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Sample records for classical effective field

  1. Classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Classical field theory, which concerns the generation and interaction of fields, is a logical precursor to quantum field theory, and can be used to describe phenomena such as gravity and electromagnetism. Written for advanced undergraduates, and appropriate for graduate level classes, this book provides a comprehensive introduction to field theories, with a focus on their relativistic structural elements. Such structural notions enable a deeper understanding of Maxwell's equations, which lie at the heart of electromagnetism, and can also be applied to modern variants such as Chern–Simons and Born–Infeld. The structure of field theories and their physical predictions are illustrated with compelling examples, making this book perfect as a text in a dedicated field theory course, for self-study, or as a reference for those interested in classical field theory, advanced electromagnetism, or general relativity. Demonstrating a modern approach to model building, this text is also ideal for students of theoretic...

  2. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  3. Effects of a conducting E layer on classical F region cross-field plasma diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickrey, J.F.; Kelley, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    The rate of cross-field plasma diffusion in the F region ionosphere is significantly increased when the magnetic field lines thread a highly conducting E region below. This reduces the lifetime of small-scale F region electron density irregularities in the polar ionosphere where the presence of a highly conducting E region is comonplace. A simple mmodel is developed to describe the effects of a conducting E layer on classical F region plasma diffusion. In the absence of an E region, the difference in ion and electron diffusion rates leads to a charge separation and, hence, to an electrostatic field that retards ion diffusion. When the highly conducting magnetic field lines are tied to a conducting E region, however, electrons can flow along B to reduce the ambipolar diffusion electric field, and ions can proceed perpendicular to B at a rate approaching their own (higher) diffusion velocity. It is shown that the enhanced total diffusion rate that results depends strongly on the height of the F layer and on the ratio of the E to F region Pedersen conductivities

  4. Classic and Quantum Capacitances in Bernal Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene Field Effect Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Sadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our focus in this study is on characterizing the capacitance voltage (C-V behavior of Bernal stacking bilayer graphene (BG and trilayer graphene (TG as the channel of FET devices. The analytical models of quantum capacitance (QC of BG and TG are presented. Although QC is smaller than the classic capacitance in conventional devices, its contribution to the total metal oxide semiconductor capacitor in graphene-based FET devices becomes significant in the nanoscale. Our calculation shows that QC increases with gate voltage in both BG and TG and decreases with temperature with some fluctuations. However, in bilayer graphene the fluctuation is higher due to its tunable band structure with external electric fields. In similar temperature and size, QC in metal oxide BG is higher than metal oxide TG configuration. Moreover, in both BG and TG, total capacitance is more affected by classic capacitance as the distance between gate electrode and channel increases. However, QC is more dominant when the channel becomes thinner into the nanoscale, and therefore we mostly deal with quantum capacitance in top gate in contrast with bottom gate that the classic capacitance is dominant.

  5. From classical to quantum fields

    CERN Document Server

    Baulieu, Laurent; Sénéor, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Field Theory has become the universal language of most modern theoretical physics. This introductory textbook shows how this beautiful theory offers the correct mathematical framework to describe and understand the fundamental interactions of elementary particles. The book begins with a brief reminder of basic classical field theories, electrodynamics and general relativity, as well as their symmetry properties, and proceeds with the principles of quantisation following Feynman's path integral approach. Special care is used at every step to illustrate the correct mathematical formulation of the underlying assumptions. Gauge theories and the problems encountered in their quantisation are discussed in detail. The last chapters contain a full description of the Standard Model of particle physics and the attempts to go beyond it, such as grand unified theories and supersymmetry. Written for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in physics and mathematics, the book could also serve as a re...

  6. Effects of classical and neo-classical cross-field transport of tungsten impurity in realistic tokamak geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamoto, S.; Inoue, H.; Sawada, Y.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama (Japan); Homma, Y.; Hoshino, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Bonnin, X. [ITER Organization, St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Coster, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Schneider, R. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The initial simulation study of the neoclassical perpendicular self-diffusion transport in the SOL/Divertor regions for a realistic tokamak geometry with the IMPGYRO code has been performed in this paper. One of the most unique features of the IMPGYRO code is calculating exact Larmor orbit of the test particle instead of assuming guiding center approximation. Therefore, effects of the magnetic drifts in realistic tokamaks are naturally taken into account in the IMPGYRO code. This feature makes it possible to calculate neoclassical transport processes, which possibly become large in the SOL/divertor plasma. Indeed, neoclassical self-diffusion process, the resultant effect of the combination of magnetic drift and Coulomb collisions with background ions, has already been included in the IMPGYRO model. In the present paper, prior to implementing the detailed model of neoclassical transport process into IMPGYRO, we have investigated the effect of neoclassical selfdiffusion in a realistic tokamak geometry with lower single null X-point. We also use a model with guiding center approximation in order to compare with the IMPGYRO full orbit model. The preliminary calculation results of each model have shown differences in the perpendicular average velocity of impurity ions at the top region of the SOL. The mechanism which leads to the difference has been discussed. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Minding one's P's and Q's: From the one loop effective action in quantum field theory to classical transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju; Wirstam, Jens

    2000-01-01

    The one loop effective action in quantum field theory can be expressed as a quantum mechanical path integral over world lines, with internal symmetries represented by Grassmanian variables. In this paper, we develop a real time, many body, world line formalism for the one loop effective action. In particular, we study hot QCD and obtain the classical transport equations which, as Litim and Manuel have shown, reduce in the appropriate limit to the non-Abelian Boltzmann-Langevin equation first obtained by Boedeker. In the Vlasov limit, the classical kinetic equations are those that correspond to the hard thermal loop effective action. We also discuss the imaginary time world line formalism for a hot φ 4 theory, and elucidate its relation to classical transport theory. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  8. Vortex currents in turbulent superfluid and classical fluid channel flow, the magnus effect, and Goldstone boson fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, E.R.

    1994-01-01

    Expressing hydrodynamics in terms of the flow of vorticity, using the vortex current tensor, helps unify the picture of turbulent channel flow for viscous fluids and for superfluids. In both, eddy viscosity plays a major role in energy dissipation, and in both there is a similar cross stream flow of vorticity, which in the case of superfluids leads to the Josephson frequency. The vortex current tensor, which was introduced in an earlier paper to derive an exact three dimensional Magnus effect formula, turns out to be the classical hydrodynamic limit of the vortex current that is the source for a classical Goldstone-boson field

  9. Semi-classical noise investigation for sub-40nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spathis, C.; Birbas, A.; Georgakopoulou, K.

    2015-01-01

    Device white noise levels in short channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) dictate the performance and reliability of high-frequency circuits ranging from high-speed microprocessors to Low-Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and microwave circuits. Recent experimental noise measurements with very short devices demonstrate the existence of suppressed shot noise, contrary to the predictions of classical channel thermal noise models. In this work we show that, as the dimensions continue to shrink, shot noise has to be considered when the channel resistance becomes comparable to the barrier resistance at the source-channel junction. By adopting a semi-classical approach and taking retrospectively into account transport, short-channel and quantum effects, we investigate the partitioning between shot and thermal noise, and formulate a predictive model that describes the noise characteristics of modern devices

  10. Semi-classical noise investigation for sub-40nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spathis, C., E-mail: cspathis@ece.upatras.gr; Birbas, A.; Georgakopoulou, K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Patras 26500 (Greece)

    2015-08-15

    Device white noise levels in short channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) dictate the performance and reliability of high-frequency circuits ranging from high-speed microprocessors to Low-Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and microwave circuits. Recent experimental noise measurements with very short devices demonstrate the existence of suppressed shot noise, contrary to the predictions of classical channel thermal noise models. In this work we show that, as the dimensions continue to shrink, shot noise has to be considered when the channel resistance becomes comparable to the barrier resistance at the source-channel junction. By adopting a semi-classical approach and taking retrospectively into account transport, short-channel and quantum effects, we investigate the partitioning between shot and thermal noise, and formulate a predictive model that describes the noise characteristics of modern devices.

  11. Investigation of Schottky-Barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor by an efficient semi-classical numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changxin; Zhang Wei; Zhao Bo; Zhang Yafei

    2009-01-01

    An efficient semi-classical numerical modeling approach has been developed to simulate the coaxial Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (SB-CNTFET). In the modeling, the electrostatic potential of the CNT is obtained by self-consistently solving the analytic expression of CNT carrier distribution and the cylindrical Poisson equation, which significantly enhances the computational efficiency and simultaneously present a result in good agreement to that obtained from the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism based on the first principle. With this method, the effects of the CNT diameter, power supply voltage, thickness and dielectric constant of gate insulator on the device performance are investigated.

  12. Point-particle effective field theory I: classical renormalization and the inverse-square potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, C.P.; Hayman, Peter [Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University,Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Williams, M. [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, KU Leuven,Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Zalavári, László [Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University,Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2017-04-19

    Singular potentials (the inverse-square potential, for example) arise in many situations and their quantum treatment leads to well-known ambiguities in choosing boundary conditions for the wave-function at the position of the potential’s singularity. These ambiguities are usually resolved by developing a self-adjoint extension of the original problem; a non-unique procedure that leaves undetermined which extension should apply in specific physical systems. We take the guesswork out of this picture by using techniques of effective field theory to derive the required boundary conditions at the origin in terms of the effective point-particle action describing the physics of the source. In this picture ambiguities in boundary conditions boil down to the allowed choices for the source action, but casting them in terms of an action provides a physical criterion for their determination. The resulting extension is self-adjoint if the source action is real (and involves no new degrees of freedom), and not otherwise (as can also happen for reasonable systems). We show how this effective-field picture provides a simple framework for understanding well-known renormalization effects that arise in these systems, including how renormalization-group techniques can resum non-perturbative interactions that often arise, particularly for non-relativistic applications. In particular we argue why the low-energy effective theory tends to produce a universal RG flow of this type and describe how this can lead to the phenomenon of reaction catalysis, in which physical quantities (like scattering cross sections) can sometimes be surprisingly large compared to the underlying scales of the source in question. We comment in passing on the possible relevance of these observations to the phenomenon of the catalysis of baryon-number violation by scattering from magnetic monopoles.

  13. Effect of magnetic field on noncollinear magnetism in classical bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasrija, Kanika, E-mail: kanikapasrija@iisermohali.ac.in; Kumar, Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeev@iisermohali.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, S. A. S. Nagar, Manauli PO 140306 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of a bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional square lattice in the presence of an external magnetic field. The study is motivated by the relevance of this simple model to the non-collinear magnetism and the consequent ferroelectric behavior in the recently discovered high-temperature multiferroic, cupric oxide (CuO). We show that an external magnetic field stabilizes a non-coplanar magnetic phase, which is characterized by a finite ferromagnetic moment along the direction of the applied magnetic field and a spiral spin texture if projected in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Real-space analysis highlights a coexistence of non-collinear regions with ferromagnetic clusters. The results are also supported by simple variational calculations.

  14. Effective action for reggeized gluons, classical gluon field of relativistic color charge and color glass condensate approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, S.; Prygarin, A. [Ariel University, Physics Department, Ariel (Israel); Lipatov, L. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hamburg University, II Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    We discuss application of formalism of small-x effective action for reggeized gluons (Gribov, Sov. Phys. JETP 26:414, 1968; Lipatov, Nucl. Phys. B 452:369, 1995; Lipatov, Phys. Rep. 286:131, 1997; Lipatov, Subnucl. Ser. 49:131, 2013; Lipatov, Int. J. Mod. Phys. Conf. Ser. 39:1560082, 2015; Lipatov, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 31(28/29):1645011, 2016; Lipatov, EPJ Web Conf. 125:01010, 2016; Lipatov, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 23:338, 1976; Kuraev et al., Sov. Phys. JETP 45:199, 1977; Kuraev et al., Zh Eksp, Teor. Fiz. 72:377, 1977; Balitsky and Lipatov, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 28:822, 1978; Balitsky and Lipatov, Yad. Fiz. 28:1597 1978), for the calculation of classical gluon field of relativistic color charge, similarly to that done in CGC approach of McLerran and Venugopalan, Phys. Rev. D 49:2233 (1994), Jalilian-Marian et al., Phys. Rev. D 55:5414 (1997), Jalilian-Marian et al., Nucl. Phys. B 504:415 (1997), Jalilian-Marian et al., Phys. Rev. D 59:014014 (1998), Jalilian-Marian et al., Phys. Rev. D 59:014015 (1998), Iancu et al., Nucl. Phys. A 692:583 (2001), Iancu et al., Phys. Lett. B 510:133 (2001), Ferreiro et al., Nucl. Phys. A 703:489 (2002). The equations of motion with the reggeon fields are solved in LO and NLO approximations and new solutions are found. The results are compared to the calculations performed in the CGC framework and it is demonstrated that the LO CGC results for the classical field are reproduced in our calculations. Possible applications of the NLO solution in the effective action and CGC frameworks are discussed as well. (orig.)

  15. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  16. The classical theory of fields electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Helrich, Carl S

    2012-01-01

    The study of classical electromagnetic fields is an adventure. The theory is complete mathematically and we are able to present it as an example of classical Newtonian experimental and mathematical philosophy. There is a set of foundational experiments, on which most of the theory is constructed. And then there is the bold theoretical proposal of a field-field interaction from James Clerk Maxwell. This textbook presents the theory of classical fields as a mathematical structure based solidly on laboratory experiments. Here the student is introduced to the beauty of classical field theory as a gem of theoretical physics. To keep the discussion fluid, the history is placed in a beginning chapter and some of the mathematical proofs in the appendices. Chapters on Green’s Functions and Laplace’s Equation and a discussion of Faraday’s Experiment further deepen the understanding. The chapter on Einstein’s relativity is an integral necessity to the text. Finally, chapters on particle motion and waves in a dis...

  17. Casimir effect: The classical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, J.; Mann, A.; Revzen, M.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the high temperature (or classical) limit of the Casimir effect. A useful quantity which arises naturally in our discussion is the 'relative Casimir energy', which we define for a configuration of disjoint conducting boundaries of arbitrary shapes, as the difference of Casimir energies between the given configuration and a configuration with the same boundaries infinitely far apart. Using path integration techniques, we show that the relative Casimir energy vanishes exponentially fast in temperature. This is consistent with a simple physical argument based on Kirchhoff's law. As a result the 'relative Casimir entropy', which we define in an obviously analogous manner, tends, in the classical limit, to a finite asymptotic value which depends only on the geometry of the boundaries. Thus the Casimir force between disjoint pieces of the boundary, in the classical limit, is entropy driven and is governed by a dimensionless number characterizing the geometry of the cavity. Contributions to the Casimir thermodynamical quantities due to each individual connected component of the boundary exhibit logarithmic deviations in temperature from the behavior just described. These logarithmic deviations seem to arise due to our difficulty to separate the Casimir energy (and the other thermodynamical quantities) from the 'electromagnetic' self-energy of each of the connected components of the boundary in a well defined manner. Our approach to the Casimir effect is not to impose sharp boundary conditions on the fluctuating field, but rather take into consideration its interaction with the plasma of 'charge carriers' in the boundary, with the plasma frequency playing the role of a physical UV cutoff. This also allows us to analyze deviations from a perfect conductor behavior

  18. Special relativity and classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman are back. This time, they introduce readers to Einstein's special relativity and Maxwell's classical field theory. Using their typical brand of real math, enlightening drawings, and humor, Susskind and Friedman walk us through the complexities of waves, forces, and particles by exploring special relativity and electromagnetism. It's a must-read for both devotees of the series and any armchair physicist who wants to improve their knowledge of physics' deepest truths.

  19. Quantum scattering from classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.M.; Poppitz, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    We show that scattering amplitudes between initial wave packet states and certain coherent final states can be computed in a systematic weak coupling expansion about classical solutions satisfying initial-value conditions. The initial-value conditions are such as to make the solution of the classical field equations amenable to numerical methods. We propose a practical procedure for computing classical solutions which contribute to high energy two-particle scattering amplitudes. We consider in this regard the implications of a recent numerical simulation in classical SU(2) Yang-Mills theory for multiparticle scattering in quantum gauge theories and speculate on its generalization to electroweak theory. We also generalize our results to the case of complex trajectories and discuss the prospects for finding a solution to the resulting complex boundary value problem, which would allow the application of our method to any wave packet to coherent state transition. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these results to the issues of baryon number violation and multiparticle scattering at high energies. ((orig.))

  20. Classical trajectories and quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitiello, Giuseppe; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Salerno

    2005-01-01

    The density matrix and the Wigner function formalism requires the doubling of the degrees of freedom in quantum mechanics (QM) and quantum field theory (QFT). The doubled degrees of freedom play the role of the thermal bath or environment degrees of freedom and are entangled with the system degrees of freedom. They also account for quantum noise in the fluctuating random forces in the system-environment coupling. The algebraic structure of QFT turns out to be the one of the deformed Hopf algebra. In such a frame, the trajectories in the space of the unitarily inequivalent representations of the canonical commutation relations turn out to be classical trajectories and, under convenient conditions, they may exhibit properties typical of classical chaotic trajectories in nonlinear dynamics. The quantum Brownian motion and the two-slit experiment in QM are discussed in connection with the doubling of the degrees of freedom. (author)

  1. Introduction to classical and quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Tai-Kai

    2009-01-01

    This is the first introductory textbook on quantum field theory to be written from the point of view of condensed matter physics. As such, it presents the basic concepts and techniques of statistical field theory, clearly explaining how and why they are integrated into modern quantum (and classical) field theory, and includes the latest developments. Written by an expert in the field, with a broad experience in teaching and training, it manages to present such substantial topics as phases and phase transitions or solitons and instantons in an accessible and concise way. Divided into three parts, the first part covers fundamental physics and the mathematics background needed by students in order to enter the field, while the second part introduces more advanced concepts and techniques. Part III discusses applications of quantum field theory to a few basic problems. The emphasis here lies on how modern concepts of quantum field theory are embedded in these approaches, and also on the limitations of standard quantum field theory techniques in facing, 'real' physics problems. Throughout there are numerous end-of-chapter problems, and a free solutions manual is available for lecturers. (orig.)

  2. New solutions of a nonlinear classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, G.C.; Ventura, I.

    1975-01-01

    New solutions of a relativistic, classical, field theoretical model having logarithmic nonlinearities are obtained. Some of these solutions correspond to field not bounded in time but having finite energy and charge. There are no bounded solutions (bound states and resonances in particular) if the charge exceeds a certain value. This effect is due to the existance of a 'charge barrier' in this field theoretical model. All calculations are performed in a number of spatial dimensions [pt

  3. Classical limit for scalar fields at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Jakovac, A.

    1998-01-01

    We study real-time correlation functions in scalar quantum field theories at temperature T=1/β. We show that the behaviour of soft, long-wavelength modes is determined by classical statistical field theory. The loss of quantum coherence is due to interactions with the soft modes of the thermal bath. The soft modes are separated from the hard modes by an infrared cutoff Λ<<1/(ℎβ). Integrating out the hard modes yields an effective theory for the soft modes. The infrared cutoff Λ controls corrections to the classical limit which are O(ℎβΛ). As an application, the plasmon damping rate is calculated. (orig.)

  4. Gauge bridges in classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobs, S.

    2009-03-01

    In this thesis Poisson structures of two classical gauge field theories (Maxwell-Klein-Gordon- and Maxwell-Dirac-system) are constructed using the parametrix construction of Green's functions. Parametrices for the Maxwell-Klein-Gordon- and Maxwell-Dirac-system are constructed in Minkowski space and this construction is later generalized to curved space times for the Maxwell-Klein-Gordon-system. With these Green's functions Poisson brackets will be defined as Peierls brackets. Finally non-local, gauge invariant observables, the so-called ''gauge bridges''are constructed. Gauge bridges are the matrix elements of holonomy operators. It is shown, that these emerge from Poisson brackets of local, gauge invariant observables. (orig.)

  5. Classical behavior of a scalar field in the inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Nambu, Yasusada; Nakao, Ken-ichi.

    1987-09-01

    Extending the coarse-graining approach of Starobinsky, we formulate a theory to deal with the dynamics of a scalar field in inflationary universe models. We find a set of classical Langevin equations which describes the large scale behavior of the scalar field, provided that the coarse-grained size is greater than the effective compton wavelength of the scalar field. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is also derived which is defined on the phase space of the scalar field. We show that our theory is essentially equivalent to the one-loop field theory in de Sitter space and reduces to that of Starobinsky in a strong limit of the slow roll-over condition. Analysis of a simple Higgs potential model is done and the implications are discussed. (author)

  6. Classical diffusion in a field-reversed mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.P.; Condit, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Classical transport of particles and heat in field-reversed mirrors is discussed. The X-points (field nulls on axis) are shown to have no deleterious effect on transport; this conclusion is true for any transport model. For an elongated Hill's vortex equilibrium the classical diffusion coefficient is calculated analytically and used to construct an analytic solution to the transport equation for particles or energy; this yields exact results for particle and energy confinement times. These life-times are roughly 3 to 6 times shorter than previous heuristic estimates. Experimentally determined life-times are within a factor of 3 to 4 of our estimates. To assess the impact of these results on reactor designs, the authors construct an analytic reactor model in which neutral-beam input balances ion heat loss. Energy loss due to synchrotron radiation is calculated analytically and shown to be negligible, even with no wall reflection. Formulas are presented which give the reactor parameters in terms of plasma temperature, energy multiplication factor Q, and allowed neutron wall loading. The effect of anomalous resistivity is incorporated heuristically by assuming an anomalous resistivity which is enhanced by a factor A over classical resistivity. For large A the minimum power of a reactor scales as Asup(11/6). A=50 gives a reactor design which still seems reasonable, but A=200 leads to extremely large, high-power reactors. (author)

  7. Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Quantum field theory has evolved from its early beginnings as a tool for understanding the interaction of light with matter into a rather formidable technical paradigm, one that has successfully provided the mathematical underpinnings of all non-gravitational interactions. Over the eight decades since it was first contemplated the methods have become increasingly more streamlined and sophisticated, yielding new insights into our understanding of the subatomic world and our abilities to make clear and precise predictions. Some of the more elegant methods have to do with non-perturbative and semiclassical approaches to the subject. The chief players here are solitons, instantons, and anomalies. Over the past three decades there has been a steady rise in our understanding of these objects and of our ability to calculate their effects and implications for the rest of quantum field theory. This book is a welcome contribution to this subject. In 12 chapters it provides a clear synthesis of the key developments in these subjects at a level accessible to graduate students that have had an introductory course to quantum field theory. In the author's own words it provides both 'a survey and an overview of this field'. The first half of the book concentrates on solitons-–kinks, vortices, and magnetic monopoles-–and their implications for the subject. The reader is led first through the simplest models in one spatial dimension, into more sophisticated cases that required more advanced topological methods. The author does quite a nice job of introducing the various concepts as required, and beginning students should be able to get a good grasp of the subject directly from the text without having to first go through the primary literature. The middle part of the book deals with the implications of these solitons for both cosmology and for duality. While the cosmological discussion is quite nice, the discussion on BPS solitons, supersymmetry and duality is

  8. Grassmann expansion of the classical N=2 supergravity field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embacher, F.

    1984-01-01

    The classical field equations of N=2 supergravity are expanded with respect to an infinite dimensional Grassmann algebra. The general freedom in constructing classical solution is exhibited. As an application, a uniqueness theorem for supersymmetric extreme black holes is given. (Author)

  9. Asymptotic Conservation Laws in Classical Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, I.M.; Torre, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    A new, general, field theoretic approach to the derivation of asymptotic conservation laws is presented. In this approach asymptotic conservation laws are constructed directly from the field equations according to a universal prescription which does not rely upon the existence of Noether identities or any Lagrangian or Hamiltonian formalisms. The resulting general expressions of the conservation laws enjoy important invariance properties and synthesize all known asymptotic conservation laws, such as the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner energy in general relativity. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. The spin-statistics connection in classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J A

    2006-01-01

    The spin-statistics connection is obtained for a simple formulation of a classical field theory containing even and odd Grassmann variables. To that end, the construction of irreducible canonical realizations of the rotation group corresponding to general causal fields is reviewed. The connection is obtained by imposing local commutativity on the fields and exploiting the parity operation to exchange spatial coordinates in the scalar product of classical field evaluated at one spatial location with the same field evaluated at a distinct location. The spin-statistics connection for irreducible canonical realizations of the Poincare group of spin j is obtained in the form: classical fields and their conjugate momenta satisfy fundamental field-theoretic Poisson bracket relations for 2j even and fundamental Poisson antibracket relations for 2j odd

  11. Classical and non-classical effective medium theories: New perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukerman, Igor, E-mail: igor@uakron.edu

    2017-05-18

    Highlights: • Advanced non-asymptotic and nonlocal homogenization theories of metamaterials, valid in electrostatics and electrodynamics. • Classical theories (Clausius–Mossotti, Lorenz–Lorentz, Maxwell Garnett) fit well into the proposed framework. • Nonlocal effects can be included in the model, making order-of-magnitude accuracy improvements possible. • A challenging problem for future research is to determine what effective tensors are attainable for given constituents of a metamaterial. - Abstract: Future research in electrodynamics of periodic electromagnetic composites (metamaterials) can be expected to produce sophisticated homogenization theories valid for any composition and size of the lattice cell. The paper outlines a promising path in that direction, leading to non-asymptotic and nonlocal homogenization models, and highlights aspects of homogenization that are often overlooked: the finite size of the sample and the role of interface boundaries. Classical theories (e.g. Clausius–Mossotti, Maxwell Garnett), while originally derived from a very different set of ideas, fit well into the proposed framework. Nonlocal effects can be included in the model, making an order-of-magnitude accuracy improvements possible. One future challenge is to determine what effective parameters can or cannot be obtained for a given set of constituents of a metamaterial lattice cell, thereby delineating the possible from the impossible in metamaterial design.

  12. Classical and non-classical effective medium theories: New perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukerman, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Advanced non-asymptotic and nonlocal homogenization theories of metamaterials, valid in electrostatics and electrodynamics. • Classical theories (Clausius–Mossotti, Lorenz–Lorentz, Maxwell Garnett) fit well into the proposed framework. • Nonlocal effects can be included in the model, making order-of-magnitude accuracy improvements possible. • A challenging problem for future research is to determine what effective tensors are attainable for given constituents of a metamaterial. - Abstract: Future research in electrodynamics of periodic electromagnetic composites (metamaterials) can be expected to produce sophisticated homogenization theories valid for any composition and size of the lattice cell. The paper outlines a promising path in that direction, leading to non-asymptotic and nonlocal homogenization models, and highlights aspects of homogenization that are often overlooked: the finite size of the sample and the role of interface boundaries. Classical theories (e.g. Clausius–Mossotti, Maxwell Garnett), while originally derived from a very different set of ideas, fit well into the proposed framework. Nonlocal effects can be included in the model, making an order-of-magnitude accuracy improvements possible. One future challenge is to determine what effective parameters can or cannot be obtained for a given set of constituents of a metamaterial lattice cell, thereby delineating the possible from the impossible in metamaterial design.

  13. Quantum fermions and quantum field theory from classical statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, Christof

    2012-01-01

    An Ising-type classical statistical ensemble can describe the quantum physics of fermions if one chooses a particular law for the time evolution of the probability distribution. It accounts for the time evolution of a quantum field theory for Dirac particles in an external electromagnetic field. This yields in the non-relativistic one-particle limit the Schrödinger equation for a quantum particle in a potential. Interference or tunneling arise from classical probabilities.

  14. A Tulczyjew triple for classical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The geometrical structure known as the Tulczyjew triple has proved to be very useful in describing mechanical systems, even those with singular Lagrangians or subject to constraints. Starting from basic concepts of the variational calculus, we construct the Tulczyjew triple for first-order field theory. The important feature of our approach is that we do not postulate ad hoc the ingredients of the theory, but obtain them as unavoidable consequences of the variational calculus. This picture of field theory is covariant and complete, containing not only the Lagrangian formalism and Euler–Lagrange equations but also the phase space, the phase dynamics and the Hamiltonian formalism. Since the configuration space turns out to be an affine bundle, we have to use affine geometry, in particular the notion of the affine duality. In our formulation, the two maps α and β which constitute the Tulczyjew triple are morphisms of double structures of affine-vector bundles. We also discuss the Legendre transformation, i.e. the transition between the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian formulation of the first-order field theory. (paper)

  15. Classical solutions of some field theoretic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewski, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to simpler fields theories, so chosen that they possess several properties of nonabelian gauge theories. They preserve the conformal invariance of the action and one can define the topological charge for them. They possess nontrivial solutions to the equations of motion. The perturbation theory based on the fluctuations around each solution is characterized by asymptotic freedom. A model called CP sup(n-1) is presented and some models which are its natural generalizations are discussed. (M.F.W.)

  16. Lectures on classical and quantum theory of fields

    CERN Document Server

    Arodz, Henryk

    2017-01-01

    This textbook addresses graduate students starting to specialize in theoretical physics. It provides didactic introductions to the main topics in the theory of fields, while taking into account the contemporary view of the subject. The student will find concise explanations of basic notions essential for applications of the theory of fields as well as for frontier research in theoretical physics. One third of the book is devoted to classical fields. Each chapter contains exercises of varying degree of difficulty with hints or solutions, plus summaries and worked examples as useful. It aims to deliver a unique combination of classical and quantum field theory in one compact course.

  17. Classical and quantum electrodynamics and the B(3) field

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Myron W

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that classical electrodynamics is riddled with internal inconsistencies springing from the fact that it is a linear, Abelian theory in which the potentials are unphysical. This volume offers a self-consistent hypothesis which removes some of these problems, as well as builds a framework on which linear and nonlinear optics are treated as a non-Abelian gauge field theory based on the emergence of the fundamental magnetizing field of radiation, the B(3) field. Contents: Interaction of Electromagnetic Radiation with One Fermion; The Field Equations of Classical O (3) b Electrodyn

  18. Classical field configurations and infrared slavery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Mark S.

    1987-09-01

    The problem of determining the energy of two spinor particles interacting through massless-particle exchange is analyzed using the path-integral method. A form for the long-range interaction energy is obtained by analyzing an abridged vertex derived from the parent theory. This abridged vertex describes the radiation of zero-momentum particles by pointlike sources. A path-integral formalism for calculating the energy of the radiation field associated with this abridged vertex is developed and applications are made to determine the energy necessary for adiabatic separation of two sources in quantum electrodynamics and for an SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. The latter theory is shown to be consistent with confinement via infrared slavery.

  19. Lectures on classical and quantum theory of fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arodz, Henryk; Hadasz, Leszek [Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. Physics

    2010-07-01

    This textbook on classical and quantum theory of fields addresses graduate students starting to specialize in theoretical physics. It provides didactic introductions to the main topics in the theory of fields, while taking into account the contemporary view of the subject. The student will find concise explanations of basic notions essential for applications of the theory of fields as well as for frontier research in theoretical physics. One third of the book is devoted to classical fields. Each chapter contains exercises of varying degree of difficulty with hints or solutions, plus summaries and worked examples as useful. The textbook is based on lectures delivered to students of theoretical physics at Jagiellonian University. It aims to deliver a unique combination of classical and quantum field theory in one compact course. (orig.)

  20. Lectures on classical and quantum theory of fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, Henryk; Hadasz, Leszek

    2010-01-01

    This textbook on classical and quantum theory of fields addresses graduate students starting to specialize in theoretical physics. It provides didactic introductions to the main topics in the theory of fields, while taking into account the contemporary view of the subject. The student will find concise explanations of basic notions essential for applications of the theory of fields as well as for frontier research in theoretical physics. One third of the book is devoted to classical fields. Each chapter contains exercises of varying degree of difficulty with hints or solutions, plus summaries and worked examples as useful. The textbook is based on lectures delivered to students of theoretical physics at Jagiellonian University. It aims to deliver a unique combination of classical and quantum field theory in one compact course. (orig.)

  1. Lectures on Classical and Quantum Theory of Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Arodź, Henryk

    2010-01-01

    This textbook on classical and quantum theory of fields addresses graduate students starting to specialize in theoretical physics. It provides didactic introductions to the main topics in the theory of fields, while taking into account the contemporary view of the subject. The student will find concise explanations of basic notions essential for applications of the theory of fields as well as for frontier research in theoretical physics. One third of the book is devoted to classical fields. Each chapter contains exercises of varying degree of difficulty with hints or solutions, plus summaries and worked examples as useful. The textbook is based on lectures delivered to students of theoretical physics at Jagiellonian University. It aims to deliver a unique combination of classical and quantum field theory in one compact course.

  2. Colour Constancy Beyond the Classical Receptive Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarinia, Arash; Parraga, C Alejandro

    2017-09-18

    The problem of removing illuminant variations to preserve the colours of objects (colour constancy) has already been solved by the human brain using mechanisms that rely largely on centre-surround computations of local contrast. In this paper we adopt some of these biological solutions described by long known physiological findings into a simple, fully automatic, functional model (termed Adaptive Surround Modulation or ASM). In ASM, the size of a visual neuron's receptive field (RF) as well as the relationship with its surround varies according to the local contrast within the stimulus, which in turn determines the nature of the centre-surround normalisation of cortical neurons higher up in the processing chain. We modelled colour constancy by means of two overlapping asymmetric Gaussian kernels whose sizes are adapted based on the contrast of the surround pixels, resembling the change of RF size. We simulated the contrast-dependent surround modulation by weighting the contribution of each Gaussian according to the centre-surround contrast. In the end, we obtained an estimation of the illuminant from the set of the most activated RFs' outputs. Our results on three single-illuminant and one multi-illuminant benchmark datasets show that ASM is highly competitive against the state-of-the-art and it even outperforms learning-based algorithms in one case. Moreover, the robustness of our model is more tangible if we consider that our results were obtained using the same parameters for all datasets, that is, mimicking how the human visual system operates. These results might provide an insight on how dynamical adaptation mechanisms contribute to make object's colours appear constant to us.

  3. Dynamics of classical and quantum fields an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Setlur, Girish S

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of Classical and Quantum Fields: An Introduction focuses on dynamical fields in non-relativistic physics. Written by a physicist for physicists, the book is designed to help readers develop analytical skills related to classical and quantum fields at the non-relativistic level, and think about the concepts and theory through numerous problems. In-depth yet accessible, the book presents new and conventional topics in a self-contained manner that beginners would find useful. A partial list of topics covered includes: Geometrical meaning of Legendre transformation in classical mechanics Dynamical symmetries in the context of Noether's theorem The derivation of the stress energy tensor of the electromagnetic field, the expression for strain energy in elastic bodies, and the Navier Stokes equation Concepts of right and left movers in case of a Fermi gas explained Functional integration is interpreted as a limit of a sequence of ordinary integrations Path integrals for one and two quantum particles and for...

  4. Classical and quantum mechanics of non-abelian gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvidy, G.K.

    1984-01-01

    Classical and quantum mechanics of non-abelian gauge fields are investigated both with and without spontaneous symmetry breaking. The fundamental subsystem (FS) of Yang-Mills classical mechanics (YMCM) is considered. It is shown to be a Kolmogorov K-system, and hence to have strong statistical properties. Integrable systems are also found, to which in terms of KAM theory Yang-Mills-Higgs classical mechanics (YMHCM) is close. Quantum-mechanical properties of the YM system and their relation to the problem of confinement are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Scattering of classical and quantum particles by impulsive fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasin, Herbert; Aichelburg, Peter C.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the scattering of classical and quantum particles in impulsive backgrounds fields. These fields model short outbursts of radiation propagating with the speed of light. The singular nature of the problem will be accounted for by the use of Colombeau’s generalized function which however give rise to ambiguities. It is the aim of the paper to show that these ambiguities can be overcome by implementing additional physical conditions, which in the non-singular case would be satisfied automatically. As example we discuss the scattering of classical, Klein–Gordon and Dirac particles in impulsive electromagnetic fields.

  6. The radiation amplification effect in the scattering of a quasi-classical electron by an ion in an electromagnetic field of medium intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiv, A V; Roshchupkin, S P

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of amplification of electromagnetic radiation is theoretically studied in the scattering of a quasi-classical electron by an ion in a field of linearly polarized waves of medium intensity. An expression for the total cross-section (the gain coefficient) for the wide interval of values of the adiabaticity parameter is obtained. It is shown that the wave amplification takes place in the range of values of adiabaticity parameter greater than 2 and can be sufficiently large

  7. Generalized force in classical field theory. [Euler-Lagrange equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, J [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas

    1976-02-01

    The source strengths of the Euler-Lagrange equations, for a system of interacting fields, are heuristically interpreted as generalized forces. The canonical form of the energy-momentum tensor thus consistently appears, without recourse to space-time symmetry arguments. A concept of 'conservative' generalized force in classical field theory is also briefly discussed.

  8. Classical color fields as a dark matter candidate

    OpenAIRE

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The model of Dark Matter is proposed in which the Dark Matter is a classical color field. The color fields are invisible as they may interact with colored elementary particles like 't Hooft - Polyakov monopole only. The comparison with the Universal Rotation Curve is carried out.

  9. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Manti, S. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-02-21

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  10. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Manti, S.

    2013-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  11. An application of information theory to stochastic classical gravitational fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J.; Angulo, J. C.; Angulo, J. M.

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study lies on the incorporation of the concepts developed in the Information Theory (entropy, complexity, etc.) with the aim of quantifying the variation of the uncertainty associated with a stochastic physical system resident in a spatiotemporal region. As an example of application, a relativistic classical gravitational field has been considered, with a stochastic behavior resulting from the effect induced by one or several external perturbation sources. One of the key concepts of the study is the covariance kernel between two points within the chosen region. Using this concept and the appropriate criteria, a methodology is proposed to evaluate the change of uncertainty at a given spatiotemporal point, based on available information and efficiently applying the diverse methods that Information Theory provides. For illustration, a stochastic version of the Einstein equation with an added Gaussian Langevin term is analyzed.

  12. A quantum analogy to the classical gravitomagnetic clock effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, S. B.

    2018-06-01

    We present an approximation to the solution of Dirac equation in Schwarzschild field found through the use of Foldy-Wouthuysen Hamiltonian. We solve the equation for the positive energy states and found the frequencies by which the states oscillate. Difference of the periods of oscillation of the two states with two different total angular momentum quantum number j has an analogical form of the classical clock effect found in general relativity. But unlike the term that appears as clock effect in classical physics, here the term is quantized. Thus, we find a quantum analogue of the classical gravitomagnetic clock effect.

  13. Confusion-limited galaxy fields. II. Classical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokshi, A.; Wright, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Chokshi and Wright presented a detailed model for simulating angular distribution of galaxy images in fields that extended to very high redshifts. Standard tools are used to analyze these simulated galaxy fields for the Omega(O) = 0 and the Omega(O) = 1 cases in order to test the discriminatory power of these tools. Classical number-magnitude diagrams and surface brightness-color-color diagrams are employed to study crowded galaxy fields. An attempt is made to separate the effects due to stellar evolution in galaxies from those due to the space time geometry. The results show that this discrimination is maximized at near-infrared wavelengths where the stellar photospheres are still visible but stellar evolution effects are less severe than those observed at optical wavelenghts. Rapid evolution of the stars on the asymptotic giant branch is easily recognized in the simulated data for both cosmologies and serves to discriminate between the two extreme values of Omega(O). Measurements of total magnitudes of individual galaxies are not essential for studying light distribution in galaxies as a function of redshift. Calculations for the extragalactic background radiation are carried out using the simulated data, and compared to integrals over the evolutionary models used. 29 refs

  14. Second quantization of classical nonlinear relativistic field theory. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, T.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of a relativistic interacting local quantum field is given in two steps: first the classical nonlinear relativistic field theory is written down in terms of Poisson brackets, with initial conditions as canonical variables: next a representation of Poisson bracket Lie algebra by means of linear operators in the topological vector space is given and an explicit form of a local interacting relativistic quantum field PHI is obtained. (orig./BJ) [de

  15. Classically integrable boundary conditions for affine Toda field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowcock, P.; Corrigan, E.; Dorey, P.E.; Rietdijk, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary conditions compatible with classical integrability are studied both directly, using an approach based on the explicit construction of conserved quantities, and indirectly by first developing a generalisation of the Lax pair idea. The latter approach is closer to the spirit of earlier work by Sklyanin and yields a complete set of conjectures for permissible boundary conditions for any affine Toda field theory. (orig.)

  16. Constrained variational calculus for higher order classical field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Cedric M; De Leon, Manuel; De Diego, David MartIn, E-mail: cedricmc@icmat.e, E-mail: mdeleon@icmat.e, E-mail: david.martin@icmat.e [Instituto de Ciencias Matematicas, CSIC-UAM-UC3M-UCM, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-11-12

    We develop an intrinsic geometrical setting for higher order constrained field theories. As a main tool we use an appropriate generalization of the classical Skinner-Rusk formalism. Some examples of applications are studied, in particular to the geometrical description of optimal control theory for partial differential equations.

  17. Constrained variational calculus for higher order classical field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Cedric M; De Leon, Manuel; De Diego, David MartIn

    2010-01-01

    We develop an intrinsic geometrical setting for higher order constrained field theories. As a main tool we use an appropriate generalization of the classical Skinner-Rusk formalism. Some examples of applications are studied, in particular to the geometrical description of optimal control theory for partial differential equations.

  18. Anyons as spin particles: from classical mechanics to field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    1995-01-01

    (2+1)-dimensional relativistic fractional spin particles are considered within the framework of the group-theoretical approach to anyons starting from the level of classical mechanics and concluding by the construction of the minimal set of linear differential field equations.

  19. Classical electromagnetic field theory in the presence of magnetic sources

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Li, Kang; Naón, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Using two new well defined 4-dimensional potential vectors, we formulate the classical Maxwell's field theory in a form which has manifest Lorentz covariance and SO(2) duality symmetry in the presence of magnetic sources. We set up a consistent Lagrangian for the theory. Then from the action principle we get both Maxwell's equation and the equation of motion of a dyon moving in the electro-magnetic field.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Quantum field theory has evolved from its early beginnings as a tool for understanding the interaction of light with matter into a rather formidable technical paradigm, one that has successfully provided the mathematical underpinnings of all non-gravitational interactions. Over the eight decades since it was first contemplated the methods have become increasingly more streamlined and sophisticated, yielding new insights into our understanding of the subatomic world and our abilities to make clear and precise predictions. Some of the more elegant methods have to do with non-perturbative and semiclassical approaches to the subject. The chief players here are solitons, instantons, and anomalies. Over the past three decades there has been a steady rise in our understanding of these objects and of our ability to calculate their effects and implications for the rest of quantum field theory. This book is a welcome contribution to this subject. In 12 chapters it provides a clear synthesis of the key developments in these subjects at a level accessible to graduate students that have had an introductory course to quantum field theory. In the author's own words it provides both 'a survey and an overview of this field'. The first half of the book concentrates on solitons--kinks, vortices, and magnetic monopoles--and their implications for the subject. The reader is led first through the simplest models in one spatial dimension, into more sophisticated cases that required more advanced topological methods. The author does quite a nice job of introducing the various concepts as required, and beginning students should be able to get a good grasp of the subject directly from the text without having to first go through the primary literature. The middle part of the book deals with the implications of these solitons for both cosmology and for duality. While the cosmological discussion is quite nice, the discussion on BPS solitons, supersymmetry and duality is rather condensed. It is

  1. Quantized Dirac field interacting with a classical Maxwell field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolsrud, M.

    1987-10-01

    The S operator for the quantized and the s matrix for the unquantized Dirac field, both fields interacting with an unquantized Maxwell field, are shown to be related in the following way: S=exp(-ic†kc) and s=exp(-ik). Here c is the column matrix of the particle operators, and k is a Hermitian matrix. With splitting of c into an electron and a positron part, a corresponding factorization of S is performed. Exact expressions for the probability amplitude for various electron and/or positron processes are then obtained

  2. Remarks on the classical limit of quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckmann, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in computing quantum mechanical corrections to solutions of classical field equations. In this note, proceeding in the opposite way, theorems about the classical limit of relativistic quantum field models are summarized. These results are a byproduct of the so called 'constructive' approach to quantum field theory. Section 1 deals with generalities; in Section 2 the situation where no phase transitions occur is discussed in the limit h→0; and in Section 3 one result in the case where such a transition occurs is reformulated (Glimm et al). The validity of the loop expansion is discussed. It seems however that the tools to show the rigorous validity of soliton calculations are not yet prepared. (Auth.)

  3. Classical origins of stabilization in circularly polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chism, Will; Choi, Dae-Il; Reichl, L. E.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of a two-dimensional model atom with an intense, high-frequency circularly polarized laser pulse. As the laser intensity is increased, the ionization rate initially increases, then decreases dramatically, with the electron wave function developing an asymmetric ring form which rotates with the electric field. We provide evidence that this wave form is due to localization of the electron onto nonlinear classical structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. Local gauge invariant Lagrangeans in classical field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigore, D.R.

    1982-07-01

    We investigate the most general local gauge invariant Lagrangean in the framework of classical field theory. We rederive esentially Utiyama's result with a slight generalization. Our proof makes clear the importance of the so called current conditions, i.e. the requirement that the Noether currents are different from zero. This condition is of importance both in the general motivation for the introduction of the Yang-Mills fields and for the actual proof. Some comments are made about the basic mathematical structure of the problem - the gauge group. (author)

  5. Motion of small bodies in classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.

    2010-01-01

    I show how prior work with R. Wald on geodesic motion in general relativity can be generalized to classical field theories of a metric and other tensor fields on four-dimensional spacetime that (1) are second-order and (2) follow from a diffeomorphism-covariant Lagrangian. The approach is to consider a one-parameter-family of solutions to the field equations satisfying certain assumptions designed to reflect the existence of a body whose size, mass, and various charges are simultaneously scaled to zero. (That such solutions exist places a further restriction on the class of theories to which our results apply.) Assumptions are made only on the spacetime region outside of the body, so that the results apply independent of the body's composition (and, e.g., black holes are allowed). The worldline 'left behind' by the shrinking, disappearing body is interpreted as its lowest-order motion. An equation for this worldline follows from the 'Bianchi identity' for the theory, without use of any properties of the field equations beyond their being second-order. The form of the force law for a theory therefore depends only on the ranks of its various tensor fields; the detailed properties of the field equations are relevant only for determining the charges for a particular body (which are the ''monopoles'' of its exterior fields in a suitable limiting sense). I explicitly derive the force law (and mass-evolution law) in the case of scalar and vector fields, and give the recipe in the higher-rank case. Note that the vector force law is quite complicated, simplifying to the Lorentz force law only in the presence of the Maxwell gauge symmetry. Example applications of the results are the motion of 'chameleon' bodies beyond the Newtonian limit, and the motion of bodies in (classical) non-Abelian gauge theory. I also make some comments on the role that scaling plays in the appearance of universality in the motion of bodies.

  6. Classical transport in field reversed mirrors: reactor implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.P.; Condit, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Assuming that the field-reversed mirror (or the closely related spheromak) turns out to be stable, the next crucial issue is transport of particles and heat. Of particular concern is the field null on axis (the X-point), which at first glance seems to allow particles to flow out unhindered. We have evaluated the classical diffusion coefficients for particles and heat in field-reversed mirrors, with particular reference to a class of Hill's vortex models. Two fairly surprising results emerge from this study. First, the diffusion-driven flow of particles and heat is finite at the X-points. This may be traced to the geometrical constraint that the current (and hence the ion-electron drag force, which causes cross-field transport) must vanish on axis. This conclusion holds for any transport model. Second, the classical diffusion coefficient D(psi), which governs both particle and heat flux, is finite on the separatrix. Indeed, in a wide class of Hill's vortex equilibria (spherical, oblate, or prolate) D(psi) is essentially independent of psi (except for the usual factor of n

  7. Classical and quantum mechanical studies of HF in an intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardi, P.S.; Gray, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of an HF molecule in an intense laser field is investigated with both classical trajectories and quantum dynamics. Vibration-rotation transition probabilities and energy absorption as a function of laser pulse time are calculated for the diatomic initially in its ground state. For comparison, results are also reported for a model nonrotating HF molecule. It is found that classical mechanics does not predict the correct time behavior of the system, nor does it predict the correct rotational state distributions. Classical mechanics does, however, predict pulse time averaged quantities to be the correct order of magnitude. There is also a correct general trend of increased multiphoton excitation for laser frequencies red-shifted from the one-photon resonance, although multiphoton resonance peaks are not observed in the classical results and far too little multiphoton excitation is predicted. The effect of laser phase has also been investigated and shown to be relatively unimportant in both the classical and quantum dynamics

  8. Prequantum classical statistical field theory: background field as a source of everything?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    Prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT) is a new attempt to consider quantum mechanics (QM) as an emergent phenomenon, cf. with De Broglie's 'double solution' approach, Bohmian mechanics, stochastic electrodynamics (SED), Nelson's stochastic QM and its generalization by Davidson, 't Hooft's models and their development by Elze. PCSFT is a comeback to a purely wave viewpoint on QM, cf. with early Schrodinger. There is no quantum particles at all, only waves. In particular, photons are simply wave-pulses of the classical electromagnetic field, cf. SED. Moreover, even massive particles are special 'prequantum fields': the electron field, the neutron field, and so on. PCSFT claims that (sooner or later) people will be able to measure components of these fields: components of the 'photonic field' (the classical electromagnetic field of low intensity), electronic field, neutronic field, and so on. At the moment we are able to produce quantum correlations as correlations of classical Gaussian random fields. In this paper we are interested in mathematical and physical reasons of usage of Gaussian fields. We consider prequantum signals (corresponding to quantum systems) as composed of a huge number of wave-pulses (on very fine prequantum time scale). We speculate that the prequantum background field (the field of 'vacuum fluctuations') might play the role of a source of such pulses, i.e., the source of everything.

  9. Experimental Bell violations with classical, non-entangled optical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, J.; Sánchez, P.; Barberena, D.; Yugra, Y.; Caballero, R.; De Zela, F.

    2018-02-01

    We report experiments in which the Bell parameter S that enters the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality: | S| ≤slant 2, attains values | S| > 2. In our experiments, we used two spatially separated optical beams, the electric fields of which were correlated to one another. The amount of correlation was quantified by the spectral degree of coherence η (α ,β ). This quantity measures the correlation between fields that exist at two distant locations and whose respective polarizations are given in terms of angles α and β, which can be set independently from one another. Such a correlation qualifies for the construction of the Bell parameter S. By changing the amount of field correlation, we could cover a range that goes from | S| 2. Our experimental findings should provide useful material for the ongoing, theoretical discussions about the quantum-classical border.

  10. On the mathematical theory of classical fields and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Klainerman, S

    1993-01-01

    From the perspective of an analyst, like myself, the General Theory of Relativity provides an extrordinary rich and vastly virgin territory. It is the aim of my lecture to provide, first, an account of those aspects of the theory which attract me most and second a perspective of what has been accomplished so far in that respect. In trying to state our main objectives it helps to view General Relativity in the broader context of Classical Field Theory. EinsteiniVacuum equations, or shortly E—V, is already sufficiently complicated. I will thus restrict my attention to them.

  11. On classical solutions of SU(3) gauge field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    1975-01-01

    Static classical solutions of SU(3) gauge field equations are studied. The roles of the O(3) subgroup and of the quadrupole generators are discussed systematically. The general form thus obtained leads, through-out, to a high degree of symmetry in the results. This brings in some simplifying features. An octet of scalar mesons is finally added. Certain classes of exact solutions are given that are singular at the origin. A generalized gauge condition is pointed out. The relation of the general form to known particular cases is discussed [fr

  12. Classical understanding of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yeong Deok [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Woosuk University, Wanju, Cheonbuk, 565-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Taeseung, E-mail: tschoi@swu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Food System, College of Natural Science, Seoul Women' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computational Sciences, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-012 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-25

    Recently, interesting observations on electron vortex beams have been made. We propose a classical model that shows vortex-like motion due to suitably-synchronized motion of each electron's cyclotron motion in a uniform magnetic field. It is shown that some basic features of electron vortex beams in a uniform magnetic field, such as azimuthal currents, the relation between energy and kinetic angular momentum, and the parallel-axis theorem are understandable by using this classical model. We also show that the time-dependence of kinetic angular momentum of electron vortex beams could be understood as an effect of a specific nonuniform distribution of classical electrons. - Highlights: • A classical model for electron vortex beams is proposed. • The basic features of azimuthal currents could be understood by using this model. • The kinetic angular momentum of electron vortex beams is intuitively understandable.

  13. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-11

    Nov 11, 2013 ... Polanyi's classic paper, co-authored by Henry Eyring, reproduced in this ... spatial conf guration of the atoms in terms of the energy function of the diatomic .... The present communication deals with the construction of such .... These three contributions are complemented by a fourth term if one takes into.

  14. Enhancing Quantum Discord in Cavity QED by Applying Classical Driving Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Yi; Xu Jing-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the quantum discord dynamics in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system, which consists of two noninteracting two-level atoms driven by independent optical fields and classical fields, and find that the quantum discord vanishes only asymptotically although entanglement disappears suddenly during the time evolution in the absence of classical fields. It is shown that the amount of quantum discord can be increased by adjusting the classical driving fields because the increasing degree of the amount of quantum mutual information is greater than classical correlation by applying the classical driving fields. Finally, the influence of the classical driving field on the fidelity of the system is also examined. (general)

  15. Quasiperiodical orbits in the scalar classical lambdaphi4 field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, T.I.; Kudryavtsev, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    New numerical and theoretical results of resonance kink-antikink (Kanti K) interactions in the classical one-dimentional space Higgs theory are presented. Earlier studies of these interactions revealed nine initial relative velocity-intervals with two-bounce Kanti K-collisions followed by the escape of kinks to infinite separations, the breathing solution was formed outside those intervals. Two-bounce Kanti K-interactions with the number of small oscillations between Kanti K-bounces up to 35 in the initial kink velocity interval 0.18 <= Vsub(infinite) <= 0.26 were found. Several examples for n-bounces Kanti K-interaction (n <= 6) are also found. The observed phenomenon can be explaned by the existence of quasi-two-periodical solutions of the nonlinear wave equation. The simple Hamiltonian with two degrees of freedom is studied. This model supplies quantitative descrtiptions of all numerical results for the field theory considered above. The considered phenomenon may be called ''autoquantization'' of a nonlinear classical scalar selfinteracting field

  16. Geometry of Lagrangian first-order classical field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria-Enriquez, A.; Munoz-Lecanda, M.C.; Roman-Roy, N.

    1996-01-01

    We construct a lagrangian geometric formulation for first-order field theories using the canonical structures of first-order jet bundles, which are taken as the phase spaces of the systems in consideration. First of all, we construct all the geometric structures associated with a first-order jet bundle and, using them, we develop the lagrangian formalism, defining the canonical forms associated with a lagrangian density and the density of lagrangian energy, obtaining the Euler-Lagrange equations in two equivalent ways: as the result of a variational problem and developing the jet field formalism (which is a formulation more similar to the case of mechanical systems). A statement and proof of Noether's theorem is also given, using the latter formalism. Finally, some classical examples are briefly studied. (orig.)

  17. Geometry of Lagrangian first-order classical field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeverria-Enriquez, A. [Univ. Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Telematica; Munoz-Lecanda, M.C. [Univ. Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Telematica; Roman-Roy, N. [Univ. Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Telematica

    1996-10-01

    We construct a lagrangian geometric formulation for first-order field theories using the canonical structures of first-order jet bundles, which are taken as the phase spaces of the systems in consideration. First of all, we construct all the geometric structures associated with a first-order jet bundle and, using them, we develop the lagrangian formalism, defining the canonical forms associated with a lagrangian density and the density of lagrangian energy, obtaining the Euler-Lagrange equations in two equivalent ways: as the result of a variational problem and developing the jet field formalism (which is a formulation more similar to the case of mechanical systems). A statement and proof of Noether`s theorem is also given, using the latter formalism. Finally, some classical examples are briefly studied. (orig.)

  18. Principles of physics from quantum field theory to classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Ni

    2014-01-01

    This book starts from a set of common basic principles to establish the formalisms in all areas of fundamental physics, including quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, general relativity, electromagnetic field, and classical mechanics. Instead of the traditional pedagogic way, the author arranges the subjects and formalisms in a logical-sequential way, i.e. all the formulas are derived from the formulas before them. The formalisms are also kept self-contained. Most of the required mathematical tools are also given in the appendices. Although this book covers all the disciplines of fundamental physics, the book is concise and can be treated as an integrated entity. This is consistent with the aphorism that simplicity is beauty, unification is beauty, and thus physics is beauty. The book may be used as an advanced textbook by graduate students. It is also suitable for physicists who wish to have an overview of fundamental physics. Readership: This is an advanced gradua...

  19. Critical behavior in a random field classical Heisenberg model for amorphous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Douglas F. de; Alves, Sandro Roberto L.; Arruda, Alberto S. de

    2005-01-01

    By using the differential operator technique and the effective field theory scheme, the critical behavior of amorphous classical Heisenberg ferromagnet of spin-1/2 in a random field is studied. The phase diagram in the T-H and T-α planes on a simple cubic lattice for a cluster with two spins is obtained. Tricritical points, reentrant phenomena and influence of the random field and amorphization on the transition temperature are discussed

  20. Rovibrational dynamics of the RbCs molecule in static electric fields. Classical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaiz, Pedro F.; Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logroño (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logroño (Spain)

    2012-04-02

    We study the classical dynamics of the RbCs molecule in the presence of a static electric field. Under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, we perform a rovibrational investigation which includes the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. The stability of the equilibrium points and the phase space structure of the system are explored in detail. We find that, for strong electric fields or for energies close to the dissociation threshold, the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics. -- Highlights: ► We study the classical rovibrational dynamics of the alkali polar dimer RbCs. ► In the model we consider the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. ► The potential energy surface is studied depending on the electric field strength. ► Using surfaces of section we study the phase space structure. ► We find that the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics.

  1. Rovibrational dynamics of the RbCs molecule in static electric fields. Classical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaiz, Pedro F.; Iñarrea, Manuel; Salas, J. Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We study the classical dynamics of the RbCs molecule in the presence of a static electric field. Under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, we perform a rovibrational investigation which includes the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. The stability of the equilibrium points and the phase space structure of the system are explored in detail. We find that, for strong electric fields or for energies close to the dissociation threshold, the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics. -- Highlights: ► We study the classical rovibrational dynamics of the alkali polar dimer RbCs. ► In the model we consider the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. ► The potential energy surface is studied depending on the electric field strength. ► Using surfaces of section we study the phase space structure. ► We find that the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics.

  2. Gauge-fields and integrated quantum-classical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    Physical situations in which quantum systems communicate continuously to their classically described environment are not covered by contemporary quantum theory, which requires a temporary separation of quantum degrees of freedom from classical ones. A generalization would be needed to cover these situations. An incomplete proposal is advanced for combining the quantum and classical degrees of freedom into a unified objective description. It is based on the use of certain quantum-classical structures of light that arise from gauge invariance to coordinate the quantum and classical degrees of freedom. Also discussed is the question of where experimenters should look to find phenomena pertaining to the quantum-classical connection. 17 refs

  3. Statistical metastability of a classical ideal gas in the Schwarzschild gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaina, A.B.; Zaslavskii, O.B.

    1990-01-01

    A classical ideal gas in the Schwarzschild gravitational field is considered. The lifetime of a gas influenced by thermal fluctuations has been calculated. It is shown that thermal effects can lead to the electric charging of a black hole in a plasma containing particles with different masses. (author)

  4. On the construction of classical superstring field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopka, Sebastian Johann Hermann

    2016-07-01

    This thesis describes the construction of classical superstring field theories based on the small Hilbert space. First we describe the traditional construction of perturbative superstring theory as an integral over the supermoduli space of type II world sheets. The geometry of supermoduli space dictates many algebraic properties of the string field theory action. In particular it allows for an algebraisation of the construction problem for classical superstring field theories in terms of homotopy algebras. Next, we solve the construction problem for open superstrings based on Witten's star product. The construction is recursive and involves a choice of homotopy operator for the zero mode of the η-ghost. It turns out that the solution can be extended to the Neveu-Schwarz subsectors of all superstring field theories. The recursive construction involves a hierarchy of string products at various picture deficits. The construction is not entirely natural, but it is argued that different choices give rise to solutions related by a field redefinition. Due to the presence of odd gluing parameters for Ramond states the extension to full superstring field theory is non-trivial. Instead, we construct gauge-invariant equations of motion for all superstring field theories. The realisation of spacetime supersymmetry in the open string sector is highly non-trivial and is described explicitly for the solution based on Witten's star product. After a field redefinition the non-polynomial equations of motion and the small Hilbert space constraint become polynomial. This polynomial system is shown to be supersymmetric. Quite interestingly, the supersymmetry algebra closes only up to gauge transformations. This indicates that only the physical phase space realizes N=1 supersymmetry. Apart from the algebraic constraints dictated by the geometry of supermoduli space the equations of motion or action should reproduce the traditional string S-matrix. The S-matrix of a field

  5. Escaping the crunch: Gravitational effects in classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Yang, I-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    During eternal inflation, a landscape of vacua can be populated by the nucleation of bubbles. These bubbles inevitably collide, and collisions sometimes displace the field into a new minimum in a process known as a classical transition. In this paper, we examine some new features of classical transitions that arise when gravitational effects are included. Using the junction condition formalism, we study the conditions for energy conservation in detail, and solve explicitly for the types of allowed classical transition geometries. We show that the repulsive nature of domain walls, and the de Sitter expansion associated with a positive energy minimum, can allow for classical transitions to vacua of higher energy than that of the colliding bubbles. Transitions can be made out of negative or zero energy (terminal) vacua to a de Sitter phase, restarting eternal inflation, and populating new vacua. However, the classical transition cannot produce vacua with energy higher than the original parent vacuum, which agrees with previous results on the construction of pockets of false vacuum. We briefly comment on the possible implications of these results for various measure proposals in eternal inflation.

  6. Classical effective Hamiltonians, Wigner functions, and the sign problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    In the functional-integral technique an auxiliary field, coupled to appropriate operators such as spins, linearizes the interaction term in a quantum many-body system. The partition function is then averaged over this time-dependent stochastic field. Quantum Monte Carlo methods evaluate this integral numerically, but suffer from the sign (or phase) problem: the integrand may not be positive definite (or not real). It is shown that, in certain cases that include the many-band Hubbard model and the Heisenberg model, the sign problem is inevitable on fundamental grounds. Here, Monte Carlo simulations generate a distribution of incompatible operators---a Wigner function---from which expectation values and correlation functions are to be calculated; in general no positive-definite distribution of this form exists. The distribution of time-averaged auxiliary fields is the convolution of this operator distribution with a Gaussian of variance proportional to temperature, and is interpreted as a Boltzmann distribution exp(-βV eff ) in classical configuration space. At high temperatures and large degeneracies this classical effective Hamiltonian V eff tends to the static approximation as a classical limit. In the low-temperature limit the field distribution becomes a Wigner function, the sign problem occurs, and V eff is complex. Interpretations of the distributions, and a criterion for their positivity, are discussed. The theory is illustrated by an exact evaluation of the Wigner function for spin s and the effective classical Hamiltonian for the spin-1/2 van der Waals model. The field distribution can be negative here, more noticeably if the number of spins is odd

  7. Recurrence spectroscopy of atoms in electric fields: Failure of classical scaling laws near bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.A.; Robicheaux, F.

    1998-01-01

    The photoabsorption spectra of atoms in a static external electric field shows modulations from recurrences: electron waves that go out from and return to the vicinity of the atomic core. Closed-orbit theory predicts the amplitudes and phases of these modulations in terms of closed classical orbits. A classical scaling law relates the properties of a closed orbit at one energy and field strength to its properties at another energy and field strength at fixed scaled energy ε=EF -1/2 . The scaling law states that the recurrence strength of orbits along the electric field axis scale as F 1/4 . We show how this law fails near bifurcations when the effective Planck constant ℎ≡ℎF 1/4 increases with increasing field at fixed ε. The recurrences of orbits away from the axis scale as F 1/8 in accordance with the classical prediction. These deviations from the classical scaling law are important in interpreting the recurrence spectra of atoms in current experiments. This leads to an extension of the uniform approximation developed by Gao and Delos [Phys. Rev. A 56, 356 (1997)] to complex momenta. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  8. Classical nucleation theory in the phase-field crystal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jreidini, Paul; Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2018-04-01

    A full understanding of polycrystalline materials requires studying the process of nucleation, a thermally activated phase transition that typically occurs at atomistic scales. The numerical modeling of this process is problematic for traditional numerical techniques: commonly used phase-field methods' resolution does not extend to the atomic scales at which nucleation takes places, while atomistic methods such as molecular dynamics are incapable of scaling to the mesoscale regime where late-stage growth and structure formation takes place following earlier nucleation. Consequently, it is of interest to examine nucleation in the more recently proposed phase-field crystal (PFC) model, which attempts to bridge the atomic and mesoscale regimes in microstructure simulations. In this work, we numerically calculate homogeneous liquid-to-solid nucleation rates and incubation times in the simplest version of the PFC model, for various parameter choices. We show that the model naturally exhibits qualitative agreement with the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT) despite a lack of some explicit atomistic features presumed in CNT. We also examine the early appearance of lattice structure in nucleating grains, finding disagreement with some basic assumptions of CNT. We then argue that a quantitatively correct nucleation theory for the PFC model would require extending CNT to a multivariable theory.

  9. Classical nucleation theory in the phase-field crystal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jreidini, Paul; Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2018-04-01

    A full understanding of polycrystalline materials requires studying the process of nucleation, a thermally activated phase transition that typically occurs at atomistic scales. The numerical modeling of this process is problematic for traditional numerical techniques: commonly used phase-field methods' resolution does not extend to the atomic scales at which nucleation takes places, while atomistic methods such as molecular dynamics are incapable of scaling to the mesoscale regime where late-stage growth and structure formation takes place following earlier nucleation. Consequently, it is of interest to examine nucleation in the more recently proposed phase-field crystal (PFC) model, which attempts to bridge the atomic and mesoscale regimes in microstructure simulations. In this work, we numerically calculate homogeneous liquid-to-solid nucleation rates and incubation times in the simplest version of the PFC model, for various parameter choices. We show that the model naturally exhibits qualitative agreement with the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT) despite a lack of some explicit atomistic features presumed in CNT. We also examine the early appearance of lattice structure in nucleating grains, finding disagreement with some basic assumptions of CNT. We then argue that a quantitatively correct nucleation theory for the PFC model would require extending CNT to a multivariable theory.

  10. On covariant Poisson brackets in classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forger, Michael; Salles, Mário O.

    2015-01-01

    How to give a natural geometric definition of a covariant Poisson bracket in classical field theory has for a long time been an open problem—as testified by the extensive literature on “multisymplectic Poisson brackets,” together with the fact that all these proposals suffer from serious defects. On the other hand, the functional approach does provide a good candidate which has come to be known as the Peierls–De Witt bracket and whose construction in a geometrical setting is now well understood. Here, we show how the basic “multisymplectic Poisson bracket” already proposed in the 1970s can be derived from the Peierls–De Witt bracket, applied to a special class of functionals. This relation allows to trace back most (if not all) of the problems encountered in the past to ambiguities (the relation between differential forms on multiphase space and the functionals they define is not one-to-one) and also to the fact that this class of functionals does not form a Poisson subalgebra

  11. On covariant Poisson brackets in classical field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forger, Michael [Instituto de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66281, BR–05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salles, Mário O. [Instituto de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66281, BR–05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário – Lagoa Nova, BR–59078-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    How to give a natural geometric definition of a covariant Poisson bracket in classical field theory has for a long time been an open problem—as testified by the extensive literature on “multisymplectic Poisson brackets,” together with the fact that all these proposals suffer from serious defects. On the other hand, the functional approach does provide a good candidate which has come to be known as the Peierls–De Witt bracket and whose construction in a geometrical setting is now well understood. Here, we show how the basic “multisymplectic Poisson bracket” already proposed in the 1970s can be derived from the Peierls–De Witt bracket, applied to a special class of functionals. This relation allows to trace back most (if not all) of the problems encountered in the past to ambiguities (the relation between differential forms on multiphase space and the functionals they define is not one-to-one) and also to the fact that this class of functionals does not form a Poisson subalgebra.

  12. Classical particles with spin in electromagnetic and gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, R.M. de.

    1977-02-01

    Following a review of several problems connected with classical particles with intrinsic angular momentum are reproduced the Frenkel equations (with the condition S sup(μν)U sub(ν)=0) by means of a holonomic variational principle, and have related them to Bargann, Michel and Tededgie equations. The treatment is then generalized to the case in wich S sup(μν)U sub(ν)=0 and the resulting equation coincide in the linearized limit with those obtained by Suttorp and de Groot. Also, by using variational principles, the generalizations to Frenkel equations are obtained, as well as to those of Suttorp and de Groot when electromagnetic and gravitational interactions are considered. Finally, those equations are analysed according to a scheme proposed by Oliveira and Tiommo where the gravitational interactions are described by gravielectric and gravimagnetic fields. The analogies in these equations of motion between the gravitational and eletromagnetic interactions, in the case in which the particle has a giromagnetic factor g=1, are shown. The last results complete a previous study by wald. (Author) [pt

  13. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    gravitational acceleration, the physical properties of air and water, and so forth. ... system, I will consider aspects of the physical world and ask what organisms, ..... speed should have little or no direct effect on water loss by transpiration.

  14. Brane classical and quantum cosmology from an effective action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seahra, Sanjeev S.; Sepangi, H.R.; Ponce de Leon, J.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the Randall-Sundrum braneworld scenario, we discuss the classical and quantum dynamics of a (d+1)-dimensional boundary wall between a pair of (d+2)-dimensional topological Schwarzschild-AdS black holes. We assume there are quite general--but not completely arbitrary--matter fields living on the boundary 'brane universe', and that its geometry is that of a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model. The effective action governing the model in the minisuperspace approximation is derived. We find that the presence of black hole horizons in the bulk gives rise to a complex action for certain classically allowed brane configurations, but that the imaginary contribution plays no role in the equations of motion. Classical and instanton brane trajectories are examined in general and for special cases, and we find a subset of configuration space that is not allowed at the classical or semiclassical level; this subset corresponds to spacelike branes carrying tachyonic matter. The Hamiltonization and Dirac quantization of the model is then performed for the general case; the latter involves the manipulation of the Hamiltonian constraint before it is transformed into an operator that annihilates physical state vectors. The ensuing covariant Wheeler-DeWitt equation is examined at the semiclassical level, and we consider the possible localization of the brane universe's wave function away from the cosmological singularity. This is easier to achieve for branes with low density and/or spherical spatial sections

  15. Brane classical and quantum cosmology from an effective action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seahra, Sanjeev S.; Sepangi, H. R.; Ponce de Leon, J.

    2003-09-01

    Motivated by the Randall-Sundrum braneworld scenario, we discuss the classical and quantum dynamics of a (d+1)-dimensional boundary wall between a pair of (d+2)-dimensional topological Schwarzschild-AdS black holes. We assume there are quite general—but not completely arbitrary—matter fields living on the boundary “brane universe,” and that its geometry is that of a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model. The effective action governing the model in the minisuperspace approximation is derived. We find that the presence of black hole horizons in the bulk gives rise to a complex action for certain classically allowed brane configurations, but that the imaginary contribution plays no role in the equations of motion. Classical and instanton brane trajectories are examined in general and for special cases, and we find a subset of configuration space that is not allowed at the classical or semiclassical level; this subset corresponds to spacelike branes carrying tachyonic matter. The Hamiltonization and Dirac quantization of the model is then performed for the general case; the latter involves the manipulation of the Hamiltonian constraint before it is transformed into an operator that annihilates physical state vectors. The ensuing covariant Wheeler-DeWitt equation is examined at the semiclassical level, and we consider the possible localization of the brane universe’s wave function away from the cosmological singularity. This is easier to achieve for branes with low density and/or spherical spatial sections.

  16. Phase-space representation of non-classical behaviour of scalar wave-fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas-Cardona, Gustavo; Castaneda, Roman; Vinck-Posada, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of optical fields by using radiant and virtual point sources for the spatial coherence wavelets in the phase-space representation evidences some effects, conventionally attributed to non-classical correlations of light, although such type of correlations are not explicitly included in the model. Specifically, a light state is produced that has similar morphology to the Wigner Distribution Function of the well-known quantum Schroedinger cat and squeezed states.

  17. Non-stationary classical diffusion in field - reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, R.A.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Mania, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma decay in field-reversed configurations (FRC) is described using resistive MHD equations. Assuming non-stationariety together with uniform but time dependent plasma temperature and neglecting inertial effects in the momentum balance equation, it is possible to show that the functional dependence of the plasma pressure with the poloidal magnetic flux remains fixed during diffusion. This allows to describe FRC evolution as a continuous sequence of plasma equilibria satisfying proper boundary conditions. The method is applied to pressure profiles linear with the poloidal magnetic flux obtaining the evolution of the flux, the number of confined particles and the size of the plasma boundary. (author) [pt

  18. Quantum averaging and resonances: two-level atom in a one-mode classical laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amniat-Talab

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available   We use a nonperturbative method based on quantum averaging and an adapted from of resonant transformations to treat the resonances of the Hamiltonian of a two-level atom interacting with a one-mode classical field in Floquet formalism. We illustrate this method by extraction of effective Hamiltonians of the system in two regimes of weak and strong coupling. The results obtained in the strong-coupling regime, are valid in the whole range of the coupling constant for the one-photon zero-field resonance.

  19. Force-Field Functor Theory: Classical Force-Fields which Reproduce Equilibrium Quantum Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eBabbush

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Feynman and Hibbs were the first to variationally determine an effective potential whose associated classical canonical ensemble approximates the exact quantum partition function. We examine the existence of a map between the local potential and an effective classical potential which matches the exact quantum equilibrium density and partition function. The usefulness of such a mapping rests in its ability to readily improve Born-Oppenheimer potentials for use with classical sampling. We show that such a map is unique and must exist. To explore the feasibility of using this result to improve classical molecular mechanics, we numerically produce a map from a library of randomly generated one-dimensional potential/effective potential pairs then evaluate its performance on independent test problems. We also apply the map to simulate liquid para-hydrogen, finding that the resulting radial pair distribution functions agree well with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The surprising accessibility and transferability of the technique suggest a quantitative route to adapting Born-Oppenheimer potentials, with a motivation similar in spirit to the powerful ideas and approximations of density functional theory.

  20. A course in mathematical physics 1 and 2 classical dynamical systems and classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Thirring, Walter

    1992-01-01

    The last decade has seen a considerable renaissance in the realm of classical dynamical systems, and many things that may have appeared mathematically overly sophisticated at the time of the first appearance of this textbook have since become the everyday tools of working physicists. This new edition is intended to take this development into account. I have also tried to make the book more readable and to eradicate errors. Since the first edition already contained plenty of material for a one­ semester course, new material was added only when some of the original could be dropped or simplified. Even so, it was necessary to expand the chap­ ter with the proof of the K-A-M Theorem to make allowances for the cur­ rent trend in physics. This involved not only the use of more refined mathe­ matical tools, but also a reevaluation of the word "fundamental. " What was earlier dismissed as a grubby calculation is now seen as the consequence of a deep principle. Even Kepler's laws, which determine the radii of the ...

  1. Classical calculation of radiative lifetimes of atomic hydrogen in a homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbatsch, M.W.; Hessels, E.A.; Horbatsch, M.

    2005-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of hydrogenic atoms in a homogeneous magnetic field of moderate strength are calculated on the basis of classical radiation. The modifications of the Keplerian orbits due to the magnetic field are incorporated by classical perturbation theory. The model is complemented by a classical radiative decay calculation using the radiated Larmor power. A recently derived highly accurate formula for the transition rate of a field-free hydrogenic state is averaged over the angular momentum oscillations caused by the magnetic field. The resulting radiative lifetimes for diamagnetic eigenstates classified by n,m and the diamagnetic energy shift C compare well with quantum results

  2. On the Lie symmetry group for classical fields in noncommutative space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ricardo Martinho Lima Santiago [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil); Instituto Federal da Bahia (IFBA), BA (Brazil); Ressureicao, Caio G. da [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Vianna, Jose David M. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil); Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: An alternative way to include effects of noncommutative geometries in field theory is based on the concept of noncommutativity among degrees of freedom of the studied system. In this context it is reasonable to consider that, in the multiparticle noncommutative quantum mechanics (NCQM), the noncommutativity among degrees of freedom to discrete system with N particles is also verified. Further, an analysis of the classical limit of the single particle NCQM leads to a deformed Newtonian mechanics where the Newton's second law is modified in order to include the noncommutative parameter {theta}{sub {iota}j} and, for a one-dimensional discrete system with N particles, the dynamical evolution of each particle is given by this modified Newton's second law. Hence, applying the continuous limit to this multiparticle classical system it is possible to obtain a noncommutative extension of two -dimensional field theory in a noncommutative space. In the present communication we consider a noncommutative extension of the scalar field obtained from this approach and we analyze the Lie symmetries in order to compare the Lie group of this field with the usual scalar field in the commutative space. (author)

  3. Quantum correlations and dynamics from classical random fields valued in complex Hilbert spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    One of the crucial differences between mathematical models of classical and quantum mechanics (QM) is the use of the tensor product of the state spaces of subsystems as the state space of the corresponding composite system. (To describe an ensemble of classical composite systems, one uses random variables taking values in the Cartesian product of the state spaces of subsystems.) We show that, nevertheless, it is possible to establish a natural correspondence between the classical and the quantum probabilistic descriptions of composite systems. Quantum averages for composite systems (including entangled) can be represented as averages with respect to classical random fields. It is essentially what Albert Einstein dreamed of. QM is represented as classical statistical mechanics with infinite-dimensional phase space. While the mathematical construction is completely rigorous, its physical interpretation is a complicated problem. We present the basic physical interpretation of prequantum classical statistical field theory in Sec. II. However, this is only the first step toward real physical theory.

  4. Classical limit of a quantum particle in an external Yang-Mills field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moschella, U.

    1989-01-01

    It is studied the classical limit of a quantum particle in an external non-abelian gauge field. It is shown that the unitary group describing the quantum fluctuations around any classic phase orbit has a classical limit when h tends to zero under very general conditions on the potentials. It is also proved the self-adjointness of the Hamilton's operator of the quantum theory for a large class of potentials. Some applications of the theory are finally exposed

  5. An analogue of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation in prequantum classical field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrennikov, Andrei, E-mail: Andrei.Khrennikov@vxu.s [International Center for Mathematical Modelling in Physics and Cognitive Sciences, University of Vaexjoe, Vaexjoe (Sweden) and Institute of Information Security, Russian State University for Humanities, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-02-01

    Prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT) is a model that provides the possibility of representing averages of quantum observables, including correlations of observables on subsystems of a composite system, as averages with respect to fluctuations of classical random fields. PCSFT is a classical model of wave type. For example, 'electron' is described by electronic field. In contrast to quantum mechanics (QM), this field is a real physical field and not a field of probabilities. An important point is that the prequantum field of , for example, an electron contains the irreducible contribution of the background field vacuum fluctuations. In principle, the traditional QM-formalism can be considered as a special regularization procedure: subtraction of averages with respect to vacuum fluctuations. In this paper, we derive a classical analogue of the Heisenberg-Robertson inequality for dispersions of functionals of classical (prequantum) fields. The PCSFT Robertson-like inequality provides a restriction on the product of classical dispersions. However, this restriction is not so rigid as in QM.

  6. An analogue of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation in prequantum classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    Prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT) is a model that provides the possibility of representing averages of quantum observables, including correlations of observables on subsystems of a composite system, as averages with respect to fluctuations of classical random fields. PCSFT is a classical model of wave type. For example, 'electron' is described by electronic field. In contrast to quantum mechanics (QM), this field is a real physical field and not a field of probabilities. An important point is that the prequantum field of , for example, an electron contains the irreducible contribution of the background field vacuum fluctuations. In principle, the traditional QM-formalism can be considered as a special regularization procedure: subtraction of averages with respect to vacuum fluctuations. In this paper, we derive a classical analogue of the Heisenberg-Robertson inequality for dispersions of functionals of classical (prequantum) fields. The PCSFT Robertson-like inequality provides a restriction on the product of classical dispersions. However, this restriction is not so rigid as in QM.

  7. k-Cosymplectic Classical Field Theories: Tulczyjew and Skinner-Rusk Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Angel M.; Román-Roy, Narciso; Salgado, Modesto; Vilariño, Silvia

    2012-06-01

    The k-cosymplectic Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms of first-order classical field theories are reviewed and completed. In particular, they are stated for singular and almost-regular systems. Subsequently, several alternative formulations for k-cosymplectic first-order field theories are developed: First, generalizing the construction of Tulczyjew for mechanics, we give a new interpretation of the classical field equations. Second, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms are unified by giving an extension of the Skinner-Rusk formulation on classical mechanics.

  8. k-Cosymplectic Classical Field Theories: Tulczyjew and Skinner–Rusk Formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Angel M.; Román-Roy, Narciso; Salgado, Modesto; Vilariño, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The k-cosymplectic Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms of first-order classical field theories are reviewed and completed. In particular, they are stated for singular and almost-regular systems. Subsequently, several alternative formulations for k-cosymplectic first-order field theories are developed: First, generalizing the construction of Tulczyjew for mechanics, we give a new interpretation of the classical field equations. Second, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms are unified by giving an extension of the Skinner–Rusk formulation on classical mechanics.

  9. Bosonic Loop Diagrams as Perturbative Solutions of the Classical Field Equations in φ4-Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finster, Felix; Tolksdorf, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of the classical φ 4 -theory in Minkowski space-time are analyzed in a perturbation expansion in the nonlinearity. Using the language of Feynman diagrams, the solution of the Cauchy problem is expressed in terms of tree diagrams which involve the retarded Green's function and have one outgoing leg. In order to obtain general tree diagrams, we set up a ''classical measurement process'' in which a virtual observer of a scattering experiment modifies the field and detects suitable energy differences. By adding a classical stochastic background field, we even obtain all loop diagrams. The expansions are compared with the standard Feynman diagrams of the corresponding quantum field theory.

  10. Bosonic Loop Diagrams as Perturbative Solutions of the Classical Field Equations in ϕ4-Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, Felix; Tolksdorf, Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Solutions of the classical ϕ4-theory in Minkowski space-time are analyzed in a perturbation expansion in the nonlinearity. Using the language of Feynman diagrams, the solution of the Cauchy problem is expressed in terms of tree diagrams which involve the retarded Green's function and have one outgoing leg. In order to obtain general tree diagrams, we set up a "classical measurement process" in which a virtual observer of a scattering experiment modifies the field and detects suitable energy differences. By adding a classical stochastic background field, we even obtain all loop diagrams. The expansions are compared with the standard Feynman diagrams of the corresponding quantum field theory.

  11. Classical solutions in quantum field theory solitons and instantons in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, Erick J

    2012-01-01

    Classical solutions play an important role in quantum field theory, high energy physics and cosmology. Real-time soliton solutions give rise to particles, such as magnetic monopoles, and extended structures, such as domain walls and cosmic strings, that have implications for early universe cosmology. Imaginary-time Euclidean instantons are responsible for important nonperturbative effects, while Euclidean bounce solutions govern transitions between metastable states. Written for advanced graduate students and researchers in elementary particle physics, cosmology and related fields, this book brings the reader up to the level of current research in the field. The first half of the book discusses the most important classes of solitons: kinks, vortices and magnetic monopoles. The cosmological and observational constraints on these are covered, as are more formal aspects, including BPS solitons and their connection with supersymmetry. The second half is devoted to Euclidean solutions, with particular emphasis on ...

  12. A course in mathematical physics 2 classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Thirring, Walter

    1978-01-01

    In the past decade the language and methods ofmodern differential geometry have been increasingly used in theoretical physics. What seemed extravagant when this book first appeared 12 years ago, as lecture notes, is now a commonplace. This fact has strengthened my belief that today students of theoretical physics have to learn that language-and the sooner the better. Afterall, they willbe the professors ofthe twenty-first century and it would be absurd if they were to teach then the mathematics of the nineteenth century. Thus for this new edition I did not change the mathematical language. Apart from correcting some mistakes I have only added a section on gauge theories. In the last decade it has become evident that these theories describe fundamental interactions, and on the classical level their structure is suffi­ cientlyclear to qualify them for the minimum amount ofknowledge required by a theoretician. It is with much regret that I had to refrain from in­ corporating the interesting developments in Kal...

  13. Classical geometrical interpretation of ghost fields and anomalies in Yang-Mills theory and quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Mieg, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the reinterpretation of the BRS equations of Quantum Field Theory as the Maurer Cartan equation of a classical principal fiber bundle leads to a simple gauge invariant classification of the anomalies in Yang Mills theory and gravity

  14. Classical geometrical interpretation of ghost fields and anomalies in Yang-Mills theory and quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Mieg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The reinterpretation of the BRS equations of Quantum Field Theory as the Maurer Cartan equation of a classical principal fiber bundle leads to a simple gauge invariant classification of the anomalies in Yang Mills theory and gravity

  15. Correspondence between classical and quantum chaos for hydrogen in a uniform magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, A; Hasegawa, H [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1983-06-01

    It is shown, by numerical computations, that the classical and the quantal critical energy of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field, characterising the onset of irregular motions, approximately coincide. This result is obtained by applying a simple scaling property of the classical Hamiltonian, valid only for Lsub(z)=O (the angular momentum component along the field vanishes), to the numerically deduced relative areas of the irregular region of Poincare surfaces of section.

  16. Field transformations and the classical equation of motion in chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.; Fearing, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    The construction of effective Lagrangians commonly involves the application of the ''classical equation of motion'' to eliminate redundant structures and thus generate the minimal number of independent terms. We investigate this procedure in the framework of chiral perturbation theory with particular emphasis on the new features which appear at O(p 6 ). The use of the ''classical equation of motion'' is interpreted in terms of field transformations. Such an interpretation is crucial if one wants to bring a given Lagrangian into a canonical form with a minimal number of terms. We emphasize that the application of field transformations leads to a modification of the coefficients of higher-order terms as well as eliminating structures, or what is equivalent, expressing certain structures in terms of already known different structures. This will become relevant once one considers the problem of expressing in canonical form a model effective interaction containing terms beyond next-to-leading order, i.e., beyond O(p 4 ). In such circumstances the naive application of the clasical equation of motion to simply drop terms, as is commonly done at lowest order, leads to subtle errors, which we discuss

  17. On the stability of solitary waves for classical scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, P.; Stubbe, J.; Vazquez, L.

    1986-01-01

    We study the stability for the bound states of lowest action of certain nonlinear Klein-Gordon and Schroedinger equations by applying the Shatah-Strauss formalism. We extend the range of application of this formalism by using a recent existence theorem for minimum action solutions to a large class of equations including logarithmic Klein-Gordon equation and logarithmic Schroedinger equation and scalar fields with fractional non-linearities. Furthermore we discuss the relation between different stability criteria considered in the literature. (orig.)

  18. Cavity quantum chromodynamics in the presence of a classical background field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, E.J.O.; Viollier, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The QCD (quantum chromodynamics) Lagrange density is constructed in which the gluon field has a classical part, using the background field gauge. The conserved currents deriving from the symmetries of this theory are given and used to define boundary conditions on the field operators on the surface of a spherical, static cavity. The field operators are expanded in terms of a complete set of cavity modes that satisfy the boundary conditions and the field equations in the Dirac picture. 13 refs

  19. Tensor algebra over Hilbert space: Field theory in classical phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos Neto, A.; Vianna, J.D.M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown using tensor algebras, namely Symmetric and Grassmann algebras over Hilbert Space that it is possible to introduce field operators, associated to the Liouville equation of classical statistical mechanics, which are characterized by commutation (for Symmetric) and anticommutation (for Grassmann) rules. The procedure here presented shows by construction that many-particle classical systems admit an algebraic structure similar to that of quantum field theory. It is considered explicitly the case of n-particle systems interacting with an external potential. A new derivation of Schoenberg's result about the equivalence between his field theory in classical phase space and the usual classical statistical mechanics is obtained as a consequence of the algebraic structure of the theory as introduced by our method. (Author) [pt

  20. Lorentz invariance from classical particle paths in quantum field theory of electric and magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.A.; Neri, F.; Zwanziger, D.

    1979-01-01

    We establish the Lorentz invariance of the quantum field theory of electric and magnetic charge. This is a priori implausible because the theory is the second-quantized version of a classical field theory which is inconsistent if the minimally coupled charged fields are smooth functions. For our proof we express the generating functional for the gauge-invariant Green's functions of quantum electrodynamics: with or without magnetic charge: as a path integral over the trajectories of classical charged point particles. The electric-electric and electric-magnetic interactions contribute factors exp(JDJ) and exp(JD'K), where J and K are the electric and magnetic currents of classical point particles and D is the usual photon propagator. The propagator D' involves the Dirac string but exp(JD'K) depends on it only through a topological integer linking string and classical particle trajectories. The charge quantization condition e/sub i/g/sub j/ - g/sub i/e/sub j/ = integer then suffices to make the gauge-invariant Green's functions string independent. By implication our formulation shows that if the Green's functions of quantum electrodynamics are expressed as usual as functional integrals over classical charged fields, the smooth field configurations have measure zero and all the support of the Feynman measure lies on the trajectories of classical point particles

  1. Pairing effects in rotating nuclei: a semi classical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, M.

    1985-10-01

    The semi-classical phase-space distribution ρ(r,p) is calculated for rotating superfluid nuclei, taking into account the reaction of the pairing field to the rotational motion. Moments of inertia and current distributions calculated by means of this distribution pass continuously from a rigid to an irrotational behaviour

  2. Microcanonical simulations in classical and quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, a stochastic adaptation of the microcanonical simulation method is applied to the numerical simulation of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian for polyacetylene, a one-dimensional polymer were fermion-boson interactions play a dominant role in the dynamics of the system. The pure microcanonical simulation method fails in the marginally ergodic case and a stochastic adaptation, the hybrid microcanonical method, is employed to resolve problems with ergodicity. The hybrid method is shown to be an efficient method for higher dimensional fermionic quantum systems. In the second part of this thesis, a numerical simulation of the evolution of a network of global cosmic strings is an expanding Robertson-Walker universe is carried out. The system is quenched through an order-disorder phase transition and the nature of the string distribution is examined. While the string distribution observed at the phase transition is in good agreement with earlier estimates, the simulation reveals that the dynamics of the strings are suppressed by interactions with the Goldstone field. The network decays by topological annihilation and no spatial correlations are observed at any point in the simulation

  3. Acoustic Effects in Classical Nucleation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, J. K.; Su, C.-H.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of sound wave oscillations on the rate of nucleation in a parent phase can be calculated by expanding the free energy of formation of a nucleus of the second phase in powers of the acoustic pressure. Since the period of sound wave oscillation is much shorter than the time scale for nucleation, the acoustic effect can be calculated as a time average of the free energy of formation of the nucleus. The leading non-zero term in the time average of the free energy is proportional to the square of the acoustic pressure. The Young-Laplace equation for the surface tension of the nucleus can be used to link the time average of the square of the pressure in the parent phase to its time average in the nucleus of the second phase. Due to the surface tension, the pressure in the nuclear phase is higher than the pressure in the parent phase. The effect is to lower the free energy of formation of the nucleus and increase the rate of nucleation.

  4. Colored, spinning classical particle in an external non-Abelian gauge field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, H.

    1982-04-01

    Classical non-relativistic equations of motion are derived for a colored, spinning point-like particle in an external SU(2) gauge field from Dirac equation. It is found that in addition to the classical spin and color spin vectors, S, I, it is necessary to introduce a new classical dynamical variable [Jsup(ab)], a,b = 1,2,3, describing a mixing of the spin and color. The constraint relations between [Jsup(ab)], S, I are also found. (Auth.)

  5. Fluctuating local field method probed for a description of small classical correlated lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, Alexey N.

    2018-05-01

    Thermal-equilibrated finite classical lattices are considered as a minimal model of the systems showing an interplay between low-energy collective fluctuations and single-site degrees of freedom. Standard local field approach, as well as classical limit of the bosonic DMFT method, do not provide a satisfactory description of Ising and Heisenberg small lattices subjected to an external polarizing field. We show that a dramatic improvement can be achieved within a simple approach, in which the local field appears to be a fluctuating quantity related to the low-energy degree(s) of freedom.

  6. Radiation reaction for the classical relativistic spinning particle in scalar, tensor and linearized gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Cruz, M.G.

    1992-08-01

    We use the method of analytic continuation of the equation of motion including the self-fields to evaluate the radiation reaction for a classical relativistic spinning point particle in interaction with scalar, tensor and linearized gravitational fields in flat spacetime. In the limit these equations reduce to those of spinless particles. We also show the renormalizability of these theories. (author). 10 refs

  7. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields. Semiclassical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with timely and interesting issues in strong laser physics. Illustrates complex strong field atomic ionization with the simple semiclassical model of classical trajectory perspective for the first time. Provides a theoretical model that can be used to account for recent experiments. The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers in the field of laser physics, atom molecule physics and theoretical physics. Dr. Jie Liu is a professor of Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, China and Peking University.

  8. Rydberg atoms in circular polarization: Classical stabilization in optical frequency fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chism, Will; Reichl, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the classical dynamics of the Rydberg atom in circularly polarized laser fields, restricted to the two-dimensional plane of polarization. We use a Poincare surface of section to study nonlinear resonance structures for optical frequency driving fields. We demonstrate the existence and morphology of these structures as the laser intensity transitions from moderate to intense

  9. Effective potentials for twisted fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banach, R.

    1981-01-01

    Minus the density of the effective action, evaluated at the lowest eigenfunction of the (space-time) derivative part of the second (functional) derivative of the classical action, is proposed as a generalised definition of the effective potential, applicable to twisted as well as untwisted sectors of a field theory. The proposal is corroborated by several specific calculations in the twisted sector, namely phi 4 theory (real and complex) and wrong-sign-Gordon theory, in an Einstein cylinder, where the exact integrability of the static solutions confirms the effective potential predictions. Both models exhibit a phase transition, which the effective potential locates, and the one-loop quantum shift in the critical radius is computed for the real phi 4 model, being a universal result. Topological mass generation at the classical level is pointed out, and the exactness of the classical effective potential approximation for complex phi 4 is discussed. (author)

  10. A Classical Based Derivation of Time Dilation Providing First Order Accuracy to Schwarzschild's Solution of Einstein's Field Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rickey W.

    In Einstein's theory of Special Relativity (SR), one method to derive relativistic kinetic energy is via applying the classical work-energy theorem to relativistic momentum. This approach starts with a classical based work-energy theorem and applies SR's momentum to the derivation. One outcome of this derivation is relativistic kinetic energy. From this derivation, it is rather straight forward to form a kinetic energy based time dilation function. In the derivation of General Relativity a common approach is to bypass classical laws as a starting point. Instead a rigorous development of differential geometry and Riemannian space is constructed, from which classical based laws are derived. This is in contrast to SR's approach of starting with classical laws and applying the consequences of the universal speed of light by all observers. A possible method to derive time dilation due to Newtonian gravitational potential energy (NGPE) is to apply SR's approach to deriving relativistic kinetic energy. It will be shown this method gives a first order accuracy compared to Schwarzschild's metric. The SR's kinetic energy and the newly derived NGPE derivation are combined to form a Riemannian metric based on these two energies. A geodesic is derived and calculations compared to Schwarzschild's geodesic for an orbiting test mass about a central, non-rotating, non-charged massive body. The new metric results in high accuracy calculations when compared to Einsteins General Relativity's prediction. The new method provides a candidate approach for starting with classical laws and deriving General Relativity effects. This approach mimics SR's method of starting with classical mechanics when deriving relativistic equations. As a compliment to introducing General Relativity, it provides a plausible scaffolding method from classical physics when teaching introductory General Relativity. A straight forward path from classical laws to General Relativity will be derived. This derivation

  11. Reproducing Quantum Probability Distributions at the Speed of Classical Dynamics: A New Approach for Developing Force-Field Functors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Vikram; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2018-04-05

    Modeling nuclear quantum effects is required for accurate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of molecules. The community has paid special attention to water and other biomolecules that show hydrogen bonding. Standard methods of modeling nuclear quantum effects like Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) are computationally costlier than running classical trajectories. A force-field functor (FFF) is an alternative method that computes an effective force field that replicates quantum properties of the original force field. In this work, we propose an efficient method of computing FFF using the Wigner-Kirkwood expansion. As a test case, we calculate a range of thermodynamic properties of Neon, obtaining the same level of accuracy as RPMD, but with the shorter runtime of classical simulations. By modifying existing MD programs, the proposed method could be used in the future to increase the efficiency and accuracy of MD simulations involving water and proteins.

  12. Is the Meissner effect explicable in terms of classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freud, R.

    1979-01-01

    The core radius r 0 of a current-carrying superconducting cylinder in the intermediate state determined from experimental data disagrees with the theoretical value of r 0 derived on the basis of the classical interpretation of the Meissner effect. Then the problem arises of whether this interpretation of the Meissner effect corresponds to reality. (Auth.)

  13. Lower Bound on the Energy Density in Classical and Quantum Field Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Aron C

    2017-04-14

    A novel method for deriving energy conditions in stable field theories is described. In a local classical theory with one spatial dimension, a local energy condition always exists. For a relativistic field theory, one obtains the dominant energy condition. In a quantum field theory, there instead exists a quantum energy condition, i.e., a lower bound on the energy density that depends on information-theoretic quantities. Some extensions to higher dimensions are briefly discussed.

  14. Quantum dynamics in transverse-field Ising models from classical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schmitt, Markus Heyl

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficient representation of quantum many-body states with classical resources is a key challenge in quantum many-body theory. In this work we analytically construct classical networks for the description of the quantum dynamics in transverse-field Ising models that can be solved efficiently using Monte Carlo techniques. Our perturbative construction encodes time-evolved quantum states of spin-1/2 systems in a network of classical spins with local couplings and can be directly generalized to other spin systems and higher spins. Using this construction we compute the transient dynamics in one, two, and three dimensions including local observables, entanglement production, and Loschmidt amplitudes using Monte Carlo algorithms and demonstrate the accuracy of this approach by comparisons to exact results. We include a mapping to equivalent artificial neural networks, which were recently introduced to provide a universal structure for classical network wave functions.

  15. The Effects of Classical Music on Listening Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Cara

    A study determined the effectiveness of background classical music on listening comprehension. Nine special education students were read 10 different stories while music was either playing or not. They were asked the same four story element questions after each story. Results showed no significant differences between the two types of listening…

  16. Possibility to obtain the classical Faraday effect with a recoiless gamma ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, Danila; Rogalski, Mircea

    1975-01-01

    The possibility to obtain the classical Faraday effect with a linearly polarized Moessbauer radiation, which passes through a Moessbauer absorber in a longitudinal applied magnetic field was studied. As in the classical optics, the emergent radiation is linearly polarized and his plane of polarization rotated. The same problem for the case of the magnetic field of the absorber making an angle theta=0 with the gamma radiation direction is solved. This enables to do a better analysis of the experimental data. The application of the formulae in the case of iron-57 shows a good agreement with the experiments [fr

  17. Plasmon mass scale and quantum fluctuations of classical fields on a real time lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurkela Aleksi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical real-time lattice simulations play an important role in understanding non-equilibrium phenomena in gauge theories and are used in particular to model the prethermal evolution of heavy-ion collisions. Above the Debye scale the classical Yang-Mills (CYM theory can be matched smoothly to kinetic theory. First we study the limits of the quasiparticle picture of the CYM fields by determining the plasmon mass of the system using 3 different methods. Then we argue that one needs a numerical calculation of a system of classical gauge fields and small linearized fluctuations, which correspond to quantum fluctuations, in a way that keeps the separation between the two manifest. We demonstrate and test an implementation of an algorithm with the linearized fluctuation showing that the linearization indeed works and that the Gauss’s law is conserved.

  18. Semi-classical derivation of charge-quantization through charge-field self-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosok, M.; Madhyastha, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    A semi-classical synthesis of classical mechanics, wave mechanics, and special relativity yields a unique nonlinear energy-wave structure of relations (velocity triad uv = c 2 ) fundamental to modern physics. Through the above vehicle, using Maxwell's equations, charge quantization and the fine structure constant are derived. It is shown that the numerical value of the nonlinear charge-field self-interaction range for the electron is of the order of 10 -13 m, which is greater than the classical electron radius but less than the Compton wavelength of the electron. Finally, it is suggested that the structure of the electron-in-space is expressed by a self-extending nonlinear ''fractal geometry'' based on derived numerical values obtained from our model, thus opening this presentation of charge-field structure to experimental testing for possible verification

  19. Plasmon mass scale and quantum fluctuations of classical fields on a real time lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Lappi, Tuomas; Peuron, Jarkko

    2018-03-01

    Classical real-time lattice simulations play an important role in understanding non-equilibrium phenomena in gauge theories and are used in particular to model the prethermal evolution of heavy-ion collisions. Above the Debye scale the classical Yang-Mills (CYM) theory can be matched smoothly to kinetic theory. First we study the limits of the quasiparticle picture of the CYM fields by determining the plasmon mass of the system using 3 different methods. Then we argue that one needs a numerical calculation of a system of classical gauge fields and small linearized fluctuations, which correspond to quantum fluctuations, in a way that keeps the separation between the two manifest. We demonstrate and test an implementation of an algorithm with the linearized fluctuation showing that the linearization indeed works and that the Gauss's law is conserved.

  20. Classical field theory on electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories and gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, Florian

    2012-01-01

    The book describes Maxwell's equations first in their integral, directly testable form, then moves on to their local formulation. The first two chapters cover all essential properties of Maxwell's equations, including their symmetries and their covariance in a modern notation. Chapter 3 is devoted to Maxwell theory as a classical field theory and to solutions of the wave equation. Chapter 4 deals with important applications of Maxwell theory. It includes topical subjects such as metamaterials with negative refraction index and solutions of Helmholtz' equation in paraxial approximation relevant for the description of laser beams. Chapter 5 describes non-Abelian gauge theories from a classical, geometric point of view, in analogy to Maxwell theory as a prototype, and culminates in an application to the U(2) theory relevant for electroweak interactions. The last chapter 6 gives a concise summary of semi-Riemannian geometry as the framework for the classical field theory of gravitation. The chapter concludes wit...

  1. Quantum–classical correspondence of a field induced KAM-type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. A transition from regular to chaotic behaviour in the dynamics of a classical Henon–Heiles oscillator in the presence of an external field is shown to have a similar quantum signature when studied using the pertaining phase portraits and the associated Kolmogorov–Sinai–Lyapunov entropies obtained through the ...

  2. On the classical origins of yangian symmetry in integrable field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKay, N.J.

    1992-01-01

    We show that Drinfeld's yangian algebra, studied recently as the algebra of conserved charges in certain two-dimensional integrable quantum field theories, is also present in the classical theory as a Poisson-Hopf algebra, and exhibit explicitly the Serre relations, coproduct and antipode. (orig.)

  3. Cold neutron interaction with a classical electric field: Some basic theoretical and experimental considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, S.; Diaz-Valdes, J.; Bennun, L.; Minning, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of performing an experiment to measure the interaction of cold neutrons with a given classical electric field. Bound and scattering states could be detected by means of an approximate Aharonov-Casher configuration. The theoretical background is presented and then some primary elements for building a neutron detector of this nature are proposed

  4. Geometrical phases from global gauge invariance of nonlinear classical field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, J.C.; Chiao, R.Y.

    1988-01-01

    We show that the geometrical phases recently discovered in quantum mechanics also occur naturally in the theory of any classical complex multicomponent field satisfying nonlinear equations derived from a Lagrangean with is invariant under gauge transformations of the first kind. Some examples are the paraxial wave equation for nonlinear optics, and Ginzburg-Landau equations for complex order parameters in condensed-matter physics

  5. New classical inversion formulas for centrosymmetric electric and magnetic fields; focusing potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, I.V.; Demkov, Y.N.

    1982-01-01

    New inversion formulas are obtained for the classical scattering of a charged particle by a spherical or axisymmetric electric or magnetic field at a fixed impact parameter or angular momentum. For different cases, focusing fields are obtained similar to those previously considered for scattering by an electric field at a given energy, viz., of the backscattering (cat's eye), Maxwell fish eye, or Luneberg lens type. A magnetoelectric analogy is formulated, namely the existence of equivalent axisymmetric electric and magnetic fields that scatter charged particles in identical fashion

  6. Classical open-string field theory: A∞-algebra, renormalization group and boundary states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsu, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    We investigate classical bosonic open-string field theory from the perspective of the Wilson renormalization group of world-sheet theory. The microscopic action is identified with Witten's covariant cubic action and the short-distance cut-off scale is introduced by length of open-string strip which appears in the Schwinger representation of open-string propagator. Classical open-string field theory in the title means open-string field theory governed by a classical part of the low energy action. It is obtained by integrating out suitable tree interactions of open-strings and is of non-polynomial type. We study this theory by using the BV formalism. It turns out to be deeply related with deformation theory of A ∞ -algebra. We introduce renormalization group equation of this theory and discuss it from several aspects. It is also discussed that this theory is interpreted as a boundary open-string field theory. Closed-string BRST charge and boundary states of closed-string field theory in the presence of open-string field play important roles

  7. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories and gravitation. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheck, Florian

    2018-04-01

    Scheck's successful textbook presents a comprehensive treatment, ideally suited for a one-semester course. The textbook describes Maxwell's equations first in their integral, directly testable form, then moves on to their local formulation. The first two chapters cover all essential properties of Maxwell's equations, including their symmetries and their covariance in a modern notation. Chapter 3 is devoted to Maxwell's theory as a classical field theory and to solutions of the wave equation. Chapter 4 deals with important applications of Maxwell's theory. It includes topical subjects such as metamaterials with negative refraction index and solutions of Helmholtz' equation in paraxial approximation relevant for the description of laser beams. Chapter 5 describes non-Abelian gauge theories from a classical, geometric point of view, in analogy to Maxwell's theory as a prototype, and culminates in an application to the U(2) theory relevant for electroweak interactions. The last chapter 6 gives a concise summary of semi-Riemannian geometry as the framework for the classical field theory of gravitation. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the Schwarzschild solution of Einstein's equations and the classical tests of general relativity. The new concept of this edition presents the content divided into two tracks: the fast track for master's students, providing the essentials, and the intensive track for all wanting to get in depth knowledge of the field. Cleary labeled material and sections guide students through the preferred level of treatment. Numerous problems and worked examples will provide successful access to Classical Field Theory.

  8. Some connections between relativistic classical mechanics, statistical mechanics, and quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remler, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    A gauge-invariant version of the Wigner representation is used to relate relativistic mechanics, statistical mechanics, and quantum field theory in the context of the electrodynamics of scalar particles. A unified formulation of quantum field theory and statistical mechanics is developed which clarifies the physics interpretation of the single-particle Wigner function. A covariant form of Ehrenfest's theorem is derived. Classical electrodynamics is derived from quantum field theory after making a random-phase approximation. The validity of this approximation is discussed

  9. Dirac particle in a plane wave field and the semi-classical approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourouaine, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Mentouri University, Constantine (Algeria)

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of photon represented by plane wave field on Dirac particle in the context of path integral approach given by Fradkin and Gitman formalism. In our case, although the action relative to Dirac particle in plane wave field seems to be non quadratic, the result obtained by semi-classical approach is the same as that found by an exact calculation. Hence; when we add the plane wave field to any quadratic actions related to Fradkin and Gitman approach, the total action behaves like quadratic. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Dirac particle in a plane wave field and the semi-classical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourouaine, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of photon represented by plane wave field on Dirac particle in the context of path integral approach given by Fradkin and Gitman formalism. In our case, although the action relative to Dirac particle in plane wave field seems to be non quadratic, the result obtained by semi-classical approach is the same as that found by an exact calculation. Hence; when we add the plane wave field to any quadratic actions related to Fradkin and Gitman approach, the total action behaves like quadratic. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. General treatment of quantum and classical spinning particles in external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2017-11-01

    We develop the general theory of spinning particles with electric and magnetic dipole moments moving in arbitrary electromagnetic, inertial, and gravitational fields. Both the quantum-mechanical and classical dynamics is investigated. We start from the covariant Dirac equation extended to a spin-1/2 fermion with anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments and then perform the relativistic Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. This transformation allows us to obtain the quantum-mechanical equations of motion for the physical operators in the Schrödinger form and to establish the classical limit of relativistic quantum mechanics. The results obtained are then compared to the general classical description of the spinning particle interacting with electromagnetic, inertial and gravitational fields. The complete agreement between the quantum mechanics and the classical theory is proven in the general case. As an application of the results obtained, we consider the dynamics of a spinning particle in a gravitational wave and analyze the prospects of using the magnetic resonance setup to find possible manifestations of the gravitational wave on spin.

  12. Classical and quantum effects in noble metal and graphene plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics — the interaction of light with free electrons in metals — is commonly understood within classical electrodynamics using local-response constitutive laws (such as Ohm's law). However, the tight localization of plasmons to small volumes is revealing intriguing new physics such as noncla......Plasmonics — the interaction of light with free electrons in metals — is commonly understood within classical electrodynamics using local-response constitutive laws (such as Ohm's law). However, the tight localization of plasmons to small volumes is revealing intriguing new physics...... such as nonclassical electrodynamics with a nonlocal response of the plasmons. Nonlocal effects are being explored both theoretically and experimentally in different charge-conducting material systems with examples ranging from sub-10 nanometer noble metal particles to one-atom thin disks of doped graphene....

  13. 10th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Preface The International Association for Relativistic Dynamics was organized in February 1998 in Houston, Texas, with John R. Fanchi as president. Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored, from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view, since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical relativistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There, moreover, remained the important questions of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge’s book, The Relativistic Gas , and in Balescu’s book on relativistic statistical mechanics, and the development of a consistent single and many body relativistic quantum theory. In recent years, the very high accuracy of telescopes and advanced facilities for computation have brought a high level of interest in cosmological problems such as the structure of galaxies (dark matter) and the apparently anomalous expansion of the universe (dark energy). Some of the papers reported here deal with these problems, as well as other fundamental related issues. It was for this purpose, to bring together researchers from a wide variety of fields, such as particle physics, astrophysics, cosmology, foundations of relativity theory, and mathematical physics, with a common interest in relativistic dynamics, to investigate fundamental questions of

  14. Polymer quantization of the free scalar field and its classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laddha, Alok; Varadarajan, Madhavan, E-mail: alok@rri.res.i, E-mail: madhavan@rri.res.i [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560 080 (India)

    2010-09-07

    Building on prior work, a generally covariant reformulation of a free scalar field theory on the flat Lorentzian cylinder is quantized using loop quantum gravity (LQG)-type 'polymer' representations. This quantization of the continuum classical theory yields a quantum theory which lives on a discrete spacetime lattice. We explicitly construct a state in the polymer Hilbert space which reproduces the standard Fock vacuum two-point functions for long-wavelength modes of the scalar field. Our construction indicates that the continuum classical theory emerges under coarse graining. All our considerations are free of the 'triangulation' ambiguities which plague attempts to define quantum dynamics in LQG. Our work constitutes the first complete LQG-type quantization of a generally covariant field theory together with a semi-classical analysis of the true degrees of freedom and thus provides a perfect infinite-dimensional toy model to study open issues in LQG, particularly those pertaining to the definition of quantum dynamics.

  15. Classical study of the rovibrational dynamics of a polar diatomic molecule in static electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inarrea, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.inarrea@unirioja.e [Area de Fisica, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logrono (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo [Area de Fisica, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logrono (Spain); Gonzalez-Ferez, Rosario [Instituto ' Carlos I' de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Schmelcher, Peter [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-01-04

    We study the classical dynamics of a polar diatomic molecule in the presence of a strong static homogeneous electric field. Our full rovibrational investigation includes the interaction with the field due to the permanent electric dipole moment and the polarizability of the molecule. Using the LiCs molecule as a prototype, we explore the stability of the equilibrium points and their bifurcations as the field strength is increased. The phase space structure and its dependence on the energy and field strength are analyzed in detail. We demonstrate that depending on the field strength and on the energy, the phase space is characterized either by regular features or by small stochastic layers of chaotic motion.

  16. On the existence of classical solutions for stationary extended mean field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Patrizi, Stefania; Voskanyan, Vardan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider extended stationary mean-field games, that is mean-field games which depend on the velocity field of the players. We prove various a-priori estimates which generalize the results for quasi-variational mean-field games in Gomes et al. (2012). In addition we use adjoint method techniques to obtain higher regularity bounds. Then we establish the existence of smooth solutions under fairly general conditions by applying the continuity method. When applied to standard stationary mean-field games as in Lasry and Lions (2006), Gomes and Sanchez-Morgado (2011) or Gomes et al. (2012) this paper yields various new estimates and regularity properties not available previously. We discuss additionally several examples where the existence of classical solutions can be proved. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On the existence of classical solutions for stationary extended mean field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we consider extended stationary mean-field games, that is mean-field games which depend on the velocity field of the players. We prove various a-priori estimates which generalize the results for quasi-variational mean-field games in Gomes et al. (2012). In addition we use adjoint method techniques to obtain higher regularity bounds. Then we establish the existence of smooth solutions under fairly general conditions by applying the continuity method. When applied to standard stationary mean-field games as in Lasry and Lions (2006), Gomes and Sanchez-Morgado (2011) or Gomes et al. (2012) this paper yields various new estimates and regularity properties not available previously. We discuss additionally several examples where the existence of classical solutions can be proved. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Testing nonclassicality in multimode fields: A unified derivation of classical inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranowicz, Adam; Bartkowiak, Monika; Wang Xiaoguang; Liu Yuxi; Nori, Franco

    2010-01-01

    We consider a way to generate operational inequalities to test nonclassicality (or quantumness) of multimode bosonic fields (or multiparty bosonic systems) that unifies the derivation of many known inequalities and allows to propose new ones. The nonclassicality criteria are based on Vogel's criterion corresponding to analyzing the positivity of multimode P functions or, equivalently, the positivity of matrices of expectation values of, e.g., creation and annihilation operators. We analyze not only monomials but also polynomial functions of such moments, which can sometimes enable simpler derivations of physically relevant inequalities. As an example, we derive various classical inequalities which can be violated only by nonclassical fields. In particular, we show how the criteria introduced here easily reduce to the well-known inequalities describing (a) multimode quadrature squeezing and its generalizations, including sum, difference, and principal squeezing; (b) two-mode one-time photon-number correlations, including sub-Poisson photon-number correlations and effects corresponding to violations of the Cauchy-Schwarz and Muirhead inequalities; (c) two-time single-mode photon-number correlations, including photon antibunching and hyperbunching; and (d) two- and three-mode quantum entanglement. Other simple inequalities for testing nonclassicality are also proposed. We have found some general relations between the nonclassicality and entanglement criteria, in particular those resulting from the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. It is shown that some known entanglement inequalities can be derived as nonclassicality inequalities within our formalism, while some other known entanglement inequalities can be seen as sums of more than one inequality derived from the nonclassicality criterion. This approach enables a deeper analysis of the entanglement for a given nonclassicality.

  19. Production of partons in the presence of classical fields in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, D.D.

    2003-09-01

    In this work the production of quarks, antiquarks and of gluonic fluctuations is studied in the presence of classical bosonic field. A comparison of the production of anti-quark pairs with the creation of pairs of gluonic quantum fluctuations based on perturbative calculations will be presented here. This analysis is valid for quantum particles with a large momentum compared to the magnitude of the classical vector potential multiplied by the coupling constant. The model contains 3 parameters: the initial magnitude of the gauge field, the coupling constant and the time scale on which the field decays. It appears that none of the species (quark-antiquark pairs, gluonic fluctuation pairs, bosons and fermion-anti fermions) can be neglected from the beginning. A corresponding calculation requires a non-perturbative description of at least the soft fermions. In this thesis the exact expression for fields varying arbitrarily in time is derived. After the full solution has been obtained, various approximation schemes are proposed for different domains, in order to find out into which the situation under consideration falls. There are approximations in the ultraviolet (perturbative), the infrared, and the Abelian (commutative) regime. The exact expression and the lowest orders of the different approximation schemes are evaluated in the presence of the model field with the same parameters as before. (A.C.)

  20. Magnetic properties of a classical XY spin dimer in a “planar” magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftja, Orion, E-mail: ogciftja@pvamu.edu [Department of Physics, Prairie View A& M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Prenga, Dode [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana, Bul. Zog I, Tirana (Albania)

    2016-10-15

    Single-molecule magnetism originates from the strong intra-molecular magnetic coupling of a small number of interacting spins. Such spins generally interact very weakly with the neighboring spins in the other molecules of the compound, therefore, inter-molecular spin couplings are negligible. In certain cases the number of magnetically coupled spins is as small as a dimer, a system that can be considered the smallest nanomagnet capable of storing non-trivial magnetic information on the molecular level. Additional interesting patterns arise if the spin motion is confined to a two-dimensional space. In such a scenario, clusters consisting of spins with large-spin values are particularly attractive since their magnetic interactions can be described well in terms of classical Heisenberg XY spins. In this work we calculate exactly the magnetic properties of a nanomagnetic dimer of classical XY spins in a “planar” external magnetic field. The problem is solved by employing a mathematical approach whose idea is the introduction of auxiliary spin variables into the starting expression of the partition function. Results for the total internal energy, total magnetic moment, spin–spin correlation function and zero-field magnetic susceptibility can serve as a basis to understand the magnetic properties of large-spin dimer building blocks. - Highlights: • Exact magnetic properties of a dimer system of classical XY spins in magnetic field. • Partition function in nonzero magnetic field obtained in closed-form. • Novel exact analytic results are important for spin models in a magnetic field. • Result provides benchmarks to gauge the accuracy of computational techniques.

  1. A New Semi-Symmetric Unified Field Theory of the Classical Fields of Gravity and Electromagnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to present a classical theoretical framework in which the gravitational and electromagnetic fields are unified as intrinsic geometric objects in the space-time manifold. For this purpose, we first present the preliminary geometric considerations dealing with the metric differential geometry of Cartan connections. The unified field theory is then developed as an extension of the general theory of relativity based on a semi- symmetric Cartan connection which is meant to be as close as possible structurally to the symmetric connection of the Einstein-Riemann space-time.

  2. Mean-field approximation for spacing distribution functions in classical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Diego Luis; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a mean-field method to calculate approximately the spacing distribution functions p(n)(s) in one-dimensional classical many-particle systems. We compare our method with two other commonly used methods, the independent interval approximation and the extended Wigner surmise. In our mean-field approach, p(n)(s) is calculated from a set of Langevin equations, which are decoupled by using a mean-field approximation. We find that in spite of its simplicity, the mean-field approximation provides good results in several systems. We offer many examples illustrating that the three previously mentioned methods give a reasonable description of the statistical behavior of the system. The physical interpretation of each method is also discussed.

  3. Restrictions on Possible Forms of Classical Matter Fields Carrying no Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowski, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    It is postulated in general relativity that the matter energy-momentum tensor vanishes if and only if all the matter fields vanish. In classical Lagrangian field theory the energy and momentum density are described by the variational (symmetric) energy-momentum tensor (named the stress tensor) and a priori it might occur that for some systems the tensor is identically to zero for all field configurations whereas evolution of the system is subject to deterministic Lagrange equations of motion. Such a system would not generate its own gravitational field. To check if these systems can exist in the framework of classical field theory we find a relationship between the stress tensor and the Euler operator (i.e. the Lagrange field equations). We prove that if a system of interacting scalar fields (the number of fields cannot exceed the spacetime dimension d) or a single vector field (in spacetimes with d even) has the stress tensor such that its divergence is identically zero (i.e. ''on and of shell''), then the Lagrange equations of motion hold identically too. These systems have then no propagation equations at all and should be regarded as unphysical. Thus nontrivial field equations require the stress tensor be nontrivial too. This relationship between vanishing (of divergence) of the stress tensor and of the Euler operator breaks down if the number of fields is greater than d. We show on concrete examples that a system of n > d interacting scalars or two interacting vector fields can have the stress tensor equal identically to zero while their propagation equations are nontrivial. This means that non-self-gravitating (and yet detectable) field systems are in principle admissible. Their equations of motion are, however, in some sense degenerate. We also show, that for a system of arbitrary number of interacting scalar fields or for a single vector field (in some specific spacetimes in the latter case), if the stress tensor is not identically zero, then it cannot

  4. The classical centre-of-mass separation for two particles in a homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, A.S.; Patterson, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate classically the problem of the centre-of-mass separation for a two-body system with net charge in a homogeneous magnetic field. Particular attention is paid to the case where one particle is much heavier than the other. Alternative momenta involving a suggested near-constant of the motion are investigated for use with a translation-invariant internal potential. These lead to a 'near separation' in terms of two coupled particles characterised by vectors which possess a simple classical interpretation, even in the presence of an interaction potential. However it is found that the coupling is not small and is not reduced when one of the particles is much heavier than the other, although the frequencies of the two motions then differ widely. (author)

  5. Classical field theory on electrodynamics, non-abelian gauge theories and gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, Florian

    2018-01-01

    Scheck’s successful textbook presents a comprehensive treatment, ideally suited for a one-semester course. The textbook describes Maxwell's equations first in their integral, directly testable form, then moves on to their local formulation. The first two chapters cover all essential properties of Maxwell's equations, including their symmetries and their covariance in a modern notation. Chapter 3 is devoted to Maxwell's theory as a classical field theory and to solutions of the wave equation. Chapter 4 deals with important applications of Maxwell's theory. It includes topical subjects such as metamaterials with negative refraction index and solutions of Helmholtz' equation in paraxial approximation relevant for the description of laser beams. Chapter 5 describes non-Abelian gauge theories from a classical, geometric point of view, in analogy to Maxwell's theory as a prototype, and culminates in an application to the U(2) theory relevant for electroweak interactions. The last chapter 6 gives a concise summary...

  6. Classical and macroquantum dynamics of charged particles in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    The investigations relating to the dynamics of charged particles in a magnetic field carried out over more than 40 years have been reviewed with special reference to the problem of nonadiabaticity due to field inhomogeneity, and time dependence. A detailed overview is presented of the standard approaches to one of the main problems namely the determination of the residence times of charged particles in an adiabatic magnetic trap which involves nonadiabaticity in a crucial way. In a major departure from the standard approach, a new paradigm described here as 'macroquantum dynamics' was advanced by the author to address the problem of residence times. The evolution and development of this new paradigm is next presented as the main focus of the review. This consists of a probability amplitude Schroedinger-like formalism for the classical macrodomain, which has been shown to be a description of the system in the correspondence limit of large Landau quantum numbers. It is demonstrated that this represents a remarkable persistence of matter wave behaviour well into the classical macrodomain, leading to unexpected experimental consequences. Experimental results confirming some of the spectacular predictions of this formalism are presented. These refer to the existence of macroscopic matter wave interference phenomena and the observation of the curl-free vector potential a la Aharonov-Bohm in the macrodomain. The problem of the nonadiabatic leakage of particles from an adiabatic trap takes the appearance here of the quantum-like tunneling of the adiabatic potential. The multiplicity of residence times predicted by the set of Schroedinger-like equations have been well confirmed by experiments. A critical comparison is finally presented of the classical vs. macroquantum description of the system in the macrodomain. The new paradigm thus represents an entirely new and unexpected manifestation of quantum dynamics in the classical macrodomain

  7. A Wigner quasi-distribution function for charged particles in classical electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levanda, M.; Fleurov, V.

    2001-01-01

    A gauge-invariant Wigner quasi-distribution function for charged particles in classical electromagnetic fields is derived in a rigorous way. Its relation to the axial gauge is discussed, as well as the relation between the kinetic and canonical momenta in the Wigner representation. Gauge-invariant quantum analogs of Hamilton-Jacobi and Boltzmann kinetic equations are formulated for arbitrary classical electromagnetic fields in terms of the 'slashed' derivatives and momenta, introduced for this purpose. The kinetic meaning of these slashed quantities is discussed. We introduce gauge-invariant conditional moments and use them to derive a kinetic momentum continuity equation. This equation provides us with a hydrodynamic representation for quantum transport processes and a definition of the 'collision force'. The hydrodynamic equation is applied for the rotation part of the electron motion. The theory is illustrated by its application in three examples: Wigner quasi-distribution function and equations for an electron in a magnetic field and harmonic potential; Wigner quasi-distribution function for a charged particle in periodic systems using the kq representation; two Wigner quasi-distribution functions for heavy-mass polaron in an electric field

  8. Effects of classical resonances on the chaotic microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R V

    1987-05-01

    Experimental measurements of the microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from n = 32 to 90 are well described by a classical treatment of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In particular, the measurements of the threshold field for the onset of significant ionization exhibits a curious dependence on the microwave frequency with distinct peaks at rational values of the scaled frequency, n/sup 3/..cap omega.. = 1, 2/3, 1/2, 2/5, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, which is in excellent agreement with the predictions for the onset of classical chaos in a one-dimensional model of the experiment. In the classical theory this frequency dependence of the threshold fields is due to the stabilizing effect of nonlinear resonances (''islands'') in the classical phase space which is greatly enhanced when the microwave perturbation is turned on slowly (adiabatically) as in the experiments. Quantum calculations for this one-dimensional model also exhibit this stabilizing effect due to the preferential excitation of localized quasi-energy states.

  9. Classical field theory in the space of reference frames. [Space-time manifold, action principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toller, M [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Libera Universita, Trento (Italy)

    1978-03-11

    The formalism of classical field theory is generalized by replacing the space-time manifold M by the ten-dimensional manifold S of all the local reference frames. The geometry of the manifold S is determined by ten vector fields corresponding to ten operationally defined infinitesimal transformations of the reference frames. The action principle is written in terms of a differential 4-form in the space S (the Lagrangian form). Densities and currents are represented by differential 3-forms in S. The field equations and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws (Noether's theorem) are derived from the action principle. Einstein's theory of gravitation and Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism are reformulated in this language. The general formalism can also be used to formulate theories in which charge, energy and momentum cannot be localized in space-time and even theories in which a space-time manifold cannot be defined exactly in any useful way.

  10. On gravity's role in the genesis of rest masses of classical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabados, László B.

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that in the Einstein-conformally coupled Higgs-Maxwell system with Friedman-Robertson-Walker symmetries the energy density of the Higgs field has stable local minimum only if the mean curvature of the t=const hypersurfaces is less than a finite critical value χ _c, while for greater mean curvature the energy density is not bounded from below. Therefore, there are extreme gravitational situations in which even quasi-locally defined instantaneous vacuum states of the Higgs sector cannot exist, and hence one cannot at all define the rest mass of all the classical fields. On hypersurfaces with mean curvature less than χ _c the energy density has the `wine bottle' (rather than the familiar `Mexican hat') shape, and the gauge field can get rest mass via the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism. The spacelike hypersurface with the critical mean curvature represents the moment of `genesis' of rest masses.

  11. Generation of longitudinal current by a transverse electromagnetic field in classical and quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latyshev, A. V., E-mail: avlatyshev@mail.ru; Yushkanov, A. A. [Moscow State Regional University (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    A distribution function for collisionless plasma is derived from the Vlasov kinetic equation in the quadratic approximation with respect to the electromagnetic field. Formulas for calculation of the electric current at an arbitrary temperature (arbitrary degree of degeneration of the electron gas) are deduced. The case of small wavenumbers is considered. It is shown that nonlinearity leads to the generation of an electric current directed along the wave vector. This longitudinal current is orthogonal to the classical transverse current, well known in the linear theory. A distribution function for collisionless quantum plasma is derived from the kinetic equation with the Wigner integral in the quadratic approximation with respect to the vector potential. Formulas for calculation of the electric current at an arbitrary temperature are deduced. The case of small wavenumbers is considered. It is shown that, at small values of the wavenumber, the value of the longitudinal current for quantum plasma coincides with that for classical plasma. The dimensionless currents in quantum and classical plasmas are compared graphically.

  12. Field-testing of the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Sørensen, Morten Togo; Gozalov, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We aimed to field-test the beta version of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The proposed beta draft of the 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases...... (ICD-11 beta) is almost exclusively based on the ICHD-3 beta classification structure although slightly abbreviated. We compared sensitivity and specificity to ICHD-2 criteria, and evaluated the needs for revision. METHODS: Clinical characteristics were systematically and prospectively collected from...

  13. Relativistic and nonrelativistic classical field theory on fivedimensional space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunzle, H.P.; Duval, C.

    1985-07-01

    This paper is a sequel to earlier ones in which, on the one hand, classical field theories were described on a curved Newtonian space-time, and on the other hand, the Newtonian gravitation theory was formulated on a fivedimensional space-time with a metric of signature and a covariantly constant vector field. Here we show that Lagrangians for matter fields are easily formulated on this extended space-time from simple invariance arguments and that stress-energy tensors can be derived from them in the usual manner so that four-dimensional space-time expressions are obtained that are consistent in the relativistic as well as in the Newtonian case. In the former the theory is equivalent to General Relativity. When the magnitude of the distinguished vector field vanishes equations for the (covariant) Newtonian limit follow. We demonstrate this here explicity in the case of the Klein-Gordon/Schroedinger and the Dirac field and its covariant nonrelativistic analogue, the Levy-Leblond field. Especially in the latter example the covariant Newtonian theory simplifies dramatically in this fivedimensional form

  14. Thermal and viscous effects on sound waves: revised classical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony M J; Brenner, Howard

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the recently developed, bi-velocity model of fluid mechanics based on the principles of linear irreversible thermodynamics (LIT) is applied to sound propagation in gases taking account of first-order thermal and viscous dissipation effects. The results are compared and contrasted with the classical Navier-Stokes-Fourier results of Pierce for this same situation cited in his textbook. Comparisons are also made with the recent analyses of Dadzie and Reese, whose molecularly based sound propagation calculations furnish results virtually identical with the purely macroscopic LIT-based bi-velocity results below, as well as being well-supported by experimental data. Illustrative dissipative sound propagation examples involving application of the bi-velocity model to several elementary situations are also provided, showing the disjoint entropy mode and the additional, evanescent viscous mode.

  15. Effective state metamorphosis in semi-classical loop quantum cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Parampreet [Institute for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2005-10-21

    Modification to the behaviour of geometrical density at short scales is a key result of loop quantum cosmology, responsible for an interesting phenomenology in the very early universe. We demonstrate the way matter with arbitrary scale factor dependence in Hamiltonian incorporates this change in its effective dynamics in the loop-modified phase. For generic matter, the equation of state starts varying near a critical scale factor, becomes negative below it and violates the strong energy condition. This opens a new avenue to generalize various phenomenological applications in loop quantum cosmology. We show that different ways to define energy density may yield radically different results, especially for the case corresponding to classical dust. We also discuss implications for frequency dispersion induced by modification to geometric density at small scales.

  16. Noether symmetries, energy-momentum tensors, and conformal invariance in classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of classical field theory, we first review the Noether theory of symmetries, with simple rederivations of its essential results, with special emphasis given to the Noether identities for gauge theories. With this baggage on board, we next discuss in detail, for Poincare invariant theories in flat spacetime, the differences between the Belinfante energy-momentum tensor and a family of Hilbert energy-momentum tensors. All these tensors coincide on shell but they split their duties in the following sense: Belinfante's tensor is the one to use in order to obtain the generators of Poincare symmetries and it is a basic ingredient of the generators of other eventual spacetime symmetries which may happen to exist. Instead, Hilbert tensors are the means to test whether a theory contains other spacetime symmetries beyond Poincare. We discuss at length the case of scale and conformal symmetry, of which we give some examples. We show, for Poincare invariant Lagrangians, that the realization of scale invariance selects a unique Hilbert tensor which allows for an easy test as to whether conformal invariance is also realized. Finally we make some basic remarks on metric generally covariant theories and classical field theory in a fixed curved background.

  17. Flowing states and vortices in the classical XY model in an external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Shigeo; Aoki, Toshizumi; Takeno, Shozo.

    1981-01-01

    Uniformly flowing states and vortices in the classical XY model in an external field are studied. This is done by using a continuum approximation and by paying attention to particular solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations for two angles theta and phi of rotation of spins for which phi satisfies the Laplace equation. For these two states equations for theta have forms similar to that in the classical Ising model in a transverse field. The uniformly flowing states are therefore described by kink-type excitations identical to those in the two-dimensional Ising model. Phonon modes associated with the uniformly flowing states are also studied, which are similar to Bogoliubov phonons. Vortex solutions and vortex formation energy are studied in close similarity to the case of liquid He 4 . By comparing the energies of these two states, an expression for critical velocity is obtained. By making correspondence to the case of liquid He 4 , numerical values of the critical velocity and of the velocity of phonons around the uniformly flowing states are estimated. For the former the numerical value is in fair agreement with experimental data. (author)

  18. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sulimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated.

  19. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimov, A V; Kutov, D C; Katkova, E V; Sulimov, V B

    2017-01-01

    Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated.

  20. Quantization in the neighborhood of a classical solution in the theory of a Fermi field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveshnikov, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    The quantization of a Fermi-Bose field system in the neighborhood of a classical solution of the equations of motion that contains both bosonic and spinor components is considered. The latter is regarded as an absolutely anticommuting (Grassmann) component of a fermion field. On account of the transport of the fermion number, such an object mixes the fermionic and bosonic and fermionic and antifermionic degrees of freedom already at the level of the single-particle states (in the approximately of quadratic forms). Explicit expressions are obtained for the operator of the S matrix, which describes such transport processes, and the total Hamiltonian and total fermion charge of the system in this approximation

  1. Attention operates uniformly throughout the classical receptive field and the surround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Maunsell, John HR

    2016-01-01

    Shifting attention among visual stimuli at different locations modulates neuronal responses in heterogeneous ways, depending on where those stimuli lie within the receptive fields of neurons. Yet how attention interacts with the receptive-field structure of cortical neurons remains unclear. We measured neuronal responses in area V4 while monkeys shifted their attention among stimuli placed in different locations within and around neuronal receptive fields. We found that attention interacts uniformly with the spatially-varying excitation and suppression associated with the receptive field. This interaction explained the large variability in attention modulation across neurons, and a non-additive relationship among stimulus selectivity, stimulus-induced suppression and attention modulation that has not been previously described. A spatially-tuned normalization model precisely accounted for all observed attention modulations and for the spatial summation properties of neurons. These results provide a unified account of spatial summation and attention-related modulation across both the classical receptive field and the surround. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17256.001 PMID:27547989

  2. Measurement of velocity field in pipe with classic twisted tape using matching refractive index technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Min Seop; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Eung Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Many researchers conducted experiments and numerical simulations to measure or predict a Nusselt number or a friction factor in a pipe with a twisted tape while some other studies focused on the heat transfer performance enhancement using various twisted tape configurations. However, since the optical access to the inner space of a pipe with a twisted tape was limited, the detailed flow field data were not obtainable so far. Thus, researchers mainly relied on the numerical simulations to obtain the data of the flow field. In this study, a 3D printing technique was used to manufacture a transparent test section for optical access. And also, a noble refractive index matching technique was used to eliminate optical distortion. This two combined techniques enabled to measure the velocity profile with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measured velocity field data can be used either to understand the fundamental flow characteristics around a twisted tape or to validate turbulence models in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In this study, the flow field in the test-section was measured for various flow conditions and it was finally compared with numerically calculated data. Velocity fields in a pipe with a classic twisted tape was measured using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. To obtain undistorted particle images, a noble optical technique, refractive index matching, was used and it was proved that high-quality image can be obtained from this experimental equipment. The velocity data from the PIV was compared with the CFD simulations.

  3. Measurement of velocity field in pipe with classic twisted tape using matching refractive index technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Min Seop; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Eung Soo

    2014-01-01

    Many researchers conducted experiments and numerical simulations to measure or predict a Nusselt number or a friction factor in a pipe with a twisted tape while some other studies focused on the heat transfer performance enhancement using various twisted tape configurations. However, since the optical access to the inner space of a pipe with a twisted tape was limited, the detailed flow field data were not obtainable so far. Thus, researchers mainly relied on the numerical simulations to obtain the data of the flow field. In this study, a 3D printing technique was used to manufacture a transparent test section for optical access. And also, a noble refractive index matching technique was used to eliminate optical distortion. This two combined techniques enabled to measure the velocity profile with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measured velocity field data can be used either to understand the fundamental flow characteristics around a twisted tape or to validate turbulence models in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In this study, the flow field in the test-section was measured for various flow conditions and it was finally compared with numerically calculated data. Velocity fields in a pipe with a classic twisted tape was measured using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. To obtain undistorted particle images, a noble optical technique, refractive index matching, was used and it was proved that high-quality image can be obtained from this experimental equipment. The velocity data from the PIV was compared with the CFD simulations

  4. Thermodynamic properties for applications in chemical industry via classical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Hasse, Hans; Vrabec, Jadran

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of fluids are of key importance for the chemical industry. Presently, the fluid property models used in process design and optimization are mostly equations of state or G (E) models, which are parameterized using experimental data. Molecular modeling and simulation based on classical force fields is a promising alternative route, which in many cases reasonably complements the well established methods. This chapter gives an introduction to the state-of-the-art in this field regarding molecular models, simulation methods, and tools. Attention is given to the way modeling and simulation on the scale of molecular force fields interact with other scales, which is mainly by parameter inheritance. Parameters for molecular force fields are determined both bottom-up from quantum chemistry and top-down from experimental data. Commonly used functional forms for describing the intra- and intermolecular interactions are presented. Several approaches for ab initio to empirical force field parameterization are discussed. Some transferable force field families, which are frequently used in chemical engineering applications, are described. Furthermore, some examples of force fields that were parameterized for specific molecules are given. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods for the calculation of transport properties and vapor-liquid equilibria are introduced. Two case studies are presented. First, using liquid ammonia as an example, the capabilities of semi-empirical force fields, parameterized on the basis of quantum chemical information and experimental data, are discussed with respect to thermodynamic properties that are relevant for the chemical industry. Second, the ability of molecular simulation methods to describe accurately vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of binary mixtures containing CO(2) is shown.

  5. Quantum Metrology beyond the Classical Limit under the Effect of Dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Benjamin, Simon; Nakayama, Shojun; Saito, Shiro; Munro, William J.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum sensors have the potential to outperform their classical counterparts. For classical sensing, the uncertainty of the estimation of the target fields scales inversely with the square root of the measurement time T . On the other hand, by using quantum resources, we can reduce this scaling of the uncertainty with time to 1 /T . However, as quantum states are susceptible to dephasing, it has not been clear whether we can achieve sensitivities with a scaling of 1 /T for a measurement time longer than the coherence time. Here, we propose a scheme that estimates the amplitude of globally applied fields with the uncertainty of 1 /T for an arbitrary time scale under the effect of dephasing. We use one-way quantum-computing-based teleportation between qubits to prevent any increase in the correlation between the quantum state and its local environment from building up and have shown that such a teleportation protocol can suppress the local dephasing while the information from the target fields keeps growing. Our method has the potential to realize a quantum sensor with a sensitivity far beyond that of any classical sensor.

  6. Equation of Motion of a Mass Point in Gravitational Field and Classical Tests of Gauge Theory of Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ning; Zhang Dahua

    2007-01-01

    A systematic method is developed to study the classical motion of a mass point in gravitational gauge field. First, by using Mathematica, a spherical symmetric solution of the field equation of gravitational gauge field is obtained, which is just the traditional Schwarzschild solution. Combining the principle of gauge covariance and Newton's second law of motion, the equation of motion of a mass point in gravitational field is deduced. Based on the spherical symmetric solution of the field equation and the equation of motion of a mass point in gravitational field, we can discuss classical tests of gauge theory of gravity, including the deflection of light by the sun, the precession of the perihelia of the orbits of the inner planets and the time delay of radar echoes passing the sun. It is found that the theoretical predictions of these classical tests given by gauge theory of gravity are completely the same as those given by general relativity.

  7. Improved CORF model of simple cell combined with non-classical receptive field and its application on edge detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Chai, Guobei; Liu, Wei; Bao, Wenzhuo; Zhao, Xiaoning; Ming, Delie

    2018-02-01

    Simple cells in primary visual cortex are believed to extract local edge information from a visual scene. In this paper, inspired by different receptive field properties and visual information flow paths of neurons, an improved Combination of Receptive Fields (CORF) model combined with non-classical receptive fields was proposed to simulate the responses of simple cell's receptive fields. Compared to the classical model, the proposed model is able to better imitate simple cell's physiologic structure with consideration of facilitation and suppression of non-classical receptive fields. And on this base, an edge detection algorithm as an application of the improved CORF model was proposed. Experimental results validate the robustness of the proposed algorithm to noise and background interference.

  8. Gauge bridges in classical field theory; Eichbruecken in der klassischen Feldtheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, S.

    2009-03-15

    In this thesis Poisson structures of two classical gauge field theories (Maxwell-Klein-Gordon- and Maxwell-Dirac-system) are constructed using the parametrix construction of Green's functions. Parametrices for the Maxwell-Klein-Gordon- and Maxwell-Dirac-system are constructed in Minkowski space and this construction is later generalized to curved space times for the Maxwell-Klein-Gordon-system. With these Green's functions Poisson brackets will be defined as Peierls brackets. Finally non-local, gauge invariant observables, the so-called 'gauge bridges'are constructed. Gauge bridges are the matrix elements of holonomy operators. It is shown, that these emerge from Poisson brackets of local, gauge invariant observables. (orig.)

  9. Multinomial Bayesian learning for modeling classical and nonclassical receptive field properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Haruo

    2012-08-01

    We study the interplay of Bayesian inference and natural image learning in a hierarchical vision system, in relation to the response properties of early visual cortex. We particularly focus on a Bayesian network with multinomial variables that can represent discrete feature spaces similar to hypercolumns combining minicolumns, enforce sparsity of activation to learn efficient representations, and explain divisive normalization. We demonstrate that maximal-likelihood learning using sampling-based Bayesian inference gives rise to classical receptive field properties similar to V1 simple cells and V2 cells, while inference performed on the trained network yields nonclassical context-dependent response properties such as cross-orientation suppression and filling in. Comparison with known physiological properties reveals some qualitative and quantitative similarities.

  10. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  11. External field-induced chaos in classical and quantum Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Classical nonlinear nonintegrable systems exhibit dense sets of resonance zones in phase space. Global chaotic motion appears when neighboring resonance zones overlap. The chaotic motion signifies the destruction of a quasi constant of motion. The motion of a particle, trapped in one of the wells of a sinusoidal, potential driven by a monochromatic external field was studied. Global chaotic behavior sets in when the amplitude of the external field reaches a critical value. The particle then escapes the well. The critical values are found to be in good agreement with a resonance overlap criterion rather than a renormalization-group scheme. A similar system was then studied, but with the particle being confined in an infinite square well potential instead. A stochastic layer is found in the low-energy part of the phase space. The resonance zone structure is found to be in excellent agreement with predictions. The critical values for the onset of global chaotic behavior are found to be in excellent agreement with the renormalization group scheme. The quantum version of the second model above was then considered. In a similar fashion, the external field induces quantum resonance zones. The spectral statistics were computed, and a transition of statistics from Poissonian to Wigner-like was found as overlap of quantum resonances occurs. This also signifies the destruction of a quasi-constant of motion

  12. All-Atom Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting QM data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude force field yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100 ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduces (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII sub-states of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive force field, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  13. Effective field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.; Kalkreuter, T.; Palma, G.; Speh, M.

    1992-05-01

    Effective field theories encode the predictions of a quantum field theory at low energy. The effective theory has a fairly low utraviolet cutoff. As a result, loop corrections are small, at least if the effective action contains a term which is quadratic in the fields, and physical predictions can be read straight from the effective Lagrangean. Methods will be discussed how to compute an effective low energy action from a given fundamental action, either analytically or numerically, or by a combination of both methods. Basically, the idea is to integrate out the high frequency components of fields. This requires the choice of a 'blockspin', i.e. the specification af a low frequency field as a function of the fundamental fields. These blockspins will be fields of the effective field theory. The blockspin need not be a field of the same type as one of the fundamental fields, and it may be composite. Special features of blockspin in nonabelian gauge theories will be discussed in some detail. In analytical work and in multigrid updating schemes one needs interpolation kernels A from coarse to fine grid in addition to the averaging kernels C which determines the blockspin. A neural net strategy for finding optimal kernels is presented. Numerical methods are applicable to obtain actions of effective theories on lattices of finite volume. The special case of a 'lattice' with a single site (the constraint effective potential) is of particular interest. In a higgs model, the effective action reduces in this case to the free energy, considered as a function of a gauge covariant magnetization. Its shape determines the phase structure of the theory. Its loop expansion with and without gauge fields can be used to determine finite size corrections to numerical data. (orig.)

  14. Quantum mean-field approximation for lattice quantum models: Truncating quantum correlations and retaining classical ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpetti, Daniele; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The mean-field approximation is at the heart of our understanding of complex systems, despite its fundamental limitation of completely neglecting correlations between the elementary constituents. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 130401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.130401], we have shown that in quantum many-body systems at finite temperature, two-point correlations can be formally separated into a thermal part and a quantum part and that quantum correlations are generically found to decay exponentially at finite temperature, with a characteristic, temperature-dependent quantum coherence length. The existence of these two different forms of correlation in quantum many-body systems suggests the possibility of formulating an approximation, which affects quantum correlations only, without preventing the correct description of classical fluctuations at all length scales. Focusing on lattice boson and quantum Ising models, we make use of the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics to introduce such an approximation, which we dub quantum mean-field (QMF) approach, and which can be readily generalized to a cluster form (cluster QMF or cQMF). The cQMF approximation reduces to cluster mean-field theory at T =0 , while at any finite temperature it produces a family of systematically improved, semi-classical approximations to the quantum statistical mechanics of the lattice theory at hand. Contrary to standard MF approximations, the correct nature of thermal critical phenomena is captured by any cluster size. In the two exemplary cases of the two-dimensional quantum Ising model and of two-dimensional quantum rotors, we study systematically the convergence of the cQMF approximation towards the exact result, and show that the convergence is typically linear or sublinear in the boundary-to-bulk ratio of the clusters as T →0 , while it becomes faster than linear as T grows. These results pave the way towards the development of semiclassical numerical

  15. Interaction between benzenedithiolate and gold: Classical force field for chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yongsheng; Krstić, Predrag S.; Wells, Jack C.; Cummings, Peter T.; Dean, David J.

    2005-06-01

    We have constructed a group of classical potentials based on ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to describe the chemical bonding between benzenedithiolate (BDT) molecule and gold atoms, including bond stretching, bond angle bending, and dihedral angle torsion involved at the interface between the molecule and gold clusters. Three DFT functionals, local-density approximation (LDA), PBE0, and X3LYP, have been implemented to calculate single point energies (SPE) for a large number of molecular configurations of BDT-1, 2 Au complexes. The three DFT methods yield similar bonding curves. The variations of atomic charges from Mulliken population analysis within the molecule/metal complex versus different molecular configurations have been investigated in detail. We found that, except for bonded atoms in BDT-1, 2 Au complexes, the Mulliken partial charges of other atoms in BDT are quite stable, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in partial charge selections in classical molecular simulations. Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structure of BDT self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the adsorption geometry of S adatoms on Au (111) surface. We found that the bond-stretching potential is the most dominant part in chemical bonding. Whereas the local bonding geometry of BDT molecular configuration may depend on the DFT functional used, the global packing structure of BDT SAM is quite independent of DFT functional, even though the uncertainty of some force-field parameters for chemical bonding can be as large as ˜100%. This indicates that the intermolecular interactions play a dominant role in determining the BDT SAMs global packing structure.

  16. Non-Gaussian statistics, classical field theory, and realizable Langevin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    The direct-interaction approximation (DIA) to the fourth-order statistic Z ∼ left-angle λψ 2 ) 2 right-angle, where λ is a specified operator and ψ is a random field, is discussed from several points of view distinct from that of Chen et al. [Phys. Fluids A 1, 1844 (1989)]. It is shown that the formula for Z DIA already appeared in the seminal work of Martin, Siggia, and Rose (Phys. Rev. A 8, 423 (1973)] on the functional approach to classical statistical dynamics. It does not follow from the original generalized Langevin equation (GLE) of Leith [J. Atmos. Sd. 28, 145 (1971)] and Kraichnan [J. Fluid Mech. 41, 189 (1970)] (frequently described as an amplitude representation for the DIA), in which the random forcing is realized by a particular superposition of products of random variables. The relationship of that GLE to renormalized field theories with non-Gaussian corrections (''spurious vertices'') is described. It is shown how to derive an improved representation, that realizes cumulants through O(ψ 4 ), by adding to the GLE a particular non-Gaussian correction. A Markovian approximation Z DIA M to Z DIA is derived. Both Z DIA and Z DIA M incorrectly predict a Gaussian kurtosis for the steady state of a solvable three-mode example

  17. First order mean field games - explicit solutions, perturbations and connection with classical mechanics

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2016-01-06

    We present recent developments in the theory of first-order mean-field games (MFGs). A standard assumption in MFGs is that the cost function of the agents is monotone in the density of the distribution. This assumption leads to a comprehensive existence theory and to the uniqueness of smooth solutions. Here, our goals are to understand the role of local monotonicity in the small perturbation regime and the properties of solutions for problems without monotonicity. Under a local monotonicity assumption, we show that small perturbations of MFGs have unique smooth solutions. In addition, we explore the connection between first-order MFGs and classical mechanics and KAM theory. Next, for non-monotone problems, we construct non-unique explicit solutions for a broad class of first-order mean-field games. We provide an alternative formulation of MFGs in terms of a new current variable. These examples illustrate two new phenomena: the non-uniqueness of solutions and the breakdown of regularity.

  18. First order mean field games - explicit solutions, perturbations and connection with classical mechanics

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Nurbekyan, Levon; Prazeres, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We present recent developments in the theory of first-order mean-field games (MFGs). A standard assumption in MFGs is that the cost function of the agents is monotone in the density of the distribution. This assumption leads to a comprehensive existence theory and to the uniqueness of smooth solutions. Here, our goals are to understand the role of local monotonicity in the small perturbation regime and the properties of solutions for problems without monotonicity. Under a local monotonicity assumption, we show that small perturbations of MFGs have unique smooth solutions. In addition, we explore the connection between first-order MFGs and classical mechanics and KAM theory. Next, for non-monotone problems, we construct non-unique explicit solutions for a broad class of first-order mean-field games. We provide an alternative formulation of MFGs in terms of a new current variable. These examples illustrate two new phenomena: the non-uniqueness of solutions and the breakdown of regularity.

  19. Effective quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgi, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    The most appropriate description of particle interactions in the language of quantum field theory depends on the energy at which the interactions are studied; the description is in terms of an ''effective field theory'' that contains explicit reference only to those particles that are actually important at the energy being studied. The various themes of the article are: local quantum field theory, quantum electrodynamics, new physics, dimensional parameters and renormalizability, socio-dynamics of particle theory, spontaneously broken gauge theories, scale dependence, grand unified and effective field theories. 2 figs

  20. Effects of complex parameters on classical trajectories of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Permanent address: Department of Mathematics, University of Jaffna, Jaffna, Sri Lanka. ∗ ... is complex and k = 1 or 2) are closed and periodic only for a discrete set of parameter curves in the complex b-plane. ... are periodic for a discrete set of real energies (i.e., classical energy gets discretized or quantized by imposing ...

  1. A classical picture of anomalous effects in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the atomic collisions between plasma ions and a very small amount of neutral particles remaining in a hot plasma plays a very important role for plasma transports and may be an origin of anomalous effects observed in a tokamak such as the diffusion coefficient independent of the field strength, a rapid plasma density increase during gas puffing and current penetration with anomalously high speed in the start-up phase. The Ohm's law derived by Cowling is used for the analysis. (author)

  2. Quantum epistemology from subquantum ontology: Quantum mechanics from theory of classical random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    The scientific methodology based on two descriptive levels, ontic (reality as it is) and epistemic (observational), is briefly presented. Following Schrödinger, we point to the possible gap between these two descriptions. Our main aim is to show that, although ontic entities may be unaccessible for observations, they can be useful for clarification of the physical nature of operational epistemic entities. We illustrate this thesis by the concrete example: starting with the concrete ontic model preceding quantum mechanics (the latter is treated as an epistemic model), namely, prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), we propose the natural physical interpretation for the basic quantum mechanical entity-the quantum state ("wave function"). The correspondence PCSFT ↦ QM is not straightforward, it couples the covariance operators of classical (prequantum) random fields with the quantum density operators. We use this correspondence to clarify the physical meaning of the pure quantum state and the superposition principle-by using the formalism of classical field correlations. In classical mechanics the phase space description can be considered as the ontic description, here states are given by points λ =(x , p) of phase space. The dynamics of the ontic state is given by the system of Hamiltonian equations.We can also consider probability distributions on the phase space (or equivalently random variables valued in it). We call them probabilistic ontic states. Dynamics of probabilistic ontic states is given by the Liouville equation.In classical physics we can (at least in principle) measure both the coordinate and momentum and hence ontic states can be treated as epistemic states as well (or it is better to say that here epistemic states can be treated as ontic states). Probabilistic ontic states represent probabilities for outcomes of joint measurement of position and momentum.However, this was a very special, although very important, example of

  3. Corrections to classical kinetic and transport theory for a two-temparature, fully ionized plasma in electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeien, A.H.

    1977-06-01

    Sets of lower order and higher order kinetic and macroscopic equations are developed for a plasma where collisions are important but electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures when transports, due to gradients and fields, set in. Solving the lower order kinetic equations and taking appropriate velocity moments we show that usual classical transports emerge. From the higher order kinetic equations special notice is taken of some new correction terms to the classical transports. These corrections are linear in gradients and fields, some of which are found in a two-temperature state only. (Auth.)

  4. Collective classical and quantum fields in plasmas, superconductors, superfluid $^{3}$He, and liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen Kleinert

    2018-01-01

    This is an introductory book dealing with collective phenomena in many-body systems. A gas of bosons or fermions can show oscillations of various types of density. These are described by different combinations of field variables. Especially delicate is the competition of these variables. In superfluid 3He, for example, the atoms can be attracted to each other by molecular forces, whereas they are repelled from each other at short distance due to a hardcore repulsion. The attraction gives rise to Cooper pairs, and the repulsion is overcome by paramagnon oscillations. The combination is what finally led to the discovery of superfluidity in 3He. In general, the competition between various channels can most efficiently be studied by means of a classical version of the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. A gas of electrons is controlled by the interplay of plasma oscillations and pair formation. In a system of rod- or disc-like molecules, liquid crystals are observed with directional orientations that behave in ...

  5. The classical field limit of scattering theory for non-relativistic many-boson systems. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginibre, J.

    1979-01-01

    We study the classical field limit of non-relativistic many-boson theories in space dimension n >= 3. When h → 0, the correlation functions, which are the averages of products of bounded functions of field operators at different times taken in suitable states, converge to the corresponding functions of the appropriate solutions of the classical field equation, and the quantum fluctuations, are described by the equation obtained by linearizing the field equation around the classical solution. These properties were proved by Hepp for suitably regular potentials and in finite time intervals. Using a general theory of existence of global solutions and a general scattering theory for the clasical equation, we extend these results in two directions: (1) we consider more singular potentials, (2) more imortant, we prove that for dispersive classical solutions, the h → 0 limit is uniform in time in an appropriate representation of the field operators. As a consequence we obtain the convergence of suitable matrix elements of the wave operators and, if asymptotic completeness holds, of the S-matrix. (orig.) [de

  6. Effects of Classical Background Music on Stress, Anxiety, and Knowledge of Filipino Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Kevin; Macabasag, Romeo Luis A; Capili, Brylle; Castro, Timothy; Danque, Marilee; Evangelista, Hanzel; Rivero, Jenica Ana; Gonong, Michell Katrina; Diño, Michael Joseph; Cajayon, Sharon

    2017-10-28

    Previous work on the use of background music suggests conflicting results in various psychological, behavioral, and educational measures. This quasi-experiment examined the effect of integrating classical background music during a lecture on stress, anxiety, and knowledge. A total of 42 nursing students participated this study. We utilized independent sample t-test and multivariate analysis of variance to examine the effect of classical background music. Our findings suggest that the presence or absence of classical background music do not affect stress, anxiety, and knowledge scores (Λ = 0.999 F(3, 78) = 0.029, p = 0.993). We provided literature to explain the non-significant result. Although classical music failed to establish a significant influence on the dependent variables, classical background music during lecture hours can be considered a non-threatening stimulus. We recommend follow up studies regarding the role of classical background music in regulating attention control of nursing students during lecture hours.

  7. Low-field susceptibility of classical Heisenberg chains with arbitrary and different nearest-neighbour exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cregg, P J; Murphy, K; Garcia-Palacios, J L; Svedlindh, P

    2008-01-01

    Interest in molecular magnets continues to grow, offering a link between the atomic and nanoscale properties. The classical Heisenberg model has been effective in modelling exchange interactions in such systems. In this, the magnetization and susceptibility are calculated through the partition function, where the Hamiltonian contains both Zeeman and exchange energy. For an ensemble of N spins, this requires integrals in 2N dimensions. For two, three and four spin nearest-neighbour chains these integrals reduce to sums of known functions. For the case of the three and four spin chains, the sums are equivalent to results of Joyce. Expanding these sums, the effect of the exchange on the linear susceptibility appears as Langevin functions with exchange term arguments. These expressions are generalized here to describe an N spin nearest-neighbour chain, where the exchange between each pair of nearest neighbours is different and arbitrary. For a common exchange constant, this reduces to the result of Fisher. The high-temperature expansion of the Langevin functions for the different exchange constants leads to agreement with the appropriate high-temperature quantum formula of Schmidt et al, when the spin number is large. Simulations are presented for open linear chains of three, four and five spins with up to four different exchange constants, illustrating how the exchange constants can be retrieved successfully

  8. Classical theory of atom-surface scattering: The rainbow effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador; Pollak, Eli

    2012-07-01

    The scattering of heavy atoms and molecules from surfaces is oftentimes dominated by classical mechanics. A large body of experiments have gathered data on the angular distributions of the scattered species, their energy loss distribution, sticking probability, dependence on surface temperature and more. For many years these phenomena have been considered theoretically in the framework of the “washboard model” in which the interaction of the incident particle with the surface is described in terms of hard wall potentials. Although this class of models has helped in elucidating some of the features it left open many questions such as: true potentials are clearly not hard wall potentials, it does not provide a realistic framework for phonon scattering, and it cannot explain the incident angle and incident energy dependence of rainbow scattering, nor can it provide a consistent theory for sticking. In recent years we have been developing a classical perturbation theory approach which has provided new insight into the dynamics of atom-surface scattering. The theory includes both surface corrugation as well as interaction with surface phonons in terms of harmonic baths which are linearly coupled to the system coordinates. This model has been successful in elucidating many new features of rainbow scattering in terms of frictions and bath fluctuations or noise. It has also given new insight into the origins of asymmetry in atomic scattering from surfaces. New phenomena deduced from the theory include friction induced rainbows, energy loss rainbows, a theory of super-rainbows, and more. In this review we present the classical theory of atom-surface scattering as well as extensions and implications for semiclassical scattering and the further development of a quantum theory of surface scattering. Special emphasis is given to the inversion of scattering data into information on the particle-surface interactions.

  9. Classical Wigner method with an effective quantum force: application to reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage; Li, Huaqing; Nyman, Gunnar

    2009-07-14

    We construct an effective "quantum force" to be used in the classical molecular dynamics part of the classical Wigner method when determining correlation functions. The quantum force is obtained by estimating the most important short time separation of the Feynman paths that enter into the expression for the correlation function. The evaluation of the force is then as easy as classical potential energy evaluations. The ideas are tested on three reaction rate problems. The resulting transmission coefficients are in much better agreement with accurate results than transmission coefficients from the ordinary classical Wigner method.

  10. Classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Benacquista, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to classical mechanics at a level intermediate between the typical undergraduate and advanced graduate level. This text describes the background and tools for use in the fields of modern physics, such as quantum mechanics, astrophysics, particle physics, and relativity. Students who have had basic undergraduate classical mechanics or who have a good understanding of the mathematical methods of physics will benefit from this book.

  11. Thermoelectric power in ultrathin films, quantum wires and carbon nanotubes under classically large magnetic field: Simplified theory and relative comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.; Choudhury, S. [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, East Sikkim 737 132 (India); Saha, S. [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Mallabhum Institute of Technology College Campus, Brajaradhanagar, P.O. Gosaipur, P.S. Bishnupur, District - Bankura 722 122 (India); Pahari, S. [Administration Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); De, D. [Department of Computer Science Engineering, West Bengal University of Technology, BF 142, Sector 1, Kolkatta 700 064, West Bengal (India); Bhattacharya, S. [Nano Scale Device Research Laboratory, Center for Electronics Design and Technology, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ghatak, K.P., E-mail: kamakhyaghatak@yahoo.co.i [Department of Electronic Science, University Calcutta, 92 Acharyya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2010-01-01

    We study the thermoelectric power under classically large magnetic field (TPM) in ultrathin films (UFs), quantum wires (QWs) of non-linear optical materials on the basis of a newly formulated electron dispersion law considering the anisotropies of the effective electron masses, the spin-orbit splitting constants and the presence of the crystal field splitting within the framework of k.p formalism. The results of quantum confined III-V compounds form the special cases of our generalized analysis. The TPM has also been studied for quantum confined II-VI, stressed materials, bismuth and carbon nanotubes (CNs) on the basis of respective dispersion relations. It is found taking quantum confined CdGeAs{sub 2}, InAs, InSb, CdS, stressed n-InSb and Bi that the TPM increases with increasing film thickness and decreasing electron statistics exhibiting quantized nature for all types of quantum confinement. The TPM in CNs exhibits oscillatory dependence with increasing carrier concentration and the signature of the entirely different types of quantum systems are evident from the plots. Besides, under certain special conditions, all the results for all the materials gets simplified to the well-known expression of the TPM for non-degenerate materials having parabolic energy bands, leading to the compatibility test.

  12. Classical particle-like behavior of Sine--Gordon solitons in scattering potentials and applied fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogel, M.B.; Trullinger, S.E.; Bishop, A.R.; Krumhansl, J.A.

    1976-02-01

    We show that classical Sine-Gordon solitons maintain their integrity to a high degree in the presence of external perturbations. Two examples, of particular importance in condensed matter, are described in detail: (i) a model impurity is found to bind low-velocity solitons but merely phase-shift those with high-velocities, (ii) external static driving terms with damping accelerate the soliton to a terminal velocity. The importance of a translation mode is emphasized and it is concluded that the soliton behaves as a classical particle in all essential respects

  13. Studying the effects of classic hallucinogens in the treatment of alcoholism: rationale, methodology, and current research with psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Michael P

    2013-03-01

    Recent developments in the study of classic hallucinogens, combined with a re-appraisal of the older literature, have led to a renewal of interest in possible therapeutic applications for these drugs, notably their application in the treatment of addictions. This article will first provide a brief review of the research literature providing direct and indirect support for the possible therapeutic effects of classic hallucinogens such as psilocybin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in the treatment of addictions. Having provided a rationale for clinical investigation in this area, we discuss design issues in clinical trials using classic hallucinogens, some of which are unique to this class of drug. We then discuss the current status of this field of research and design considerations in future randomized trials.

  14. Classical gluon fields and collective dynamics of color-charge systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronyuk, V.; Goloviznin, V. V.; Zinovjev, G. M.; Cassing, W.; Molodtsov, S. V.; Snigirev, A. M.; Toneev, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    An investigation of color fields that arise in collisions of relativistic heavy ions reveals that, in the non-Abelian case, a change in the color charge leads to the appearance of an extra term that generates a sizable contribution of color-charge glow in chromoelectric and chromomagnetic fields. The possibility of the appearance of a color echo in the scattering of composite color particles belonging to the dipole type is discussed. Arguments are adduced in support of the statement that such effects are of importance in simulating the first stage of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions,where the initial parton state is determined by a high nonequilibrium parton density and by strong local color fluctuations

  15. Modeling quantization effects in field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troger, C.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulation in the field of semiconductor device development advanced to a valuable, cost-effective and flexible facility. The most widely used simulators are based on classical models, as they need to satisfy time and memory constraints. To improve the performance of field effect transistors such as MOSFETs and HEMTs these devices are continuously scaled down in their dimensions. Consequently the characteristics of such devices are getting more and more determined by quantum mechanical effects arising from strong transversal fields in the channel. In this work an approach based on a two-dimensional electron gas is used to describe the confinement of the carriers. Quantization is considered in one direction only. For the derivation of a one-dimensional Schroedinger equation in the effective mass framework a non-parabolic correction for the energy dispersion due to Kane is included. For each subband a non-parabolic dispersion relation characterized by subband masses and subband non-parabolicity coefficients is introduced and the parameters are calculated via perturbation theory. The method described in this work has been implemented in a software tool that performs a self-consistent solution of Schroedinger- and Poisson-equation for a one-dimensional cut through a MOS structure or heterostructure. The calculation of the carrier densities is performed assuming Fermi-Dirac statistics. In the case of a MOS structure a metal or a polysilicon gate is considered and an arbitrary gate bulk voltage can be applied. This allows investigating quantum mechanical effects in capacity calculations, to compare the simulated data with measured CV curves and to evaluate the results obtained with a quantum mechanical correction for the classical electron density. The behavior of the defined subband parameters is compared to the value of the mass and the non-parabolicity coefficient from the model due to Kane. Finally the presented characterization of the subbands is applied

  16. Investigation of surface resistance of copper in classical and anomalous skin-effect region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutovoj, V.A.; Egorov, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The surface resistance of copper in classical and anomalous skin-effect region has been investigated, and the surface resistance improvement factor equal to the ratio of the surface resistance of copper at room temperature to that of helium temperature, depending on the electromagnetic field frequency, has been determined. The improvement factor has been shown to have inverse power law dependence on frequency. The frequencies at which the improvement factor of copper equals 10 have been determined. It has been found that the quality factor of a resonance high-frequency system made of copper, operating at temperature T ≥ 4.2 K can be increased 10 times or more as against a quality factor of a resonance high-frequency system operating at room temperature

  17. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of "quantum physical brain" reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a variety of concrete images given by temporal realizations of the corresponding (Gaussian) random signal. This signal has the covariance operator coinciding with the density operator encoding the abstract concept under consideration. The presence of various temporal scales in the brain plays the crucial role in creation of QLR in the brain. Moreover, in our model electromagnetic noise produced by neurons is a source of superstrong QL correlations between processes in different spatial domains in the brain; the binding problem is solved on the QL level, but with the aid of the classical background fluctuations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The time dependent Schrodinger equation revisited I: quantum field and classical Hamilton-Jacobi routes to Schrodinger's wave equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scully, M O

    2008-01-01

    The time dependent Schrodinger equation is frequently 'derived' by postulating the energy E → i h-bar (∂/∂t) and momentum p-vector → ( h-bar /i)∇ operator relations. In the present paper we review the quantum field theoretic route to the Schrodinger wave equation which treats time and space as parameters, not operators. Furthermore, we recall that a classical (nonlinear) wave equation can be derived from the classical action via Hamiltonian-Jacobi theory. By requiring the wave equation to be linear we again arrive at the Schrodinger equation, without postulating operator relations. The underlying philosophy is operational: namely 'a particle is what a particle detector detects.' This leads us to a useful physical picture combining the wave (field) and particle paradigms which points the way to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation

  19. Effective quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgi, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Certain dimensional parameters play a crucial role in the understanding of weak and strong interactions based on SU(2) x U(1) and SU(3) symmetry group theories and of grand unified theories (GUT's) based on SU(5). These parameters are the confinement scale of quantum chromodynamics and the breaking scales of SU(2) x U(1) and SU(5). The concepts of effective quantum field theories and renormalisability are discussed with reference to the economics and ethics of research. (U.K.)

  20. Internal tilting and classical transport for field-reversed configurations based on the Maschke--Hernegger solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, R.A.; Grillo, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that elongated field-reversed configurations based on the Maschke--Hernegger solution of the Grad--Shafranov equation are unstable to internal tilting. The particle transport properties across the flux surfaces of such a model are also considered in the limit of large elongation of the separatrix. An estimation of the time of confinement of particles in terms of classical conductivity, which is lower than previous estimates, is given

  1. Classical dynamics and localization of resonances in the high-energy region of the hydrogen atom in crossed fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Cartarius, Holger; Wunner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    When superimposing the potentials of external fields on the Coulomb potential of the hydrogen atom, a saddle point (called the Stark saddle point) appears. For energies slightly above the saddle point energy, one can find classical orbits that are located in the vicinity of this point. We follow those so-called quasi-Penning orbits to high energies and field strengths, observing structural changes and uncovering their bifurcation behavior. By plotting the stability behavior of those orbits against energy and field strength, the appearance of a stability apex is reported. A cusp bifurcation, located in the vicinity of the apex, will be investigated in detail. In this cusp bifurcation, another orbit of similar shape is found. This orbit becomes completely stable in the observed region of positive energy, i.e., in a region of parameter space, where the Kepler-like orbits located around the nucleus are already unstable. By quantum mechanically exact calculations, we prove the existence of signatures in quantum spectra belonging to those orbits. Husimi distributions are used to compare quantum-Poincaré sections with the extension of the classical torus structure around the orbits. Since periodic orbit theory predicts that each classical periodic orbit contributes an oscillating term to photoabsorption spectra, we finally give an estimation for future experiments, which could verify the existence of the stable orbits.

  2. Effect of the poloidal current from the classical diffusion in the steady-state neo-classical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igna Junior, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The relevant parameters of two steady-state models of a plasma column, in fusion regime, were analyzed for an ideal Tokamak. The neo-classical transport theory was considered in the banana regime and in the Pfirsch-Schlueter regime. The first model proposes a correction in the numerical coefficients of the transport equations. In the other one, a poloidal current from Pfirsch-Schlueter classical diffusion is considered aiming to satisfy the pressure balance. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. Unified field theory from the classical wave equation: Preliminary application to atomic and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Múnera, Héctor A., E-mail: hmunera@hotmail.com [Centro Internacional de Física (CIF), Apartado Aéreo 4948, Bogotá, Colombia, South America (Colombia); Retired professor, Department of Physics, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia, South America (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    It is postulated that there exists a fundamental energy-like fluid, which occupies the flat three-dimensional Euclidean space that contains our universe, and obeys the two basic laws of classical physics: conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of total energy; the fluid is described by the classical wave equation (CWE), which was Schrödinger’s first candidate to develop his quantum theory. Novel solutions for the CWE discovered twenty years ago are nonharmonic, inherently quantized, and universal in the sense of scale invariance, thus leading to quantization at all scales of the universe, from galactic clusters to the sub-quark world, and yielding a unified Lorentz-invariant quantum theory ab initio. Quingal solutions are isomorphic under both neo-Galilean and Lorentz transformations, and exhibit nother remarkable property: intrinsic unstability for large values of ℓ (a quantum number), thus limiting the size of each system at a given scale. Unstability and scale-invariance together lead to nested structures observed in our solar system; unstability may explain the small number of rows in the chemical periodic table, and nuclear unstability of nuclides beyond lead and bismuth. Quingal functions lend mathematical basis for Boscovich’s unified force (which is compatible with many pieces of evidence collected over the past century), and also yield a simple geometrical solution for the classical three-body problem, which is a useful model for electronic orbits in simple diatomic molecules. A testable prediction for the helicoidal-type force is suggested.

  4. Classical treatments of quantum mechanical effects in collisions of weakly bound complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Jose G.; McCoy, Anne B.

    2005-01-01

    Classical and quantum simulations of Ne + Ar 2 collision dynamics are performed in order to investigate where quantum mechanical effects are most important and where classical simulations provide good descriptions of the dynamics. It is found that when Ar 2 is in a low-lying vibrational state, the differences between the results of quantum and quasiclassical simulations are profound. However, excellent agreement between the results of the quantum and classical simulations can be achieved when the initial conditions for the classical trajectories are sampled from the quantum phase space distribution given by the Wigner function. These effects are largest when collisions occur under constrained geometries or when Ar 2 is in its ground vibrational state. The results of this work suggest that sampling the initial conditions using the Wigner function provides a straightforward way to incorporate the most important quantum mechanical effects in simulations of collisions involving very cold weakly bound complexes

  5. Useful Pedagogical Applications of the Classical Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    One of the most known phenomena in physics is the Hall effect. This is mainly due to its simplicity and to the wide range of its theoretical and practical applications. To complete the pedagogical utility of the Hall effect in physics teaching, I will apply it here to determine the Faraday constant as a fundamental physical number and the number…

  6. Effect of boundary conditions on the classical skin depth and nonlocal behavior in inductively coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Aman-ur; Pu Yikang

    2005-01-01

    When the finiteness of plasma geometry is taken into account, the expression for classical skin depth is different from the one obtained for an unbounded plasma (for both the planar and cylindrical geometries). This change in the expression of the classical skin depth also changes the nonlocality parameter, which is defined as the square of the ratio of the effective mean free path to the classical skin depth. It is concluded that it is the compactness of the geometry due to the metallic boundary condition (E=0) that impacts nonlocal heating (particularly in the low-frequency regime) rather than the shape of the geometry

  7. Holographic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martucci, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia “Galileo Galilei' , Università di Padova,and INFN - Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Zaffaroni, Alberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca,and INFN - Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2016-06-28

    We derive the four-dimensional low-energy effective field theory governing the moduli space of strongly coupled superconformal quiver gauge theories associated with D3-branes at Calabi-Yau conical singularities in the holographic regime of validity. We use the dual supergravity description provided by warped resolved conical geometries with mobile D3-branes. Information on the baryonic directions of the moduli space is also obtained by using wrapped Euclidean D3-branes. We illustrate our general results by discussing in detail their application to the Klebanov-Witten model.

  8. Higgs Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this meeting is to present new theoretical advancements related to effective field theories, evaluate the impact of initial results from the LHC Run2, and discuss proposals for data interpretation/presentation during Run2. A crucial role of the meeting is to bring together theorists from different backgrounds and with different viewpoints and to extend bridges towards the experimental community. To this end, we would like to achieve a good balance between senior and junior speakers, enhancing the visibility of younger scientists while keeping some overview talks.

  9. A classical treatment of the quadratic Zeeman effect in atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Laithy, M. A.; Farmer, C. M.; McDowell, M. R. C.

    1985-03-01

    A description of the non-relativistic classical motion of the electron of a hydrogen atom in the presence of a static magnetic field of arbitrary (non-relativistic) strength is given for arbitrary angular momentum. Applications are given to m = 0 and m = 3 at B = 26.877 kG.

  10. Performance of extended Lagrangian schemes for molecular dynamics simulations with classical polarizable force fields and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Valerio; Dziedzic, Jacek; Albaugh, Alex; Niklasson, Anders M N; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2017-03-28

    Iterative energy minimization with the aim of achieving self-consistency is a common feature of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) and classical molecular dynamics with polarizable force fields. In the former, the electronic degrees of freedom are optimized, while the latter often involves an iterative determination of induced point dipoles. The computational effort of the self-consistency procedure can be reduced by re-using converged solutions from previous time steps. However, this must be done carefully, as not to break time-reversal symmetry, which negatively impacts energy conservation. Self-consistent schemes based on the extended Lagrangian formalism, where the initial guesses for the optimized quantities are treated as auxiliary degrees of freedom, constitute one elegant solution. We report on the performance of two integration schemes with the same underlying extended Lagrangian structure, which we both employ in two radically distinct regimes-in classical molecular dynamics simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field and in BOMD simulations with the Onetep linear-scaling density functional theory (LS-DFT) approach. Both integration schemes are found to offer significant improvements over the standard (unpropagated) molecular dynamics formulation in both the classical and LS-DFT regimes.

  11. Open and Closed String field theory interpreted in classical Algebraic Topology

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    There is an interpretation of open string field theory in algebraic topology. An interpretation of closed string field theory can be deduced from this open string theory to obtain as well the interpretation of open and closed string field theory combined.

  12. Classical radiation theory of charged particles moving in electromagnetic fields in nonabsorbable isotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinovich, A.V.; Melnychuk, S.V.; Konstantinovich, I.A.

    2002-01-01

    The integral expressions for spectral-angular and spectral distributions of the radiation power of heterogeneous charged particles system moving on arbitrary trajectory in nonabsorbable isotropic media media with ε≠1 , μ≠1 are obtained using the Lorentz's self-interaction method. In this method a proper electromagnetic field, acting on electron, is defined as a semi difference between retarded and advanced potentials (Dirac, 1938). The power spectrum of Cherenkov radiation for the linear uniformly moving heterogeneous system of charged particles are obtained. It is found that the expression for the radiation power of heterogeneous system of charged particles becomes simplified when a system of charged particles is homogeneous. In this case the radiation power includes the coherent factor. It is shown what the redistribution effects in energy of the radiation spectrum of the studied system are caused by the coherent factor. The radiation spectrum of the system of electrons moving in a circle in this medium is discrete. The Doppler effect causes the appearance of the new harmonics for the system of electrons moving in a spiral. These harmonics form the region of continuous radiation spectrum. (authors)

  13. Maxwell fields in the vicinity of an atom: are they essentially classical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, E.A.; Thirunamachandran, T.

    1984-01-01

    Multipolar formalism is commonly used as the starting point in quantum optics, and the coupling between the radiation field and atoms is taken to be in the lowest order, namely the electric dipole interaction. In the present work, the authors use the Heisenberg picture to describe the Maxwell fields and the charge fields evolving together as a coupled system. The basic electromagnetic fields are calculated as power series in the transition moments of the atom. At t = 0, the time when the different pictures are chosen to agree, the Maxwell operators act in the photon occupation space only and the electron field operators act solely in the fermion space. However, for t > O, the Heisenberg operators act in the composite space so that the electromagnetic fields are complicated functions of the annihilation and creation operators for both electrons and photons. The explicit forms of the first few terms of the series for the displacement vector and magnetic fields are presented

  14. PREFACE: IARD 2012: 8th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Land, Martin C.; Gill, Tepper; Lusanna, Luca; Salucci, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored, from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view, since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical relativistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Lindner et al [Physical Review Letters 95 0040401 (2005)] as well as the more recent proposal of Palacios et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)] and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg [Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)] could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular

  15. Qubit-qubit entanglement dynamics control via external classical pumping and Kerr nonlinearity mediated by a single detuned cavity field powered by two-photon processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateto, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    The nonlinear time-dependent two-photon Hamiltonian of a couple of classically pumped independent qubits is analytically solved, and the corresponding time evolution unitary operator, in an exact form, is derived. Using the concurrence, entanglement dynamics between the qubits under the influence of a wide range of effective parameters are examined and, in detail, analyzed. Observations analysis is documented with aid of the field phase-space distribution Wigner function. A couple of initial qubit states is considered, namely similar excited states and a Bell-like pure state. It is demonstrated that an initial Bell-like pure state is as well typical initial qubits setting for robust, regular and a high degree of entanglement. Moreover, it is established that high-constant Kerr media represent an effective tool for generating periodical entanglement at fixed time cycles of maxima reach unity forever when qubits are initially in a Bell-like pure state. Further, it is showed that the medium strength of the classical pumping stimulates efficiently qubits entanglement, specially, when the interaction occurs off resonantly. However, the high-intensity pumping thermalizes the coherent distribution of photons, thus, the least photons number is used and, hence, the least minimum degree of qubits entanglement could be created. Furthermore, when the cavity field and external pumping are detuned, the external pumping acts like an auxiliary effective frequency for the cavity, as a result, the field Gaussian distribution acquires linear chirps, and consequently, more entanglement revivals appear in the same cycle during timescale.

  16. PREFACE: IARD 2010: The 7th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Hu, Bei-Lok; Lee, Da-Shin; Gill, Tepper; Land, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anamolous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical realtivistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Linder et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 0040401 (2005)) as well as the more recent work of Palacios et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)) and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg (Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)) could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular, local

  17. Theoretical physics 3. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories, and gravitation. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheck, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Stringent presentation of field theory, mediates the connection from the classicalelectrodynamics up to modern gauge theories. The compact presentation is ideal for the bachelor study. New chapter on general relativity theory. Deepens the learned by numerous application from laser physic, metamaterials and different more. Theoretical physics 3. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian, and gravitation is the third of five volumes on theoretical physics by professor Scheck. The cycle theoretical physics comprehends: Volume 1: Mechanics. From Newtons law to the deterministic chaos. Volume 2: Nonrelativistic quantum theory. From the hydrogen atom to the many-particle systems. Volume 3: Classical field theory. From the electrodynamics to the gauge theories. Volume 5: From the laws of thermodynamics to the quantum statistics. This textbook mediates modern theoretical physics in string presentation illustrated by many examples. It contains numerous problems with solution hints ore exemplary, complete solutions. The third edition was revised in many single topics, especially the chapter on general relativity theory was supplemented by an extensive analysis of the Schwarzschild solution. [de

  18. Discrete allowed and forbidden states in the classical mechanical domain in the charged particle motion in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, R.K.; Punithavelu, A.M.; Banerjee, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    The properties of the motion of charged particles injected almost parallel to the magnetic field are studied by measuring the electron current as a function of the cathode voltage (electron energy), as electrons from the gun traverse a distance L to the detector. The plate current is found to exhibit oscillatory behaviour in contradistinction with the behaviour expected according to the standard classical mechanical paradigm, with the peaks fitting a relation obtained from a quantum like theory predicting such a behaviour. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  19. Currents and the energy-momentum tensor in classical field theory: a fresh look at an old problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forger, Michael; Roemer, Hartmann

    2004-01-01

    We give a comprehensive review of various methods to define currents and the energy-momentum tensor in classical field theory, with emphasis on a geometric point of view. The necessity of 'improving' the expressions provided by the canonical Noether procedure is addressed and given an adequate geometric framework. The main new ingredient is the explicit formulation of a principle of 'ultralocality' with respect to the symmetry generators, which is shown to fix the ambiguity inherent in the procedure of improvement and guide it towards a unique answer: when combined with the appropriate splitting of the fields into sectors, it leads to the well-known expressions for the current as the variational derivative of the matter field Lagrangian with respect to the gauge field and for the energy-momentum tensor as the variational derivative of the matter field Lagrangian with respect to the metric tensor. In the second case, the procedure is shown to work even when the matter field Lagrangian depends explicitly on the curvature, thus establishing the correct relation between scale invariance, in the form of local Weyl invariance 'on shell', and tracelessness of the energy-momentum tensor, required for a consistent definition of the concept of a conformal field theory

  20. Development of a classical force field for the oxidized Si surface: application to hydrophilic wafer bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Daniel J; Payne, Mike C; Csányi, Gábor; Spearing, S Mark; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio

    2007-11-28

    We have developed a classical two- and three-body interaction potential to simulate the hydroxylated, natively oxidized Si surface in contact with water solutions, based on the combination and extension of the Stillinger-Weber potential and of a potential originally developed to simulate SiO(2) polymorphs. The potential parameters are chosen to reproduce the structure, charge distribution, tensile surface stress, and interactions with single water molecules of a natively oxidized Si surface model previously obtained by means of accurate density functional theory simulations. We have applied the potential to the case of hydrophilic silicon wafer bonding at room temperature, revealing maximum room temperature work of adhesion values for natively oxidized and amorphous silica surfaces of 97 and 90 mJm(2), respectively, at a water adsorption coverage of approximately 1 ML. The difference arises from the stronger interaction of the natively oxidized surface with liquid water, resulting in a higher heat of immersion (203 vs 166 mJm(2)), and may be explained in terms of the more pronounced water structuring close to the surface in alternating layers of larger and smaller densities with respect to the liquid bulk. The computed force-displacement bonding curves may be a useful input for cohesive zone models where both the topographic details of the surfaces and the dependence of the attractive force on the initial surface separation and wetting can be taken into account.

  1. Quantization in classical mechanics and its relation to the Bohmian Ψ-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusov, V.D.; Vlasenko, D.S.; Mavrodiev, S.Cht.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: →The Schroedinger equation is derived from the classical Hamiltonian mechanics. →This derivation is based on the Chetaev theorem on stable dynamical trajectories. →The conditions for correctness of trajectory quantum mechanics are discussed. - Abstract: Based on the Chetaev theorem on stable dynamical trajectories in the presence of dissipative forces, we obtain the generalized condition for stability of Hamilton systems in the form of the Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the energy of dissipative forces, which generate the Chetaev generalized condition of stability, coincides exactly with the Bohm 'quantum' potential. Within the frame-work of Bohmian quantum mechanics supplemented by the generalized Chetaev theorem and on the basis of the principle of least action for dissipative forces, we show that the squared amplitude of a wave function in the Schroedinger equation is equivalent semantically and syntactically to the probability density function for the number of particle trajectories, relative to which the velocity and the position of the particle are not hidden parameters. The conditions for the correctness of trajectory interpretation of quantum mechanics are discussed.

  2. Theory of motion for monopole-dipole singularities of classical Yang-Mills-Higgs fields. I. Laws of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drechsler, W.; Havas, P.; Rosenblum, A.

    1984-01-01

    In two recent papers, the general form of the laws of motion for point particles which are multipole sources of the classical coupled Yang-Mills-Higgs fields was determined by Havas, and for the special case of monopole singularities of a Yang-Mills field an iteration procedure was developed by Drechsler and Rosenblum to obtain the equations of motion of mass points, i.e., the laws of motion including the explicit form of the fields of all interacting particles. In this paper we give a detailed derivation of the laws of motion of monopole-dipole singularities of the coupled Yang-Mills-Higgs fields for point particles with mass and spin, following a procedure first applied by Mathisson and developed by Havas. To obtain the equations of motion, a systematic approximation method is developed in the following paper for the solution of the nonlinear field equations and determination of the fields entering the laws of motion found here to any given order in the coupling constant g

  3. Efficient generation of series expansions for ±J Ising spin glasses in a classical or a quantum field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. R. P.; Young, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    We discuss generation of series expansions for Ising spin glasses with a symmetric ±J (i.e., bimodal) distribution on d -dimensional hypercubic lattices using linked-cluster methods. Simplifications for the bimodal distribution allow us to go to higher order than for a general distribution. We discuss two types of problems, one classical and one quantum. The classical problem is that of the Ising spin glass in a longitudinal magnetic field h , for which we obtain high temperature series expansions in variables tanh(J /T ) and tanh(h /T ) . The quantum problem is a T =0 study of the Ising spin glass in a transverse magnetic field hT for which we obtain a perturbation theory in powers of J /hT . These methods require (i) enumeration and counting of all connected clusters that can be embedded in the lattice up to some order n , and (ii) an evaluation of the contribution of each cluster for the quantity being calculated, known as the weight. We discuss a general method that takes the much smaller list (and count) of all no free-end (NFE) clusters on a lattice up to some order n and automatically generates all other clusters and their counts up to the same order. The weights for finite clusters in both cases have a simple graphical interpretation that allows us to proceed efficiently for a general configuration of the ±J bonds and at the end perform suitable disorder averaging. The order of our computations is limited by the weight calculations for the high-temperature expansions of the classical model, while they are limited by graph counting for the T =0 quantum system. Details of the calculational methods are presented.

  4. Interaction and collective effects in classical-equations-of-motion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss results obtained with the classical-equations-of-motion (CEOM) approach, with particular reference to interaction (potential energy) and collective effects in central collisions of equal mass nuclei. The essence of the CEOM approach is the classical calculation of all A = A/sub P/ + A/sub T/ trajectories using a 2-body potential V between all pairs of nucleons; V = V/sub short/ + V/sub long/ has a short range repulsion and a longer range attractive tail. In contrast to hydrodynamics, the CEOM approach is microscopic and includes transparency and nonequilibrium effects

  5. Spin precession of a particle with an electric dipole moment: contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silenko, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    The new derivation of the equation of the spin precession is given for a particle possessing electric and magnetic dipole moments. Contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect are explicitly separated. A fully covariant approach is used. The final equation is expressed in a very simple form in terms of the fields in the instantaneously accompanying frame. The Lorentz transformations of the electric and magnetic dipole moments and of the spin are derived from basic equations of classical electrodynamics. For this purpose, the Maxwell equations in matter are used and the result is confirmed by other methods. An antisymmetric four-tensor is correctly constructed from the electric and magnetic dipole moments. (article)

  6. Classical relativistic equations for particles with spin moving in external fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, H. van; Ruijgrok, Th.W.

    1980-01-01

    We derive equations of motion for a point particle with spin in an external electromagnetic and in an external scalar field. The derivation is based on the ten conservation laws of linear and angular momentum and on a general expression for the current by which the particle interacts with the

  7. Classical electromagnetic non-minimal coupling for spin 3/2 fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, V. M.; Obregon, O.; Nieto, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    We obtain a non-minimal electromagnetic coupling for spin 3/2 particles from linearized N=2 Supergravity. This coupling coincides with the one found by Ferrara et al. by demanding g=2 at the tree level. Linearized Einstein field equations plus interaction terms are obtained by squaring the Rarita-Schwinger with this non-minimal coupling by using generalized Poisson brackets

  8. Global effects in quaternionic quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumby, S.P.; Joshi, G.C.

    1997-01-01

    A local quaternionic gauge structure is introduced onto space-time. It is a theory of vector bosons and dimensionless scalar fields, which recalls semi-classical treatments of gravity. After transforming to the 'i' gauge, it was found that the quaternionic symmetry takes the form of an exotic SU (2) gauge theory in the standard complex framework, with global phenomena appearing in the form of cosmic strings. Coupling this quaternionic sector to the Standard Model sector has only been achieved at the level of an effective theory, which is constrained by the quaternionic origin of the bosons to be of a nonrenormalisable form. 14 refs.,

  9. Classical two-slit interference effects in double photoionization of molecular hydrogen at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Daniel A.; Miyabe, Shungo; Rescigno, Thomas N; McCurdy, C. William; Morales, Felipe; Martin, Fernando

    2008-07-06

    Recent experiments on double photoionization of H$_2$ with photon energies between 160 and 240 eV have revealed body-frame angular distributions that suggest classical two-slit interference effects may be present when one electron carries most of the available energy and the second electron is not observed. We report precise quantum mechanical calculations that reproduce the experimental findings. They reveal that the interpretation in terms of classical diffraction is only appropriate atsubstantially higher photon energies. At the energies considered in the experiment we offer an alternative explanation based on the mixing of two non-diffractive contributions by circularly polarized light.

  10. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects on quantum and classical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francica, F.; Plastina, F.; Maniscalco, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility of modifying the dynamics of both quantum correlations, such as entanglement and discord, and classical correlations of an open bipartite system by means of the quantum Zeno effect. We consider two qubits coupled to a common boson reservoir at zero temperature. This model describes, for example, two atoms interacting with a quantized mode of a lossy cavity. We show that when the frequencies of the two atoms are symmetrically detuned from that of the cavity mode, oscillations between the Zeno and anti-Zeno regimes occur. We also calculate analytically the time evolution of both classical correlations and quantum discord, and we compare the Zeno dynamics of entanglement with the Zeno dynamics of classical correlations and discord.

  11. Effects of Quercetin Supplementation on Lipid and Protein Metabolism after Classic Boxing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Nevzat

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic fitness (MF) is a component of athletes' physical conditioning. This study aims to investigate the effects of quercetin supplementation on Turkish Junior athletes' lipid and protein metabolism relating to MF after one month classic boxing training. Totally 20 voluntary junior male athletes were separated into two equal groups as the…

  12. Canonical formulations of a classical particle in a Yang-Mills field and Wong's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, R.

    1984-01-01

    Wong (1970) introduced equations of motion for a spin 0 particle in a Yang-Mills field which was widely accepted among physicists. It is shown that these are equivalent to the various mathematical formulations for the motion of such particles as given by the Kaluza-Klein formulation of Kerner, and those of Sternberg, and Weinstein. In doing this, we show that Sternberg's space is, in a natural way, a symplectic leaf of a reduced Poisson manifold and relations to a construction of Kummer's for dynamics on the cotangent bundle of a principle bundle are clarified. (orig.)

  13. An efficient and stable hybrid extended Lagrangian/self-consistent field scheme for solving classical mutual induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albaugh, Alex; Demerdash, Omar; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    We have adapted a hybrid extended Lagrangian self-consistent field (EL/SCF) approach, developed for time reversible Born Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for quantum electronic degrees of freedom, to the problem of classical polarization. In this context, the initial guess for the mutual induction calculation is treated by auxiliary induced dipole variables evolved via a time-reversible velocity Verlet scheme. However, we find numerical instability, which is manifested as an accumulation in the auxiliary velocity variables, that in turn results in an unacceptable increase in the number of SCF cycles to meet even loose convergence tolerances for the real induced dipoles over the course of a 1 ns trajectory of the AMOEBA14 water model. By diagnosing the numerical instability as a problem of resonances that corrupt the dynamics, we introduce a simple thermostating scheme, illustrated using Berendsen weak coupling and Nose-Hoover chain thermostats, applied to the auxiliary dipole velocities. We find that the inertial EL/SCF (iEL/SCF) method provides superior energy conservation with less stringent convergence thresholds and a correspondingly small number of SCF cycles, to reproduce all properties of the polarization model in the NVT and NVE ensembles accurately. Our iEL/SCF approach is a clear improvement over standard SCF approaches to classical mutual induction calculations and would be worth investigating for application to ab initio molecular dynamics as well

  14. Absorbing Boundary Conditions in Quantum Relativistic Mechanics for Spinless Particles Subject to a Classical Electromagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, Julien

    The theory of Artificial Boundary Conditions described by Antoine et al. [2,4-6] for the Schrodinger equation is applied to the Klein-Gordon (KG) in two-dimensions (2-D) for spinless particles subject to electromagnetic fields. We begin by providing definitions for a basic understanding of the theory of operators, differential geometry and wave front sets needed to discuss the factorization theorem thanks to Nirenberg and Hormander [14, 16]. The laser-free Klein-Gordon equation in 1-D is then discussed, followed by the case including electrodynamics potentials, concluding with the KG equation in 2-D space with electrodynamics potentials. We then consider numerical simulations of the laser-particle KG equation, which includes a brief analysis of a finite difference scheme. The conclusion integrates a discussion of the numerical results, the successful completion of the objective set forth, a declaration of the unanswered encountered questions and a suggestion of subjects for further research.

  15. Effect of classic uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and laser-assisted uvulopalatopharyngoplasty on voice acoustics and speech nasalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud Y Abu El-ella

    2010-01-01

    Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is a commonly used surgical technique for oropharyngeal reconstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This procedure can be done either through the classic or the laser-assisted uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (LAUP) technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of classic UPPP and LAUP on acoustics of voice and speech nasalance, and to compare the effect of each operation on these two domains. Patients and The study included 27 patients with a mean age of 46 years. All patients were diagnosed with OSA based on polysomnographic examination. Patients were divided into two groups according to the type of surgical procedure. Fifteen patients underwent classic UPPP, whereas 12 patients were subjected to LAUP. A full assessment was done for all patients preoperatively and postoperatively, including auditory perceptual assessment (APA) of voice and speech, objective assessment using acoustic voice analysis and nasometry. Auditory perceptual assessment of speech and voice, acoustic analysis of voice and nasometric analysis of speech did not show statistically significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative evaluations in either group (P>.05).The results of this study demonstrated that in patients with OSA, the surgical technique, whether classic UPPP or LAUP, does not have significant effects on the patients' voice quality or their speech outcomes (Author).

  16. Effects of Pilates and Classical Kinesiotherapy on chronic low back pain: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanna Avila Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Chronic low back pain (LBP is characterized by daily lower back pain lasting more than three consecutive months. It may lead to functional disability and can be treated by several physical therapy techniques, including therapeutic exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pilates and classical kinesiotherapy on the treatment of pain and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and methods : The study sample consisted of five patients with a diagnosis of chronic low back pain and a mean age of 32.4 ± 15.6 years. A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used for pain assessment, and the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess functional disability at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. Patients were divided into two groups and received 20 individual sessions of therapeutic exercise at a frequency of two sessions per week. Group A was treated with classical kinesiotherapy and group B was treated with pilates exercises. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon's test. The significance level was set at 5%. Results : There was a significant reduction in pain (p = 043 and functional disability (p = 042 in both groups. We found no significant differences between the effects of pilates and classical kinesiotherapy on pain and functional disability. Conclusions : We conclude that, in the population studied here, both pilates and classical kinesiotherapy were effective in treating chronic low back pain symptoms, with no significant difference between them.

  17. Analog model of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in Bose-Einstein condensates: Application of the classical field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Piyush; Weinfurtner, Silke; Visser, Matt; Gardiner, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Analog models of gravity have been motivated by the possibility of investigating phenomena not readily accessible in their cosmological counterparts. In this paper, we investigate the analog of cosmological particle creation in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe by numerically simulating a Bose-Einstein condensate with a time-dependent scattering length. In particular, we focus on a two-dimensional homogeneous condensate using the classical field method via the truncated Wigner approximation. We show that for various forms of the scaling function the particle production is consistent with the underlying theory in the long wavelength limit. In this context, we further discuss the implications of modified dispersion relations that arise from the microscopic theory of a weakly interacting Bose gas

  18. Particle on a torus knot: Constrained dynamics and semi-classical quantization in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Praloy, E-mail: praloydasdurgapur@gmail.com; Pramanik, Souvik, E-mail: souvick.in@gmail.com; Ghosh, Subir, E-mail: subirghosh20@gmail.com

    2016-11-15

    Kinematics and dynamics of a particle moving on a torus knot poses an interesting problem as a constrained system. In the first part of the paper we have derived the modified symplectic structure or Dirac brackets of the above model in Dirac’s Hamiltonian framework, both in toroidal and Cartesian coordinate systems. This algebra has been used to study the dynamics, in particular small fluctuations in motion around a specific torus. The spatial symmetries of the system have also been studied. In the second part of the paper we have considered the quantum theory of a charge moving in a torus knot in the presence of a uniform magnetic field along the axis of the torus in a semiclassical quantization framework. We exploit the Einstein–Brillouin–Keller (EBK) scheme of quantization that is appropriate for multidimensional systems. Embedding of the knot on a specific torus is inherently two dimensional that gives rise to two quantization conditions. This shows that although the system, after imposing the knot condition reduces to a one dimensional system, even then it has manifested non-planar features which shows up again in the study of fractional angular momentum. Finally we compare the results obtained from EBK (multi-dimensional) and Bohr–Sommerfeld (single dimensional) schemes. The energy levels and fractional spin depend on the torus knot parameters that specifies its non-planar features. Interestingly, we show that there can be non-planar corrections to the planar anyon-like fractional spin.

  19. Infinities in Quantum Field Theory and in Classical Computing: Renormalization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manin, Yuri I.

    Introduction. The main observable quantities in Quantum Field Theory, correlation functions, are expressed by the celebrated Feynman path integrals. A mathematical definition of them involving a measure and actual integration is still lacking. Instead, it is replaced by a series of ad hoc but highly efficient and suggestive heuristic formulas such as perturbation formalism. The latter interprets such an integral as a formal series of finite-dimensional but divergent integrals, indexed by Feynman graphs, the list of which is determined by the Lagrangian of the theory. Renormalization is a prescription that allows one to systematically "subtract infinities" from these divergent terms producing an asymptotic series for quantum correlation functions. On the other hand, graphs treated as "flowcharts", also form a combinatorial skeleton of the abstract computation theory. Partial recursive functions that according to Church's thesis exhaust the universe of (semi)computable maps are generally not everywhere defined due to potentially infinite searches and loops. In this paper I argue that such infinities can be addressed in the same way as Feynman divergences. More details can be found in [9,10].

  20. Studying the Identity of Iranian Classical Effective Literature and Contemporary Impressible Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmajid Mohaqeqi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After the advent of Islam in Iran, Persian Literature has always been considered as one of the major characteristics of Iranian culture and identity to the extent that some people believe whatever western has achieved in terms of literature – especially English literature – and honors to them originate from rich Persian literature. However, Persian literature has severely been influenced by works of western writers in contemporary era so that even modern Persian story and poem is divided based on western styles. Unfortunately, this situation – that a part of identity of Iranian culture has been drastically affected by alien culture – offends each educated Iranian. Today, a flashback to Iranian classical styles does not meet the need for a development created in literary works. However, it is necessary that tasteful and patriotic people create novel works in Iran’s contemporary literature against the decades-old literary identity of the west through adaptation of past-targeted literature and under the effect of conditions of today modern society in order to recover the lost identity of Iranian literature which other fields are considered as its subset. Therefore, this paper is going to present solutions for modeling the identity of Iranian literature for the next two decades in line with Islamization of universities in order to divide the pure academic literature into pure and applied sub-branches and develop academic literary activities. As a result, the international works would be established based on the columns of Persian literature whose kernel will not to be damaged in the rain and wind of alien cultures.

  1. High doses of dextromethorphan, an NMDA antagonist, produce effects similar to classic hallucinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although reports of dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have increased recently, few studies have examined the effects of high doses of DXM. Objective This study in humans evaluated the effects of supratherapeutic doses of DXM and triazolam. Methods Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg/70kg), and placebo were administered to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Subjective, behavioral, and physiological effects were assessed repeatedly after drug administration for 6 hours. Results Triazolam produced dose-related increases in subject-rated sedation, observer-rated sedation, and behavioral impairment. DXM produced a profile of dose-related physiological and subjective effects differing from triazolam. DXM effects included increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and emesis, increases in observer-rated effects typical of classic hallucinogens (e.g. distance from reality, visual effects with eyes open and closed, joy, anxiety), and participant ratings of stimulation (e.g. jittery, nervous), somatic effects (e.g. tingling, headache), perceptual changes, end-of-session drug liking, and mystical-type experience. After 400 mg/70kg DXM, 11 of 12 participants indicated on a pharmacological class questionnaire that they thought they had received a classic hallucinogen (e.g. psilocybin). Drug effects resolved without significant adverse effects by the end of the session. In a 1-month follow up volunteers attributed increased spirituality and positive changes in attitudes, moods, and behavior to the session experiences. Conclusions High doses of DXM produced effects distinct from triazolam and had characteristics that were similar to the classic hallucinogen psilocybin. PMID:22526529

  2. Effect of Turkish classical music on blood pressure: a randomized controlled trial in hypertensive elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiroğlu, Tansel; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ergün, Yusuf; Ekerbiçer, Hasan Çetin

    2013-06-01

    Existing studies suggest that music therapy can have favorable effects on hypertension and anxiety. We therefore set out to investigate the effect of Turkish classical music. To investigate whether Turkish classical music has positive effects on blood pressures and anxiety levels in elderly patients. This was a randomized controlled trial performed on 60 hypertensive patients living in a local elderly home in Adana, Turkey. Following the completion of a socio-demographic form for each patient, Hamilton anxiety scale was applied. Thereafter, the subjects were randomly divided into two equal-size groups and were allowed to either listen to Turkish classical music (music therapy group) or have a resting period (control group) for 25 min. The primary and secondary outcome measures were blood pressure and Hamilton anxiety scale scores, respectively. The mean reduction in systolic blood pressure was 13.00 mmHg in the music therapy group and 6.50 mmHg in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 6.80-9.36). The median reductions in diastolic blood pressures were 10 mmHg both in the music therapy and control groups. The between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.839). The mean reduction in HAMA-A was 1.63 in the music therapy group and 0.77 in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.82-1.92). The study demonstrated that both Turkish classical music and resting alone have positive effects on blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Pilates and Classical Kinesiotherapy on chronic low back pain: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Ivanna Avila; Oliveira,Tiago Damé de; Blois,Cleci Redin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction : Chronic low back pain (LBP) is characterized by daily lower back pain lasting more than three consecutive months. It may lead to functional disability and can be treated by several physical therapy techniques, including therapeutic exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pilates and classical kinesiotherapy on the treatment of pain and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and methods : The study sample cons...

  4. On the effective field theory of intersecting D3-branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspur, Reza

    2018-05-01

    We study the effective field theory of two intersecting D3-branes with one common dimension along the lines recently proposed in ref. [1]. We introduce a systematic way of deriving the classical effective action to arbitrary orders in perturbation theory. Using a proper renormalization prescription to handle logarithmic divergencies arising at all orders in the perturbation series, we recover the first order renormalization group equation of ref. [1] plus an infinite set of higher order equations. We show the consistency of the higher order equations with the first order one and hence interpret the first order result as an exact RG flow equation in the classical theory.

  5. The classical electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Eyges, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    This excellent text covers a year's course in advanced theoretical electromagnetism, first introducing theory, then its application. Topics include vectors D and H inside matter, conservation laws for energy, momentum, invariance, form invariance, covariance in special relativity, and more.

  6. Nonlocal origin of response suppression from stimulation outside the classic receptive field in area 17 of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H A; Allison, J D; Samonds, J M; Bonds, A B

    2003-01-01

    A stimulus located outside the classic receptive field (CRF) of a striate cortical neuron can markedly influence its behavior. To study this phenomenon, we recorded from two cortical sites, recorded and peripheral, with separate electrodes in cats anesthetized with Propofol and nitrous oxide. The receptive fields of each site were discrete (2-7.3 deg between centers). A control orientation tuning (OT) curve was measured for a single recorded cell with a drifting grating. The OT curve was then remeasured while stimulating simultaneously the cell's CRF as well as the peripheral site with a stimulus optimized for that location. For 22/60 cells, the peripheral stimulus suppressed the peak response and/or shifted the center of mass of the OT curve. For 19 of these 22 cells, we then reversibly blocked stimulus-driven activity at the peripheral site by iontophoretic application of GABA (0.5 M). For 6/19 cells, the response returned to control levels, implying that for these cells the inhibitory influence arose from the blocked site. The responses of nine cells remained reduced during inactivation of the peripheral site, suggesting that influence was generated outside the region of local block in area 17. This is consistent with earlier findings suggesting that modulatory influences can originate from higher cortical areas. Three cells had mixed results, suggesting multiple origins of influence. The response of each cell returned to suppressed levels after dissipation of the GABA and returned to baseline values when the peripheral stimulus was removed. These findings support a cortical model in which a cell's response is modulated by an inhibitory network originating from beyond the receptive field that supplants convergence of excitatory lateral geniculate neurons. The existence of cells that exhibit no change in peripherally inhibited responses during the GABA application suggests that peripheral influences may arise from outside area 17, presumably from other cortical

  7. Effect of classic massage in quality of life of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Miguel Lopes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Due to often excessive academic activities, some university students are affected by stress, anxiety and depression, which can negatively influence quality of life. The classical massage was tested as a strategy for improving quality of life, since it presents psychogenic effects that contribute to this. Objective : To evaluate the effects of classical massage on quality of life, in stress, anxiety, depression and cardiorespiratory variables of university students. Methods : The sample consisted of an intervention group and a control group. While the intervention group (n = 10 received ten massage sessions, twice a week, for 30 minutes in the region of the cervical and thoracic spine, the control group (n = 12 received no intervention. For evaluating psychological variables, the Quality of Life Scale, the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. To assess cardiorespiratory variables, blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate were measured. Results : There was a significant improvement in quality of life and significant decrease in cardiorespiratory variables. Conclusion : The classic massage can be a strategy for the improvement of quality of life in university students who present symptoms of stress, anxiety, elevation of blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate.

  8. Effect of lullaby and classical music on physiologic stability of hospitalized preterm infants: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, E; Rafiei, P; Zarei, K; Gohari, M; Hamidi, M

    2013-01-01

    Music is considered a subset of developmental supportive care. It may act as a suitable auditory stimulant in preterm infants. Also, it may reduce stress responses in autonomic, motor and state systems. To assess and compare the influence of lullaby and classical music on physiologic parameters. This is a randomized clinical trial with cross-over design. A total of 25 stable preterm infants with birth weight of 1000-2500 grams were studied for six consecutive days. Each infant was exposed to three phases: lullaby music, classical music, and no music (control) for two days each. The sequence of these phases was assigned randomly to each subject. Babies were continuously monitored for heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation and changes between phases were analyzed. Lullaby reduced heart rate (p music reduced heart rate (p = 0.018). The effects of classical music disappeared once the music stopped. Oxygen saturation did not change during intervention. Music can affect vital signs of preterm infants; this effect can possibly be related to the reduction of stress during hospitalization. The implications of these findings on clinical and developmental outcomes need further study.

  9. Evidence for the ferromagnetic frustration in a classical spin- 1 / 2 system with multisite interaction in external magnetic field: Exact results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the influence of the multisite interaction among sites within elementary triangles of the kagome-like recursive lattice on the properties of the classical spin- 1 / 2 ferromagnetic Ising model in the external magnetic field. The exact solution of the model is found and it is shown that the model exhibits a nontrivial structure of the first order as well as second order phase transitions in nonzero external magnetic fields related to the multisite interaction. The equation for the exact determination of the positions of the critical points of the second order phase transitions is derived. The thermodynamic properties of the model are investigated in detail and it is shown that the competition between the ferromagnetic interaction and the multisite interaction leads to the appearance of strong ferromagnetic frustration effects represented by the formation of a nontrivial system of macroscopically degenerated plateau-like and single-point-like ground states. The residual entropies of all ground states are found and the kagome spin-ice-like highly macroscopically degenerated plateau state with nonzero magnetization is identified with the exact residual entropy per site s /kB = ln(4 / 3) / 3 ≈ 0 . 095894. The properties of the specific heat are investigated, its Schottky-type behavior near the single-point ground state values of the magnetic field is identified, the existence of large magnetocaloric effect is discussed, and the existence of the first order phase transitions without the specific heat capacity change is demonstrated.

  10. Classical and quantum ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbisà, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to provide a self-contained review of why it is generically a problem when a solution of a theory possesses ghost fields among the perturbation modes. We define what a ghost field is and we show that its presence is associated with a classical instability whenever the ghost field interacts with standard fields. We then show that the instability is more severe at quantum level, and that perturbative ghosts can exist only in low energy effective theories. However, if we do not consider very ad hoc choices, compatibility with observational constraints implies that low energy effective ghosts can exist only at the price of giving up Lorentz invariance or locality above the cut-off, in which case the cut-off has to be much lower that the energy scales we currently probe in particle colliders. We also comment on the possible role of extra degrees of freedom which break Lorentz invariance spontaneously. (paper)

  11. Organic tunnel field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Tietze, Max Lutz; Lussem, Bjorn; Liu, Shiyi

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are provided for organic tunnel field effect transistors (OTFET), and methods thereof. In one example, an OTFET includes a first intrinsic layer (i-layer) of organic semiconductor material disposed over a gate insulating layer

  12. Classical region of a trapped Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakie, P Blair [Jack Dodd Centre for Photonics and Ultra-Cold Atoms, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Davis, Matthew J [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2007-06-14

    The classical region of a Bose gas consists of all single particle modes that have a high average occupation and are well described by a classical field. Highly occupied modes only occur in massive Bose gases at ultra-cold temperatures, in contrast to the photon case where there are highly occupied modes at all temperatures. For the Bose gas the number of these modes is dependent on the temperature, the total number of particles and their interaction strength. In this paper, we characterize the classical region of a harmonically trapped Bose gas over a wide parameter regime. We use a Hartree-Fock approach to account for the effects of interactions, which we observe to significantly change the classical region as compared to the idealized case. We compare our results to full classical field calculations and show that the Hartree-Fock approach provides a qualitatively accurate description of a classical region for the interacting gas.

  13. How do classical particle-field systems become unstable? - The last physics problem that Ronald Davidson studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Many of the classical particle-field systems in (neutral and nonneutral) plasma physics and accelerator physics become unstable when the system parameters vary. How do these instabilities happen? It turns out, very interestingly, that all conservative systems become unstable by the same mechanism, i.e, the resonance between a positive- and a negative-action modes. And this is the only route that a stable system can become unstable. In this talk, I will use several examples in plasma physics and accelerator physics with finite and infinite degrees of freedom to illustrate the basic physical picture and the rigorous theoretical structure of the process. The features at the transition between stable and unstable regions in the parameter space are the fundamental characteristics of the underlying real Hamiltonian system and complex G-Hamiltonian system. The resonance between a positive- and a negative-action modes at the transition is the Krein collision well-known to mathematicians. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  14. Quantum features derived from the classical model of a bouncer-walker coupled to a zero-point field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwabl, H; Mesa Pascasio, J; Fussy, S; Grössing, G

    2012-01-01

    In our bouncer-walker model a quantum is a nonequilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy. Specifically, we consider a 'particle' as a bouncer whose oscillations are phase-locked with those of the energy-momentum reservoir of the zero-point field (ZPF), and we combine this with the random-walk model of the walker, again driven by the ZPF. Starting with this classical toy model of the bouncer-walker we were able to derive fundamental elements of quantum theory. Here this toy model is revisited with special emphasis on the mechanism of emergence. Especially the derivation of the total energy hω o and the coupling to the ZPF are clarified. For this we make use of a sub-quantum equipartition theorem. It can further be shown that the couplings of both bouncer and walker to the ZPF are identical. Then we follow this path in accordance with Ref. [2], expanding the view from the particle in its rest frame to a particle in motion. The basic features of ballistic diffusion are derived, especially the diffusion constant D, thus providing a missing link between the different approaches of our previous works.

  15. Thermal quantum and classical correlations in a two-qubit XX model in a nonuniform external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ali Saif M [Department of Physics, University of Amran, Amran (Yemen); Lari, Behzad; Joag, Pramod S, E-mail: alisaif73@gmail.co, E-mail: behzadlari1979@yahoo.co, E-mail: pramod@physics.unipune.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2010-12-03

    We investigate how thermal quantum discord (QD) and classical correlations (CC) of a two-qubit one-dimensional XX Heisenberg chain in thermal equilibrium depend on the temperature of the bath as well as on nonuniform external magnetic fields applied to two qubits and varied separately. We show that the behavior of QD differs in many unexpected ways from the thermal entanglement (EOF). For the nonuniform case (B{sub 1} = -B{sub 2}), we find that QD and CC are equal for all values of (B{sub 1} = -B{sub 2}) and for different temperatures. We show that, in this case, the thermal states of the system belong to a class of mixed states and satisfy certain conditions under which QD and CC are equal. The specification of this class and the corresponding conditions are completely general and apply to any quantum system in a state in this class satisfying these conditions. We further find that the relative contributions of QD and CC can be controlled easily by changing the relative magnitudes of B{sub 1} and B{sub 2}. Finally, we connect our results with the monogamy relations between the EOF, CC and the QD of two qubits and the environment.

  16. Comparison of the effect of classic massage and aromatherapy on cardiac parameters in patients with cervical spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Sadeck

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Classical massage treatments affect the changing parameters of blood pressure and heart rate immediately after the massage and 5 minutes after the massage. Aromatherapy massage exhibits superior analgesic effect than classic massage, what to look for when selecting treatment for patients with back pain.

  17. Magnetic field effects in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R.

    2016-06-01

    Many animals can sense the geomagnetic field, which appears to aid in behaviours such as migration. The influence of man-made magnetic fields on biology, however, is potentially more sinister, with adverse health effects being claimed from exposure to fields from mobile phones or high voltage power lines. Do these phenomena have a common, biophysical origin, and is it even plausible that such weak fields can profoundly impact noisy biological systems? Radical pair intermediates are widespread in protein reaction mechanisms, and the radical pair mechanism has risen to prominence as perhaps the most plausible means by which even very weak fields might impact biology. In this New Views article, I will discuss the literature over the past 40 years that has investigated the topic of magnetic field effects in proteins. The lack of reproducible results has cast a shadow over the area. However, magnetic field and spin effects have proven to be useful mechanistic tools for radical mechanism in biology. Moreover, if a magnetic effect on a radical pair mechanism in a protein were to influence a biological system, the conditions necessary for it to do so appear increasing unlikely to have come about by chance.

  18. Classical-driving-assisted entanglement dynamics control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying-Jie, E-mail: yingjiezhang@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Han, Wei [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Xia, Yun-Jie, E-mail: yjxia@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2017-04-15

    We propose a scheme of controlling entanglement dynamics of a quantum system by applying the external classical driving field for two atoms separately located in a single-mode photon cavity. It is shown that, with a judicious choice of the classical-driving strength and the atom–photon detuning, the effective atom–photon interaction Hamiltonian can be switched from Jaynes–Cummings model to anti-Jaynes–Cummings model. By tuning the controllable atom–photon interaction induced by the classical field, we illustrate that the evolution trajectory of the Bell-like entanglement states can be manipulated from entanglement-sudden-death to no-entanglement-sudden-death, from no-entanglement-invariant to entanglement-invariant. Furthermore, the robustness of the initial Bell-like entanglement can be improved by the classical driving field in the leaky cavities. This classical-driving-assisted architecture can be easily extensible to multi-atom quantum system for scalability.

  19. Classical antiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors)

  20. Effect of pairwise additivity on finite-temperature behavior of classical ideal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekaari, Ashkan; Jafari, Mahmoud

    2018-05-01

    Finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations have been applied to inquire into the effect of pairwise additivity on the behavior of classical ideal gas within the temperature range of T = 250-4000 K via applying a variety of pair potentials and then examining the temperature dependence of a number of thermodynamical properties. Examining the compressibility factor reveals the most deviation from ideal-gas behavior for the Lennard-Jones system mainly due to the presence of both the attractive and repulsive terms. The systems with either attractive or repulsive intermolecular potentials are found to present no resemblance to real gases, but the most similarity to the ideal one as temperature rises.

  1. The Effect of String Tension Variation on the Perceived Pitch of a Classical Guitar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Jadwiga Lewis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Actual motion of a vibrating guitar string is a superposition of many possible shapes (modes in which it could vibrate. Each of these modes has a corresponding frequency, and the lowest frequency is associated with a shape idealised as a single wave, referred to as the fundamental mode. The other contributing modes, each with their own progressively higher frequency, are referred to as overtones, or harmonics. By attaching a string to a medium (a soundboard capable of a response to the vibrating string, sound waves are generated. The sound heard is dominated by the fundamental mode, ‘coloured’ by contributions from the overtones, as explained by the classical theory of vibration. The classical theory, however, assumes that the string tension remains constant during vibration, and this cannot be strictly true; when considering just the fundamental mode, string tension will reach two maximum changes, as it oscillates up and down. These changes, occurring twice during the fundamental period match the frequency of the octave higher, 1st overtone. It is therefore plausible to think that the changing tension effect, through increased force on the bridge and, therefore, greater soundboard deflection, could be amplifying the colouring effect of (at least the 1st overtone. In this paper, we examine the possible influence of string tension variation on tonal response of a classical guitar. We use a perturbation model based on the classical result for a string in general vibration in conjunction with a novel method of assessment of plucking force that incorporates the engineering concept of geometric stiffness, to assess the magnitude of the normal force exerted by the string on the bridge. The results of our model show that the effect of tension variation is significantly smaller than that due to the installed initial static tension, and affects predominantly the force contribution arising from the fundamental mode. We, therefore, conclude that string

  2. Quantum effects in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted to quantum effects for photons in spatially inhomogeneous fields. Since the purely analytical solution of the corresponding equations is an unsolved problem even today, a main aspect of this work is to use the worldline formalism for scalar QED to develop numerical algorithms for correlation functions beyond perturbative constructions. In a first step we take a look at the 2-Point photon correlation function, in order to understand effects like vacuum polarization or quantum reflection. For a benchmark test of the numerical algorithm we reproduce analytical results in a constant magnetic background. For inhomogeneous fields we calculate for the first time local refractive indices of the quantum vacuum. In this way we find a new de-focusing effect of inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Furthermore the numerical algorithm confirms analytical results for quantum reflection obtained within the local field approximation. In a second step we take a look at higher N-Point functions, with the help of our numerical algorithm. An interesting effect at the level of the 3-Point function is photon splitting. First investigations show that the Adler theorem remains also approximately valid for inhomogeneous fields.

  3. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  4. Graphene field-effect devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtermeyer, T. J.; Lemme, M. C.; Bolten, J.; Baus, M.; Ramsteiner, M.; Kurz, H.

    2007-09-01

    In this article, graphene is investigated with respect to its electronic properties when introduced into field effect devices (FED). With the exception of manual graphene deposition, conventional top-down CMOS-compatible processes are applied. Few and monolayer graphene sheets are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical properties of monolayer graphene sandwiched between two silicon dioxide films are studied. Carrier mobilities in graphene pseudo-MOS structures are compared to those obtained from double-gated Graphene-FEDs and silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs).

  5. The Effects of Classical Guitar Ensembles on Student Self-Perceptions and Acquisition of Music Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Classical guitar ensembles are increasing in the United States as popular alternatives to band, choir, and orchestra. Classical guitar ensembles are offered at many middle and high schools as fine arts electives as one of the only options for classical guitarists to participate in ensembles. The purpose of this study was to explore the development…

  6. Effect of classic back massage on spinal pain in a woman with large breasts - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Zielińska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The most common ailment of the motion system is spinal pain. For one of the main reasons, it consider a sedentary lifestyle that weakens the musculo-skeletal system, obesity that increases spine load, sleep disorders resulting from unsettled positions during rest or sleep, and chronic stress. The use of massage can reduce the painful pain of the spine, by loosening the excessively tight spine muscles, the articular joints of the joints and the relaxation of the body. Objective. An assessment of the effect of classical spine massage on spinal pain in a woman with large breasts. Material and methods. 10 massage treatments of the classical ridge using olive oil were performed. Sessions took place 2-3 times a week after 30-50 minutes. Before and after intervention were measured: linear measurements of upper and lower limbs; Measurement of the first and short long and short for the upper and lower limbs for the upper and lower extremities; Measurement of the range of mobility of individual segments of the spine; Measurement of muscle strength of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar musculature of the upper limbs; Assessment of deviation from the symmetry of body posture. Also tested was the Cross Stroke Challenge, finger-to-floor test, lumbar vertebrae overtaxis test, Laseque test, Scherer test and Gilett test. Results. The difference in the range of motion, ie the flexion of the thorax and lumbar spine and the finger-to-floor examination, was statistically significantly different. After intervention the silhouette of the body was positioned closer to the vertical axis. The Laseque test for both lower limbs turned out to be negative. The difference in linear and limb length measurements and the Schober test was not statistically significant. The test of cross-provocation, the overtaking test for the lumbar spine movement and the Gillet test did not show deviations before or after intervention. Conclusions. Therapeutic massage of the

  7. Evolution operator equation: Integration with algebraic and finite difference methods. Applications to physical problems in classical and quantum mechanics and quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Torre, Amalia [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Ottaviani, Pier Luigi [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy); Vasquez, Luis [Madris, Univ. Complutense (Spain). Dept. de Matemateca Aplicado

    1997-10-01

    The finite-difference based integration method for evolution-line equations is discussed in detail and framed within the general context of the evolution operator picture. Exact analytical methods are described to solve evolution-like equations in a quite general physical context. The numerical technique based on the factorization formulae of exponential operator is then illustrated and applied to the evolution-operator in both classical and quantum framework. Finally, the general view to the finite differencing schemes is provided, displaying the wide range of applications from the classical Newton equation of motion to the quantum field theory.

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF LAVENDER AROMATHERAPY AND CLASSICAL MUSIC THERAPY IN LOWERING BLOOD PRESSURE IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH HYPERTENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Maisi; Suryono; Melyana Nurul Widyawati; Ari Suwondo; Suryati Kusworowulan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypertension during pregnancy remains high in Indonesia. It is a major cause of maternal death. Aromatherapy lavender and classical music therapy are considered effective in lowering blood pressure in hypertension. Objective: To examine the effect of lavender aromatherapy and classical music therapy in lowering blood pressure in pregnant women with hypertension. Methods: A quasy experimental study with pretest-posttest control group design. There were 52 pregnant women with ...

  9. Causality and superluminal behavior in classical field theories: Applications to k-essence theories and modified-Newtonian-dynamics-like theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Field theories with Lorentz (or diffeomorphism invariant) action can exhibit superluminal behavior through the breaking of local Lorentz invariance. Quantum induced superluminal velocities are well-known examples of this effect. The issue of the causal behavior of such propagation is somewhat controversial in the literature and we intend to clarify it. We provide a careful analysis of the meaning of causality in classical relativistic field theories and stress the role played by the Cauchy problem and the notion of chronology. We show that, in general, superluminal behavior threatens causality only if one assumes that a prior chronology in spacetime exists. In the case where superluminal propagation occurs, however, there are at least two nonconformally related metrics in spacetime and thus two available notions of chronology. These two chronologies are on equal footing, and it would thus be misleading to choose ab initio one of them to define causality. Rather, we provide a formulation of causality in which no prior chronology is assumed. We argue that this is the only way to deal with the issue of causality in the case where some degrees of freedom propagate faster than others. In that framework, then, it is shown that superluminal propagation is not necessarily noncausal, the final answer depending on the existence of an initial data formulation. This also depends on global properties of spacetime that we discuss in detail. As an illustration of these conceptual issues, we consider two field theories, namely, k-essence scalar fields and bimetric theories of gravity, and we derive the conditions imposed by causality. We discuss various applications such as the dark energy problem, modified-Newtonian-dynamics-like theories of gravity, and varying speed of light theories

  10. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, E.

    1993-01-01

    In this generally intelligible article, the author describes at first the physical fundamentals of electromagnetic fields and their basic biological significance and effects for animals and human beings before dealing with the discussion regarding limiting values and dangers. The article treats possible connections with leukaemia as well as ith melatonine production more detailed. (vhe) [de

  11. Synaptic Effects of Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Asif

    Learning and sensory processing in the brain relies on the effective transmission of information across synapses. The strength and efficacy of synaptic transmission is modifiable through training and can be modulated with noninvasive electrical brain stimulation. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), specifically, induces weak intensity and spatially diffuse electric fields in the brain. Despite being weak, electric fields modulate spiking probability and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. These effects critically depend on the direction of the electric field relative to the orientation of the neuron and on the level of endogenous synaptic activity. TES has been used to modulate a wide range of neuropsychiatric indications, for various rehabilitation applications, and cognitive performance in diverse tasks. How can a weak and diffuse electric field, which simultaneously polarizes neurons across the brain, have precise changes in brain function? Designing therapies to maximize desired outcomes and minimize undesired effects presents a challenging problem. A series of experiments and computational models are used to define the anatomical and functional factors leading to specificity of TES. Anatomical specificity derives from guiding current to targeted brain structures and taking advantage of the direction-sensitivity of neurons with respect to the electric field. Functional specificity originates from preferential modulation of neuronal networks that are already active. Diffuse electric fields may recruit connected brain networks involved in a training task and promote plasticity along active synaptic pathways. In vitro, electric fields boost endogenous synaptic plasticity and raise the ceiling for synaptic learning with repeated stimulation sessions. Synapses undergoing strong plasticity are preferentially modulated over weak synapses. Therefore, active circuits that are involved in a task could be more susceptible to stimulation than inactive circuits

  12. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, César D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, R8402AGP, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C., E-mail: lombardo@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física Juan José Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation.

  13. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, Cesar D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C. [Ciudad Universitaria, Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA y IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  14. The effect of initial density and parasitoid intergenerational survival rate on classical biological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yanni; Tang Sanyi

    2008-01-01

    Models of biological control have a long history of theoretical development that have focused on the interaction of a parasitoid and its host. The host-parasitoid systems have identified several important and general factors affecting the long-term dynamics of interacting populations. However, much less is known about how the initial densities of host-parasitoid populations affect the biological control as well as the stability of host-parasitoid systems. To do this, the classical Nicholson-Bailey model with host self-regulation and parasitoid intergenerational survival rate is used to uncover the effect of initial densities on the successful biological control. The results indicate that the simplest Nicholson-Bailey model has various coexistence with a wide range of parameters, including boundary attractors where the parasitoid population is absent and interior attractors where host-parasitoid coexists. The final stable states of host-parasitoid populations depend on their initial densities as well as their ratios, and those results are confirmed by basins of attraction of initial densities. The results also indicate that the parasitoid intergenerational survival rate increases the stability of the host-parasitoid systems. Therefore, the present research can help us to further understand the dynamical behavior of host-parasitoid interactions, to improve the classical biological control and to make management decisions

  15. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  16. Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1λ. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

  17. Methods for evaluating physical processes in strong external fields at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Furry picture and quasi-classical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Stefano [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Hartin, Anthony [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Future linear colliders designs, ILC and CLIC, are expected to be powerful machines for the discovery of Physics Beyond the Standard Model and subsequent precision studies. However, due to the intense beams (high luminosity, high energy), strong electromagnetic fields occur in the beam-beam interaction region. In the context of precision high energy physics, the presence of such strong fields may yield sensitive corrections to the observed electron-positron processes. The Furry picture of quantum states gives a conceptually simple tool to treat physics processes in an external field. A generalization of the quasi-classical operator method (QOM) as an approximation is considered too.

  18. Quark pair creation in color electric fields and effects of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Noato

    2010-01-01

    The time evolution of a system where a uniform and classical SU(3) color electric field and quantum fields of quarks interact with each other is studied focusing on non-perturbative pair creation and its back reaction. We characterize a color direction of an electric field in a gauge invariant way, and investigate its dependence. Momentum distributions of created quarks show plasma oscillation as well as quantum effects such as the Pauli blocking and interference. Pressure of the system is also calculated, and we show that pair creation moderates degree of anisotropy of pressure. Furthermore, enhancement of pair creation and induction of chiral charge under a color magnetic field which is parallel to an electric field are discussed.

  19. Asymptotic behavior of correlation functions for electric potential and field fluctuations in a classical one-component plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The correlations of the electric potential fluctuations in a classical one-component plasma are studied for large distances between the observation points. The two-point correlation function for these fluctuations is known to decay slowly for large distances, even if exponential clustering holds for

  20. All framing effects are not created equal: Low convergent validity between two classic measurements of framing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Shanshan; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-07-20

    Human risk-taking attitudes can be influenced by two logically equivalent but descriptively different frames, termed the framing effect. The classic hypothetical vignette-based task (Asian disease problem) and a recently developed reward-based gambling task have been widely used to assess individual differences in the framing effect. Previous studies treat framing bias as a stable trait that has genetic basis. However, these two paradigms differ in terms of task domain (loss vs. gain) and task context (vignette-based vs. reward-based) and the convergent validity of these measurements remains unknown. Here, we developed a vignette-based task and a gambling task in both gain and loss domains and tested correlations of the framing effect among these tasks in 159 young adults. Our results revealed no significant correlation between the vignette-based task in the loss domain and the gambling task in the gain domain, indicating low convergent validity. The current findings raise the question of how to measure the framing effect precisely, especially in individual difference studies using large samples and expensive neuroscience methods. Our results suggest that the framing effect is influenced by both task domain and task context and future research should be cautious about the operationalization of the framing effect.

  1. Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator: I. Refinement Using Quantum Mechanical Base Stacking and Conformational Energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkul, Justin A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2017-05-09

    Empirical force fields seek to relate the configuration of a set of atoms to its energy, thus yielding the forces governing its dynamics, using classical physics rather than more expensive quantum mechanical calculations that are computationally intractable for large systems. Most force fields used to simulate biomolecular systems use fixed atomic partial charges, neglecting the influence of electronic polarization, instead making use of a mean-field approximation that may not be transferable across environments. Recent hardware and software developments make polarizable simulations feasible, and to this end, polarizable force fields represent the next generation of molecular dynamics simulation technology. In this work, we describe the refinement of a polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model by targeting quantum mechanical interaction energies and conformational energy profiles of model compounds necessary to build a complete DNA force field. The parametrization strategy employed in the present work seeks to correct weak base stacking in A- and B-DNA and the unwinding of Z-DNA observed in the previous version of the force field, called Drude-2013. Refinement of base nonbonded terms and reparametrization of dihedral terms in the glycosidic linkage, deoxyribofuranose rings, and important backbone torsions resulted in improved agreement with quantum mechanical potential energy surfaces. Notably, we expand on previous efforts by explicitly including Z-DNA conformational energetics in the refinement.

  2. Nonequivalence of classical MHC class I loci in ability to direct effective antiviral immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Pavelko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural diversity in the peptide binding sites of the redundant classical MHC antigen presenting molecules is strongly selected in humans and mice. Although the encoded antigen presenting molecules overlap in antigen presenting function, differences in polymorphism at the MHC I A, B and C loci in humans and higher primates indicate these loci are not functionally equivalent. The structural basis of these differences is not known. We hypothesize that classical class I loci differ in their ability to direct effective immunity against intracellular pathogens. Using a picornavirus infection model and chimeric H-2 transgenes, we examined locus specific functional determinants distinguishing the ability of class I sister genes to direct effective anti viral immunity. Whereas, parental FVB and transgenic FVB mice expressing the H-2K(b gene are highly susceptible to persisting Theiler's virus infection within the CNS and subsequent demyelination, mice expressing the D(b transgene clear the virus and are protected from demyelination. Remarkably, animals expressing a chimeric transgene, comprised primarily of K(b but encoding the peptide binding domain of D(b, develop a robust anti viral CTL response yet fail to clear virus and develop significant demyelination. Differences in expression of the chimeric K(bα1α2D(b gene (low and D(b (high in the CNS of infected mice mirror expression levels of their endogenous H-2(q counterparts in FVB mice. These findings demonstrate that locus specific elements other than those specifying peptide binding and T cell receptor interaction can determine ability to clear virus infection. This finding provides a basis for understanding locus-specific differences in MHC polymorphism, characterized best in human populations.

  3. The effectiveness of anticellulite treatment using tripolar radiofrequency monitored by classic and high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlosek, R K; Woźniak, W; Malinowska, S; Lewandowski, M; Nowicki, A

    2012-06-01

      Cellulite affects nearly 85% of the female population. Given the size of the phenomenon, we are continuously looking for effective ways to reduce cellulite. Reliable monitoring of anticellulite treatment remains a problem.   The main aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of anticellulite treatment carried out using radiofrequency (RF), which was monitored by classical and high-frequency ultrasound.   Twenty-eight women underwent anticellulite treatment using RF, 17 women were in the placebo group. The therapy was monitored by classical and high-frequency ultrasound. The examinations evaluated the thickness of the epidermal echo, dermis thickness, dermis echogenicity, the length of the subcutaneous tissue bands growing into the dermis, the presence or absence of oedema, the thickness of subcutaneous tissue as well as thigh circumference and the stage of cellulite (according to the Nürnberger-Müller scale).   Cellulite was reduced in 89.286% of the women who underwent RF treatment. After the therapy, the following observations were made: a decrease in the thickness of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue, an increase in echogenicity reflecting on the increase in the number of collagen fibres, decreased subcutaneous tissue growing into bands in the dermis, and the reduction of oedema. In the placebo group, no statistically significant changes of the above parameters were observed.   Radiofrequency enables cellulite reduction. A crucial aspect is proper monitoring of the progress of such therapy, which ultrasound allows. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Listener perception of the effect of abdominal kinematic directives on respiratory behavior in female classical singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Sally; Kenny, Dianna T; Archer, Michaele

    2011-01-01

    Breath management training in classical singing is becoming increasingly physiologically focused, despite evidence that directives focusing on chest-wall kinematic (ribcage and abdominal) behavior effect minimal change in acoustical measures of singing. A direct and proportionate relationship between breathing behavior and vocal quality is important in singing training because singing teachers rely primarily on changes in sound quality to assess the efficacy of breath management modification. Pedagogical opinion is also strongly divided over whether the strategy of retarding the reduction in abdominal dimension during singing has a negative effect on vocal quality. This study investigated whether changes in abdominal kinematic strategy were perceptible and whether listeners preferred a particular strategy. Fourteen experienced singing teachers and vocal coaches assessed audio samples of five female classical singers whose respiratory kinematic patterns during singing had been recorded habitually and under two simple, dichotomous directives: Gradually drawing the abdomen inward and gradually expanding the abdomen, during each phrase. Listeners rated the singers on standard of singing and of breath management. Ratings analysis took into consideration changes in kinematic behavior under each directive determined from the respiratory recordings. Listener ratings for two singers were unaffected by directive. For three singers, ratings were lower when the directive opposed habitual kinematic behavior. The results did not support the pedagogical assumption of a direct and proportional link between respiratory behavior and standard of singing or that the abdomen-outward strategy was deleterious to vocal quality. The findings demonstrate the importance of considering habitual breathing behavior in both research and pedagogical contexts. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effective field theory dimensional regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Dirk; Prezeau, Gary

    2002-01-01

    A Lorentz-covariant regularization scheme for effective field theories with an arbitrary number of propagating heavy and light particles is given. This regularization scheme leaves the low-energy analytic structure of Greens functions intact and preserves all the symmetries of the underlying Lagrangian. The power divergences of regularized loop integrals are controlled by the low-energy kinematic variables. Simple diagrammatic rules are derived for the regularization of arbitrary one-loop graphs and the generalization to higher loops is discussed

  6. Effective field theory dimensional regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Dirk; Prézeau, Gary

    2002-01-01

    A Lorentz-covariant regularization scheme for effective field theories with an arbitrary number of propagating heavy and light particles is given. This regularization scheme leaves the low-energy analytic structure of Greens functions intact and preserves all the symmetries of the underlying Lagrangian. The power divergences of regularized loop integrals are controlled by the low-energy kinematic variables. Simple diagrammatic rules are derived for the regularization of arbitrary one-loop graphs and the generalization to higher loops is discussed.

  7. The effective crystal field potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mulak, J

    2000-01-01

    As it results from the very nature of things, the spherical symmetry of the surrounding of a site in a crystal lattice or an atom in a molecule can never occur. Therefore, the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of any bound ion or atom have to differ from those of spherically symmetric respective free ions. In this way, the most simplified concept of the crystal field effect or ligand field effect in the case of individual molecules can be introduced. The conventional notion of the crystal field potential is narrowed to its non-spherical part only through ignoring the dominating spherical part which produces only a uniform energy shift of gravity centres of the free ion terms. It is well understood that the non-spherical part of the effective potential "seen" by open-shell electrons localized on a metal ion plays an essential role in most observed properties. Light adsorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, inelastic neutron scattering and basic characteristics derived from magnetic and thermal measurements, ar...

  8. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, C.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic (em) fields on biological systems were first observed and exploited well over a century ago. Concern over the possible health hazards of human exposure to such fields developed much later. It is now well known that excessive exposure to em fields may have in undesirable biological consequences. Standards were introduced to determine what constitute an excessive exposure and how to avoid it. Current concern over the issue of hazards stems mainly from recent epidemiological studies of exposed populations and also from the results of laboratory experiments in which whole animals are exposed in vivo or tissue and cell cultures exposed in vitro to low levels of irradiation. The underlying fear is the possibility of a causal relationship between chronic exposure to low field levels and some forms of cancer. So far the evidence does not add up to a firm statement on the matter. At present it is not known how and at what level, if at all, can these exposure be harmful to human health. This state of affair does not provide a basis for incorporating the outcome of such research in exposure standards. This paper will give a brief overview of the research in this field and how it is evaluated for the purpose of producing scientifically based standards. The emphasis will be on the physical, biophysical and biological mechanisms implicated in the interaction between em fields and biological systems. Understanding such mechanisms leads not only to a more accurate evaluation of their health implications but also to their optimal utilization, under controlled conditions, in biomedical applications. (author)

  9. Casimir effect for interacting fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses some recent work on the Casimir effect: that is the problem of renormalizing Tsub(μγ) on locally-flat space-times. That is on space-times which, while topologically non-trivial are locally Minkowskian - with vanishing local curvature. The author has developed a systematic method for calculating this Casimir effect for interacting fields to arbitrary order in perturbation theory - and for arbitrary components of Tsub(μγ) which he describes in general and then illustrates it by describing first order perturbation theory calculations for a lambdaphi 4 theory for the two models: the cylinder space-time and the parallel plates. (Auth.)

  10. Theoretical physics 3. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories, and gravitation. 4. ed.; Theoretische Physik 3. Klassische Feldtheorie. Von Elektrodynamik, nicht-Abelschen Eichtheorien und Gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheck, Florian [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2017-09-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Maxwell's equations together with their symmetry and covariance, the Maxwell theory as classical field theory, simple applications of Maxwell's theory, local gauge theories, classical field theory of gravitation. (HSI)

  11. Analysis of geometric phase effects in the quantum-classical Liouville formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2014-02-28

    We analyze two approaches to the quantum-classical Liouville (QCL) formalism that differ in the order of two operations: Wigner transformation and projection onto adiabatic electronic states. The analysis is carried out on a two-dimensional linear vibronic model where geometric phase (GP) effects arising from a conical intersection profoundly affect nuclear dynamics. We find that the Wigner-then-Adiabatic (WA) QCL approach captures GP effects, whereas the Adiabatic-then-Wigner (AW) QCL approach does not. Moreover, the Wigner transform in AW-QCL leads to an ill-defined Fourier transform of double-valued functions. The double-valued character of these functions stems from the nontrivial GP of adiabatic electronic states in the presence of a conical intersection. In contrast, WA-QCL avoids this issue by starting with the Wigner transform of single-valued quantities of the full problem. As a consequence, GP effects in WA-QCL can be associated with a dynamical term in the corresponding equation of motion. Since the WA-QCL approach uses solely the adiabatic potentials and non-adiabatic derivative couplings as an input, our results indicate that WA-QCL can capture GP effects in two-state crossing problems using first-principles electronic structure calculations without prior diabatization or introduction of explicit phase factors.

  12. A classical regression framework for mediation analysis: fitting one model to estimate mediation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Christina T; Blume, Jeffrey D

    2017-10-26

    Mediation analysis explores the degree to which an exposure's effect on an outcome is diverted through a mediating variable. We describe a classical regression framework for conducting mediation analyses in which estimates of causal mediation effects and their variance are obtained from the fit of a single regression model. The vector of changes in exposure pathway coefficients, which we named the essential mediation components (EMCs), is used to estimate standard causal mediation effects. Because these effects are often simple functions of the EMCs, an analytical expression for their model-based variance follows directly. Given this formula, it is instructive to revisit the performance of routinely used variance approximations (e.g., delta method and resampling methods). Requiring the fit of only one model reduces the computation time required for complex mediation analyses and permits the use of a rich suite of regression tools that are not easily implemented on a system of three equations, as would be required in the Baron-Kenny framework. Using data from the BRAIN-ICU study, we provide examples to illustrate the advantages of this framework and compare it with the existing approaches. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Analysis of geometric phase effects in the quantum-classical Liouville formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Izmaylov, Artur F. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada); Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2014-02-28

    We analyze two approaches to the quantum-classical Liouville (QCL) formalism that differ in the order of two operations: Wigner transformation and projection onto adiabatic electronic states. The analysis is carried out on a two-dimensional linear vibronic model where geometric phase (GP) effects arising from a conical intersection profoundly affect nuclear dynamics. We find that the Wigner-then-Adiabatic (WA) QCL approach captures GP effects, whereas the Adiabatic-then-Wigner (AW) QCL approach does not. Moreover, the Wigner transform in AW-QCL leads to an ill-defined Fourier transform of double-valued functions. The double-valued character of these functions stems from the nontrivial GP of adiabatic electronic states in the presence of a conical intersection. In contrast, WA-QCL avoids this issue by starting with the Wigner transform of single-valued quantities of the full problem. As a consequence, GP effects in WA-QCL can be associated with a dynamical term in the corresponding equation of motion. Since the WA-QCL approach uses solely the adiabatic potentials and non-adiabatic derivative couplings as an input, our results indicate that WA-QCL can capture GP effects in two-state crossing problems using first-principles electronic structure calculations without prior diabatization or introduction of explicit phase factors.

  14. Fringing-field effects in acceleration columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavor, M.I.; Weick, H.; Wollnik, H.

    1999-01-01

    Fringing-field effects in acceleration columns are investigated, based on the fringing-field integral method. Transfer matrices at the effective boundaries of the acceleration column are obtained, as well as the general transfer matrix of the region separating two homogeneous electrostatic fields with different field strengths. The accuracy of the fringing-field integral method is investigated

  15. Ambipolar phosphorene field effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saptarshi; Demarteau, Marcel; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-11-25

    In this article, we demonstrate enhanced electron and hole transport in few-layer phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) using titanium as the source/drain contact electrode and 20 nm SiO2 as the back gate dielectric. The field effect mobility values were extracted to be ∼38 cm(2)/Vs for electrons and ∼172 cm(2)/Vs for the holes. On the basis of our experimental data, we also comprehensively discuss how the contact resistances arising due to the Schottky barriers at the source and the drain end effect the different regime of the device characteristics and ultimately limit the ON state performance. We also propose and implement a novel technique for extracting the transport gap as well as the Schottky barrier height at the metal-phosphorene contact interface from the ambipolar transfer characteristics of the phosphorene FETs. This robust technique is applicable to any ultrathin body semiconductor which demonstrates symmetric ambipolar conduction. Finally, we demonstrate a high gain, high noise margin, chemical doping free, and fully complementary logic inverter based on ambipolar phosphorene FETs.

  16. Production of partons in the presence of classical fields in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions; Produktion von Patronen in Anwesenheit klassischer Felder in ultrarelativistischen Schwerionenkollisionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, D.D

    2003-09-01

    In this work the production of quarks, antiquarks and of gluonic fluctuations is studied in the presence of classical bosonic field. A comparison of the production of anti-quark pairs with the creation of pairs of gluonic quantum fluctuations based on perturbative calculations will be presented here. This analysis is valid for quantum particles with a large momentum compared to the magnitude of the classical vector potential multiplied by the coupling constant. The model contains 3 parameters: the initial magnitude of the gauge field, the coupling constant and the time scale on which the field decays. It appears that none of the species (quark-antiquark pairs, gluonic fluctuation pairs, bosons and fermion-anti fermions) can be neglected from the beginning. A corresponding calculation requires a non-perturbative description of at least the soft fermions. In this thesis the exact expression for fields varying arbitrarily in time is derived. After the full solution has been obtained, various approximation schemes are proposed for different domains, in order to find out into which the situation under consideration falls. There are approximations in the ultraviolet (perturbative), the infrared, and the Abelian (commutative) regime. The exact expression and the lowest orders of the different approximation schemes are evaluated in the presence of the model field with the same parameters as before. (A.C.)

  17. Classical conditioning for preserving the effects of short melatonin treatment in children with delayed sleep: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maanen A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Annette van Maanen,1 Anne Marie Meijer,1 Marcel G Smits,2 Frans J Oort1 1Research Institute Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 2Centre for Sleep-Wake Disorders and Chronobiology, Hospital Gelderse Vallei, Ede, the Netherlands Abstract: Melatonin treatment is effective in treating sleep onset problems in children with delayed melatonin onset, but effects usually disappear when treatment is discontinued. In this pilot study, we investigated whether classical conditioning might help in preserving treatment effects of melatonin in children with sleep onset problems, with and without comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or autism. After a baseline week, 16 children (mean age: 9.92 years, 31% ADHD/autism received melatonin treatment for 3 weeks and then gradually discontinued the treatment. Classical conditioning was applied by having children drink organic lemonade while taking melatonin and by using a dim red light lamp that was turned on when children went to bed. Results were compared with a group of 41 children (mean age: 9.43 years, 34% ADHD/autism who received melatonin without classical conditioning. Melatonin treatment was effective in advancing dim light melatonin onset and reducing sleep onset problems, and positive effects were found on health and behavior problems. After stopping melatonin, sleep returned to baseline levels. We found that for children without comorbidity in the experimental group, sleep latency and sleep start delayed less in the stop week, which suggests an effect of classical conditioning. However, classical conditioning seems counterproductive in children with ADHD or autism. Further research is needed to establish these results and to examine other ways to preserve melatonin treatment effects, for example, by applying morning light. Keywords: melatonin, classical conditioning, children, delayed sleep

  18. Comparative analysis of four active compounds of Baikal skullcap and its classical TCM prescriptions according to different clinical curative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Wei Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A sensitive HPLC-DAD detection method was established for the comparative analysis of the four active compounds (including baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside and wogonin of Baikal Skullcap and its classical TCM prescriptions according to different clinical curative effects. And analyze the relationship between compatibility of medicines, content and clinical curative effect.

  19. Room Temperature Silicene Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwande, Deji

    Silicene, a buckled Si analogue of graphene, holds significant promise for future electronics beyond traditional CMOS. In our predefined experiments via encapsulated delamination with native electrodes approach, silicene devices exhibit an ambipolar charge transport behavior, corroborating theories on Dirac band in Ag-free silicene. Monolayer silicene device has extracted field-effect mobility within the theoretical expectation and ON/OFF ratio greater than monolayer graphene, while multilayer silicene devices show decreased mobility and gate modulation. Air-stability of silicene devices depends on the number of layers of silicene and intrinsic material structure determined by growth temperature. Few or multi-layer silicene devices maintain their ambipolar behavior for days in contrast to minutes time scale for monolayer counterparts under similar conditions. Multilayer silicene grown at different temperatures below 300oC possess different intrinsic structures and yield different electrical property and air-stability. This work suggests a practical prospect to enable more air-stable silicene devices with layer and growth condition control, which can be leveraged for other air-sensitive 2D materials. In addition, we describe quantum and classical transistor device concepts based on silicene and related buckled materials that exploit the 2D topological insulating phenomenon. The transistor device physics offer the potential for ballistic transport that is robust against scattering and can be employed for both charge and spin transport. This work was supported by the ARO.

  20. Squeezing and other non-classical features in k-photon anharmonic oscillator in binomial and negative binomial states of the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, A.; Lawande, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study of squeezing obtained from k-photon anharmonic oscillator (with interaction hamiltonian of the form (a † ) k , k ≥ 2) interacting with light whose statistics can be varied from sub-Poissonian to poissonian via binomial state of field and super-Poissonian to poissonian via negative binomial state of field is presented. The authors predict that for all values of k there is a tendency increase in squeezing with increased sub-Poissonian character of the field while the reverse is true with super-Poissonian field. They also present non-classical behavior of the first order coherence function explicitly for k = 2 case (i.e., for two-photon anharmonic oscillator model used for a Kerr-like medium) with variation in the statistics of the input light

  1. Fermions from classical statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe fermions in terms of a classical statistical ensemble. The states τ of this ensemble are characterized by a sequence of values one or zero or a corresponding set of two-level observables. Every classical probability distribution can be associated to a quantum state for fermions. If the time evolution of the classical probabilities p τ amounts to a rotation of the wave function q τ (t)=±√(p τ (t)), we infer the unitary time evolution of a quantum system of fermions according to a Schroedinger equation. We establish how such classical statistical ensembles can be mapped to Grassmann functional integrals. Quantum field theories for fermions arise for a suitable time evolution of classical probabilities for generalized Ising models.

  2. Classical anomalous absorption in strongly magnetized plasmas and effective shielding length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, K.

    1981-01-01

    The high-frequency conductivity tensor of a plasma in a magnetic field has been evaluated. An anomalous perpendicular conductivity is obtained for a strongly magnetized plasma. Contrarily to the previous prediction, the effective shielding length is found to be the Debye length even when the Debye length is larger than the electron gyroradius. The effective shielding length is further discussed by presenting the generalized Balescu-Lenard equation

  3. Phenomenological analysis of quantum level correlations and classical repulsion effects in SU(3) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Shigeyasu; Sakata, Fumihiko

    2003-01-01

    The quantum level fluctuation in various systems has been shown to be characterized by the random matrix theory, and to be related to a regular-to-chaos transition in classical system. We present a new qualitative analysis of quantum and classical fluctuation properties by exploiting correlation coefficients and variances. It is shown that the correlation coefficient of quantum level density is inversely proportional to the variance of consecutive phase-space point spacings on the Poincare section plane. (author)

  4. Emergency vaccination for classical swine fever will not be cost-effective for countries with a large export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boklund, Anette; Toft, Nils; Alban, Lis

    2009-01-01

    the epidemiological and economic consequences of such control strategies under Danish conditions with respect to herd demographics and geography as well as to investigate the effect of extra biosecurity on farms. We used InterSpread Plus to model the effect of nine different control strategies: the minimum measures......,H.M., Smak,J.A., Pluimers,F.H., 1999. The classical swine fever epidemic 1997-1998 in The Netherlands: descriptive epidemiology, Prev.Vet.Med., 42, 157-184. Fritzemeier,J., Teuffert,J., Greiser,Wilke,I, Staubach,Ch, Schlüter,H., Moennig,V., 2000. Epidemiology of classical swine fever in Germany in the 1990s......, Vet.Microbiol. 77, 29-41. MacKinnon, J.D., 2001. Some clinical and epidemiological aspects of the outbreak of Classical Swine Fe-ver in East Anglia in 2000, State Vet.J,, 11, 2-7....

  5. The effects of classic altitude training on hemoglobin mass in swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, N B; Völzke, C; Prommer, N; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Frese, F; Spahl, O; Eastwood, A; Stray-Gundersen, J; Schmidt, W

    2013-05-01

    Aim of the study was to determine the influence of classic altitude training on hemoglobin mass (Hb-mass) in elite swimmers under the following aspects: (1) normal oscillation of Hb-mass at sea level; (2) time course of adaptation and de-adaptation; (3) sex influences; (4) influences of illness and injury; (5) interaction of Hb-mass and competition performance. Hb-mass of 45 top swimmers (male 24; female 21) was repeatedly measured (~6 times) over the course of 2 years using the optimized CO-rebreathing method. Twenty-five athletes trained between one and three times for 3-4 weeks at altitude training camps (ATCs) at 2,320 m (3 ATCs) and 1,360 m (1 ATC). Performance was determined by analyzing 726 competitions according to the German point system. The variation of Hb-mass without hypoxic influence was 3.0 % (m) and 2.7 % (f). At altitude, Hb-mass increased by 7.2 ± 3.3 % (p altitude. In conclusion, the altitude (2,320 m) effect on Hb-mass is still present 3 weeks after return, it decisively depends on the health status, but is not influenced by sex. In healthy subjects it exceeds by far the oscillation occurring at sea level. After return from altitude performance increases after a delay of 3 weeks.

  6. Classical, Semi-classical and Quantum Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, H; Scully, Marlan

    2012-01-01

    David Middleton was a towering figure of 20th Century engineering and science and one of the founders of statistical communication theory. During the second World War, the young David Middleton, working with Van Fleck, devised the notion of the matched filter, which is the most basic method used for detecting signals in noise. Over the intervening six decades, the contributions of Middleton have become classics. This collection of essays by leading scientists, engineers and colleagues of David are in his honor and reflect the wide  influence that he has had on many fields. Also included is the introduction by Middleton to his forthcoming book, which gives a wonderful view of the field of communication, its history and his own views on the field that he developed over the past 60 years. Focusing on classical noise modeling and applications, Classical, Semi-Classical and Quantum Noise includes coverage of statistical communication theory, non-stationary noise, molecular footprints, noise suppression, Quantum e...

  7. Effects of an electric field on interaction of aromatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Il Seung; Cho, Woo Jong; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-04-30

    The effect of uniform external electric field on the interactions between small aromatic compounds and an argon atom is investigated using post-HF (MP2, SCS-MP2, and CCSD(T)) and density functional (PBE0-D3, PBE0-TS, and vdW-DF2) methods. The electric field effect is quantified by the difference of interaction energy calculated in the presence and absence of the electric field. All the post-HF methods describe electric field effects accurately although the interaction energy itself is overestimated by MP2. The electric field effect is explained by classical electrostatic models, where the permanent dipole moment from mutual polarization mainly determines its sign. The size of π-conjugated system does not have significant effect on the electric field dependence. We found out that PBE0-based methods give reasonable interaction energies and electric field response in every case, while vdW-DF2 sometimes shows spurious artifact owing to its sensitivity toward the real space electron density. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Classical spins in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, H [Tokyo Univ.; Maki, K

    1968-08-01

    It is shown that there exists a localized excited state in the energy gap in a superconductor with a classical spin. At finite concentration localized excited states around classical spins form an impurity band. The process of growth of the impurity band and its effects on observable quantities are investigated.

  9. Electromagnetic field effects in explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Douglas

    2009-06-01

    Present and previous research on the effects of electromagnetic fields on the initiation and detonation of explosives and the electromagnetic properties of explosives are reviewed. Among the topics related to detonating explosives are: measurements of conductivity; enhancement of performance; and control of initiation and growth of reaction. Hayes...()^1 showed a strong correlation of peak electrical conductivity with carbon content of the detonation products. Ershov.......^2 linked detailed electrical conductivity measurements with reaction kinetics and this work was extended to enhance detonation performance electrically;...^3 for this, electrical power densities of the order of 100 TW/m^2 of explosive surface normal to the detonation front were required. However, small electrical powers are required to affect the initiation and growth of reaction.......^4,5 A continuation of this work will be reported. LA-UR 09-00873 .^1 B. Hayes, Procs. of 4th Symposium (International) on Detonation (1965), p. 595. ^2 A. Ershov, P. Zubkov, and L. Luk'yanchikov, Combustion, Explosion, and Shock Waves 10, 776-782 (1974). ^3 M. Cowperthwaite, Procs. 9th Detonation Symposium (1989), p. 388-395. ^4 M. A. Cook and T. Z. Gwyther, ``Influence of Electric Fields on Shock to Detonation Transition,'' (1965). ^5 D. Salisbury, R. Winter, and L. Biddle, Procs. of the APS Topical Conference on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (2005) p. 1010-1013.

  10. Effective field theory description of halo nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, H.-W.; Ji, C.; Phillips, D. R.

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear halos emerge as new degrees of freedom near the neutron and proton driplines. They consist of a core and one or a few nucleons which spend most of their time in the classically-forbidden region outside the range of the interaction. Individual nucleons inside the core are thus unresolved in the halo configuration, and the low-energy effective interactions are short-range forces between the core and the valence nucleons. Similar phenomena occur in clusters of 4He atoms, cold atomic gases near a Feshbach resonance, and some exotic hadrons. In these weakly-bound quantum systems universal scaling laws for s-wave binding emerge that are independent of the details of the interaction. Effective field theory (EFT) exposes these correlations and permits the calculation of non-universal corrections to them due to short-distance effects, as well as the extension of these ideas to systems involving the Coulomb interaction and/or binding in higher angular-momentum channels. Halo nuclei exhibit all these features. Halo EFT, the EFT for halo nuclei, has been used to compute the properties of single-neutron, two-neutron, and single-proton halos of s-wave and p-wave type. This review summarizes these results for halo binding energies, radii, Coulomb dissociation, and radiative capture, as well as the connection of these properties to scattering parameters, thereby elucidating the universal correlations between all these observables. We also discuss how Halo EFT's encoding of the long-distance physics of halo nuclei can be used to check and extend ab initio calculations that include detailed modeling of their short-distance dynamics.

  11. Renormalons in effective field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, M.; Manohar, A.V.; Savage, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the high-order behavior of perturbative matching conditions in effective field theories. These series are typically badly divergent, and are not Borel summable due to infrared and ultraviolet renormalons which introduce ambiguities in defining the sum of the series. We argue that, when treated consistently, there is no physical significance to these ambiguities. Although nonperturbative matrix elements and matching conditions are in general ambiguous, the ambiguity in any physical observable is always higher order in 1/M than the theory has been defined. We discuss the implications for the recently noticed infrared renormalon in the pole mass of a heavy quark. We show that a ratio of form factors in exclusive Λ b decays (which is related to the pole mass) is free from renormalon ambiguities regardless of the mass used as the expansion parameter of heavy quark effective theory. The renormalon ambiguities also cancel in inclusive heavy hadron decays. Finally, we demonstrate the cancellation of renormalons in a four-Fermi effective theory obtained by integrating out a heavy colored scalar

  12. The effect of verbalization strategy on wisconsin card sorting test performance in schizophrenic patients receiving classical or atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallaro Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of reports showed en encouraging remediation in some patients' executive deficits thanks to the use of 'information processing strategies'. Moreover the impact of antipsychotics on cognitive functions of the schizophrenics is an important issue, especially if an integrated psychosocial treatment is needed. The aim of this paper is to evaluate different executive performance and response to verbalization, a strategy of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST remediation, in subjects on classical vs atypical antipsychotic (AP treatment. Methods Sixty-three schizophrenic subjects undertook the WCST under standard and modified (verbalization administration. Subjects were stratified by the kind of WCST response (i.e. good, poor and remediable and AP treatment (i.e. atypical vs. classical. Results Subjects on atypical APs showed a better performance than those on classical ones. More poor performers who did not remediate were seen in the sample with classical Aps while subjects who remediated the performance were seen in the subgroup with atypical APs only. An increase of perseverative and total errors was seen in poor performers subjects on classical APs. Conclusion Subjects on atypicals showed a better cognitive pattern in terms of WCST performance. Since the naturalistic assignment of medication we cannot draw conclusions about its effect on cognitive performance and its interaction with cognitive remediation potential. However the data lead us to hypothesize that subjects with potential room for remediation did so with the atypical APs.

  13. The Effect of Classical Music on Painting Quality and Classroom Behaviour for Students with Severe Intellectual Disabilities in Special Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Russell F.; Riddoch, Jane V.

    2007-01-01

    There are few studies measuring the effects on painting quality of playing background classical music at special schools. Primary students with severe intellectual disabilities (N=24) were taught abstract painting in a two-part method. The first part involved a Pictorial Only method and the second, immediately following it, involved a Pictorial…

  14. Simulated epidemiological and economic effects of measures to reduce piglet supply during a classical swine fever epidemic in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangen, M.J.J.; Nielen, M.; Burrell, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of additional measures adopted during a classical swine fever (CSF) epidemic to reduce piglet supply, namely, an insemination ban, abortion of sows and killing of young piglets, are studied using a stochastic, spatial, dynamic epidemiological simulation model of the pig sector in the

  15. Correlation analysis of quantum fluctuations and repulsion effects of classical dynamics in SU(3) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Shigeyasu; Sakata, Fumihiko

    2003-01-01

    In many quantum systems, random matrix theory has been used to characterize quantum level fluctuations, which is known to be a quantum correspondent to a regular-to-chaos transition in classical systems. We present a new qualitative analysis of quantum and classical fluctuation properties by exploiting correlation coefficients and variances. It is shown that the correlation coefficient of the quantum level density is roughly inversely proportional relation to the variance of consecutive phase-space point spacings on the Poincare section plane. (author)

  16. Effect of classic ketogenic diet treatment on lipoprotein subfractions in children and adolescents with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo de Lima, Patricia; Baldini Prudêncio, Mariana; Murakami, Daniela Kawamoto; Pereira de Brito Sampaio, Leticia; Figueiredo Neto, Antônio Martins; Teixeira Damasceno, Nágila Raquel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the classic ketogenic diet (KD) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions in children and adolescents with refractory epilepsy. This prospective study recruited children and adolescents of either sex, whose epilepsy was refractory to treatment with multiple drugs. To be included, the patient had to have an indication for treatment with the KD and be treated as an outpatient. At baseline and after 3 and 6 mo of the KD, lipid profile (total cholesterol [TC], triacylglycerols [TG], LDL cholesterol [LDL-C], and HDL cholesterol [HDL-C]), apolipoproteins (apoA-I and apoB), 10 subfractions of HDL, 7 subfractions of LDL, LDL phenotype, and LDL size were analyzed using the Lipoprint system. The lipid profile components (TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, apoA-I, and apoB) increased during the 3-mo follow-up, and remained consistent after 6 mo of treatment. Similarly, non-HDL-C, TC/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, and apoB/apoA-I ratios, representing atherogenic particles, significantly increased. In contrast, qualitative lipoprotein characteristics progressively changed during the follow-up period. Small LDL subfractions increased, and this profile was related with reduced LDL size (27.3 nm to 26.7 nm). The LDL phenotype became worse; 52.1% of the patients had a non-A phenotype after 6 mo of the KD. Small HDL subfractions decreased only after 6 mo of the KD. KD treatment promotes negative changes in lipoprotein size and phenotype, contributing to atherogenic risk in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of different types of classical music played at a veterinary hospital on dog behavior and owner satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Whitney J; Bain, Melissa

    2017-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of different types of classical music played during a veterinary visit on dog behavior and owner satisfaction. DESIGN Prospective randomized controlled study. ANIMALS 74 dogs examined at a veterinary teaching hospital. PROCEDURES Dogs examined for a wellness visit, presurgical health evaluation, or nonurgent illness were exposed to 1 of 3 treatments (modified classical music, the same music in its original format, and no music [control]) while in the examination room. Owners completed a standardized survey regarding the dog's behavior and their satisfaction with the visit. Clinicians completed a separate standardized survey regarding the dog's behavior. Information regarding monetary charges, procedures performed, diagnoses, and physiologic variables was obtained from the electronic medical record after the appointment. RESULTS Owners rated their dog's anxiety level in the waiting room greater than that in the examination room regardless of treatment. Mean anxiety and aggression scores of dogs during the physical examination as rated by owners were significantly greater than those assigned by clinicians. Visit satisfaction for owners exposed to original classical music was significantly greater than that for owners not exposed to music. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested placing a pet and its owner into an examination room instead of a waiting room immediately after clinic arrival may ameliorate pet anxiety during the veterinary visit. Playing classical music at a low volume can be a simple and cost-effective way to improve owner satisfaction with the veterinary visit. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of music on pet anxiety.

  18. Born-Infeld magnetars: larger than classical toroidal magnetic fields and implications for gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Coelho, Jaziel G.; de Lima, Rafael C. R.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetars are neutron stars presenting bursts and outbursts of X- and soft-gamma rays that can be understood with the presence of very large magnetic fields. In this setting, nonlinear electrodynamics should be taken into account for a more accurate description of such compact systems. We study that in the context of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and make a realization of our analysis to the case of the well known Born-Infeld (BI) electromagnetism in order to come up with some of its astrophysical consequences. We focus here on toroidal magnetic fields as motivated by already known magnetars with low dipolar magnetic fields and their expected relevance in highly magnetized stars. We show that BI electrodynamics leads to larger toroidal magnetic fields when compared to Maxwell's electrodynamics. Hence, one should expect higher production of gravitational waves (GWs) and even more energetic giant flares from nonlinear stars. Given current constraints on BI's scale field, giant flare energetics and magnetic fields in magnetars, we also find that the maximum magnitude of magnetar ellipticities should be 10^{-6}-10^{-5}. Besides, BI electrodynamics may lead to a maximum increase of order 10-20% of the GW energy radiated from a magnetar when compared to Maxwell's, while much larger percentages may arise for other physically motivated scenarios. Thus, nonlinear theories of the electromagnetism might also be probed in the near future with the improvement of GW detectors.

  19. Organic tunnel field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Tietze, Max Lutz

    2017-06-29

    Various examples are provided for organic tunnel field effect transistors (OTFET), and methods thereof. In one example, an OTFET includes a first intrinsic layer (i-layer) of organic semiconductor material disposed over a gate insulating layer; source (or drain) contact stacks disposed on portions of the first i-layer; a second i-layer of organic semiconductor material disposed on the first i-layer surrounding the source (or drain) contact stacks; an n-doped organic semiconductor layer disposed on the second i-layer; and a drain (or source) contact layer disposed on the n-doped organic semiconductor layer. The source (or drain) contact stacks can include a p-doped injection layer, a source (or drain) contact layer, and a contact insulating layer. In another example, a method includes disposing a first i-layer over a gate insulating layer; forming source or drain contact stacks; and disposing a second i-layer, an n-doped organic semiconductor layer, and a drain or source contact.

  20. The stark effect in intense field. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.S.; Mur, V.D.; Sergeev, A.V.; Weinberg, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of hydrogen atom in homogeneous electric field is considered. The Stark shifts and widths of atomic levels are computed by summation of divergent perturbation series and by 1/n-expansion - up to E values comparable with the field on the electron orbit. The results of the calculations are presented for the following sequences of states: |n 1 ,0,0>, |0,n 2 ,0>, |n 1 ,n 1 ,0>, as well as for all states with n=2 and 3 (n is the principal quantum number). The Stark shifts and widths of Rydberg states (with n=15-30) in electric field which exceeds the classical ionization threshold are computed. The results of our calculations agree with experiment

  1. Mathematical physics classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Knauf, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    As a limit theory of quantum mechanics, classical dynamics comprises a large variety of phenomena, from computable (integrable) to chaotic (mixing) behavior. This book presents the KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) theory and asymptotic completeness in classical scattering. Including a wealth of fascinating examples in physics, it offers not only an excellent selection of basic topics, but also an introduction to a number of current areas of research in the field of classical mechanics. Thanks to the didactic structure and concise appendices, the presentation is self-contained and requires only knowledge of the basic courses in mathematics. The book addresses the needs of graduate and senior undergraduate students in mathematics and physics, and of researchers interested in approaching classical mechanics from a modern point of view.

  2. Classical states of an electric dipole in an external magnetic field: Complete solution for the center of mass and trapped states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atenas, Boris; Pino, Luis A. del; Curilef, Sergio, E-mail: scurilef@ucn.cl

    2014-11-15

    We study the classical behavior of an electric dipole in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. Using the Lagrangian formulation, we obtain the equations of motion, whose solutions are represented in terms of Jacobi functions. We also identify two constants of motion, namely, the energy E and a pseudomomentumC{sup →}. We obtain a relation between the constants that allows us to suggest the existence of a type of bound states without turning points, which are called trapped states. These results are consistent with and complementary to previous results. - Highlights: • Bound states without turning points. • Lagrangian Formulation for an electric dipole in a magnetic field. • Motion of the center of mass and trapped states. • Constants of motion: pseudomomentum and energy.

  3. Enlarging photovoltaic effect: combination of classic photoelectric and ferroelectric photovoltaic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjiao; Su, Xiaodong; Shen, Mingrong; Dai, Zhihua; Zhang, Lingjun; He, Xiyun; Cheng, Wenxiu; Cao, Mengyu; Zou, Guifu

    2013-01-01

    Converting light energy to electrical energy in photovoltaic devices relies on the photogenerated electrons and holes separated by the built-in potential in semiconductors. Photo-excited electrons in metal electrodes are usually not considered in this process. Here, we report an enhanced photovoltaic effect in the ferroelectric lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) by using low work function metals as the electrodes. We believe that electrons in the metal with low work function could be photo-emitted into PLZT and form the dominant photocurrent in our devices. Under AM1.5 (100 mW/cm²) illumination, the short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage of Mg/PLZT/ITO are about 150 and 2 times of those of Pt/PLZT/ITO, respectively. The photovoltaic response of PLZT capacitor was expanded from ultraviolet to visible spectra, and it may have important impact on design and fabrication of high performance photovoltaic devices based on ferroelectric materials.

  4. Representations of classical groups on the lattice and its application to the field theory on discrete space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Lorente, M.

    2003-01-01

    We explore the mathematical consequences of the assumption of a discrete space-time. The fundamental laws of physics have to be translated into the language of discrete mathematics. We find integral transformations that leave the lattice of any dimension invariant and apply these transformations to field equations.

  5. Issues of effective field theories with resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gegelia, J.; Japaridze, G.

    2014-01-01

    We address some issues of renormalization and symmetries of effective field theories with unstable particles - resonances. We also calculate anomalous contributions in the divergence of the singlet axial current in an effective field theory of massive SU(N) Yang-Mills fields interacting with fermions and discuss their possible relevance to the strong CP problem. (author)

  6. Classic and quantic interpretation of Doppler effect in a refractive medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.I.

    1978-01-01

    Ginsburg giving quantum consideration to the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect made an assumption that the emission of a photon corresponds to the momentum Psub(ω) = nhω/c. From here one obtains a correct relationship for the frequency and direction of radiation in the Doppler effect. In the present paper on the basis of the author's data (1942 and 1947) and those of Ginzburg and Eidman the energy of radiation is compared with the work made by the field acting on a moving source of radiation. It is shown that the relatjonship Psub(ω) = nEsub(ω)/c between the total momentum flux and energy must take place without fail. Therefore, it is impossible to say which of the energy-momentum tensor by Minkowski or Abraham is to prefer, since they consider the momentum density and not the total momentum flux. (author)

  7. Classical tokamak transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, Aldo

    1982-01-01

    A qualitative treatment of the classical transport theory of a magnetically confined, toroidal, axisymmetric, two-species plasma is presented. The 'weakly collisional' ('banana' and 'plateau') and 'collision dominated' ('Pfirsch-Schlueter' and 'highly collisional') regimes, as well as the Ware effect are discussed. The method used to evaluate the diffusion coffieicnts of particles and heat in the weakly collisional regime is based on stochastic argument, that requires an analysis of the characteristic collision frequencies and lengths for particles moving in a tokamak-like magnetic field. The same method is used to evaluate the Ware effect. In the collision dominated regime on the other hand, the particle and heat fluxes across the magnetic field lines are dominated by macroscopic effects so that, although it is possible to present them as diffusion (in fact, the fluxes turn out to be proportional to the density and temperature gradients), a macroscopic treatment is more appropriate. Hence, fluid equations are used to inveatigate the collision dominated regime, to which particular attention is devoted, having been shown relatively recently that it is more complicated than the usual Pfirsch-Schlueter regime. The whole analysis presented here is qualitative, aiming to point out the relevant physical mechanisms involved in the various regimes more than to develop a rigorous mathematical derivation of the diffusion coefficients, for which appropriate references are given. (author)

  8. Batf3 and Id2 have a synergistic effect on Irf8-directed classical CD8α+ dendritic cell development

    KAUST Repository

    Jaiswal, Hemant

    2013-11-13

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous cell populations represented by different subtypes, each varying in terms of gene expression patterns and specific functions. Recent studies identified transcription factors essential for the development of different DC subtypes, yet molecular mechanisms for the developmental program and functions remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed and characterized a mouse DC progenitor-like cell line, designated DC9, from Irf8-/- bone marrow cells as a model for DC development and function. Expression of Irf8 in DC9 cells led to plasmacytoid DCs and CD8α+ DC-like cells, with a concomitant increase in plasmacytoid DC- and CD8α+ DC-specific gene transcripts and induction of type I IFNs and IL12p40 following TLR ligand stimulation. Irf8 expression in DC9 cells led to an increase in Id2 and Batf3 transcript levels, transcription factors shown to be important for the development of CD8α+ DCs. We show that, without Irf8 , expression of Id2 and Batf3 was not sufficient for directing classical CD8α+ DC development. When coexpressed with Irf8, Batf3 and Id2 had a synergistic effect on classical CD8α+ DC development. We demonstrate that Irf8 is upstream of Batf3 and Id2 in the classical CD8α+ DC developmental program and define the hierarchical relationship of transcription factors important for classical CD8α+ DC development.

  9. EFFECTS OF PARAMETRIC VARIATIONS ON SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR NON-CLASSICALLY DAMPED COUPLED SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XU, J.; DEGRASSI, G.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive benchmark program was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform an evaluation of state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for performing seismic analyses of coupled systems with non-classical damping. The program, which was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was designed to address various aspects of application and limitations of these state-of-the-art analysis methods to typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) structures with non-classical damping, and was carried out through analyses of a set of representative benchmark problems. One objective was to examine the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled systems. The examination was performed using parametric variations for three simple benchmark models. This paper presents the comparisons and evaluation of the program participants' results to the BNL exact solutions for the applicable ranges of modeling dynamic characteristic parameters

  10. Classical solutions in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baaklini, N.S.; Ferrara, S.; Nieuwenhuizen Van, P.

    1977-06-01

    Classical solutions of supergravity are obtained by making finite global supersymmetry rotation on known solutions of the field equations of the bosonic sector. The Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstoem solutions of general relativity are extended to various supergravity systems and the modification to the perihelion precession of planets is discussed

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF LAVENDER AROMATHERAPY AND CLASSICAL MUSIC THERAPY IN LOWERING BLOOD PRESSURE IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Maisi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension during pregnancy remains high in Indonesia. It is a major cause of maternal death. Aromatherapy lavender and classical music therapy are considered effective in lowering blood pressure in hypertension. Objective: To examine the effect of lavender aromatherapy and classical music therapy in lowering blood pressure in pregnant women with hypertension. Methods: A quasy experimental study with pretest-posttest control group design. There were 52 pregnant women with the inclusion criteria selected as samples using simple random sampling, divided into lavender aromatherapy group, classical music group, combination of aromatherapy and music group, and control group. Sphygmomanometer was used to measure blood pressure. Mann Whitney and Post Hoc test were used for data analysis. Results: Results showed that four groups have a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure after given intervention with p-value <0.05. The mean decrease of systolic blood pressure among four groups was: lavender group (5.77 mmHg, music group (7.23 mmHg, combination group (9.54 mmHg, and control group (3.67 mmHg; and the mean decrease of diastolic blood pressure was: the lavender group (2.77 mmHg, music group (0.61 mmHg, combination group (8.23 mmHg, and control group (3.42 mmHg. Conclusion: there was a significant effect of lavender aromatherapy and classical music therapy in lowering blood pressure in pregnant women with hypertension. However, the combination of both interventions was more effective than lavender aromatherapy or music therapy alone.

  12. Classic experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Franklin, M

    2001-01-01

    These will be a set of lectures on classic particle physics experiments, with emphasis on how the emasurements are made. I will discuss experiments made to measure the electric charge distribution of particles, to measure the symmetries of the weak decays, to measure the magnetic moment of the muon. As well as experiments performed which discovered new particles or resonances, like the tAU2and the J/Psi. The coverage will be general and should be understandable to someone knowing little particle physics.

  13. Behaviour of symmetric solutions of a nonlinear elliptic field equation in the semi-classical limit: Concentration around a circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa D'Aprile

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the existence of concentrated solutions of the nonlinear field equation $$ -h^{2}Delta v+V(xv-h^{p}Delta_{p}v+ W'(v=0,, $$ where $v:{mathbb R}^{N}o{mathbb R}^{N+1}$, $Ngeq 3$, $p>N$, the potential $V$ is positive and radial, and $W$ is an appropriate singular function satisfying a suitable symmetric property. Provided that $h$ is sufficiently small, we are able to find solutions with a certain spherical symmetry which exhibit a concentration behaviour near a circle centered at zero as $ho 0^{+}$. Such solutions are obtained as critical points for the associated energy functional; the proofs of the results are variational and the arguments rely on topological tools. Furthermore a penalization-type method is developed for the identification of the desired solutions.

  14. Particle Production and Effective Thermalization in Inhomogeneous Mean Field Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, G.; Smit, J.

    2000-01-01

    As a toy model for dynamics in nonequilibrium quantum field theory we consider the abelian Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions with fermions. In the approximate dynamical equations, inhomogeneous classical (mean) Bose fields are coupled to quantized fermion fields, which are treated with a mode function

  15. Effective theories of single field inflation when heavy fields matter

    CERN Document Server

    Achucarro, Ana; Hardeman, Sjoerd; Palma, Gonzalo A; Patil, Subodh P

    2012-01-01

    We compute the low energy effective field theory (EFT) expansion for single-field inflationary models that descend from a parent theory containing multiple other scalar fields. By assuming that all other degrees of freedom in the parent theory are sufficiently massive relative to the inflaton, it is possible to derive an EFT valid to arbitrary order in perturbations, provided certain generalized adiabaticity conditions are respected. These conditions permit a consistent low energy EFT description even when the inflaton deviates off its adiabatic minimum along its slowly rolling trajectory. By generalizing the formalism that identifies the adiabatic mode with the Goldstone boson of this spontaneously broken time translational symmetry prior to the integration of the heavy fields, we show that this invariance of the parent theory dictates the entire non-perturbative structure of the descendent EFT. The couplings of this theory can be written entirely in terms of the reduced speed of sound of adiabatic perturbat...

  16. Reappraisal of the diuretic effect of empagliflozin in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial: Comparison with classic diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2016-09-01

    Empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, has been associated with a remarkable reduction in cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and antecedents of cardiovascular disease. This effect was attributed to a diuretic (haemodynamic) rather than metabolic (antiatherogenic) effect. The aim of this review is to offer arguments that either support or challenge this 'diuretic hypothesis'. The literature was scrutinized to: (1) examine the diuretic effects of SGLT2 inhibitors vs. hydrochlorothiazide as the reference diuretic; (2) analyze the effects of classic diuretics on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in diabetic patients; and (3) reconsider some of the specific analyses of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial possibly related to a diuretic effect. The diuretic effect of empagliflozin has so far been poorly investigated, although SGLT2 inhibitors have actions distinct from those of classic diuretics. The effects of thiazide-like diuretics on cardiovascular and overall mortality have been limited in diabetic patients with hypertension, whereas the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in subgroups of diabetic patients with heart failure were more impressive, but still largely inferior to those reported in EMPA-REG, where relative reductions in mortality with empagliflozin were observed in diabetic patients with or without heart failure, arterial hypertension, renal impairment or diuretic background therapy. Although the diuretic hypothesis was put forward to explain the remarkable reduction in mortality with empagliflozin in EMPA-REG, the available results do not support a major contribution of this mechanism, unless the specific diuretic effect of SGLT2 inhibitors turns out to be markedly different from those of classic diuretics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic effects of nonionizing electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Henry

    2001-01-01

    Due to the increased use of electricity and wireless communication devices, there is a concern on whether exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic fields (50/60 Hz fields and radiofrequency radiation) can lead to harmful health effects, particularly, genetic effects and cancer development. This presentation will review recent research on genetic effects of power line frequency and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Even though the mechanism of interaction is still unknown, there is increasing evidence that these electromagnetic fields at low intensities can cause genetic damage in cells. There is also evidence suggesting that the effects are caused by oxidative stress. (author)

  18. Comparing the epidemiological and economic effects of control strategies against classical swine fever in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boklund, Anette; Toft, Nils; Alban, Lis

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, total Danish pork exports were valued at (sic)3.8 billion, corresponding to approximately 5% of the total Danish exports, and an outbreak of a notifiable disease would have dramatic consequences for the agricultural sector in Denmark. Several outbreaks of classical swine fever (CSF) have...... occurred in Europe within the last decade, and different control strategies have been suggested. The objective of this study was to simulate the epidemiological and economic consequences of such control strategies in a CSF epidemic under Danish conditions with respect to herd demographics and geography...

  19. Invariance identities associated with finite gauge transformations and the uniqueness of the equations of motion of a particle in a classical gauge field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rund, H.

    1984-01-01

    A certain class of geometric objects is considered against the background of a classical gauge field associated with an arbitrary structural Lie group. It is shown that the necessary and sufficient conditions for the invariance of the given objects under a finite gauge transformation are embodied in a set of three relations involving the derivatives of their components. As a special case these so-called invariance identities indicate that there cannot exist a gauge-invariant Lagrangian that depends on the gauge potentials, the interaction parameters, and the 4-velocity components of a test particle. However, the requirement that the equations of motion that result from such a lagrangian be gauge-invariant, uniquely determines the structure of these equations. (author)

  20. Antiferromagnetic Ising model decorated with D-vector spins: Transversal and longitudinal local fields effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos Dos Santos, R.J.; Coutinho, S.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of a local field acting on decorating classical D-vector bond spins of an antiferromagnetic Ising model on the square lattice is studied for both the annealed isotropic and the axial decorated cases. In both models the effect on the phase diagrams of the transversal and the longitudinal components of the local field acting on the decorating spins are fully analyzed and discussed

  1. Towards the unified non-classical physics: account for quantum fluctuations in equilibrium thermodynamics via the effective temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G.Rudoy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of effective temperature (ET T*(T0, T is used in order to approximately "quantize" the thermodynamic functions of the dynamical object which is in the thermal equilibrium with thermal bath being at constant temperature T (T0=E0/kB, where E0 is the ground-state energy, kB - Boltzmann constant, is the characteristic ``quantum'' temperature of the system itself. On these grounds the extensive comparative investigation is carried out for the ``standard model'' of statistical mechanics - the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator (HO. Three well-known approaches are considered and their thermodynamic consequences thoroughly studied. These are: the exact quantum, or non-classical Planck-Einstein approach, intermediate, or semiclassical Bloch-Wigner approach and, finally, the pure classical, or Maxwell-Boltzmann approach.

  2. Classic Problems of Probability

    CERN Document Server

    Gorroochurn, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    "A great book, one that I will certainly add to my personal library."—Paul J. Nahin, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, University of New Hampshire Classic Problems of Probability presents a lively account of the most intriguing aspects of statistics. The book features a large collection of more than thirty classic probability problems which have been carefully selected for their interesting history, the way they have shaped the field, and their counterintuitive nature. From Cardano's 1564 Games of Chance to Jacob Bernoulli's 1713 Golden Theorem to Parrondo's 1996 Perplexin

  3. Effect of circadian phase on memory acquisition and recall: operant conditioning vs. classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garren, Madeleine V; Sexauer, Stephen B; Page, Terry L

    2013-01-01

    There have been several studies on the role of circadian clocks in the regulation of associative learning and memory processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The results have been quite variable and at present it is unclear to what extent the variability observed reflects species differences or differences in methodology. Previous results have shown that following differential classical conditioning in the cockroach, Rhyparobia maderae, in an olfactory discrimination task, formation of the short-term and long-term memory is under strict circadian control. In contrast, there appeared to be no circadian regulation of the ability to recall established memories. In the present study, we show that following operant conditioning of the same species in a very similar olfactory discrimination task, there is no impact of the circadian system on either short-term or long-term memory formation. On the other hand, ability to recall established memories is strongly tied to the circadian phase of training. On the basis of these data and those previously reported for phylogenetically diverse species, it is suggested that there may be fundamental differences in the way the circadian system regulates learning and memory in classical and operant conditioning.

  4. Effect of circadian phase on memory acquisition and recall: operant conditioning vs. classical conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine V Garren

    Full Text Available There have been several studies on the role of circadian clocks in the regulation of associative learning and memory processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The results have been quite variable and at present it is unclear to what extent the variability observed reflects species differences or differences in methodology. Previous results have shown that following differential classical conditioning in the cockroach, Rhyparobia maderae, in an olfactory discrimination task, formation of the short-term and long-term memory is under strict circadian control. In contrast, there appeared to be no circadian regulation of the ability to recall established memories. In the present study, we show that following operant conditioning of the same species in a very similar olfactory discrimination task, there is no impact of the circadian system on either short-term or long-term memory formation. On the other hand, ability to recall established memories is strongly tied to the circadian phase of training. On the basis of these data and those previously reported for phylogenetically diverse species, it is suggested that there may be fundamental differences in the way the circadian system regulates learning and memory in classical and operant conditioning.

  5. Random electrodynamics: the theory of classical electrodynamics with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of classical electrodynamics with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation is outlined here under the title random electrodynamics. The work represents a reanalysis of the bounds of validity of classical electron theory which should sharpen the understanding of the connections and distinctions between classical and quantum theories. The new theory of random electrodynamics is a classical electron theory involving Newton's equations for particle motion due to the Lorentz force, and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic fields with point particles as sources. However, the theory departs from the classical electron theory of Lorentz in that it adopts a new boundary condition on Maxwell's equations. It is assumed that the homogeneous boundary condition involves random classical electromagnetic radiation with a Lorentz-invariant spectrum, classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation. The implications of random electrodynamics for atomic structure, atomic spectra, and particle-interference effects are discussed on an order-of-magnitude or heuristic level. Some detailed mathematical connections and some merely heuristic connections are noted between random electrodynamics and quantum theory. (U.S.)

  6. Classical tachyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.

    1984-01-01

    A review of tachyons, with particular attention to their classical theory, is presented. The extension of Special Relativity to tachyons in two dimensional is first presented, an elegant model-theory which allows a better understanding also of ordinary physics. Then, the results are extended to the four-dimensional case (particular on tachyon mechanics) that can be derived without assuming the existence of Super-luminal reference-frames. Localizability and the unexpected apparent shape of tachyonic objects are discussed, and it is shown (on the basis of tachyon kinematics) how to solve the common causal paradoxes. In connection with General Relativity, particularly the problem of the apparent superluminal expansions in astrophysics is reviewed. The problem (still open) of the extension of relativitic theories to tachyons in four dimensions is tackled, and the electromagnetic theory of tachyons, a topic that can be relevant also for the experimental side, is reviewed. (Author) [pt

  7. Towards accurate simulation of fringe field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berz, M.; Erdelyi, B.; Makino, K.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study various fringe field effects. Previously, we showed the large impact that fringe fields can have on certain lattice scenarios of the proposed Neutrino Factory. Besides the linear design of the lattice, the effects depend strongly on the details of the field fall off. Various scenarios are compared. Furthermore, in the absence of detailed information, we study the effects for the LHC, a case where the fringe fields are known, and try to draw some conclusions for Neutrino Factory lattices

  8. Effective Field Theory on Manifolds with Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Benjamin I.

    In the monograph Renormalization and Effective Field Theory, Costello made two major advances in rigorous quantum field theory. Firstly, he gave an inductive position space renormalization procedure for constructing an effective field theory that is based on heat kernel regularization of the propagator. Secondly, he gave a rigorous formulation of quantum gauge theory within effective field theory that makes use of the BV formalism. In this work, we extend Costello's renormalization procedure to a class of manifolds with boundary and make preliminary steps towards extending his formulation of gauge theory to manifolds with boundary. In addition, we reorganize the presentation of the preexisting material, filling in details and strengthening the results.

  9. Regular behaviors in SU(2) Yang-Mills classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoming

    1997-01-01

    In order to study regular behaviors in high-energy nucleon-nucleon collisions, a representation of the vector potential A i a is defined with respect to the (a,i)-dependence in the SU(2) Yang-Mills classical mechanics. Equations of the classical infrared field as well as effective potentials are derived for the elastic or inelastic collision of two plane wave in a three-mode model and the decay of an excited spherically-symmetric field

  10. Quantum classical correspondence in nonrelativistic electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, B.; Weatherford, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    A form of classical electrodynamic field exists which gives exact agreement with the operator field of quantum electrodynamics (QED) for the Lamb shift of a harmonically bound point electron. Here it is pointed out that this form of classical theory, with its physically acceptable interpretation, is the result of an unconventional resolution of a mathematically ambiguous term in classical field theory. Finally, a quantum classical correspondence principle is shown to exist in the sense that the classical field and expectation value of the QED operator field are identical, if retardation is neglected in the latter

  11. An introduction to effective field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, John F.

    1999-01-01

    In these lectures I describe the main ideas of effective field theory. These are first illustrated using QED and the linear sigma model as examples. Calculational techniques using both Feynman diagrams and dispersion relations are introduced. Within QCD, chiral perturbation theory is a complete effective field theory, and I give a guide to some calculations in the literature which illustrates key ideas. (author)

  12. From quantum to classical modeling of radiation reaction: A focus on stochasticity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niel, F.; Riconda, C.; Amiranoff, F.; Duclous, R.; Grech, M.

    2018-04-01

    Radiation reaction in the interaction of ultrarelativistic electrons with a strong external electromagnetic field is investigated using a kinetic approach in the nonlinear moderately quantum regime. Three complementary descriptions are discussed considering arbitrary geometries of interaction: a deterministic one relying on the quantum-corrected radiation reaction force in the Landau and Lifschitz (LL) form, a linear Boltzmann equation for the electron distribution function, and a Fokker-Planck (FP) expansion in the limit where the emitted photon energies are small with respect to that of the emitting electrons. The latter description is equivalent to a stochastic differential equation where the effect of the radiation reaction appears in the form of the deterministic term corresponding to the quantum-corrected LL friction force, and by a diffusion term accounting for the stochastic nature of photon emission. By studying the evolution of the energy moments of the electron distribution function with the three models, we are able to show that all three descriptions provide similar predictions on the temporal evolution of the average energy of an electron population in various physical situations of interest, even for large values of the quantum parameter χ . The FP and full linear Boltzmann descriptions also allow us to correctly describe the evolution of the energy variance (second-order moment) of the distribution function, while higher-order moments are in general correctly captured with the full linear Boltzmann description only. A general criterion for the limit of validity of each description is proposed, as well as a numerical scheme for the inclusion of the FP description in particle-in-cell codes. This work, not limited to the configuration of a monoenergetic electron beam colliding with a laser pulse, allows further insight into the relative importance of various effects of radiation reaction and in particular of the discrete and stochastic nature of high

  13. Integrability and soliton in a classical one dimensional site dependent biquadratic Heisenberg spin chain and the effect of nonlinear inhomogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavitha, L.; Daniel, M.

    2002-07-01

    The integrability of one dimensional classical continuum inhomogeneous biquadratic Heisenberg spin chain and the effect of nonlinear inhomogeneity on the soliton of an underlying completely integrable spin model are studied. The dynamics of the spin system is expressed in terms of a higher order generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation through a differential geometric approach which becomes integrable for a particular choice of the biquadratic exchange interaction and for linear inhomogeneity. The effect of nonlinear inhomogeneity on the spin soliton is studied by carrying out a multiple scale perturbation analysis. (author)

  14. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-28

    Feb 28, 2012 ... radiofrequency emitting sources are radars, mobile phones and their base stations, ... and industrial applications, could have effect on living organisms. ...... Hazards of Electromagnetic Pollution (Msc Thesis). Department of ...

  15. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Banerjee

    Full Text Available DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM and spectroscopy (AFS. The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  16. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Banerjee, S; Sett, S; Ghosh, S; Rakshit, T; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  17. Euclidean quantum field theory and the Hawking effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapedes, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    Complex analytic continuation in a time variable in order to define a Feynman propagator is investigated in a general relativistic context. When external electric fields are present a complex analytic continuation in the electric charge is also introduced. The new Euclidean formalism is checked by reproducing Schwinger's special relativistic result for pair creation by an external, homogenous, electric field, and then applied to the Robinson-Bertotti universe. The Robinson-Bertotti universe, although unphysical, provides an interesting theoretical laboratory in which to investigate quantum effects, much as the unphysical Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) universe does for purely classical general relativity. A conformally related problem of pair creation by a supercritically charged nucleus is also considered, and a sensible resolution is obtained to this classic problem. The essential mathematical point throughout is the use of the Feynman path-integral form of the propagator to motivate replacing hyperbolic equations by elliptic equations. The unique, bounded solution for the elliptic Green's function is then analytically continued back to physical values to define the Feynman Green's function

  18. Nonlinear classical theory of electromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisello, D.

    1977-01-01

    A topological theory of electric charge is given. Einstein's criteria for the completion of classical electromagnetic theory are summarized and their relation to quantum theory and the principle of complementarity is indicated. The inhibiting effect that this principle has had on the development of physical thought is discussed. Developments in the theory of functions on nonlinear spaces provide the conceptual framework required for the completion of electromagnetism. The theory is based on an underlying field which is a continuous mapping of space-time into points on the two-sphere. (author)

  19. Mean-field density functional theory of a nanoconfined classical, three-dimensional Heisenberg fluid. I. The role of molecular anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattes, Stefanie M.; Gubbins, Keith E.; Schoen, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we employ classical density functional theory (DFT) to investigate for the first time equilibrium properties of a Heisenberg fluid confined to nanoscopic slit pores of variable width. Within DFT pair correlations are treated at modified mean-field level. We consider three types of walls: hard ones, where the fluid-wall potential becomes infinite upon molecular contact but vanishes otherwise, and hard walls with superimposed short-range attraction with and without explicit orientation dependence. To model the distance dependence of the attractions, we employ a Yukawa potential. The orientation dependence is realized through anchoring of molecules at the substrates, i.e., an energetic discrimination of specific molecular orientations. If the walls are hard or attractive without specific anchoring, the results are "quasi-bulk"-like in that they can be linked to a confinement-induced reduction of the bulk mean field. In these cases, the precise nature of the walls is completely irrelevant at coexistence. Only for specific anchoring nontrivial features arise, because then the fluid-wall interaction potential affects the orientation distribution function in a nontrivial way and thus appears explicitly in the Euler-Lagrange equations to be solved for minima of the grand potential of coexisting phases.

  20. Field emission current from a junction field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monshipouri, Mahta; Abdi, Yaser

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of a titanium dioxide/carbon nanotube (TiO 2 /CNT)-based transistor is reported. The transistor can be considered as a combination of a field emission transistor and a junction field-effect transistor. Using direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) technique, CNTs were grown on a p-typed (100)-oriented silicon substrate. The CNTs were then covered by TiO 2 nanoparticles 2–5 nm in size, using an atmospheric pressure CVD technique. In this device, TiO 2 /CNT junction is responsible for controlling the emission current. High on/off-current ratio and proper gate control are the most important advantages of device. A model based on Fowler–Nordheim equation is utilized for calculation of the emission current and the results are compared with experimental data. The effect of TiO 2 /CNT hetero-structure is also investigated, and well modeled

  1. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-27

    Warning stimuli, as well as learning material, i.e. the numbers to recall, were presented binaurally via earphones at an intensity of 65dB sound...ensued in a remarkable increase in the yield of ES-derived spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes. Figure 3 Effect of MF on...move the mucus along a surface layer of saline. This is very likely that the cilia, beating with the frequency about few tenth of Hertz, generate some

  2. Quantized Eigenstates of a Classical Particle in a Ponderomotive Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin, I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    The average dynamics of a classical particle under the action of a high-frequency radiation resembles quantum particle motion in a conservative field with an effective de Broglie wavelength λ equal to the particle average displacement on a period of oscillations. In a ''quasi-classical'' field, with a spatial scale large compared to λ, the guiding center motion is adiabatic. Otherwise, a particle exhibits quantized eigenstates in a ponderomotive potential well, can tunnel through classically forbidden regions and experience reflection from an attractive potential. Discrete energy levels are also found for a ''crystal'' formed by multiple ponderomotive barriers

  3. Quantum dynamical effects as a singular perturbation for observables in open quasi-classical nonlinear mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G.P.; Borgonovi, F.; Dalvit, D.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    We review our results on a mathematical dynamical theory for observables for open many-body quantum nonlinear bosonic systems for a very general class of Hamiltonians. We show that non-quadratic (nonlinear) terms in a Hamiltonian provide a singular 'quantum' perturbation for observables in some 'mesoscopic' region of parameters. In particular, quantum effects result in secular terms in the dynamical evolution, that grow in time. We argue that even for open quantum nonlinear systems in the deep quasi-classical region, these quantum effects can survive after decoherence and relaxation processes take place. We demonstrate that these quantum effects in open quantum systems can be observed, for example, in the frequency Fourier spectrum of the dynamical observables, or in the corresponding spectral density of noise. Estimates are presented for Bose-Einstein condensates, low temperature mechanical resonators, and nonlinear optical systems prepared in large amplitude coherent states. In particular, we show that for Bose-Einstein condensate systems the characteristic time of deviation of quantum dynamics for observables from the corresponding classical dynamics coincides with the characteristic time-scale of the well-known quantum nonlinear effect of phase diffusion.

  4. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  5. The classical theory of fields

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Lev Davidovich

    1975-01-01

    Translated from the 6th Russian edition, this latest edition contains seven new sections with chapters on General Relativity, Gravitational Waves and Relativistic Cosmology, where Professor Lifshitz's interests lay. The text of the 3rd English edition has been thoroughly revised and additional problems inserted

  6. Effect of magnetic field on food freezing

    OpenAIRE

    村田, 圭治; 奥村, 太一; 荒賀, 浩一; 小堀, 康功

    2010-01-01

    [Abstract] This paper presents an experimental investigation on effects of magnetic field on food freezing process. Although purpose of food freezing is to suppress the deterioration of food, freezing breaks food tissue down, and some nutrient and delicious element flow out after thawing. Recently, a few of refrigeration equipments with electric and magnetic fields have attracted attention from food production companies and mass media. Water and tuna were freezed in magnetic field (100kH, 1.3...

  7. Boundary effects on quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    Quantum field theory in the S 1 *R 3 space-time is simply described by the imaginary time formalism. We generalize Schwinger-DeWitt proper-time technique which is very useful in zero temperature field theories to this case. As an example we calculate the one-loop effective potential of the finite temperature scala field theory by this technique.(Author)

  8. Effective field theory for NN interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duy Khuong; Vo Hanh Phuc

    2003-01-01

    The effective field theory of NN interactions is formulated and the power counting appropriate to this case is reviewed. It is more subtle than in most effective field theories since in the limit that the S-wave NN scattering lengths go to infinity. It is governed by nontrivial fixed point. The leading two body terms in the effective field theory for nucleon self interactions are scale invariant and invariant under Wigner SU(4) spin-isospin symmetry in this limit. Higher body terms with no derivatives (i.e. three and four body terms) are automatically invariant under Wigner symmetry. (author)

  9. Pseudoclassical fermionic model and classical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailagic, A.

    1981-08-01

    We study classical limit of fermionic fields seen as Grassmann variables and deduce the proper quantization prescription using Dirac's method for constrained systems and investigate quantum meaning of classical solutions for the Thirring model. (author)

  10. Electric field confinement effect on charge transport in organic field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Kadashchuk, A.; Fishchuk, I.I.; Smaal, W.T.T.; Gelinck, G.H.; Broer, D.J.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.; Bässler, H.

    2012-01-01

    While it is known that the charge-carrier mobility in organic semiconductors is only weakly dependent on the electric field at low fields, the experimental mobility in organic field-effect transistors using silylethynyl-substituted pentacene is found to be surprisingly field dependent at low

  11. QCD Effective Field Theories for Heavy Quarkonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, Nora

    2006-01-01

    QCD nonrelativistic effective field theories (NREFT) are the modern and most suitable frame to describe heavy quarkonium properties. Here I summarize few relevant concepts and some of the interesting physical applications (spectrum, decays, production) of NREFT

  12. Effective field theory approach to nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saviankou, P.; Gruemmer, F.; Epelbaum, E.; Krewald, S.; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2006-01-01

    Effective field theory provides a systematic approach to hardon physics and few-nucleon systems. It allows one to determine the effective two-, three-, and more-nucleon interactions which are consistent with each other. We present a project to derive bulk properties of nuclei from the effective nucleonic interactions

  13. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in generalized epilepsy in a multi-neurotransmitter system: How to improve the antiepileptic effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Here, we describe in generalized epilepsies the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides acting at specific subreceptors. In order to consider a network context rather than one based on focal substrates and in order to make the interaction between neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and their specific subreceptors comprehensible, neural networks in the hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex are described. In this disease, a neurotransmitter imbalance between dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons and between presynaptic GABAergic neurons (hypoactivity) and glutaminergic neurons (hyperactivity) occurs. Consequently, combined GABA A agonists and NMDA antagonists could furthermore stabilize the neural networks in a multimodal pharmacotherapy. The antiepileptic effect and the mechanisms of action of conventional and recently developed antiepileptic drugs are reviewed. The GASH:Sal animal model can contribute to examine the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs. The issues of whether the interaction of classical neurotransmitters with other subreceptors (5-HT 7 , metabotropic 5 glutaminergic, A 2A adenosine, and alpha nicotinic 7 cholinergic receptors) or whether the administration of agonists/antagonists of neuropeptides might improve the therapeutic effect of antiepileptic drugs should be addressed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic and Reflex Epilepsies, Audiogenic Seizures and Strains: From Experimental Models to the Clinic". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Construction of classical and non-classical coherent photon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honegger, Reinhard; Rieckers, Alfred

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that the diagonal matrix elements of all-order coherent states for the quantized electromagnetic field have to constitute a Poisson distribution with respect to the photon number. The present work gives first the summary of a constructive scheme, developed previously, which determines in terms of an auxiliary Hilbert space all possible off-diagonal elements for the all-order coherent density operators in Fock space and which identifies all extremal coherent states. In terms of this formalism it is then demonstrated that each pure classical coherent state is a uniformly phase locked (quantum) coherent superposition of number states. In a mixed classical coherent state the exponential of the locked phase is shown to be replaced by a rather arbitrary unitary operator in the auxiliary Hilbert space. On the other hand classes for density operators--and for their normally ordered characteristic functions--of non-classical coherent states are obtained, especially by rather weak perturbations of classical coherent states. These illustrate various forms of breaking the classical uniform phase locking and exhibit rather peculiar properties, such as asymmetric fluctuations for the quadrature phase operators. Several criteria for non-classicality are put forward and applied to the elaborated non-classical coherent states, providing counterexamples against too simple arguments for classicality. It is concluded that classicality is only a stable concept for coherent states with macroscopic intensity

  15. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutteridge, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the author, except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. These maps directly yield an absolute value for the water content of the sample that is unaffected by relaxation and any RF inhomogeneity or calibration errors in the radio frequency pulses applied. It has also been suggested that the signal generated by dipolar field effects may provide novel contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging. In the third application, the effects of microscopic susceptibility variation on the signal are studied and the relaxation rate of the signal is compared to that of a conventional spin echo. (author)

  16. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  17. Classical density functional theory and the phase-field crystal method using a rational function to describe the two-body direct correlation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisutha-Arnond, N; Chan, V W L; Iyer, M; Gavini, V; Thornton, K

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to represent a two-body direct correlation function (DCF) in order to alleviate the computational demand of classical density functional theory (CDFT) and enhance the predictive capability of the phase-field crystal (PFC) method. The approach utilizes a rational function fit (RFF) to approximate the two-body DCF in Fourier space. We use the RFF to show that short-wavelength contributions of the two-body DCF play an important role in determining the thermodynamic properties of materials. We further show that using the RFF to empirically parametrize the two-body DCF allows us to obtain the thermodynamic properties of solids and liquids that agree with the results of CDFT simulations with the full two-body DCF without incurring significant computational costs. In addition, the RFF can also be used to improve the representation of the two-body DCF in the PFC method. Last, the RFF allows for a real-space reformulation of the CDFT and PFC method, which enables descriptions of nonperiodic systems and the use of nonuniform and adaptive grids.

  18. Classical chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is currently our only candidate for a theory of strong-interaction dynamics. But the evidence for it is very scanty. Indeed, QCD has only been experimentally verified in its predictions of scaling violation in deep inelastic neutrino scattering. Yet, research continues on QCD because it is based on a beautiful idea, namely the incorporation of observed particle symmetries via local gauge invariance. Nevertheless QCD, a quantum field theory in 3 + 1 dimensions is still without solution. The sheer difficulty in solving the full quantum problem has led some to various approximations, in the hopes of shedding light on the structure of the theory. (orig./FKS)

  19. Field emission current from a junction field-effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monshipouri, Mahta; Abdi, Yaser, E-mail: y.abdi@ut.ac.ir [University of Tehran, Nano-Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Fabrication of a titanium dioxide/carbon nanotube (TiO{sub 2}/CNT)-based transistor is reported. The transistor can be considered as a combination of a field emission transistor and a junction field-effect transistor. Using direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) technique, CNTs were grown on a p-typed (100)-oriented silicon substrate. The CNTs were then covered by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles 2–5 nm in size, using an atmospheric pressure CVD technique. In this device, TiO{sub 2}/CNT junction is responsible for controlling the emission current. High on/off-current ratio and proper gate control are the most important advantages of device. A model based on Fowler–Nordheim equation is utilized for calculation of the emission current and the results are compared with experimental data. The effect of TiO{sub 2}/CNT hetero-structure is also investigated, and well modeled.

  20. Analytical model for the effects of wetting on thermal boundary conductance across solid/classical liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, Matthew E.; Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    We develop an analytical model for the thermal boundary conductance between a solid and a liquid. By infusing recent developments in the phonon theory of liquid thermodynamics with diffuse mismatch theory, we derive a closed form model that can predict the effects of wetting on the thermal boundary conductance across an interface between a solid and a classical liquid. We account for the complete wetting (hydrophilicity), or lack thereof (hydrophobicity), of the liquid to the solid by considering varying contributions of transverse mode interactions between the solid and liquid interfacial layers; this transverse coupling relationship is determined with local density of states calculations from molecular dynamics simulations between Lennard-Jones solids and a liquids with different interfacial interaction energies. We present example calculations for the thermal boundary conductance between both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces of Al/water and Au/water, which show excellent agreement with measured values reported by Ge et al. [Z. Ge, D. G. Cahill, and P. V. Braun, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 186101 (2006)]. Our model does not require any fitting parameters and is appropriate to model heat flow across any planar interface between a solid and a classical liquid.

  1. RAFT Polymerization of Styrene and Maleimide in the Presence of Fluoroalcohol: Hydrogen Bonding Effects with Classical Alternating Copolymerization as Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Yao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of hydrogen bonding on polymerization behavior has been of interest for a long time; however, universality and in-depth understanding are still lacking. For the first time, the effect of hydrogen bonding on the classical alternating-type copolymerization of styrene and maleimide was explored. N-phenylmaleimide (N-PMI/styrene was chosen as a model monomer pair in the presence of hydrogen bonding donor solvent 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP, which interacted with N-PMI via hydrogen bonding. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT technique was used to guarantee the “living” polymerization and thus the homogeneity of chain compositions. In comparison with the polymerization in nonhydrogen bonding donor solvent (toluene, the copolymerization in HFIP exhibited a high rate and a slight deviation from alternating copolymerization tendency. The reactivity ratios of N-PMI and St were revealed to be 0.078 and 0.068, respectively, while the reactivity ratios in toluene were 0.026 and 0.050. These interesting results were reasonably explained by using computer simulations, wherein the steric repulsion and electron induction by the hydrogen bonding between HFIP and NPMI were revealed. This work first elucidated the hydrogen bonding interaction in the classical alternating-type copolymerization, which will enrich the research on hydrogen bonding-induced polymerizations.

  2. The Effect of Classical Turkish Music on Pain Severity and Anxiety Levels in Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Ülkü; Taşcı, Sultan; Yıldızhan, Esra; Aslan, Süheyla; Eser, Bülent

    2018-05-18

    Bone marrow aspiration is a painful procedure. In addition, the anxiety experienced during the procedure can affect the pain felt during the procedure. This study was conducted as a randomized controlled study to determine the effect of classical Turkish music on pain severity and anxiety levels in patients undergoing bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. The study was performed in an oncology hospital with a total of 30 patients, of whom 14 were in the intervention group and 16 were in the control group. All underwent bone marrow aspiration and biopsy for the first time. Ethics committee approval, institutional permission, and the study participants' written informed consent were obtained. Data were collected using patient information forms and follow-up charts, the Visual Analog Scale, and the State Anxiety Inventory. It was determined that the scores gathered from the State Anxiety Inventory during the first follow-up increased in the second follow-up in both the intervention and control groups, and this increase was statistically significant in the intervention group (p < .05). The mean pain severity scores of the patients undergoing the procedure were significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group (p < .05). This study found that classical Turkish music reduced the severity of pain but increased the levels of anxiety in patients undergoing bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Designing Isoform-selective Inhibitors Against Classical HDACs for Effective Anticancer Therapy: Insight and Perspectives from In Silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors, the small molecules modulating the biological activity of histone deacetylases are emerging as potent chemotherapeutic agents. Despite their considerable therapeutic benefits in disease models, the lack of isoform specificity culminates in debilitating off target effects, raising serious concerns regarding their applicability. This emphasizes the pressing and unmet medical need of designing isoform selective inhibitors for safe and effective anticancer therapy. Keeping these grim facts in view, the current article sheds light on structural basis of off-targeting. Furthermore, the article discusses extensively the role of in silico strategies such as Molecular Docking, Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Energetically-optimized structure based pharmacophore approach in designing on-target inhibitors against classical HDACs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Dynamics of unitarization by classicalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvali, Gia; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-01-01

    We study dynamics of the classicalization phenomenon suggested in G. Dvali et al. , according to which a class of non-renormalizable theories self-unitarizes at very high-energies via creation of classical configurations (classicalons). We study this phenomenon in an explicit model of derivatively-self-coupled scalar that serves as a prototype for a Nambu-Goldstone-Stueckelberg field. We prepare the initial state in form of a collapsing wave-packet of a small occupation number but of very high energy, and observe that the classical configuration indeed develops. Our results confirm the previous estimates, showing that because of self-sourcing the wave-packet forms a classicalon configuration with radius that increases with center of mass energy. Thus, classicalization takes place before the waves get any chance of probing short-distances. The self-sourcing by energy is the crucial point, which makes classicalization phenomenon different from the ordinary dispersion of the wave-packets in other interacting theories. Thanks to this, unlike solitons or other non-perturbative objects, the production of classicalons is not only unsuppressed, but in fact dominates the high-energy scattering. In order to make the difference between classicalizing and non-classicalizing theories clear, we use a language in which the scattering cross section in a generic theory can be universally understood as a geometric cross section set by a classical radius down to which waves can propagate freely, before being scattered. We then show, that in non-classicalizing examples this radius shrinks with increasing energy and becomes microscopic, whereas in classicalizing theories expands and becomes macroscopic. We study analogous scattering in a Galileon system and discover that classicalization also takes place there, although somewhat differently. We thus observe, that classicalization is source-sensitive and that Goldstones pass the first test.

  5. Neuroendocrine Associations Underlying the Persistent Therapeutic Effects of Classic Serotonergic Psychedelics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle A. D. Schindler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports on the effects of psychedelic-assisted therapies for mood disorders and addiction, as well as the effects of psychedelics in the treatment of cluster headache, have demonstrated promising therapeutic results. In addition, the beneficial effects appear to persist well after limited exposure to the drugs, making them particularly appealing as treatments for chronic neuropsychiatric and headache disorders. Understanding the basis of the long-lasting effects, however, will be critical for the continued use and development of this drug class. Several mechanisms, including biological and psychological ones, have been suggested to explain the long-lasting effects of psychedelics. Actions on the neuroendocrine system are some such mechanisms that warrant further investigation in the study of persisting psychedelic effects. In this report, we review certain structural and functional neuroendocrinological pathologies associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and cluster headache. We then review the effects that psychedelic drugs have on those systems and provide preliminary support for potential long-term effects. The circadian biology of cluster headache is of particular relevance in this area. We also discuss methodologic considerations for future investigations of neuroendocrine system involvement in the therapeutic benefits of psychedelic drugs.

  6. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Ichiro [University of the Ryukyus, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a ''fake'' symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic field effects on electrochemical metal depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bund, Adriana Ispas and Gerd Mutschke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent experimental and numerical results from the authors' labs on the effects of moderate magnetic (B fields in electrochemical reactions. The probably best understood effect of B fields during electrochemical reactions is the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD effect. In the majority of cases it manifests itself in increased mass transport rates which are a direct consequence of Lorentz forces in the bulk of the electrolyte. This enhanced mass transport can directly affect the electrocrystallization. The partial currents for the nucleation of nickel in magnetic fields were determined using an in situ micro-gravimetric technique and are discussed on the basis of the nucleation model of Heerman and Tarallo. Another focus of the paper is the numerical simulation of MHD effects on electrochemical metal depositions. A careful analysis of the governing equations shows that many MHD problems must be treated in a 3D geometry. In most cases there is a complex interplay of natural and magnetically driven convection.

  8. Effective lagrangian from bosonic string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Naohito

    1987-01-01

    We investigate the low-energy effective action from the string field theoretical view point. The low-energy effective lagrangian for the massless mode of bosonic string is determined to the order of α'. We find a term which can not be determined from the S-matrix approach. (author)

  9. Effective field equations for expectation values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    We discuss functional methods which allow calculation of expectation values, rather than the usual in-out amplitudes, from a path integral. The technique, based on Schwinger's idea of summing over paths which go from the past to the future and then back to the past, provides effective field equations satisfied by the expectation value of the field. These equations are shown to be real and causal for a general theory up to two-loop order, and unitarity is checked to this order. These methods are applied to a simple quantum-mechanical example to illustrate the differences between the new formalism and the standard theory. When applied to the gravitational field, the new effective field equations should be useful for studies of quantum cosmology

  10. Effects of collisions on conservation laws in gyrokinetic field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H.; Nunami, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Watanabe, T.-H. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Effects of collisions on conservation laws for toroidal plasmas are investigated based on the gyrokinetic field theory. Associating the collisional system with a corresponding collisionless system at a given time such that the two systems have the same distribution functions and electromagnetic fields instantaneously, it is shown how the collisionless conservation laws derived from Noether's theorem are modified by the collision term. Effects of the external source term added into the gyrokinetic equation can be formulated similarly with the collisional effects. Particle, energy, and toroidal momentum balance equations including collisional and turbulent transport fluxes are systematically derived using a novel gyrokinetic collision operator, by which the collisional change rates of energy and canonical toroidal angular momentum per unit volume in the gyrocenter space can be given in the conservative forms. The ensemble-averaged transport equations of particles, energy, and toroidal momentum given in the present work are shown to include classical, neoclassical, and turbulent transport fluxes which agree with those derived from conventional recursive formulations.

  11. Classical dynamics a modern perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarshan, Ennackal Chandy George

    2016-01-01

    Classical dynamics is traditionally treated as an early stage in the development of physics, a stage that has long been superseded by more ambitious theories. Here, in this book, classical dynamics is treated as a subject on its own as well as a research frontier. Incorporating insights gained over the past several decades, the essential principles of classical dynamics are presented, while demonstrating that a number of key results originally considered only in the context of quantum theory and particle physics, have their foundations in classical dynamics.Graduate students in physics and practicing physicists will welcome the present approach to classical dynamics that encompasses systems of particles, free and interacting fields, and coupled systems. Lie groups and Lie algebras are incorporated at a basic level and are used in describing space-time symmetry groups. There is an extensive discussion on constrained systems, Dirac brackets and their geometrical interpretation. The Lie-algebraic description of ...

  12. On the field determination of effective porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javandel, I.

    1989-03-01

    Effective porosity of geologic materials is a very important parameter for estimating groundwater travel time and modeling contaminant transport in hydrologic systems. Determination of a representative effective porosity for nonideal systems is a problem still challenging hydrogeologists. In this paper, some of the conventional field geophysical and hydrological methods for estimating effective porosity of geologic materials are reviewed. The limitations and uncertainties associated with each method are discussed. 30 refs., 8 figs

  13. Effective field theory for triaxially deformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Q.B. [Technische Universitaet Muechen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Peking University, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Kaiser, N. [Technische Universitaet Muechen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Meissner, Ulf G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics and JARA-HPC, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Meng, J. [Peking University, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beijing (China); University of Stellenbosch, Department of Physics, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2017-10-15

    Effective field theory is generalized to investigate the rotational motion of triaxially deformed even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian for the triaxial rotor is obtained up to next-to-leading order within the effective field theory formalism. Its applicability is examined by comparing with a five-dimensional rotor-vibrator Hamiltonian for the description of the energy spectra of the ground state and γ band in Ru isotopes. It is found that by taking into account the next-to-leading order corrections, the ground state band in the whole spin region and the γ band in the low spin region are well described. The deviations for high-spin states in the γ bands point towards the importance of including vibrational degrees of freedom in the effective field theory formulation. (orig.)

  14. Effective field theory and the quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc; Jaczko, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the connections between the quark model (QM) and the description of hadrons in the low-momentum limit of heavy-baryon effective field theory in QCD. By using a three-flavor-index representation for the effective baryon fields, we show that the 'nonrelativistic' constituent QM for baryon masses and moments is completely equivalent through O(m s ) to a parametrization of the relativistic field theory in a general spin-flavor basis. The flavor and spin variables can be identified with those of effective valence quarks. Conversely, the spin-flavor description clarifies the structure and dynamical interpretation of the chiral expansion in effective field theory, and provides a direct connection between the field theory and the semirelativistic models for hadrons used in successful dynamical calculations. This allows dynamical information to be incorporated directly into the chiral expansion. We find, for example, that the striking success of the additive QM for baryon magnetic moments is a consequence of the relative smallness of the non-additive spin-dependent corrections

  15. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A.

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30–90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other’s CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that

  16. Classical kinetic equations for orientational effects with account for the two-particle correlation function of a crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ol'khovskij, I.I.; Sadykov, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of classical-statistical approach to the orientational effect theory with account of the influence of the two-particle correlation function of a crystal on diffusion processes. Peculiarities of fast particle movement in the crystal moving at small angles to crystallographic axes and planes are caused by a great number of correlated collisions of the beam particle with the crystal atoms during which the particle slightly deviates in each collision from the direction of its movement before the collision. Obtained is the kinetic equation for the distribution function over coordinates and velocities describing the movement of these particles in the crystal. Lacking the particle deceleration the equation describing movement of the beam particles in the averaged potential and their diffusion by velocities is also obtained. The main peculiarity of these equations is the fact that they take into account strong spatial non-uniformity in the crystal atom distribution [ru

  17. The effects of vestibular stimulation and fatigue on postural control in classical ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Diana M; Grisbrook, Tiffany L; Newnham, Prudence J; Edwards, Dylan J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of ballet-specific vestibular stimulation and fatigue on static postural control in ballet dancers and to establish whether these effects differ across varying levels of ballet training. Dancers were divided into three groups: professional, pre-professional, and recreational. Static postural control of 23 dancers was measured on a force platform at baseline and then immediately, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds after vestibular stimulation (pirouettes) and induction of fatigue (repetitive jumps). The professional dancers' balance was unaffected by both the vestibular stimulation and the fatigue task. The pre-professional and recreational dancers' static sway increased following both perturbations. It is concluded that professional dancers are able to compensate for vestibular and fatiguing perturbations due to a higher level of skill-specific motor training.

  18. Playing with QCD I: effective field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.

    2009-01-01

    The building blocks of hadrons are quarks and gluons, although color is confined into singlet states. QCD is believed to be the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Its asymptotically free nature puts the vacuum out of reach for perturbation theory. The Lagrangian of QCD and the Feynman rules associated were built by using the Gauge Principle, starting from the quark matter fields and obtaining gluons as connections. A simpler, and sometimes necessary or complementary, approach is provided by effective field theories or effective models, especially when one has to deal with the nonperturbative sector of the theory. (author)

  19. Classical algebraic chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    I develop an extension of the usual equations of SU(n) chromodynamics which permits the consistent introduction of classical, noncommuting quark source charges. The extension involves adding a singlet gluon, giving a U(n) -based theory with outer product P/sup a/(u,v) = (1/2)(d/sup a/bc + if/sup a/bc)(u/sup b/v/sup c/ - v/sup b/u/sup c/) which obeys the Jacobi identity, inner product S (u,v) = (1/2)(u/sup a/v/sup a/ + v/sup a/u/sup a/), and with the n 2 gluon fields elevated to algebraic fields over the quark color charge C* algebra. I show that provided the color charge algebra satisfies the condition S (P (u,v),w) = S (u,P (v,w)) for all elements u,v,w of the algebra, all the standard derivations of Lagrangian chromodynamics continue to hold in the algebraic chromodynamics case. I analyze in detail the color charge algebra in the two-particle (qq, qq-bar, q-barq-bar) case and show that the above consistency condition is satisfied for the following unique (and, interestingly, asymmetric) choice of quark and antiquark charges: Q/sup a//sub q/ = xi/sup a/, Q/sup a//sub q/ = xi-bar/sup a/ + delta/sup a/0(n/2)/sup 3/2/1, with xi/sup a/xi/sup b/ = (1/2)(d/sup a/bc + if/sup a/bc) xi/sup c/, xi-bar/sup a/xi-bar/sup b/ = -(1/2)(d/sup a/bc - if/sup a/bc) xi-bar/sup c/. The algebraic structure of the two-particle U(n) force problem, when expressed on an appropriately diagonalized basis, leads for all n to a classical dynamics problem involving an ordinary SU(2) Yang-Mills field with uniquely specified classical source charges which are nonparallel in the color-singlet state. An explicit calculation shows that local algebraic U(n) gauge transformations lead only to a rigid global rotation of axes in the overlying classical SU(2) problem, which implies that the relative orientations of the classical source charges have physical significance

  20. Focus on classical and quantum analogues for gravitational phenomena and related effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Maia, Clovis; Schützhold, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Hawking's prediction that black holes are not black but radiate has been one of the intellectually most influential results of theoretical physics, but Hawking's theory has not so far been testable. Recent developments in analogue models of gravity might change that. This focus issue assembles a series of papers that report on steps towards this goal and related physical effects in a variety of physical systems. (editorial)

  1. Classical two-split interference effects in double photoionization of molecular hydrogen at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Daniel A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyabe, S [LBNL; Rescigno, T N [LBNL; Mccurdy, C W [LBNL; Morales, F [MADRID, SPAIN; Martin, F [MADRID, SPAIN

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a thorough theoretical study of one photon double ionization of H{sub 2}. They suggest that interference effects reported in one photon ionization will be reproducible in the case of double ionization when one of the photons carriers most of the available energy and the other electron is not observed. These calculations reproduce recent double photoionization experiments of H{sub 2}.

  2. The effects of classic ketogenic diet on serum lipid profile in children with refractory seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Gholam Reza; Mohammadi, Mahmoud; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Karimi, Parviz; Mahmoudi, Maryam; Badv, Reza Shervin; Tavassoli, Ali Reza; Azizi Malamiri, Reza

    2016-12-01

    More than 25 % of children with epilepsy develop refractory seizures unresponsive to both old and new generation anticonvulsants. Since such seizures have a serious negative impact on the quality of life, other treatment options are considered. The ketogenic diet is a well-known treatment for managing refractory seizures, although its mechanism of action is unknown. Studies have shown that this diet is as good as, or better than, any of the newer medications in reducing seizure frequency. However, concerns about adverse effects have been raised. We conducted an open label trial to show the effects of this diet on serum lipid profile. Thirty-three children with refractory epilepsy were treated with the ketogenic diet and were followed for 6 months. Their serum lipid profile was assessed at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after initiating the diet. Seizure frequency was reduced in 63 % of children (no seizures in 2/33 and reduced >50 % in 19/33). However, after 6 months of administering the diet, median triglyceride was significantly increased (from 84 to 180 mg/dl, P ketogenic diet in children with refractory seizures is effective in seizure reduction, but leads to development of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. Detection of epistatic effects with logic regression and a classical linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Magdalena; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger; Posch, Martin; Bogdan, Małgorzata

    2014-02-01

    To locate multiple interacting quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing a trait of interest within experimental populations, usually methods as the Cockerham's model are applied. Within this framework, interactions are understood as the part of the joined effect of several genes which cannot be explained as the sum of their additive effects. However, if a change in the phenotype (as disease) is caused by Boolean combinations of genotypes of several QTLs, this Cockerham's approach is often not capable to identify them properly. To detect such interactions more efficiently, we propose a logic regression framework. Even though with the logic regression approach a larger number of models has to be considered (requiring more stringent multiple testing correction) the efficient representation of higher order logic interactions in logic regression models leads to a significant increase of power to detect such interactions as compared to a Cockerham's approach. The increase in power is demonstrated analytically for a simple two-way interaction model and illustrated in more complex settings with simulation study and real data analysis.

  4. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, Timothy W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allured, Bradley [UNIV NEVADA, RENO; Carpenter, Michael A [CAMBRIDGE UNIV. UK

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  5. Mathematical methods of classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    This short primer, geared towards students with a strong interest in mathematically rigorous approaches, introduces the essentials of classical physics, briefly points out its place in the history of physics and its relation to modern physics, and explains what benefits can be gained from a mathematical perspective. As a starting point, Newtonian mechanics is introduced and its limitations are discussed. This leads to and motivates the study of different formulations of classical mechanics, such as Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, which are the subjects of later chapters. In the second part, a chapter on classical field theories introduces more advanced material. Numerous exercises are collected in the appendix.

  6. Classical solutions and extended supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Alfaro, V.; Fubini, S.; Furlan, G.

    1980-03-01

    The existence and properties of classical solutions for gravity coupled to matter fields have been investigated previously with the limitation to conformally flat solutions. In the search for a guiding criterion to determine the form of the coupling among the fields, one is led to consider supersymmetric theories, and the question arises whether classical solutions persist in these models. It is found that a discrepancy persists between supergravity and standard meron solutions. Owing to the appearance of the scalar field, a new set of meron solutions exists for particular Lagrangian models. In conclusion, the form of solutions in Minkowski space is discussed

  7. Effects of an applied low frequency field on the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a single-mode field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xun-Wei, Xu; Nian-Hua, Liu

    2010-01-01

    The effects of an applied low frequency field on the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a single-mode field are investigated. It is shown that the time evolution of the atomic population is mainly controlled by the coupling constants and the frequency of the low frequency field, which leads to a low frequency modulation function for the time evolution of the upper state population. The amplitude of the modulation function becomes larger as the coupling constants increase. The frequency of the modulation function is proportional to the frequency of the low frequency field, and decreases with increasing coupling constant. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  8. Effective field theory for magnetic compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmuller, Wilfried; Dierigl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dudas, Emilian [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay,F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Schweizer, Julian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-04-10

    Magnetic flux plays an important role in compactifications of field and string theories in two ways, it generates a multiplicity of chiral fermion zero modes and it can break supersymmetry. We derive the complete four-dimensional effective action for N=1 supersymmetric Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories in six dimensions compactified on a torus with flux. The effective action contains the tower of charged states and it accounts for the mass spectrum of bosonic and fermionic fields as well as their level-dependent interactions. This allows us to compute quantum corrections to the mass and couplings of Wilson lines. We find that the one-loop corrections vanish, contrary to the case without flux. This can be traced back to the spontaneous breaking of symmetries of the six-dimensional theory by the background gauge field, with the Wilson lines as Goldstone bosons.

  9. Gravitational effects in field gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.; Vlasov, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities to describe various gravitation effects of field gravitation theory (FGT) are considered. Past-Newtonian approximation of the FGT has been constructed and on the basis of this approximation it has been shown that the field theory allows one to describe the whole set of experimental facts. The comparison of post-Newtonian parameters in FGT with those in the Einstein's theory makes it clear that these two; theories are undistinguishable from the viewpoint of any experiments, realized with post-Newtonian accuracy. Gravitational field of an island type source with spherically symmetrical distribution of matter and unstationary homogeneous model of Universe, which allows to describe the effect of cosmological red shift, are considered

  10. On the derivation of effective field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzunov, Dimo I.

    2004-12-01

    A general self-consistency approach allows a thorough treatment of the corrections to the standard mean-field approximation (MFA). The natural extension of standard MFA with the help of cumulant expansion leads to a new point of view on the effective field theories. The proposed approach can be used for a systematic treatment of fluctuation effects of various length scales and, perhaps, for the development of a new coarse graining procedure. We outline and justify our method by some preliminary calculations. Concrete results are given for the critical temperature and the Landau parameters of the φ 4 -theory - the field counterpart of the Ising model. An important unresolved problem of the modern theory of phase transitions - the problem for the calculation of the true critical temperature, is considered within the framework of the present approach. A comprehensive description of the ground state properties of many-body systems is also demonstrated. (author)

  11. PROBABILISTIC APPROACH OF STABILIZED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELEA. I.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the omnipresence of the electromagnetic field are certain and recognized. Assessing as accurately as possible these effects, which characterize random phenomena require the use of statistical-probabilistic calculation. This paper aims at assessing the probability of exceeding the admissible values of the characteristic sizes of the electromagnetic field - magnetic induction and electric field strength. The first part justifies the need for concern and specifies how to approach it. The mathematical model of approach and treatment is presented in the second part of the paper and the results obtained with reference to 14 power stations are synthesized in the third part. In the last part, are formulated the conclusions of the evaluations.

  12. On some nonlinear effects in ultrasonic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjotta

    2000-03-01

    Nonlinear effects associated with intense sound fields in fluids are considered theoretically. Special attention is directed to the study of higher effects that cannot be described within the standard propagation models of nonlinear acoustics (the KZK and Burgers equations). The analysis is based on the fundamental equations of motion for a thermoviscous fluid, for which thermal equations of state exist. Model equations are derived and used to analyze nonlinear sources for generation of flow and heat, and other changes in the ambient state of the fluid. Fluctuations in the coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity caused by the sound field, are accounted for. Also considered are nonlinear effects induced in the fluid by flexural vibrations. The intensity and absorption of finite amplitude sound waves are calculated, and related to the sources for generation of higher order effects.

  13. Ferromagnetic hysteresis and the effective field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Jiles-Atherton model of the behavior of ferromagnetic materials determines the irreversible magnetization from the effective field by using a differential equation. This paper presents an exact, analytical solution to the equation, one displaying hysteresis. The inclusion of magnetomechanical

  14. Age structure and capital dilution effects in neo-classical growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, D

    1988-01-01

    Economists often over estimate capital dilution effects when applying neoclassical growth models which use age structured population and depreciation of capital stock. This occurs because capital stock is improperly characterized. A standard model which assumes a constant depreciation of capital intimates that a population growth rate equal to a negative constant savings ratio is preferable to any higher growth rate. Growth rates which are lower than a negative constant savings ratio suggest an ever growing capital/labor ratio and an ever growing standard of living, even if people do not save. This is suggested because the natural reduction of the capital stock through depreciation is slower than the population decrease which is simply unrealistic. This model overlooks the fact that low or negative growth rates result in an ageing of the capital stock, and this ageing subsequently results in an increase of the overall rate of capital depreciation. In that overly simplistic model, depreciation was assumed independent of the age of the captial stock. Incorporating depreciation as a variable into a model allows a more symmetric treatment of capital. Using models with heterogenous capital, this article explores what occurs when more than 1 kind of capital good is involved in production and when these various captial goods have different lengths of life. Applying economic models, it also examines what occurs when the length of life of capital may vary. These variations correct the negative impact that population growth can have on per capital production and consumption.

  15. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brivio, I.; Gavela, M. B.; Merlo, L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is d...... final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations....

  16. Origin of classical structure in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Claus [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Lohmar, Ingo [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Polarski, David [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Astroparticules, UMR 5207 CNRS, Universite de Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier (France); Starobinsky, Alexei A [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kosygina St. 2, Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    We address the quantum-to-classical transition for primordial fluctuations, that is, the emergence of classical stochastic properties for these fluctuations. We discuss in particular the entanglement entropy for these fluctuations, the decoherence time, and the question of the classical basis (pointer basis) for them. The decoherence time for modes outside the Hubble scale is set by the Hubble parameter. The classical states are narrow Gaussians in the field amplitude.

  17. Quantum versus classical statistical dynamics of an ultracold Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berges, Juergen; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which quantum fluctuations are relevant for the quantitative interpretation of experiments with ultracold Bose gases. This requires to go beyond the description in terms of the Gross-Pitaevskii and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theories, which can be obtained as classical (statistical) field-theory approximations of the quantum many-body problem. We employ functional-integral techniques based on the two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective action. The role of quantum fluctuations is studied within the nonperturbative 2PI 1/N expansion to next-to-leading order. At this accuracy level memory integrals enter the dynamic equations, which differ for quantum and classical statistical descriptions. This can be used to obtain a classicality condition for the many-body dynamics. We exemplify this condition by studying the nonequilibrium evolution of a one-dimensional Bose gas of sodium atoms, and discuss some distinctive properties of quantum versus classical statistical dynamics

  18. Toroidal field ripple effects in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tsang, K.T.; Callen, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    In an experimental power reactor, the ripple produced by the finite number of toroidal field coils destroys the ideal axisymmetry of the configuration and is responsible for additional particle trapping, loss regions and plasma transport. The effects of toroidal field ripple on the plasma transport coefficient, the loss of alpha particles and energetic injection ions, and the relaxation of toroidal flows are investigated in a new and systematic way. The relevant results are applied to the ORNL-EPR reference design; the maximum ripple there of about 2.2 percent at the outer edge of the plasma column is found to be tolerable from plasma physics considerations

  19. The effect of classical and quantum dynamics on vibrational frequency shifts of H2 in clathrate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plattner, Nuria; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Vibrational frequency shifts of H 2 in clathrate hydrates are important to understand the properties and elucidate details of the clathrate structure. Experimental spectra of H 2 in clathrate hydrates have been measured for different clathrate compositions, temperatures, and pressures. In order to establish reliable relationships between the clathrate structure, dynamics, and observed frequencies, calculations of vibrational frequency shifts in different clathrate environments are required. In this study, a combination of classical molecular dynamics simulations, electronic structure calculations, and quantum dynamical simulation is used to calculate relative vibrational frequencies of H 2 in clathrate hydrates. This approach allows us to assess dynamical effects and simulate the change of vibrational frequencies with temperature and pressure. The frequency distributions of the H 2 vibrations in the different clathrate cage types agree favorably with experiment. Also, the simulations demonstrate that H 2 in the 5 12 cage is more sensitive to the details of the environment and to quantum dynamical effects, in particular when the cage is doubly occupied. We show that for the 5 12 cage quantum effects lead to frequency increases and double occupation is unlikely. This is different for the 5 12 6 4 cages for which higher occupation numbers than one H 2 per cage are likely

  20. Band mixing effects in mean field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuyucak, S.; Morrison, I.

    1989-01-01

    The 1/N expansion method, which is an angular momentum projected mean field theory, is used to investigate the nature of electromagnetic transitions in the interacting boson model (IBM). Conversely, comparison with the exact IBM results sheds light on the range of validity of the mean field theory. It is shown that the projected mean field results for the E2 transitions among the ground, β and γ bands are incomplete for the spin dependent terms and it is essential to include band mixing effect for a correct (Mikhailov) analysis of E2 data. The algebraic expressions derived are general and will be useful in the analysis of experimental data in terms of both the sd and sdg boson models. 17 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  1. Field Effect Microparticle Generation for Cell Microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Brend Ray-Sea; Fu, Shin-Huei

    2017-01-01

    The diameter and sphericity of alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate microcapsules, determined by the size and the shape of calcium alginate microspheres, affect their in vivo durability and biocompatibility and the results of transplantation. The commonly used air-jet spray method generates microspheres with a wider variation in diameter, larger sphere morphology, and evenly distributed encapsulated cells. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we designed a field effect microparticle generator to create a stable electric field to prepare microparticles with a smaller diameter and more uniform morphology. Using this electric field microparticle generator the encapsulated cells will be located at the periphery of the microspheres, and thus the supply of oxygen and nutrients for the encapsulated cells will be improved compared with the centrally located encapsulated cells in the air-jet spray method.

  2. Investigations about the effects of magnetic fields on QGP in heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inghirami, Gabriele; Bleicher, Marcus [FIAS, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Del Zanna, Luca [Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri - INAF, Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Haddadi, Mohsen [Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Becattini, Francesco [Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Beraudo, Andrea [INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Rolando, Valentina [Universita degli Studi di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-07-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic simulations of heavy ion collisions are constantly refined through the addition of effects that may significantly improve the matching with experimental data, like viscosity or fluctuating initial conditions, but, so far, electromagnetic interactions have been almost completely neglected. However, recent lattice QCD computations and classical electrodynamics estimates both suggest that the magnetic fields produced immediately after the collisions between nuclei may live long enough and with a strength sufficient to produce measurable effects. We would like to present the results of some preliminary investigations about the influence on the properties of the medium due the presence of a strong magnetic field.

  3. Effective Field Theories and Matching for Codimension-2 Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; De Rham, C; Tasinato, G

    2009-01-01

    It is generic for the bulk fields sourced by branes having codimension two and higher to diverge at the brane position, much as does the Coulomb potential at the position of its source charge. This complicates finding the relation between brane properties and the bulk geometries they source. (These complications do not arise for codimension-1 sources, such as in RS geometries, because of the special properties unique to codimension one.) Understanding these relations is a prerequisite for phenomenological applications involving higher-codimension branes. Using codimension-2 branes in extra-dimensional scalar-tensor theories as an example, we identify the classical matching conditions that relate the near-brane asymptotic behaviour of bulk fields to the low-energy effective actions describing how space-filling codimension-2 branes interact with the surrounding extra-dimensional bulk. We do so by carefully regulating the near-brane divergences, and show how these may be renormalized in a general way. Among the ...

  4. Field theory approach to quantum hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabo, A.; Chaichian, M.

    1990-07-01

    The Fradkin's formulation of statistical field theory is applied to the Coulomb interacting electron gas in a magnetic field. The electrons are confined to a plane in normal 3D-space and also interact with the physical 3D-electromagnetic field. The magnetic translation group (MTG) Ward identities are derived. Using them it is shown that the exact electron propagator is diagonalized in the basis of the wave functions of the free electron in a magnetic field whenever the MTG is unbroken. The general tensor structure of the polarization operator is obtained and used to show that the Chern-Simons action always describes the Hall effect properties of the system. A general proof of the Streda formula for the Hall conductivity is presented. It follows that the coefficient of the Chern-Simons terms in the long-wavelength approximation is exactly given by this relation. Such a formula, expressing the Hall conductivity as a simple derivative, in combination with diagonal form of the full propagator allows to obtain a simple expressions for the filling factor and the Hall conductivity. Indeed, these results, after assuming that the chemical potential lies in a gap of the density of states, lead to the conclusion that the Hall conductivity is given without corrections by σ xy = νe 2 /h where ν is the filling factor. In addition it follows that the filling factor is independent of the magnetic field if the chemical potential remains in the gap. (author). 21 ref, 1 fig

  5. Effects of intracellular chelatable iron and oxidative stress on transcription of classical cellular glutathione peroxidase gene in murine erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, O.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of intracellular chelatable iron levels and of oxidative stress on nuclear classical cellular glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) RNA nascent chain elongation (run-on transcription) and on the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA was investigated in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. The amount in the intracellular low molecular mass iron pool was changed by incubation of MEL cells transformed by Friend virus with iron donors or iron chelators. Transcription in vitro in isolated nuclei from treated cells showed that the treatment with chelators (desferrioxamine (DFO), pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone) decrease the rate of nuclear GSHPx-1 RNA nascent chain elongation in both un-induced and with 5 mmol hexamethylenebisacetamide to erythroid differentiation induced MEL cells. Iron donors (diferric transferrin,, Fe-PIH or their combination) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) had the opposite effect on GSHPx-1 gene transcription in run-on experiments. On the other hand, 50 μmol DFO or 2.5 μmol t-BuOOH did not change the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA in both un-induced and induced MEL cells treated with 5 μmol actinomycin D and with or without these agents for 9 h. These findings indicate that iron and oxidative stress play their role at the transcriptional level of GSHPx-1 gene expression. (author)

  6. Effect of Using Extra Fins on the Pin Fin Classic Geometry for Enhancement Heat Sink Performance using EGM Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadhum Audaa Jehhef

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of new cross-section fin geometries on overall thermal/fluid performance had been investigated. The cross-section included the base original geometry of (triangular, square, circular, and elliptical pin fins by adding exterior extra fins along the sides of the origin fins. The present extra fins include rectangular extra fin of 2 mm (height and 4 mm (width and triangular extra fin of 2 mm (base 4 mm (height. The use of entropy generation minimization method (EGM allows the combined effect of thermal resistance and pressure drop to be assessed through the simultaneous interaction with the heat sink. A general dimensionless expression for the entropy generation rate is obtained by considering a control volume around the pin fin including a base plate and applying the conservations equations of mass and energy with the entropy balance. The dimensionless numbers used includes the aspect ratio (ε, Reynolds number (Re, Nusselt number (Nu, and the drag coefficients (CD. Fourteen different cross-section fin geometries are examined for the heat transfer, fluid friction, and the minimum entropy generation rate. The results showed that the Nusselt number increases with increasing the Reynolds number for all employed models. The ellipse models (ET and ER-models give the highest value in the Nusselt number as compared with the classical pin fins. The fin of the square geometry with four rectangular extra fins (SR-models gives an agreement in Nusselt number as compared with the previous study.

  7. Magnetic field effects in hybrid perovskite devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Sun, D.; Sheng, C.-X.; Zhai, Y. X.; Mielczarek, K.; Zakhidov, A.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic field effects have been a successful tool for studying carrier dynamics in organic semiconductors as the weak spin-orbit coupling in these materials gives rise to long spin relaxation times. As the spin-orbit coupling is strong in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites, which are promising materials for photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, magnetic field effects are expected to be negligible in these optoelectronic devices. We measured significant magneto-photocurrent, magneto-electroluminescence and magneto-photoluminescence responses in hybrid perovskite devices and thin films, where the amplitude and shape are correlated to each other through the electron-hole lifetime, which depends on the perovskite film morphology. We attribute these responses to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs with different g-factors--the Δg model. We validate this model by measuring large Δg (~ 0.65) using field-induced circularly polarized photoluminescence, and electron-hole pair lifetime using picosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

  8. Nanowire field effect transistors principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2014-01-01

    “Nanowire Field Effect Transistor: Basic Principles and Applications” places an emphasis on the application aspects of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET). Device physics and electronics are discussed in a compact manner, together with the p-n junction diode and MOSFET, the former as an essential element in NWFET and the latter as a general background of the FET. During this discussion, the photo-diode, solar cell, LED, LD, DRAM, flash EEPROM and sensors are highlighted to pave the way for similar applications of NWFET. Modeling is discussed in close analogy and comparison with MOSFETs. Contributors focus on processing, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and application of NWFET. This includes coverage of solar and memory cells, biological and chemical sensors, displays and atomic scale light emitting diodes. Appropriate for scientists and engineers interested in acquiring a working knowledge of NWFET as well as graduate students specializing in this subject.

  9. Effective-field theories for heavy quarkonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, Nora; Pineda, Antonio; Soto, Joan; Vairo, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent theoretical developments in heavy-quarkonium physics from the point of view of effective-field theories of QCD. We discuss nonrelativistic QCD and concentrate on potential nonrelativistic QCD. The main goal will be to derive Schroedinger equations based on QCD that govern heavy-quarkonium physics in the weak- and strong-coupling regimes. Finally, the review discusses a selected set of applications, which include spectroscopy, inclusive decays, and electromagnetic threshold production

  10. J. Genet. classic 101

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. 101. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. 102. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. 103. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. 104. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. Page 5. J. Genet. classic.

  11. J. Genet. classic 37

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 37. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 38. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 39. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 40. Page 5. J. Genet. classic. Journal of ...

  12. The effect of the number of seed variables on the performance of Cooke′s classical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggstaff, Justin W.; Mazzuchi, Thomas A.; Sarkani, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    In risk analysis, Cooke′s classical model for aggregating expert judgment has been widely used for over 20 years. However, the validity of this model has been the subject of much debate. Critics assert that this model′s scoring rule may unintentionally reward experts who manipulate their quantile estimates in order to receive a greater weight. In addition, the question of the number of seed variables required to ensure adequate performance of Cooke′s classical model remains unanswered. In this study, we conduct a comprehensive examination of the model through an iterative, cross validation test to perform an out-of-sample comparison between Cooke′s classical model and the equal-weight linear opinion pool method on almost all of the expert judgment studies compiled by Cooke and colleagues to date. Our results indicate that Cooke′s classical model significantly outperforms equally weighting expert judgment, regardless of the number of seed variables used; however, there may, in fact, be a maximum number of seed variables beyond which Cooke′s model cannot outperform an equally-weighted panel. - Highlights: • We examine Cooke′s classical model through an iterative, cross validation test. • The performance-based and equally weighted decision makers are compared. • Results strengthen Cooke′s argument for a two-fold cross-validation approach. • Accuracy test results show strong support in favor of Cooke′s classical method. • There may be a maximum number of seed variables that ensures model performance

  13. Space-time Dependency of the Time and its Effect on the Relativistic Classical Equation of the String Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Amirshahkarami, Abdolazim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    In special relativity theory, time dilates in velocity of near light speed. Also based on ``Substantial motion'' theory of Sadra, relative time (time flux); R = f (mv , σ , τ) , for each atom is momentum of its involved fundamental particles, which is different from the other atoms. In this way, for modification of the relativistic classical equation of string theory and getting more precise results, we should use effect of dilation and contraction of time in equation. So we propose to add two derivatives of the time's flux to the equation as follows: n.tp∂/R ∂ τ +∂2Xμ/(σ , τ) ∂τ2 = n .tp (∂/R ∂ σ ) +c2∂2Xμ/(σ , τ) ∂σ2 In which, Xμ is space-time coordinates of the string, σ & τ are coordinates on the string world sheet, respectively space and time along the string, string's mass m , velocity of string's motion v , factor n depends on geometry of each hidden extra dimension which relates to its own flux time, and tp is Planck's time. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  14. N-Cinnamoylation of Antimalarial Classics: Effects of Using Acyl Groups Other than Cinnamoyl toward Dual-Stage Antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana; Machado, Marta; Lobo, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Prudêncio, Miguel; Teixeira, Cátia; Gomes, Paula

    2015-08-01

    In a follow-up study to our reports of N-cinnamoylated chloroquine and quinacrine analogues as promising dual-stage antimalarial leads with high in vitro potency against both blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and liver-stage Plasmodium berghei, we decided to investigate the effect of replacing the cinnamoyl moiety with other acyl groups. Thus, a series of N-acylated analogues were synthesized, and their activities against blood- and liver-stage Plasmodium spp. were assessed along with their in vitro cytotoxicities. Although the new N-acylated analogues were found to be somewhat less active and more cytotoxic than their N-cinnamoylated counterparts, they equally displayed nanomolar activities in vitro against blood-stage drug-sensitive and drug-resistant P. falciparum, and significant in vitro liver-stage activity against P. berghei. Therefore, it is demonstrated that simple N-acylated surrogates of classical antimalarial drugs are promising dual-stage antimalarial leads. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Investigation of classical radiation reaction with aligned crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Piazza, A., E-mail: dipiazza@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 (Germany); Wistisen, Tobias N.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2017-02-10

    Classical radiation reaction is the effect of the electromagnetic field emitted by an accelerated electric charge on the motion of the charge itself. The self-consistent underlying classical equation of motion including radiation–reaction effects, the Landau–Lifshitz equation, has never been tested experimentally, in spite of the first theoretical treatments of radiation reaction having been developed more than a century ago. Here we show that classical radiation reaction effects, in particular those due to the near electromagnetic field, as predicted by the Landau–Lifshitz equation, can be measured in principle using presently available facilities, in the energy emission spectrum of 30-GeV electrons crossing a 0.55-mm thick diamond crystal in the axial channeling regime. Our theoretical results indicate the feasibility of the suggested setup, e.g., at the CERN Secondary Beam Areas (SBA) beamlines.

  16. Fringing field effects in negative capacitance field-effect transistors with a ferroelectric gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Junichi; Fukuda, Koichi; Ikegami, Tsutomu; Ota, Hiroyuki; Migita, Shinji; Asai, Hidehiro; Toriumi, Akira

    2018-04-01

    We study the effects of fringing electric fields on the behavior of negative-capacitance (NC) field-effect transistors (FETs) with a silicon-on-insulator body and a gate stack consisting of an oxide film, an internal metal film, a ferroelectric film, and a gate electrode using our own device simulator that can properly handle the complicated relationship between the polarization and the electric field in ferroelectric materials. The behaviors of such NC FETs and the corresponding metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) FETs are simulated and compared with each other to evaluate the effects of the NC of the ferroelectric film. Then, the fringing field effects are evaluated by comparing the NC effects in NC FETs with and without gate spacers. The fringing field between the gate stack, especially the internal metal film, and the source/drain region induces more charges at the interface of the film with the ferroelectric film. Accordingly, the function of the NC to modulate the gate voltage and the resulting function to improve the subthreshold swing are enhanced. We also investigate the relationships of these fringing field effects to the drain voltage and four design parameters of NC FETs, i.e., gate length, gate spacer permittivity, internal metal film thickness, and oxide film thickness.

  17. Bell inequalities for random fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Peter [Physics Department, Yale University, CT 06520 (United States)

    2006-06-09

    The assumptions required for the derivation of Bell inequalities are not satisfied for random field models in which there are any thermal or quantum fluctuations, in contrast to the general satisfaction of the assumptions for classical two point particle models. Classical random field models that explicitly include the effects of quantum fluctuations on measurement are possible for experiments that violate Bell inequalities.

  18. Bell inequalities for random fields

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The assumptions required for the derivation of Bell inequalities are not usually satisfied for random fields in which there are any thermal or quantum fluctuations, in contrast to the general satisfaction of the assumptions for classical two point particle models. Classical random field models that explicitly include the effects of quantum fluctuations on measurement are possible for experiments that violate Bell inequalities.

  19. The Supersymmetric Effective Field Theory of Inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delacrétaz, Luca V.; Gorbenko, Victor [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94306 (United States); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94306 (United States); Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University and SLAC,Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    We construct the Supersymmetric Effective Field Theory of Inflation, that is the most general theory of inflationary fluctuations when time-translations and supersymmetry are spontaneously broken. The non-linear realization of these invariances allows us to define a complete SUGRA multiplet containing the graviton, the gravitino, the Goldstone of time translations and the Goldstino, with no auxiliary fields. Going to a unitary gauge where only the graviton and the gravitino are present, we write the most general Lagrangian built out of the fluctuations of these fields, invariant under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms, but softly-breaking time diffeomorphisms and gauged SUSY. With a suitable Stückelberg transformation, we introduce the Goldstone boson of time translation and the Goldstino of SUSY. No additional dynamical light field is needed. In the high energy limit, larger than the inflationary Hubble scale for the Goldstino, these fields decouple from the graviton and the gravitino, greatly simplifying the analysis in this regime. We study the phenomenology of this Lagrangian. The Goldstino can have a non-relativistic dispersion relation. Gravitino and Goldstino affect the primordial curvature perturbations at loop level. The UV modes running in the loops generate three-point functions which are degenerate with the ones coming from operators already present in the absence of supersymmetry. Their size is potentially as large as corresponding to f{sub NL}{sup equil.,orthog.}∼1 or, for particular operators, even ≫1. The non-degenerate contribution from modes of order H is estimated to be very small.

  20. Effective field theories for correlated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallington, J.P.

    1999-10-01

    In this thesis, techniques of functional integration are applied to the construction of effective field theories for models of strongly correlated electrons. This is accomplished by means of the Hubbard-Stratonovic transformation which maps a system of interacting fermions onto one of free fermions interacting, not with each other, but with bosonic fields representing the collective modes of the system. Different choices of transformation are investigated throughout the thesis. It is shown that there exists a new group of discrete symmetries and transformations of the Hubbard model. Using this new group, the problem of choosing a Hubbard-Stratonovic decomposition of the Hubbard interaction term is solved. In the context of the exotic doped barium bismuthates, an extended Hubbard model with on-site attraction and nearest neighbour repulsion is studied. Mean field and renormalisation group analyses show a 'pseudospin-flop' from charge density wave to superconductivity as a function of filling. The nearest neighbour attractive Hubbard model on a quasi-2D lattice is studied as a simple phenomenological model for the high-T c cuprates. Mean field theory shows a transition from pure d-wave to pure s-wave superconductivity, via a mixed symmetry s + id state. Using Gaussian fluctuations, the BCS-Bose crossover is examined and suggestions are made about the origin of the angle dependence of the pseudogap. The continuum delta-shell potential model is introduced for anisotropic superconductors. Its mean field phases are studied and found to have some unusual properties. The BCS-Bose crossover is examined and the results are compared with those of the lattice model. Quasi-2D (highly anisotropic 3D) systems are considered. The critical properties of a Bose gas are investigated as the degree of anisotropy is varied. A new 2D Bose condensate state is found. A renormalisation group analysis is used to investigate the crossover from 2D to 3D. (author)

  1. Field-effect P-N junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, William; Zettl, Alexander

    2015-05-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to field-effect p-n junctions. In one aspect, a device includes an ohmic contact, a semiconductor layer disposed on the ohmic contact, at least one rectifying contact disposed on the semiconductor layer, a gate including a layer disposed on the at least one rectifying contact and the semiconductor layer and a gate contact disposed on the layer. A lateral width of the rectifying contact is less than a semiconductor depletion width of the semiconductor layer. The gate contact is electrically connected to the ohmic contact to create a self-gating feedback loop that is configured to maintain a gate electric field of the gate.

  2. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  3. The effects of feeding unpredictability and classical conditioning on pre-release training of white-lipped peccary (Mammalia, Tayassuidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene S C Nogueira

    Full Text Available Some authors have suggested that environmental unpredictability, accompanied by some sort of signal for behavioral conditioning, can boost activity or foster exploratory behavior, which may increase post-release success in re-introduction programs. Thus, using white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari, a vulnerable Neotropical species, as a model, we evaluated an unpredictable feeding schedule. Associating this with the effect of classical conditioning on behavioral activities, we assessed the inclusion of this approach in pre-release training protocols. The experimental design comprised predictable feeding phases (control phases: C1, C2 and C3 and unpredictable feeding phases (U1- signaled and U2- non-signaled. The animals explored more during the signaled and non-signaled unpredictable phases and during the second control phase (C2 than during the other two predictable phases (C1 and C3. The peccaries also spent less time feeding during the signaled unpredictable phase (U1 and the following control phase (C2 than during the other phases. Moreover, they spent more time in aggressive encounters during U1 than the other experimental phases. However, the animals did not show differences in the time they spent on affiliative interactions or in the body weight change during the different phases. The signaled unpredictability, besides improving foraging behavior, showing a prolonged effect on the next control phase (C2, also increased the competition for food. The signaled feeding unpredictability schedule, mimicking wild conditions by eliciting the expression of naturalistic behaviors in pre-release training, may be essential to fully prepare them for survival in the wild.

  4. The effects of feeding unpredictability and classical conditioning on pre-release training of white-lipped peccary (Mammalia, Tayassuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Selene S C; Abreu, Shauana A; Peregrino, Helderes; Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio L G

    2014-01-01

    Some authors have suggested that environmental unpredictability, accompanied by some sort of signal for behavioral conditioning, can boost activity or foster exploratory behavior, which may increase post-release success in re-introduction programs. Thus, using white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a vulnerable Neotropical species, as a model, we evaluated an unpredictable feeding schedule. Associating this with the effect of classical conditioning on behavioral activities, we assessed the inclusion of this approach in pre-release training protocols. The experimental design comprised predictable feeding phases (control phases: C1, C2 and C3) and unpredictable feeding phases (U1- signaled and U2- non-signaled). The animals explored more during the signaled and non-signaled unpredictable phases and during the second control phase (C2) than during the other two predictable phases (C1 and C3). The peccaries also spent less time feeding during the signaled unpredictable phase (U1) and the following control phase (C2) than during the other phases. Moreover, they spent more time in aggressive encounters during U1 than the other experimental phases. However, the animals did not show differences in the time they spent on affiliative interactions or in the body weight change during the different phases. The signaled unpredictability, besides improving foraging behavior, showing a prolonged effect on the next control phase (C2), also increased the competition for food. The signaled feeding unpredictability schedule, mimicking wild conditions by eliciting the expression of naturalistic behaviors in pre-release training, may be essential to fully prepare them for survival in the wild.

  5. Magnetic field effects of tow-leg Heisenberg antiferromagnetic ladders: Thermodynamic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoqun; Yu Lu

    2000-05-01

    Using the recently developed transfer-matrix renormalization group method, we have studied the thermodynamic properties of two-leg antiferromagnetic ladders in the magnetic field. Based on different behavior of magnetization, we found disordered spin liquid, Luttinger liquid, spin-polarized phases and a classical regime depending on magnetic field and temperature. Our calculations in Luttinger liquid regime suggest that both the divergence of the NMR relaxation rate and the anomalous specific heat behavior observed on Cu 2 (C 5 H 12 N 2 ) 2 Cl 4 are due to quasi-one-dimensional effect rather than three-dimensional ordering. (author)

  6. Effective field theory analysis of Higgs naturalness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Shalom, Shaouly [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel); Soni, Amarjit [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wudka, Jose [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Assuming the presence of physics beyond the Standard Model ( SM) with a characteristic scale M ~ O (10) TeV, we investigate the naturalness of the Higgs sector at scales below M using an effective field theory (EFT) approach. We obtain the leading 1 -loop EFT contributions to the Higgs mass with a Wilsonian-like hard cutoff, and determine t he constraints on the corresponding operator coefficients for these effects to alleviate the little hierarchy problem up to the scale of the effective action Λ < M , a condition we denote by “EFT-naturalness”. We also determine the types of physics that can lead to EFT-naturalness and show that these types of new physics are best probed in vector-boson and multiple-Higgs production. The current experimental constraints on these coefficients are also discussed.

  7. Effective Field Theory with Two Higgs Doublets

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Procura, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    In this article we extend the effective field theory framework describing new physics effects to the case where the underlying low-energy theory is a Two-Higgs-Doublet model. We derive a complete set of independent operators up to dimension six assuming a $Z_2$-invariant CP-conserving Higgs potential. The effects on Higgs and gauge boson masses, mixing angles in the Higgs sector as well as couplings to fermions and gauge bosons are computed. At variance with the case of a single Higgs doublet, we find that pair production of SM-like Higgses, arising through dimension-six operators, is not fixed by fermion-fermion-Higgs couplings and can therefore be sizable.

  8. Effective masses and the nuclear mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.; Sartor, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effective mass characterizes the energy dependence of the empirical average nuclear potential. This energy dependence has two different sources, namely the nonlocality in space of the microscopic mean field on the one hand, and its true energy dependence on the other hand. Correspondingly it is convenient to divide the effective mass into two components, the k-mass and the ω-mass. The latter is responsible for the existence of a peak in the energy dependence of the effective mass. This peak is located near the Fermi energy in nuclear matter and in nuclei, as well as in the electron gas, the hard sphere Fermi gas and liquid helium 3. A related phenomenon is the existence of a low energy anomaly in the energy dependence of the optical model potential between two heavy ions. (orig.)

  9. The Effect of Creatin and Carnitine Supplementation on 5 kmClassic and 10 km Free Styles Race Performance of Cross Country Skiers

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru ÇETİN

    2004-01-01

    This İnvestigation examined the effect of creatin and carnitine supplementation on 5 km classic and 10 km free styles race performance of competitive cross country skiers.Eighteen highly trained (12 male and 6 female) cross country skiers aged 13-16 years seperated into 3 equal groups. All groups participated in the 5 km classic and 10 km free races styles in Erciyes at 2200m altitude ski center before the carnitine and creatine loading. After the race subjects were seperated into carnitine, ...

  10. Higgs effective field theories. Systematics and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Claudius G.

    2016-07-28

    Researchers of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced on July 4th, 2012, the observation of a new particle. The properties of the particle agree, within the relatively large experimental uncertainties, with the properties of the long-sought Higgs boson. Particle physicists around the globe are now wondering, ''Is it the Standard Model Higgs that we observe; or is it another particle with similar properties?'' We employ effective field theories (EFTs) for a general, model-independent description of the particle. We use a few, minimal assumptions - Standard Model (SM) particle content and a separation of scales to the new physics - which are supported by current experimental results. By construction, effective field theories describe a physical system only at a certain energy scale, in our case at the electroweak-scale v. Effects of new physics from a higher energy-scale, Λ, are described by modified interactions of the light particles. In this thesis, ''Higgs Effective Field Theories - Systematics and Applications'', we discuss effective field theories for the Higgs particle, which is not necessarily the Higgs of the Standard Model. In particular, we focus on a systematic and consistent expansion of the EFT. The systematics depends on the dynamics of the new physics. We distinguish two different consistent expansions. EFTs that describe decoupling new-physics effects and EFTs that describe non-decoupling new-physics effects. We briefly discuss the first case, the SM-EFT. The focus of this thesis, however, is on the non-decoupling EFTs. We argue that the loop expansion is the consistent expansion in the second case. We introduce the concept of chiral dimensions, equivalent to the loop expansion. Using the chiral dimensions, we expand the electroweak chiral Lagrangian up to next-to-leading order, O(f{sup 2}/Λ{sup 2})=O(1/16π{sup 2}). Further, we discuss how different

  11. Leading-order classical Lagrangians for the nonminimal standard-model extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, J. A. A. S.; Schreck, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we derive the general leading-order classical Lagrangian covering all fermion operators of the nonminimal standard-model extension (SME). Such a Lagrangian is considered to be the point-particle analog of the effective field theory description of Lorentz violation that is provided by the SME. At leading order in Lorentz violation, the Lagrangian obtained satisfies the set of five nonlinear equations that govern the map from the field theory to the classical description. This result can be of use for phenomenological studies of classical bodies in gravitational fields.

  12. The Effective Field Theory of nonsingular cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yong [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Wan, Youping [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy,University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Li, Hai-Guang [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Qiu, Taotao [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University,Wuhan 430079 (China); Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Central China Normal University,Wuhan 430079 (China); Piao, Yun-Song [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-01-20

    In this paper, we explore the nonsingular cosmology within the framework of the Effective Field Theory (EFT) of cosmological perturbations. Due to the recently proved no-go theorem, any nonsingular cosmological models based on the cubic Galileon suffer from pathologies. We show how the EFT could help us clarify the origin of the no-go theorem, and offer us solutions to break the no-go. Particularly, we point out that the gradient instability can be removed by using some spatial derivative operators in EFT. Based on the EFT description, we obtain a realistic healthy nonsingular cosmological model, and show the perturbation spectrum can be consistent with the observations.

  13. The Effective Field Theory of nonsingular cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yong; Wan, Youping; Li, Hai-Guang; Qiu, Taotao; Piao, Yun-Song

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the nonsingular cosmology within the framework of the Effective Field Theory (EFT) of cosmological perturbations. Due to the recently proved no-go theorem, any nonsingular cosmological models based on the cubic Galileon suffer from pathologies. We show how the EFT could help us clarify the origin of the no-go theorem, and offer us solutions to break the no-go. Particularly, we point out that the gradient instability can be removed by using some spatial derivative operators in EFT. Based on the EFT description, we obtain a realistic healthy nonsingular cosmological model, and show the perturbation spectrum can be consistent with the observations.

  14. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  15. The Biological Effects of Weak Electromagnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algattawi, A.; Elshyrih, H.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies investigated that weak electromagnetic fields remove calcium ions bound to the membranes of living cells, making them more likely to tear,. There is an enzyme that destroys DNA this enzyme leaking through the membranes of lysosomes explains the fragmentation of DNA. This case was seen in cells exposed to mobile phone signals. When this occurs in the germ line it reduces fertility and predicts genetic damage in future generations. Although leakage of calcium ions into the cytosol (the main part of the cell) accelerates the growth, but it also promotes the growth of tumors. Leakage of calcium ions into neurons (brain cells) makes nerve impulses accounting for pain and other neurological symptoms in electro sensitive. It also reduces the signal to noise ratio of the brain making it less likely to respond. This may be partially responsible for the increased accident rate of drivers using mobile phones. More details for the molecular mechanisms to explain characteristics of electromagnetic exposure are needed, e.g. I) why weak fields are more effective than strong ones, II) why some frequencies such as 16 Hz are especially potent and III) why pulsed fields do more damage

  16. Dynamics of Gauge Fields at High Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    An effective description of dynamical Bose fields is provided by the classical (high-temperature) limit of thermal field theory. The main subject of this thesis is to improve the ensuing classical field theory, that is, to include the dominant quantum corrections and to add counter terms for the

  17. Effects of gain-scheduling methods in a classical wind turbine controller on wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaldi, Carlo; Henriksen, Lars Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    The eects of dierent gain-scheduling methods for a classical wind turbine controller, operating in full load region, on the wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads are investigated in this work. The dierent techniques are derived looking at the physical problem to take into account the chan......The eects of dierent gain-scheduling methods for a classical wind turbine controller, operating in full load region, on the wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads are investigated in this work. The dierent techniques are derived looking at the physical problem to take into account...

  18. Effective surveillance for early classical swine fever virus detection will utilize both virus and antibody detection capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyasing, Yaowalak; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Kittawornrat, Apisit; Ji, Ju; Giménez-Lirola, Luis; Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    Early recognition and rapid elimination of infected animals is key to controlling incursions of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). In this study, the diagnostic characteristics of 10 CSFV assays were evaluated using individual serum (n = 601) and/or oral fluid (n = 1417) samples collected from -14 to 28 days post inoculation (DPI). Serum samples were assayed by virus isolation (VI), 2 commercial antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), virus neutralization (VN), and 3 antibody ELISAs. Both serum and oral fluid samples were tested with 3 commercial real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays. One or more serum samples was positive by VI from DPIs 3 to 21 and by antigen-capture ELISAs from DPIs 6 to 17. VN-positive serum samples were observed at DPIs ≥ 7 and by antibody ELISAs at DPIs ≥ 10. CSFV RNA was detected in serum samples from DPIs 2 to 28 and in oral fluid samples from DPIs 4 to 28. Significant differences in assay performance were detected, but most importantly, no single combination of sample and assay was able to dependably identify CSFV-inoculated pigs throughout the 4-week course of the study. The results show that effective surveillance for CSFV, especially low virulence strains, will require the use of PCR-based assays for the detection of early infections (<14 days) and antibody-based assays, thereafter. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Classical approach in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom discovered with the help of Poincare section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treated as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semiclassical series such as renormalization group symmetry, criterion of accuracy and so on are reviewed as well. (author)

  20. Nucleon Polarisabilities and Effective Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.

    2017-09-01

    Low-energy Compton scattering probes the nucleon's two-photon response to electric and magnetic fields at fixed photon frequency and multipolarity. It tests the symmetries and strengths of the interactions between constituents, and with photons. For convenience, this energy-dependent information is often compressed into the two scalar dipole polarisabilities αE 1 and βM 1 at zero photon energy. These are fundamental quantities, and important for the proton charge radius puzzle and the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen. Combined with emerging lattice QCD computations, they provide stringent tests for our understanding of hadron structure. Extractions of the proton and neutron polarisabilities from all published elastic data below 300 MeV in Chiral Effective Field Theory with explicit Δ (1232) are now available. This talk emphasises χEFT as natural bridge between lattice QCD and ongoing or approved efforts at HI γS, MAMI and MAX-lab. Chiral lattice extrapolations from mπ > 200 MeV to the physical point compare well to lattice computations. Combining χEFT with high-intensity experiments with polarised targets and polarised beams will extract not only scalar polarisabilities, but in particular the four so-far poorly explored spin-polarisabilities. These parametrise the stiffness of the spin in external electro-magnetic fields (nucleonic bi-refringence/Faraday effect). New chiral predictions for proton, deuteron and 3He observables show intriguing sensitivities on spin and neutron polarisabilities. Data consistency and a model-independent quantification of residual theory uncertainties by Bayesian analysis are also discussed. Proton-neutron differences explore the interplay between chiral symmetry breaking and short-distance Physics. Finally, I address their impact on the neutron-proton mass difference, big-bang nucleosynthesis, and their relevance for anthropic arguments. Supported in part by DOE DE-SC0015393 and George Washington University.

  1. Classical theory of radiating strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Haws, D.; Hindmarsh, M.

    1990-01-01

    The divergent part of the self force of a radiating string coupled to gravity, an antisymmetric tensor and a dilaton in four dimensions are calculated to first order in classical perturbation theory. While this divergence can be absorbed into a renormalization of the string tension, demanding that both it and the divergence in the energy momentum tensor vanish forces the string to have the couplings of compactified N = 1 D = 10 supergravity. In effect, supersymmetry cures the classical infinities.

  2. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brivio, I. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gavela, M.B.; Merlo, L.; Rey, R. del [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Mimasu, K. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universite Catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); No, J.M. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Sanz, V. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is determined and compared with that for the linear expansion. Associated phenomenological signals at colliders are explored for both scenarios, deriving new bounds and analyzing future prospects, including LHC and High Luminosity LHC sensitivities. Mono-Z, mono-W, W-photon plus missing energy and on-shell top final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations. (orig.)

  3. Consistency relations in effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munshi, Dipak; Regan, Donough, E-mail: D.Munshi@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: D.Regan@sussex.ac.uk [Astronomy Centre, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-01

    The consistency relations in large scale structure relate the lower-order correlation functions with their higher-order counterparts. They are direct outcome of the underlying symmetries of a dynamical system and can be tested using data from future surveys such as Euclid. Using techniques from standard perturbation theory (SPT), previous studies of consistency relation have concentrated on continuity-momentum (Euler)-Poisson system of an ideal fluid. We investigate the consistency relations in effective field theory (EFT) which adjusts the SPT predictions to account for the departure from the ideal fluid description on small scales. We provide detailed results for the 3D density contrast δ as well as the scaled divergence of velocity θ-bar . Assuming a ΛCDM background cosmology, we find the correction to SPT results becomes important at k ∼> 0.05 h/Mpc and that the suppression from EFT to SPT results that scales as square of the wave number k , can reach 40% of the total at k ≈ 0.25 h/Mpc at z = 0. We have also investigated whether effective field theory corrections to models of primordial non-Gaussianity can alter the squeezed limit behaviour, finding the results to be rather insensitive to these counterterms. In addition, we present the EFT corrections to the squeezed limit of the bispectrum in redshift space which may be of interest for tests of theories of modified gravity.

  4. Deformable Organic Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeongjun; Oh, Jin Young; Kim, Taeho Roy; Gu, Xiaodan; Kim, Yeongin; Wang, Ging-Ji Nathan; Wu, Hung-Chin; Pfattner, Raphael; To, John W F; Katsumata, Toru; Son, Donghee; Kang, Jiheong; Matthews, James R; Niu, Weijun; He, Mingqian; Sinclair, Robert; Cui, Yi; Tok, Jeffery B-H; Lee, Tae-Woo; Bao, Zhenan

    2018-02-01

    Deformable electronic devices that are impervious to mechanical influence when mounted on surfaces of dynamically changing soft matters have great potential for next-generation implantable bioelectronic devices. Here, deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) composed of single organic nanowires (NWs) as the semiconductor are presented. The NWs are composed of fused thiophene diketopyrrolopyrrole based polymer semiconductor and high-molecular-weight polyethylene oxide as both the molecular binder and deformability enhancer. The obtained transistors show high field-effect mobility >8 cm 2 V -1 s -1 with poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) polymer dielectric and can easily be deformed by applied strains (both 100% tensile and compressive strains). The electrical reliability and mechanical durability of the NWs can be significantly enhanced by forming serpentine-like structures of the NWs. Remarkably, the fully deformable NW FETs withstand 3D volume changes (>1700% and reverting back to original state) of a rubber balloon with constant current output, on the surface of which it is attached. The deformable transistors can robustly operate without noticeable degradation on a mechanically dynamic soft matter surface, e.g., a pulsating balloon (pulse rate: 40 min -1 (0.67 Hz) and 40% volume expansion) that mimics a beating heart, which underscores its potential for future biomedical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Sugawara operators for classical Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Molev, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    The celebrated Schur-Weyl duality gives rise to effective ways of constructing invariant polynomials on the classical Lie algebras. The emergence of the theory of quantum groups in the 1980s brought up special matrix techniques which allowed one to extend these constructions beyond polynomial invariants and produce new families of Casimir elements for finite-dimensional Lie algebras. Sugawara operators are analogs of Casimir elements for the affine Kac-Moody algebras. The goal of this book is to describe algebraic structures associated with the affine Lie algebras, including affine vertex algebras, Yangians, and classical \\mathcal{W}-algebras, which have numerous ties with many areas of mathematics and mathematical physics, including modular forms, conformal field theory, and soliton equations. An affine version of the matrix technique is developed and used to explain the elegant constructions of Sugawara operators, which appeared in the last decade. An affine analogue of the Harish-Chandra isomorphism connec...

  6. The Effect of Differentiated Video Presentation Formats on Community College Students' Preferences for Selected Excerpts of Western Classical Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tracey Jean

    2009-01-01

    This study was an examination of participants' preference for classical music excerpts presented in differentiated types of music video formats. Participants (N = 83) were volunteer students enrolled in intact music appreciation classes at a suburban community college located in a Midwestern city. Participants listened to and viewed music video…

  7. Using thermal imaging to assess the effect of classical massage on selected physiological parameters of upper limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: the aim of this study was to assess the relationship between classical sport massage of the hand and the forearm and the surface temperature of upper limb muscles, and between hand grip strength and the range of motion in the radiocarpal joint.

  8. The Effects of Academic and Interpersonal Stress on Dating Violence among College Students: A Test of Classical Strain Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Brandon; Smithey, Martha

    2012-01-01

    This study examines Merton's Classical Strain Theory (1938) as a causative factor in intimate partner violence among college students. We theorize that college students experience general life strain and cumulative strain as they pursue the goal of a college degree. We test this strain on the likelihood of using intimate partner violence. Strain…

  9. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  10. Gravitational Field effects on the Decoherence Process and the Quantum Speed Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdashti, Sh; Avazzadeh, Z; Xu, Z; Shen, J Q; Mirza, B; Wang, H

    2017-11-08

    In this paper we use spinor transformations under local Lorentz transformations to investigate the curvature effect on the quantum-to-classical transition, described in terms of the decoherence process and of the quantum speed limit. We find that gravitational fields (introduced adopting the Schwarzschild and anti-de Sitter geometries) affect both the decoherence process and the quantum speed limit of a quantum particle with spin-1/2. In addition, as a tangible example, we study the effect of the Earth's gravitational field, characterized by the Rindler space-time, on the same particle. We find that the effect of the Earth's gravitational field on the decoherence process and quantum speed limit is very small, except when the mean speed of the quantum particle is comparable to the speed of light.

  11. Simple algorithm to estimate mean-field effects from minor differential permeability curves based on the Preisach model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevertov, Oleksiy

    2003-01-01

    The classical Preisach model (PM) of magnetic hysteresis requires that any minor differential permeability curve lies under minor curves with larger field amplitude. Measurements of ferromagnetic materials show that very often this is not true. By applying the classical PM formalism to measured minor curves one can discover that it leads to an oval-shaped region on each half of the Preisach plane where the calculations produce negative values in the Preisach function. Introducing an effective field, which differs from the applied one by a mean-field term proportional to the magnetization, usually solves this problem. Complex techniques exist to estimate the minimum necessary proportionality constant (the moving parameter). In this paper we propose a simpler way to estimate the mean-field effects for use in nondestructive testing, which is based on experience from the measurements of industrial steels. A new parameter (parameter of shift) is introduced, which monitors the mean-field effects. The relation between the shift parameter and the moving one was studied for a number of steels. From preliminary experiments no correlation was found between the shift parameter and the classical magnetic ones such as the coercive field, maximum differential permeability and remanent magnetization

  12. J. Genet. classic 235

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 235. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 236. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 237. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 238. Page 5 ...

  13. Classical and quantum dynamics from classical paths to path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Graduate students who wish to become familiar with advanced computational strategies in classical and quantum dynamics will find in this book both the fundamentals of a standard course and a detailed treatment of the time-dependent oscillator, Chern-Simons mechanics, the Maslov anomaly and the Berry phase, to name just a few topics. Well-chosen and detailed examples illustrate perturbation theory, canonical transformations and the action principle, and demonstrate the usage of path integrals. The fifth edition has been revised and enlarged to include chapters on quantum electrodynamics, in particular, Schwinger’s proper time method and the treatment of classical and quantum mechanics with Lie brackets and pseudocanonical transformations. It is shown that operator quantum electrodynamics can be equivalently described with c-numbers, as demonstrated by calculating the propagation function for an electron in a prescribed classical electromagnetic field.

  14. Critical properties of the classical XY and classical Heisenberg models: A renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, J. Ricardo; de Albuquerque, Douglas F.

    1997-02-01

    By using two approaches of renormalization group (RG), mean field RG (MFRG) and effective field RG (EFRG), we study the critical properties of the simple cubic lattice classical XY and classical Heisenberg models. The methods are illustrated by employing its simplest approximation version in which small clusters with one ( N‧ = 1) and two ( N = 2) spins are used. The thermal and magnetic critical exponents, Yt and Yh, and the critical parameter Kc are numerically obtained and are compared with more accurate methods (Monte Carlo, series expansion and ε-expansion). The results presented in this work are in excellent agreement with these sophisticated methods. We have also shown that the exponent Yh does not depend on the symmetry n of the Hamiltonian, hence the criteria of universality for this exponent is only a function of the dimension d.

  15. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  16. Classical altitude training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann-Bette, B

    2008-08-01

    For more than 40 years, the effects of classical altitude training on sea-level performance have been the subject of many scientific investigations in individual endurance sports. To our knowledge, no studies have been performed in team sports like football. Two well-controlled studies showed that living and training at an altitude of >or=1800-2700 m for 3-4 weeks is superior to equivalent training at sea level in well-trained athletes. Most of the controlled studies with elite athletes did not reveal such an effect. However, the results of some uncontrolled studies indicate that sea-level performance might be enhanced after altitude training also in elite athletes. Whether hypoxia provides an additional stimulus for muscular adaptation, when training is performed with equal intensity compared with sea-level training is not known. There is some evidence for an augmentation of total hemoglobin mass after classical altitude training with duration >or=3 weeks at an altitude >or=2000 m due to altitude acclimatization. Considerable individual variation is observed in the erythropoietic response to hypoxia and in the hypoxia-induced reduction of aerobic performance capacity during training at altitude, both of which are thought to contribute to inter-individual variation in the improvement of sea-level performance after altitude training.

  17. Effective field theory of cosmological perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazza, Federico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    The effective field theory of cosmological perturbations stems from considering a cosmological background solution as a state displaying spontaneous breaking of time translations and (adiabatic) perturbations as the related Nambu–Goldstone modes. With this insight, one can systematically develop a theory for the cosmological perturbations during inflation and, with minor modifications, also describe in full generality the gravitational interactions of dark energy, which are relevant for late-time cosmology. The formalism displays a unique set of Lagrangian operators containing an increasing number of cosmological perturbations and derivatives. We give an introductory description of the unitary gauge formalism for theories with broken gauge symmetry—that allows us to write down the most general Lagrangian—and of the Stückelberg ‘trick’—that allows to recover gauge invariance and to make the scalar field explicit. We show how to apply this formalism to gravity and cosmology and we reproduce the detailed analysis of the action in the ADM variables. We also review some basic applications to inflation and dark energy. (paper)

  18. Effective field theory of cosmological perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Federico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    The effective field theory of cosmological perturbations stems from considering a cosmological background solution as a state displaying spontaneous breaking of time translations and (adiabatic) perturbations as the related Nambu-Goldstone modes. With this insight, one can systematically develop a theory for the cosmological perturbations during inflation and, with minor modifications, also describe in full generality the gravitational interactions of dark energy, which are relevant for late-time cosmology. The formalism displays a unique set of Lagrangian operators containing an increasing number of cosmological perturbations and derivatives. We give an introductory description of the unitary gauge formalism for theories with broken gauge symmetry—that allows us to write down the most general Lagrangian—and of the Stückelberg ‘trick’—that allows to recover gauge invariance and to make the scalar field explicit. We show how to apply this formalism to gravity and cosmology and we reproduce the detailed analysis of the action in the ADM variables. We also review some basic applications to inflation and dark energy.

  19. Classical and Quantum Chaos in Atom Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Saif, Farhan

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of an atom with an electromagnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electromagnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits ...

  20. Effective field theory for cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, H.-W.

    2005-01-01

    Effective Field Theory (EFT) provides a powerful framework that exploits a separation of scales in physical systems to perform systematically improvable, model-independent calculations. Particularly interesting are few-body systems with short-range interactions and large two-body scattering length. Such systems display remarkable universal features. In systems with more than two particles, a three-body force with limit cycle behavior is required for consistent renormalization already at leading order. We will review this EFT and some of its applications in the physics of cold atoms. Recent extensions of this approach to the four-body system and N-boson droplets in two spatial dimensions will also be discussed