches the exact quantum equilibrium density and partition function. The usefulness of such a mapping rests in its ability to readily improve Born-Oppenheimer potentials for use with classical sampling. We show that such a map is unique and must exist. To explore the feasibility of using this result to improve classical molecular mechanics, we numerically produce a map from a library of randomly generated one-dimensional potential/effective potential pairs then evaluate its performance on independent test problems. We also apply the map to simulate liquid para-hydrogen, finding that the resulting radial pair distribution functions agree well with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The surprising accessibility and transferability of the technique suggest a quantitative route to adapting Born-Oppenheimer potentials, with a motivation similar in spirit to the powerful ideas and approximations of density functional theory.

  19. A Four-Dimensional Continuum Theory of Space-Time and the Classical Physical Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we attempt to describe the classical physical fields of gravity, electromagnetism, and the so-called intrinsic spin (chirality in terms of a set of fully geometrized constitutive equations. In our formalism, we treat the four-dimensional space-time continuum as a deformable medium and the classical fields as intrinsic stress and spin fields generated by infinitesimal displacements and rotations in the space-time continuum itself. In itself, the unifying continuum approach employed herein may suggest a possible unified field theory of the known classical physical fields.

  20. Quantum Electrodynamics Basis of Classical-Field High-Harmonic Generation Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兵兵; 高靓辉; 傅盘铭; 郭东升; R. R. Freeman

    2001-01-01

    From the nonperturbative quantum electrodynamics theory, we derive the Landau-Dykhne formula which represents the quantum-mechanical formulation of the three-step model. These studies provide a basis for the classical-field approaches to high-order harmonic generation and justify some assumptions used in classical-field modelling.

  1. Physical reality of electromagnetic potentials and the classical limit of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, S C

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature on the Aharonov-Bohm effect has raised fundamental questions on the classical correspondence of this effect and the physical reality of the electromagnetic potentials in quantum mechanics. Reappraisal on Feynman's approach to the classical limit of AB effect is presented. The critique throws light on the significance of quantum interference and quantum phase shifts in any such classical correspondence. Detailed analysis shows that Feynman arguments are untenable on physical grounds and the claim made in the original AB paper that this effect had no classical analog seems valid. The importance of nonintegrable phase factor distinct from the AB phase factor, here termed as Fock-London-Weyl phase factor for the historical reasons, is underlined in connection with the classical aspects/limits. A topological approach incorporating the physical significance of the interaction field momentum is proposed. A new idea emerges from this approach that attributes the origin of the AB effect to the exchan...

  2. Motion in classical field theories and the foundations of the self-force problem

    CERN Document Server

    Harte, Abraham I

    2014-01-01

    This article serves as a pedagogical introduction to the problem of motion in classical field theories. The primary focus is on self-interaction: How does an object's own field affect its motion? General laws governing the self-force and self-torque are derived using simple, non-perturbative arguments. The relevant concepts are developed gradually by considering motion in a series of increasingly complicated theories. Newtonian gravity is discussed first, then Klein-Gordon theory, electromagnetism, and finally general relativity. Linear and angular momenta as well as centers of mass are defined in each of these cases. Multipole expansions for the force and torque are then derived to all orders for arbitrarily self-interacting extended objects. These expansions are found to be structurally identical to the laws of motion satisfied by extended test bodies, except that all relevant fields are replaced by effective versions which exclude the self-fields in a particular sense. Regularization methods traditionally ...

  3. Phase diagram of the classical Heisenberg model in a trimodal random field distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Filho, A.; Albuquerque, D. F. de; Santos-Filho, J. B.; Batista, T. S. Araujo

    2016-11-01

    The classical spin 1 / 2 Heisenberg model on a simple cubic lattice, with fluctuating bond interactions between nearest neighbors and in the presence of a random magnetic field, is investigated by effective field theory based on two-spin cluster. The random field is drawn from the asymmetric and anisotropic trimodal probability distribution. The fluctuating bond is extracted from the symmetric and anisotropic bimodal probability. We estimate the transition temperatures, and the phase diagram in the Tc- h, Tc- p and Tc - α planes. We observe that the temperature of the tricritical point decreases with the increase of disorder in exchange interactions until the system ceases to display tricritical behavior. The disorder of the interactions and reentrant phenomena depends on the trimodal distribution of the random field.

  4. A course in mathematical physics 1 and 2 classical dynamical systems and classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Thirring, Walter

    1992-01-01

    The last decade has seen a considerable renaissance in the realm of classical dynamical systems, and many things that may have appeared mathematically overly sophisticated at the time of the first appearance of this textbook have since become the everyday tools of working physicists. This new edition is intended to take this development into account. I have also tried to make the book more readable and to eradicate errors. Since the first edition already contained plenty of material for a one­ semester course, new material was added only when some of the original could be dropped or simplified. Even so, it was necessary to expand the chap­ ter with the proof of the K-A-M Theorem to make allowances for the cur­ rent trend in physics. This involved not only the use of more refined mathe­ matical tools, but also a reevaluation of the word "fundamental. " What was earlier dismissed as a grubby calculation is now seen as the consequence of a deep principle. Even Kepler's laws, which determine the radii of the ...

  5. Entanglement Entropy Renormalization for the NC scalar field coupled to classical BTZ geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Jurić, Tajron

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider a noncommutative (NC) massless scalar field coupled to the classical nonrotational BTZ geometry. In a manner of the theories where the gravity emerges from the underlying scalar field theory, we study the effective action and the entropy derived from this noncommutative model. In particular, the entropy is calculated by making use of the two different approaches, the brick wall method and the heat kernel method designed for spaces with conical singularity. We show that the UV divergent structures of the entropy, obtained through these two different methods, agree with each other. It is also shown that the same renormalization condition that removes the infinities from the effective action can also be used to renormalize the entanglement entropy for the same system. Besides, the interesting feature of the NC model considered here is that it allows an interpretation in terms of an equivalent system comprising of a commutative massive scalar field, but in a modified geometry; that of th...

  6. Quantum description of classical apparatus; Zeno effect and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Gurvitz, S A

    2003-01-01

    We study the measurement process by treating classical detectors entirely quantum mechanically. Transition to the classical description and the mechanism of decoherence is investigated. We concentrate on influence of continuous measurement on decay of unstable systems (quantum Zeno effect). We discuss the experimental consequences of our results and a role of the projection postulate in a measurement process.

  7. Bose Einstein condensation of the classical axion field in cosmology?

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Sacha

    2013-01-01

    The axion is a motivated cold dark matter candidate, which it would be interesting to distinguish from weakly interacting massive particles. Sikivie has suggested that axions could behave differently during non-linear galaxy evolution, if they form a bose einstein condensate. Using classical equations of motion during linear structure formation, we explore whether "gravitational thermalisation" can drive axions to a bose einstein condensate. At linear order in G_N, we interpret that the principle activities of gravity are to expand the Universe and grow density fluctuations. From the anisotropic stress, we estimate a short dissipation scale for axions which does not confirm previous estimates of their gravitational thermalisation rate.

  8. Quantum and classical statistics of the electromagnetic zero-point field

    CERN Document Server

    Ibison, M

    1996-01-01

    A classical electromagnetic zero-point field (ZPF) analogue of the vacuum of quantum field theory has formed the basis for theoretical investigations in the discipline known as random or stochastic electrodynamics (SED) wherein quantum measurements are imitated by the introduction of a stochastic classical background EM field. Random EM fluctuations are assumed to provide perturbations which can mimic some quantum phenomena while retaining a purely classical basis, e.g. the Casimir force, the Van-der-Waals force, the Lamb shift, spontaneous emission, the RMS radius of the harmonic oscillator, and the radius of the Bohr atom. This classical ZPF is represented as a homogeneous, isotropic ensemble of plane waves with fixed amplitudes and random phases. Averaging over the random phases is assumed to be equivalent to taking the ground-state expectation values of the corresponding quantum operator. We demonstrate that this is not precisely correct by examining the statistics of the classical ZPF in contrast to that...

  9. k-Cosymplectic Classical Field Theories: Tulczyjew and Skinner-Rusk Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Angel M.; Román-Roy, Narciso; Salgado, Modesto; Vilariño, Silvia

    2012-06-01

    The k-cosymplectic Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms of first-order classical field theories are reviewed and completed. In particular, they are stated for singular and almost-regular systems. Subsequently, several alternative formulations for k-cosymplectic first-order field theories are developed: First, generalizing the construction of Tulczyjew for mechanics, we give a new interpretation of the classical field equations. Second, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms are unified by giving an extension of the Skinner-Rusk formulation on classical mechanics.

  10. On the Distribution of Neutral and Charged Pions through the Production of a Classical Pion Field

    CERN Document Server

    Anselm, A A; Bander, Myron

    1994-01-01

    High energy reactions may produce a state around the collision point that is best described by a classical pion field. Such a field might be an isospin rotated vacuum of the chiral $\\sigma$-model or, as discussed in this work, a solution of the equations of motion resultinng from the coupling of fields of this model to quarks produced in the collision. In such configurations all directions in isospin space are allowed leading to a sizable probability of events with, essentially, only charged particles (Centauros) or all neutral particles (anti-Centauros). (In more common statistical models of multiparticle production, the probability of such events is suppressed exponentially by the total multiplicity.) We find that the isospin violation due to the mass difference of the up and down quarks has a significant effect on these distributions and enhances the production of events consisting predominantly of neutral particles.

  11. Classical solutions in quantum field theory solitons and instantons in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, Erick J

    2012-01-01

    Classical solutions play an important role in quantum field theory, high energy physics and cosmology. Real-time soliton solutions give rise to particles, such as magnetic monopoles, and extended structures, such as domain walls and cosmic strings, that have implications for early universe cosmology. Imaginary-time Euclidean instantons are responsible for important nonperturbative effects, while Euclidean bounce solutions govern transitions between metastable states. Written for advanced graduate students and researchers in elementary particle physics, cosmology and related fields, this book brings the reader up to the level of current research in the field. The first half of the book discusses the most important classes of solitons: kinks, vortices and magnetic monopoles. The cosmological and observational constraints on these are covered, as are more formal aspects, including BPS solitons and their connection with supersymmetry. The second half is devoted to Euclidean solutions, with particular emphasis on ...

  12. Carter subgroups of singular classical groups over finite fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高有; 石新华

    2004-01-01

    Let Fq be a finite field with qelements whereq = pα. In the present paper, the authors study the existence and structure of Carter subgroups of singular symplectic group Sp (Fq), singular unitary group U ( Fq2 ) and singular orthogonal group O ( Fq ) ( n is even) over finite fields Fq.

  13. Second-order spatial correlation in the far-field: Comparing entangled and classical light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erfeng; Liu, Weitao; Lin, Huizu; Chen, Pingxing

    2016-02-01

    We consider second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field. The quantum theory of second-order spatial correlation is analyzed, and the role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. Meanwhile, the difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced.

  14. Classical Kinetic Theory of Landau Damping for Self-interacting Scalar Fields in the Broken Phase

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The classical kinetic theory of one-component self-interacting scalar fields is formulated in the broken symmetry phase and applied to the phenomenon of Landau damping. The domain of validity of the classical approach is found by comparing with the result of a 1-loop quantum calculation.

  15. Field theory and weak Euler-Lagrange equation for classical particle-field systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Burby, Joshua W; Davidson, Ronald C

    2014-10-01

    It is commonly believed as a fundamental principle that energy-momentum conservation of a physical system is the result of space-time symmetry. However, for classical particle-field systems, e.g., charged particles interacting through self-consistent electromagnetic or electrostatic fields, such a connection has only been cautiously suggested. It has not been formally established. The difficulty is due to the fact that the dynamics of particles and the electromagnetic fields reside on different manifolds. We show how to overcome this difficulty and establish the connection by generalizing the Euler-Lagrange equation, the central component of a field theory, to a so-called weak form. The weak Euler-Lagrange equation induces a new type of flux, called the weak Euler-Lagrange current, which enters conservation laws. Using field theory together with the weak Euler-Lagrange equation developed here, energy-momentum conservation laws that are difficult to find otherwise can be systematically derived from the underlying space-time symmetry.

  16. Geometric field theory and weak Euler-Lagrange equation for classical relativistic particle-field systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Peifeng; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Nong; Yu, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    A manifestly covariant, or geometric, field theory for relativistic classical particle-field system is developed. The connection between space-time symmetry and energy-momentum conservation laws for the system is established geometrically without splitting the space and time coordinates, i.e., space-time is treated as one identity without choosing a coordinate system. To achieve this goal, we need to overcome two difficulties. The first difficulty arises from the fact that particles and field reside on different manifold. As a result, the geometric Lagrangian density of the system is a function of the 4-potential of electromagnetic fields and also a functional of particles' world-lines. The other difficulty associated with the geometric setting is due to the mass-shell condition. The standard Euler-Lagrange (EL) equation for a particle is generalized into the geometric EL equation when the mass-shell condition is imposed. For the particle-field system, the geometric EL equation is further generalized into a w...

  17. Embeddings of maximal tori in classical groups over local and global fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer-Fluckiger, E.; Lee, T.-Y.; Parimala, R.

    2016-08-01

    Embeddings of maximal tori in classical groups over fields of characteristic not 2 are the subject matter of several recent papers. The aim of the present paper is to give necessary and sufficient conditions for such an embedding to exist, when the base field is a local field, or the field of real numbers. This completes the results of [3], where a complete criterion is given for the Hasse principle to hold when the base field is a global field.

  18. A course in mathematical physics 2 classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Thirring, Walter

    1978-01-01

    In the past decade the language and methods ofmodern differential geometry have been increasingly used in theoretical physics. What seemed extravagant when this book first appeared 12 years ago, as lecture notes, is now a commonplace. This fact has strengthened my belief that today students of theoretical physics have to learn that language-and the sooner the better. Afterall, they willbe the professors ofthe twenty-first century and it would be absurd if they were to teach then the mathematics of the nineteenth century. Thus for this new edition I did not change the mathematical language. Apart from correcting some mistakes I have only added a section on gauge theories. In the last decade it has become evident that these theories describe fundamental interactions, and on the classical level their structure is suffi­ cientlyclear to qualify them for the minimum amount ofknowledge required by a theoretician. It is with much regret that I had to refrain from in­ corporating the interesting developments in Kal...

  19. Generation of longitudinal electric current by the transversal electromagnetic field in classical and quantum plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of nonlinear interaction of transversal electromagnetic field with degenerate collisionless classical and quantum plasmas is carried out. Formulas for calculation electric current in degenerate collisionless classical and quantum plasmas are deduced. It has appeared, that the nonlinearity account leads to occurrence of longitudinal electric current directed along a wave vector. This second current is orthogonal to the known transversal current, received at the classical linear analysis. Graphic comparison of density of electric current for classical degenerate Fermi plasmas and Fermi-Dirac plasmas (plasmas with any degree of degeneration of electronic gas) is carried out. Graphic comparison of density of electric current for classical and quantum degenerate plasmas is carried out. Also comparison of dependence of density of electric current of quantum degenerate plasmas from dimensionless wave number at various values of dimensionless frequency of oscillations of electromagnetic field is carried ...

  20. Green-Function-Based Monte Carlo Method for Classical Fields Coupled to Fermions

    OpenAIRE

    Weiße, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Microscopic models of classical degrees of freedom coupled to non-interacting fermions occur in many different contexts. Prominent examples from solid state physics are descriptions of colossal magnetoresistance manganites and diluted magnetic semiconductors, or auxiliary field methods for correlated electron systems. Monte Carlo simulations are vital for an understanding of such systems, but notorious for requiring the solution of the fermion problem with each change in the classical field c...

  1. Classical Field-Theoretical approach to the non-linear q-Klein-Gordon Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Plastino, A

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of efforts made in [EPL {\\bf 97}, 41001 (2012)], we extend them here by developing a classical field theory (FT)to the q-Klein-Gordon equation advanced in [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 106}, 140601 (2011)]. This makes it possible to generate a hipotetical conjecture regarding black matter. We also develop the classical field theory for a q-Schrodinger equation, different from the one in [EPL {\\bf 97}, 41001 (2012)], that was deduced in [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 379}, 2690 (2015)] from the hypergeometric differential equation. Our two classical theories reduce to the usual quantum FT for $q\\rightarrow 1$.

  2. Non-Noetherian symmetries for oscillators in classical mechanics and in field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Sergio A.; Delajara, Jamie; Pena, Leda

    1995-01-01

    Infinitely many new conservation laws both for free fields as well as for test fields evolving on a given gravitational background are presented. The conserved currents are constructed using the field theoretical counterpart of a recently discovered non-Noetherian symmetry which gives rise to a new way of solving the classical small oscillations problem. Several examples are discussed.

  3. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  4. Involutions on Classical Crossed Products over Global Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Hatzaras; Th. Theohari-Apostolidi

    2002-01-01

    If L/K is a finite Galois extension of the global field K with Galois group G, we denote by A = (L/K, α) the crossed product algebra of G over L,where α is the factor set of G. We give a criterion when A admits an involution of the first kind by which a characterization of the factor set is given.

  5. Synthetic Lorentz force in classical atomic gases via Doppler effect and radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Dubček, T; Jukić, D; Aumiler, D; Ban, T; Buljan, H

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically predict a novel type of synthetic Lorentz force for classical (cold) atomic gases, which is based on the Doppler effect and radiation pressure. A fairly uniform and strong force can be constructed for gases in macroscopic volumes of several cubic millimeters and more. This opens the possibility to mimic classical charged gases in magnetic fields, such as those in a tokamak, in cold atom experiments.

  6. Comments on cold neutron confinement by an electromagnetic classical field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, S [University of Concepcion, P O Box 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2007-02-15

    Regarding a recent paper (Bruce S 2006 Phys. Scr. 74 371), we comment on cold neutron confining in a system consisting of an Aharonov-Casher together with a properly set Aharonov-Bohm configuration. We find that, for the supersymmetric ground state, an extra spin-orbit (spin-electromagnetic angular momentum density) term should be present. This effect turns out to modify the phenomenology associated with the anomalous magnetic moment of the neutron.

  7. Second-order spatial correlation in the far-field: Comparing entangled and classical light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Erfeng, E-mail: efzhang@163.com; Liu, Weitao; Lin, Huizu; Chen, Pingxing

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field is investigated. • The role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. • The difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced. - Abstract: We consider second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field. The quantum theory of second-order spatial correlation is analyzed, and the role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. Meanwhile, the difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced.

  8. Analysis of Slight Discrepancy Between Quantum Dynamics and Classical Statistical Dynamics For Second Order Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Werbos, P J

    2003-01-01

    Quantum Field Theory (QFT) makes predictions by combining two sets of assumptions: (1) quantum dynamics, such as a Schrodinger or Liouville equation; (2) quantum measurement, such as stochastic collapse to an eigenfunction of a measurement operator. A previous paper defined a classical density matrix R encoding the statistical moments of an ensemble of states of classical second-order Hamiltonian field theory. It proved Tr(RQ)=E(Q), etc., for the usual field operators as defined by Weinberg, and it proved that those observables of the classical system obey the usual Heisenberg dynamic equation. However, R itself obeys dynamics different from the usual Liouville equation! This paper derives those dynamics, and calculates the discrepancy between CFT and normal form QFT in predicting general observables g(Q,P). There is some preliminary evidence for the conjecture that the discrepancies disappear in equilibrium states (bound states and scattering states) for finite bosonic field theories. Even if not, they appea...

  9. Particle creation, classicality and related issues in quantum field theory: I. Formalism and toy models

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2007-01-01

    The quantum theory of a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent frequency arises in several important physical problems, especially in the study of quantum field theory in an external background. While the mathematics of this system is straightforward, several conceptual issues arise in such a study. We present a general formalism to address some of the conceptual issues like the emergence of classicality, definition of particle content, back reaction etc. In particular, we parametrize the wave function in terms of a complex number (which we call excitation parameter) and express all physically relevant quantities in terms it. Many of the notions -- like those of particle number density, effective Lagrangian etc., which are usually defined using asymptotic in-out states -- are generalized as time-dependent concepts and we show that these generalized definitions lead to useful and reasonable results. Having developed the general formalism we apply it to several examples. Exact analytic expressions are found ...

  10. Quantum epistemology from subquantum ontology: Quantum mechanics from theory of classical random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    The scientific methodology based on two descriptive levels, ontic (reality as it is) and epistemic (observational), is briefly presented. Following Schrödinger, we point to the possible gap between these two descriptions. Our main aim is to show that, although ontic entities may be unaccessible for observations, they can be useful for clarification of the physical nature of operational epistemic entities. We illustrate this thesis by the concrete example: starting with the concrete ontic model preceding quantum mechanics (the latter is treated as an epistemic model), namely, prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), we propose the natural physical interpretation for the basic quantum mechanical entity-the quantum state ("wave function"). The correspondence PCSFT ↦ QM is not straightforward, it couples the covariance operators of classical (prequantum) random fields with the quantum density operators. We use this correspondence to clarify the physical meaning of the pure quantum state and the superposition principle-by using the formalism of classical field correlations.

  11. Conditional symmetries in axisymmetric quantum cosmologies with scalar fields and the fate of the classical singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampeli, Adamantia; Pailas, Theodoros; Terzis, Petros A.; Christodoulakis, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the classical and quantum solutions of some axisymmetric cosmologies coupled to a massless scalar field are studied in the context of minisuperspace approximation. In these models, the singular nature of the Lagrangians entails a search for possible conditional symmetries. These have been proven to be the simultaneous conformal symmetries of the supermetric and the superpotential. The quantization is performed by adopting the Dirac proposal for constrained systems, i.e. promoting the first-class constraints to operators annihilating the wave function. To further enrich the approach, we follow [1] and impose the operators related to the classical conditional symmetries on the wave function. These additional equations select particular solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. In order to gain some physical insight from the quantization of these cosmological systems, we perform a semiclassical analysis following the Bohmian approach to quantum theory. The generic result is that, in all but one model, one can find appropriate ranges of the parameters, so that the emerging semiclassical geometries are non-singular. An attempt for physical interpretation involves the study of the effective energy-momentum tensor which corresponds to an imperfect fluid.

  12. Numerical study of chiral plasma instability within the classical statistical field theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Buividovich, P V

    2015-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the real-time dynamics of chirally imbalanced lattice Dirac fermions coupled to dynamical electromagnetic field. To this end we use the classical statistical field theory approach, in which the quantum evolution of fermions is simulated exactly, and electromagnetic fields are treated as classical. Motivated by recent experiments on chirally imbalanced Dirac semimetals, we use the Wilson-Dirac lattice Hamiltonian for fermions in order to model the emergent nature of chiral symmetry at low energies. In general, we observe that the backreaction of fermions on the electromagnetic field prevents the system from acquiring large chirality imbalance. In the case of chirality pumping in parallel electric and magnetic fields, electric field is screened by the produced on-shell fermions and the accumulation of chirality is hence stopped. In the case of evolution with initially present chirality imbalance, axial charge tends to decay at the expense of nonzero helicity of electromagnetic ...

  13. Classical Electromagnetic Fields from Quantum Sources in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Holliday, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields are generated in high energy nuclear collisions by spectator valence protons. These fields are traditionally computed by integrating the Maxwell equations with point sources. One might expect that such an approach is valid at distances much larger than the proton size and thus such a classical approach should work well for almost the entire interaction region in the case of heavy nuclei. We argue that, in fact, the contrary is true: due to the quantum diffusion of the proton wave function, the classical approximation breaks down at distances of the order of the system size. As a result, the electromagnetic field (in vacuum) is present in the interaction region in the form of a traveling wave for much longer time than it was previously anticipated. Additionally, the quantum treatment of the sources removes the short-distance divergence of the field, making it possible to compute the maximal field strength achievable at a given collision energy.

  14. Classical field theory on electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories and gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, Florian

    2012-01-01

    The book describes Maxwell's equations first in their integral, directly testable form, then moves on to their local formulation. The first two chapters cover all essential properties of Maxwell's equations, including their symmetries and their covariance in a modern notation. Chapter 3 is devoted to Maxwell theory as a classical field theory and to solutions of the wave equation. Chapter 4 deals with important applications of Maxwell theory. It includes topical subjects such as metamaterials with negative refraction index and solutions of Helmholtz' equation in paraxial approximation relevant for the description of laser beams. Chapter 5 describes non-Abelian gauge theories from a classical, geometric point of view, in analogy to Maxwell theory as a prototype, and culminates in an application to the U(2) theory relevant for electroweak interactions. The last chapter 6 gives a concise summary of semi-Riemannian geometry as the framework for the classical field theory of gravitation. The chapter concludes wit...

  15. On classical and quantum dynamics of tachyon-like fields and their cosmological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrijević, Dragoljub D., E-mail: ddrag@pmf.ni.ac.rs; Djordjević, Goran S., E-mail: ddrag@pmf.ni.ac.rs; Milošević, Milan, E-mail: ddrag@pmf.ni.ac.rs [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, University of Niš (Serbia); Vulcanov, Dumitru [Faculty of Physics, West University of Timisoara (Romania)

    2014-11-24

    We consider a class of tachyon-like potentials, motivated by string theory, D-brane dynamics and inflation theory in the context of classical and quantum mechanics. A formalism for describing dynamics of tachyon fields in spatially homogenous and one-dimensional - classical and quantum mechanical limit is proposed. A few models with concrete potentials are considered. Additionally, possibilities for p-adic and adelic generalization of these models are discussed. Classical actions and corresponding quantum propagators, in the Feynman path integral approach, are calculated in a form invariant on a change of the background number fields, i.e. on both archimedean and nonarchimedean spaces. Looking for a quantum origin of inflation, relevance of p-adic and adelic generalizations are briefly discussed.

  16. Field-testing of the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Sørensen, Morten Togo; Gozalov, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We aimed to field-test the beta version of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The proposed beta draft of the 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases...

  17. Apparent Paradoxes in Classical Electrodynamics: A Fluid Medium in an Electromagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmetskii, A. L.; Yarman, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we analyse a number of teaching paradoxes of classical electrodynamics, dealing with the relativistic transformation of energy and momentum for a fluid medium in an external electromagnetic field. In particular, we consider a moving parallel plate charged capacitor, where the electric attraction of its plates is balanced by the…

  18. Generation of non-classical optical fields by a beam splitter with second-order nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Hari

    2016-01-01

    We propose quantum-mechanical model of a beam splitter with second-order nonlinearity and show that non-classical features such as squeezing and sub-Poissonian photon statistics of optical fields can be generated in output fundamental and second harmonic modes when we mix coherent light beams via such a nonlinear beam splitter.

  19. Quantum-classical correspondence of a field induced KAM-type transition: A QTM approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Chattaraj; S Sengupta; S Giri

    2008-01-01

    A transition from regular to chaotic behaviour in the dynamics of a classical Henon-Heiles oscillator in the presence of an external field is shown to have a similar quantum signature when studied using the pertaining phase portraits and the associated Kolmogorov-Sinai-Lyapunov entropies obtained through the corresponding Bohmian trajectories.

  20. Effective resonant interactions via a driving field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A B [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Sainz, I [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Saavedra, C [Center for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2004-11-01

    Effective resonant quantum atom-field interactions are studied. These resonant interactions are induced by the presence of an external classical driving field. An adequate choice for frequencies of the driving field produces nonlinear effective Hamiltonians both for atom-field and for spin-spin interactions. It is shown that the exact numerical evolution for each resonance condition is well described by the corresponding effective Hamiltonian.

  1. SIMLA: Simulating particle dynamics in intense laser and other electromagnetic fields via classical and quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. G.; Harvey, C. N.

    2015-07-01

    We present the Fortran program SIMLA, which is designed for the study of charged particle dynamics in laser and other background fields. The dynamics can be determined classically via the Lorentz force and Landau-Lifshitz equations or, alternatively, via the simulation of photon emission events determined by strong-field quantum-electrodynamics amplitudes and implemented using Monte-Carlo routines. Multiple background fields can be included in the simulation and, where applicable, the propagation direction, field type (plane wave, focussed paraxial, constant crossed, or constant magnetic), and time envelope of each can be independently specified.

  2. Back-Reaction of Classical Fields on Black Hole Area Law

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Wung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    We study the back-reaction of classical Maxwell field and massive scalar field on the BTZ black hole entropy. The exact values of the modification which correct the black hole area law are found. We discuss the similar properties between the scalar and Maxwell field which is investigated in both of Coulomb gauge and Lorentz gauge. The dependences of mass and mode number on the black hole entropy are illustrated. We also study the back-reaction by D branes, which is described by DBI action, and explicitly check that the classical solution which gives the black hole entropy precisely corrects the black hole area law. Our results extend the calculations of the generalized gravitational entropy proposed in recent by Lewkowycz and Maldacena [1].

  3. Pseudo-classical transport in a sheared magnetic field: Theory and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevins, W.M.; Harte, J.; Gell, Y.

    1979-11-01

    The cross-field transport due to the trapping of electrons in a finite amplitude wave (pseudo-classical transport) is investigated. Both finite wave frequencies and magnetic shear are included. The single particle orbit equations are solved to obtain the trapping criterion as well as the trapped particle orbit width and bounce frequency. Using a random walk model, the scaling of the pseudo-classical transport coefficients with the parameters of the plasma and wave are deduced. This scaling is employed to extend a previous calculation of the transport coefficients to include magnetic shear which is found to reduce these transport coefficients. Computer simulations of this transport process are presented. The measured transport rates are in very good agreement with the previous kinetic calculation in the absence of magnetic shear and with this extension of pseudo-classical transport theory which includes magnetic shear.

  4. Excitation of the classical electromagnetic field in a cavity containing a thin slab with a time-dependent conductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Dodonov, V V

    2016-01-01

    An exact infinite set of coupled ordinary differential equations, describing the evolution of the modes of the classical electromagnetic field inside an ideal cavity, containing a thin slab with the time-dependent conductivity $\\sigma(t)$ and dielectric permittivity $\\varepsilon(t)$, is derived for the dispersion-less media. This problem is analyzed in connection with the attempts to simulate the so called Dynamical Casimir Effect in three-dimensional electromagnetic cavities, containing a thin semiconductor slab, periodically illuminated by strong laser pulses. Therefore it is assumed that functions $\\sigma(t)$ and $\\delta\\varepsilon(t)=\\varepsilon(t)-\\varepsilon(0)$ are different from zero during short time intervals (pulses) only. The main goal is to find the conditions, under which the initial nonzero classical field could be amplified after a single pulse (or a series of pulses). Approximate solutions to the dynamical equations are obtained in the cases of "small" and "big" maximal values of the function...

  5. A Study of Classics-Reading Curriculum, Classics-Reading Promotion, and Classics-Reading Effect Modeling Exploration in Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuen-An Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study are to test reliabilities and validities of classics-reading curriculum (CRC scale, classics-reading promotion (CRP scale, and classics-reading effect (CRE scale and to examine the relationships between CRC, CRP, and CRE in elementary schools through applying CORPS framework. The pilot sample and formal sample contain 141 and 500 participants from elementary school faculties and classics-reading volunteers in the north, central, south, and east regions of Taiwan. The findings indicate that Cronbach α coefficients of curriculum cognition (CC, curriculum teaching (CT, inside-school promotion (IP, outside-school promotion (EP, learning effect (LE, and class management effect (CME subscales are .88, .85, .93, .91, .91, .94, respectively, through exploratory factor analysis and they have good internal reliabilities and construct validities, respectively, through confirmatory factor analysis. Moreover, CC, CT, IP, and EP have positive influences on LE (standardized coefficients .34, .25, .14, and .22 and on CME (standardized coefficients .41, .14, .14, and .20, respectively. CC, CT, IP, and EP can explain 69% of LE and 61% of CME. The model is supported by the data. Lastly, this study proposes some suggestions regarding the classics-reading education for elementary schools.

  6. Pig chromosome aberrations after vaccination against classical swine fever in field trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genghini, Rosa; Tiranti, Iván; Wittouck, Patricia

    2002-07-26

    Chromosomal aberrations were observed after vaccination against classical swine fever (CSF) in a previous study done on experimental pigs. To determine if the same effect occurs in farm animals, field trials were done with immunized pigs. The cytogenetic analysis was made from lymphocyte cultures of pigs sampled in three farms of Río Cuarto region on six different periods: one, pre-vaccination (control) and in five post-vaccination (days 3, 7, 10, 15 and 22). Vaccine inoculation induced significant increase of cell frequency with chromosomal aberrations from days 3 to 10, when maximal frequencies of 6.78, 10.36 and 7.21% were observed in farms A, B and C, respectively. Afterwards, a decrease was recorded, reaching values not significantly different from controls. Mean frequencies of cells with chromosomal aberrations were 2.8+/-0.3, 5.9+/-0.4, 3.1+/-0.3%, for A, B and C farms, respectively. Cytogenetic effect was clastogenic, being chromosome breaks the first type of alteration to increase from the day 3 post-vaccination onwards, followed by chromatid exchanges and cells with multiple abnormalities. Chromosome pulverization was the last type to show increment, reaching a top value on day 10, after that it started to diminish gradually. There was no difference in the frequency of polyploid cells among sampling dates meaning that this type of alteration would not be induced by vaccination. Results of this field study confirm the mutagenic capacity of live virus vaccines against CSF and indicate that the evolution of chromosome alterations on the five evaluated post-vaccination periods was similar at different environments.

  7. Quantum epistemology from subquantum ontology: quantum mechanics from theory of classical random fields

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The scientific methodology based on two descriptive levels, ontic (reality as it is ) and epistemic (observational), is briefly presented. Following Schr\\"odinger, we point to the possible gap between these two descriptions. Our main aim is to show that, although ontic entities may be inaccessible for observations, they can be useful for clarification of the physical nature of operational epistemic entities. We illustrate this thesis by the concrete example: starting with the concrete ontic model preceding quantum mechanics (the latter is treated as an epistemic model), namely, prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), we propose the natural physical interpretation for the basic quantum mechanical entity - the quantum state ("wave function"). The correspondence PCSFT to QM is not straightforward, it couples the covariance operators of classical (prequantum) random fields with the quantum density operators. We use this correspondence to clarify the physical meaning of the pure quantum state and th...

  8. On the relativistic classical motion of a radiating spinning particle in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Arnab; Rajeev, S. G.

    2011-04-01

    We propose classical equations of motion for a charged particle with magnetic moment, taking radiation reaction into account. This generalizes the Landau-Lifshitz equations for the spinless case. In the special case of spin-polarized motion in a constant magnetic field (synchrotron motion) we verify that the particle does lose energy. Previous proposals did not predict dissipation of energy and also suffered from runaway solutions analogous to those of the Lorentz-Dirac equations of motion.

  9. Critical properties of the classical Heisenberg and XY models : A mean field renormalization group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sadeghi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available  Using both mean field renormalization group (MFRG and Surface-Bulk MFRG (SBMFRG, we study the critical behavior of the classical Heisenberg and XY models on a simple cubic lattice. Critical temperatures as well as critical exponents, characteristic the universality classes of these two models were calculated, analytically for1, 2, 3 and 4 spin clusters. The results are in good agreement with higher accurate methods such as Monte Carlo and High- temperature series.

  10. On The Relativistic Classical Motion of a Radiating Spinning Particle in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Kar, Arnab

    2010-01-01

    We propose classical equations of motion for a charged particle with magnetic moment, taking radiation reaction into account. This generalizes the Landau-Lifshitz equations for the spinless case. In the special case of spin-polarized motion in a constant magnetic field (synchrotron motion) we verify that the particle does lose energy. Previous proposals did not predict dissipation of energy and also suffered from runaway solutions analogous to those of the Lorentz-Dirac equations of motion.

  11. Classical field theories of first order and lagrangian submanifolds of premultisymplectic manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, Cédric M; Marrero, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    A description of classical field theories of first order in terms of Lagrangian submanifolds of premultisymplectic manifolds is presented. For this purpose, a Tulczyjew's triple associated with a fibration is discussed. The triple is adapted to the extended Hamiltonian formalism. Using this triple, we prove that Euler-Lagrange and Hamilton-De Donder-Weyl equations are the local equations defining Lagrangian submanifolds of a premultisymplectic manifold.

  12. On the existence of classical solutions for stationary extended mean field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we consider extended stationary mean-field games, that is mean-field games which depend on the velocity field of the players. We prove various a-priori estimates which generalize the results for quasi-variational mean-field games in Gomes et al. (2012). In addition we use adjoint method techniques to obtain higher regularity bounds. Then we establish the existence of smooth solutions under fairly general conditions by applying the continuity method. When applied to standard stationary mean-field games as in Lasry and Lions (2006), Gomes and Sanchez-Morgado (2011) or Gomes et al. (2012) this paper yields various new estimates and regularity properties not available previously. We discuss additionally several examples where the existence of classical solutions can be proved. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A New Semi-Symmetric Unified Field Theory of the Classical Fields of Gravity and Electromagnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to present a classical theoretical framework in which the gravitational and electromagnetic fields are unified as intrinsic geometric objects in the space-time manifold. For this purpose, we first present the preliminary geometric considerations dealing with the metric differential geometry of Cartan connections. The unified field theory is then developed as an extension of the general theory of relativity based on a semi- symmetric Cartan connection which is meant to be as close as possible structurally to the symmetric connection of the Einstein-Riemann space-time.

  14. The quench map in an integrable classical field theory: nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudrelier, Vincent; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics obtained by an abrupt change (a quench) in the parameters of an integrable classical field theory, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We first consider explicit one-soliton examples, which we fully describe by solving the direct part of the inverse scattering problem. We then develop some aspects of the general theory using elements of the inverse scattering method. For this purpose, we introduce the quench map which acts on the space of scattering data and represents the change of parameter with fixed field configuration (initial condition). We describe some of its analytic properties by implementing a higher level version of the inverse scattering method, and we discuss the applications of Darboux–Bäcklund transformations, Gelfand–Levitan–Marchenko equations and the Rosales series solution to a related, dual quench problem. Finally, we comment on the interplay between quantum and classical tools around the theme of quenches and on the usefulness of the quantization of our classical approach to the quantum quench problem.

  15. Mean-field approximation for spacing distribution functions in classical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Diego Luis; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a mean-field method to calculate approximately the spacing distribution functions p(n)(s) in one-dimensional classical many-particle systems. We compare our method with two other commonly used methods, the independent interval approximation and the extended Wigner surmise. In our mean-field approach, p(n)(s) is calculated from a set of Langevin equations, which are decoupled by using a mean-field approximation. We find that in spite of its simplicity, the mean-field approximation provides good results in several systems. We offer many examples illustrating that the three previously mentioned methods give a reasonable description of the statistical behavior of the system. The physical interpretation of each method is also discussed.

  16. Analysis of classical phase space and energy transfer for two rotating dipoles in an electric field

    CERN Document Server

    González-Férez, Rosario; Salas, J Pablo; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We explore the classical dynamics of two interacting rotating dipoles that are fixed in the space and exposed to an external homogeneous electric field. Kinetic energy transfer mechanisms between the dipoles are investigated varying both the amount of initial excess kinetic energy of one of them and the strength of the electric field. In the field-free case, and depending on the initial excess energy an abrupt transition between equipartition and non-equipartition regimes is encountered. The study of the phase space structure of the system as well as the formulation of the Hamiltonian in an appropriate coordinate frame provide a thorough understanding of this sharp transition. When the electric field is turned on, the kinetic energy transfer mechanism is significantly more complex and the system goes through different regimes of equipartition and non-equipartition of the energy including chaotic behavior.

  17. Some Complex Pressure Effects on Spectra from Simple Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    I will first recall how [the two Newton's equations, 1rst year of university] one can very easily compute the rotational and translational classical dynamics of an ensemble of linear molecules interacting through an (input) pair-wise intermolecular potential. These Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations (CMDS), which provide the time dependence of the positions and axis-orientations of gas phase molecules, are then used to calculate a number of pressure effects manifesting in absorption and scattering spectra. The cases of CO2, O2 and N2 will be considered, systems for which fully quantum approaches are intractable, and comparisons with measured data will be made, free of any adjusted parameter. I will show that, with a few input ingredients from literature (molecule geometry, electric multipoles, polarizabilities, ...) an no adjusted parameter, excellent agreements with various measurements are obtained. Examples will be given for: (1) Collision induced absorption (due to the interaction induced dipole) ; (2) The far wings of absorption (due to the dipole) and light scattering (due to polarizability) bands ; (3) The broadening and shapes (with their deviations from the Voigt profile) of individual absorption lines for both "free" and spatially tightly confined gases. If times allows, additional demonstrations of the interest of CMDS will be given by considering line-mixing effects and the relaxation of laser-kicked molecules.

  18. Classical T Tauri stars: magnetic fields, coronae, and star-disc interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, C P; Gregory, S G; Donati, J -F; Hussain, G

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fields of young stars set their coronal properties and control their spin evolution via the star-disc interaction and outflows. Using 14 magnetic maps of 10 classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) we investigate their closed X-ray emitting coronae, their open wind-bearing magnetic fields, and the geometry of magnetospheric accretion flows. The magnetic fields of all the CTTSs are multipolar. Stars with simpler (more dipolar) large-scale magnetic fields have stronger fields, are slower rotators, and have larger X-ray emitting coronae compared to stars with more complex large-scale magnetic fields. The field complexity controls the distribution of open and closed field regions across the stellar surface, and strongly influences the location and shapes of accretion hot spots. However, the higher order field components are of secondary importance in determining the total unsigned open magnetic flux, which depends mainly on the strength of the dipole component and the stellar surface area. Likewise, the dipol...

  19. The principle of stationary nonconservative action for classical mechanics and field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Galley, Chad R; Stein, Leo C

    2014-01-01

    We further develop a recently introduced variational principle of stationary action for problems in nonconservative classical mechanics and extend it to classical field theories. The variational calculus used is consistent with an initial value formulation of physical problems and allows for time-irreversible processes, such as dissipation, to be included at the level of the action. In this formalism, the equations of motion are generated by extremizing a nonconservative action $\\mathcal{S}$, which is a functional of a doubled set of degrees of freedom. The corresponding nonconservative Lagrangian contains a potential $K$ which generates nonconservative forces and interactions. Such a nonconservative potential can arise in several ways, including from an open system interacting with inaccessible degrees of freedom or from integrating out or coarse-graining a subset of variables in closed systems. We generalize Noether's theorem to show how Noether currents are modified and no longer conserved when $K$ is non-...

  20. Generation of the longitudinal current by the transversal electromagnetic field in classical and quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2015-01-01

    From Vlasov kinetic equation for collisionless plasmas distribution function in square-law approximation on size of electromagnetic field is received. Formulas for calculation electric current at any temperature (any degree of degeneration of electronic gas) are deduced. The case of small values of the wave numbers is considered. It is shown, that the nonlinearity account leads to occurrence the longitudinal electric current directed along a wave vector. This longitudinal current orthogonal to known transversal classical current, received at the linear analysis. From the kinetic equation with Wigner integral for collisionless quantum plasma distribution function is received in square-law on vector potential approximation. Formulas for calculation electric current at any temperature are deduced. The case of small values of wave number is considered. It is shown, that size of a longitudinal current at small values of wave number and for classical plasma and for quantum plasma coincide. Graphic comparison of dim...

  1. Systematic method for unification of various field theories in a two-dimensional classical $\\phi^4$ field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Zarei, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Although creating a unified theory in Elementary Particles Physics is still an open problem, there are a lot of attempts for unifying other fields of physics. Following such unifications, we regard a two dimensional (2D) classical $\\Phi^{4}$ field theory model to study several field theories with different symmetries in various dimensions. While the completeness of this model has been already proved by a mapping between statistical mechanics and quantum information theory, here, we take into account a fundamental systematic approach with purely mathematical basis to re-derive such completeness in a general manner. Due to simplicity and generality, we believe that our method leads to a general approach which can be understood by other physical communities as well as quantum information theorists. Furthermore, our proof of the completeness is not only a proof-of-principle, but also an interesting algorithmic proof. We consider a discrete version of a general field theory as an arbitrary polynomial function of f...

  2. A Langevin Approach to a Classical Brownian Oscillator in an Electromagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza Ortiz, J. S.; Bauke, F. C.; Lagos, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a charged Brownian particle bounded by an harmonic potential, embedded in a Markovian heat bath and driven from equilibrium by external electric and magnetic fields. We develop a quaternionic-like (or Pauli spinor-like) representation, hitherto exploited in classical Lorentz related dynamics. Within this formalism, in a very straight forward and elegant fashion, we compute the exact solution for the resulting generalized Langevin equation, for the case of a constant magnetic field. For the case the source electromagnetic fields satisfy Maxwell's equations, yielding spinor-like Mathieu equations, we compute the solutions within the JWKB approximation. With the solutions at hand we further compute spatial, velocities and crossed time correlations. In particular we study the (kinetically defined) nonequilbrium temperature. Therefore, we can display the system's time evolution towards equilibrium or towards non equilibrium (steady or not) states.

  3. Parametric Instability of Classical Yang-Mills Fields in an Expanding Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tsutsui, Shoichiro; Ohnishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the instability of classical Yang-Mills field in an expanding geometry under a color magnetic background field within the linear regime. We consider homogeneous, boost-invariant and time-dependent color magnetic fields simulating the glasma configuration. We introduce the conformal coordinates which enable us to map an expanding problem approximately into a nonexpanding problem. We find that the fluctuations with finite longitudinal momenta can grow exponentially due to parametric instability. Fluctuations with finite transverse momenta can also show parametric instability, but their momenta are restricted to be small. The most unstable modes start to grow exponentially in the early stage of the dynamics and they may affect the thermalization in heavy-ion collisions.

  4. Parametric instability of classical Yang-Mills fields in an expanding geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shoichiro; Kunihiro, Teiji; Ohnishi, Akira

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the instability of a classical Yang-Mills field in an expanding geometry under a color magnetic background field within the linear regime. We consider homogeneous, boost-invariant, and time-dependent color magnetic fields simulating the glasma configuration. We introduce the conformal coordinates which enable us to map an expanding problem approximately into a nonexpanding problem. We find that the fluctuations with finite longitudinal momenta can grow exponentially due to parametric instability. Fluctuations with finite transverse momenta can also show parametric instability, but their momenta are restricted to be small. The most unstable modes start to grow exponentially in the early stage of the dynamics, and they may affect the thermalization in heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Classical R-matrix theory for bi-Hamiltonian field systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaszak, Maciej [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Szablikowski, Blazej M [Department of Mathematics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QW (United Kingdom)], E-mail: blaszakm@amu.edu.pl, E-mail: b.szablikowski@maths.gla.ac.uk

    2009-10-09

    This is a survey of the application of the classical R-matrix formalism to the construction of infinite-dimensional integrable Hamiltonian field systems. The main point is the study of bi-Hamiltonian structures. Appropriate constructions on Poisson, noncommutative and loop algebras as well as the central extension procedure are presented. The theory is developed for (1 + 1)- and (2 + 1)-dimensional field and lattice soliton systems as well as hydrodynamic systems. The formalism presented contains sufficiently many proofs and important details to make it self-contained and complete. The general theory is applied to several infinite-dimensional Lie algebras in order to construct both dispersionless and dispersive (soliton) integrable field systems.

  6. Femtosecond measurements of electric fields: from classical amplitudes to quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, Claudius; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    Ultrabroadband electro-optic sampling is presented as an extremely sensitive technique to detect electric field amplitudes in free space. The temporal resolution provided by few-femtosecond laser pulses results in a bandwidth exceeding 100 THz, potentially covering the entire infrared spectral range. A pedagogic introduction to the operational principle of the method is given along the lines of a classical coherent input field and a zincblende-type electro-optic sensor. We then show that even the bare vacuum fluctuations of the electric field in the quantum ground state may be detected. This time-domain approach to quantum physics operates directly on sub-cycle scales where no local energy conservation holds. Therefore, signals may be obtained from purely virtual photons without amplification to finite intensity.

  7. The classical particle coupled to external electromagnetic field: symmetries and conserved quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Gabriel Duarte; Ferreira, Renata Rosa; Thibes, Ronaldo [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia (UESB), BA (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: We consider a classical particle minimally coupled to an external electromagnetic field, in both non-relativistic and relativistic regimes. The coupling is constructed via the electromagnetic potential which is assumed to satisfy the classical Maxwell equations. We review Noether's theorem at classical level associating infinitesimal symmetries to conserved quantities. The fundamental space-time symmetries are investigated considering a non-relativistic action, a relativistic action in a particular reference frame and an explicitly Lorentz invariant Lagrangian. We work out in detail the corresponding conserved quantities for each case. The well-known Noether's theorem establishes a connection between continuous infinitesimal symmetries of the action and conserved quantities - given a particular action, for each infinitesimal symmetry there exists an explicit conserved quantity. In particular, a single particle subjected to an external electromagnetic field gives rise to an action which may enjoy space-time symmetries. For the non-relativistic particle, we analyze translations in space and time and spatial rotations, calculating the conserved quantities - linear momentum, energy and angular momentum. The relativistic particle enjoys space-time Lorentz symmetry. Thus we check the six symmetries of the homogeneous Lorentz group, corresponding to three spatial rotations and three boosts, and the four space-time translations extending to the non-homogeneous Lorentz group (Poincare group). We consider two distinct actions describing the relativistic particle minimally coupled to an external electromagnetic field - the first one describes the particle in a particular frame of reference enforcing the relativistic generalization of Newton's second law with the Lorentz force while the second one is obtained from a Lorentz scalar Lagrangian. In all cases the conserved quantities are explicitly calculated via Noether's theorem. (author)

  8. Cosmological consequences of classical flavor-space locked gauge field radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeld, Jannis; Caldwell, Robert R.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a classical SU(2) gauge field in a flavor-space locked configuration as a species of radiation in the early Universe and show that it would have a significant imprint on a primordial stochastic gravitational wave spectrum. In the flavor-space locked configuration, the electric and magnetic fields of each flavor are parallel and mutually orthogonal to other flavors, with isotropic and homogeneous stress energy. Due to the non-Abelian coupling, the gauge field breaks the symmetry between left- and right-circularly polarized gravitational waves. This broken chiral symmetry results in a unique signal: nonzero cross-correlation of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization, T B and E B , both of which should be zero in the standard, chiral symmetric case. We forecast the ability of current and future cosmic microwave background experiments to constrain this model. Furthermore, a wide range of behavior is shown to emerge, depending on the gauge field coupling, abundance, and allocation into electric and magnetic field energy density. The fluctuation power of primordial gravitational waves oscillates back and forth into fluctuations of the gauge field. In certain cases, the gravitational wave spectrum is shown to be suppressed or amplified by up to an order of magnitude depending on the initial conditions of the gauge field.

  9. Field test of classical symmetric encryption with continuous variables quantum key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouguet, Paul; Kunz-Jacques, Sébastien; Debuisschert, Thierry; Fossier, Simon; Diamanti, Eleni; Alléaume, Romain; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe; Leverrier, Anthony; Pache, Philippe; Painchault, Philippe

    2012-06-18

    We report on the design and performance of a point-to-point classical symmetric encryption link with fast key renewal provided by a Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution (CVQKD) system. Our system was operational and able to encrypt point-to-point communications during more than six months, from the end of July 2010 until the beginning of February 2011. This field test was the first demonstration of the reliability of a CVQKD system over a long period of time in a server room environment. This strengthens the potential of CVQKD for information technology security infrastructure deployments.

  10. The Quench Map in an Integrable Classical Field Theory: Nonlinear Schr\\"odinger Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Caudrelier, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics obtained by an abrupt change (a {\\em quench}) in the parameters of an integrable classical field theory, the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. We first consider explicit one-soliton examples, which we fully describe by solving the direct part of the inverse scattering problem. We then develop some aspects of the general theory using elements of the inverse scattering method. For this purpose, we introduce the {\\em quench map} which acts on the space of scattering data and represents the change of parameter with fixed field configuration (initial condition). We describe some of its analytic properties by implementing a higher level version of the inverse scattering method, and we discuss the applications of Darboux-B\\"acklund transformations, Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equations and the Rosales series solution to a related, dual quench problem. Finally, we comment on the interplay between quantum and classical tools around the theme of quenches and on the usefulness of the ...

  11. Magnetic properties of a classical XY spin dimer in a "planar" magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftja, Orion; Prenga, Dode

    2016-10-01

    Single-molecule magnetism originates from the strong intra-molecular magnetic coupling of a small number of interacting spins. Such spins generally interact very weakly with the neighboring spins in the other molecules of the compound, therefore, inter-molecular spin couplings are negligible. In certain cases the number of magnetically coupled spins is as small as a dimer, a system that can be considered the smallest nanomagnet capable of storing non-trivial magnetic information on the molecular level. Additional interesting patterns arise if the spin motion is confined to a two-dimensional space. In such a scenario, clusters consisting of spins with large-spin values are particularly attractive since their magnetic interactions can be described well in terms of classical Heisenberg XY spins. In this work we calculate exactly the magnetic properties of a nanomagnetic dimer of classical XY spins in a "planar" external magnetic field. The problem is solved by employing a mathematical approach whose idea is the introduction of auxiliary spin variables into the starting expression of the partition function. Results for the total internal energy, total magnetic moment, spin-spin correlation function and zero-field magnetic susceptibility can serve as a basis to understand the magnetic properties of large-spin dimer building blocks.

  12. Classical and quantum theory of the massive spin-two field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigstein, Adrian; Giacosa, Francesco; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we review classical and quantum field theory of massive non-interacting spin-two fields. We derive the equations of motion and Fierz-Pauli constraints via three different methods: the eigenvalue equations for the Casimir invariants of the Poincaré group, a Lagrangian approach, and a covariant Hamilton formalism. We also present the conserved quantities, the solution of the equations of motion in terms of polarization tensors, and the tree-level propagator. We then discuss canonical quantization by postulating commutation relations for creation and annihilation operators. We express the energy, momentum, and spin operators in terms of the former. As an application, quark-antiquark currents for tensor mesons are presented. In particular, the current for tensor mesons with quantum numbers JPC =2-+ is, to our knowledge, given here for the first time.

  13. Thermodynamic properties for applications in chemical industry via classical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Hasse, Hans; Vrabec, Jadran

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of fluids are of key importance for the chemical industry. Presently, the fluid property models used in process design and optimization are mostly equations of state or G (E) models, which are parameterized using experimental data. Molecular modeling and simulation based on classical force fields is a promising alternative route, which in many cases reasonably complements the well established methods. This chapter gives an introduction to the state-of-the-art in this field regarding molecular models, simulation methods, and tools. Attention is given to the way modeling and simulation on the scale of molecular force fields interact with other scales, which is mainly by parameter inheritance. Parameters for molecular force fields are determined both bottom-up from quantum chemistry and top-down from experimental data. Commonly used functional forms for describing the intra- and intermolecular interactions are presented. Several approaches for ab initio to empirical force field parameterization are discussed. Some transferable force field families, which are frequently used in chemical engineering applications, are described. Furthermore, some examples of force fields that were parameterized for specific molecules are given. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods for the calculation of transport properties and vapor-liquid equilibria are introduced. Two case studies are presented. First, using liquid ammonia as an example, the capabilities of semi-empirical force fields, parameterized on the basis of quantum chemical information and experimental data, are discussed with respect to thermodynamic properties that are relevant for the chemical industry. Second, the ability of molecular simulation methods to describe accurately vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of binary mixtures containing CO(2) is shown.

  14. Vacuum awakening effect in spheroidal and rotating configurations, and its relation to the classical instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Raissa F.P.; Matsas, George E.A.; Lima, William C.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IFT/UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vanzella, Daniel A.T. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Recently, it has been shown that certain space-time evolutions can induce an exponential growth of the vacuum fluctuations of some non-minimally coupled free scalar fields (PRL 104, 161102). This 'vacuum awakening mechanism' may have consequences, in particular, to astrophysics, since the vacuum energy density of the scalar field can grow as large as the nuclear density of neutron stars in few milliseconds once the effect is triggered (PRL 105, 151102). Conversely, the existence of classes of non-minimally coupled scalar fields can be unfavored by the determination of the mass-radius ratio of relativistic stars with known equations of state. For this latter purpose, it is relevant to know if the main features described in the original works are preserved when assumptions such as spherical symmetry or staticity are relaxed. In this presentation, we discuss this mechanism in the context of spheroidal and rotating thin shells, in order to investigate the consequences of deviations from spherical symmetry and staticity on the triggering of the effect. We also make explicit the relation between this vacuum awakening effect and the related classical instability, approached for instance by a quasi-normal mode analysis, and show how quantum fluctuations can be simulated by classical perturbations of a corresponding amplitude. (author)

  15. Conformal Field Theory Correlators from Classical Field Theory on Anti-de Sitter Space; 2, Vector and Spinor Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mück, W

    1998-01-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to calculate CFT correlation functions of vector and spinor fields. The connection between the AdS and boundary fields is properly treated via a Dirichlet boundary value problem.

  16. Effects of complex parameters on classical trajectories of Hamiltonian systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asiri Nanayakkara; Thilagarajah Mathanaranjan

    2014-06-01

    Anderson et al have shown that for complex energies, the classical trajectories of real quartic potentials are closed and periodic only on a discrete set of eigencurves. Moreover, recently it was revealed that when time is complex $t(t = t_r e^{i_})$, certain real Hermitian systems possess close periodic trajectories only for a discrete set of values of . On the other hand, it is generally true that even for real energies, classical trajectories of non-PT symmetric Hamiltonians with complex parameters are mostly non-periodic and open. In this paper, we show that for given real energy, the classical trajectories of complex quartic Hamiltonians $H = p^2 + ax^4 + bx^k$ (where is real, is complex and = 1 or 2) are closed and periodic only for a discrete set of parameter curves in the complex -plane. It was further found that given complex parameter , the classical trajectories are periodic for a discrete set of real energies (i.e., classical energy gets discretized or quantized by imposing the condition that trajectories are periodic and closed). Moreover, we show that for real and positive energies (continuous), the classical trajectories of complex Hamiltonian $H = p^2 + x^4$, ($= _r$ e$^{i}$) are periodic when $ = 4 \\tan^{−1}$[($n/(2m + n)$)] for $\\forall n$ and $m \\mathbb{Z}$.

  17. Exact solution of the classical mechanical quadratic Zeeman effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sambhu N Datta; Anshu Pandey

    2007-06-01

    We address the curious problem of quadratic Zeeman effect at the classical mechanical level. The problem has been very well understood for decades, but an analytical solution of the equations of motion is still to be found. This state of affairs persists because the simultaneous presence of the Coulombic and quadratic terms lowers the dynamical symmetry. Energy and orbital angular momentum are still constants of motion. We find the exact solutions by introducing the concept of an image ellipse. The quadratic effect leads to a dilation of space–time, and a one-to-one correspondence is observed for pairs of physical quantities like energy and angular momentum, and the maximum and minimum distances from the Coulomb center for the Zeeman orbit and the corresponding pairs for the image ellipse. Thus, instead of finding additional conserved quantities, we find constants of motion for an additional dynamics, namely, the image problem. The trajectory is open, in agreement with Bertrand's theorem, but necessarily bound. A stable unbound trajectory does not exist for real values of energy and angular momentum. The radial distance, the angle covered in the plane of the orbit, and the time are uniquely determined by introducing further the concept of an image circle. While the radial distance is defined in a closed form as a transcendental function of the image-circular angle, the corresponding orbit angle and time variables are found in the form of two convergent series expansions. The latter two variables are especially contracted, thereby leading to a precession of the open cycles around the Coulomb center. It is expected that the space–time dilation effect observed here would somehow influence the solution of the quantum mechanical problem at the non-relativistic level.

  18. Gauge bridges in classical field theory; Eichbruecken in der klassischen Feldtheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, S.

    2009-03-15

    In this thesis Poisson structures of two classical gauge field theories (Maxwell-Klein-Gordon- and Maxwell-Dirac-system) are constructed using the parametrix construction of Green's functions. Parametrices for the Maxwell-Klein-Gordon- and Maxwell-Dirac-system are constructed in Minkowski space and this construction is later generalized to curved space times for the Maxwell-Klein-Gordon-system. With these Green's functions Poisson brackets will be defined as Peierls brackets. Finally non-local, gauge invariant observables, the so-called 'gauge bridges'are constructed. Gauge bridges are the matrix elements of holonomy operators. It is shown, that these emerge from Poisson brackets of local, gauge invariant observables. (orig.)

  19. Classic (Nonquantic Algorithm for Observations and Measurements Based on Statistical Strategies of Particles Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Savastru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge about surroundings can be achieved by observations and measurements but both are influenced by errors (noise. Therefore one of the first tasks is to try to eliminate the noise by constructing instruments with high accuracy. But any real observed and measured system is characterized by natural limits due to the deterministic nature of the measured information. The present work is dedicated to the identification of these limits. We have analyzed some algorithms for selection and estimation based on statistical hypothesis and we have developed a theoretical method for their validation. A classic (non-quantic algorithm for observations and measurements based on statistical strategies of optical field is presented in detail. A generalized statistical strategy for observations and measurements on the nuclear particles, is based on these results, taking into account the particular type of statistics resulting from the measuring process also.

  20. Lorentz Dispersion Law from classical Hydrogen electron orbits in AC electric field via geometric algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Uzziel; Sugon, Quirino M; McNamara, Daniel J; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2015-01-01

    We studied the orbit of an electron revolving around an infinitely massive nucleus of a large classical Hydrogen atom subject to an AC electric field oscillating perpendicular to the electron's circular orbit. Using perturbation theory in geometric algebra, we show that the equation of motion of the electron perpendicular to the unperturbed orbital plane satisfies a forced simple harmonic oscillator equation found in Lorentz dispersion law in Optics. We show that even though we did not introduce a damping term, the initial orbital position and velocity of the electron results to a solution whose absorbed energies are finite at the dominant resonant frequency $\\omega=\\omega_0$; the electron slowly increases its amplitude of oscillation until it becomes ionized. We computed the average power absorbed by the electron both at the perturbing frequency and at the electron's orbital frequency. We graphed the trace of the angular momentum vector at different frequencies. We showed that at different perturbing frequen...

  1. Polarizable empirical force field for acyclic polyalcohols based on the classical Drude oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xibing; Lopes, Pedro E M; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2013-10-01

    A polarizable empirical force field for acyclic polyalcohols based on the classical Drude oscillator is presented. The model is optimized with an emphasis on the transferability of the developed parameters among molecules of different sizes in this series and on the condensed-phase properties validated against experimental data. The importance of the explicit treatment of electronic polarizability in empirical force fields is demonstrated in the cases of this series of molecules with vicinal hydroxyl groups that can form cooperative intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Compared to the CHARMM additive force field, improved treatment of the electrostatic interactions avoids overestimation of the gas-phase dipole moments resulting in significant improvement in the treatment of the conformational energies and leads to the correct balance of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding of glycerol as evidenced by calculated heat of vaporization being in excellent agreement with experiment. Computed condensed phase data, including crystal lattice parameters and volumes and densities of aqueous solutions are in better agreement with experimental data as compared to the corresponding additive model. Such improvements are anticipated to significantly improve the treatment of polymers in general, including biological macromolecules.

  2. On the Classical String Solutions and String/Field Theory Duality

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandrova, D.; Bozhilov, P.

    2003-01-01

    We classify almost all classical string configurations, considered in the framework of the semi-classical limit of the string/gauge theory duality. Then, we describe a procedure for obtaining the conserved quantities and the exact classical string solutions in general string theory backgrounds, when the string embedding coordinates depend non-linearly on the worldsheet time parameter.

  3. Quantum mean-field approximation for lattice quantum models: Truncating quantum correlations and retaining classical ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpetti, Daniele; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The mean-field approximation is at the heart of our understanding of complex systems, despite its fundamental limitation of completely neglecting correlations between the elementary constituents. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 130401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.130401], we have shown that in quantum many-body systems at finite temperature, two-point correlations can be formally separated into a thermal part and a quantum part and that quantum correlations are generically found to decay exponentially at finite temperature, with a characteristic, temperature-dependent quantum coherence length. The existence of these two different forms of correlation in quantum many-body systems suggests the possibility of formulating an approximation, which affects quantum correlations only, without preventing the correct description of classical fluctuations at all length scales. Focusing on lattice boson and quantum Ising models, we make use of the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics to introduce such an approximation, which we dub quantum mean-field (QMF) approach, and which can be readily generalized to a cluster form (cluster QMF or cQMF). The cQMF approximation reduces to cluster mean-field theory at T =0 , while at any finite temperature it produces a family of systematically improved, semi-classical approximations to the quantum statistical mechanics of the lattice theory at hand. Contrary to standard MF approximations, the correct nature of thermal critical phenomena is captured by any cluster size. In the two exemplary cases of the two-dimensional quantum Ising model and of two-dimensional quantum rotors, we study systematically the convergence of the cQMF approximation towards the exact result, and show that the convergence is typically linear or sublinear in the boundary-to-bulk ratio of the clusters as T →0 , while it becomes faster than linear as T grows. These results pave the way towards the development of semiclassical numerical

  4. Control and Transfer of Entanglement between Two Atoms Driven by Classical Fields under Dressed-State Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qing-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Xu, Juan; Yan, Qiu-Rong; Liu, Ye; Chen, An

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the dynamics and transfer of the entanglement of the two identical atoms simultaneously interacting with vacuum field by employing the dressed-state representation. The two atoms are driven by classical fields. The influence of the initial entanglement degree of two atoms, the coupling strength between the atom and the classical field and the detuning between the atomic transition frequency and the frequency of classical field on the entanglement and atomic linear entropy is discussed. The initial entanglement of the two atoms can be transferred into the entanglement between the atom and cavity field when the dissipation is neglected. The maximally entangled state between the atoms and cavity field can be obtained under some certain conditions. The time of disentanglement of two atoms can be controlled and manipulated by adjusting the detuning and classical driving fields. Moreover, the larger the cavity decay rate is, the more quickly the entanglement of the two atoms decays. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11247213, 61368002, 11304010, 11264030, 61168001, China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2013M531558, Jiangxi Postdoctoral Research Project under Grant No. 2013KY33, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province under Grant No. 20142BAB217001, the Foundation for Young Scientists of Jiangxi Province (Jinggang Star) under Grant No. 20122BCB23002, the Research Foundation of the Education Department of Jiangxi Province under Grant Nos. GJJ13051, GJJ13057, and the Graduate Innovation Special Fund of Nanchang University under Grant No. cx2015137

  5. Classical and quantum effects in noble metal and graphene plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics — the interaction of light with free electrons in metals — is commonly understood within classical electrodynamics using local-response constitutive laws (such as Ohm's law). However, the tight localization of plasmons to small volumes is revealing intriguing new physics such as noncla...

  6. Nonsequential double ionization as a completely classical photoelectric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phay J; Panfili, R; Haan, S L; Eberly, J H

    2005-03-11

    We introduce a unified and simplified theory of atomic double ionization. Our results show that at high laser intensities (I>/=10(14) W/cm(2)) purely classical correlation is strong enough to account for all of the main features observed in experiments to date.

  7. Effects of classical music as part of environmental enrichment in captive Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Pereira da Cruz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the wild, animals are exposed to an ever-changing array of sensory stimuli. The captive environment, by contrast, is generally much more impoverished in terms of the cues it offers the animals housed within. In a bid to remedy this, and promote better welfare, mice (Mus musculus were exposed to two conditions: no auditory stimulation, and stimulation with classical music. In all experiments, a battery of behavior tests was used. The results demonstrated significantly decreased immobility in the forced swim, increased enclosed arm entries in the plus-maze, and decreased immobility in the open-field, in animals that had been pre-exposed to music 24h earlier, suggesting that changes in mouse motor activity were caused by classical music. This study led to the conclusion that environmental enrichment may have profound effects on the behavior of mice in behavioral tests, and that classical music can be a relatively simple method of contributing to the well-being of captive mice, but it can affect the results of experiments such as forced swimming.

  8. Finite-temperature Casimir pistons for an electromagnetic field with mixed boundary conditions and its classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, L P [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya, 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2009-03-13

    In this paper, the finite-temperature Casimir force acting on a two-dimensional Casimir piston due to an electromagnetic field is computed. It was found that if mixed boundary conditions are assumed on the piston and its opposite wall, then the Casimir force always tends to restore the piston toward the equilibrium position, regardless of the boundary conditions assumed on the walls transverse to the piston. In contrast, if pure boundary conditions are assumed on the piston and the opposite wall, then the Casimir force always tends to pull the piston toward the closer wall and away from the equilibrium position. The nature of the force is not affected by temperature. However, in the high-temperature regime, the magnitude of the Casimir force grows linearly with respect to temperature. This shows that the Casimir effect has a classical limit as has been observed in other literature.

  9. Characterization of a 20 kHz sonoreactor. Part I: analysis of mechanical effects by classical and numerical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez Bernal, Verónica; Frías Ferrer, Ángel; Iniesta Valcárcel, Jesús; González García, José; Aldaz Riera, Antonio; Riera Franco de Sarabia, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been carried out in order to characterize the ultrasonic field propagation and to obtain the spatial distribution of the mechanical effect derived from it. The results have been compared with those obtained with different classical physical methods (calorimetry, aluminium foil erosion, thermal probes) and have given useful information about the influence of the presence of probes and auxiliary tools in the ultrasonic field. All these information have been used for t...

  10. Classical trajectories in polar-asymmetric laser fields: Synchronous THz and XUV emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragossian, Aram; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of intense near- and mid-infrared laser pulses with rare gases has produced bursts of radiation with spectral content extending into the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray region of electromagnetic spectrum. On the other end of the spectrum, laser-driven gas plasmas has been shown to produce coherent sub-harmonic optical waveforms, covering from terahertz (THz) to mid- and near-infrared frequency spectral band. Both processes can be enhanced via a combination of a driving field and its second harmonic. Despite this striking similarity, only limited experimental and theoretical attempts have been made to address these two regimes simultaneously. Here we present systematic experiments and a unifying picture of these processes, based on our extension of the semi-classical three-step model. Further understanding of the generation and coherent control of time-synchronized transients with photon energies from meV to 1 keV can lead to numerous technological advances and to an intriguing possibilities of ultra-broadband investigations into complex condensed matter systems.

  11. Classical Oe Stars in the Field of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Golden-Marx, Jesse B; Lamb, J B; Graus, Andrew S; White, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    We present $29\\pm1$ classical Oe stars from RIOTS4, a spatially complete, spectroscopic survey of Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) field OB stars. The two earliest are O6e stars, and four are earlier than any Milky Way (MW) Oe stars. We also find ten Ope stars, showing He~\\textsc{i} infill and/or emission; five appear to be at least as hot as $\\sim$O7.5e stars. The hottest, star 77616, shows He~\\textsc{ii} disk emission, suggesting that even the hottest O stars can form decretion disks, and offers observational support for theoretical predictions that the hottest, fastest rotators can generate He$^+$-ionizing atmospheres. Our data also demonstrate that Ope stars correspond to Oe stars earlier than O7.5e with strong disk emission. We find that in the SMC, Oe stars extend to earlier spectral types than in the MW, and our SMC Oe/O frequency, $0.26\\pm0.04$, is much greater than the MW value, $0.03\\pm0.01$. These results are consistent with angular momentum transport by stronger winds suppressing decretion disk format...

  12. Thermal quantum and classical correlations in two qubit XX model in a nonuniform external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, Ali Saif M; Joag, Pramod S

    2010-01-01

    We investigate how thermal quantum discord $(QD)$ and classical correlations $(CC)$ of a two qubit one-dimensional XX Heisenberg chain in thermal equilibrium depend on temperature of the bath as well as on nonuniform external magnetic fields applied to two qubits and varied separately. We show that the behaviour of $QD$ differs in many unexpected ways from thermal entanglement $(EN)$. For the nonuniform case, $(B_1= - B_2)$ we find that $QD$ and $CC$ are equal for all values of $(B_1=-B_2)$ and for different temperatures. We show that, in this case, the thermal states of the system belong to a class of mixed states and satisfy certain conditions under which $QD$ and $CC$ are equal. The specification of this class and the corresponding conditions is completely general and apply to any quantum system in a state in this class and satisfying these conditions. We further find the relative contributions of $QD$ and $CC$ can be controlled easily by changing the relative magnitudes of $B_1$ and $B_2$.

  13. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models unravelling hidden possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anjan Kundu

    2015-11-01

    Reviewing briefly the concept of classical and quantum integrable systems, we propose an alternative Lax operator approach, leading to quasi-higher-dimensional integrable model, unravelling some hidden dimensions in integrable systems. As an example, we construct a novel integrable quasi-two-dimensional NLS equation at the classical and the quantum levels with intriguing application in rogue wave modelling.

  14. Emerging quantum mechanics: Coefficient of second-order coherence from classical random fields interacting with threshold type detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2014-11-01

    This paper is a contribution to the project "emergent quantum mechanics" unifying a variety of attempts to treat quantum mechanics (QMs) as emergent from other theories pretending on finer descriptions of quantum phenomena. More concretely it is about an attempt to model detection probabilities predicted by QM for single photon states by using classical random fields interacting with detectors of the threshold type. Continuous field model, prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), was developed in recent years and its predictions about probabilities and correlations match well with QM. The main problem is to develop the corresponding measurement theory which would describe the transition from continuous fields to discrete events, "clicks of detectors". Some success was achieved and the click-probabilities for quantum observables can be derived from PCSFT by modeling interaction of fields with the threshold type detectors. However, already for the coefficient of second-order coherence g2(0) calculations are too complicated and only an estimation of g2(0) was obtained. In this paper, we present results of numerical simulation based on PCSFT and modeling of interaction with threshold type detectors. The "prequantum random field" interacting with a detector is modeled as the Brownian motion in the space of classical fields (Wiener process in complex Hilbert space). Simulation for g2(0) shows that this coefficient approaches zero with increase of the number of detections.

  15. Classification and Properties of Solutions for the System of Equations of Classical Electrode Effect Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, A. V.; Grigor'ev, E. E.; Zhidkov, A. A.; Terent'ev, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    We study a one-dimensional stationary system of equations comprising the continuity equation for the ion concentration with the recombination effects taken into account and the Gauss law for the electric field. This system gives a simplified description of various phenomena in ionized medium theory and is used, in particular, for modeling of the electrode effect in the atmospheric surface layers with the turbulent diffusion effects neglected. Using the integral of the system and a phase portrait in the ion concentration plane, we offer a complete classification of types of solutions of the system, examine their properties, and deduce some analytical relations between the ion concentration and the electric field. The basic equations of classical electrode effect theory are obtained for some classes of solutions within the framework of this approach. Correct formulations of the problems are discussed. New classes of solutions, for which there are layers with infinitely increasing conductivity and charge density are described. The Appendix illustrates, in both analytical and graphical form, the results obtained in the main part of this paper on the basis of qualitative reasoning for parameters close to real. Analytical expressions for the fields and ion concentrations are given for all types of solutions. Relations for the distances between electrodes and analytical relations describing the properties of the spatially localized solutions are presented.

  16. One-Step Generation of Cluster States Assisted by a Strong Driving Classical Field in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Xiao-Qiang; ZHANG Shou

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme for one-step generation of cluster states with atoms sent through a thermal cavity with strong classical driving field, based on the resonant atom-cavity interaction so that the operating time is sharply short, which is important in the view of decoherence.

  17. Effects of barrier fluctuation on the tunneling dynamics in the presence of classical chaos in a mixed quantum-classical system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aparna Saha; Bidhan Chandra Bag; Pranab Sarkar

    2007-03-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the tunneling dynamics of a particle moving in a bistable potential with fluctuating barrier which is coupled to a non-integrable classical system and study the interplay between classical chaos and barrier fluctuation in the tunneling dynamics. We found that the coupling of the quantum system with the classical subsystem decreases the tunneling rate irrespective of whether the classical subsystem is regular or chaotic and also irrespective of the fact that whether the barrier fluctuates or not. Presence of classical chaos always enhances the tunneling rate constant. The effect of barrier fluctuation on the tunneling rate in a mixed quantum-classical system is to suppress the tunneling rate. In contrast to the case of regular subsystem, the suppression arising due to barrier fluctuation is more visible when the subsystem is chaotic.

  18. Classical integrability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  19. Equation of Motion of a Mass Point in Gravitational Field and Classical Tests of Gauge Theory of Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning; ZHANG Da-Hua

    2007-01-01

    A systematic method is developed to study the classical motion of a mass point in gravitational gauge field.First,by using Mathematica,a spherical symmetric solution of the field equation of gravitational gauge field is obtained,which is just the traditional Schwarzschild solution.Combining the principle of gauge covariance and Newton's second law of motion,the equation of motion of a mass point in gravitational field is deduced.Based on the spherical symmetric solution of the field equation and the equation of motion of a mass point in gravitational field,we can discuss classical tests of gauge theory of gravity,including the deflection of light by the sun,the precession of the perihelia of the orbits of the inner planets and the time delay of radar echoes passing the sun.It is found that the theoretical predictions of these classical tests given by gauge theory of gravity are completely the same as those given by general relativity.

  20. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of ``quantum physical brain'' reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a var...

  1. Effect of preoperative biliary drainage on outcome of classical pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandra Shekhar Bhati; Chandrashekhar Kubal; Pankaj Kumar Sihag; Ankur Atal Gupta; Raj Kamal Jenav; Nicholas G Inston; Jagdish M Mehta

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in the outcome of classical pancreaticodu odenectomy.METHODS: A 10-year retrospective data analysis was performed on patients (n = 48) undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy from March 1994 to March 2004 in department of surgery at SMS medical college, Jaipur, India. Demographic variables, details of preoperative stenting, operative procedure and post operative complications were noted.RESULTS: Preoperative biliary drainage was performed in 21 patients (43.5%). The incidence of septic complications was significantly higher in patients with biliary stent placement (P < 0.05, 0 vs 4). This group of patients also had a significantly higher minor biliary leak rate. Mortality and hospital stay in each group was comparable.CONCLUSION: Within this study population the use of PBD by endoscopic stenting was associated with a high incidence of infective complications. These findings do not support the routine use of biliary stenting in patients prior to pancreatico-duodenectomy.

  2. Local equilibria and state transfer of charged classical particles on a helix in an electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Plettenberg, J; Zampetaki, A V; Schmelcher, P

    2016-01-01

    We explore the effects of a homogeneous external electric field on the static properties and dynamical behavior of two charged particles confined to a helix. In contrast to the field-free setup which provides a separation of the center-of-mass and relative motion, the existence of an external force perpendicular to the helix axis couples the center-of-mass to the relative degree of freedom leading to equilibria with a localized center of mass. By tuning the external field various fixed points are created and/or annihilated through different bifurcation scenarios. We provide a detailed analysis of these bifurcations based on which we demonstrate a robust state transfer between essentially arbitrary equilibrium configurations of the two charges that can be induced by making the external force time-dependent.

  3. Studying the effects of classic hallucinogens in the treatment of alcoholism: rationale, methodology, and current research with psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Michael P

    2013-03-01

    Recent developments in the study of classic hallucinogens, combined with a re-appraisal of the older literature, have led to a renewal of interest in possible therapeutic applications for these drugs, notably their application in the treatment of addictions. This article will first provide a brief review of the research literature providing direct and indirect support for the possible therapeutic effects of classic hallucinogens such as psilocybin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in the treatment of addictions. Having provided a rationale for clinical investigation in this area, we discuss design issues in clinical trials using classic hallucinogens, some of which are unique to this class of drug. We then discuss the current status of this field of research and design considerations in future randomized trials.

  4. Adding quantum effects to the semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the molecular dynamics (MD) using classical or semi-classical trajectories provides important details for the understanding of many chemical reactions, protein folding, drug design, and solvation effects. MD simulations using trajectories have achieved great successes in the computer simulations of various systems, but it is difficult to incorporate quantum effects in a robust way. Therefore, improving quantum wavepacket dynamics and incorporating nonadiabatic transitions and quantum effects into classical and semi-classical molecular dynamics is critical as well as challenging. In this paper, we present a MD scheme in which a new set of equations of motion (EOM) are proposed to effectively propagate nuclear trajectories while conserving quantum mechanical energy which is critical for describing quantum effects like tunneling. The new quantum EOM is tested on a one-state one-dimensional and a two-state two-dimensional model nonadiabatic systems. The global quantum force experienced by each trajecto...

  5. Classical Gravitational Interactions and Gravitational Lorentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In quantum gauge theory of gravity, the gravitational field is represented by gravitational gauge field.The field strength of gravitational gauge field has both gravitoelectric component and gravitomagnetic component. In classical level, gauge theory of gravity gives classical Newtonian gravitational interactions in a relativistic form. Besides,it gives gravitational Lorentz force, which is the gravitational force on a moving object in gravitomagnetic field The direction of gravitational Lorentz force is not the same as that of classical gravitational Newtonian force. Effects of gravitational Lorentz force should be detectable, and these effects can be used to discriminate gravitomagnetic field from ordinary electromagnetic magnetic field.

  6. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Shyamal, E-mail: sbsp@uohyd.ac.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, C.R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad-500046 (India)

    2015-05-15

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  7. Higgs Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this meeting is to present new theoretical advancements related to effective field theories, evaluate the impact of initial results from the LHC Run2, and discuss proposals for data interpretation/presentation during Run2. A crucial role of the meeting is to bring together theorists from different backgrounds and with different viewpoints and to extend bridges towards the experimental community. To this end, we would like to achieve a good balance between senior and junior speakers, enhancing the visibility of younger scientists while keeping some overview talks.

  8. PREFACE: The 9th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, L. P.

    2015-05-01

    The most recent meeting took place at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, on June 9-13, 2014. This meeting forms the basis for the Proceedings that are recorded in this issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Along with the work of some of the founding members of the Association, we were fortunate to have lecturers from application areas that provided strong challenges for further developments in quantum field theory, cosmological problems, and in the dynamics of systems subject to accelerations and the effects of general relativity. Topics treated in this issue include studies of the dark matter problem, rotation curves, and, in particular, for the (relatively accessible) Milky Way galaxy, compact stellar objects, a composite particle model, and the properties of a conformally invariant theory with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The Stueckelberg theory is further investigated for its properties in producing bremsstrahlung and pair production and apparent superluminal effects, and, as mentioned above, the implications of low energy nuclear reactions for such off-shell theories. Other "proper time" theories are investigated as well, and a study of the clock synchronization problem is presented. A mathematical study of to quantum groupo associated with the Toda lattice and its implications for quantum field theory, as well as a phenomenological discussion of supernova mechanics as well as a semiclassical discussion of electron spin and the question of the compatibility of special relativity and the quantum theory. A careful analysis of the covariant Aharonov-Bohm effect is given as well. The quantization of massless fields and the relation to the Maxwell theory is also discussed. We wish to thank the participants who contributed very much through their lectures, personal discussions, and these papers, to the advancement of the subject and our understanding.

  9. Sudden death and rebirth of entanglement for different dimensional systems driven by a classical random external field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, N.; Eleuch, H.; Obada, A.-S.

    2016-10-01

    The entangled behavior of different dimensional systems driven by classical external random field is investigated. The amount of the survival entanglement between the components of each system is quantified. There are different behaviors of entanglement that come into view decay, sudden death, sudden birth and long-lived entanglement. The maximum entangled states which can be generated from any of theses suggested systems are much fragile than the partially entangled ones. The systems of larger dimensions are more robust than those of smaller dimensions systems, where the entanglement decay smoothly, gradually and may vanish for a very short time. For the class of $2\\times 3$ dimensional system, the one parameter family is found to be more robust than the two parameters family. Although the entanglement of driven $ 2 \\times 3$ dimensional system is very sensitive to the classical external random field, one can use them to generate a long-lived entanglement.

  10. Useful Pedagogical Applications of the Classical Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    One of the most known phenomena in physics is the Hall effect. This is mainly due to its simplicity and to the wide range of its theoretical and practical applications. To complete the pedagogical utility of the Hall effect in physics teaching, I will apply it here to determine the Faraday constant as a fundamental physical number and the number…

  11. Relaxation of 2+1 dimensional classical O(2) symmetric scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Borsanyi, S; Borsanyi, Sz.; Szep, Zs.

    2001-01-01

    Real time thermalization and relaxation phenomena are studied in the low energy density phase of the 2+1 dimensional classical O(2) symmetric scalar theory by solving numerically its dynamics. The near-equilibrium decay rate of on-shell waves and the power law governing the large time asymptotics of the off-shell relaxation agree with the analytic results based on linear response theory. The realisation of the Mermin-Wagner theorem is also studied in the final equilibrium ensemble.

  12. Unified field theory from the classical wave equation: Preliminary application to atomic and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, Héctor A.

    2016-07-01

    It is postulated that there exists a fundamental energy-like fluid, which occupies the flat three-dimensional Euclidean space that contains our universe, and obeys the two basic laws of classical physics: conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of total energy; the fluid is described by the classical wave equation (CWE), which was Schrödinger's first candidate to develop his quantum theory. Novel solutions for the CWE discovered twenty years ago are nonharmonic, inherently quantized, and universal in the sense of scale invariance, thus leading to quantization at all scales of the universe, from galactic clusters to the sub-quark world, and yielding a unified Lorentz-invariant quantum theory ab initio. Quingal solutions are isomorphic under both neo-Galilean and Lorentz transformations, and exhibit nother remarkable property: intrinsic unstability for large values of ℓ (a quantum number), thus limiting the size of each system at a given scale. Unstability and scale-invariance together lead to nested structures observed in our solar system; unstability may explain the small number of rows in the chemical periodic table, and nuclear unstability of nuclides beyond lead and bismuth. Quingal functions lend mathematical basis for Boscovich's unified force (which is compatible with many pieces of evidence collected over the past century), and also yield a simple geometrical solution for the classical three-body problem, which is a useful model for electronic orbits in simple diatomic molecules. A testable prediction for the helicoidal-type force is suggested.

  13. Verification and Invalidation of the Theory of Symplectic Manifold with Contact Degeneracies as Applied to the Classical Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    A theory of Symplectic Manifold with Contact Degeneracies (SMCD) was developed in [Zot'ev,2007]. The symplectic geometry uses an anti-symmetric tensor (closed differential form) such as a field tensor used in the classical field theory. The SMCD theory studies degeneracies of such form. In [Zot'ev,2011] the SMCD theory was applied to study a front of an electromagnetic pulsed field propagating into a region with no field. Here, the result of [Zot'ev,2011] is compared with the problem solution obtained using the well-known method presented in Witham, G.B., Linear and nonlinear waves, 1974. It is shown that the SMCD theory prediction is not supported by the result obtained with the Witham method.

  14. Gravity, as a classical regularizator for the Higgs field, and the genesis of rest masses and charge

    CERN Document Server

    Szabados, László B

    2016-01-01

    The classical Einstein--Standard Model system with conformally invariant coupling of the Higgs field to gravity is investigated. We show that, while the \\emph{structure} of the field equations for the matter fields is not changed by the conformal coupling, the energy-momentum tensor changes significantly: It will \\emph{not} be polynomial in the Higgs field, yielding in the observable Universe \\emph{a finite, universal upper bound} for the pointwise norm of the Higgs field in terms of Newton's gravitational constant. This provides a natural cut-off in the field theoretic calculations. The energy-momentum has two singularities: In cosmological spacetimes the usual Big Bang type singularity with diverging matter field variables, and a second, less violent one (`Small Bang'), in which it is only the geometry that is singular but the matter field variables remain finite. In the presence of Friedman--Robertson--Walker symmetries the energy density can have finite local minimum only for Higgs fields whose norm is le...

  15. Open and Closed String field theory interpreted in classical Algebraic Topology

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    There is an interpretation of open string field theory in algebraic topology. An interpretation of closed string field theory can be deduced from this open string theory to obtain as well the interpretation of open and closed string field theory combined.

  16. Competing Classical and Quantum Effects in Shape Relaxation of a Metallic Nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmin; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Toshishi; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that the quantum size effect (QSE) plays a competing role along side the classical thermodynamic effect in the shape relaxation of a small metallic island. Together, these effects transforms a lead(Pb) island grown on Si(111) substrate from its initially flattop faceted morphology to a peculiar ring-shape island, a process catalysed by the tip electric field of a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). We shall show for the first time how QSE affects the relaxation process dynamically. In particular, it leads to a novel strip-flow growth and double-step growth on selective strips of a plateau inside the ring, defined by the substrate steps more than 60?0?3 below. It appears that atoms diffusing on the plateau can clearly (sub i)(deg)sense(sub i)+/- the quantized energy states inside the island and have preferentially attached to regions that further reduces the surface energy as a result of the QSE, limiting its own growth and stabilizing the ring shape. The mechanism proposed here offers a sound explanation for ring shape metal and semiconductor islands observed in other systems as well.

  17. PREFACE: IARD 2012: 8th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Land, Martin C.; Gill, Tepper; Lusanna, Luca; Salucci, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored, from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view, since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical relativistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Lindner et al [Physical Review Letters 95 0040401 (2005)] as well as the more recent proposal of Palacios et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)] and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg [Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)] could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular

  18. Radiative accretion shocks along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields in classical T Tauri stars

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Argiroffi, C; Reale, F; Peres, G; Miceli, M; Matsakos, T; Stehle', C; Ibgui, L; de Sa, L; Chie`ze, J P; Lanz, T

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) AIMS. We investigate the dynamics and stability of post-shock plasma streaming along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields at the impact region of accretion columns. We study how the magnetic field configuration and strength determine the structure, geometry, and location of the shock-heated plasma. METHODS. We model the impact of an accretion stream onto the chromosphere of a CTTS by 2D axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Our model takes into account the gravity, the radiative cooling, and the magnetic-field-oriented thermal conduction. RESULTS. The structure, stability, and location of the shocked plasma strongly depend on the configuration and strength of the magnetic field. For weak magnetic fields, a large component of B may develop perpendicular to the stream at the base of the accretion column, limiting the sinking of the shocked plasma into the chromosphere. An envelope of dense and cold chromospheric material may also develop around the shocked column. For strong magnetic fields, th...

  19. Extension of high-order harmonic cutoff frequency by synthesizing the waveform of a laser field via the optimization of classical electron trajectory in the laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Di; Li Fu-Li

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate high-order harmonic generation by employing strong-field approximation (SFA) and present a new approach to the extension of the high-order harmonic cutoff frequency via an exploration of the dependence of high-order harmonic generation on the waveform of laser fields.The dependence is investigated via detailed analysis of the classical trajectories of the ionized electron moving in the continuum in the velocity-position plane.The classical trajectory consists of three sections (Acceleration Away,Deceleration Away,and Acceleration Back),and their relationship with the electron recollision energy is investigated.The analysis of classical trajectories indicates that,besides the final (Acceleration Back) section,the electron recollision energy also relies on the previous two sections.We simultaneously optimize the waveform in all three sections to increase the electron recollision energy,and an extension of the cutoff frequency up to Ip + 20.26Up is presented with a theoretically synthesized waveform of the laser field.

  20. PREFACE: IARD 2010: The 7th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Hu, Bei-Lok; Lee, Da-Shin; Gill, Tepper; Land, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anamolous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical realtivistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Linder et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 0040401 (2005)) as well as the more recent work of Palacios et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)) and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg (Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)) could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular, local

  1. ForceFit: a code to fit classical force fields to ab-initio potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, Neil Jon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldher, Benjamin [WSU; Kuta, Jadwiga [WSU; Clark, Aurora [WSU; Clark, Aurora E [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    The ForceFit program package has been developed for fitting classical force field parameters based upon a force matching algorithm to quantum mechanical gradients of configurations that span the potential energy surface of the system. The program, which runs under Unix and is written in C++, is an easy to use, nonproprietary platform that enables gradient fitting of a wide variety of functional force field forms to quantum mechanical information obtained from an array of common electronic structure codes. All aspects of the fitting process are run from a graphical user interface, from the parsing of quantum mechanical data, assembling of a potential energy surface database, setting the force field and variables to be optimized, choosing a molecular mechanics code for comparison to the reference data, and finally, the initiation of a least squares minimization algorithm. Furthermore, the code is based on a modular templated code design that enables the facile addition of new functionality to the program.

  2. Classical enhancement of quantum vacuum fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for the enhancement of vacuum fluctuations by means of a classical field. The basic idea is that if an observable quantity depends quadratically upon a quantum field, such as the electric field, then the application of a classical field produces a cross term between the classical and quantum fields. This cross term may be significantly larger than the purely quantum part, but also undergoes fluctuations driven by the quantum field. We illustrate this effect in a model for lightcone fluctuations involving pulses in a nonlinear dielectric. Vacuum electric field fluctuations produce fluctuations in the speed of a probe pulse, and form an analog model for quantum gravity effects. If the material has a nonzero third-order susceptibility, then the fractional light speed fluctuations are proportional to the square of the fluctuating electric field. Hence the application of a classical electric field can enhance the speed fluctuations. We give an example where this enhancement can be an increas...

  3. Multisymplectic effective General Boundary Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Arjang, Mona

    2013-01-01

    The transfer matrix in lattice field theory connects the covariant and the initial data frameworks; in spin foam models, it can be written as a composition of elementary cellular amplitudes/propagators. We present a framework for discrete spacetime classical field theory in which solutions to the field equations over elementary spacetime cells may be amalgamated if they satisfy simple gluing conditions matching the composition rules of cellular amplitudes in spin foam models. Furthermore, the formalism is endowed with a multisymplectic structure responsible for local conservation laws. Some models within our framework are effective theories modeling a system at a given scale. Our framework allows us to study coarse graining and the continuum limit.

  4. Effective field theory of slowly-moving "extreme black holes"

    OpenAIRE

    Degura, Yoshitaka; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    We consider the non-relativistic effective field theory of ``extreme black holes'' in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with an arbitrary dilaton coupling. We investigate finite-temperature behavior of gas of ``extreme black holes'' using the effective theory. The total energy of the classical many-body system is also derived.

  5. Interaction of charged amino-acid side chains with ions: an optimization strategy for classical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlen, Jens; Salimi, Leila; Sulpizi, Marialore; Peter, Christine; Donadio, Davide

    2014-04-10

    Many well-established classical biomolecular force fields, fitted on the solvation properties of single ions, do not necessarily describe all the details of ion pairing accurately, especially for complex polyatomic ions. Depending on the target application, it might not be sufficient to reproduce the thermodynamics of ion pairing, but it may also be necessary to correctly capture structural details, such as the coordination mode. In this work, we analyzed how classical force fields can be optimized to yield a realistic description of these different aspects of ion pairing. Given the prominent role of the interactions of negatively charged amino-acid side chains and divalent cations in many biomolecular systems, we chose calcium acetate as a benchmark system to devise a general optimization strategy that we applied to two popular force fields, namely, GROMOS and OPLS-AA. Using experimental association constants and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations as a reference, we found that small modifications of the van der Waals ion-ion interaction parameters allow a systematic improvement of the essential thermodynamic and structural properties of ion pairing.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation of the classical axion field in cosmology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Sacha; Elmer, Martin, E-mail: s.davidson@ipnl.in2p3.fr, E-mail: m.elmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue E. Fermi, Villeurbanne cedex, 69622 (France)

    2013-12-01

    The axion is a motivated cold dark matter candidate, which it would be interesting to distinguish from weakly interacting massive particles. Sikivie has suggested that axions could behave differently during non-linear galaxy evolution, if they form a Bose-Einstein condensate, and argues that ''gravitational thermalisation'' drives them to a Bose-Einstein condensate during the radiation dominated era. Using classical equations of motion during linear structure formation, we explore whether the gravitational interactions of axions can generate enough entropy. At linear order in G{sub N}, we interpret that the principle activities of gravity are to expand the Universe and grow density fluctuations. To quantify the rate of entropy creation we use the anisotropic stress to estimate a short dissipation scale for axions which does not confirm previous estimates of their gravitational thermalisation rate.

  7. Noise as a Boolean algebra of sigma-fields. II. Classicality, blackness, spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Tsirelson, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Similarly to noises, Boolean algebras of sigma-fields can be black. A noise may be treated as a homomorphism from a Boolean algebra of regular open sets to a Boolean algebra of sigma-fields. Spectral sets are useful also in this framework.

  8. Comparative merits of the memory function and dynamic local field correction of the classical one-component plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mithen, James P; Gregori, G

    2011-01-01

    The complementarity of the liquid and plasma descriptions of the classical one-component plasma (OCP) is explored by studying wavevector and frequency dependent dynamical quantities: the dynamical structure factor (DSF), and the dynamic local field correction (LFC). Accurate Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to validate/test models of the DSF and LFC. Our simulations, which span the entire fluid regime ($\\Gamma = 0.1 - 175$), show that the DSF is very well represented by a simple and well known memory function model of generalized hydrodynamics. On the other hand, the LFC, which we have computed using MD for the first time, is not well described by existing models.

  9. A Comparison of Classical Force-Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Ewen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For the successful development and application of lubricants, a full understanding of their complex nanoscale behavior under a wide range of external conditions is required, but this is difficult to obtain experimentally. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations can be used to yield unique insights into the atomic-scale structure and friction of lubricants and additives; however, the accuracy of the results depend on the chosen force-field. In this study, we demonstrate that the use of an accurate, all-atom force-field is critical in order to; (i accurately predict important properties of long-chain, linear molecules; and (ii reproduce experimental friction behavior of multi-component tribological systems. In particular, we focus on n-hexadecane, an important model lubricant with a wide range of industrial applications. Moreover, simulating conditions common in tribological systems, i.e., high temperatures and pressures (HTHP, allows the limits of the selected force-fields to be tested. In the first section, a large number of united-atom and all-atom force-fields are benchmarked in terms of their density and viscosity prediction accuracy of n-hexadecane using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD simulations at ambient and HTHP conditions. Whilst united-atom force-fields accurately reproduce experimental density, the viscosity is significantly under-predicted compared to all-atom force-fields and experiments. Moreover, some all-tom force-fields yield elevated melting points, leading to significant overestimation of both the density and viscosity. In the second section, the most accurate united-atom and all-atom force-field are compared in confined NEMD simulations which probe the structure and friction of stearic acid adsorbed on iron oxide and separated by a thin layer of n-hexadecane. The united-atom force-field provides an accurate representation of the structure of the confined stearic acid film; however, friction coefficients are

  10. Equations of motion in Double Field Theory: from classical particles to quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Kan, Nahomi; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The equation of motion for a point particle in the background field of double field theory is considered. We find that the motion is described by a geodesic flow in the doubled geometry. Inspired by analysis on the particle motion, we propose a modified model of quantum string cosmology, which includes two scale factors. The report is based on Phys. Rev. D84 (2011) 124049 [arXiv:1108.5795].

  11. Quantum field theory and classical optics: determining the fine structure constant

    OpenAIRE

    Leuchs, Gerd; Hawton, Margaret; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the vacuum are described by quantum physics including the response to external fields such as electromagnetic radiation. Of the two parameters that govern the details of the electromagnetic field dynamics in vacuum, one is fixed by the requirement of Lorentz invariance $c= 1/\\sqrt{\\varepsilon_{0} \\mu_{0}}$. The other one, $Z_{0}= \\sqrt{\\mu_{0}/\\varepsilon_{0}} = 1/(c\\varepsilon_{0})$ and its relation to the quantum vacuum, is discussed in this contribution. Deriving $\\vareps...

  12. Quantum and classical aspects of scalar and vector fields around black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Mengjie

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents recent studies on test scalar and vector fields around black holes. It is separated in two parts according to the asymptotic properties of the spacetime under study. In the first part, we investigate scalar and Proca fields on an asymptotically flat background. For the Proca field, we obtain a complete set of equations of motion in higher dimensional spherically symmetric backgrounds. These equations are solved numerically, both to compute Hawking radiation spectra and quasi-bound states. In the former case, we carry out a precise study of the longitudinal degrees of freedom induced by the field mass. This can be used to improve the model in the black hole event generators currently used at the Large Hadron Collider. Regarding quasi-bound states, we find arbitrarily long lived modes for a charged Proca field, as well as for a charged scalar field, in a Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole. The second part of this thesis presents research on superradiant instabilities of scalar and Maxwell fiel...

  13. Theory of motion for monopole-dipole singularities of classical Yang-Mills-Higgs fields. I. Laws of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Wolfgang; Havas, Peter; Rosenblum, Arnold

    1984-02-01

    In two recent papers, the general form of the laws of motion for point particles which are multipole sources of the classical coupled Yang-Mills-Higgs fields was determined by Havas, and for the special case of monopole singularities of a Yang-Mills field an iteration procedure was developed by Drechsler and Rosenblum to obtain the equations of motion of mass points, i.e., the laws of motion including the explicit form of the fields of all interacting particles. In this paper we give a detailed derivation of the laws of motion of monopole-dipole singularities of the coupled Yang-Mills-Higgs fields for point particles with mass and spin, following a procedure first applied by Mathisson and developed by Havas. To obtain the equations of motion, a systematic approximation method is developed in the following paper for the solution of the nonlinear field equations and determination of the fields entering the laws of motion found here to any given order in the coupling constant g.

  14. The truncated polynomial expansion Monte Carlo method for fermion systems coupled to classical fields: a model independent implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, G.; Şen, C.; Furukawa, N.; Motome, Y.; Dagotto, E.

    2005-05-01

    A software library is presented for the polynomial expansion method (PEM) of the density of states (DOS) introduced in [Y. Motome, N. Furukawa, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 68 (1999) 3853; N. Furukawa, Y. Motome, H. Nakata, Comput. Phys. Comm. 142 (2001) 410]. The library provides all necessary functions for the use of the PEM and its truncated version (TPEM) in a model independent way. The PEM/TPEM replaces the exact diagonalization of the one electron sector in models for fermions coupled to classical fields. The computational cost of the algorithm is O(N)—with N the number of lattice sites—for the TPEM [N. Furukawa, Y. Motome, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 73 (2004) 1482] which should be contrasted with the computational cost of the diagonalization technique that scales as O(N). The method is applied for the first time to a double exchange model with finite Hund coupling and also to diluted spin-fermion models. Program summaryTitle of library:TPEM Catalogue identifier: ADVK Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVK Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1707 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 644 Distribution format:tar.gz Operating system:Linux, UNIX Number of files:4 plus 1 test program Programming language used:C Computer:PC Nature of the physical problem:The study of correlated electrons coupled to classical fields appears in the treatment of many materials of much current interest in condensed matter theory, e.g., manganites, diluted magnetic semiconductors and high temperature superconductors among others. Method of solution: Typically an exact diagonalization of the electronic sector is performed in this type of models for each configuration of classical fields, which are integrated using a classical Monte Carlo algorithm. A polynomial expansion of the density of states is able to replace the exact

  15. Field reparametrization in effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Passarino, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    Debate topic for Effective Field Theory (EFT) is the choice of a "basis" for $\\mrdim = 6$ operators Clearly all bases are equivalent as long as they are a "basis", containing a minimal set of operators after the use of equations of motion and respecting gauge invariance. From a more formal point of view a basis is characterized by its closure with respect to renormalization. Equivalence of bases should always be understood as a statement for the S-matrix and not for the Lagrangian, as dictated by the equivalence theorem. Any phenomenological approach that misses one of these ingredients is still acceptable for a preliminar analysis, as long as it does not pretend to be an EFT. Here we revisit the equivalence theorem and its consequences for EFT when two sets of higher dimensional operators are connected by a set of non-linear, noninvariant, field reparametrizations.

  16. Effects of local anesthesia of the cerebellum on classical fear conditioning in goldfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano Ruriko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides the amygdala, of which emotion roles have been intensively studied, the cerebellum has also been demonstrated to play a critical role in simple classical fear conditioning in both mammals and fishes. In the present study, we examined the effect of local administration of the anesthetic agent lidocaine into the cerebellum on fear-related, classical heart-rate conditioning in goldfish. Methods The effects of microinjection of the anesthetic agent lidocaine into the cerebellum on fear conditioning were investigated in goldfish. The fear conditioning paradigm was delayed classical conditioning with light as a conditioned stimulus and electric shock as an unconditioned stimulus; cardiac deceleration (bradycardia was the conditioned response. Results Injecting lidocaine into the cerebellum had no effect on the base heart rate, an arousal/orienting response to the novel stimulus (i.e., the first presentation of light, or an unconditioned response to electric shock. However, lidocaine injection greatly impaired acquisition of conditioned bradycardia. Lidocaine injection 60 min before the start of the conditioning procedure showed no effect on acquisition of conditioned bradycardia, indicating that the effect of lidocaine was reversible. Conclusions The present results further confirm the idea that the cerebellum in teleost fish, as in mammals, is critically involved in classical fear conditioning.

  17. New theorem of classical electromagnetism: equilibrium magnetic field and current density are zero inside ideal conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Fiolhais, Miguel C N; Providencia, C; Nordmark, Arne B

    2010-01-01

    We prove a theorem on the magnetic energy minimum in a system of perfect, or ideal, conductors. It is analogous to Thomson's theorem on the equilibrium electric field and charge distribution in a system of conductors. We first prove Thomson's theorem using a variational principle. Our new theorem is then derived by similar methods. We find that magnetic energy is minimized when the current distribution is a surface current density with zero interior magnetic field; perfect conductors are perfectly diamagnetic. The results agree with currents in superconductors being confined near the surface. The theorem implies a generalized force that expels current and magnetic field from the interior of a conductor that loses its resistivity. Examples of solutions that obey the theorem are presented.

  18. Classical two-slit interference effects in double photoionization of molecular hydrogen at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Daniel A.; Miyabe, Shungo; Rescigno, Thomas N; McCurdy, C. William; Morales, Felipe; Martin, Fernando

    2008-07-06

    Recent experiments on double photoionization of H$_2$ with photon energies between 160 and 240 eV have revealed body-frame angular distributions that suggest classical two-slit interference effects may be present when one electron carries most of the available energy and the second electron is not observed. We report precise quantum mechanical calculations that reproduce the experimental findings. They reveal that the interpretation in terms of classical diffraction is only appropriate atsubstantially higher photon energies. At the energies considered in the experiment we offer an alternative explanation based on the mixing of two non-diffractive contributions by circularly polarized light.

  19. An educational contribution to the inadequacy of interpreting the photoelectric effect through the classical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoyannis, A. S.; Kalkanis, G.

    2017-03-01

    We develop a simulation to facilitate the teaching of the photoelectric effect in an introductory course on quantum mechanics at undergraduate level. Through a Visual Basic program we describe the interaction of light with electrons in a metal conductor in the phenomenon according to the classical theory. The description includes both the microscopic interaction, as well as the predictions of the theory for the experimental results, arising from the microscopic scale. The predictions of the classical model are in stark contrast with the experimental results of a real photoelectric device.

  20. Smoothing Effects for the Classical Solutions to the Landau-Fermi-Dirac Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuangqian LIU

    2012-01-01

    The smoothness of the solutions to the full Landau equation for Fermi-Dirac particles is investigated.It is shown that the classical solutions near equilibrium to the Landau-Fermi-Dirac equation have a regularizing effects in all variables (time,space and velocity),that is,they become immediately smooth with respect to all variables.

  1. Who gains, who loses? Welfare effects of classical swine fever epidemics in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangen, M.J.J.; Burrell, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    A sectoral market model and a stochastic epidemiological model were used to simulate the effects of classical swine fever (CSF) epidemics in the Netherlands in 1997-1998. Compulsory EU control measures were implemented. Welfare changes of Dutch stakeholders, as well as government costs, were calcula

  2. Elliptically oscillating classical solution in Higgs potential and the effects on vacuum transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadono, Yoshio; Inagaki, Tomohiro

    2016-05-01

    We investigate oscillating solutions of the equation of motion for the Higgs potential. The solutions are described by Jacobian elliptic functions. Classifying the classical solutions, we evaluate a possible parameter space for the initial conditions. To construct the field theory around the oscillating solutions, quantum fluctuations are introduced. This alternative perturbation method is useful to describe the nontrivial quantum theory around the oscillating state. This perturbation theory reduces to the standard one if we take the solution at the vacuum expectation value. It is shown that the transition probability between the vacuum and multiquanta states is finite as long as the initial field configuration does not start from the true vacuum.

  3. Dream-land with Classic Higgs field, Dimensional Reduction and all that

    CERN Document Server

    Shirkov, D V

    2012-01-01

    This text, on the one hand, is related to the talk delivered at the Conference "Gauge Fields. Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow", dedicated to the Andrej Slavnov 70th anniversary; on the other - in the form of a fairy tale - it summarizes some results of researches performed after this Fest, mainly due to discussion around the talk.

  4. Quantum statistical properties of the Jaynes-Cummings model in the presence of a classical homogeneous gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, M [Department of Physics, Science and Research Campus Azad University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, M H [Quantum Optics Group, Department of Physics, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltanolkotabi, M [Quantum Optics Group, Department of Physics, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-02-09

    The temporal evolution of quantum statistical properties of an interacting atom-radiation field system in the presence of a classical homogeneous gravitational field is investigated within the framework of the Jaynes-Cummings model. To analyse the dynamical evolution of the atom-radiation system a quantum treatment of the internal and external dynamics of the atom is presented based on an alternative su(2) dynamical algebraic structure. By solving the Schroedinger equation in the interaction picture, the evolving state of the system is found by which the influence of the gravitational field on the dynamical behaviour of the atom-radiation system is explored. Assuming that initially the radiation field is prepared in a coherent state and the two-level atom is in a coherent superposition of the excited and ground states, the influence of gravity on the collapses and revivals of the atomic population inversion, atomic dipole squeezing, atomic momentum diffusion, photon counting statistics and quadrature squeezing of the radiation field is studied.

  5. The Effective Field Theory of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    We propose a universal description of dark energy and modified gravity that includes all single-field models. By extending a formalism previously applied to inflation, we consider the metric universally coupled to matter fields and we write in terms of it the most general unitary gauge action consistent with the residual unbroken symmetries of spatial diffeomorphisms. Our action is particularly suited for cosmological perturbation theory: the background evolution depends on only three operators. All other operators start at least at quadratic order in the perturbations and their effects can be studied independently and systematically. In particular, we focus on the properties of a few operators which appear in non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor gravity and galileon theories. In this context, we study the mixing between gravity and the scalar degree of freedom. We assess the quantum and classical stability, derive the speed of sound of fluctuations and the renormalization of the Newton constant. The scalar ca...

  6. Does the classically chaotic Henon–Heiles oscillator exhibit quantum chaos under intense laser fields?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neetu Gupta; B M Deb

    2006-12-01

    The quantum dynamics of an electron moving under the Henon–Heiles (HH) potential in the presence of external time-dependent (TD) laser fields of varying intensities have been studied by evolving in real time the unperturbed ground-state wave function (, , ) of the HH oscillator. The TD Schröinger equation is solved numerically and the system is allowed to generate its own wave packet. Two kinds of sensitivities, namely, sensitivity to the initial quantum state and to the Hamiltonian, are examined. The threshold intensity of the laser field for an electron moving in the HH potential to reach its continuum is identified and in this region quantum chaos has been diagnosed through a combination of various dynamical signatures such as the autocorrelation function, quantum `phase-space' volume, `phase-space' trajectory, distance function and overlap integral (akin to quantum fidelity or Loschmidt echo), in terms of the sensitivity towards an initial state characterized by a mixture of quantum states (wave packet) brought about by small changes in the Hamiltonian, rather than a `pure' quantum state (a single eigenstate). The similarity between the HH potential and atoms/molecules in intense laser fields is also analyzed.

  7. A non-classical Mindlin plate model incorporating microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2016-07-01

    A non-classical model for a Mindlin plate resting on an elastic foundation is developed in a general form using a modified couple stress theory, a surface elasticity theory and a two-parameter Winkler-Pasternak foundation model. It includes all five kinematic variables possible for a Mindlin plate. The equations of motion and the complete boundary conditions are obtained simultaneously through a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle, and the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are treated in a unified manner. The newly developed model contains one material length-scale parameter to describe the microstructure effect, three surface elastic constants to account for the surface energy effect, and two foundation parameters to capture the foundation effect. The current non-classical plate model reduces to its classical elasticity-based counterpart when the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are all suppressed. In addition, the new model includes the Mindlin plate models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect or the foundation influence alone as special cases, recovers the Kirchhoff plate model incorporating the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects, and degenerates to the Timoshenko beam model including the microstructure effect. To illustrate the new Mindlin plate model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported rectangular plate are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulae derived.

  8. Classical force field for hydrofluorocarbon molecular simulations. Application to the study of gas solubility in poly(vinylidene fluoride).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachet, V; Teuler, J-M; Rousseau, B

    2015-01-08

    A classical all-atoms force field for molecular simulations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) has been developed. Lennard-Jones force centers plus point charges are used to represent dispersion-repulsion and electrostatic interactions. Parametrization of this force field has been performed iteratively using three target properties of pentafluorobutane: the quantum energy of an isolated molecule, the dielectric constant in the liquid phase, and the compressed liquid density. The accuracy and transferability of this new force field has been demonstrated through the simulation of different thermophysical properties of several fluorinated compounds, showing significant improvements compared to existing models. This new force field has been applied to study solubilities of several gases in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) above the melting temperature of this polymer. The solubility of CH4, CO2, H2S, H2, N2, O2, and H2O at infinite dilution has been computed using test particle insertions in the course of a NpT hybrid Monte Carlo simulation. For CH4, CO2, and their mixtures, some calculations beyond the Henry regime have also been performed using hybrid Monte Carlo simulations in the osmotic ensemble, allowing both swelling and solubility determination. An ideal mixing behavior is observed, with identical solubility coefficients in the mixtures and in pure gas systems.

  9. Fitting of dihedral terms in classical force fields as an analytic linear least-squares problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Chad W; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2014-07-28

    The derivation and optimization of most energy terms in modern force fields are aided by automated computational tools. It is therefore important to have algorithms to rapidly and precisely train large numbers of interconnected parameters to allow investigators to make better decisions about the content of molecular models. In particular, the traditional approach to deriving dihedral parameters has been a least-squares fit to target conformational energies through variational optimization strategies. We present a computational approach for simultaneously fitting force field dihedral amplitudes and phase constants which is analytic within the scope of the data set. This approach completes the optimal molecular mechanics representation of a quantum mechanical potential energy surface in a single linear least-squares fit by recasting the dihedral potential into a linear function in the parameters. We compare the resulting method to a genetic algorithm in terms of computational time and quality of fit for two simple molecules. As suggested in previous studies, arbitrary dihedral phases are only necessary when modeling chiral molecules, which include more than half of drugs currently in use, so we also examined a dihedral parametrization case for the drug amoxicillin and one of its stereoisomers where the target dihedral includes a chiral center. Asymmetric dihedral phases are needed in these types of cases to properly represent the quantum mechanical energy surface and to differentiate between stereoisomers about the chiral center.

  10. An efficient and stable hybrid extended Lagrangian/self-consistent field scheme for solving classical mutual induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaugh, Alex [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Demerdash, Omar [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Teresa, E-mail: thg@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We have adapted a hybrid extended Lagrangian self-consistent field (EL/SCF) approach, developed for time reversible Born Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for quantum electronic degrees of freedom, to the problem of classical polarization. In this context, the initial guess for the mutual induction calculation is treated by auxiliary induced dipole variables evolved via a time-reversible velocity Verlet scheme. However, we find numerical instability, which is manifested as an accumulation in the auxiliary velocity variables, that in turn results in an unacceptable increase in the number of SCF cycles to meet even loose convergence tolerances for the real induced dipoles over the course of a 1 ns trajectory of the AMOEBA14 water model. By diagnosing the numerical instability as a problem of resonances that corrupt the dynamics, we introduce a simple thermostating scheme, illustrated using Berendsen weak coupling and Nose-Hoover chain thermostats, applied to the auxiliary dipole velocities. We find that the inertial EL/SCF (iEL/SCF) method provides superior energy conservation with less stringent convergence thresholds and a correspondingly small number of SCF cycles, to reproduce all properties of the polarization model in the NVT and NVE ensembles accurately. Our iEL/SCF approach is a clear improvement over standard SCF approaches to classical mutual induction calculations and would be worth investigating for application to ab initio molecular dynamics as well.

  11. Point-source idealization in classical field theories. II. Mechanical energy losses from electromagnetic radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Ronald E.; Rosenblum, Arnold

    1982-05-01

    This paper compares the mechanical energy losses due to electromagnetic radiation reaction on a two-particle, slow-motion system, as calculated from (1) the method of matched asymptotic expansions and (2) the Lorentz-Dirac equation, which assumes point sources. The matching derivation of the preceding paper avoided the assumption of a δ-function source by using Reissner-Nordström matching zones. Despite the differing mathematical assumptions of the two methods, their results are in agreement with each other and with the electromagnetic-field energy losses calculated by the evaluation of flux integrals. Our purpose is eventually to analyze Rosenblum's use of point sources as a possible cause of disagreement between the analogous calculations of gravitational radiation on a slow-motion system of two bodies. We begin with the simpler electromagnetic problem.

  12. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, M. A.; Di Luzio, Sr.; Di Luzio, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, concerns about hazards from electromagnetic fields represent an alarming source for human lives in technologically developed countries. We are surrounded by electromagnetic fields everywhere we spend our working hours, rest or recreational activities. The aim of this review is to summarize the biological effects due to these fields arising from power and transmission lines, electrical cable splices, electronic devices inside our homes and work-places, distribution networks and associated devices such as cellular telephones and wireless communication tower, etc. Special care has been reserved to study the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on cell lines of the mammalian immune system about which our research group has been working for several years.

  13. Quantum and Classical Effects in the Two-Frequency Kicked Rotor with Variable Initial Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Mullins, T G; Sadgrove, M P; Hoogerland, M D; Parkins, A S; Leonhardt, R

    2004-01-01

    We present an investigation into effects exhibited by the two-frequency kicked rotor. Experiments were performed and in addition quantum and classical dynamics were simulated and compared with the experimental results. The experiments involved pulsing the optical standing wave with two pulsing periods of differing frequencies and variable initial phase offset. The ratio of pulsing periods was sampled for rational and irrational values for different experimental runs. In this paper we present these results and examine the measured momentum distributions for the cause of any structures that are seen in the energy as the initial phase offset is changed. Irrational ratios exhibit no significant quantum effects, whereas rational ratios show dynamical localisation (DL) for certain values of the initial phase. However, most of the observed structure is found to be due to classical effects, in particular KAM boundaries, and is therefore not of uniquely quantum origin.

  14. Classical phase space and Hadamard states in the BRST formalism for gauge field theories on curved spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Wrochna, Michał

    2014-01-01

    We investigate linearized gauge theories on globally hyperbolic spacetimes in the BRST formalism. A consistent definition of the classical phase space and of its Cauchy surface analogue is proposed. We prove it is isomorphic to the phase space in the subsidiary condition approach of Hack and Schenkel in the case of Maxwell, Yang-Mills, and Rarita-Schwinger fields. Defining Hadamard states in the BRST formalism in a standard way, their existence in the Maxwell and Yang-Mills case is concluded from known results in the subsidiary condition (or Gupta-Bleuler) formalism. Within our framework, we also formulate criteria for non-degeneracy of the phase space in terms of BRST cohomology and discuss special cases. These include an example in the Yang-Mills case, where degeneracy is not related to a non-trivial topology of the Cauchy surface.

  15. Extracting Closed Classical Orbits from Quantum Recurrence Spectra of a Non-Hydrogenic Atom in Parallel Electric and Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Hua; LIN Sheng-Lu

    2004-01-01

    @@ We show how to extract the closed orbits from the quantum spectra data. According to the closed orbit theory,each closed orbit produces a sharp peak in the recurrence spectra of a non-hydrogenic atom in parallel electric and magnetic fields. For a given initial state, closed-orbit theory gives the dependence of this recurrence amplitude on the initial angle of an orbit. By comparing the recurrence amplitude for different initial states, we can determine the initial angles of the closed classical orbits from the quantum recurrence spectra. Therefore, by integrating the Hamiltonian motion equations, we can obtain the closed orbits directly. This method can also be used to extract the closed orbits from the experimental data.

  16. Antigenic differentiation of classical swine fever vaccinal strain PAV-250 from other strains, including field strains from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Susana; Correa-Giron, Pablo; Aguilera, Edgar; Colmenares, Germán; Torres, Oscar; Cruz, Tonatiuh; Romero, Andres; Hernandez-Baumgarten, Eliseo; Ciprián, Abel

    2007-10-10

    Twenty-nine classical swine fever virus (CSFv) strains were grown in the PK15 or SK6 cell lines. Antigenic differentiation studies were performed using monoclonal antibodies (McAbs), produced at Lelystad (CDI-DLO), The Netherlands. The monoclonals which were classified numerically as monoclonals 2-13. Epitope map patterns that resulted from the reactivity with McAbs were found to be unrelated to the pathogenicity of the viruses studied. Antigenic determinants were recognized by McAbs 5 and 8, were not detected in some Mexican strains; however, sites for McAb 6 were absent in all strains. The PAV-250 vaccine strain was recognized by all MAbs, except by MAb 6. Furthermore, the Chinese C-S vaccine strain was found to be very similar to the GPE(-) vaccine. None of the studied Mexican vaccines or field strains was found to be similar to the PAV-250 vaccine strain.

  17. Non-equilibrium statistical field theory for classical particles: Non-linear structure evolution with first-order interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Berg, Daniel; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Viermann, Celia

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the power spectrum of density fluctuations in the statistical non-equilibrium field theory for classical, microscopic degrees of freedom to first order in the interaction potential. We specialise our result to cosmology by choosing appropriate initial conditions and propagators and show that the non-linear growth of the density power spectrum found in numerical simulations of cosmic structure evolution is reproduced well to redshift zero and for arbitrary wave numbers. The main difference of our approach to ordinary cosmological perturbation theory is that we do not perturb a dynamical equation for the density contrast. Rather, we transport the initial phase-space distribution of a canonical particle ensemble forward in time and extract any collective information from it at the time needed. Since even small perturbations of particle trajectories can lead to large fluctuations in density, our approach allows to reach high density contrast already at first order in the perturbations of the particle...

  18. Classical-to-quantum crossover in the critical behavior of the transverse-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Rajak, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2015-10-01

    We study the critical behavior of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model in transverse field (at finite temperature) using Monte Carlo simulation and exact diagonalization (at zero temperature). We determine the phase diagram of the model by estimating the Binder cumulant. We also determine the correlation length exponent from the collapse of the scaled data. Our numerical studies here indicate that critical Binder cumulant (indicating the universality class of the transition behavior) and the correlation length exponent cross over from their "classical" to "quantum" values at a finite temperature (unlike the cases of pure systems, where such crossovers occur at zero temperature). We propose a qualitative argument supporting such an observation, employing a simple tunneling picture.

  19. Particle on a torus knot: Constrained dynamics and semi-classical quantization in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Praloy; Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2016-11-01

    Kinematics and dynamics of a particle moving on a torus knot poses an interesting problem as a constrained system. In the first part of the paper we have derived the modified symplectic structure or Dirac brackets of the above model in Dirac's Hamiltonian framework, both in toroidal and Cartesian coordinate systems. This algebra has been used to study the dynamics, in particular small fluctuations in motion around a specific torus. The spatial symmetries of the system have also been studied. In the second part of the paper we have considered the quantum theory of a charge moving in a torus knot in the presence of a uniform magnetic field along the axis of the torus in a semiclassical quantization framework. We exploit the Einstein-Brillouin-Keller (EBK) scheme of quantization that is appropriate for multidimensional systems. Embedding of the knot on a specific torus is inherently two dimensional that gives rise to two quantization conditions. This shows that although the system, after imposing the knot condition reduces to a one dimensional system, even then it has manifested non-planar features which shows up again in the study of fractional angular momentum. Finally we compare the results obtained from EBK (multi-dimensional) and Bohr-Sommerfeld (single dimensional) schemes. The energy levels and fractional spin depend on the torus knot parameters that specifies its non-planar features. Interestingly, we show that there can be non-planar corrections to the planar anyon-like fractional spin.

  20. Studying the Identity of Iranian Classical Effective Literature and Contemporary Impressible Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmajid Mohaqeqi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After the advent of Islam in Iran, Persian Literature has always been considered as one of the major characteristics of Iranian culture and identity to the extent that some people believe whatever western has achieved in terms of literature – especially English literature – and honors to them originate from rich Persian literature. However, Persian literature has severely been influenced by works of western writers in contemporary era so that even modern Persian story and poem is divided based on western styles. Unfortunately, this situation – that a part of identity of Iranian culture has been drastically affected by alien culture – offends each educated Iranian. Today, a flashback to Iranian classical styles does not meet the need for a development created in literary works. However, it is necessary that tasteful and patriotic people create novel works in Iran’s contemporary literature against the decades-old literary identity of the west through adaptation of past-targeted literature and under the effect of conditions of today modern society in order to recover the lost identity of Iranian literature which other fields are considered as its subset. Therefore, this paper is going to present solutions for modeling the identity of Iranian literature for the next two decades in line with Islamization of universities in order to divide the pure academic literature into pure and applied sub-branches and develop academic literary activities. As a result, the international works would be established based on the columns of Persian literature whose kernel will not to be damaged in the rain and wind of alien cultures. Keywords: Islamic Iranian identity, western philosophy, Persian literature, contemporary literature, art

  1. High doses of dextromethorphan, an NMDA antagonist, produce effects similar to classic hallucinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although reports of dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have increased recently, few studies have examined the effects of high doses of DXM. Objective This study in humans evaluated the effects of supratherapeutic doses of DXM and triazolam. Methods Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg/70kg), and placebo were administered to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Subjective, behavioral, and physiological effects were assessed repeatedly after drug administration for 6 hours. Results Triazolam produced dose-related increases in subject-rated sedation, observer-rated sedation, and behavioral impairment. DXM produced a profile of dose-related physiological and subjective effects differing from triazolam. DXM effects included increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and emesis, increases in observer-rated effects typical of classic hallucinogens (e.g. distance from reality, visual effects with eyes open and closed, joy, anxiety), and participant ratings of stimulation (e.g. jittery, nervous), somatic effects (e.g. tingling, headache), perceptual changes, end-of-session drug liking, and mystical-type experience. After 400 mg/70kg DXM, 11 of 12 participants indicated on a pharmacological class questionnaire that they thought they had received a classic hallucinogen (e.g. psilocybin). Drug effects resolved without significant adverse effects by the end of the session. In a 1-month follow up volunteers attributed increased spirituality and positive changes in attitudes, moods, and behavior to the session experiences. Conclusions High doses of DXM produced effects distinct from triazolam and had characteristics that were similar to the classic hallucinogen psilocybin. PMID:22526529

  2. Effective model hierarchies for dynamic and static classical density functional theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majaniemi, S [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PO Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Provatas, N [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S-4L7 (Canada); Nonomura, M, E-mail: maj@fyslab.hut.f [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The origin and methodology of deriving effective model hierarchies are presented with applications to solidification of crystalline solids. In particular, it is discussed how the form of the equations of motion and the effective parameters on larger scales can be obtained from the more microscopic models. It will be shown that tying together the dynamic structure of the projection operator formalism with static classical density functional theories can lead to incomplete (mass) transport properties even though the linearized hydrodynamics on large scales is correctly reproduced. To facilitate a more natural way of binding together the dynamics of the macrovariables and classical density functional theory, a dynamic generalization of density functional theory based on the nonequilibrium generating functional is suggested.

  3. Sudden Transition between Quantum Correlation and Classical Correlation: the Effect of Interaction between Subsystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun-Yan; WANG Lin-Cheng; YI Xue-Xi

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative environment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems. The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist. The entanglements are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.%@@ We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative envi- ronment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems.The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist.The entangle- ments are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.

  4. Effects of Pilates and Classical Kinesiotherapy on chronic low back pain: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Ivanna Avila; Oliveira,Tiago Damé de; Blois,Cleci Redin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction : Chronic low back pain (LBP) is characterized by daily lower back pain lasting more than three consecutive months. It may lead to functional disability and can be treated by several physical therapy techniques, including therapeutic exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pilates and classical kinesiotherapy on the treatment of pain and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and methods : The study sample cons...

  5. Corrigendum: "Extracting Closed Classical Orbits from Quantum Recurrence Spectra of a Non-Hydrogenic Atom in Parallel Electric and Magnetic Fields"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Hua

    2010-01-01

    @@ In a paper published by us,[1] we studied how to extract the closed orbit of the non-hydrogenic atom in parallel electric and magnetic fields. However, there was another paper published in 1996 by Courtney,[2] which studied the initial conditions of closed classical orbits from quantum spectra of hydrogen atom in magnetic field.

  6. Contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect to the spin precession of a particle with the electric dipole moment

    CERN Document Server

    Silenko, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    The fulfilled derivation of equation of spin precession of a particle possessing magnetic and electric dipole moments uses a fully covariant approach and explicitly separates contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect. The expression of the final equation in terms of the fields in the instantly accompanying frame presents it in a very simple form. The Lorentz transformations of the magnetic and electric dipole moments and the spin are derived from basic equations of classical electrodynamics, namely, from the equation connecting the angular momentum and the magnetic moment and from the Maxwell equations in matter. An antisymmetric four-tensor is constructed from the electric and magnetic dipole moments.

  7. Elliptically Oscillating Classical Solution in Higgs Potential and the Effects on Vacuum Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Kitadono, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We investigate oscillating solutions of the equation of motion for the Higgs potential. The solutions are described by Jacobian elliptic functions. Classifying the classical solutions, we evaluate a possible parameter-space for the initial conditions. In order to construct the field theory around the oscillating solutions quantum fluctuations are introduced. This alternative perturbation method is useful to describe the non-trivial quantum theory around the oscillating state. This perturbation theory reduces to the standard one if we take the solution at the vacuum expectation value. It is shown that the transition probability between the vacuum and multi-quanta states is finite as long as the initial field configuration does not start from the true vacuum.

  8. Effective field theory of dissipative fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Crossley, Michael; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We develop an effective field theory for dissipative fluids which governs the dynamics of gapless modes associated to conserved quantities. The system is put in a curved spacetime and coupled to external sources for charged currents. The invariance of the hydrodynamical action under gauge symmetries and diffeomorphisms suggests a natural set of dynamical variables which provide a mapping between an emergent "fluid spacetime" and the physical spacetime. An essential aspect of our formulation is to identify the appropriate symmetries in the fluid spacetime. Our theory applies to nonlinear disturbances around a general density matrix. For a thermal density matrix, we require an additional Z_2 symmetry, to which we refer as the local KMS condition. This leads to the standard constraints of hydrodynamics, as well as a nonlinear generalization of the Onsager relations. It also leads to an emergent supersymmetry in the classical statistical regime, with a higher derivative version required for the full quantum regim...

  9. Comparison of immune effect on spleen and lymph tissue and cell line origin classical swine fever vaccine in field%猪瘟脾淋苗和传代细胞苗田间免疫效果比较试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪江庭

    2015-01-01

    Three vaccines were used to compare immune effect on spleen and lymph tissue and cell line origin classical swine fever vaccine. Forty-five 30-day-old piglets were randomly selected and divided into 3 groups in a scale farm in Xiamen, meanwhile first immunization was carried out, second immunizationafter28 days, group A used spleen and lymph tissue origin classical swine fever vaccine from CQ and group B used spleen and lymph tissue origin vaccine from CD, while group C used cell line origin classical swine fever vaccine from JX, through regular tracking of antibody level to evaluate the immune effect. The results showed: The anti-body positive rate in group C herds was the highest on the 38thday after second immunization, with a significant difference in group A herds.%为比较猪瘟脾淋苗和传代细胞苗的免疫效果,在厦门市同安区某规模猪场,选用代号为CQ、CD和JX 3个厂家生产的猪瘟脾淋苗和传代细胞苗进行免疫效果试验。随机选取45头30日龄断乳仔猪,分为3组,30日龄首免,首免后28 d二免,A组免疫接种CQ厂家的猪瘟脾淋苗,B组免疫接种CD厂家的猪瘟脾淋苗,C组免疫接种JX厂家的猪瘟细胞传代苗,通过定期跟踪3组猪群血清中的抗体水平,评估疫苗的免疫效果。结果显示:3组猪群二免后7d前免疫抗体抗体水平和阳性率无显著差异,38 d后才出现免疫抗体水平和阳性率显著差异,以C组猪群的抗体阳性率最高,A组猪群的抗体阳性率最低。

  10. The classical electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Eyges, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    This excellent text covers a year's course in advanced theoretical electromagnetism, first introducing theory, then its application. Topics include vectors D and H inside matter, conservation laws for energy, momentum, invariance, form invariance, covariance in special relativity, and more.

  11. Random exchange interaction effects on the phase transitions in frustrated classical Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, W. C.; Song, X.; Feng, J. J.; Zeng, M.; Gao, X. S.; Qin, M. H., E-mail: qinmh@scnu.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Materials and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jia, X. T. [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2015-07-07

    In this work, the effects of the random exchange interaction on the phase transitions and phase diagrams of classical frustrated Heisenberg model are investigated by Monte Carlo simulation in order to simulate the chemical doping effect in real materials. It is observed that the antiferromagnetic transitions shift toward low temperature with the increasing magnitude of the random exchange interaction, which can be qualitatively understood from the competitions among local spin states. This study is related to the magnetic properties in the doped iron-based superconductors.

  12. Quantum statistical correlations in thermal field theories: boundary effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, A; de Carvalho, C A A; Fraga, E S

    2010-01-01

    We show that the one-loop effective action at finite temperature for a scalar field with quartic interaction has the same renormalized expression as at zero temperature if written in terms of a certain classical field $\\phi_c$, and if we trade free propagators at zero temperature for their finite-temperature counterparts. The result follows if we write the partition function as an integral over field eigenstates (boundary fields) of the density matrix element in the functional Schr\\"{o}dinger field-representation, and perform a semiclassical expansion in two steps: first, we integrate around the saddle-point for fixed boundary fields, which is the classical field $\\phi_c$, a functional of the boundary fields; then, we perform a saddle-point integration over the boundary fields, whose correlations characterize the thermal properties of the system. This procedure provides a dimensionally-reduced effective theory for the thermal system. We calculate the two-point correlation as an example.

  13. Quantum features derived from the classical model of a bouncer-walker coupled to a zero-point field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabl, H.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Fussy, S.; Grössing, G.

    2012-05-01

    In our bouncer-walker model a quantum is a nonequilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy. Specifically, we consider a "particle" as a bouncer whose oscillations are phase-locked with those of the energy-momentum reservoir of the zero-point field (ZPF), and we combine this with the random-walk model of the walker, again driven by the ZPF. Starting with this classical toy model of the bouncer-walker we were able to derive fundamental elements of quantum theory [1]. Here this toy model is revisited with special emphasis on the mechanism of emergence. Especially the derivation of the total energy hslashωo and the coupling to the ZPF are clarified. For this we make use of a sub-quantum equipartition theorem. It can further be shown that the couplings of both bouncer and walker to the ZPF are identical. Then we follow this path in accordance with Ref. [2], expanding the view from the particle in its rest frame to a particle in motion. The basic features of ballistic diffusion are derived, especially the diffusion constant D, thus providing a missing link between the different approaches of our previous works [1, 2].

  14. Quantum features derived from the classical model of a bouncer-walker coupled to a zero-point field

    CERN Document Server

    Schwabl, Herbert; Fussy, Siegfried; Groessing, Gerhard; 10.1088/1742-6596/361/1/012021

    2012-01-01

    In our bouncer-walker model a quantum is a nonequilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy. Specifically, we consider a "particle" as a bouncer whose oscillations are phase-locked with those of the energy-momentum reservoir of the zero-point field (ZPF), and we combine this with the random-walk model of the walker, again driven by the ZPF. Starting with this classical toy model of the bouncer-walker we were able to derive fundamental elements of quantum theory. Here this toy model is revisited with special emphasis on the mechanism of emergence. Especially the derivation of the total energy hbar.omega and the coupling to the ZPF are clarified. For this we make use of a sub-quantum equipartition theorem. It can further be shown that the couplings of both bouncer and walker to the ZPF are identical. Then we follow this path in accordance with previous work, expanding the view from the particle in its rest frame to a particle in motion. The basic features of ballistic diffusion are der...

  15. How do classical particle-field systems become unstable? - The last physics problem that Ronald Davidson studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Many of the classical particle-field systems in (neutral and nonneutral) plasma physics and accelerator physics become unstable when the system parameters vary. How do these instabilities happen? It turns out, very interestingly, that all conservative systems become unstable by the same mechanism, i.e, the resonance between a positive- and a negative-action modes. And this is the only route that a stable system can become unstable. In this talk, I will use several examples in plasma physics and accelerator physics with finite and infinite degrees of freedom to illustrate the basic physical picture and the rigorous theoretical structure of the process. The features at the transition between stable and unstable regions in the parameter space are the fundamental characteristics of the underlying real Hamiltonian system and complex G-Hamiltonian system. The resonance between a positive- and a negative-action modes at the transition is the Krein collision well-known to mathematicians. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  16. Thermal quantum and classical correlations in a two-qubit XX model in a nonuniform external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ali Saif M [Department of Physics, University of Amran, Amran (Yemen); Lari, Behzad; Joag, Pramod S, E-mail: alisaif73@gmail.co, E-mail: behzadlari1979@yahoo.co, E-mail: pramod@physics.unipune.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2010-12-03

    We investigate how thermal quantum discord (QD) and classical correlations (CC) of a two-qubit one-dimensional XX Heisenberg chain in thermal equilibrium depend on the temperature of the bath as well as on nonuniform external magnetic fields applied to two qubits and varied separately. We show that the behavior of QD differs in many unexpected ways from the thermal entanglement (EOF). For the nonuniform case (B{sub 1} = -B{sub 2}), we find that QD and CC are equal for all values of (B{sub 1} = -B{sub 2}) and for different temperatures. We show that, in this case, the thermal states of the system belong to a class of mixed states and satisfy certain conditions under which QD and CC are equal. The specification of this class and the corresponding conditions are completely general and apply to any quantum system in a state in this class satisfying these conditions. We further find that the relative contributions of QD and CC can be controlled easily by changing the relative magnitudes of B{sub 1} and B{sub 2}. Finally, we connect our results with the monogamy relations between the EOF, CC and the QD of two qubits and the environment.

  17. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  18. Quantum-classical crossover in electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, J

    2006-01-01

    A classical field theory is proposed for the electric current and the electromagnetic field interpolating between microscopic and macroscopic domains. It represents a generalization of the density functional for the dynamics of the current and the electromagnetic field in the quantum side of the crossover and reproduces standard classical electrodynamics on the other side. The effective action derived in the closed time path formalism and the equations of motion follow from the variational principle. The polarization of the Dirac-see can be taken into account in the quadratic approximation of the action by the introduction of the deplacement field strengths as in conventional classical electrodynamics. Decoherence appears naturally as a simple one-loop effect in this formalism. It is argued that the radiation time arrow is generated from the quantum boundary conditions in time by decoherence at the quantum-classical crossover and the Abraham-Lorentz force arises from the accelerating charge or from other char...

  19. The Effect of String Tension Variation on the Perceived Pitch of a Classical Guitar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Jadwiga Lewis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Actual motion of a vibrating guitar string is a superposition of many possible shapes (modes in which it could vibrate. Each of these modes has a corresponding frequency, and the lowest frequency is associated with a shape idealised as a single wave, referred to as the fundamental mode. The other contributing modes, each with their own progressively higher frequency, are referred to as overtones, or harmonics. By attaching a string to a medium (a soundboard capable of a response to the vibrating string, sound waves are generated. The sound heard is dominated by the fundamental mode, ‘coloured’ by contributions from the overtones, as explained by the classical theory of vibration. The classical theory, however, assumes that the string tension remains constant during vibration, and this cannot be strictly true; when considering just the fundamental mode, string tension will reach two maximum changes, as it oscillates up and down. These changes, occurring twice during the fundamental period match the frequency of the octave higher, 1st overtone. It is therefore plausible to think that the changing tension effect, through increased force on the bridge and, therefore, greater soundboard deflection, could be amplifying the colouring effect of (at least the 1st overtone.In this paper, we examine the possible influence of string tension variation on tonal response of a classical guitar. We use a perturbation model based on the classical result for a string in general vibration in conjunction with a novel method of assessment of plucking force that incorporates the engineering concept of geometric stiffness, to assess the magnitude of the normal force exerted by the string on the bridge. The results of our model show that the effect of tension variation is significantly smaller than that due to the installed initial static tension, and affects predominantly the force contribution arising from the fundamental mode. We, therefore, conclude that string

  20. Finite-temperature Casimir effect in piston geometry and its classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, S.C. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Teo, L.P. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Information Technology, Cyberjaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2009-03-15

    We consider the Casimir force acting on a d-dimensional rectangular piston due to a massless scalar field with periodic, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions and an electromagnetic field with perfect electric-conductor and perfect magnetic-conductor boundary conditions. The Casimir energy in a rectangular cavity is derived using the cut-off method. It is shown that the divergent part of the Casimir energy does not contribute to the Casimir force acting on the piston, thus renders an unambiguously defined Casimir force acting on the piston. At any temperature, it is found that the Casimir force acting on the piston increases from -{infinity} to 0 when the separation a between the piston and the opposite wall increases from 0 to {infinity}. This implies that the Casimir force is always an attractive force pulling the piston towards the closer wall, and the magnitude of the force gets larger as the separation a gets smaller. Explicit exact expressions for the Casimir force for small and large plate separations and for low and high temperatures are computed. The limits of the Casimir force acting on the piston when some pairs of transversal plates are large are also derived. An interesting result regarding the influence of temperature is that in contrast to the conventional result that the leading term of the Casimir force acting on a wall of a rectangular cavity at high temperature is the Stefan-Boltzmann (or black-body radiation) term which is of order T {sup d+1}, it is found that the contributions of this term from the two regions separating the piston cancel with each other in the case of piston. The high-temperature leading-order term of the Casimir force acting on the piston is of order T, which shows that the Casimir force has a nontrivial classical {Dirac_h}{yields}0 limit. Explicit formulas for the classical limit are computed. (orig.)

  1. Beyond HTL: The Classical Kinetic Theory of Landau Damping for Selfinteracting Scalar Fields in the Broken Phase

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The effective theory of low frequency fluctuations of selfinteracting scalar fields is constructed in the broken symmetry phase. The theory resulting from integrating fluctuations with frequencies much above the spontanously generated mass scale $(p_0>>M)$ is found to be local. Non-local dynamics, especially Landau damping emerges under the effect of fluctuations in the $p_0 \\sim M$ region. A kinetic theory of relativistic scalar gas particles interacting via their locally variable mass with ...

  2. Entanglement in Classical Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghose, Partha

    2013-01-01

    The emerging field of entanglement or nonseparability in classical optics is reviewed, and its similarities with and differences from quantum entanglement clearly pointed out through a recapitulation of Hilbert spaces in general, the special restrictions on Hilbert spaces imposed in quantum mechanics and the role of Hilbert spaces in classical polarization optics. The production of Bell-like states in classical polarization optics is discussed, and new theorems are proved to discriminate between separable and nonseparable states in classical wave optics where no discreteness is involved. The influence of the Pancharatnam phase on a classical Bell-like state is deived. Finally, to what extent classical polarization optics can be used to simulate quantum information processing tasks is also discussed. This should be of great practical importance because coherence and entanglement are robust in classical optics but not in quantum systems.

  3. Flavour effects in Resonant Leptogenesis from semi-classical and Kadanoff-Baym approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Flavour effects play an important role in the statistical evolution of particle number densities in several particle physics phenomena. We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena, in order to consistently capture all flavour effects in the system. We explicitly study the scenario of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL), and show that flavour covariance requires one to consider generically off-diagonal number densities, rank-4 rate tensors in flavour space, and non-trivial generalization of the discrete symmetries C, P and T. The flavour-covariant transport equations, obtained in our semi-classical framework, describe the effects of three relevant physical phenomena: coherent heavy-neutrino oscillations, quantum decoherence in the charged-lepton sector, and resonant CP violation due to heavy-neutrino mixing. We show quantitatively that the final asymmetry is enhanced by up to an order of magnitude, for electroweak-scale heavy neutrinos, as compared to that obtained from flavour-diagonal or pa...

  4. Classical and remote post-conditioning effects on ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute oxidant kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Najafi, Atefeh; Seifi, Behjat

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed to analyze and compare the effects of classical and remote ischemic postconditioning (POC) on rat renal ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-induced acute kidney injury. After right nephrectomy, male rats were randomly assigned into four groups (n = 8). In the IR group, 45 min of left renal artery occlusion was induced followed by 24 h of reperfusion. In the classical POC group, after induction of 45 min ischemia, 4 cycles of 10 s of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion were applied to the kidney before complete restoring of renal blood. In the remote POC group, 4 cycles of 5 min ischemia and reperfusion of left femoral artery were applied after 45 min renal ischemia and right at the time of renal reperfusion. There was a reduction in renal function (increase in blood urea and creatinine) in the IR group. Application of both forms of POC prevented the IR-induced reduction in renal function and histology. There were also significant improvements in kidney oxidative stress status in both POC groups demonstrated by a reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) formation and preservation of antioxidant levels comparing to the IR group. We concluded that both methods of POC have protective effects on renal function and histology possibly by a reduction in IR-induced oxidative stress.

  5. Classical antiparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors). 13 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Classical antiparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Costella, J P; Rawlinson, A A; Costella, John P.; Kellar, Bruce H. J. Mc; Rawlinson, Andrew A.

    1997-01-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain.

  7. Field enhancement effect of metal probe in evanescent field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaogang Hong; Wendong Xu; Xiaogang Li; Chengqiang Zhao; Xiaodong Tang

    2009-01-01

    Field enhancement effect of metal probe in evanescent field, induced by using a multi-layers structure for exciting surface plasmon resonance (SPR), is analyzed numerically by utilizing two-dimensional (2D) TM wave finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In this letter, we used a fundamental mode Gaussian beam to induce evanescent field, and calculated the electric intensity. The results show that compared with the nonmetal probe, the metal probe has a larger field enhancement effect, and its scattering wave induced by field enhancement has a bigger decay coefficient. The field enhancement effect should conclude that the metal probe has an important application in nanolithography.

  8. Evolution operator equation: Integration with algebraic and finite difference methods. Applications to physical problems in classical and quantum mechanics and quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Torre, Amalia [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Ottaviani, Pier Luigi [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy); Vasquez, Luis [Madris, Univ. Complutense (Spain). Dept. de Matemateca Aplicado

    1997-10-01

    The finite-difference based integration method for evolution-line equations is discussed in detail and framed within the general context of the evolution operator picture. Exact analytical methods are described to solve evolution-like equations in a quite general physical context. The numerical technique based on the factorization formulae of exponential operator is then illustrated and applied to the evolution-operator in both classical and quantum framework. Finally, the general view to the finite differencing schemes is provided, displaying the wide range of applications from the classical Newton equation of motion to the quantum field theory.

  9. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, Cesar D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C. [Ciudad Universitaria, Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA y IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  10. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, César D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, R8402AGP, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C., E-mail: lombardo@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física Juan José Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation.

  11. Methylation as an epigenetic source of random genetic effects in the classical twin design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolan CV

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Conor V Dolan,1,3 Michel G Nivard,1,3 Jenny van Dongen,1,3 Sophie van der Sluis,2 Dorret I Boomsma,1,3,41Department of Biological Psychology, Netherlands Twin Register, VU University Amsterdam, 2Section Complex Trait Genetics, Department of Clinical Genetics, VU Medical Center, 3EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, 4Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: The epigenetic effects of cytosine methylation on gene expression are an acknowledged source of phenotypic variance. The discordant monozygotic (MZ twin design has been used to demonstrate the role of methylation in disease. Application of the classical twin design, featuring both monozygotic and dizygotic twins, has demonstrated that individual differences in methylation levels are attributable to genetic and environmental (including stochastic factors, with the latter explaining most of the variance. What implications epigenetic sources of variance have for the twin modeling of (non-epigenetic phenotypes such as height and IQ is an open question. One possibility is that epigenetic effects are absorbed by the variance component attributable to unshared environmental. Another possibility is that such effects form an independent source of variance distinguishable in principle from standard genetic and environmental sources. In the present paper, we conceptualized epigenetic processes as giving rise to randomness in the effects of polygenetic influences. This means that the regression coefficient in the regression of the phenotype on the polygenic factor, as specified in the twin model, varies over individuals. We investigate the consequences of ignoring this randomness in the standard twin model. Keywords: classical twin design, epigenetics, methylation, parameter randomness, heritability

  12. Effective Field Theories and Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Holman, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the possible influence of very-high-energy physics on inflationary predictions focussing on whether effective field theories can allow effects which are parametrically larger than order H^2/M^2, where M is the scale of heavy physics and H is the Hubble scale at horizon exit. By investigating supersymmetric hybrid inflation models, we show that decoupling does not preclude heavy-physics having effects for the CMB with observable size even if H^2/M^2 << O(1%), although their presence can only be inferred from observations given some a priori assumptions about the inflationary mechanism. Our analysis differs from the results of hep-th/0210233, in which other kinds of heavy-physics effects were found which could alter inflationary predictions for CMB fluctuations, inasmuch as the heavy-physics can be integrated out here to produce an effective field theory description of low-energy physics. We argue, as in hep-th/0210233, that the potential presence of heavy-physics effects in the CMB does no...

  13. Modelling of the magnetic field effects in hydrodynamic codes using a second order tensorial diffusion scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breil, J; Maire, P-H; Nicolai, P; Schurtz, G [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux I, CNRS, CEA, 351 cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)], E-mail: breil@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr

    2008-05-15

    In laser produced plasmas large self-generated magnetic fields have been measured. The classical formulas by Braginskii predict that magnetic fields induce a reduction of the magnitude of the heat flux and its rotation through the Righi-Leduc effect. In this paper a second order tensorial diffusion method used to correctly solve the Righi-Leduc effect in multidimensional code is presented.

  14. Classical Statistical Mechanics and Landau Damping

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We study the retarded response function in scalar $\\phi^4$-theory at finite temperature. We find that in the high-temperature limit the imaginary part of the self-energy is given by the classical theory to leading order in the coupling. In particular the plasmon damping rate is a purely classical effect to leading order, as shown by Aarts and Smit. The dominant contribution to Landau damping is given by the propagation of classical fields in a heat bath of non-interacting fields.

  15. The effective crystal field potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mulak, J

    2000-01-01

    As it results from the very nature of things, the spherical symmetry of the surrounding of a site in a crystal lattice or an atom in a molecule can never occur. Therefore, the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of any bound ion or atom have to differ from those of spherically symmetric respective free ions. In this way, the most simplified concept of the crystal field effect or ligand field effect in the case of individual molecules can be introduced. The conventional notion of the crystal field potential is narrowed to its non-spherical part only through ignoring the dominating spherical part which produces only a uniform energy shift of gravity centres of the free ion terms. It is well understood that the non-spherical part of the effective potential "seen" by open-shell electrons localized on a metal ion plays an essential role in most observed properties. Light adsorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, inelastic neutron scattering and basic characteristics derived from magnetic and thermal measurements, ar...

  16. Rotational symmetry of classical orbits, arbitrary quantization of angular momentum and the role of the gauge field in two-dimensional space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Jun-Li; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2012-01-01

    We study quantum-classical correspondence in terms of the coherent wave functions of a charged particle in twodimensional central-scalar potentials as well as the gauge field of a magnetic flux in the sense that the probability clouds of wave functions are well localized on classical orbits.For both closed and open classical orbits,the non-integer angular-momentum quantization with the level space of angular momentum being greater or less than h is determined uniquely by the same rotational symmetry of classical orbits and probability clouds of coherent wave functions,which is not necessarily 2π-periodic.The gauge potential of a magnetic flux impenetrable to the particle cannot change the quantization rule but is able to shift the spectrum of canonical angular momentum by a flux-dependent value,which results in a common topological phase for all wave functions in the given model.The well-known quantum mechanical anyon model becomes a special case of the arbitrary quantization,where the classical orbits are 2π-periodic.

  17. All framing effects are not created equal: Low convergent validity between two classic measurements of framing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Shanshan; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-07-20

    Human risk-taking attitudes can be influenced by two logically equivalent but descriptively different frames, termed the framing effect. The classic hypothetical vignette-based task (Asian disease problem) and a recently developed reward-based gambling task have been widely used to assess individual differences in the framing effect. Previous studies treat framing bias as a stable trait that has genetic basis. However, these two paradigms differ in terms of task domain (loss vs. gain) and task context (vignette-based vs. reward-based) and the convergent validity of these measurements remains unknown. Here, we developed a vignette-based task and a gambling task in both gain and loss domains and tested correlations of the framing effect among these tasks in 159 young adults. Our results revealed no significant correlation between the vignette-based task in the loss domain and the gambling task in the gain domain, indicating low convergent validity. The current findings raise the question of how to measure the framing effect precisely, especially in individual difference studies using large samples and expensive neuroscience methods. Our results suggest that the framing effect is influenced by both task domain and task context and future research should be cautious about the operationalization of the framing effect.

  18. Methods for evaluating physical processes in strong external fields at e+e- colliders: Furry picture and quasi-classical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Porto, Stefano; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid

    2013-01-01

    Future linear colliders designs, ILC and CLIC, are expected to be powerful machines for the discovery of Physics Beyond the Standard Model and subsequent precision studies. However, due to the intense beams (high luminosity, high energy), strong electromagnetic fields occur in the beam-beam interaction region. In the context of precision high energy physics, the presence of such strong fields may yield sensitive corrections to the observed electron-positron processes. The Furry picture of quantum states gives a conceptually simple tool to treat physics processes in an external field. A generalization of the quasi-classical operator method (QOM) as an approximation is considered too.

  19. Methods for evaluating physical processes in strong external fields at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Furry picture and quasi-classical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Stefano [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Hartin, Anthony [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Future linear colliders designs, ILC and CLIC, are expected to be powerful machines for the discovery of Physics Beyond the Standard Model and subsequent precision studies. However, due to the intense beams (high luminosity, high energy), strong electromagnetic fields occur in the beam-beam interaction region. In the context of precision high energy physics, the presence of such strong fields may yield sensitive corrections to the observed electron-positron processes. The Furry picture of quantum states gives a conceptually simple tool to treat physics processes in an external field. A generalization of the quasi-classical operator method (QOM) as an approximation is considered too.

  20. Classical conditioning for preserving the effects of short melatonin treatment in children with delayed sleep: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Annette; Meijer, Anne Marie; Smits, Marcel G; Oort, Frans J

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin treatment is effective in treating sleep onset problems in children with delayed melatonin onset, but effects usually disappear when treatment is discontinued. In this pilot study, we investigated whether classical conditioning might help in preserving treatment effects of melatonin in children with sleep onset problems, with and without comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism. After a baseline week, 16 children (mean age: 9.92 years, 31% ADHD/autism) received melatonin treatment for 3 weeks and then gradually discontinued the treatment. Classical conditioning was applied by having children drink organic lemonade while taking melatonin and by using a dim red light lamp that was turned on when children went to bed. Results were compared with a group of 41 children (mean age: 9.43 years, 34% ADHD/autism) who received melatonin without classical conditioning. Melatonin treatment was effective in advancing dim light melatonin onset and reducing sleep onset problems, and positive effects were found on health and behavior problems. After stopping melatonin, sleep returned to baseline levels. We found that for children without comorbidity in the experimental group, sleep latency and sleep start delayed less in the stop week, which suggests an effect of classical conditioning. However, classical conditioning seems counterproductive in children with ADHD or autism. Further research is needed to establish these results and to examine other ways to preserve melatonin treatment effects, for example, by applying morning light.

  1. Semi-Classical and Quantized-Field Descriptions of Light Propagation in General Non-Local and Non-Stationary Dispersive and Absorbing Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Verne

    2016-05-01

    Semi-classical and quantum-field descriptions for the interaction of light with matter are systematically discussed. Applications of interest include resonant pump-probe optical phenomena, such as electromagnetically induced transparency. In the quantum-mechanical description of matter systems, we introduce a general reduced-density-matrix framework. Time-domain (equation-of-motion) and frequency-domain (resolvent-operator) formulations are developed in a unified and self-consistent manner, using a Liouville-space operator representation. In the semi-classical description, the electromagnetic field is described as a classical field satisfying the Maxwell equations. Compact Liouville-space operator expressions are derived for the linear and the general (n'th order) non-linear electromagnetic-response tensors describing moving many-electron systems. The tetradic matrix elements of the Liouville-space self-energy operators are evaluated for environmental collisional and radiative interactions. The quantized-field approach is essential for a fully self-consistent quantum-mechanical description. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research through the Basic Research Program at The Naval Research Laboratory.

  2. Analysis of geometric phase effects in the quantum-classical Liouville formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2014-02-28

    We analyze two approaches to the quantum-classical Liouville (QCL) formalism that differ in the order of two operations: Wigner transformation and projection onto adiabatic electronic states. The analysis is carried out on a two-dimensional linear vibronic model where geometric phase (GP) effects arising from a conical intersection profoundly affect nuclear dynamics. We find that the Wigner-then-Adiabatic (WA) QCL approach captures GP effects, whereas the Adiabatic-then-Wigner (AW) QCL approach does not. Moreover, the Wigner transform in AW-QCL leads to an ill-defined Fourier transform of double-valued functions. The double-valued character of these functions stems from the nontrivial GP of adiabatic electronic states in the presence of a conical intersection. In contrast, WA-QCL avoids this issue by starting with the Wigner transform of single-valued quantities of the full problem. As a consequence, GP effects in WA-QCL can be associated with a dynamical term in the corresponding equation of motion. Since the WA-QCL approach uses solely the adiabatic potentials and non-adiabatic derivative couplings as an input, our results indicate that WA-QCL can capture GP effects in two-state crossing problems using first-principles electronic structure calculations without prior diabatization or introduction of explicit phase factors.

  3. Rationale for classical biological control of cattle fever ticks and proposed methods for field collection of natural enemies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical biological control using specialist parasitoids, predators and/or nematodes from the native ranges of cattle fever ticks Rhipicephalus microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus could complement existing control strategies for this livestock pest in the transboundary region between Mexico and T...

  4. Bifurcation of a periodic instanton and quantum-classical transition in the biaxial nano-ferromagnet with a magnetic field along hard axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂一行; 李志坚; 梁九卿; 严启伟

    2003-01-01

    Crossover from classical to quantum regimes of the barrier transition rate in a biaxial ferromagnetic magnet with a magnetic field applied along hard anisotropy axis is investigated. We show that the type of action-temperature diagrams can be determined by counting the number of bifurcation points. The model possesses not only the known type Ⅰ and Ⅱ, but also the interesting type Ⅲ and Ⅳ of transition which do not occur in general.

  5. Photovoltage field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Valerio; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-02-01

    The detection of infrared radiation enables night vision, health monitoring, optical communications and three-dimensional object recognition. Silicon is widely used in modern electronics, but its electronic bandgap prevents the detection of light at wavelengths longer than about 1,100 nanometres. It is therefore of interest to extend the performance of silicon photodetectors into the infrared spectrum, beyond the bandgap of silicon. Here we demonstrate a photovoltage field-effect transistor that uses silicon for charge transport, but is also sensitive to infrared light owing to the use of a quantum dot light absorber. The photovoltage generated at the interface between the silicon and the quantum dot, combined with the high transconductance provided by the silicon device, leads to high gain (more than 104 electrons per photon at 1,500 nanometres), fast time response (less than 10 microseconds) and a widely tunable spectral response. Our photovoltage field-effect transistor has a responsivity that is five orders of magnitude higher at a wavelength of 1,500 nanometres than that of previous infrared-sensitized silicon detectors. The sensitization is achieved using a room-temperature solution process and does not rely on traditional high-temperature epitaxial growth of semiconductors (such as is used for germanium and III–V semiconductors). Our results show that colloidal quantum dots can be used as an efficient platform for silicon-based infrared detection, competitive with state-of-the-art epitaxial semiconductors.

  6. Graphene field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Dharmendar; Register, Leonard F; Banerjee, Sanjay K [Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Carpenter, Gary D [IBM Austin Research Labs, Austin, Texas 78728 (United States)

    2011-08-10

    Owing in part to scaling challenges for metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) logic, the semiconductor industry is placing an increased emphasis on emerging materials and devices that may provide improved MOSFET performance beyond the 22 nm node, or provide novel functionality for, e.g. 'beyond CMOS' devices. Graphene, with its novel and electron-hole symmetric band structure and its high carrier mobilities and thermal velocities, is one such material that has garnered a great deal of interest for both purposes. Single and few layer carbon sheets have been fabricated by a variety of techniques including mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition, and field-effect transistors have been demonstrated with room-temperature mobilities as high as 10 000 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. But graphene is a gapless semiconductor and gate control of current is challenging, off-state leakage currents are high, and current does not readily saturate with drain voltage. However, various ways to overcome, adapt to, or even embrace this property are now being considered for device applications. In this work we explore through illustrative examples the potential of and challenges to graphene use for conventional and novel device applications. (topical review)

  7. Graphene field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Dharmendar; Register, Leonard F.; Carpenter, Gary D.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2011-08-01

    Owing in part to scaling challenges for metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) logic, the semiconductor industry is placing an increased emphasis on emerging materials and devices that may provide improved MOSFET performance beyond the 22 nm node, or provide novel functionality for, e.g. 'beyond CMOS' devices. Graphene, with its novel and electron-hole symmetric band structure and its high carrier mobilities and thermal velocities, is one such material that has garnered a great deal of interest for both purposes. Single and few layer carbon sheets have been fabricated by a variety of techniques including mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition, and field-effect transistors have been demonstrated with room-temperature mobilities as high as 10 000 cm2 V-1 s-1. But graphene is a gapless semiconductor and gate control of current is challenging, off-state leakage currents are high, and current does not readily saturate with drain voltage. However, various ways to overcome, adapt to, or even embrace this property are now being considered for device applications. In this work we explore through illustrative examples the potential of and challenges to graphene use for conventional and novel device applications.

  8. Classics Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Dee L.

    1995-01-01

    Appraises several databases devoted to classical literature. Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) contains the entire extant corpus of ancient Greek literature, including works on lexicography and historiography, extending into the 15th century. Other works awaiting completion are the Database of Classical Bibliography and a CD-ROM pictorial dictionary…

  9. The quantum vacuum in electromagnetic fields: From the Heisenberg-Euler effective action to vacuum birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Karbstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The focus of these lectures is on the quantum vacuum subjected to classical electromagnetic fields. To this end we explicitly derive the renowned Heisenberg-Euler effective action in constant electromagnetic fields in a rather pedagogical and easy to conceive way. As an application, we use it to study vacuum birefringence constituting one of the most promising optical signatures of quantum vacuum nonlinearity.

  10. [Health effects of electromagnetic fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röösli, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Use of electricity causes extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) and wireless communication devices emit radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). Average ELF-MF exposure is mainly determined by high voltage power lines and transformers at home or at the workplace, whereas RF-EMF exposure is mainly caused by devices operating close to the body (mainly mobile and cordless phones). Health effects of EMF are controversially discussed. The IARC classified ELF-MF and RF-EMF as possible carcinogenic. Most consistent epidemiological evidence was found for an association between ELF-MF and childhood leukaemia. If causal, 1 - 4 percent of all childhood leukaemia cases could be attributed to ELF-MF. Epidemiological research provided some indications for an association between ELF-MF and Alzheimer's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, although not entirely consistent. Regarding mobile phones and brain tumours, some studies observed an increased risk after heavy or long term use on the one hand. On the other hand, brain tumour incidence was not found to have increased in the last decade in Sweden, England or the US. Acute effects of RF-EMF on non-specific symptoms of ill health seem unlikely according to randomized and double blind provocation studies. However, epidemiological research on long term effects is still limited. Although from the current state of the scientific knowledge a large individual health risk from RF-EMF exposure is unlikely, even a small risk would have substantial public health relevance because of the widespread use of wireless communication technologies.

  11. Stabilization and relative phase effects in a dichromatically driven diatomic Morse molecule: interpretation based on nonlinear classical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantoudis, Vassilios; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A

    2005-02-22

    The dissociation dynamics of a dichromatically laser-driven diatomic Morse molecule vibrating in the ground state is investigated by applying tools of the nonlinear theory of classical Hamiltonian systems. Emphasis is placed on the role of the relative phase of the two fields, phi. First, it is found that, just like in quantum mechanics, there is dependence of the dissociation probability on phi. Then, it is demonstrated that addition of the second laser leads to suppression of probability (stabilization), when the intensity of the first laser is kept constant just above or below the single laser dissociation threshold. This "chemical bond hardening" diminishes as phi increases. These effects are investigated and interpreted in terms of modifications in phase space topology. Variations of phi as well as of the intensity of the second laser may cause (i) appearance/disappearance of the stability island corresponding to the common resonance with the lowest energy and (ii) deformation and movement of the region of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser tori that survive from the undriven system. The latter is the main origin in phase space of stabilization and phi dependence. Finally, it is shown that the use of short laser pulses enhances both effects.

  12. Rotational Symmetry of Classical Orbits, Arbitrary Quantization of Angular Momentum and the Role of Gauge Field in Two-Dimensional Space

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Jun-Li

    2010-01-01

    We study the quantum-classical correspondence in terms of coherent wave functions of a charged particle in two-dimensional central-scalar-potentials as well as the gauge field of a magnetic flux in the sense that the probability clouds of wave functions are well localized on classical orbits. For both closed and open classical orbits, the non-integer angular-momentum quantization with the level-space of angular momentum being greater or less than $\\hbar$ is determined uniquely by the same rotational symmetry of classical orbits and probability clouds of coherent wave functions, which is not necessarily $2\\pi$-periodic. The gauge potential of a magnetic flux impenetrable to the particle cannot change the quantization rule but is able to shift the spectrum of canonical angular momentum by a flux-dependent value, which results in a common topological phase for all wave functions in the given model. The quantum mechanical model of anyon proposed by Wilczek (Phys. Rev. Lette. 48, 1144) becomes a special case of th...

  13. Analysis of geometric phase effects in the quantum-classical Liouville formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Kapral, Raymond; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2013-01-01

    We analyze two approaches to the quantum-classical Liouville (QCL) formalism that differ in the order of two operations: Wigner transformation and projection onto adiabatic electronic states. The analysis is carried out on a two-dimensional linear vibronic model where geometric phase (GP) effects arising from a conical intersection profoundly affect nuclear dynamics. We find that the Wigner-then-Adiabatic (WA) QCL approach captures GP effects, whereas the Adiabatic-then-Wigner (AW) QCL approach does not. Moreover, the Wigner transform in AW-QCL leads to an ill-defined Fourier transform of double-valued functions. The double-valued character of these functions stems from the nontrivial GP of adiabatic electronic states in the presence of a conical intersection. In contrast, WA-QCL avoids this issue by starting with the Wigner transform of single-valued quantities of the full problem. Since the WA-QCL approach uses solely the adiabatic potentials and non-adiabatic derivative couplings as an input, our results i...

  14. Spin one-half particles in strong electromagnetic fields: spin effects and radiation reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Meng; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Various different classical models of electrons including their spin degree of freedom are commonly applied to describe the electron dynamics in strong electromagnetic fields. We demonstrate that different models can lead to different or even contradicting predictions how the spin degree of freedom modifies the electron's orbital motion when the electron moves in strong electromagnetic fields. This discrepancy is rooted in the model-specific energy dependency of the spin induced Stern-Gerlach force acting on the electron. The Frenkel model and the classical Foldy-Wouthuysen model are compared exemplarily in the nonrelativistic and the relativistic limits in order to identify parameter regimes where these classical models make different predictions. This allows for experimental tests of these models. In ultra strong laser setups at parameter regimes where effects of the Stern-Gerlach force become relevant also radiation reaction effects are expected to set in. We incorporate radiation reaction classically via ...

  15. Effective field theory approach to quasi-single field inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Noumi, Toshifumi; Yokoyama, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    We apply the effective field theory approach to quasi-single field inflation, which contains an additional scalar field with Hubble scale mass other than inflaton. Based on the time-dependent spatial diffeomorphism, which is not broken by the time-dependent background evolution, the most generic action of quasi-single field inflation is constructed up to third order fluctuations. Using the obtained action, the effects of the additional massive scalar field on the primordial curvature perturbations are discussed. In particular, we calculate the power spectrum and discuss the momentum-dependence of three point functions in the squeezed limit for general settings of quasi-single field inflation. Our framework can be also applied to inflation models with heavy particles. We make a qualitative discussion on the effects of heavy particles during inflation and that of sharp turning trajectory in our framework.

  16. Production of partons in the presence of classical fields in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions; Produktion von Patronen in Anwesenheit klassischer Felder in ultrarelativistischen Schwerionenkollisionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, D.D

    2003-09-01

    In this work the production of quarks, antiquarks and of gluonic fluctuations is studied in the presence of classical bosonic field. A comparison of the production of anti-quark pairs with the creation of pairs of gluonic quantum fluctuations based on perturbative calculations will be presented here. This analysis is valid for quantum particles with a large momentum compared to the magnitude of the classical vector potential multiplied by the coupling constant. The model contains 3 parameters: the initial magnitude of the gauge field, the coupling constant and the time scale on which the field decays. It appears that none of the species (quark-antiquark pairs, gluonic fluctuation pairs, bosons and fermion-anti fermions) can be neglected from the beginning. A corresponding calculation requires a non-perturbative description of at least the soft fermions. In this thesis the exact expression for fields varying arbitrarily in time is derived. After the full solution has been obtained, various approximation schemes are proposed for different domains, in order to find out into which the situation under consideration falls. There are approximations in the ultraviolet (perturbative), the infrared, and the Abelian (commutative) regime. The exact expression and the lowest orders of the different approximation schemes are evaluated in the presence of the model field with the same parameters as before. (A.C.)

  17. Lectures on Classical Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the lectures consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schroedinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  18. Effective gravitational fields in transplackian scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Betti, Luca S G

    2014-01-01

    After a short introduction to the general Quantum Gravity problem, we compare a result from the S-matrix description of gravitational interaction due to Amati, Ciafaloni and Veneziano (ACV) with classical General Relativity results. In Chapter 1, we introduce the metric produced by a massless particle moving at the speed of light. In Chapter 2, we review ACV's semiclassical approach to gravitation and show some of its result. In Chapter 3, we detail the computation of gravitational field expectation values in a high-energy scattering process, following ACV's prescriptions. In Chapter 4, we analyze our results. The main feature is that the leading contributions to the metric computed in terms of the Feynman diagrams deriving from ACV's model perfectly reproduce classical results.

  19. The effect of verbalization strategy on wisconsin card sorting test performance in schizophrenic patients receiving classical or atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallaro Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of reports showed en encouraging remediation in some patients' executive deficits thanks to the use of 'information processing strategies'. Moreover the impact of antipsychotics on cognitive functions of the schizophrenics is an important issue, especially if an integrated psychosocial treatment is needed. The aim of this paper is to evaluate different executive performance and response to verbalization, a strategy of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST remediation, in subjects on classical vs atypical antipsychotic (AP treatment. Methods Sixty-three schizophrenic subjects undertook the WCST under standard and modified (verbalization administration. Subjects were stratified by the kind of WCST response (i.e. good, poor and remediable and AP treatment (i.e. atypical vs. classical. Results Subjects on atypical APs showed a better performance than those on classical ones. More poor performers who did not remediate were seen in the sample with classical Aps while subjects who remediated the performance were seen in the subgroup with atypical APs only. An increase of perseverative and total errors was seen in poor performers subjects on classical APs. Conclusion Subjects on atypicals showed a better cognitive pattern in terms of WCST performance. Since the naturalistic assignment of medication we cannot draw conclusions about its effect on cognitive performance and its interaction with cognitive remediation potential. However the data lead us to hypothesize that subjects with potential room for remediation did so with the atypical APs.

  20. Effects of Storage Time and Condition on Mineral Contents of Grape Pekmez Produced by Vacuum and Classical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kayisoglu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effect of storage period and conditions on chemical properties of boiled grape juice (pekmez produced from the grape variety of Kınalı Yapıncak using classical and vacuum methods. Pekmez samples were stored in 250 cc volumed jars. Products obtained using two different production methods were stored for 10 months in room conditions and at +4 ºC temperature. Starting from the beginning of the storage, mineral analyses were repeated in every two months. Average copper, manganese, phosphorus, and sodium contents in pekmez samples produced by vacuum method were higher than by classical method at the end of storage period. But, calcium content in pekmez samples produced by classical method was higher than that of the other. Zinc, iron, and potassium contents in either vacuum method or classical method were not significantly different. In conclusion; in general, mineral contents were better in pekmez produced by vacuum method than classical method. Phosphor, sodium, potassium, calcium, copper, zinc and manganese contents were affected significantly by storage period, but iron was not. In addition, storage condition did not affect sodium, zinc and iron contents.

  1. Classical, Semi-classical and Quantum Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, H; Scully, Marlan

    2012-01-01

    David Middleton was a towering figure of 20th Century engineering and science and one of the founders of statistical communication theory. During the second World War, the young David Middleton, working with Van Fleck, devised the notion of the matched filter, which is the most basic method used for detecting signals in noise. Over the intervening six decades, the contributions of Middleton have become classics. This collection of essays by leading scientists, engineers and colleagues of David are in his honor and reflect the wide  influence that he has had on many fields. Also included is the introduction by Middleton to his forthcoming book, which gives a wonderful view of the field of communication, its history and his own views on the field that he developed over the past 60 years. Focusing on classical noise modeling and applications, Classical, Semi-Classical and Quantum Noise includes coverage of statistical communication theory, non-stationary noise, molecular footprints, noise suppression, Quantum e...

  2. Simulated epidemiological and economic effects of measures to reduce piglet supply during a classical swine fever epidemic in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangen, M.J.J.; Nielen, M.; Burrell, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of additional measures adopted during a classical swine fever (CSF) epidemic to reduce piglet supply, namely, an insemination ban, abortion of sows and killing of young piglets, are studied using a stochastic, spatial, dynamic epidemiological simulation model of the pig sector in the Net

  3. Membrane glucocorticoid receptor activation induces proteomic changes aligning with classical glucocorticoid effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernocchi, Sara; Battello, Nadia; Schmitz, Stephanie; Revets, Dominique; Billing, Anja M; Turner, Jonathan D; Muller, Claude P

    2013-07-01

    Glucocorticoids exert rapid nongenomic effects by several mechanisms including the activation of a membrane-bound glucocorticoid receptor (mGR). Here, we report the first proteomic study on the effects of mGR activation by BSA-conjugated cortisol (Cort-BSA). A subset of target proteins in the proteomic data set was validated by Western blot and we found them responding to mGR activation by BSA-conjugated cortisol in three additional cell lines, indicating a conserved effect in cells originating from different tissues. Changes in the proteome of BSA-conjugated cortisol treated CCRF-CEM leukemia cells were associated with early and rapid pro-apoptotic, immune-modulatory and metabolic effects aligning with and possibly "priming" classical activities of the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (cGR). PCR arrays investigating target genes of the major signaling pathways indicated that the mGR does not exert its effects through the transcriptional activity of any of the most common kinases in these leukemic cells, but RhoA signaling emerged from our pathway analysis. All cell lines tested displayed very low levels of mGR on their surface. Highly sensitive and specific in situ proximity ligation assay visualized low numbers of mGR even in cells previously thought to be mGR negative. We obtained similar results when using three distinct anti-GR monoclonal antibodies directed against the N-terminal half of the cGR. This strongly suggests that the mGR and the cGR have a high sequence homology and most probably originate from the same gene. Furthermore, the mGR appears to reside in caveolae and its association with caveolin-1 (Cav-1) was clearly detected in two of the four cell lines investigated using double recognition proximity ligation assay. Our results indicate however that Cav-1 is not necessary for membrane localization of the GR since CCRF-CEM and Jurkat cells have a functional mGR, but did not express this caveolar protein. However, if expressed, this membrane protein

  4. Wave packet dynamics under effect of a pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, A. R. C. B.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dynamics of an electron in a crystalline one-dimensional model under effect of a time-dependent Gaussian field. The time evolution of an initially Gaussian wave packet it was obtained through the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Our analysis consists of computing the electronic centroid as well as the mean square displacement. We observe that the electrical pulse is able to promote a special kind of displacement along the chain. We demonstrated a direct relation between the group velocity of the wave packet and the applied electrical pulses. We compare those numerical calculations with a semi-classical approach.

  5. Global Asymptotic Stability of the Classical PID Controller by Considering Saturation Effects in Industrial Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Yarza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An unsolved ancient problem in position control of robot manipulators is to find a stability analysis that proves global asymptotic stability of the classical PID control in closed loop with robot manipulators. The practical evidence suggests that in fact the classical PID in industrial robots is a global regulator. The main goal of the present paper is theoretically to show why in the practice such a fact is achieved. We show that considering the natural saturations of every control stage in practical robots, the classical PID becomes a type of saturated nonlinear PID controller. In this work such a nonlinear PID controller with bounded torques for robot manipulators is proposed. This controller, unlike other saturated nonlinear PID controllers previously proposed, uses a single saturation for the three terms of the controller. Global asymptotical stability is proved via Lyapunov stability theory. Experimental results are presented in order to observe the performance of the proposed controller.

  6. Casimir effect for Elko spinor field

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, S H; Santos, Rubia dos

    2016-01-01

    The Casimir effect for the Elko spinor field in $3+1$ dimension is obtained using Dirichlet boundary conditions. It is shown the existence of a repulsive force four times greater than the case of the scalar field. The precise reason for such differences are highlighted and interpreted, as well as the right parallel of the Casimir effect due to scalar and fermionic fields.

  7. Classical Conditioning of Emotional Responses (Meaning, Attitudes, Values, Interests) and Effects on Social Behavior: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Arthur W.; Carlson, Carl G.

    This is a bibliography of 81 papers and books published in the years 1957-1970 relevant to the subject of verbally-elicited responses that are in accordance with principles of classical conditioning. Of these publications, 24 are by Staats--one of the bibliographers--and his associates. (MF)

  8. Classical Conditioning and Retention of the Infant's Eyelid Response: Effects of Age and Interstimulus Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Arlene H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reports that lengthy interstimulus interval facilitates classical conditioning in very young infants. Infants trained in a single session at 20 days of age exhibited reliable retention of the conditioned eyelid reflex 10 days later, but infants 10 days of age did not. (Author)

  9. Cost-effectiveness of measures to prevent classical swine fever introduction into The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de C.J.; Saatkamp, H.W.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent history has demonstrated that classical swine fever (CSF) epidemics can incur high economic losses, especially for exporting countries that have densely populated pig areas and apply a strategy of non-vaccination, such as The Netherlands. Introduction of CSF virus (CSFV) remains a continuing

  10. Enlarging photovoltaic effect: combination of classic photoelectric and ferroelectric photovoltaic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjiao; Su, Xiaodong; Shen, Mingrong; Dai, Zhihua; Zhang, Lingjun; He, Xiyun; Cheng, Wenxiu; Cao, Mengyu; Zou, Guifu

    2013-01-01

    Converting light energy to electrical energy in photovoltaic devices relies on the photogenerated electrons and holes separated by the built-in potential in semiconductors. Photo-excited electrons in metal electrodes are usually not considered in this process. Here, we report an enhanced photovoltaic effect in the ferroelectric lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) by using low work function metals as the electrodes. We believe that electrons in the metal with low work function could be photo-emitted into PLZT and form the dominant photocurrent in our devices. Under AM1.5 (100 mW/cm²) illumination, the short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage of Mg/PLZT/ITO are about 150 and 2 times of those of Pt/PLZT/ITO, respectively. The photovoltaic response of PLZT capacitor was expanded from ultraviolet to visible spectra, and it may have important impact on design and fabrication of high performance photovoltaic devices based on ferroelectric materials.

  11. Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    This is the English version of a friendly graduate course on Classical Mechanics, containing about 80% of the material I covered during the January-June 1999 semester at IFUG in the Mexican city of Leon. For the Spanish version, see physics/9906066

  12. Viscosity and dissipative hydrodynamics from effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Polonyi, Janos

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of deriving dissipative hydrodynamics from an action, we study classical actions for open systems, which follow from the generic structure of effective actions in the Schwinger-Keldysh closed-time-path (CTP) formalism with two time axes and a doubling of degrees of freedom. The central structural feature of such effective actions is the coupling between degrees of freedom on the two time axes. This reflects the fact that from an effective field theory point of view, dissipation is the loss of energy of the low-energy hydrodynamical degrees of freedom to the integrated-out, UV degrees of freedom of the environment. The dynamics of only the hydrodynamical modes may therefore not possess a conserved stress-energy tensor. After a general discussion of the CTP effective actions, we use the variational principle to derive the energy-momentum balance equation for a dissipative fluid from an effective Goldstone action of the long-range hydrodynamical modes. Despite the absence of conserved energy and momentum, we show that we can construct the first-order dissipative stress-energy tensor and derive the Navier-Stokes equations near hydrodynamical equilibrium. The shear viscosity is shown to vanish in the classical theory under consideration, while the bulk viscosity is determined by the form of the effective action. We also discuss the thermodynamics of the system and analyze the entropy production.

  13. Comparing the Effect of English Language Teaching by Instructional Softwares and Classical Method on Students Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Heidari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to compare the effect of teaching English through instructional softwares to teaching it through classical methods on students’ academic achievement. The research had an applied aim and its method was quasi-experimental. Statistical population included all the male students of secondary schools of Sari, district-one consisting 934 students and 479 of whom were selected by simple random sampling method. A researcher-made questionnaire with an adequate reliability (a = 0/86 was used for gathering data. The gathered data were analyzed by single-group t test, two dependent groups t test and two independent group t test.The results revealed that not only using instructional softwares were effective on students’ academic achievement but its' effect on students’ academic achievement was more than classical methods as well. Teaching english through instructional softwares highly motivated the students toward language learning.

  14. Batf3 and Id2 have a synergistic effect on Irf8-directed classical CD8α+ dendritic cell development

    KAUST Repository

    Jaiswal, Hemant

    2013-11-13

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous cell populations represented by different subtypes, each varying in terms of gene expression patterns and specific functions. Recent studies identified transcription factors essential for the development of different DC subtypes, yet molecular mechanisms for the developmental program and functions remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed and characterized a mouse DC progenitor-like cell line, designated DC9, from Irf8-/- bone marrow cells as a model for DC development and function. Expression of Irf8 in DC9 cells led to plasmacytoid DCs and CD8α+ DC-like cells, with a concomitant increase in plasmacytoid DC- and CD8α+ DC-specific gene transcripts and induction of type I IFNs and IL12p40 following TLR ligand stimulation. Irf8 expression in DC9 cells led to an increase in Id2 and Batf3 transcript levels, transcription factors shown to be important for the development of CD8α+ DCs. We show that, without Irf8 , expression of Id2 and Batf3 was not sufficient for directing classical CD8α+ DC development. When coexpressed with Irf8, Batf3 and Id2 had a synergistic effect on classical CD8α+ DC development. We demonstrate that Irf8 is upstream of Batf3 and Id2 in the classical CD8α+ DC developmental program and define the hierarchical relationship of transcription factors important for classical CD8α+ DC development.

  15. EFFECTS OF PARAMETRIC VARIATIONS ON SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR NON-CLASSICALLY DAMPED COUPLED SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XU,J.; DEGRASSI,G.

    2000-04-02

    A comprehensive benchmark program was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform an evaluation of state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for performing seismic analyses of coupled systems with non-classical damping. The program, which was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was designed to address various aspects of application and limitations of these state-of-the-art analysis methods to typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) structures with non-classical damping, and was carried out through analyses of a set of representative benchmark problems. One objective was to examine the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled systems. The examination was performed using parametric variations for three simple benchmark models. This paper presents the comparisons and evaluation of the program participants' results to the BNL exact solutions for the applicable ranges of modeling dynamic characteristic parameters.

  16. Acute effect of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and classic exercises in adhesive capsulitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Yuruk, Zeliha Ozlem; Zeybek, Aslican; Gulsen, Mustafa; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of our study was to compare the initial effects of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and classic exercise interventions with physiotherapy modalities on pain, scapular dyskinesis, range of motion, and function in adhesive capsulitis. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-three subjects were allocated to 3 groups: scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercies and physiotherapy modalities, classic exercise and physiotherapy modalities, and only physiotherapy modalities. The intervention was applied in a single session. The Visual Analog Scale, Lateral Scapular Slide Test, range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test were evaluated before and just after the one-hour intervention in the same session (all in one session). [Results] All of the groups showed significant differences in shoulder flexion and abduction range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test scores. There were statistically significant differences in Visual Analog Scale scores in the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and control groups, and no treatment method had significant effect on the Lateral Scapular Slide Test results. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups before and after the intervention. [Conclusion] Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, classic exercise, and physiotherapy modalities had immediate effects on adhesive capsulitis in our study. However, there was no additional benefit of exercises in one session over physiotherapy modalities. Also, an effective treatment regimen for shoulder rehabilitation of adhesive capsulitis patients should include scapular exercises.

  17. The classical Doppler effect as a rendezvous problem; 3D case

    OpenAIRE

    Di Rocco, Hector Omar

    2016-01-01

    En este trabajo se deriva la fórmula para el corrimiento Doppler como si tratásemos un problema de encuentro, unificando todos los posibles movimientos relativos entre la fuente y el observador We derive the classical Doppler shift formula as a rendezvous problem, unifying all possible relative movements between the source and the observer Fil: Di Rocco, Hector Omar. Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas. Instituto de Fisica Arroyo...

  18. Classical and quantum many-body effects on the critical properties and thermodynamic regularities of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, C.; Anderson, P. W.; Delhommelle, J.

    2017-02-01

    Using molecular simulation, we determine the critical properties of Si as well as the loci for several remarkable thermodynamic contours spanning the supercritical region of the phase diagram. We consider a classical three-body potential as well as a quantum (tight-binding) many-body model, and determine the loci for the ideality contours, including the Zeno line and the H line of ideal enthalpy. The two strategies (classical or quantum) lead to strongly asymmetric binodals and to critical properties in good agreement with each other. The Zeno and H lines are found to remain linear over a wide temperature interval, despite the changes in electronic structure undergone by the fluid along these contours. We also show that the classical and quantum model yield markedly different results for the parameters defining the H line, the exponents for the power-laws underlying the line of minima for the isothermal enthalpy and for the density required to achieve ideal behavior, most notably for the enthalpy.

  19. Radiation reaction effects in cascade scattering of intense, tightly focused laser pulses by relativistic electrons: Classical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A.; Masuda, S.; Bulanov, S. S.; Koga, J.; Hosokai, T.; Kodama, R.

    2014-05-01

    Nonlinear cascade scattering of intense, tightly focused laser pulses by relativistic electrons is studied numerically in the classical approximation including radiation damping for the quantum parameter ⟨ℏωxray⟩/ɛ <1 and an arbitrary radiation parameter χ. The electron's energy loss, along with its being scattered to the side by the ponderomotive force, makes scattering in the vicinity of a high laser field nearly impossible at high electron energies. The use of a second, copropagating laser pulse as a booster is shown to partially solve this problem.

  20. Self compensation of classical non abelian charge

    OpenAIRE

    Bartnik, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    A new classical, non singular solution with arbitrarily low energy is found for SU(2) non abelian fields in the presence of a static charge. Physically it means that a classical charge coupled to any SU(N) non abelian gauge field will develop a pure gauge field, carrying no energy, that will completely screen it - there are no visible classical non abelian charges.

  1. Nuclear Dynamics with Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the international workshop on "Nuclear Dynamics with Effective Field Theories" held at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany from July 1 to 3, 2013. The workshop focused on effective field theories of low-energy QCD, chiral perturbation theory for nuclear forces as well as few- and many-body physics. Included are a short contribution per talk.

  2. The effective mass of the atom-radiation field system and the cavity-field Wigner distribution in the presence of a homogeneous gravitational field in the Jaynes-Cummings model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, M [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University-Shahreza Branch, Shahreza, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: majid471702@yahoo.com

    2009-07-28

    The effective mass that approximately describes the influence of a classical homogeneous gravitational field on an interacting atom-radiation field system is determined within the framework of the Jaynes-Cummings model. By taking into account both the atomic motion and the gravitational field, a full quantum treatment of the internal and external dynamics of the atom is presented. By exactly solving the Schroedinger equation in the interaction picture, the evolving state of the system is found. The influence of a classical homogeneous gravitational field on the energy eigenvalues, the effective mass of the atom-radiation field system and the Wigner distribution of the radiation field are studied, when the initial condition is such that the radiation field is prepared in a coherent state and the two-level atom is in a coherent superposition of the excited and ground states.

  3. Theory of motion for monopole-dipole singularities of classical Yang-Mills-Higgs fields. II. Approximation scheme and equations of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Wolfgang; Havas, Peter; Rosenblum, Arnold

    1984-02-01

    In the preceding paper, the laws of motion were established for classical particles with spin which are monopole-dipole singularities of Yang-Mills-Higgs fields. In this paper, a systematic approximation scheme is developed for solving the coupled nonlinear field equations in any order and for determining the corresponding equations of motion. In zeroth order the potentials are taken as the usual Liénard-Wiechert and Bhabha-Harish-Chandra potentials (generalized to isospace); in this order the solutions are necessarily Abelian, since the isovector describing the charge is constant. The regularization necessary to obtain expressions finite on the world lines of the particles is achieved by the method of Riesz potentials. All fields are taken as retarded and are expressed in integral form. Omitting dipole interactions, the integrals for the various terms are carried out as far as possible for general motions, including radiation-reaction terms. In first order, the charge isovectors are no longer necessarily constant; thus the solutions are not necessarily Abelian, and it is possible for charge to be radiated away. The cases of time-symmetric field theory and of an action-at-a-distance formulation of the theory are discussed in an appendix.

  4. Classical Corrections in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brustein, Ram; Brustein, Ram; Madden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    An important element in a model of non-singular string cosmology is a phase in which classical corrections saturate the growth of curvature in a deSitter-like phase with a linearly growing dilaton (an `algebraic fixed point'). As the form of the classical corrections is not well known, here we look for evidence, based on a suggested symmetry of the action, scale factor duality and on conformal field theory considerations, that they can produce this saturation. It has previously been observed that imposing scale factor duality on the $O(\\alpha')$ corrections is not compatible with fixed point behavior. Here we present arguments that these problems persist to all orders in $\\alpha'$. We also present evidence for the form of a solution to the equations of motion using conformal perturbation theory, examine its implications for the form of the effective action and find novel fixed point structure.

  5. Classical Effects of Carrier-Envelope Phase on Nonsequential Double Ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yue-Ming; LIAO Qing; LAN Peng-Fei; LU Pei-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    A classical microcanonical 1+1-dimensional model is used to investigate the ion momentum distributions in non-sequential double ionization with linearly polarized few-cycle pulses. We find that the ion momentum distribution has a strong dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the few-cycle pulse, which is consistent with the experimental results qualitatively. Back analysis shows that the ionization probability of the first electron at different phases and its returning kinetic energy play the main role on the ion momentum distributions.

  6. Effects of speed on temporal patterns in classical style and freestyle cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johnny; Tveit, Per; Eikrehagen, Olav

    2004-01-01

    The purpose was to study the adaptation to speed in the temporal patterns of the movement cycle and determine any differences in velocity, cycle rate and cycle length at the maximum speed level in the different classical style and freestyle cross-country skiing techniques. Eight skilled male cross-country skiers were filmed with a digital video camera in the sagittal plane while skiing on a flat cross-country ski track. The skiers performed three classical style techniques the diagonal stride, kick double poling and the double poling technique and four freestyle techniques paddle dance (gear 2), double dance (gear 3), single dance (gear 4) and combiskate (gear 5) at four different self-selected speed levels slow, medium, fast and their maximum. Cycle duration, cycle rate, cycle length, and relative and absolute cycle phase duration of the different techniques at the different speed levels were analysed by means of a video analysis system. The cycle rate in all tested classical and freestyle techniques was found to increase significantly (p skiing techniques. A minor, not significant, change in cycle length, and the significant increase in cycle rate with speed showed that the classical and freestyle cross-country skiing styles are dependent, to a large extent, on an increase in cycle rate for speed adaptation. A striking finding was the constant relative phase duration with speed, which indicates a simplified neural control of the speed adaptation in both cross-country skiing styles. For the practitioner, the knowledge about the importance of increasing cycle frequency rather than cycle length in the speed adaptation can be used to optimise a rapid increase in speed. The knowledge about the decrease in absolute phase duration, especially the thrust phase duration, points to the need for strength and technique training to enable force production at a high cycle rate and skiing speed. The knowledge that the relative phase duration stays constant with speed may be

  7. Transferability of different classical force fields for right and left handed α-helices constructed from enantiomeric amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Santu; Sarkar, Sujit; Pandey, Prithvi Raj; Roy, Sudip

    2016-02-21

    Amino acids can form d and l enantiomers, of which the l enantiomer is abundant in nature. The naturally occurring l enantiomer has a greater preference for a right handed helical conformation, and the d enantiomer for a left handed helical conformation. The other conformations, that is, left handed helical conformations of the l enantiomers and right handed helical conformations of the d enantiomers, are not common. The energetic differences between left and right handed alpha helical peptide chains constructed from enantiomeric amino acids are investigated using quantum chemical calculations (using the M06/6-311g(d,p) level of theory). Further, the performances of commonly used biomolecular force fields (OPLS/AA, CHARMM27/CMAP and AMBER) to represent the different helical conformations (left and right handed) constructed from enantiomeric (D and L) amino acids are evaluated. 5- and 10-mer chains from d and l enantiomers of alanine, leucine, lysine, and glutamic acid, in right and left handed helical conformations, are considered in the study. Thus, in total, 32 α-helical polypeptides (4 amino acids × 4 conformations of 5-mer and 10-mer) are studied. Conclusions, with regards to the performance of the force fields, are derived keeping the quantum optimized geometry as the benchmark, and on the basis of phi and psi angle calculations, hydrogen bond analysis, and different long range helical order parameters.

  8. [Classical taxomomies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubarskiĭ, G Iu

    2006-01-01

    The sequence of classic paradigms in taxonomy that partly replaced each other and partly co-exist is given as follows: the theory of "organ and organism similarity", the naturalistic theory, the descriptive theory, and the phylogenetic theory. The naturalistic classics accepted the notion of "the plan of creation". The rejection of appealing to this plan brought forth certain problems in the formulation of the purpose of taxonomy; these problems were differently solved by the descriptive and the phylogenetic classic traditions. The difficulties of the current paradigms arising from the loss of a "strong purpose", a problem to be solved by taxonomists that is to be clear and interesting to a wide range of non-professionals. The paradox of formalization led to the losing of content of the methods due to their formalization. To attract attention to taxonomy, a new "image of the results" of its work that would be interesting to the non-professionals is necessary. The co-existence of different methods of reseach applied to different groups of facts leads to the loss of integrity of the research. It is not only that the taxon becomes a hypothesis and such hypotheses multiply. The comparison of these hypotheses is problematic, because each of them is supported by its own independent scope of facts. Because of the existence of a fundamental meronotaxonomic discrepancy, taxonomic systems based on different groups of characters appear to be incomparable, being rather systems of characters than systems of taxa. Systems of characters are not directly comparable with each other; they can be compared only through appealing to taxa, but taxa themselves exist only in the form of a number of hypotheses. Consequently, each separate taxonomic approach creates its own nature, its own subject of research. Therefore, it is necessary to describe the subject of research correctly (and indicate the purpose of research), as well as to distinguish clearly between results achieved through

  9. Behaviour of symmetric solutions of a nonlinear elliptic field equation in the semi-classical limit: Concentration around a circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa D'Aprile

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the existence of concentrated solutions of the nonlinear field equation $$ -h^{2}Delta v+V(xv-h^{p}Delta_{p}v+ W'(v=0,, $$ where $v:{mathbb R}^{N}o{mathbb R}^{N+1}$, $Ngeq 3$, $p>N$, the potential $V$ is positive and radial, and $W$ is an appropriate singular function satisfying a suitable symmetric property. Provided that $h$ is sufficiently small, we are able to find solutions with a certain spherical symmetry which exhibit a concentration behaviour near a circle centered at zero as $ho 0^{+}$. Such solutions are obtained as critical points for the associated energy functional; the proofs of the results are variational and the arguments rely on topological tools. Furthermore a penalization-type method is developed for the identification of the desired solutions.

  10. In vivo effect on pig chromosomes of high dosage vaccine against classic swine fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genghini, R; Tiranti, I; Segade, G; Amado, J; Wittouck, P; Mian, L

    1998-12-03

    Hog cholera virus (HCV) can induce chromosome abnormalities in diseased pigs as well as in those vaccinated with attenuated virus vaccine against classic swine fever. An experiment was made using animals from potency and safety control tests of commercial vaccines in Argentina. The different types of chromosomal alterations observed were chromatid and chromosome breaks, chromatid exchanges, polyploid, multiple aberrations cells, and chromosome pulverization. In this study the occurrence of chromosome alterations in pigs receiving either 1 or 10 vaccine doses was evaluated by means of blood sampling at different periods after vaccination. An essay comparing prolificity between treated and non-treated sows was also made. Significant differences in the amount of damaged chromosomes as well as differences in the type of predominant alterations between the two treatments were observed. Aberration frequencies increased from the 5-day postvaccination period reaching the highest value of 4.14% at the 10th, for the one-dose treatment; and highest value of 42.7% including 33.96% of cell with chromosome pulverization which was found in the 7th day interval when applying 10 doses. From then on, the proportion of affected cells dropped until the 20th day interval, which was the last recorded. The prolificity trial did not show any difference between treated and control sows, indicating that chromosome alteration might be limited to lymphocytes. It is concluded that HCV maintains its mutagenic potentiality in the attenuated vaccine, being able to induce chromosomal damage as it does in classic swine fever diseased animals.

  11. Effect of circadian phase on memory acquisition and recall: operant conditioning vs. classical conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine V Garren

    Full Text Available There have been several studies on the role of circadian clocks in the regulation of associative learning and memory processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The results have been quite variable and at present it is unclear to what extent the variability observed reflects species differences or differences in methodology. Previous results have shown that following differential classical conditioning in the cockroach, Rhyparobia maderae, in an olfactory discrimination task, formation of the short-term and long-term memory is under strict circadian control. In contrast, there appeared to be no circadian regulation of the ability to recall established memories. In the present study, we show that following operant conditioning of the same species in a very similar olfactory discrimination task, there is no impact of the circadian system on either short-term or long-term memory formation. On the other hand, ability to recall established memories is strongly tied to the circadian phase of training. On the basis of these data and those previously reported for phylogenetically diverse species, it is suggested that there may be fundamental differences in the way the circadian system regulates learning and memory in classical and operant conditioning.

  12. Field-effect ion-transport devices with carbon nanotube channels: schematics and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Yul; Kang, Jeong Won; Byun, Ki Ryang; Kang, Eu Seok; Hwang, Ho Jung [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha; Lee, Hoong Joo [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Min [Chung-Cheong University, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-15

    We investigated field-effect ion-transport devices based on carbon nanotubes by using classical molecular dynamics simulations under applied external force fields, and we present model schematics that can be applied to the nanoscale data storage devices and unipolar ionic field-effect transistors. As the applied external force field is increased, potassium ions rapidly flow through the nanochannel. Under low external force fields, thermal fluctuations of the nanochannels affect tunneling of the potassium ions whereas the effects of thermal fluctuations are negligible under high external force fields. Since the electric current conductivity increases when potassium ions are inserted into fullerenes or carbon nanotubes, the field effect due to the gate, which can modify the position of the potassium ions, changes the tunneling current between the drain and the source.

  13. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  14. Communication: dynamical embedding: correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H2O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  15. Non-equilibrium statistical field theory for classical particles: Linear and mildly non-linear evolution of cosmological density power spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Berg, Daniel; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Viermann, Celia

    2014-01-01

    We use the non-equlibrium statistical field theory for classical particles, recently developed by Mazenko and Das and Mazenko, together with the free generating functional we have previously derived for point sets initially correlated in phase space, to calculate the time evolution of power spectra in the free theory, i.e. neglecting particle interactions. We provide expressions taking linear and quadratic momentum correlations into account. Up to this point, the expressions are general with respect to the free propagator of the microscopic degrees of freedom. We then specialise the propagator to that expected for particles in cosmology treated within the Zel'dovich approximation and show that, to linear order in the momentum correlations, the linear growth of the cosmological power spectrum is reproduced. Quadratic momentum correlations return a first contribution to the non-linear evolution of the power spectrum, for which we derive a simple closed expression valid for arbitrary wave numbers. This expressio...

  16. Perspective: Quantum or classical coherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H

    2012-06-07

    Some coherence effects in chemical dynamics are described correctly by classical mechanics, while others only appear in a quantum treatment--and when these are observed experimentally it is not always immediately obvious whether their origin is classical or quantum. Semiclassical theory provides a systematic way of adding quantum coherence to classical molecular dynamics and thus provides a useful way to distinguish between classical and quantum coherence. Several examples are discussed which illustrate both cases. Particularly interesting is the situation with electronically non-adiabatic processes, where sometimes whether the coherence effects are classical or quantum depends on what specific aspects of the process are observed.

  17. Classic Problems of Probability

    CERN Document Server

    Gorroochurn, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    "A great book, one that I will certainly add to my personal library."—Paul J. Nahin, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, University of New Hampshire Classic Problems of Probability presents a lively account of the most intriguing aspects of statistics. The book features a large collection of more than thirty classic probability problems which have been carefully selected for their interesting history, the way they have shaped the field, and their counterintuitive nature. From Cardano's 1564 Games of Chance to Jacob Bernoulli's 1713 Golden Theorem to Parrondo's 1996 Perplexin

  18. The Effects of Two Forms of Physical Activity on Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John T.; Chess, Amy C.; Burns, Montana; Schachinger, Kira M.; Thanellou, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary exercise, in the form of free access to a running wheel in the home cage, has been shown to improve several forms of learning and memory. Acrobatic training, in the form of learning to traverse an elevated obstacle course, has been shown to induce markers of neural plasticity in the cerebellar cortex in rodents. In three experiments, we examined the effects of these two forms of physical activity on delay eyeblink conditioning in rats. In Experiment 1, exercising rats were given 17 days of free access to a running wheel in their home cage prior to 10 days of delay eyeblink conditioning. Rats that exercised conditioned significantly better and showed a larger reflexive eyeblink unconditioned response to the periocular stimulation unconditioned stimulus than rats that did not exercise. In Experiment 2, exercising rats were given 17 days of free access to a running wheel in their home cage prior to 10 days of explicitly unpaired stimulus presentations. Rats that exercised responded the same to tone, light, and periocular stimulation as rats that did not exercise. In Experiment 3, acrobatic training rats were given 15 days of daily training on an elevated obstacle course prior to 10 days of eyeblink conditioning. Activity control rats underwent 15 days of yoked daily running in an open field. Rats that underwent acrobatic training did not differ in eyeblink conditioning from activity control rats. The ability to measure the learned response precisely, and the well-mapped neural circuitry of eyeblink conditioning offer some advantages for the study of exercise effects on learning and memory. PMID:21238502

  19. The effects of two forms of physical activity on eyeblink classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John T; Chess, Amy C; Burns, Montana; Schachinger, Kira M; Thanellou, Alexandra

    2011-05-16

    Voluntary exercise, in the form of free access to a running wheel in the home cage, has been shown to improve several forms of learning and memory. Acrobatic training, in the form of learning to traverse an elevated obstacle course, has been shown to induce markers of neural plasticity in the cerebellar cortex in rodents. In three experiments, we examined the effects of these two forms of physical activity on delay eyeblink conditioning in rats. In Experiment 1, exercising rats were given 17 days of free access to a running wheel in their home cage prior to 10 days of delay eyeblink conditioning. Rats that exercised conditioned significantly better and showed a larger reflexive eyeblink unconditioned response to the periocular stimulation unconditioned stimulus than rats that did not exercise. In Experiment 2, exercising rats were given 17 days of free access to a running wheel in their home cage prior to 10 days of explicitly unpaired stimulus presentations. Rats that exercised responded the same to tone, light, and periocular stimulation as rats that did not exercise. In Experiment 3, acrobatic training rats were given 15 days of daily training on an elevated obstacle course prior to 10 days of eyeblink conditioning. Activity control rats underwent 15 days of yoked daily running in an open field. Rats that underwent acrobatic training did not differ in eyeblink conditioning from activity control rats. The ability to measure the learned response precisely, and the well-mapped neural circuitry of eyeblink conditioning offer some advantages for the study of exercise effects on learning and memory.

  20. A multiscale variational approach to the kinetics of viscous classical liquids: The coarse-grained mean field approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-04-01

    A closed kinetic equation for the single-particle density of a viscous simple liquid is derived using a variational method for the Liouville equation and a coarse-grained mean-field (CGMF) ansatz. The CGMF ansatz is based on the notion that during the characteristic time of deformation a given particle interacts with many others so that it experiences an average interaction. A trial function for the N-particle probability density is constructed using a multiscale perturbation method and the CGMF ansatz is applied to it. The multiscale perturbation scheme is based on the ratio of the average nearest-neighbor atom distance to the total size of the assembly. A constraint on the initial condition is discovered which guarantees that the kinetic equation is mass-conserving and closed in the single-particle density. The kinetic equation has much of the character of the Vlasov equation except that true viscous, and not Landau, damping is accounted for. The theory captures condensation kinetics and takes much of the character of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the weak-gradient short-range force limit.

  1. Gravity effects on thick brane formation from scalar field dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, Alexander A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, V.A. Fock Department of Theoretical Physics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Universitat de Barcelona, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Barcelona (Spain); Andrianov, Vladimir A.; Novikov, Oleg O. [Saint-Petersburg State University, V.A. Fock Department of Theoretical Physics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The formation of a thick brane in five-dimensional space-time is investigated when warp geometries of AdS{sub 5} type are induced by scalar matter dynamics and triggered by a thin-brane defect. The scalar matter is taken to consist of two fields with O(2) symmetric self-interaction and with manifest O(2) symmetry breaking by terms quadratic in fields. One of them serves as a thick brane formation mode around a kink background and another one is of a Higgs-field type which may develop a classical background as well. Scalar matter interacts with gravity in the minimal form and gravity effects on (quasi)localized scalar fluctuations are calculated with usage of gauge invariant variables suitable for perturbation expansion. The calculations are performed in the vicinity of the critical point of spontaneous breaking of the combined parity symmetry where a non-trivial v.e.v. of the Higgs-type scalar field is generated. The non-perturbative discontinuous gravitational effects in the mass spectrum of light localized scalar states are studied in the presence of a thin-brane defect. The thin brane with negative tension happens to be the most curious case when the singular barriers form a potential well with two infinitely tall walls and the discrete spectrum of localized states arises completely isolated from the bulk. (orig.)

  2. Nonrelativistic Effective Field Theory for Axions

    CERN Document Server

    Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Axions can be described by a relativistic field theory with a real scalar field $\\phi$ whose self-interaction potential is a periodic function of $\\phi$. Low-energy axions, such as those produced in the early universe by the vacuum misalignment mechanism, can be described more simply by a nonrelativistic effective field theory with a complex scalar field $\\psi$ whose effective potential is a function of $\\psi^*\\psi$. We determine the coefficients in the expansion of the effective potential to fifth order in $\\psi^*\\psi$ by matching low-energy axion scattering amplitudes. In order to describe a Bose-Einstein condensate of axions that is too dense to expand the effective potential in powers of $\\psi^*\\psi$, we develop a sequence of systematically improvable approximations to the effective potential that include terms of all orders in $\\psi^*\\psi$.

  3. Nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Axions can be described by a relativistic field theory with a real scalar field ϕ whose self-interaction potential is a periodic function of ϕ . Low-energy axions, such as those produced in the early Universe by the vacuum misalignment mechanism, can be described more simply by a nonrelativistic effective field theory with a complex scalar field ψ whose effective potential is a function of ψ*ψ . We determine the coefficients in the expansion of the effective potential to fifth order in ψ*ψ by matching low-energy axion scattering amplitudes. In order to describe a Bose-Einstein condensate of axions that is too dense to truncate the expansion of the effective potential in powers of ψ*ψ , we develop a sequence of systematically improvable approximations to the effective potential that resum terms of all orders in ψ*ψ .

  4. On the effect of rotation on populations of classical Cepheids I. Predictions at solar metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, R I; Georgy, C; Meynet, G; Mowlavi, N; Eyer, L

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We aim to improve the understanding of Cepheids from an evolutionary perspective and establish the role of rotation in the Cepheid paradigm. In particular, we are interested in the contribution of rotation to the problem of Cepheid masses, and explore testable predictions of quantities that can be confronted with observations. Evolutionary models including a homogeneous and self-consistent treatment of rotation are studied in detail during the crossings of the classical instability strip (IS). The dependence of several parameters on initial rotation is studied. These parameters include mass, luminosity, temperature, lifetimes, equatorial velocity, surface abundances, and rates of period change. Several key results are obtained: i) mass-luminosity (M-L) relations depend on rotation, particularly during the blue loop phase; ii) luminosity increases between crossings of the IS. Hence, Cepheid M-L relations at fixed initial rotation rate depend on crossing number (faster rotation yields greater luminos...

  5. Electrodynamics classical inconsistencies

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    1995-01-01

    The problems of Classical Electrodynamics with the electron equation of motion and with non-integrable singularity of its self-field stress tensor are well known. They are consequences, we show, of neglecting terms that are null off the charge world line but that gives a non null contribution on its world line. The self-field stress tensor of a point classical electron is integrable, there is no causality violation and no conflict with energy conservation in its equation of motion, and there is no need of any kind of renormalization nor of any change in the Maxwell's theory for this. (This is part of the paper hep-th/9510160, stripped , for simplicity, of its non-Minkowskian geometrization of causality and of its discussion about the physical meaning of the Maxwell-Faraday concept of field).

  6. Chiral effective field theory and nuclear forces

    CERN Document Server

    Machleidt, R

    2011-01-01

    We review how nuclear forces emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory. The presentation is accessible to the non-specialist. At the same time, we also provide considerable detailed information (mostly in appendices) for the benefit of researchers who wish to start working in this field.

  7. Electric field confinement effect on charge transport in organic field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Kadashchuk, A.; Fishchuk, I.I.; Smaal, W.T.T.; Gelinck, G.H.; Broer, D.J.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.; Bässler, H.

    2012-01-01

    While it is known that the charge-carrier mobility in organic semiconductors is only weakly dependent on the electric field at low fields, the experimental mobility in organic field-effect transistors using silylethynyl-substituted pentacene is found to be surprisingly field dependent at low source-

  8. Classic writings on instructional technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ely, Donald P.; Plomp, Tjeerd

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process of 17 articles for inclusion in the book, "Classic Writings on Instructional Technology." The book brings together original "classic" educational technology articles into one volume to document the history of the field through its literature. It is also an

  9. The Magnetic Field Effect on Planetary Nebulae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. R. Khesali; K. Kokabi

    2006-01-01

    In our previous work on the 3-dimensional dynamical structure of planetary nebulae the effect of magnetic field was not considered. Recently Jordan et al. have directly detected magnetic fields in the central stars of some planetary nebulae. This discovery supports the hypothesis that the non-spherical shape of most planetary nebulae is caused by magnetic fields in AGB stars. In this study we focus on the role of initially weak toroidal magnetic fields embedded in a stellar wind in altering the shape of the PN. We found that magnetic pressure is probably influential on the observed shape of most PNe.

  10. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  11. A New Constraint on Effective Field Theories of the QCD Flux Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, M

    2015-01-01

    Effective magnetic $SU(N)$ gauge theory with classical $Z_N$ flux tubes of intrinsic width $\\frac{1}{M}$ is an effective field theory of the long distance quark-antiquark interaction in $SU(N)$ Yang-Mills theory. Long wavelength fluctuations of the $Z_N$ vortices of this theory lead to an effective string theory. In this paper we clarify the connection between effective field theory and effective string theory and we propose a new constraint on these vortices. We first examine the impact of string fluctuations on the classical dual superconductor description of confinement. At inter-quark distances $R\\sim \\frac{1}{M}$ the classical action for a straight flux tube determines the heavy quark potentials. At distances $R \\gg \\frac{1}{M}$ fluctuations of the flux tube axis $\\tilde{x}$ give rise to an effective string theory with an action $S_{eff} (\\tilde{x})$, the classical action for a curved flux tube, evaluated %on the fluctuating vortex sheet $\\tilde{x}$ in the limit $\\frac{1}{M} \\rightarrow 0~$. This action ...

  12. Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors: Sensing Simplicity?

    OpenAIRE

    Mescher, M

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are structures made from silicon with at least one spatial dimension in the nanometer regime (1-100 nm). From these nanowires, silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be constructed. Since their introduction in 2001 silicon nanowire field-effect transistors have been studied because of their promising application as selective sensors for biological and chemical species. Their large surface-to-volume ratio promises an increased sensitivity compared to conventional, plan...

  13. Electric field control of the magnetocaloric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Dun-Hui; Cao, Qing-Qi; Liu, En-Ke; Liu, Jian; Du, You-Wei

    2015-02-04

    Through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling, it is demonstrated that the magnetocaloric effect of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy can be controlled by an electric field. Large hysteresis and the limited operating temperature region are effectively overcome by applying an electric field on a laminate comprising a piezoelectric and the alloy. Accordingly, a model for an active magnetic refrigerator with high efficiency is proposed in principle.

  14. Memory effects in the asymptotic diffusive behavior of a classical oscillator described by a generalized Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despósito, M A; Viñales, A D

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the memory effects present in the asymptotic dynamics of a classical harmonic oscillator governed by a generalized Langevin equation. Using Laplace analysis together with Tauberian theorems we derive asymptotic expressions for the mean values, variances, and velocity autocorrelation function in terms of the long-time behavior of the memory kernel and the correlation function of the random force. The internal and external noise cases are analyzed. A simple criterion to determine if the diffusion process is normal or anomalous is established.

  15. Mean-field density functional theory of a nanoconfined classical, three-dimensional Heisenberg fluid. I. The role of molecular anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattes, Stefanie M; Gubbins, Keith E; Schoen, Martin

    2016-05-21

    In this work, we employ classical density functional theory (DFT) to investigate for the first time equilibrium properties of a Heisenberg fluid confined to nanoscopic slit pores of variable width. Within DFT pair correlations are treated at modified mean-field level. We consider three types of walls: hard ones, where the fluid-wall potential becomes infinite upon molecular contact but vanishes otherwise, and hard walls with superimposed short-range attraction with and without explicit orientation dependence. To model the distance dependence of the attractions, we employ a Yukawa potential. The orientation dependence is realized through anchoring of molecules at the substrates, i.e., an energetic discrimination of specific molecular orientations. If the walls are hard or attractive without specific anchoring, the results are "quasi-bulk"-like in that they can be linked to a confinement-induced reduction of the bulk mean field. In these cases, the precise nature of the walls is completely irrelevant at coexistence. Only for specific anchoring nontrivial features arise, because then the fluid-wall interaction potential affects the orientation distribution function in a nontrivial way and thus appears explicitly in the Euler-Lagrange equations to be solved for minima of the grand potential of coexisting phases.

  16. Mean-field density functional theory of a nanoconfined classical, three-dimensional Heisenberg fluid. I. The role of molecular anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattes, Stefanie M.; Gubbins, Keith E.; Schoen, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we employ classical density functional theory (DFT) to investigate for the first time equilibrium properties of a Heisenberg fluid confined to nanoscopic slit pores of variable width. Within DFT pair correlations are treated at modified mean-field level. We consider three types of walls: hard ones, where the fluid-wall potential becomes infinite upon molecular contact but vanishes otherwise, and hard walls with superimposed short-range attraction with and without explicit orientation dependence. To model the distance dependence of the attractions, we employ a Yukawa potential. The orientation dependence is realized through anchoring of molecules at the substrates, i.e., an energetic discrimination of specific molecular orientations. If the walls are hard or attractive without specific anchoring, the results are "quasi-bulk"-like in that they can be linked to a confinement-induced reduction of the bulk mean field. In these cases, the precise nature of the walls is completely irrelevant at coexistence. Only for specific anchoring nontrivial features arise, because then the fluid-wall interaction potential affects the orientation distribution function in a nontrivial way and thus appears explicitly in the Euler-Lagrange equations to be solved for minima of the grand potential of coexisting phases.

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  18. Magnetic field screening effect in electroweak model

    CERN Document Server

    Bakry, A; Zhang, P M; Zou, L P

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that in the Weinberg-Salam model a magnetic field screening effect for static magnetic solutions takes place. The origin of that phenomenon is conditioned by features of the electro-weak interaction, namely, there is mutual cancellation of Abelian magnetic fields created by the SU(2) gauge fields and Higgs boson. The effect implies monopole charge screening in finite energy system of monopoles and antimonopoles. We consider another manifestation of the screening effect which leads to an essential energy decrease of magnetic solutions. Applying variational method we have found a magnetic field configuration with a topological azimuthal magnetic flux which minimizes the energy functional and possesses a total energy of order 1 TeV. We suppose that corresponding magnetic bound state exists in the electroweak theory and can be detected in experiment.

  19. The effects of ethanol on the developing cerebellum and eyeblink classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John T

    2004-01-01

    In rats, developmental ethanol exposure has been used to model the central nervous system deficits associated with human fetal alcohol syndrome. Binge-like ethanol exposure of neonatal rats depletes cells in the cerebellum, including Purkinje cells, granule cells, and deep nuclear cells, and produces deficits in simple tests of motor coordination. However, the extent to which anatomical damage is related to behavioral deficits has been difficult to estimate. Eyeblink classical conditioning is known to engage a discrete brain stem-cerebellar circuit, making it an ideal test of cerebellar functional integrity after developmental ethanol exposure. Eyeblink conditioning is a simple form of motor learning in which a neutral stimulus (such as a tone) comes to elicit an eyeblink when repeatedly paired with a stimulus that evokes an eyeblink prior to training (such as mild periorbital stimulation). In eyeblink conditioning, one of the deep cerebellar nuclei, the interpositus nucleus, as well as specific Purkinje cell populations, are sites of convergence for tone conditioned stimulus and somatosensory unconditioned stimulus information, and, together with brain stem nuclei, provide the necessary and sufficient substrate for the learned response. A series of studies have shown that eyeblink conditioning is impaired in both weanling and adult rats given binge-like exposure to ethanol as neonates. In addition, interpositus nucleus neurons from ethanol-exposed rats showed impaired activation during eyeblink conditioning. These deficits are accompanied by a permanent reduction In the deep cerebellar nuclear cell population. Because particular cerebellar cell populations are utilized in well-defined ways during eyeblink conditioning, conclusions regarding the underlying neural substrates of behavioral change after developmental ethanol exposure are greatly strengthened.

  20. Effect of the classic ketogenic diet on the treatment of refractory epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Duarte Martins

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:The ketogenic diet is used as a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with refractory epilepsy. It simulates biochemical changes typical of fasting. The present study verified the nutritional impact of the ketogenic diet on children with refractory epilepsy. METHODS: Nutritional status data (dietary, biochemical and anthropometric measurements, seizure frequency, and adverse events were collected from the medical records and during outpatient clinic visits of children over a period of 36 months. RESULTS: Of the 29 children who initiated the ketogenic diet, 75.8% presented fewer seizures after one month of treatment. After six months, 48.3% of the patients had at least a 90.0% decrease in seizure frequency, and 50.0% of these patients presented total seizure remission. At 12 months, eight patients continued to show positive results, and seven of these children remained on the ketogenic diet for 24 months. There was an improvement of the nutritional status at 24 months, especially in terms of weight, which culminated with the recovery of proper weightforheight. There were no significant changes in biochemical indices (total cholesterol and components, triglycerides, albumin, total protein, creatinine, glycemia, serum aspartate transaminase and serum alanine transaminase. Serum cholesterol levels increased significantly in the first month, fell in the following six months, and remained within the normal limits thereafter. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, patients on the classic ketogenic diet for at least 24 months gained weight. Moreover, approximately one third of the patients achieved significant reduction in seizure frequency, and some patients achieved total remission.

  1. The classical theory of fields

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Lev Davidovich

    1975-01-01

    Translated from the 6th Russian edition, this latest edition contains seven new sections with chapters on General Relativity, Gravitational Waves and Relativistic Cosmology, where Professor Lifshitz's interests lay. The text of the 3rd English edition has been thoroughly revised and additional problems inserted

  2. First assessment of classical swine fever marker vaccine candidate CP7_E2alf for oral immunization of wild boar under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliziani, Francesco; Blome, Sandra; Petrini, Stefano; Giammarioli, Monica; Iscaro, Carmen; Severi, Giulio; Convito, Luca; Pietschmann, Jana; Beer, Martin; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2014-04-11

    Oral vaccination against classical swine fever (CSF) is a potent tool to control disease outbreaks in wild boar. So far, vaccination campaigns have been carried out using live attenuated vaccines that do not allow serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although this drawback is acceptable for wild boar, the use of marker vaccines would facilitate studies on disease and vaccination dynamics. Recently, the CSF marker vaccine candidate CP7_E2alf was assessed for oral immunization under laboratory conditions. Promising results prompted efforts to study the vaccine candidate under field conditions and in bait formulation. In this context, two oral vaccination campaigns were carried out with CP7_E2alf bait vaccines in two areas called 'faunistic-hunting farms' in the region of Umbria, Italy. One campaign was conducted using single vaccination, the second with the routinely employed double vaccination strategy. Both campaigns were carried out before concerted hunting actions were performed. Bait uptake, vaccine virus detection and antibody responses were assessed along with inspections upon gutting. As a comparator, seven wild boar were hand-fed with baits under laboratory conditions. In the field, bait uptake ranged from 63.7% to 98.7%, whereas antibody prevalence reached only 33.3-35.1%. The marker serology showed a strong influence of sample quality on the test outcome with a total of 85% of samples being classified correctly. Vaccine virus was not detectable. Under hand feeding conditions, six out of seven wild boar took up at least one bait, and five of them showed detectable antibody levels seven weeks after vaccination. These results were supplemented by stability tests. Appropriate stability of vaccine virus was shown both under field and laboratory conditions. In total, most results were in line with our expectations. However, optimization of the DIVA assay has to be attempted in the future.

  3. Site effects in an alpine valley with strong velocity gradient: interest and limitations of the 'classical' BEM

    CERN Document Server

    Delepine, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Seismic waves may be strongly amplified in deep alluvial basins due to the velocity contrast (or velocity gradient) between the various layers as well as the basin edge effects. In this work, the seismic ground motion in a deep alpine valley (Grenoble basin, French Alps) is investigated through various 'classical' Boundary Element models. This deep valley has a peculiar geometry ("Y"-shaped) and involves a strong velocity gradient between surface geological structures. In the framework of a numerical benchmark [21-23], a representative cross section of the valley has been proposed to investigate 2D site effects through various numerical methods. The 'classical' Boundary Element Method is considered herein to model the strong velocity gradient with a 2D piecewise homogeneous medium. For a large incidence angle, the transfer functions estimated from plane SH waves are close to the one computed with shallow SH point sources. The fundamental frequency is estimated at 0.33 Hz (SH wave) and the agreement with previ...

  4. Classical approach in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'ev, Evgeni A

    2010-01-01

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom recently discovered with the help of Poincar$\\acute{\\mathrm{e}}$ section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treating as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semicla...

  5. Global Anomalies and Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Golkar, Siavash

    2015-01-01

    We show that matching anomalies under large gauge transformations and large diffeomorphisms can explain the appearance and non-renormalization of couplings in effective field theory. We focus on %thermal partition functions and thermal effective field theory where we argue that the appearance of certain unusual Chern-Simons couplings is a consequence of global anomalies. As an example, we show that a mixed global anomaly in four dimensions fixes the chiral vortical effect coefficient. This is an experimentally measurable prediction from a global anomaly. For certain situations, we propose a simpler method for calculating global anomalies which uses correlation functions rather than eta invariants.

  6. Local field effects in periodic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porvatkina, O. V.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this article we investigate dielectric and magnetic properties of periodic metamaterials taking into account the so-called local field effect, caused by interaction between single particles the material consists of. We also consider the spatial dispersion effects. As a result, generalized Clausius-Mossotti techniques have been extended to the case of periodic metamaterials; permittivity tensor and permeability tensor were obtained.

  7. The Supersymmetric Effective Field Theory of Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Delacretaz, Luca V; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    We construct the Supersymmetric Effective Field Theory of Inflation, that is the most general theory of inflationary fluctuations when time-translations and supersymmetry are spontaneously broken. The non-linear realization of these invariances allows us to define a complete SUGRA multiplet containing the graviton, the gravitino, the Goldstone of time translations and the Goldstino, with no auxiliary fields. Going to a unitary gauge where only the graviton and the gravitino are present, we write the most general Lagrangian built out of the fluctuations of these fields, invariant under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms, but softly-breaking time diffeomorphisms and gauged SUSY. With a suitable St\\"uckelberg transformation, we introduce the Goldstone boson of time translation and the Goldstino of SUSY. No additional dynamical light field is needed. In the high energy limit, larger than the inflationary Hubble scale for the Goldstino, these fields decouple from the graviton and the gravitino, greatly simplif...

  8. Lectures on classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes cover classical electrodynamics at the level of advanced undergraduates or postgraduates. There is a strong emphasis on the general features of the electromagnetic field and, in particular, on the properties of electromagnetic radiation. It offers a comprehensive and detailed, as well as self-contained, account of material that can be covered in a one-semester course for students with a solid undergraduate knowledge of basic electricity and magnetism.

  9. Effects of static magnetic fields on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent experiment on STS-107 (MFA-Biotube) we took advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the gravity receptor cells of flax roots, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (Δ ≊ HGMF, grad(H2/2) up to 109-1010 Oe2/cm) of the experimental chambers (MFCs) repelled amyloplasts from the zones of stronger field thus providing a directional stimulus for plant gravisensing system in microgravity, and causing the roots to react. Such reaction was observed in the video downlink pictures. Unfortunately, the ``Columbia'' tragedy caused loss of the plant material and most of the images, thus preventing us from detailed studies of the results. Currently we are looking for a possibility to repeat this experiment. Therefore, it is very important to understand, what other effects (besides displacing amyloplasts) static magnetic fields with intensities 0 to 2.5104 Oe, and with the size of the area of non-uniformity 10-3 to 1 cm. These effects were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are insignificant. Both theoretical estimations and control experiments confirm, that intracellular magnetophoresis of

  10. Schwinger effect in inhomogeneous electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hebenstreit, Florian

    2011-01-01

    The vacuum of quantum electrodynamics is unstable against the formation of many-body states in the presence of an external electric field, manifesting itself as the creation of electron-positron pairs (Schwinger effect). This effect has been a long-standing but still unobserved prediction as the generation of the required field strengths has not been feasible so far. However, due to the advent of a new generation of high-intensity laser systems such as the European XFEL or the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI), this effect might eventually become observable within the next decades. Based on the equal-time Wigner formalism, various aspects of the Schwinger effect in electric fields showing both temporal and spatial variations are investigated. Regarding the Schwinger effect in time-dependent electric fields, analytic expressions for the equal-time Wigner function in the presence of a static as well as a pulsed electric field are derived. Moreover, the pair creation process in the presence of a pulsed electric...

  11. Anomaly induced effects in a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    We consider a modification of electrodynamics by an additional light massive vector field, interacting with the photon via Chern-Simons-like coupling. This theory predicts observable effects for the experiments studying the propagation of light in an external magnetic field, very similar to those, predicted by theories of axion and axion-like particles. We discuss a possible microscopic origin of this theory from a theory with non-trivial gauge anomaly cancellation between massive and light p...

  12. Electromagnetic Effects in Superconductors in Gravitational Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmedov, B J

    2005-01-01

    The general relativistic modifications to the resistive state in superconductors of second type in the presence of a stationary gravitational field are studied. Some superconducting devices that can measure the gravitational field by its red-shift effect on the frequency of radiation are suggested. It has been shown that by varying the orientation of a superconductor with respect to the earth gravitational field, a corresponding varying contribution to AC Josephson frequency would be added by gravity. A magnetic flux (being proportional to angular velocity of rotation $\\Omega$) through a rotating hollow superconducting cylinder with the radial gradient of temperature $\

  13. Lattice methods and effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, Amy N

    2016-01-01

    Lattice field theory is a non-perturbative tool for studying properties of strongly interacting field theories, which is particularly amenable to numerical calculations and has quantifiable systematic errors. In these lectures we apply these techniques to nuclear Effective Field Theory (EFT), a non-relativistic theory for nuclei involving the nucleons as the basic degrees of freedom. The lattice formulation of [1,2] for so-called pionless EFT is discussed in detail, with portions of code included to aid the reader in code development. Systematic and statistical uncertainties of these methods are discussed at length, and extensions beyond pionless EFT are introduced in the final Section.

  14. Effects of collisions on conservation laws in gyrokinetic field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H.; Nunami, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Watanabe, T.-H. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Effects of collisions on conservation laws for toroidal plasmas are investigated based on the gyrokinetic field theory. Associating the collisional system with a corresponding collisionless system at a given time such that the two systems have the same distribution functions and electromagnetic fields instantaneously, it is shown how the collisionless conservation laws derived from Noether's theorem are modified by the collision term. Effects of the external source term added into the gyrokinetic equation can be formulated similarly with the collisional effects. Particle, energy, and toroidal momentum balance equations including collisional and turbulent transport fluxes are systematically derived using a novel gyrokinetic collision operator, by which the collisional change rates of energy and canonical toroidal angular momentum per unit volume in the gyrocenter space can be given in the conservative forms. The ensemble-averaged transport equations of particles, energy, and toroidal momentum given in the present work are shown to include classical, neoclassical, and turbulent transport fluxes which agree with those derived from conventional recursive formulations.

  15. Fundamentals of nanoscaled field effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Fundamentals of Nanoscaled Field Effect Transistors gives comprehensive coverage of the fundamental physical principles and theory behind nanoscale transistors. The specific issues that arise for nanoscale MOSFETs, such as quantum mechanical tunneling and inversion layer quantization, are fully explored. The solutions to these issues, such as high-κ technology, strained-Si technology, alternate devices structures and graphene technology are also given. Some case studies regarding the above issues and solution are also given in the book. In summary, this book: Covers the fundamental principles behind nanoelectronics/microelectronics Includes chapters devoted to solutions tackling the quantum mechanical effects occurring at nanoscale Provides some case studies to understand the issue mathematically Fundamentals of Nanoscaled Field Effect Transistors is an ideal book for researchers and undergraduate and graduate students in the field of microelectronics, nanoelectronics, and electronics.

  16. MODE I AND MODE II CRACK TIP ASYMPTOTIC FIELDS WITH STRAIN GRADIENT EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈少华; 王自强

    2001-01-01

    The strain gradient effect becomes significant when the size of fracture process zone around a crack tip is comparable to the intrinsic material length l,typically of the order of microns. Using the new strain gradient deformation theory given by Chen and Wang, the asymptotic fields near a crack tip in an elastic-plastic material with strain gradient effects are investigated. It is established that the dominant strain field is irrotational. For mode I plane stress crack tip asymptotic field,the stress asymptotic field and the couple stress asymptotic field can not exist simultaneously. In the stress dominated asymptotic field, the angular distributions of stresses are consistent with the classical plane stress HRR field; In the couple stress dominated asymptotic field, the angular distributions of couple stresses are consistent with that obtained by Huang et al. For mode II plane stress and plane strain crack tip asymptotic fields, only the stress-dominated asymptotic fields exist. The couple stress asymptotic field is less singular than the stress asymptotic fields. The stress asymptotic fields are the same as mode II plane stress and plane strain HRR fields,respectively. The increase in stresses is not observed in strain gradient plasticity for mode I and mode II, because the present theory is based only on the rotational gradient of deformation and the crack tip asymptotic fields are irrotational and dominated by the stretching gradient.

  17. Nuclear motion is classical

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    The notion from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations that nuclear motion is best described by classical Newton dynamics instead of the time-dependent Schr{\\"o}dinger equation is substantiated. In principle a single experiment should bring clarity. Caution is however necessary, as temperature dependent effects must be eliminated when trying to determine the existence of a zero-point energy.

  18. Electric field effects on droplet burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyal, Advitya; Kyritsis, Dimitrios; Matalon, Moshe

    2015-11-01

    The effects of an externally applied electric field are studied on the burning characteristics of a spherically symmetric fuel drop including the structure, mass burning rate and extinction characteristics of the diffusion flame. A reduced three-step chemical kinetic mechanism that reflects the chemi-ionization process for general hydrocarbon fuels has been proposed to capture the production and destruction of ions inside the flame zone. Due to the imposed symmetry, the effect of the ionic wind is simply to modify the pressure field. Our study thus focuses exclusively on the effects of Ohmic heating and kinetic effects on the burning process. Two distinguished limits of weak and strong field are identified, highlighting the relative strength of the internal charge barrier compared to the externally applied field, and numerically simulated. For both limits, significantly different charged species distributions are observed. An increase in the mass burning rate is noticed with increasing field in either limit with negligible change in the flame temperature. Increasing external voltages pushes the flame away from the droplet and causes a strengthening of the flame with a reduction in the extinction Damkhöler number.

  19. RAFT Polymerization of Styrene and Maleimide in the Presence of Fluoroalcohol: Hydrogen Bonding Effects with Classical Alternating Copolymerization as Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Yao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of hydrogen bonding on polymerization behavior has been of interest for a long time; however, universality and in-depth understanding are still lacking. For the first time, the effect of hydrogen bonding on the classical alternating-type copolymerization of styrene and maleimide was explored. N-phenylmaleimide (N-PMI/styrene was chosen as a model monomer pair in the presence of hydrogen bonding donor solvent 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP, which interacted with N-PMI via hydrogen bonding. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT technique was used to guarantee the “living” polymerization and thus the homogeneity of chain compositions. In comparison with the polymerization in nonhydrogen bonding donor solvent (toluene, the copolymerization in HFIP exhibited a high rate and a slight deviation from alternating copolymerization tendency. The reactivity ratios of N-PMI and St were revealed to be 0.078 and 0.068, respectively, while the reactivity ratios in toluene were 0.026 and 0.050. These interesting results were reasonably explained by using computer simulations, wherein the steric repulsion and electron induction by the hydrogen bonding between HFIP and NPMI were revealed. This work first elucidated the hydrogen bonding interaction in the classical alternating-type copolymerization, which will enrich the research on hydrogen bonding-induced polymerizations.

  20. Part i: the Quadratic Pade Method for Calculating Local Densities of States. Part II: Classical Stochasticity and Ionisation in a Square Potential Well Driven by AN Oscillating Laser Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Ilan Lippa

    Part I. A new method of calculating local densities of states from the moments of the Hamiltonian is developed and studied. A finite number of moments of the Hamiltonian at a given lattice site are first calculated. The quadratic Pade approximant, which is a special case of the Hermite -Pade approximant, is then used to obtain an approxi- mation for the local Green function. The local density of states is then obtained from there. The new method was tested on several cases, which included regular lattices, a regular binary alloy, the semi-infinite simple cubic lattice, and a realistic model for the valence band of silicon. The results have been compared with those obtained from other methods. The new method produces fairly accurate results in most parts of the energy band(s) if the number of singularity points is small. The accuracy obtained is comparable to or better than that of other methods of similar generality and complexity. Part II. A square potential well can be experimentally fabricated, and used in quantum well lasers. By irradiating it with a driving laser beam the quantum well laser can be made tunable. When the number of quantum emergy levels is fairly large, the behaviour of the electrons in the well can be studied by means of classical dynamics. The presence of the oscillating laser field causes the motion of the electrons to become stochastic, and thus they can escape from the well into the conduction band. Stochasticity and ionisation have been studied by looking at the solutions to the classical equations of motion. Their dependence on the frequency and intensity of the driving laser has been studied for square wells of different dimensions. The classical ionisation rate has been found to bear the charac- teristics of a multiphoton ionisation process. This unusual behaviour has been explained as the effect of the higher harmonics of the oscillating square potential well, as seen by the electron. Finally, an experimental study of this physical

  1. [Biological effects of electromagnetic fields (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, J

    1979-08-01

    This résumé deals with thermal and nonthermal effects of electromagnetic fields on man. In consideration of two aspects a limitation is necessary. Firstly, there will be discussed only direct and immediate influences on biological cells and tissues, secondly, the treatment is limited to such phenomena, for which biophysical aproximations, based on experimental data, could be developed. Hazards for the human being may occur only by thermal effects within the microwave range. Regarding frequencies below approximately 30 kHz, excitation processes cannot be excluded in exceptional cases. Thermal effects are predominant, between 30 kHz and 100 kHz, before excitations can appear. Furthermore, by comparing the electrically and magnetically induced currents with the naturally flowing currents in man caused by the brain's and heart's electrical activity, a "lower boundaryline" was estimated. Regarding electric or magnetic field strengths undercutting this boundary-line, direct effects on the central nervous system may be excluded; other mechanisms should be responsible for demonstrated biological effects. The paper closes referring to some reports--presently discussed--on experimental findings of biological effects, which are observed as a result of the influence of electromagnetic fields of small field strengths.

  2. Differential effects of classical and atypical antipsychotic drugs on rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qing-Rong; Wang, Xin-Zhao; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Yun-Chun; Wang, Huai-Hai; Zhang, Rui-Guo; Zhen, Xue-Chu; Tong, Yao; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2007-12-01

    Although classical and atypical antipsychotics may have different effects against neurotoxicity, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we compared the atypical agents, risperidone (RIP), olanzapine (OLZ), and quetiapine (QTP), with the classical agent haloperidol (HAL) in reducing cytotoxicity induced by rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, in PC12 cells. We also determined whether there were differential effects of RIP and HAL on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 (STAT-3), and the immediate early gene c-fos, as well as intracellular levels of calcium. Exposure to 6 muM rotenone for 24 h resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability and apoptotic alteration. The rotenone-induced cytotoxicity was dose-dependently worsened by pretreatment with HAL, but significantly improved by the aforementioned atypical agents at low doses. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that HAL pretreatment significantly increased BDNF mRNA expression but did not alter c-fos and STAT-3 expression compared to rotenone-exposed cells. Unlike HAL, RIP pretreatment produced a significant elevation of all the three substance mRNA expression and the expression intensity was 2.6- to 4.6-fold greater than HAL. Pretreatment with RIP, but not HAL, also effectively prevented an elevation of intracellular levels of calcium provoked by rotenone. These results suggest that the protective effects of atypical antipsychotics are associated with a greater capacity to enhance pro-cell survival factors, therapeutic biomarker expression, and blockade of calcium influx. This may provide an alternative for explaining therapeutic advantages of atypical agents observed in clinical use.

  3. Classical Trace Anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Farhoudi, M.

    1995-01-01

    We seek an analogy of the mathematical form of the alternative form of Einstein's field equations for Lovelock's field equations. We find that the price for this analogy is to accept the existence of the trace anomaly of the energy-momentum tensor even in classical treatments. As an example, we take this analogy to any generic second order Lagrangian and exactly derive the trace anomaly relation suggested by Duff. This indicates that an intrinsic reason for the existence of such a relation sh...

  4. Playing with QCD I: effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, Eduardo S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    The building blocks of hadrons are quarks and gluons, although color is confined into singlet states. QCD is believed to be the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Its asymptotically free nature puts the vacuum out of reach for perturbation theory. The Lagrangian of QCD and the Feynman rules associated were built by using the Gauge Principle, starting from the quark matter fields and obtaining gluons as connections. A simpler, and sometimes necessary or complementary, approach is provided by effective field theories or effective models, especially when one has to deal with the nonperturbative sector of the theory. (author)

  5. The Effective Field Theory of Multifield Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2010-01-01

    We generalize the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to include additional light scalar degrees of freedom that are in their vacuum at the time the modes of interest are crossing the horizon. In order to make the scalars light in a natural way we consider the case where they are the Goldstone bosons of a global symmetry group or are partially protected by an approximate supersymmetry. We write the most general Lagrangian that couples the scalar mode associated to the breaking of time translation during inflation to the additional light scalar fields. This Lagrangian is constrained by diffeomorphism invariance and the additional symmetries that keep the new scalars light. This Lagrangian describes the fluctuations around the time of horizon crossing and it is supplemented with a general parameterization describing how the additional fluctuating fields can affect cosmological perturbations. We find that multifield inflation can reproduce the non-Gaussianities that can be generated in single field inflation but...

  6. Effects of a scalar field on the thermodynamics of interuniversal entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Garay, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    We consider a multiverse scenario made up of classically disconnected regions of the space-time that are, nevertheless, in a quantum entangled state. The addition of a scalar field enriches the model and allows us to treat both the inflationary and the `oscillatory stage' of the universe on the same basis. Imposing suitable boundary conditions on the state of the multiverse, two different representations are constructed related by a Bogoliubov transformation. We compute the thermodynamic magnitudes of the entanglement, such as entropy and energy, explore the effects introduced by the presence of the scalar field and compare with previous results in the absence of scalar field.

  7. Effects of a scalar field on the thermodynamics of interuniversal entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Iñaki; Robles-Pérez, Salvador

    2014-03-01

    We consider a multiverse scenario made up of classically disconnected regions of the spacetime that are, nevertheless, in a quantum entangled state. The addition of a scalar field enriches the model and allows us to treat both the inflationary and the "oscillatory stage" of the universe on the same basis. Imposing suitable boundary conditions on the state of the multiverse, two different representations are constructed related by a Bogoliubov transformation. We compute the thermodynamic magnitudes of the entanglement, such as entropy and energy, explore the effects introduced by the presence of the scalar field and compare with previous results in the absence of scalar field.

  8. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, Timothy W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allured, Bradley [UNIV NEVADA, RENO; Carpenter, Michael A [CAMBRIDGE UNIV. UK

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  9. On the derivation of effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Uzunov, D I

    2004-01-01

    A general self-consistency approach allows a thorough treatment of the corrections to the standard mean-field approximation (MFA). The natural extension of standard MFA with the help of a cumulant expansion leads to a new point of view on the effective field theories. The proposed approach can be used for a systematic treatment of fluctuation effects of various length scales and, perhaps, for the development of a new coarse graining procedure. We outline and justify our method by some preliminary calculations. Concrete results are given for the critical temperature and the Landau parameters of the $\\phi^4_d$-theory - the field counterpart of the Ising model. An important unresolved problem of the modern theory of phase transitions - the problem for the calculation of the true critical temperature, is considered within the framework of the present approach. A comprehensive description of the ground state properties of many-body systems is also demonstrated.

  10. Effective Field Theory for Jet Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias; Rothen, Lorena; Shao, Ding Yu

    2016-05-13

    Processes involving narrow jets receive perturbative corrections enhanced by logarithms of the jet opening angle and the ratio of the energies inside and outside the jets. Analyzing cone-jet processes in effective field theory, we find that in addition to soft and collinear fields their description requires degrees of freedom that are simultaneously soft and collinear to the jets. These collinear-soft particles can resolve individual collinear partons, leading to a complicated multi-Wilson-line structure of the associated operators at higher orders. Our effective field theory provides, for the first time, a factorization formula for a cone-jet process, which fully separates the physics at different energy scales. Its renormalization-group equations control all logarithmically enhanced higher-order terms, in particular also the nonglobal logarithms.

  11. Effective field theory for magnetic compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmuller, Wilfried; Dudas, Emilian; Schweizer, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic flux plays an important role in compactifications of field and string theories in two ways, it generates a multiplicity of chiral fermion zero modes and it can break supersymmetry. We derive the complete four-dimensional effective action for N=1 supersymmetric Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories in six dimensions compactified on a torus with flux. The effective action contains the tower of charged states and it accounts for the mass spectrum of bosonic and fermionic fields as well as their level-dependent interactions. This allows us to compute quantum corrections to the mass and couplings of Wilson lines. We find that the one-loop corrections vanish, contrary to the case without flux. This can be traced back to the spontaneous breaking of a symmetry of the six-dimensional theory by the background gauge field, with the Wilson line as Goldstone boson.

  12. Effective Field Theory for Rydberg Polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullans, M. J.; Thompson, J. D.; Wang, Y.; Liang, Q.-Y.; Vuletić, V.; Lukin, M. D.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    We develop an effective field theory (EFT) to describe the few- and many-body propagation of one dimensional Rydberg polaritons. We show that the photonic transmission through the Rydberg medium can be found by mapping the propagation problem to a non-equilibrium quench, where the role of time and space are reversed. We include effective range corrections in the EFT and show that they dominate the dynamics near scattering resonances in the presence of deep bound states. Finally, we show how the long-range nature of the Rydberg-Rydberg interactions induces strong effective N-body interactions between Rydberg polaritons. These results pave the way towards studying non-perturbative effects in quantum field theories using Rydberg polaritons. PMID:27661685

  13. Finsler-like structures from Lorentz-breaking classical particles

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Neil

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for deducing classical point-particle Lagrange functions corresponding to a class of quartic dispersion relations. Applying this to particles violating Lorentz symmetry in the minimal Standard-Model Extension leads to a variety of novel lagrangians in flat spacetime. Morphisms in these classical systems are studied that echo invariance under field redefinitions in the quantized theory. The Lagrange functions found offer new possibilities for understanding Lorentz-breaking effects by exploring parallels with Finsler-like geometries.

  14. Magnetic field effects on photosynthetic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Although the influence of magnetic fields on the rates and product yields of a host of chemical reactions are well documented and can be understood in the framework of the Radical Pair Mechanism (RPM), it has so far proved impossible to demonstrate convincingly a biological RPM effect. In this work

  15. An Introduction to Effective Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, C. P.

    2007-11-01

    This review summarizes effective field theory techniques, which are the modern theoretical tools for exploiting the existence of hierarchies of scale in a physical problem. The general theoretical framework is described and evaluated explicitly for a simple model. Power-counting results are illustrated for a few cases of practical interest, and several applications to quantum electrodynamics are described.

  16. Ferromagnetic hysteresis and the effective field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Jiles-Atherton model of the behavior of ferromagnetic materials determines the irreversible magnetization from the effective field by using a differential equation. This paper presents an exact, analytical solution to the equation, one displaying hysteresis. The inclusion of magnetomechanical co

  17. Stabilizing Two Classical Antiaromatic Frameworks: Demonstration of Photoacoustic Imaging and the Photothermal Effect in Metalla-aromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Congqing; Yang, Yuhui; Luo, Ming; Yang, Caixia; Wu, Jingjing; Chen, Lina; Liu, Gang; Wen, Tingbin; Zhu, Jun; Xia, Haiping

    2015-05-18

    Antiaromatic species are substantially less thermodynamically stable than aromatic moieties. Herein, we report the stabilization of two classical antiaromatic frameworks, cyclobutadiene and pentalene, by introducing one metal fragment through the first [2+2] cycloaddition reaction of a late-transition-metal carbyne with alkynes. Experimental observations and theoretical calculations reveal that the metal fragment decreases the antiaromaticity in cyclobutadiene and pentalene simultaneously, leading to air- and moisture-stable products. These molecules show broad absorption from the UV to the near-IR region, resulting in photoacoustic and photothermal effects for metalla-aromatic compounds for the first time. These results will encourage further efforts into the exploration of organometallic compounds for photoacoustic-imaging-guided photothermal therapy.

  18. Semi-classical treatment of $k$-essence effect on cosmic temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Moulik, Arka

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological model is described for Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) evolution with dark energy an essential ingredient in the form of a $k-$essence scalar field. The following features of this evolution can be successfully obtained from this model: (a) the {\\it observed} variation of the rate of change of scale factor $a(t)$, i.e. $\\dot a$, with time and (b) the {\\it observed} value of the epoch when the universe went from a decelerating phase to an accelerated phase. These two features have been matched with graphical transcriptions of SNe Ia data. The model also indicates that the evolution is sensitive to the presence of inhomogeneity and this sensitivity increases as one goes further into the past. Further, the value of the inhomogeneity parameter determines the epoch of switch over to an accelerated phase. A positive value of inhomogeneity parameter leads to switch over at earlier epochs, while a negative value leads to switch over at later epochs. If the value of the inhomogeneity par...

  19. Classical Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2009-02-01

    Preface; Introduction; 1. Abbe's sine condition; 2. Fourier optics; 3. Effect of polarization on diffraction in systems of high numerical aperture; 4. Gaussian beam optics; 5. Coherent and incoherent imaging; 6. First-order temporal coherence in classical optics; 7. The Van Cittert-Zernike theorem; 8. Partial polarization, Stokes parameters, and the Poincarè Sphere; 9. Second-order coherence and the Hanbury Brown - Twiss experiment; 10. What in the world are surface plasmons?; 11. Surface plasmon polaritons on metallic surfaces; 12. The Faraday effecy; 13. The magneto-optical Kerr effect; 14. The Sagnac interferometer; 15. Fabry-Perot etalons in polarized light; 16. The Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem; 17. Reciprocity in classical Linear optics; 18. Optical pulse compression; 19. The uncertainty principle in classical optics; 20. Omni-directional dielectric mirrors; 21. Optical vortices; 22. Geometric-optical rays, Poynting's vector, and field momenta; 23. Doppler shift, stellar aberration, and convection of light by moving Media; 24. Diffraction gratings; 25. Diffractive optical elements; 26. The talbot effect; 27. Some quirks of total internal reflection; 28. Evanescent coupling; 29. Internal and external conical refraction; 30. Transmission of light through small elliptical apertures; 31. The method of Fox and Li; 32. The beam propagation method; 33. Launching light into a Fiber; 34. The optics of demiconductor fiode Laser; 35. Michelson's dtellar interferometer; 36. Bracewell's interferometric telescope; 37. Scanning optical microscopy; 38. Zernike's method of phase contrast; 39. Polarization microscopy; 40. Nomarski's differential interference contrast microscope; 41. The Van Leeuwenhoek microscope; 42. Projection photolithography; 43. Interaction of light with subwavelength structures; 44 The Ronchi test; 45. The Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor; 46. Ellipsometry; 47. Holography and holographic interferometry; 48. Self-focusing in non-linear optical media; 49

  20. Classical Weyl Transverse Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a "fake" symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields,...

  1. Classical dynamics a modern perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarshan, Ennackal Chandy George

    2016-01-01

    Classical dynamics is traditionally treated as an early stage in the development of physics, a stage that has long been superseded by more ambitious theories. Here, in this book, classical dynamics is treated as a subject on its own as well as a research frontier. Incorporating insights gained over the past several decades, the essential principles of classical dynamics are presented, while demonstrating that a number of key results originally considered only in the context of quantum theory and particle physics, have their foundations in classical dynamics.Graduate students in physics and practicing physicists will welcome the present approach to classical dynamics that encompasses systems of particles, free and interacting fields, and coupled systems. Lie groups and Lie algebras are incorporated at a basic level and are used in describing space-time symmetry groups. There is an extensive discussion on constrained systems, Dirac brackets and their geometrical interpretation. The Lie-algebraic description of ...

  2. Comparing the epidemiological and economic effects of control strategies against classical swine fever in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boklund, Anette; Toft, Nils; Alban, Lis;

    2009-01-01

    and to investigate the effect of extra biosecurity measures on farms. We used InterSpread Plus to model the effect of nine different control strategies: the minimum measures required by the EU plus depopulation of contact herds (EUplus), extra depopulation of neighbouring herds, extra surveillance within...... the protection and surveillance zones, extra biosecurity in SPF herds-or in all herds, vaccination of all pigs in the 1 or 2 km zones using live vaccine as a protective measure (vaccination-to-kill), vaccination of all weaners and finishers in the 1 or 2 km zones using an E2 marker vaccine as a suppressive...... is a nucleus herd. This implies that biosecurity in nucleus herds is extremely important to avoid transmission of CSF to these herds. Simulations showed that a Danish CSF epidemic will be moderate in most cases and will include fewer than 10 cases and last less than 2 weeks on average. However, for some...

  3. The effects of vestibular stimulation and fatigue on postural control in classical ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Diana M; Grisbrook, Tiffany L; Newnham, Prudence J; Edwards, Dylan J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of ballet-specific vestibular stimulation and fatigue on static postural control in ballet dancers and to establish whether these effects differ across varying levels of ballet training. Dancers were divided into three groups: professional, pre-professional, and recreational. Static postural control of 23 dancers was measured on a force platform at baseline and then immediately, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds after vestibular stimulation (pirouettes) and induction of fatigue (repetitive jumps). The professional dancers' balance was unaffected by both the vestibular stimulation and the fatigue task. The pre-professional and recreational dancers' static sway increased following both perturbations. It is concluded that professional dancers are able to compensate for vestibular and fatiguing perturbations due to a higher level of skill-specific motor training.

  4. Classical two-split interference effects in double photoionization of molecular hydrogen at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Daniel A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyabe, S [LBNL; Rescigno, T N [LBNL; Mccurdy, C W [LBNL; Morales, F [MADRID, SPAIN; Martin, F [MADRID, SPAIN

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a thorough theoretical study of one photon double ionization of H{sub 2}. They suggest that interference effects reported in one photon ionization will be reproducible in the case of double ionization when one of the photons carriers most of the available energy and the other electron is not observed. These calculations reproduce recent double photoionization experiments of H{sub 2}.

  5. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Papenbrock, T

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband $E2$ transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  6. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenbrock, T.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband E2 transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  7. Effects of spectral linewidth of ultrashort pulses on the spa-tiotemporal distribution of diffraction fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The spatiotemporal characteristics of electromagnetic pulses with ultrabroad spectral bandwidth in the far field are analyzed by using classical scalar diffraction theory. The effects of the ratio of the frequency width to the central frequency on the diffraction spatial distribution are discussed. It is concluded that the diffraction spatial dis-tribution of the pulsed radiation gets narrower than a mono-chromatic wave when the frequency width of the pulse is comparable to or larger than its central frequency.

  8. General investigation for longitudinal wave propagation under magnetic field effect via nonlocal elasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    U.GÜVEN

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the propagation of longitudinal stress waves under a longitu-dinal magnetic field is addressed using a unified nonlocal elasticity model with two scale coefficients. The analysis of wave motion is mainly based on the Love rod model. The effect of shear is also taken into account in the framework of Bishop’s correction. This analysis shows that the classical theory is not sufficient for this subject. However, this unified nonlocal elasticity model solely used in the present study reflects in a manner fairly realistic for the effect of the longitudinal magnetic field on the longitudinal wave propagation.

  9. Foreground effect on the $J$-factor estimation of classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Koji; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Sugai, Hajime; Hayashi, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray observation of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is a promising approach to search for the dark matter annihilation (or decay) signal. The dSphs are the nearby satellite galaxies with a clean environment and dense dark matter halo so that they give stringent constraints on the ${\\cal O}(1)$ TeV dark matter. However, recent studies have revealed that current estimation of astrophysical factors relevant for the dark matter searches are not conservative, where the various non-negligible systematic uncertainties are not taken into account. Among them, the effect of foreground stars on the astrophysical factors has not been paid much attention, which becomes more important for deeper and wider stellar surveys in the future. In this article, we assess the effects of the foreground contamination by generating the mock samples of stars and using a model of future spectrographs. We investigate various data cuts to optimize the quality of the data and find that the cuts on the velocity and surface gra...

  10. Finite size effects in the presence of a chemical potential: A study in the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasish; Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of a chemical potential, the physics of level crossings leads to singularities at zero temperature, even when the spatial volume is finite. These singularities are smoothed out at a finite temperature but leave behind nontrivial finite size effects which must be understood in order to extract thermodynamic quantities using Monte Carlo methods, particularly close to critical points. We illustrate some of these issues using the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model with a coupling β and chemical potential μ on a 2+1-dimensional Euclidean lattice. In the conventional formulation this model suffers from a sign problem at nonzero chemical potential and hence cannot be studied with the Wolff cluster algorithm. However, when formulated in terms of the worldline of particles, the sign problem is absent, and the model can be studied efficiently with the “worm algorithm.” Using this method we study the finite size effects that arise due to the chemical potential and develop an effective quantum mechanical approach to capture the effects. As a side result we obtain energy levels of up to four particles as a function of the box size and uncover a part of the phase diagram in the (β,μ) plane.

  11. Veselago lensing in graphene with a p-n junction: Classical versus quantum effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovanović, S. P., E-mail: slavisa.milovanovic@uantwerpen.be; Moldovan, D., E-mail: dean.moldovan@uantwerpen.be; Peeters, F. M., E-mail: francois.peeters@uantwerpen.be [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2015-10-21

    The feasibility of Veselago lensing in graphene with a p-n junction is investigated numerically for realistic injection leads. Two different set-ups with two narrow leads are considered with absorbing or reflecting side edges. This allows us to separately determine the influence of scattering on electron focusing for the edges and the p-n interface. Both semiclassical and tight-binding simulations show a distinctive peak in the transmission probability that is attributed to the Veselago lensing effect. We investigate the robustness of this peak on the width of the injector, the position of the p-n interface, and different gate potential profiles. Furthermore, the influence of scattering by both short- and long-range impurities is considered.

  12. The "Ram Effect": A "Non-Classical" Mechanism for Inducing LH Surges in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre-Nys, Claude; Chanvallon, Audrey; Dupont, Joëlle; Lardic, Lionel; Lomet, Didier; Martinet, Stéphanie; Scaramuzzi, Rex J

    2016-01-01

    During spring sheep do not normally ovulate but exposure to a ram can induce ovulation. In some ewes an LH surge is induced immediately after exposure to a ram thus raising questions about the control of this precocious LH surge. Our first aim was to determine the plasma concentrations of oestradiol (E2) E2 in anoestrous ewes before and after the "ram effect" in ewes that had a "precocious" LH surge (starting within 6 hours), a "normal" surge (between 6 and 28h) and "late» surge (not detected by 56h). In another experiment we tested if a small increase in circulating E2 could induce an LH surge in anoestrus ewes. The concentration of E2 significantly was not different at the time of ram introduction among ewes with the three types of LH surge. "Precocious" LH surges were not preceded by a large increase in E2 unlike "normal" surges and small elevations of circulating E2 alone were unable to induce LH surges. These results show that the "precocious" LH surge was not the result of E2 positive feedback. Our second aim was to test if noradrenaline (NA) is involved in the LH response to the "ram effect". Using double labelling for Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) we showed that exposure of anoestrous ewes to a ram induced a higher density of cells positive for both in the A1 nucleus and the Locus Coeruleus complex compared to unstimulated controls. Finally, the administration by retrodialysis into the preoptic area, of NA increased the proportion of ewes with an LH response to ram odor whereas treatment with the α1 antagonist Prazosin decreased the LH pulse frequency and amplitude induced by a sexually active ram. Collectively these results suggest that in anoestrous ewes NA is involved in ram-induced LH secretion as observed in other induced ovulators.

  13. Anomaly induced effects in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2008-04-01

    We consider a modification of electrodynamics by an additional light massive vector field, interacting with the photon via Chern-Simons-like coupling. This theory predicts observable effects for the experiments studying the propagation of light in an external magnetic field, very similar to those, predicted by theories of axion and axion-like particles. We discuss a possible microscopic origin of this theory from a theory with non-trivial gauge anomaly cancellation between massive and light particles (including, for example, millicharged fermions). Due to the conservation of the gauge current, the production of the new vector field is suppressed at high energies. As a result, this theory can avoid both stellar bounds (which exist for axions) and the bounds from CMB considered recently, allowing for positive results in experiments like ALPS, LIPPS, OSQAR, PVLAS-2, BMV, Q&A, etc.

  14. Anomaly induced effects in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Boyarsky, Alexey [Department of Physics, CERN, Theory Division, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ruchayskiy, Oleg [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institute of Theoretical Physics, FSB/ITP/LPPC, BSP 720, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: oleg.ruchayskiy@epfl.ch

    2008-04-11

    We consider a modification of electrodynamics by an additional light massive vector field, interacting with the photon via Chern-Simons-like coupling. This theory predicts observable effects for the experiments studying the propagation of light in an external magnetic field, very similar to those, predicted by theories of axion and axion-like particles. We discuss a possible microscopic origin of this theory from a theory with non-trivial gauge anomaly cancellation between massive and light particles (including, for example, millicharged fermions). Due to the conservation of the gauge current, the production of the new vector field is suppressed at high energies. As a result, this theory can avoid both stellar bounds (which exist for axions) and the bounds from CMB considered recently, allowing for positive results in experiments like ALPS, LIPPS, OSQAR, PVLAS-2, BMV, Q and A, etc.

  15. Anomaly induced effects in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Ruchayskiy, O

    2008-01-01

    We consider a modification of electrodynamics by an additional light massive vector field, interacting with the photon via Chern-Simons-like coupling. This theory predicts observable effects for the experiments studying the propagation of light in an external magnetic field, very similar to those, predicted by theories of axion and axion-like particles. We discuss a possible microscopic origin of this theory from a theory with non-trivial gauge anomaly cancellation between massive and light particles (including, for example, millicharged fermions). Due to the conservation of the gauge current, the production of the new vector field is suppressed at high energies. As a result, this theory can avoid both stellar bounds (which exist for axions) and the bounds from CMB considered recently, allowing for positive results in experiments like ALPS, LIPPS, OSQAR, PVLAS-2, BMV, Q&A, etc.

  16. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    DeTar, Carleton; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first observation of magnetic catalysis at zero temperature in a fully nonperturbative simulation of the graphene effective field theory. Using lattice gauge theory, a nonperturbative analysis of the theory of strongly-interacting, massless, (2+1)-dimensional Dirac fermions in the presence of an external magnetic field is performed. We show that in the zero-temperature limit, a nonzero value for the chiral condensate is obtained which signals the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. This result implies a nonzero value for the dynamical mass of the Dirac quasiparticle. This in turn has been posited to account for the quantum-Hall plateaus that are observed at large magnetic fields.

  17. Particle Indistinguishability Symmetry within a Field Theory. Entropic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Pierre Badiali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we briefly discuss a field theory approach of classical statistical mechanics. We show how an essentially entropic functional accounts for fundamental symmetries related to quantum mechanical properties which hold out in the classical limit of the quantum description. Within this framework, energetic and entropic properties are treated at equal level. Based on a series of examples on electrolytes, we illustrate how this framework gives simple interpretations where entropic fluctuations of anions and cations compete with the energetic properties related to the interaction potential.

  18. Effective Field Theories and Matching for Codimension-2 Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; De Rham, C; Tasinato, G

    2009-01-01

    It is generic for the bulk fields sourced by branes having codimension two and higher to diverge at the brane position, much as does the Coulomb potential at the position of its source charge. This complicates finding the relation between brane properties and the bulk geometries they source. (These complications do not arise for codimension-1 sources, such as in RS geometries, because of the special properties unique to codimension one.) Understanding these relations is a prerequisite for phenomenological applications involving higher-codimension branes. Using codimension-2 branes in extra-dimensional scalar-tensor theories as an example, we identify the classical matching conditions that relate the near-brane asymptotic behaviour of bulk fields to the low-energy effective actions describing how space-filling codimension-2 branes interact with the surrounding extra-dimensional bulk. We do so by carefully regulating the near-brane divergences, and show how these may be renormalized in a general way. Among the ...

  19. Strong field effects on physics processes at the Interaction Point of future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hartin, A; Porto, S

    2013-01-01

    Future lepton colliders will be precision machines whose physics program includes close study of the Higgs sector and searches for new physics via polarised beams. The luminosity requirements of such machines entail very intense lepton bunches at the interaction point with associated strong electromagnetic fields. These strong fields not only lead to obvious phenomena such as beamstrahlung, but also potentially affect every particle physics process via virtual exchange with the bunch fields. For precision studies, strong field effects have to be understood to the sub-percent level. Strong external field effects can be taken into account exactly via the Furry Picture or, in certain limits, via the Quasi-classical Operator method . Significant theoretical development is in progress and here we outline the current state of play.

  20. Quantum Transitions Between Classical Histories: Bouncing Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hartle, James

    2015-01-01

    In a quantum theory of gravity spacetime behaves classically when quantum probabilities are high for histories of geometry and field that are correlated in time by the Einstein equation. Probabilities follow from the quantum state. This quantum perspective on classicality has important implications: (a) Classical histories are generally available only in limited patches of the configuration space on which the state lives. (b) In a given patch states generally predict relative probabilities for an ensemble of possible classical histories. (c) In between patches classical predictability breaks down and is replaced by quantum evolution connecting classical histories in different patches. (d) Classical predictability can break down on scales well below the Planck scale, and with no breakdown in the classical equations of motion. We support and illustrate (a)-(d) by calculating the quantum transition across the de Sitter like throat connecting asymptotically classical, inflating histories in the no-boundary quantu...

  1. Weak gravity conjecture and effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    The weak gravity conjecture (WGC) is a proposed constraint on theories with gauge fields and gravity, requiring the existence of light charged particles and/or imposing an upper bound on the field theory cutoff Λ . If taken as a consistency requirement for effective field theories (EFTs), it rules out possibilities for model building including some models of inflation. I demonstrate simple models which satisfy all forms of the WGC, but which through Higgsing of the original gauge fields produce low-energy EFTs with gauge forces that badly violate the WGC. These models illustrate specific loopholes in arguments that motivate the WGC from a bottom-up perspective; for example the arguments based on magnetic monopoles are evaded when the magnetic confinement that occurs in a Higgs phase is accounted for. This indicates that the WGC should not be taken as a veto on EFTs, even if it turns out to be a robust property of UV quantum gravity theories. However, if the latter is true, then parametric violation of the WGC at low energy comes at the cost of nonminimal field content in the UV. I propose that only a very weak constraint is applicable to EFTs, Λ ≲(log 1/g )-1 /2Mpl , where g is the gauge coupling, motivated by entropy bounds. Remarkably, EFTs produced by Higgsing a theory that satisfies the WGC can saturate but not violate this bound.

  2. Magnetic field effect on spoke behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilica, Jaroslav; Slapanska, Marta; Klein, Peter; Vasina, Petr

    2016-09-01

    The investigations of the non-reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using high-speed camera imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and electrical probes showed that plasma is not homogeneously distributed over the target surface, but it is concentrated in regions of higher local plasma density called spokes rotating above the erosion racetrack. Magnetic field effect on spoke behaviour was studied by high-speed camera imaging in HiPIMS discharge using 3 inch titanium target. An employed camera enabled us to record two successive images in the same pulse with time delay of 3 μs between them, which allowed us to determine the number of spokes, spoke rotation velocity and spoke rotation frequency. The experimental conditions covered pressure range from 0.15 to 5 Pa, discharge current up to 350 A and magnetic fields of 37, 72 and 91 mT. Increase of the magnetic field influenced the number of spokes observed at the same pressure and at the same discharge current. Moreover, the investigation revealed different characteristic spoke shapes depending on the magnetic field strength - both diffusive and triangular shapes were observed for the same target material. The spoke rotation velocity was independent on the magnetic field strength. This research has been financially supported by the Czech Science Foundation in frame of the project 15-00863S.

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of fluoxetine: A new potential pharmacological action for a classic antidepressant drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosso, María Emilia; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used antidepressants. In particular, fluoxetine is usually chosen for the treatment of the symptoms of depression, obsessive-compulsive, panic attack and bulimia nervosa. Antidepressant therapy has been associated with immune dysfunction. However, there is contradictory evidence about the effect of fluoxetine on the immune system. Experimental findings indicate that lymphocytes express the serotonin transporter. Moreover it has been shown that fluoxetine is able to modulate the immune function through a serotonin-dependent pathway and through a novel independent mechanism. In addition, several studies have shown that fluoxetine can alter tumor cell viability. Thus, it was recently demonstrated in vivo that chronic fluoxetine treatment inhibits tumor growth by increasing antitumor T-cell activity. Here we briefly review some of the literature referring to how fluoxetine is able to modify, for better or worse, the functionality of the immune system. These results of our analysis point to the relevance of the novel pharmacological action of this drug as an immunomodulator helping to treat several pathologies in which immune deficiency and/or deregulation is present.

  4. Quantum localization of Classical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Batalin, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  5. Quantum localization of classical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  6. Plasmon mass scale in classical nonequilibrium gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lappi, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical lattice Yang-Mills calculations provide a good way to understand different nonequilibrium phenomena in nonperturbatively overoccupied systems. Above the Debye scale the classical theory can be matched smoothly to kinetic theory. The aim of this work is to study the limits of this quasiparticle picture by determining the plasmon mass in classical real time Yang-Mills theory on a lattice in 3 spatial dimensions. We compare three methods to determine the plasmon mass: a hard thermal loop expression in terms of the particle distribution, an effective dispersion relation constructed from fields and their time derivatives, and by measuring oscillations between electric and magnetic field modes after artificially introducing a homogeneous color electric field. We find that a version of the dispersion relation that uses electric fields and their time derivatives agrees with the other methods within 50%.

  7. Classical Transitions for Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Deskins, J Tate; Yang, I-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    We present the simplest model for classical transitions in flux vacua. A complex field with a spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry is embedded in $M_2\\times S_1$. We numerically construct different winding number vacua, the vortices interpolating between them, and simulate the collisions of these vortices. We show that classical transitions are generic at large boosts, independent of whether or not vortices miss each other in the compact $S_1$.

  8. Effective Field Theories and Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, C

    2015-01-01

    I describe some of the many connections between lattice QCD and effective field theories, focusing in particular on chiral effective theory, and, to a lesser extent, Symanzik effective theory. I first discuss the ways in which effective theories have enabled and supported lattice QCD calculations. Particular attention is paid to the inclusion of discretization errors, for a variety of lattice QCD actions, into chiral effective theory. Several other examples of the usefulness of chiral perturbation theory, including the encoding of partial quenching and of twisted boundary conditions, are also described. In the second part of the talk, I turn to results from lattice QCD for the low energy constants of the two- and three-flavor chiral theories. I concentrate here on mesonic quantities, but the dependence of the nucleon mass on the pion mass is also discussed. Finally I describe some recent preliminary lattice QCD calculations by the MILC Collaboration relating to the three-flavor chiral limit.

  9. Nanowire field effect transistors principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2014-01-01

    “Nanowire Field Effect Transistor: Basic Principles and Applications” places an emphasis on the application aspects of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET). Device physics and electronics are discussed in a compact manner, together with the p-n junction diode and MOSFET, the former as an essential element in NWFET and the latter as a general background of the FET. During this discussion, the photo-diode, solar cell, LED, LD, DRAM, flash EEPROM and sensors are highlighted to pave the way for similar applications of NWFET. Modeling is discussed in close analogy and comparison with MOSFETs. Contributors focus on processing, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and application of NWFET. This includes coverage of solar and memory cells, biological and chemical sensors, displays and atomic scale light emitting diodes. Appropriate for scientists and engineers interested in acquiring a working knowledge of NWFET as well as graduate students specializing in this subject.

  10. Evaluation of near-field earthquake effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, H.P.

    1994-11-01

    Structures and equipment, which are qualified for the design basis earthquake (DBE) and have anchorage designed for the DBE loading, do not require an evaluation of the near-field earthquake (NFE) effects. However, safety class 1 acceleration sensitive equipment such as electrical relays must be evaluated for both NFE and DBE since they are known to malfunction when excited by high frequency seismic motions.

  11. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-09-03

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m(-1) and 111 kV m(-1) in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form.

  12. Non-relativistic Limit of Dirac Equations in Gravitational Field and Quantum Effects of Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on unified theory of electromagnetic interactions and gravitational interactions, the non-relativistic limit of the equation of motion of a charged Dirac particle in gravitational field is studied. From the Schrodinger equation obtained from this non-relativistic limit, we can see that the classical Newtonian gravitational potential appears as a part of the potential in the Schrodinger equation, which can explain the gravitational phase effects found in COW experiments.And because of this Newtonian gravitational potential, a quantum particle in the earth's gravitational field may form a gravitationally bound quantized state, which has already been detected in experiments. Three different kinds of phase effects related to gravitational interactions are studied in this paper, and these phase effects should be observable in some astrophysical processes. Besides, there exists direct coupling between gravitomagnetic field and quantum spin, and radiation caused by this coupling can be used to directly determine the gravitomagnetic field on the surface of a star.

  13. Quantum gravity, effective fields and string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J

    2004-01-01

    We look at the various aspects of treating general relativity as a quantum theory. It is briefly studied how to consistently quantize general relativity as an effective field theory. A key achievement here is the long-range low-energy leading quantum corrections to both the Schwarzschild and Kerr metrics. The leading quantum corrections to the pure gravitational potential between two sources are also calculated, both in the mixed theory of scalar QED and quantum gravity and in the pure gravitational theory. The (Kawai-Lewellen-Tye) string theory gauge/gravity relations is next dealt with. We investigate if the KLT-operator mapping extends to the case of higher derivative effective operators. The KLT-relations are generalized, taking the effective field theory viewpoint, and remarkable tree-level amplitude relations between the field theory operators are derived. Quantum gravity is finally looked at from the the perspective of taking the limit of infinitely many spatial dimensions. It is verified that only a c...

  14. Semi-classical Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestone, John

    2016-03-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. We describe semi-classical approaches that can be used to obtain a more intuitive physical feel for several QED processes including electro-statics, Compton scattering, pair annihilation, the anomalous magnetic moment, and the Lamb shift, that could be taught easily to undergraduate students. Any physicist who brings their laptop to the talk will be able to build spread sheets in less than 10 minutes to calculate g/2 =1.001160 and a Lamb shift of 1057 MHz.

  15. Classical and quantum anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Selke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study classical and quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnets with exchange anisotropy of XXZ-type and crystal field single-ion terms of quadratic and quartic form in a field. The magnets display a variety of phases, including the spin-flop (or, in the quantum case, spin-liquid and biconical (corresponding, in the quantum lattice gas description, to supersolid phases. Applying ground-state considerations, Monte Carlo and density matrix renormalization group methods, the impact of quantum effects and lattice dimension is analysed. Interesting critical and multicritical behaviour may occur at quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  16. Classical Black Holes Are Hot

    CERN Document Server

    Curiel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1970s it is was realized that there is a striking formal analogy between the Laws of black-hole mechanics and the Laws of classical thermodynamics. Before the discovery of Hawking radiation, however, it was generally thought that the analogy was only formal, and did not reflect a deep connection between gravitational and thermodynamical phenomena. It is still commonly held that the surface gravity of a stationary black hole can be construed as a true physical temperature and its area as a true entropy only when quantum effects are taken into account; in the context of classical general relativity alone, one cannot cogently construe them so. Does the use of quantum field theory in curved spacetime offer the only hope for taking the analogy seriously? I think the answer is `no'. To attempt to justify that answer, I shall begin by arguing that the standard argument to the contrary is not physically well founded, and in any event begs the question. Looking at the various ways that the ideas of "tempe...

  17. Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Federico

    2013-01-01

    The effective field theory of cosmological perturbations stems from considering a cosmological background solution as a state displaying spontaneous breaking of time translations and (adiabatic) perturbations as the related Nambu-Goldstone modes. With this insight, one can systematically develop a theory for the cosmological perturbations during inflation and, with minor modifications, also describe in full generality the gravitational interactions of dark energy, which are relevant for late-time cosmology. The formalism displays a unique set of Lagrangian operators containing an increasing number of cosmological perturbations and derivatives. We give an introductory description of the unitary gauge formalism for theories with broken gauge symmetry---that allows to write down the most general Lagrangian---and of the Stueckelberg "trick"---that allows to recover gauge invariance and to make the scalar field explicit. We show how to apply this formalism to gravity and cosmology and we reproduce the detailed ana...

  18. Impact of electric field on Hofmeister effects in aggregation of negatively charged colloidal minerals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying Tang; Hang Li; Hualing Zhu; Rui Tian; Xiaodan Gao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the aggregation kinetics of negatively charged colloidal minerals in Na+, K+, NH+4 , Mg2+, Ca2+ and Cu2+ solutions were measured and Hofmeister effects therein were estimated through total average aggregation (TAA) rates and critical coagulation concentration (CCC). Hofmeister effects of TAA rates increased exponentially with the increase in electric field strength, which cannot be explained by the classical theories (i.e., ionic size, hydration and dispersion forces), indicating strong electric field at colloidal surface was an indispensable factor in studying Hofmeister effects. Meanwhile, Hofmeister series of CCC values Na+ > K+ > NH+4 > Mg2+ > Ca2+ > Cu2+ show fine correlation with the polarization of various cations, implying that onic polarization in strong electric field would be responsible for Hofmeister effects in aggregation of colloidal minerals, and the deduction was confirmed by the calculated results of electrostatic interactions between colloidal minerals.

  19. Exciton effective mass enhancement in coupled quantum wells in electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, J.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a calculation of exciton states in semiconductor coupled quantum wells in the presence of electric and magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the QW plane. The exciton Schrödinger equation is solved in real space in three-dimensions to obtain the Landau levels of both direct and indirect excitons. Calculation of the exciton energy levels and oscillator strengths enables mapping of the electric and magnetic field dependence of the exciton absorption spectrum. For the ground state of the system, we evaluate the Bohr radius, optical lifetime, binding energy and dipole moment. The exciton mass renormalization due to the magnetic field is calculated using a perturbative approach. We predict a non-monotonous dependence of the exciton ground state effective mass on magnetic field. Such a trend is explained in a classical picture, in terms of the ground state tending from an indirect to a direct exciton with increasing magnetic field.

  20. Effective field theory analysis of Higgs naturalness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Shalom, Shaouly [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel); Soni, Amarjit [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wudka, Jose [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Assuming the presence of physics beyond the Standard Model ( SM) with a characteristic scale M ~ O (10) TeV, we investigate the naturalness of the Higgs sector at scales below M using an effective field theory (EFT) approach. We obtain the leading 1 -loop EFT contributions to the Higgs mass with a Wilsonian-like hard cutoff, and determine t he constraints on the corresponding operator coefficients for these effects to alleviate the little hierarchy problem up to the scale of the effective action Λ < M , a condition we denote by “EFT-naturalness”. We also determine the types of physics that can lead to EFT-naturalness and show that these types of new physics are best probed in vector-boson and multiple-Higgs production. The current experimental constraints on these coefficients are also discussed.

  1. Effective Field Theory for Rydberg Polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Gullans, M J; Thompson, J D; Liang, Q -Y; Vuletic, V; Lukin, M D; Gorshkov, A V

    2016-01-01

    We study non-perturbative effects in N-body scattering of Rydberg polaritons using effective field theory (EFT). We develop an EFT in one dimension and show how a suitably long medium can be used to prepare shallow N-body bound states. We then derive the effective N-body interaction potential for Rydberg polaritons and the associated N-body contact force that arises in the EFT. We use the contact force to find the leading order corrections to the binding energy of the N-body bound states and determine the photon number at which the EFT description breaks down. We find good agreement throughout between the predictions of EFT and numerical simulations of the exact two and three photon wavefunction transmission.

  2. Investigation of classical radiation reaction with aligned crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Piazza

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Classical radiation reaction is the effect of the electromagnetic field emitted by an accelerated electric charge on the motion of the charge itself. The self-consistent underlying classical equation of motion including radiation–reaction effects, the Landau–Lifshitz equation, has never been tested experimentally, in spite of the first theoretical treatments of radiation reaction having been developed more than a century ago. Here we show that classical radiation reaction effects, in particular those due to the near electromagnetic field, as predicted by the Landau–Lifshitz equation, can be measured in principle using presently available facilities, in the energy emission spectrum of 30-GeV electrons crossing a 0.55-mm thick diamond crystal in the axial channeling regime. Our theoretical results indicate the feasibility of the suggested setup, e.g., at the CERN Secondary Beam Areas (SBA beamlines.

  3. Investigation of classical radiation reaction with aligned crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Piazza, A.; Wistisen, Tobias N.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2017-02-01

    Classical radiation reaction is the effect of the electromagnetic field emitted by an accelerated electric charge on the motion of the charge itself. The self-consistent underlying classical equation of motion including radiation-reaction effects, the Landau-Lifshitz equation, has never been tested experimentally, in spite of the first theoretical treatments of radiation reaction having been developed more than a century ago. Here we show that classical radiation reaction effects, in particular those due to the near electromagnetic field, as predicted by the Landau-Lifshitz equation, can be measured in principle using presently available facilities, in the energy emission spectrum of 30-GeV electrons crossing a 0.55-mm thick diamond crystal in the axial channeling regime. Our theoretical results indicate the feasibility of the suggested setup, e.g., at the CERN Secondary Beam Areas (SBA) beamlines.

  4. Space-time Dependency of the Time and its Effect on the Relativistic Classical Equation of the String Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Amirshahkarami, Abdolazim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    In special relativity theory, time dilates in velocity of near light speed. Also based on ``Substantial motion'' theory of Sadra, relative time (time flux); R = f (mv , σ , τ) , for each atom is momentum of its involved fundamental particles, which is different from the other atoms. In this way, for modification of the relativistic classical equation of string theory and getting more precise results, we should use effect of dilation and contraction of time in equation. So we propose to add two derivatives of the time's flux to the equation as follows: n.tp∂/R ∂ τ +∂2Xμ/(σ , τ) ∂τ2 = n .tp (∂/R ∂ σ ) +c2∂2Xμ/(σ , τ) ∂σ2 In which, Xμ is space-time coordinates of the string, σ & τ are coordinates on the string world sheet, respectively space and time along the string, string's mass m , velocity of string's motion v , factor n depends on geometry of each hidden extra dimension which relates to its own flux time, and tp is Planck's time. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  5. Exogenous classic phytohormones have limited regulatory effects on fructan and primary carbohydrate metabolism in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eGasperl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructans are polymers of fructose and one of the main constituents of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates. Fructans are involved in cold and drought resistance, regrowth following defoliation and early spring growth, seed filling, have beneficial effects on human health and are used for industrial processes. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. serves as model species to study fructan metabolism. Fructan metabolism is under the control of both synthesis by fructosyltransferases (FTs and breakdown through fructan exohydrolases (FEHs. The accumulation of fructans can be triggered by high sucrose levels and abiotic stress conditions such as drought and cold stress. However, detailed studies on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of fructan metabolism are scarce. Since different phytohormones, especially abscisic acid (ABA, are known to play an important role in abiotic stress responses, the possible short term regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism by the five classical phytohormones was investigated. Therefore, the activities of enzymes involved in fructan synthesis and breakdown, the expression levels for the corresponding genes and levels for water-soluble carbohydrates were determined following pulse treatments with ABA, auxin (AUX, ethylene (ET, gibberellic acid (GA or kinetin (KIN. The most pronounced fast effects were a transient increase of FT activities by AUX, KIN, ABA and ET, while minor effects were evident for 1-FEH activity with an increased activity in response to KIN and a decrease by GA. Fructan and sucrose levels were not affected. This observed discrepancy demonstrates the importance of determining enzyme activities to obtain insight into the physiological traits and ultimately the plant phenotype. The comparative analyses of activities for seven key enzymes of primary carbohydrate metabolism revealed no co-regulation between enzymes of the fructan and

  6. Hysteresis modeling in graphene field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, M.; Rorsman, N. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 412-96 Göteborg (Sweden); Sveinbjörnsson, E. Ö. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2015-02-21

    Graphene field effect transistors with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric are fabricated on H-intercalated bilayer graphene grown on semi-insulating 4H-SiC by chemical vapour deposition. DC measurements of the gate voltage v{sub g} versus the drain current i{sub d} reveal a severe hysteresis of clockwise orientation. A capacitive model is used to derive the relationship between the applied gate voltage and the Fermi energy. The electron transport equations are then used to calculate the drain current for a given applied gate voltage. The hysteresis in measured data is then modeled via a modified Preisach kernel.

  7. The Effective Field Theory of nonsingular cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yong; Li, Hai-Guang; Qiu, Taotao; Piao, Yun-Song

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the nonsingular cosmology within the framework of the Effective Field Theory(EFT) of cosmological perturbations. Due to the recently proved no-go theorem, any nonsingular cosmological models based on the cubic Galileon suffer from pathologies. We show how the EFT could help us clarify the origin of the no-go theorem, and offer us solutions to break the no-go. Particularly, we point out that the gradient instability can be removed by using some spatial derivative operators in EFT. Based on the EFT description, we obtain a realistic healthy nonsingular cosmological model, and show the perturbation spectrum can be consistent with the observations.

  8. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  9. Extended symmetrical classical electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A V; Kalashnikov, E G

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a modification of classical electrodynamics in which "ordinary" point charges are absent. The modified equations contain additional terms describing the induced charges and currents. The densities of the induced charges and currents depend on the vector k and the vectors of the electromagnetic field, E and B . It is shown that the vectors E and B can be defined in terms of two four-potentials and the components of k are the components of a four-tensor of the third rank. The Lagrangian of the modified electrodynamics is defined. The conditions are derived at which only one four-potential determines the behavior of the electromagnetic field. It is also shown that static modified electrodynamics can describe the electromagnetic field in the inner region of an electric monopole. In the outer region of the electric monopole the electric field is governed by the Maxwell equations. It follows from boundary conditions at the interface between the inner and outer regions of the monopole that the vector k has a discrete spectrum. The electric and magnetic fields, energy, and angular momentum of the monopole are found for different eigenvalues of k .

  10. Dynamics of Gauge Fields at High Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    An effective description of dynamical Bose fields is provided by the classical (high-temperature) limit of thermal field theory. The main subject of this thesis is to improve the ensuing classical field theory, that is, to include the dominant quantum corrections and to add counter terms for the Ray

  11. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage analogues in classical physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangelov, A A [University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Vitanov, N V [Department of Physics, Sofia University, James Bourchier 5 blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Shore, B W [618 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-03-14

    Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is a well-established technique for producing coherent population transfer in a three-state quantum system. We here exploit the resemblance between the Schroedinger equation for such a quantum system and the Newton equation of motion for a classical system undergoing torque to discuss several classical analogues of STIRAP, notably the motion of a moving charged particle subject to the Lorentz force of a quasistatic magnetic field, the orientation of a magnetic moment in a slowly varying magnetic field and the Coriolis effect. Like STIRAP, these phenomena occur for counterintuitive motion of the torque and are robustly insensitive to small changes in the interaction properties.

  12. The effects of feeding unpredictability and classical conditioning on pre-release training of white-lipped peccary (Mammalia, Tayassuidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene S C Nogueira

    Full Text Available Some authors have suggested that environmental unpredictability, accompanied by some sort of signal for behavioral conditioning, can boost activity or foster exploratory behavior, which may increase post-release success in re-introduction programs. Thus, using white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari, a vulnerable Neotropical species, as a model, we evaluated an unpredictable feeding schedule. Associating this with the effect of classical conditioning on behavioral activities, we assessed the inclusion of this approach in pre-release training protocols. The experimental design comprised predictable feeding phases (control phases: C1, C2 and C3 and unpredictable feeding phases (U1- signaled and U2- non-signaled. The animals explored more during the signaled and non-signaled unpredictable phases and during the second control phase (C2 than during the other two predictable phases (C1 and C3. The peccaries also spent less time feeding during the signaled unpredictable phase (U1 and the following control phase (C2 than during the other phases. Moreover, they spent more time in aggressive encounters during U1 than the other experimental phases. However, the animals did not show differences in the time they spent on affiliative interactions or in the body weight change during the different phases. The signaled unpredictability, besides improving foraging behavior, showing a prolonged effect on the next control phase (C2, also increased the competition for food. The signaled feeding unpredictability schedule, mimicking wild conditions by eliciting the expression of naturalistic behaviors in pre-release training, may be essential to fully prepare them for survival in the wild.

  13. The Effects of Feeding Unpredictability and Classical Conditioning on Pre-Release Training of White-Lipped Peccary (Mammalia, Tayassuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Selene S. C.; Abreu, Shauana A.; Peregrino, Helderes; Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio L. G.

    2014-01-01

    Some authors have suggested that environmental unpredictability, accompanied by some sort of signal for behavioral conditioning, can boost activity or foster exploratory behavior, which may increase post-release success in re-introduction programs. Thus, using white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a vulnerable Neotropical species, as a model, we evaluated an unpredictable feeding schedule. Associating this with the effect of classical conditioning on behavioral activities, we assessed the inclusion of this approach in pre-release training protocols. The experimental design comprised predictable feeding phases (control phases: C1, C2 and C3) and unpredictable feeding phases (U1- signaled and U2- non-signaled). The animals explored more during the signaled and non-signaled unpredictable phases and during the second control phase (C2) than during the other two predictable phases (C1 and C3). The peccaries also spent less time feeding during the signaled unpredictable phase (U1) and the following control phase (C2) than during the other phases. Moreover, they spent more time in aggressive encounters during U1 than the other experimental phases. However, the animals did not show differences in the time they spent on affiliative interactions or in the body weight change during the different phases. The signaled unpredictability, besides improving foraging behavior, showing a prolonged effect on the next control phase (C2), also increased the competition for food. The signaled feeding unpredictability schedule, mimicking wild conditions by eliciting the expression of naturalistic behaviors in pre-release training, may be essential to fully prepare them for survival in the wild. PMID:24475072

  14. Effective Field Theories for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Moult, Ian

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I study applications of effective field theories to understand aspects of QCD jets and their substructure at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, I introduce an observable, $D_2$, which can be used for distinguishing boosted $W/Z/H$ bosons from the QCD background using information about the radiation pattern within the jet, and perform a precision calculation of this observable. To simplify calculations in the soft collinear effective theory, I also develop a helicity operator basis, which facilitates matching calculations to fixed order computations performed using spinor-helicity techniques, and demonstrate its utility by computing an observable relevant for studying the properties of the newly discovered Higgs boson.

  15. Polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, F.; Estrela, P.; Mo, Y.; Migliorato, P.; Maeda, H.; Inoue, S.; Shimoda, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report the operation of polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors. These devices can be fabricated on inexpensive disposable substrates such as glass or plastics and are, therefore, promising candidates for low cost single-use intelligent multisensors. In this work we have developed an extended gate structure with a Si3N4 sensing layer. Nearly ideal pH sensitivity (54mV /pH) and stable operation have been achieved. Temperature effects have been characterized. A penicillin sensor has been fabricated by functionalizing the sensing area with penicillinase. The sensitivity to penicillin G is about 10mV/mM, in solutions with concentration lower than the saturation value, which is about 7 mM.

  16. Nuclear effective field theory on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, H; Epelbaum, E; Lee, D; ner, Ulf-G Mei\\ss

    2008-01-01

    In the low-energy region far below the chiral symmetry breaking scale (which is of the order of 1 GeV) chiral perturbation theory provides a model-independent approach for quantitative description of nuclear processes. In the two- and more-nucleon sector perturbation theory is applicable only at the level of an effective potential which serves as input in the corresponding dynamical equation. To deal with the resulting many-body problem we put chiral effective field theory (EFT) on the lattice. Here we present the results of our lattice EFT study up to next-to-next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion. Accurate description of two-nucleon phase-shifts and ground state energy ratio of dilute neutron matter up to corrections of higher orders shows that lattice EFT is a promising tool for a quantitative description of low-energy few- and many-body systems.

  17. Wake field effects in APT linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (<1 nA/m), that requires analyzing carefully all possible loss sources. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, the author studies these effects for the APT to exclude potential problems at such a high current. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. Here he concentrates on two features specific to the APT linac: loss factors for the design {beta} < 1 and CW beam structure.

  18. Wake Field Effects in the APT Linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1998-04-01

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, an analysis for the APT accelerator has been performed to exclude potential problems at such a high current leading to beam losses. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. The only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. However, it has an acceptable level and will be further reduced by HOM couplers.

  19. Oxide-on-graphene field effect biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Liddell, Kristi; Wang, Junjie; Koger, Brandon; Keating, Christine; Zhu, J.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoelectronics-based detection schemes offer fast and label-free alternatives to bioanalysis. Here we report on the design, fabrication, and operation of ion-sensitive field-effect biosensors using large-area graphene sheets synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The graphene transducer channel has a high carrier mobility of approximately 5000cm2/Vs. Our oxide-on-graphene design uses thin HfO2 and SiO2 films to passivate the graphene channel and electrodes from electrolyte and uses the top SiO2 surface for sensing and linker chemistry. The pH sensitivity of the bare SiO2 is measured to be 46mV/pH, in good agreement with literature results. We demonstrate the silanization of the SiO2 surface with aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTMS). The pH sensitivity of the APTMS-functionalized SiO2 is measured to be 43mV/pH. By applying the solution gate voltage in pulse, we eliminate hysteresis in the transfer curve of the graphene channel, which is a common challenge in achieving high-solution detection using nanostructure-based field effect sensors. The amine-functionalized SiO2 surface can be further functionalized with bio-probes to perform the detection of specific binding events such as DNA hybridization.

  20. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2017-02-08

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems.

  1. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems. PMID:28045509

  2. What classicality? Decoherence and Bohr's classical concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    Niels Bohr famously insisted on the indispensability of what he termed "classical concepts." In the context of the decoherence program, on the other hand, it has become fashionable to talk about the "dynamical emergence of classicality" from the quantum formalism alone. Does this mean that decoherence challenges Bohr's dictum and signifies a break with the Copenhagen interpretation-for example, that classical concepts do not need to be assumed but can be derived? In this paper we'll try to shine some light down the murky waters where formalism and philosophy cohabitate. To begin, we'll clarify the notion of classicality in the decoherence description. We'll then discuss Bohr's and Heisenberg's take on the quantum-classical problem and reflect on different meanings of the terms "classicality" and "classical concepts" in the writings of Bohr and his followers. This analysis will allow us to put forward some tentative suggestions for how we may better understand the relation between decoherence-induced classical...

  3. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  4. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  5. Effects of Vegetated Field Borders on Arthropods in Cotton Fields in Eastern North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Outward, Randy; Sorenson, Clyde E.; Bradley, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The influence, if any, of 5m wide, feral, herbaceous field borders on pest and beneficial arthropods in commercial cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), fields was measured through a variety of sampling techniques over three years. In each year, 5 fields with managed, feral vegetation borders and five fields without such borders were examined. Sampling was stratified from the field border or edge in each field in an attempt to elucidate any edge effects that might have occurr...

  6. Special Effect of Parallel Inductive Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈涛; 刘振兴; W.Heikkila

    2002-01-01

    Acceleration of electrons by a field-aligned electric field during a magnetospheric substorm in the deep geomagnetic tail is studied by means of a one-dimensional electromagnetic particle code. It was found that the free acceleration of the electrons by the parallel electric field is obvious; kinetic energy variation is greater than electromagnetic energy variation in the presence of parallel electric field. Magnetic energy is greater than kinetic energy variation and electric energy variation in the absence of the parallel electric field. More wave modes in the presence of the parallel electric field are generated than those in the absence of the parallel electric field.

  7. Nanowire Tunnel Field Effect Transistors: Prospects and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Somaia Sarwat

    The tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) has the potential to operate at lower voltages and lower power than the field effect transistor (FET). The TFET can circumvent the fundamental thermal limit of the inverse subthreshold slope (S) by exploiting interband tunneling of non-equilibrium "cold" carriers. The conduction mechanism in the TFET is governed by band-to-band tunneling which limits the drive current. TFETs built with III-V materials like InAs and InSb can produce enough tunneling current because of their small direct bandgap. Our simulation results show that although they require highly degenerate source doping to support the high electric fields in the tunnel region, the devices achieve minimum inverse subthreshold slopes of 30 mV/dec. In subthreshold, these devices experience both regimes of voltage-controlled tunneling and cold-carrier injection. Numerical results based on a discretized 8-band k.p model are compared to analytical WKB theory. For both regular FETs and TFETs, direct channel tunneling dominates the leakage current when the physical gate length is reduced to 5 nm. Therefore, a survey of materials is performed to determine their ability to suppress the direct tunnel current through a 5 nm barrier. The tunneling effective mass gives the best indication of the relative size of the tunnel currents. Si gives the lowest overall tunnel current for both the conduction and valence band and, therefore, it is the optimum choice for suppressing tunnel current at the 5 nm scale. Our numerical simulation shows that the finite number, random placement, and discrete nature of the dopants in the source of an InAs nanowire (NW) TFET affect both the mean value and the variance of the drive current and the inverse subthreshold slope. The discrete doping model gives an average drive current and an inverse subthreshold slope that are less than those predicted from the homogeneous doping model. The doping density required to achieve a target drive current is

  8. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  9. Effects of gain-scheduling methods in a classical wind turbine controller on wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaldi, Carlo; Henriksen, Lars Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    The eects of dierent gain-scheduling methods for a classical wind turbine controller, operating in full load region, on the wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads are investigated in this work. The dierent techniques are derived looking at the physical problem to take into account the chan......The eects of dierent gain-scheduling methods for a classical wind turbine controller, operating in full load region, on the wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads are investigated in this work. The dierent techniques are derived looking at the physical problem to take into account...

  10. Biological effects of electric fields: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.; Phillips, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    An overview of the literature suggests tha electric-field exposure is an environmental agent/influence of relatively low potential toxicity to biological systems. Generally, many of the biological effects which have been reported are quite subtle and differences between exposed and unexposed subjects may be masked by normal biological variations. However, several recent reports indicate possibly more serious consequences from chronic exposure, emphasizing the need for more research in epidemiology and laboratory experiments. This paper presents a cursory overview of investigations on the biological consequences of exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields. Three important topics are discussed, including: 1) the general methodology of exposure experiments, including those elements which are critical for definitive studies in biological systems; 2) a brief discussion of epidemiological and clinical studies conducted to date; and 3) a somewhat more extensive examination of animal experiments representing major areas of investigation (behavior, biological rhythms, nervous and endocrine systems, bone growth and repair, cardiovascular system and blood chemistry, immunology, reproduction, growth and development mortality and pathology, cellular and membrane studies, and mutagenesis). A discussion of current concepts, possible mechanisms and future directions of research is presented. 110 references.

  11. Double-slit vacuum polarisation effects in ultra-intense laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    King, B; Keitel, C H; 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.032114

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the strong laser-driven vacuum on a propagating electromagnetic probe wave has been studied in detail. We investigate two scenarios comprising a focused probe laser beam passing through a region of vacuum polarised by an ultra-intense laser field. By splitting this strong field into two, separated, monochromatic Gaussian pulses counter-propagating in a plane perpendicular to the probe field axis, we demonstrate a leading order light-by-light diffraction effect that generates an interference pattern reminiscent of the classic double-slit experiment. We calculate the total number of probe photons diffracted as well as the number diffracted into regions where the vacuum polarisation signal is higher than the probe background. In addition, we calculate the induced ellipticity and polarisation rotation in the probe beam and show how, in the realistic situation in which the centres of the two strong fields are not exactly aligned, certain ranges of beam separation and observation distance may actua...

  12. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, S.; Klco, N.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Phillips, D. R.; Thapaliya, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present procedures based on Bayesian statistics for estimating, from data, the parameters of effective field theories (EFTs). The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by theoretical expectations in a quantifiable way through the specification of Bayesian priors. A prior for natural-sized LECs reduces the possibility of overfitting, and leads to a consistent accounting of different sources of uncertainty. A set of diagnostic tools is developed that analyzes the fit and ensures that the priors do not bias the EFT parameter estimation. The procedures are illustrated using representative model problems, including the extraction of LECs for the nucleon-mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  13. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-09

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling.

  14. Quantifying truncation errors in effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Furnstahl, R J; Phillips, D R; Wesolowski, S

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian procedures designed to quantify truncation errors in perturbative calculations of quantum chromodynamics observables are adapted to expansions in effective field theory (EFT). In the Bayesian approach, such truncation errors are derived from degree-of-belief (DOB) intervals for EFT predictions. Computation of these intervals requires specification of prior probability distributions ("priors") for the expansion coefficients. By encoding expectations about the naturalness of these coefficients, this framework provides a statistical interpretation of the standard EFT procedure where truncation errors are estimated using the order-by-order convergence of the expansion. It also permits exploration of the ways in which such error bars are, and are not, sensitive to assumptions about EFT-coefficient naturalness. We first demonstrate the calculation of Bayesian probability distributions for the EFT truncation error in some representative examples, and then focus on the application of chiral EFT to neutron-pr...

  15. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Wesolowski, S; Furnstahl, R J; Phillips, D R; Thapaliya, A

    2015-01-01

    We present procedures based on Bayesian statistics for effective field theory (EFT) parameter estimation from data. The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by theoretical expectations that supplement such information in a quantifiable way through the specification of Bayesian priors. A prior for natural-sized LECs reduces the possibility of overfitting, and leads to a consistent accounting of different sources of uncertainty. A set of diagnostic tools are developed that analyze the fit and ensure that the priors do not bias the EFT parameter estimation. The procedures are illustrated using representative model problems and the extraction of LECs for the nucleon mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  16. Hadronic Transport Coefficients from Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the calculation of transport coefficients in the matter created in a relativistic heavy-ion collision after the chemical freeze-out. This matter can be well approximated by a pion gas out of equilibrium. We describe the theoretical framework to obtain the shear and bulk viscosities, the thermal and electrical conductivities and the flavor diffusion coefficients of a meson gas at low temperatures. To describe the interactions of the degrees of freedom, we use effective field theories with chiral and heavy quark symmetries. We introduce the unitarization methods in order to obtain a scattering amplitude that satisfies the unitarity condition exactly. We perform the calculation of the transport properties of the low temperature phase of quantum chromodynamics -the hadronic medium- that can be used in the hydrodynamic simulations of a relativistic heavy-ion collision and its subsequent evolution. We show that the shear viscosity over entropy density exhibits a minimum in a phase trans...

  17. Higgs Effective Field Theories - Systematics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    We discuss effective field theories (EFTs) for the Higgs particle, which is not necessarily the Higgs of the Standard Model. We distinguish two different consistent expansions: EFTs that describe decoupling new-physics effects and EFTs that describe non-decoupling new-physics effects. We briefly discuss the first case, the SM-EFT. The focus of this thesis is on the non-decoupling EFTs. We argue that the loop expansion is the consistent expansion in the second case. We introduce the concept of chiral dimensions, equivalent to the loop expansion. Using the chiral dimensions, we expand the electroweak chiral Lagrangian up to next-to-leading order, $\\mathcal{O}(f^{2}/\\Lambda^{2})=\\mathcal{O}(1/16\\pi^{2})$. We then compare the decoupling and the non-decoupling EFT. We also consider scenarios in which the new-physics sector is non-decoupling at a scale $f$, far above the electroweak-scale $v$. We discuss the relevance of the resulting double expansion in $\\xi=v^{2}/f^{2}$ and $f^{2}/\\Lambda^{2}$ for the data analys...

  18. Wake field effect analysis in APT linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The APT linac comprises both the normal conducting (below 211 MeV) and superconducting (SC) sections. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (< 1 nA/m), that requires analyzing carefully all possible loss sources. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, the authors study these effects for the APT to exclude potential problems at such a high current. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. The main conclusion is that the only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell SC cavities. It, however, has an acceptable level and, in addition, will be taken care of by HOM couplers.

  19. Wake Field Effect Analysis in APT Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, S S

    1998-01-01

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The APT linac comprises both the normal conducting (below 211 MeV) and superconducting (SC) sections. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (<1 nA/m), that requires analyzing carefully all possible loss sources. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, we study these effects for the APT to exclude potential problems at such a high current. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. Our main conclusion is that the only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell SC cavities. It, however, has an acceptable level and, in addition, will be taken care of by HOM couplers.

  20. Influence of Surface Energy Effects on Elastic Fields of a Layered Elastic Medium under Surface Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supakorn Tirapat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of a layered elastic half space under the action of axisymmetric surface loading and the influence of the surface energy effects. The boundary value problems for the bulk and the surface are formulated based on classical linear elasticity and a complete Gurtin-Murdoch constitutive relation. An analytical technique using Love’s representation and the Hankel integral transform is employed to derive an integral-form solution for both displacement and stress fields. An efficient numerical quadrature is then applied to accurately evaluate all involved integrals. Selected numerical results are presented to portray the influence of various parameters on elastic fields. Numerical results indicate that the surface stress displays a significant influence on both displacement and stress fields. It is also found that the layered half space becomes stiffer with the presence of surface stresses. In addition, unlike the classical elasticity solution, size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is noted. The present analytical solutions provide fundamental understanding of the influence of surface energy on layered elastic materials. It can also be used as a benchmark solution for the development of numerical techniques such as FEM and BEM, for analysis of more complex problems involving a layered medium under the influence of surface energy effects.