WorldWideScience

Sample records for classical dna recombination

  1. 53BP1 regulates DNA resection and the choice between classical and alternative end joining during class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmer, Anne; Robbiani, Davide F; Feldhahn, Niklas; Gazumyan, Anna; Nussenzweig, Andre; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2010-04-12

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies by joining highly repetitive DNA elements, which are separated by 60-200 kbp. CSR is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase, an enzyme that produces multiple DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in switch regions. Switch regions are joined by a mechanism that requires an intact DNA damage response and classical or alternative nonhomologous end joining (A-NHEJ). Among the DNA damage response factors, 53BP1 has the most profound effect on CSR. We explore the role of 53BP1 in intrachromosomal DNA repair using I-SceI to introduce paired DSBs in the IgH locus. We find that the absence of 53BP1 results in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent increase in DNA end resection and that resected DNA is preferentially repaired by microhomology-mediated A-NHEJ. We propose that 53BP1 favors long-range CSR in part by protecting DNA ends against resection, which prevents A-NHEJ-dependent short-range rejoining of intra-switch region DSBs.

  2. Enhanced immunity against classical swine fever in pigs induced by prime-boost immunization using an alphavirus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine and a recombinant adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Na; Li, Hong-Yu; Li, Miao; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2010-09-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) - caused by the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) - is a fatal disease of pigs that is responsible for extensive losses to the swine industry worldwide. We had demonstrated previously that a prime-boost vaccination strategy using an alphavirus (Semliki Forest virus, SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine (pSFV1CS-E2) and a recombinant adenovirus (rAdV-E2) expressing the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV induced enhanced immune responses in a mouse model. In this study, we evaluated further the efficacy of the heterologous prime-boost immunization approach in pigs, the natural host of CSFV. The results showed that the pigs (n=5) receiving pSFV1CS-E2/rAdV-E2 heterologous prime-boost immunization developed significantly higher titers of CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies and comparable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, compared to the pigs receiving double immunizations with rAdV-E2 alone. When challenged with virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the pigs of the heterologous prime-boost group did not show clinical symptoms or viremia, which were observed in one of the 5 pigs immunized with rAdV-E2 alone and all the 5 control pigs immunized with an empty adenovirus. The results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA prime and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy can induce solid protective immunity.

  3. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  4. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  5. Recombinant DNA: History of the Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigue, Charles L.; Stanziale, William G.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards associated with recombinant DNA research are presented along with some social implications and the development of recombinant DNA research guidelines by the National Institutes of Health. (SA)

  6. Recombinant DNA technology in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes the achievements of almost 20 years of recombinant DNA technology applied to apple, grouping the research results into the sections: developing the technology, insect resistance, fungal disease resistance, self-incompatibility, herbicide resistance, fire blight resistance, fruit ripening, allergens, rooting ability, and acceptance and risk assessment. The diseases fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, and scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis, were and still are the prime targets. Shelf life improvement and rooting ability of rootstocks are also relevant research areas. The tools to create genetically modified apples of added value to producers, consumers, and the environment are now available.

  7. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  8. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  9. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  10. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  11. DNA detection using recombination proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Piepenburg

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA amplification is essential to most nucleic acid testing strategies, but established techniques require sophisticated equipment or complex experimental procedures, and their uptake outside specialised laboratories has been limited. Our novel approach, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, couples isothermal recombinase-driven primer targeting of template material with strand-displacement DNA synthesis. It achieves exponential amplification with no need for pretreatment of sample DNA. Reactions are sensitive, specific, and rapid and operate at constant low temperature. We have also developed a probe-based detection system. Key aspects of the combined RPA amplification/detection process are illustrated by a test for the pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The technology proves to be sensitive to fewer than ten copies of genomic DNA. Furthermore, products can be detected in a simple sandwich assay, thereby establishing an instrument-free DNA testing system. This unique combination of properties is a significant advance in the development of portable and widely accessible nucleic acid-based tests.

  12. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  13. Science: The Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Susan

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the status of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and attempts to rationalize Suburban Highway Policy. Effective communication among members of the RAC is a current problem facing the committee. A federal transportation priority spending policy is suggested during these times of money and fuel shortages. (MA)

  14. Recombinant DNA: Scientific and Social Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegrift, Vaughn

    1979-01-01

    This article is designed to inform chemical educators not engaged in this technology as to the nature and methods used in the technology, the reasons for scientific and social concern, and the attempts made to assuage concerns involving recombinant DNA research. (author/BB)

  15. [DNA homologous recombination repair in mammalian cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popławski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious DNA damage. Due to a great variety of factors causing DSBs, the efficacy of their repair is crucial for the cell's functioning and prevents DNA fragmentation, chromosomal translocation and deletion. In mammalian cells DSBs can be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HRR) and single strand annealing (SSA). HRR can be divided into the first and second phase. The first phase is initiated by sensor proteins belonging to the MRN complex, that activate the ATM protein which target HRR proteins to obtain the second response phase--repair. HRR is precise because it utilizes a non-damaged homologous DNA fragment as a template. The key players of HRR in mammalian cells are MRN, RPA, Rad51 and its paralogs, Rad52 and Rad54.

  16. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  17. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate re...

  18. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-11-30

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities.

  19. Comparison of classical and quantal calculations of helium three-body recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Wang, Jia; Greene, Chris H

    2013-01-01

    A general method to study classical scattering in $n$-dimension is developed. Through classical trajectory calculations, the three-body recombination is computed as a function of the collision energy for helium atoms, as an example. Quantum calculations are also performed for the $J^{\\Pi}$ = $0^{+}$ symmetry of the three-body recombination rate in order to compare with the classical results, yielding good agreement for $E\\gtrsim$ 1 K. The classical threshold law is derived and numerically confirmed for the Newtonian three-body recombination rate. Finally, a relationship is found between the quantum and classical three-body hard hypersphere elastic cross sections which is analogous to the well-known shadow scattering in two-body collisions.

  20. Relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in transfected DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, D B; Wilson, J H

    1985-01-01

    Both homologous and nonhomologous recombination events occur at high efficiency in DNA molecules transfected into mammalian cells. Both types of recombination occur with similar overall efficiencies, as measured by an endpoint assay, but their relative rates are unknown. In this communication, we measure the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in DNA transfected into monkey cells. This measurement is made by using a linear simian virus 40 genome that contains a 131-ba...

  1. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  2. Genetic recombination of ultraviolet-irradiated nonreplicating lambda DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Genetic recombination of ultraviolet-irradiated, nonreplicating lambda DNA was studied. Escherichia coli homoimmune lysogens were infected with ultraviolet-irradiated lambda phage whose DNA possessed a tandem duplication of the A to V genes. Recombination between duplicated segments produced lambda, DNA molecules possessing only one copy of the A to V region. DNA was extracted from cells and used to transfect recombination-deficient spheroplasts. Transfection lysates were assayed for total lambda phage and recombinant (EDTA-resistant) phage. Ultraviolet-stimulated recombination was shown to be completely RecA-dependent, mostly RecF-dependent, and RecBC and RecE-independent. Experiments with excision repair-deficient (uvr-) bacteria suggested that ultraviolet-stimulated recombination occurred by both Uvr-dependent and Uvr-independent processes. A role for pyrimidine dimers in recombination was indicated by the reduction in recombination frequency subsequent to photoreactivation and by experiments using lambda phase irradiated under conditions that produce almost exclusively pyrimidine dimers. A role for photoproducts other than pyrimidine dimers was suggested by the photo-reactivation-insensitive component of 254nm-stimulated recombination and by the observation that recombination frequencies of 254-irradiated phage were much greater than those of 313 nm/acetophenone-irradiated phage when both types of phage possessed the same number of pyridimidine dimers per lambda duplex.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA recombination in a free-ranging Australian lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Beata; Dowton, Mark; Madsen, Thomas

    2007-04-22

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the traditional workhorse for reconstructing evolutionary events. The frequent use of mtDNA in such analyses derives from the apparent simplicity of its inheritance: maternal and lacking bi-parental recombination. However, in hybrid zones, the reproductive barriers are often not completely developed, resulting in the breakdown of male mitochondrial elimination mechanisms, leading to leakage of paternal mitochondria and transient heteroplasmy, resulting in an increased possibility of recombination. Despite the widespread occurrence of heteroplasmy and the presence of the molecular machinery necessary for recombination, we know of no documented example of recombination of mtDNA in any terrestrial wild vertebrate population. By sequencing the entire mitochondrial genome (16761bp), we present evidence for mitochondrial recombination in the hybrid zone of two mitochondrial haplotypes in the Australian frillneck lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii).

  4. Transcript-RNA-templated DNA recombination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Shen, Ying; Huang, Fei; Patel, Mikir; Yang, Taehwan; Ashley, Katie; Mazin, Alexander V; Storici, Francesca

    2014-11-20

    Homologous recombination is a molecular process that has multiple important roles in DNA metabolism, both for DNA repair and genetic variation in all forms of life. Generally, homologous recombination involves the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules; however, homologous recombination can also occur between RNA molecules, as shown for RNA viruses. Previous research showed that synthetic RNA oligonucleotides can act as templates for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast and human cells, and artificial long RNA templates injected in ciliate cells can guide genomic rearrangements. Here we report that endogenous transcript RNA mediates homologous recombination with chromosomal DNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed a system to detect the events of homologous recombination initiated by transcript RNA following the repair of a chromosomal DSB occurring either in a homologous but remote locus, or in the same transcript-generating locus in reverse-transcription-defective yeast strains. We found that RNA-DNA recombination is blocked by ribonucleases H1 and H2. In the presence of H-type ribonucleases, DSB repair proceeds through a complementary DNA intermediate, whereas in their absence, it proceeds directly through RNA. The proximity of the transcript to its chromosomal DNA partner in the same locus facilitates Rad52-driven homologous recombination during DSB repair. We demonstrate that yeast and human Rad52 proteins efficiently catalyse annealing of RNA to a DSB-like DNA end in vitro. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of homologous recombination and DNA repair in which transcript RNA is used as a template for DSB repair. Thus, considering the abundance of RNA transcripts in cells, RNA may have a marked impact on genomic stability and plasticity.

  5. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  6. Relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in transfected DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D B; Wilson, J H

    1985-05-01

    Both homologous and nonhomologous recombination events occur at high efficiency in DNA molecules transfected into mammalian cells. Both types of recombination occur with similar overall efficiencies, as measured by an endpoint assay, but their relative rates are unknown. In this communication, we measure the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in DNA transfected into monkey cells. This measurement is made by using a linear simian virus 40 genome that contains a 131-base-pair duplication at its termini. Once inside the cell, this molecule must circularize to initiate lytic infection. Circularization can occur either by direct, nonhomologous end-joining or by homologous recombination within the duplicated region. Although the products of the two recombination pathways are different, they are equally infectious. Since homologous and nonhomologous recombination processes are competing for the same substrate, the relative amounts of the products of each pathway should reflect the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination. Analysis of individual recombinant genomes from 164 plaques indicates that the rate of circularization by nonhomologous recombination is 2- to 3-fold higher than the rate of homologous recombination. The assay system described here may prove to be useful for testing procedures designed to influence the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination.

  7. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks. PMID:24119078

  8. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-11-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks.

  9. Efficient preparation of shuffled DNA libraries through recombination (Gateway) cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Taskinen, Barbara; Ojala, Elina; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Rahikainen, Rolle; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Laitinen, Olli H; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and robust subcloning is essential for the construction of high-diversity DNA libraries in the field of directed evolution. We have developed a more efficient method for the subcloning of DNA-shuffled libraries by employing recombination cloning (Gateway). The Gateway cloning procedure was performed directly after the gene reassembly reaction, without additional purification and amplification steps, thus simplifying the conventional DNA shuffling protocols. Recombination-based cloning, directly from the heterologous reassembly reaction, conserved the high quality of the library and reduced the time required for the library construction. The described method is generally compatible for the construction of DNA-shuffled gene libraries.

  10. Single-Stranded DNA Curtains for Studying Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C J; Steinfeld, J B; Greene, E C

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Genetic studies form the foundation of our knowledge on homologous recombination. Significant progress has also been made toward understanding the biochemical and biophysical properties of the proteins, complexes, and reaction intermediates involved in this essential DNA repair pathway. However, heterogeneous or transient recombination intermediates remain extremely difficult to assess through traditional ensemble methods, leaving an incomplete mechanistic picture of many steps that take place during homologous recombination. To help overcome some of these limitations, we have established DNA curtain methodologies as an experimental platform for studying homologous DNA recombination in real-time at the single-molecule level. Here, we present a detailed overview describing the preparation and use of single-stranded DNA curtains in applications related to the study of homologous DNA recombination with emphasis on recent work related to the study of the eukaryotic recombinase Rad51. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rogue athletes and recombinant DNA technology: challenges for doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H

    2007-10-01

    The quest for athletic excellence holds no limit for some athletes, and the advances in recombinant DNA technology have handed these athletes the ultimate doping weapons: recombinant proteins and gene doping. Some detection methods are now available for several recombinant proteins that are commercially available as pharmaceuticals and being abused by dopers. However, researchers are struggling to come up with efficient detection methods in preparation for the imminent threat of gene doping, expected in the 2008 Olympics. This Forum article presents the main detection strategies for recombinant proteins and the forthcoming detection strategies for gene doping as well as the prime analytical challenges facing them.

  12. Insertion DNA Accelerates Meiotic Interchromosomal Recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ding-Hong; Xue, Jia-Yu; Yang, Si-Hai; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Li, Mi-Mi; Hang, Yue-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Nucleotide insertions/deletions are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes, and the resulting hemizygous (unpaired) DNA has significant, heritable effects on adjacent DNA. However, little is known about the genetic behavior of insertion DNA. Here, we describe a binary transgenic system to study the behavior of insertion DNA during meiosis. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines were generated to carry two different defective reporter genes on nonhomologous chromosomes, designated as "recipient" and "donor" lines. Double hemizygous plants (harboring unpaired DNA) were produced by crossing between the recipient and the donor, and double homozygous lines (harboring paired DNA) via self-pollination. The transfer of the donor's unmutated sequence to the recipient generated a functional β-glucuronidase gene, which could be visualized by histochemical staining and corroborated by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. More than 673 million seedlings were screened, and the results showed that meiotic ectopic recombination in the hemizygous lines occurred at a frequency  >6.49-fold higher than that in the homozygous lines. Gene conversion might have been exclusively or predominantly responsible for the gene correction events. The direct measurement of ectopic recombination events provided evidence that an insertion, in the absence of an allelic counterpart, could scan the entire genome for homologous counterparts with which to pair. Furthermore, the unpaired (hemizygous) architectures could accelerate ectopic recombination between itself and interchromosomal counterparts. We suggest that the ectopic recombination accelerated by hemizygous architectures may be a general mechanism for interchromosomal recombination through ubiquitously dispersed repeat sequences in plants, ultimately contributing to genetic renovation and eukaryotic evolution.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA recombination in a free-ranging Australian lizard

    OpenAIRE

    Ujvari, Beata; Dowton, Mark; Madsen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the traditional workhorse for reconstructing evolutionary events. The frequent use of mtDNA in such analyses derives from the apparent simplicity of its inheritance: maternal and lacking bi-parental recombination. However, in hybrid zones, the reproductive barriers are often not completely developed, resulting in the breakdown of male mitochondrial elimination mechanisms, leading to leakage of paternal mitochondria and transient heteroplasmy, resulting in an incre...

  14. Modified Classical Graph Algorithms for the DNA Fragment Assembly Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo M. Mallén-Fullerton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA fragment assembly represents an important challenge to the development of efficient and practical algorithms due to the large number of elements to be assembled. In this study, we present some graph theoretical linear time algorithms to solve the problem. To achieve linear time complexity, a heap with constant time operations was developed, for the special case where the edge weights are integers and do not depend on the problem size. The experiments presented show that modified classical graph theoretical algorithms can solve the DNA fragment assembly problem efficiently.

  15. Homologous recombination is required for recovery from oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Michio; Umezu, Keiko

    2017-04-03

    We have been studying the genetic events, including chromosome loss, chromosome rearrangements and intragenic point mutations, that are responsible for the deletion of a URA3 marker in a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay in the yeast Saccharomycess cerevisiae. With this assay, we previously showed that homologous recombination plays an important role in genome maintenance in response to DNA lesions that occur spontaneously in normally growing cells. Here, to investigate DNA lesions capable of triggering homologous recombination, we examined the effects of oxidative stress, a prominent cause of endogenous DNA damage, on LOH events. Treatment of log-phase cells with H2O2 first caused growth arrest and then, during the subsequent recovery, chromosome loss and various chromosome rearrangements were induced more than 10-fold. Further analysis of the rearrangements showed that gene conversion was strongly induced, approximately 100 times more frequently than in untreated cells. Consistent with these results, two diploid strains deficient for homologous recombination, rad52Δ/rad52Δ and rad51Δ/rad51Δ, were sensitive to H2O2 treatment. In addition, chromosome DNA breaks were detected in H2O2-treated cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Altogether, these results suggest that oxidative stress induced recombinogenic lesions on chromosomes, which then triggered homologous recombination leading to chromosome rearrangements, and that this response contributed to the survival of cells afflicted by oxidative DNA damage. We therefore conclude that homologous recombination is required for the recovery of cells from oxidative stress.

  16. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for unders...

  17. Historical perspectives pertaining to the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wivel, Nelson A

    2014-01-01

    Science is host to a constantly emerging series of new paradigms, and it is this characteristic that makes science both interesting and dynamic. As a part of this continuum, it became possible to create recombinant DNA molecules. Immediately it was recognized that there was a potential for serious adverse events associated with this new technology. Following two scientific conferences at Asilomar, California, the National Institutes of Health moved quickly to create the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC). For approximately 38 years the RAC has served as an open forum for review of various recombinant DNA experiments, and for the last 23 years it has played a pivotal role in the oversight of human gene therapy. The RAC's existence obviated the need for more restrictive governmental legislation and has supported the development of genetic interventions that are leading to actual human therapies.

  18. Characterization of recombinant malarial RecQ DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntornthiticharoen, Pattra; Srila, Witsanu; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Limudomporn, Paviga; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2014-08-01

    RecQ DNA gene of multi-drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 (PfRecQ1) was cloned, and the recombinant C-terminal-decahistidine-tagged PfRecQ1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme could efficiently unwind partial duplex DNA substrate in a 3' to 5' direction. The malarial RecQ1 could not unwind substrates with both 5' and 3' overhangs, those with a 5' overhang, or blunt-ended DNA duplexes. Unwinding of DNA helicase activity was driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. The drug inhibitory effects of six compounds indicated that only doxorubicin and daunorubicin could inhibit the unwinding activity.

  19. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vanoli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different

  20. A Collaborative, Investigative Recombinant DNA Technology Course with Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzementi, Leo; Johnson, Joy F.

    2002-01-01

    A recombinant DNA technology course was designed to promote contextual, collaborative, inquiry-based learning of science where students learn from one another and have a sense of ownership of their education. The class stressed group presentations and critical reading and discussion of scientific articles. The laboratory consisted of two research…

  1. Classical and alternative end-joining pathways for repair of lymphocyte-specific and general DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boboila, Cristian; Alt, Frederick W; Schwer, Bjoern

    2012-01-01

    Classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ) is one of the two major known pathways for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. Our understanding of C-NHEJ has been derived, in significant part, through studies of programmed physiologic DNA DSBs formed during V(D)J recombination in the developing immune system. Studies of immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) also have revealed that there is an "alternative" end-joining process (A-EJ) that can function, relatively robustly, in the repair of DSBs in activated mature B lymphocytes. This A-EJ process has also been implicated in the formation of oncogenic translocations found in lymphoid tumors. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of C-NHEJ and A-EJ in the context of V(D)J recombination, CSR, and the formation of chromosomal translocations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2015-02-26

    Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair single-strand DNA (ssDNA) with a homologous double-strand DNA (dsDNA) template. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a ninth nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy, and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficient generation of recombinant RNA viruses using targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing full-length cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    . This strategy allows manipulation of viral cDNA by targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis within bacteria. Results A new CSFV-BAC (pBeloR26) derived from the Riems vaccine strain has been constructed and subsequently modified in the E2 coding sequence, using the targeted recombination strategy to enable......Background Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of RNA viruses. Here, a strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of classical swine fever viruses (CSFVs) from full-length cDNAs present within bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) is described...... recombination-mediated mutagenesis provides a powerful tool for expediting the construction of novel RNA genomes and should be applicable to the manipulation of other RNA viruses....

  4. Role of Recombinant DNA Technology to Improve Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was just an imagination that desirable characteristics can be improved in the living bodies by controlling the expressions of target genes. However, in recent era, this field has demonstrated unique impacts in bringing advancement in human life. By virtue of this technology, crucial proteins required for health problems and dietary purposes can be produced safely, affordably, and sufficiently. This technology has multidisciplinary applications and potential to deal with important aspects of life, for instance, improving health, enhancing food resources, and resistance to divergent adverse environmental effects. Particularly in agriculture, the genetically modified plants have augmented resistance to harmful agents, enhanced product yield, and shown increased adaptability for better survival. Moreover, recombinant pharmaceuticals are now being used confidently and rapidly attaining commercial approvals. Techniques of recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, and genetic modifications are also widely used for the purpose of bioremediation and treating serious diseases. Due to tremendous advancement and broad range of application in the field of recombinant DNA technology, this review article mainly focuses on its importance and the possible applications in daily life.

  5. Role of Recombinant DNA Technology to Improve Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Suliman; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Siddique, Rabeea; Nabi, Ghulam; Manan, Sehrish; Yousaf, Muhammad; Hou, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was just an imagination that desirable characteristics can be improved in the living bodies by controlling the expressions of target genes. However, in recent era, this field has demonstrated unique impacts in bringing advancement in human life. By virtue of this technology, crucial proteins required for health problems and dietary purposes can be produced safely, affordably, and sufficiently. This technology has multidisciplinary applications and potential to deal with important aspects of life, for instance, improving health, enhancing food resources, and resistance to divergent adverse environmental effects. Particularly in agriculture, the genetically modified plants have augmented resistance to harmful agents, enhanced product yield, and shown increased adaptability for better survival. Moreover, recombinant pharmaceuticals are now being used confidently and rapidly attaining commercial approvals. Techniques of recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, and genetic modifications are also widely used for the purpose of bioremediation and treating serious diseases. Due to tremendous advancement and broad range of application in the field of recombinant DNA technology, this review article mainly focuses on its importance and the possible applications in daily life.

  6. Role of Recombinant DNA Technology to Improve Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Suliman; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Siddique, Rabeea; Nabi, Ghulam; Manan, Sehrish; Yousaf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was just an imagination that desirable characteristics can be improved in the living bodies by controlling the expressions of target genes. However, in recent era, this field has demonstrated unique impacts in bringing advancement in human life. By virtue of this technology, crucial proteins required for health problems and dietary purposes can be produced safely, affordably, and sufficiently. This technology has multidisciplinary applications and potential to deal with important aspects of life, for instance, improving health, enhancing food resources, and resistance to divergent adverse environmental effects. Particularly in agriculture, the genetically modified plants have augmented resistance to harmful agents, enhanced product yield, and shown increased adaptability for better survival. Moreover, recombinant pharmaceuticals are now being used confidently and rapidly attaining commercial approvals. Techniques of recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, and genetic modifications are also widely used for the purpose of bioremediation and treating serious diseases. Due to tremendous advancement and broad range of application in the field of recombinant DNA technology, this review article mainly focuses on its importance and the possible applications in daily life. PMID:28053975

  7. Direct facile screening of recombinant DNA vector constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnard, Paul T; Challa, Rushi; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Raman, Venu

    2014-04-01

    Direct efficient facile screening of bacterial transformants with the goal of selecting, retrieving, and using recombinant DNA is exemplified by simple visual-based colorimetric inspections or fluorescent protein-based assays. We describe pRedScript, which introduces the constitutive expression of a very bright red fluorescent protein into transformants. On agar plates, red colonies are simply visualized in ambient white light in stark contrast to recombinant transformants that are white. In addition, the bright red fluorescence of the reporter protein can also be harnessed as a sensitive signal for screening bacterial promoters during the development of optimized fermentation conditions.

  8. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  9. De mogelijkheden van het verbeteren van brouwgerst door recombinant DNA-onderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rörsch, A.; Duijnhouwer, I.D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Het recombinant DNA-onderzoek startte omstreeks 1960. Een belangrijk deel van dit onderzoek op het gebied van gerst wordt uitgevoerd door het Carlsberg Research Center in Kopenhagen. In dit artikel worden diverse mogelijkheden van recombinant DNA-technieken belicht. Aangezien recombinant DNA-technie

  10. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an...) Surgical Suture Produced by Recombinant DNA Technology.” For the availability of this guidance document...

  11. Physical studies of chromatin. The recombination of histones with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseley, P G; Bradbury, E M; Butler-Browne, G S; Carpenter, B G; Stephens, R M

    1976-02-02

    Experiments have been carried out to define clearly which histone combinations can induce a higher order structure when combined with DNA. The criterion for a higher order structure being the series of low-angle X-ray diffraction maxima nominally at 5.5 nm, 3.7 nm, 2.7 nm and 2.2 nm. Such a pattern, with resolution similar to that of H1-depleted chromatin, is readily attainable by recombining histones H2A + H2B + H3 + H4 with DNA using a salt-gradient dialysis method. However, the use of urea in the recombination procedure is shown to be detrimental to the production of a higher order structure. Low-angle ring patterns are not obtained by recomgining DNA with single pure histones or any combination of histone pairs exept H3 + H4. The diffraction maxima from the latter are, however, weaker than those from chromatin and there are pronounced semi-equatorial arcs. The presence of a third histone, either H2A or H2B in the H3 + H4 recombination mixture tends to distort the recognised low-angle pattern. It is concluded that the histone pair H3 + H4 is essential for the formation of a regular higher order structure in chromatin, although for a complete structural development the presence of H2A + H2B is also required.

  12. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    and colleagues shows that also physiological threats to genome integrity such as DNA secondary structure-forming triplet repeat sequences relocalize to the NPC during DNA replication. Mutants that fail to reposition the triplet repeat locus to the NPC cause repeat instability. Here, we review the types of DNA...... lesions that relocalize to the NPC, the putative mechanisms of relocalization, and the types of recombinational repair that are stimulated by the NPC, and present a model for NPC-facilitated repair....

  13. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-12-15

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8(+) T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3(-/-) mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way.

  14. Choreography of recombination proteins during the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-09-02

    Genome integrity is frequently challenged by DNA lesions from both endogenous and exogenous sources. A single DNA double-strand break (DSB) is lethal if unrepaired and may lead to loss of heterozygosity, mutations, deletions, genomic rearrangements and chromosome loss if repaired improperly. Such genetic alterations are the main causes of cancer and other genetic diseases. Consequently, DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an important process in all living organisms. DSBR is also the driving mechanism in most strategies of gene targeting, which has applications in both genetic and clinical research. Here we review the cell biological response to DSBs in mitotically growing cells with an emphasis on homologous recombination pathways in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammalian cells.

  15. Choreography of recombination proteins during the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-01-01

    Genome integrity is frequently challenged by DNA lesions from both endogenous and exogenous sources. A single DNA double-strand break (DSB) is lethal if unrepaired and may lead to loss of heterozygosity, mutations, deletions, genomic rearrangements and chromosome loss if repaired improperly....... Such genetic alterations are the main causes of cancer and other genetic diseases. Consequently, DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an important process in all living organisms. DSBR is also the driving mechanism in most strategies of gene targeting, which has applications in both genetic and clinical...... research. Here we review the cell biological response to DSBs in mitotically growing cells with an emphasis on homologous recombination pathways in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammalian cells....

  16. 77 FR 54584 - Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... resistance into a microorganism must be reviewed by the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and approved... the NIH Guidelines will be revised from NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant...

  17. Synapsis of Recombination Signal Sequences Located in cis and DNA Underwinding in V(D)J Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Ciubotaru, Mihai; Schatz, David G.

    2004-01-01

    V(D)J recombination requires binding and synapsis of a complementary (12/23) pair of recombination signal sequences (RSSs) by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, aided by a high-mobility group protein, HMG1 or HMG2. Double-strand DNA cleavage within this synaptic, or paired, complex is thought to involve DNA distortion or melting near the site of cleavage. Although V(D)J recombination normally occurs between RSSs located on the same DNA molecule (in cis), all previous studies that directly assessed R...

  18. Homologous recombination in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: effects of DNA substrates and mechanistic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Jananie; Mao, Dominic; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-09-01

    Although homologous recombination (HR) is known to influence the structure, stability, and evolution of microbial genomes, few of its functional properties have been measured in cells of hyperthermophilic archaea. The present study manipulated various properties of the parental DNAs in high-resolution assays of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius transformation, and measured the impact on the efficiency and pattern of marker transfer to the recipient chromosome. The relative orientation of homologous sequences, the type and position of chromosomal mutation being replaced, and the length of DNA flanking the marked region all affected the efficiency, linkage, tract continuity, and other parameters of marker transfer. Effects predicted specifically by the classical reciprocal-exchange model of HR were not observed. One analysis observed only 90 % linkage between markers defined by adjacent bases; in another series of experiments, sequence divergence up to 4 % had no detectable impact on overall efficiency of HR or on the co-transfer of a distal non-selected marker. The effects of introducing DNA via conjugation, rather than transformation, were more difficult to assess, but appeared to increase co-transfer (i.e. linkage) of relatively distant non-selected markers. The results indicate that HR events between gene-sized duplex DNAs and the S. acidocaldarius chromosome typically involve neither crossing over nor interference from a mismatch-activated anti-recombination system. Instead, the donor DNA may anneal to a transient chromosomal gap, as in the mechanism proposed for oligonucleotide-mediated transformation of Sulfolobus and other micro-organisms.

  19. Differential requirements of singleplex and multiplex recombineering of large DNA constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thimma R; Kelsall, Emma J; Fevat, Léna M S; Munson, Sarah E; Cowley, Shaun M

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is an in vivo genetic engineering technique involving homologous recombination mediated by phage recombination proteins. The use of recombineering methodology is not limited by size and sequence constraints and therefore has enabled the streamlined construction of bacterial strains and multi-component plasmids. Recombineering applications commonly utilize singleplex strategies and the parameters are extensively tested. However, singleplex recombineering is not suitable for the modification of several loci in genome recoding and strain engineering exercises, which requires a multiplex recombineering design. Defining the main parameters affecting multiplex efficiency especially the insertion of multiple large genes is necessary to enable efficient large-scale modification of the genome. Here, we have tested different recombineering operational parameters of the lambda phage Red recombination system and compared singleplex and multiplex recombineering of large gene sized DNA cassettes. We have found that optimal multiplex recombination required long homology lengths in excess of 120 bp. However, efficient multiplexing was possible with only 60 bp of homology. Multiplex recombination was more limited by lower amounts of DNA than singleplex recombineering and was greatly enhanced by use of phosphorothioate protection of DNA. Exploring the mechanism of multiplexing revealed that efficient recombination required co-selection of an antibiotic marker and the presence of all three Red proteins. Building on these results, we substantially increased multiplex efficiency using an ExoVII deletion strain. Our findings elucidate key differences between singleplex and multiplex recombineering and provide important clues for further improving multiplex recombination efficiency.

  20. Differential requirements of singleplex and multiplex recombineering of large DNA constructs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimma R Reddy

    Full Text Available Recombineering is an in vivo genetic engineering technique involving homologous recombination mediated by phage recombination proteins. The use of recombineering methodology is not limited by size and sequence constraints and therefore has enabled the streamlined construction of bacterial strains and multi-component plasmids. Recombineering applications commonly utilize singleplex strategies and the parameters are extensively tested. However, singleplex recombineering is not suitable for the modification of several loci in genome recoding and strain engineering exercises, which requires a multiplex recombineering design. Defining the main parameters affecting multiplex efficiency especially the insertion of multiple large genes is necessary to enable efficient large-scale modification of the genome. Here, we have tested different recombineering operational parameters of the lambda phage Red recombination system and compared singleplex and multiplex recombineering of large gene sized DNA cassettes. We have found that optimal multiplex recombination required long homology lengths in excess of 120 bp. However, efficient multiplexing was possible with only 60 bp of homology. Multiplex recombination was more limited by lower amounts of DNA than singleplex recombineering and was greatly enhanced by use of phosphorothioate protection of DNA. Exploring the mechanism of multiplexing revealed that efficient recombination required co-selection of an antibiotic marker and the presence of all three Red proteins. Building on these results, we substantially increased multiplex efficiency using an ExoVII deletion strain. Our findings elucidate key differences between singleplex and multiplex recombineering and provide important clues for further improving multiplex recombination efficiency.

  1. Arabidopsis RecQl4A suppresses homologous recombination and modulates DNA damage responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagherieh-Najjar, MB; de Vries, OMH; Hille, J; Dijkwel, PP; Bagherieh-Najjar, Mohammad B.

    2005-01-01

    The DNA damage response and DNA recombination are two interrelated mechanisms involved in maintaining the integrity of the genome, but in plants they are poorly understood. RecO is a family of genes with conserved roles in the regulation of DNA recombination in eukaryotes; there are seven members in

  2. Extrachromosomal recombination in vaccinia-infected cells requires a functional DNA polymerase participating at a level other than DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinas, R J; Condit, R C; Paoletti, E

    1990-12-01

    Homologous recombination was measured in vaccinia-infected cells cotransfected with two plasmid recombination substrates. One plasmid contains a vaccinia protein lacZ coding region bearing a 1.1 kb 3' terminal deletion while the other plasmid contains a non-promoted lacZ coding region bearing a 1.1 kb 5' terminal deletion. Homologous recombination occurring between the 825 bp of lacZ common to both plasmids regenerates a functional lacZ gene from which B-galactosidase expression was measured. The entire 3 kb lacZ gene was used as a positive control. A panel of thermosensitive mutants was screened in cells either transfected with the positive control plasmid or cotransfected with the recombination substrates. A DNA - mutant, ts42, known to map to the viral DNA polymerase gene was found to be defective in recombination. Significantly, other DNA - mutants, ts17 or ts25, or other DNA polymerase mutants did not exhibit a defect in recombination similar to ts42. Inhibitors of viral DNA synthesis did not uniformly affect recombination. Cytosine arabinoside and aphidicolin inhibited B-galactosidase expression from the recombination substrates but not from the positive control plasmid, whereas hydroxyurea enhanced expression from both. Marker rescue with the cloned wildtype DNA polymerase gene repaired the defect in ts42. Southern and western analyses demonstrated that B-galactosidase activity was consistent with a recombined lacZ gene and unit size 116 kDa protein. Measurement of plasmid and viral DNA replication in cells infected with the different DNA - mutants indicated that recombination was independent of plasmid and viral DNA replication. Together these results suggest that the vaccinia DNA polymerase participates in homologous recombination at a level other than that of DNA replication.

  3. Homologous recombination is a primary pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks generated during DNA rereplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Lan N; Li, Yongjiang; Sun, Emily; Ang, Katrina; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-10-17

    Re-initiation of DNA replication at origins within a given cell cycle would result in DNA rereplication, which can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. DNA rereplication can be induced by loss of licensing control at cellular replication origins, or by viral protein-driven multiple rounds of replication initiation at viral origins. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated during rereplication, but the mechanisms of how these DSBs are repaired to maintain genome stability and cell viability are poorly understood in mammalian cells. We generated novel EGFP-based DSB repair substrates, which specifically monitor the repair of rereplication-associated DSBs. We demonstrated that homologous recombination (HR) is an important mechanism to repair rereplication-associated DSBs, and sister chromatids are used as templates for such HR-mediated DSB repair. Micro-homology-mediated non-homologous end joining (MMEJ) can also be used but to a lesser extent compared to HR, whereas Ku-dependent classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) has a minimal role to repair rereplication-associated DSBs. In addition, loss of HR activity leads to severe cell death when rereplication is induced. Therefore, our studies identify HR, the most conservative repair pathway, as the primary mechanism to repair DSBs upon rereplication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Regulation of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination: choreography of noncoding transcription, targeted DNA deamination, and long-range DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Allysia J; Zheng, Simin; DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Upon encountering antigens, mature IgM-positive B lymphocytes undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) wherein exons encoding the default Cμ constant coding gene segment of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (Igh) locus are excised and replaced with a new constant gene segment (referred to as "Ch genes", e.g., Cγ, Cɛ, or Cα). The B cell thereby changes from expressing IgM to one producing IgG, IgE, or IgA, with each antibody isotype having a different effector function during an immune reaction. CSR is a DNA deletional-recombination reaction that proceeds through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in repetitive switch (S) sequences preceding each Ch gene and is completed by end-joining between donor Sμ and acceptor S regions. CSR is a multistep reaction requiring transcription through S regions, the DNA cytidine deaminase AID, and the participation of several general DNA repair pathways including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and classical nonhomologous end-joining. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how transcription through S regions generates substrates for AID-mediated deamination and how AID participates not only in the initiation of CSR but also in the conversion of deaminated residues into DSBs. Additionally, we review the multiple processes that regulate AID expression and facilitate its recruitment specifically to the Ig loci, and how deregulation of AID specificity leads to oncogenic translocations. Finally, we summarize recent data on the potential role of AID in the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell state during epigenetic reprogramming.

  5. Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhucheng; Yang, Haijuan; Pavletich, Nikola P [HHMI

    2008-07-08

    The RecA family of ATPases mediates homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genomic integrity and for generating genetic diversity. RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) form a helical filament that binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), searches for homology, and then catalyses the exchange of the complementary strand, producing a new heteroduplex. Here we have solved the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli RecA-ssDNA and RecA-heteroduplex filaments. They show that ssDNA and ATP bind to RecA-RecA interfaces cooperatively, explaining the ATP dependency of DNA binding. The ATP {gamma}-phosphate is sensed across the RecA-RecA interface by two lysine residues that also stimulate ATP hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for DNA release. The DNA is underwound and stretched globally, but locally it adopts a B-DNA-like conformation that restricts the homology search to Watson-Crick-type base pairing. The complementary strand interacts primarily through base pairing, making heteroduplex formation strictly dependent on complementarity. The underwound, stretched filament conformation probably evolved to destabilize the donor duplex, freeing the complementary strand for homology sampling.

  6. Successful development of recombinant DNA-derived pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, R G; Pommer, C H

    1990-11-01

    Successful development of recombinant DNA-derived pharmaceuticals, a new class of therapeutic agents, is determined by a variety of factors affecting the selection and positioning of the compound under development. For an efficient development it is of utmost importance that the mechanism of action of the compound selected be understood on a molecular level. The compound's potential therapeutical profile and a strong patent position are key positioning considerations, as well as vital elements in shortening the development phase and protecting innovation. Installation of an interdisciplinary project management team, along with a clear definition of team members' responsibilities, is required to avoid delays and improve communication during development. Selection of the organism to be used in production must take into consideration both the structure of the protein and the quality and safety of the final product. New technologies require a considerable investment in new manufacturing facilities and equipment. Often, the decision for such an investment must be made early and with a high degree of uncertainty. Desired product yield, expected dosage, and estimated market potential are the most important considerations in this decision. Following public disclosure of the plan to develop recombinant DNA-derived products, approval of the production plant and expansion or adaptation to the new process and technology may be delayed. For this reason, they should be considered as a critical step in the overall development phase. Recruitment of qualified staff is a time-consuming and critical element of the production process. Its impact on the product timeline should not be underestimated, especially if such technologies are new to the company. The entire production process must be validated in respect to identity, purity, and safety of the product to guarantee constant product quality, as well as for safety aspects in the environment. Adequate in-process and final product

  7. DNA-Pairing and Annealing Processes in Homologous Recombination and Homology-Directed Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of heteroduplex DNA is a central step in the exchange of DNA sequences via homologous recombination, and in the accurate repair of broken chromosomes via homology-directed repair pathways. In cells, heteroduplex DNA largely arises through the activities of recombination proteins that promote DNA-pairing and annealing reactions. Classes of proteins involved in pairing and annealing include RecA-family DNA-pairing proteins, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins, recombination mediator proteins, annealing proteins, and nucleases. This review explores the properties of these pairing and annealing proteins, and highlights their roles in complex recombination processes including the double Holliday junction (DhJ) formation, synthesis-dependent strand annealing, and single-strand annealing pathways—DNA transactions that are critical both for genome stability in individual organisms and for the evolution of species. PMID:25646379

  8. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    -deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout...... mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK...... filament formation, stability, or function. These findings define DEK as an important and multifunctional mediator of HR, and establish a synthetic lethal relationship between DEK loss and NHEJ inhibition....

  9. Human RAD52 Captures and Holds DNA Strands, Increases DNA Flexibility, and Prevents Melting of Duplex DNA: Implications for DNA Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Brouwer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human RAD52 promotes annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA. In-depth knowledge of RAD52-DNA interaction is required to understand how its activity is integrated in DNA repair processes. Here, we visualize individual fluorescent RAD52 complexes interacting with single DNA molecules. The interaction with ssDNA is rapid, static, and tight, where ssDNA appears to wrap around RAD52 complexes that promote intra-molecular bridging. With double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, interaction is slower, weaker, and often diffusive. Interestingly, force spectroscopy experiments show that RAD52 alters the mechanics dsDNA by enhancing DNA flexibility and increasing DNA contour length, suggesting intercalation. RAD52 binding changes the nature of the overstretching transition of dsDNA and prevents DNA melting, which is advantageous for strand clamping during or after annealing. DNA-bound RAD52 is efficient at capturing ssDNA in trans. Together, these effects may help key steps in DNA repair, such as second-end capture during homologous recombination or strand annealing during RAD51-independent recombination reactions.

  10. Nuclear dynamics of RAD52 group homologous recombination proteins in response to DNA damage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke); C. Paulusma (Coen); A.L. Nigg (Alex); A. Pastink (Albert); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRecombination between homologous DNA molecules is essential for the proper maintenance and duplication of the genome, and for the repair of exogenously induced DNA damage such as double-strand breaks. Homologous recombination requires the RAD52 group proteins, including Rad51, Rad52 and

  11. Would Dissociative Recombination of DNA+ be a Possible Pathway of DNA Damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H. C.; Chen, Z. P.; Strom, R. A.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-05-01

    It is known that dissociative recombination (DR) is one of the very efficient processes of destruction of molecular cations into neutral particles. During the past few years, the focus of DR has been expanded from small inorganic molecules to macromolecular cation. We are probing the possibility of the DR of DNA+ after ionization of DNA, for example due to ionizing radiation. Therefore we are investigating the existence of autoionization states within nucleotide bases (Guanine, Adenine, Cytosine, and Thymine). Our results from computational analysis using the modern electronic structure program ORCA will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate for their financial support.

  12. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 49, Recombination at the DNA level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains full papers prepared by the participants to the 1984 Cold Springs Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. This year's theme is entitled Recombination at the DNA level. The volume consists of 93 articles grouped into subject areas entitled chromosome mechanics, yeast systems, mammalian homologous recombination, transposons, mu, plant transposons/T4 recombination, topoisomerase, resolvase and gyrase, Escherichia coli general recombination, RecA, repair, leukaryotic enzymes, integration and excision of bacteriophage, site-specific recombination, and recombination in vitro.

  13. Persistence and renaturation efficiency of thermally treated waste recombinant DNA in defined aquatic microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao H; Wang, Lei; Le, Yi Q; Hu, Jia J

    2012-01-01

    To validate the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from thermally denatured recombinant DNA discharged into the eco-system, a constructed plasmid was used to investigate the persistence and renaturation efficiency of thermally denatured recombinant DNA in defined aquatic microcosms. The results revealed that there was undecayed recombinant plasmid pMDLKJ material being discharged into the aquatic microcosms even after thermal treatment at either 100°C (using boiling water) or at 120°C (using an autoclave). The plasmid had a relatively long persistence time. At least 10(2) copies μL(-1) of a specific 245 bp fragment of the plasmid could be detected after 12 h and a specific 628 bp fragment could be detected up to 2 h. The thermally denatured recombinant DNA could efficiently renature and recover its functional double stranded structure in aquatic microcosms and the highest concentration of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) occurred around 1 h after the thermally denatured DNA was added to the system. These results imply that when thermally treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into aquatic environments, they have enough time to renature and possibly transfer to other organisms. In addition, the recombinant DNA added to aquatic microcosms could be absorbed by the seston particles in water, such as mineral, organic and colloids particles with a maximum absorption value of about 5.18 ng L(-1). This absorbed DNA could persist longer in aquatic environments than free recombinant DNA, thus further favoring HGT.

  14. Mechanism of Homologous Recombination and Implications for Aging-Related Deletions in Mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Homologous recombination is a universal process, conserved from bacteriophage to human, which is important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Recombination in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was documented more than 4 decades ago, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive. Recent studies have revealed the presence of a Rad52-type recombination system of bacteriophage origin in mitochondria, which operates by a single-strand annealing mechanism independent of the canonical RecA/Rad51-type recombinases. Increasing evidence supports the notion that, like in bacteriophages, mtDNA inheritance is a coordinated interplay between recombination, repair, and replication. These findings could have profound implications for understanding the mechanism of mtDNA inheritance and the generation of mtDNA deletions in aging cells. PMID:24006472

  15. Restrictions Limiting the Generation of DNA Double Strand Breaks during Chromosomal V(D)J Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Robert E.; Wooley, Andrea L.; Hughes, Maureen M.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Swat, Wojciech; Sleckman, Barry P.

    2002-01-01

    Antigen receptor loci are composed of numerous variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments, each flanked by recombination signal sequences (RSSs). The V(D)J recombination reaction proceeds through RSS recognition and DNA cleavage steps making it possible for multiple DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced at a single locus. Here we use ligation-mediated PCR to analyze DNA cleavage intermediates in thymocytes from mice with targeted RSS mutations at the endogenous TCRβ locus. We show that DNA cleavage does not occur at individual RSSs but rather must be coordinated between RSS pairs flanking gene segments that ultimately form coding joins. Coordination of the DNA cleavage step occurs over great distances in the chromosome and favors intra- over interchromosomal recombination. Furthermore, through several restrictions imposed on the generation of both nonpaired and paired DNA DSBs, this requirement promotes antigen receptor gene integrity and genomic stability in developing lymphocytes undergoing V(D)J recombination. PMID:11828005

  16. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg, (Russian Federation); Edlarov, M. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center of Bioengineering, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  17. Frequency and character of alternative somatic recombination fates of paralogous genes during T-DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelesko, John G; Carter, Kristy; Kinoshita, Yuki; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2005-09-01

    A synthetic RBCSB gene cluster was transformed into Arabidopsis in order to simultaneously evaluate the frequency and character of somatic illegitimate recombination, homologous recombination, and targeted gene replacement events associated with T-DNA-mediated transformation. The most frequent type of recombination event observed was illegitimate integration of the T-DNA without activation of the silent DeltaRBCS1B: LUC transgene. Sixteen luc(+) (firefly luciferase positive) T1 plants were isolated. Six of these were due to illegitimate recombination events resulting in a gene trapping effect. Nine resulted from homologous recombination between paralogous RBCSB sequences associated with T-DNA integration. The frequency of somatic homologous recombination associated with T-DNA integration was almost 200 times higher than previously reported rates of meiotic homologous recombination with the same genes. The distribution of (somatic homologous) recombination resolution sites generally fits a fractional interval length model. However, a small region adjacent to an indel showed a significant over-representation of resolution sites, suggesting that DNA mismatch recognition may also play an important role in the positioning of somatic resolution sites. The frequency of somatic resolution within exon-2 was significantly different from that previously observed during meiotic recombination.

  18. Evidence of animal mtDNA recombination between divergent populations of the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoolahan, Angelique H; Blok, Vivian C; Gibson, Tracey; Dowton, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Recombination is typically assumed to be absent in animal mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA). However, the maternal mode of inheritance means that recombinant products are indistinguishable from their progenitor molecules. The majority of studies of mtDNA recombination assess past recombination events, where patterns of recombination are inferred by comparing the mtDNA of different individuals. Few studies assess contemporary mtDNA recombination, where recombinant molecules are observed as direct mosaics of known progenitor molecules. Here we use the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, to investigate past and contemporary recombination. Past recombination was assessed within and between populations of G. pallida, and contemporary recombination was assessed in the progeny of experimental crosses of these populations. Breeding of genetically divergent organisms may cause paternal mtDNA leakage, resulting in heteroplasmy and facilitating the detection of recombination. To assess contemporary recombination we looked for evidence of recombination between the mtDNA of the parental populations within the mtDNA of progeny. Past recombination was detected between a South American population and several UK populations of G. pallida, as well as between two South American populations. This suggests that these populations may have interbred, paternal mtDNA leakage occurred, and the mtDNA of these populations subsequently recombined. This evidence challenges two dogmas of animal mtDNA evolution; no recombination and maternal inheritance. No contemporary recombination between the parental populations was detected in the progeny of the experimental crosses. This supports current arguments that mtDNA recombination events are rare. More sensitive detection methods may be required to adequately assess contemporary mtDNA recombination in animals.

  19. The Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Blomme, Jonas

    2017-04-19

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Gainand loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development.

  20. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly...... identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized...... propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins....

  1. On the classical description of the recombination of dark matter particles with a Coulomb-like interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotsky, K. M.; Esipova, E. A.; Kirillov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Cold dark matter (DM) scenario may be cured of several problems by involving self-interaction of dark matter. Viability of the models of long-range interacting DM crucially depends on the effectiveness of recombination of the DM particles, making thereby their interaction short-range. Usually in numeric calculations, recombination is described by cross section obtained on a feasible quantum level. However in a wide range of parameter values, a classical treatment, where the particles are bound due to dipole radiation, is applicable. The cross sections, obtained in both approaches, are very different and lead to diverse consequences. Classical cross section has a steeper dependence on relative velocity, what leads to the fact that, after decoupling of DM particles from thermal background of "dark photons" (carriers of DM long-range interaction), recombination process does not "freeze out", diminishing gradually density of unbound DM particles. Our simplified estimates show, that at the taken parameter values (the mass of DM particle is 100 GeV, interaction constant is 100-1, and quite natural assumptions on initial conditions, from which the result is very weakly dependent) the difference in residual density reaches about 5 orders of magnitude on pre-galactic stage. This estimate takes into account thermal effects induced by dipole radiation and recombination, which resulted in the increase of both temperature and density of DM particles by a half order of magnitude.

  2. The human RAD54 recombinational DNA repair protein is a double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); J. de Wit (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand break repair through the RAD52 homologous recombination pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires, among others, the RAD51, RAD52, and RAD54 genes. The biological importance of homologous recombination is underscored by the conservation of

  3. Molecular genetics of DNA viruses: recombinant virus technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhierl, Bernhard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant viral genomes cloned onto BAC vectors can be subjected to extensive molecular genetic analysis in the context of E. coli. Thus, the recombinant virus technology exploits the power of prokaryotic genetics to introduce all kinds of mutations into the recombinant genome. All available techniques are based on homologous recombination between a targeting vector carrying the mutated version of the gene of interest and the recombinant virus. After modification, the mutant viral genome is stably introduced into eukaryotic cells permissive for viral lytic replication. In these cells, mutant viral genomes can be packaged into infectious particles to evaluate the effect of these mutations in the context of the complete genome.

  4. Probing the Structure of DNA Aptamers with a Classic Heterocycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reid Bishop

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA aptamers are synthetic, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides selectedby SELEX methods for their binding with specific ligands. Here we present ethidiumbinding results for three related DNA aptamers (PDB code: 1OLD, 1DB6, and 2ARGthat bind L-argininamide (L-Arm. The ligand bound form of each aptamer's structurehas been reported and each are found to be composed primarily of two domainsconsisting of a stem helical region and a loop domain that forms a binding pocket for thecognate ligand. Previous thermodynamic experiments demonstrated that the DNAaptamer 1OLD undergoes a large conformational ordering upon binding to L-Arm. Herewe extend those linkage binding studies by examining the binding of the heterocyclicintercalator ethidium to each of the three aptamers by fluorescence and absorptionspectrophotometric titrations. Our results reveal that ethidium binds to each aptamer with∆Go's in the range of -8.7 to -9.4 kcal/mol. The stoichiometry of binding is 2:1 for eachaptamer and is quantitatively diminished in the presence of L-Arm as is the overallfluorescence intensity of ethidium. Together, these results demonstrate that a portion ofthe bound ethidium is excluded from the aptamer in the presence of a saturating amountof L-Arm. These results demonstrate the utility of ethidium and related compounds forthe probing of non-conventional DNA structures and reveal an interesting fundamentalthermodynamic linkage in DNA aptamers. Results are discussed in the context of thethermodynamic stability and structure of each of the aptamers examined.

  5. Role of teh Rad52 Amino-terminal DNA Binding Activity in DNA Strand Capture in Homologous Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Idina; Hallwyl, Swee Chuang Lim; Seong, Changhyun

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein promotes homologous recombination by nucleating the Rad51 recombinase onto replication protein A-coated single-stranded DNA strands and also by directly annealing such strands. We show that the purified rad52-R70A mutant protein, with a compromised amino...... conversion intermediates reveals that rad52-R70A cells can mediate DNA strand invasion but are unable to complete the recombination event. These results provide evidence that DNA binding by the evolutionarily conserved amino terminus of Rad52 is needed for the capture of the second DNA end during homologous......-terminal DNA binding domain, is capable of Rad51 delivery to DNA but is deficient in DNA annealing. Results from chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments find that rad52-R70A associates with DNA double-strand breaks and promotes recruitment of Rad51 as efficiently as wild-type Rad52. Analysis of gene...

  6. No recombination of mtDNA after heteroplasmy for 50 generations in the mouse maternal germline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, Erik; Freyer, Christoph; Battersby, Brendan J.; Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Variants of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are commonly used as markers to track human evolution because of the high sequence divergence and exclusive maternal inheritance. It is assumed that the inheritance is clonal, i.e. that mtDNA is transmitted between generations without germline recombination. In contrast to this assumption, a number of studies have reported the presence of recombinant mtDNA molecules in cell lines and animal tissues, including humans. If germline recombination of mtDNA is frequent, it would strongly impact phylogenetic and population studies by altering estimates of coalescent time and branch lengths in phylogenetic trees. Unfortunately, this whole area is controversial and the experimental approaches have been widely criticized as they often depend on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of mtDNA and/or involve studies of transformed cell lines. In this study, we used an in vivo mouse model that has had germline heteroplasmy for a defined set of mtDNA mutations for more than 50 generations. To assess recombination, we adapted and validated a method based on cloning of single mtDNA molecules in the λ phage, without prior PCR amplification, followed by subsequent mutation analysis. We screened 2922 mtDNA molecules and found no germline recombination after transmission of mtDNA under genetically and evolutionary relevant conditions in mammals. PMID:24163253

  7. Histone Methylation by Temozolomide; A Classic DNA Methylating Anticancer Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Diaz, Anthony Joseph; Mura, Hugo; Nyuwen, Lila; Coello, Daniel; Sheva, Saif; Maria, Nava; Gallo, James M.; Wang, Tieli

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim The alkylating agent, temozolomide (TMZ), is considered the standard-of-care for high-grade astrocytomas –known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)– an aggressive type of tumor with poor prognosis. The therapeutic benefit of TMZ is attributed to formation of DNA adducts involving the methylation of purine bases in DNA. We investigated the effects of TMZ on arginine and lysine amino acids, histone H3 peptides and histone H3 proteins. Materials and Methods Chemical modification of amino acids, histone H3 peptide and protein by TMZ was performed in phosphate buffer at physiological pH. The reaction products were examined by mass spectrometry and western blot analysis. Results Our results showed that TMZ following conversion to a methylating cation, can methylate histone H3 peptide and histone H3 protein, suggesting that TMZ exerts its anticancer activity not only through its interaction with DNA, but also through alterations of protein post-translational modifications. Conclusion The possibility that TMZ can methylate histones involved with epigenetic regulation of protein indicates a potentially unique mechanism of action. The study will contribute to the understanding the anticancer activity of TMZ in order to develop novel targeted molecular strategies to advance the cancer treatment. PMID:27354585

  8. Exploration of the Dissociative Recombination following DNA ionization to DNA+ due to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Richard A.; Zimmerly, Andrew T.; Andrianarijaona, Vola M.

    2014-05-01

    It is known that ionizing radiation generates low-energy secondary electrons, which may interact with the surrounding area, including biomolecules, such as triggering DNA single strand and double strand breaks as demonstrated by Sanche and coworkers (Radiat. Res. 157, 227(2002)). The bio-effects of low-energy electrons are currently a topic of high interest. Most of the studies are dedicated to dissociative electron attachments; however, the area is still mostly unexplored and still not well understood. We are computationally investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on DNA, such as its ionization to DNA+. More specifically, we are exploring the possibility of the dissociative recombination of the temporary DNA+ with one of the low-energy secondary electrons, produced by the ionizing radiation, to be another process of DNA strand breaks. Our preliminary results, which are performed with the binaries of ORCA, will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  9. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj

    2014-01-01

    -wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum......-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers...... of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens....

  10. Recombination spots prediction using DNA physical properties in the saccharomyces cerevisiae genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shou-Hui; Xu, Li-Qin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Guo-Qing; Lin, Hao

    2012-09-01

    The prediction of meiotic recombination is difficult and current available methods are limited. In this study, we propose a novel method for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots using support vector machine(SVM) with the DNA physical properties. Results of optimized pseudo-tetranucleotide show overall accuracy of 83.1% by using 5-fold cross-validation. High predictive successful rate exhibit that this model can be applied for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots.

  11. 75 FR 28811 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) by the Institutional Biosafety Committee at Lawrence Livermore... Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health. BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  12. 75 FR 31795 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA...-Curay, Acting Director, Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health. BILLING CODE...

  13. Collaborative Learning in Biology: Debating the Ethics of Recombinant DNA Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rodney P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses applications of recombinant DNA technology and the controversies surrounding that technique. Provides a cooperative learning project idea that involves teams of students investigating and debating these issues. (DDR)

  14. DNA induces conformational changes in a recombinant human minichromosome maintenance complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Emma L; Parker-Manuel, Richard P; Chaban, Yuriy; Satti, Rabab; Coverley, Dawn; Orlova, Elena V; Chong, James P J

    2015-03-20

    ATP-dependent DNA unwinding activity has been demonstrated for recombinant archaeal homohexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complexes and their yeast heterohexameric counterparts, but in higher eukaryotes such as Drosophila, MCM-associated DNA helicase activity has been observed only in the context of a co-purified Cdc45-MCM-GINS complex. Here, we describe the production of the recombinant human MCM (hMCM) complex in Escherichia coli. This protein displays ATP hydrolysis activity and is capable of unwinding duplex DNA. Using single-particle asymmetric EM reconstruction, we demonstrate that recombinant hMCM forms a hexamer that undergoes a conformational change when bound to DNA. Recombinant hMCM produced without post-translational modifications is functional in vitro and provides an important tool for biochemical reconstitution of the human replicative helicase.

  15. How-to-Do-It: Teaching Recombinant DNA Technology in High School Biology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Reports on the teaching of recombinant DNA technology in high school biology courses. Explains reactions of the public, students, and colleagues to the molecular genetics unit. Indicates equipment, curricular materials, training, workshops, and availability. (RT)

  16. PCR mediated recombination impacts the analysis of hepatitis B Virus covalently closed circular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Thiers, Valérie; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2016-12-20

    The replication of HBV involves the production of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) from the HBV genome through the repair of virion relaxed circular DNA (rcDNA) in the virion. As cccDNA is the transcription template for HBV genomes, it needs to be eliminated from hepatocytes if the eradication of chronic HBV infection is to be achieved. PCR quantitation of cccDNA copy number is the technique of choice for evaluating the efficiency of treatment regimens. The PCR target commonly used to identify cccDNA spans the gapped region of rcDNA and is considered to accurately distinguish between cccDNA and rcDNA. There is however, a potentially confounding issue in that PCR can generate larger targets from collections of small DNA fragments, a phenomenon known as PCR recombination. The impact of PCR recombination towards the amplification of this cccDNA specific target was explored by mixing three marked, yet overlapping HBV DNA fragments. Thirteen of sixteen possible recombinants were identified by sequencing with frequencies ranging from 0.6 to 23%. To confirm this finding in vivo, HBV positive sera were treated with DNase I and submitted to quantitative real-time PCR. Under these conditions, it was possible to amplify the cccDNA specific segment without difficulty. As the virion contains uniquely rcDNA, amplification of the cccDNA target resulted from PCR recombination. PCR quantitation of cccDNA may be more difficult than hitherto thought. Current detection protocols need to be investigated so as to help in the management of chronic HBV infection.

  17. Hin-mediated DNA knotting and recombining promote replicon dysfunction and mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Jennifer K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic code imposes a dilemma for cells. The DNA must be long enough to encode for the complexity of an organism, yet thin and flexible enough to fit within the cell. The combination of these properties greatly favors DNA collisions, which can knot and drive recombination of the DNA. Despite the well-accepted propensity of cellular DNA to collide and react with itself, it has not been established what the physiological consequences are. Results Here we analyze the effects of recombined and knotted plasmids in E. coli using the Hin site-specific recombination system. We show that Hin-mediated DNA knotting and recombination (i promote replicon loss by blocking DNA replication; (ii block gene transcription; and (iii cause genetic rearrangements at a rate three to four orders of magnitude higher than the rate for an unknotted, unrecombined plasmid. Conclusion These results show that DNA reactivity leading to recombined and knotted DNA is potentially toxic and may help drive genetic evolution.

  18. Mammalian DNA ligase III: Molecular cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in spermatocytes undergoing meiotic recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingwen; Danehower, S.; Besterman, J.M.; Husain, I. [Glaxo Research Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Three biochemically distinct DNA ligase activities have been identified in mammalian cell extracts. We have recently purified DNA ligase II and DNA ligase III to near homogeneity from bovine liver and testis tissue, respectively. Amino acid sequencing studies indicated that these enzymes are encoded by the same gene. In the present study, human and murine cDNA clones encoding DNA ligase III were isolated with probes based on the peptide sequences. The human DNA ligase III cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 862 amino acids, whose sequence is more closely related to those of the DNA ligases encoded by poxviruses than to replicative DNA ligases, such as human DNA ligase I. In vitro transcription and translation of the cDNA produced a catalytically active DNA ligase similar in size and substrate specificity to the purified bovine enzyme. The DNA ligase III gene was localized to human chromosome 17, which eliminated this gene as a candidate for the cancer-prone disease Bloom syndrome that is associated with DNA joining abnormalities. DNA ligase III is ubiquitously expressed at low levels, except in the testes, in which the steady-state levels of DNA ligase III mRNA are at least 10-fold higher than those detected in other tissues and cells. Since DNA ligase I mRNA is also present at high levels in the testes, we examined the expression of the DNA ligase genes during spermatogenesis. DNA ligase I mRNA expression correlated with the contribution of proliferating supermatogonia cells to the testes, in agreement with the previously defined role of this enzyme in DNA replications. In contrast, elevated levels of DNA ligase III mRNA were observed in primary supermatocytes undergoing recombination prior to the first meiotic division. Therefore, we suggest that DNA ligase III seals DNA strand breaks that arise during the process of meiotic recombination in germ cells and as a consequence of DNA damage in somatic cells. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Synapsis of recombination signal sequences located in cis and DNA underwinding in V(D)J recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubotaru, Mihai; Schatz, David G

    2004-10-01

    V(D)J recombination requires binding and synapsis of a complementary (12/23) pair of recombination signal sequences (RSSs) by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, aided by a high-mobility group protein, HMG1 or HMG2. Double-strand DNA cleavage within this synaptic, or paired, complex is thought to involve DNA distortion or melting near the site of cleavage. Although V(D)J recombination normally occurs between RSSs located on the same DNA molecule (in cis), all previous studies that directly assessed RSS synapsis were performed with the two DNA substrates in trans. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a facilitated circularization assay using DNA substrates of reduced length to assess synapsis of RSSs in cis. We show that a 12/23 pair of RSSs is the preferred substrate for synapsis of cis RSSs and that the efficiency of pairing is dependent upon RAG1-RAG2 stoichiometry. Synapsis in cis occurs rapidly and is kinetically favored over synapsis of RSSs located in trans. This experimental system also allowed the generation of underwound DNA substrates containing pairs of RSSs in cis. Importantly, we found that the RAG proteins cleave such substrates substantially more efficiently than relaxed substrates and that underwinding may enhance RSS synapsis as well as RAG1/2-mediated catalysis. The energy stored in such underwound substrates may be used in the generation of DNA distortion and/or protein conformational changes needed for synapsis and cleavage. We propose that this unwinding is uniquely sensed during synapsis of an appropriate 12/23 pair of RSSs.

  20. Alternative end-joining and classical nonhomologous end-joining pathways repair different types of double-strand breaks during class-switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortizas, Elena M; Zahn, Astrid; Hajjar, Maurice E; Patenaude, Anne-Marie; Di Noia, Javier M; Verdun, Ramiro E

    2013-12-01

    Classical nonhomologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) and alternative end-joining (A-EJ) are the main DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways when a sister chromatid is not available. However, it is not clear how one pathway is chosen over the other to process a given DSB. To address this question, we studied in mouse splenic B cells and CH12F3 cells how C-NHEJ and A-EJ repair DSBs initiated by the activation-induced deaminase during IgH (Igh) class-switch recombination (CSR). We show in this study that lowering the deamination density at the Igh locus increases DSB resolution by microhomology-mediated repair while decreasing C-NHEJ activity. This process occurs without affecting 53BP1 and γH2AX levels during CSR. Mechanistically, lowering deamination density increases exonuclease I recruitment and single-stranded DNA at the Igh locus and promotes C-terminal binding protein interacting protein and MSH2-dependent DSB repair during CSR. Indeed, reducing activation-induced deaminase levels increases CSR efficiency in C-NHEJ-defective cells, suggesting enhanced use of an A-EJ pathway. Our results establish a mechanism by which C-NHEJ and this C-terminal binding protein interacting protein/MSH2-dependent pathway that relies on microhomology can act concurrently but independently to repair different types of DSBs and reveal that the density of DNA lesions influences the choice of DSB repair pathway during CSR.

  1. Construction of a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Li, Zhao-Shen; Du, Yi-Qi; Tu, Zhen-Xing; Gong, Yan-Fang; Jin, Jing; Wu, Hong-Yu; Xu, Guo-Ming

    2005-01-07

    To construct a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA gene and to detect its immunogenicity. Genomic DNA of the standard H pylori strain 17 874 was isolated as the template, hpaA gene fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pUCmT vector. DNA sequence of the amplified hpaA gene was assayed, then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES through enzyme digestion and ligation reactions. The recombinant plasmid was used to transform competent Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and the positive clones were screened by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. Then, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was used to transform LB5000 and the recombinant plasmid isolated from LB5000 was finally used to transform SL7207. After that, the recombinant strain was grown in vitro repeatedly. In order to identify the immunogenicity of the vaccine in vitro, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was transfected to COS-7 cells using Lipofectamine2000, the immunogenicity of expressed HpaA protein was detected with SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The 750-base pair hpaA gene fragment was amplified from the genomic DNA and was consistent with the sequence of H pylori hpaA by sequence analysis. It was confirmed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion that H pylori hpaA gene was inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES and a stable recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying H pylori hpaA gene was successfully constructed and the specific strip of HpaA expressed by pIRES-hpaA was detected through Western blot. The recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine strain expressing HpaA protein with immunogenicity can be constructed and it may be helpful for further investigating the immune action of DNA vaccine in vivo.

  2. Construction of a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu; Zhao-Shen Li; Yi-Qi Du; Zhen-Xing Tu; Yan-Fang Gong; Jing Jin; Hong-Yu Wu; Guo-Ming Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA gene and to detect its immunogenicity.METHODS: Genomic DNA of the standard H pylori strain 17 874 was isolated as the template, hpaA gene fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pUCmT vector. DNA sequence of the amplified hpaA gene was assayed, then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES through enzyme digestion and ligation reactions. The recombinant plasmid was used to transform competent Escherichia coliDH5α, and the positive clones were screened by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. Then, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was used to transform LB5000 and the recombinant plasmid isolated from LB5000 was finally used to transform SL7207. After that, the recombinant strain was grown in vitrorepeatedly. In order to iclentify the immunogenicity of the vaccinein vitro, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was transfected to COS-7 cells using LipofectamineTM2000, the immunogenicity of expressed HpaA protein was detected with SDS-PAGE and Western blot.RESULTS: The 750-base pair hpaA gene fragment was amplified from the genomic DNA and was consistent with the sequence of H pylori hpaA by sequence analysis. It was confirmed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion that H pylori hpaA gene was inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES and a stable recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying H pylori hpaA gene was successfully constructed and the specific strip of HpaA expressed by pIRES-hpaA was detected through Western blot.CONCLUSION: The recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine strain expressing HpaA protein with immunogenicity can be constructed and it may be helpful for further investigating the immune action of DNA vaccine in vivo.

  3. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  4. Biparental inheritance of organelles in Pelargonium: evidence for intergenomic recombination of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitz, Janina; Weihe, Andreas; Pohlheim, Frank; Börner, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    While uniparental transmission of mtDNA is widespread and dominating in eukaryotes leaving mutation as the major source of genotypic diversity, recently, biparental inheritance of mitochondrial genes has been demonstrated in reciprocal crosses of Pelargonium zonale and P. inquinans. The thereby arising heteroplasmy carries the potential for recombination between mtDNAs of different descent, i.e. between the parental mitochondrial genomes. We have analyzed these Pelargonium hybrids for mitochondrial intergenomic recombination events by examining differences in DNA blot hybridization patterns of the mitochondrial genes atp1 and cob. Further investigation of these genes and their flanking regions using nucleotide sequence polymorphisms and PCR revealed DNA segments in the progeny, which contained both P. zonale and P. inquinans sequences suggesting an intergenomic recombination in hybrids of Pelargonium. This turns Pelargonium into an interesting subject for studies of recombination and evolutionary dynamics of mitochondrial genomes.

  5. Development and experimental validation of a mechanistic model of in vitro DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Jack; Jia Zhao; Rosser, Susan; Colloms, Sean; Bates, Declan

    2015-08-01

    Engineering cellular memory is a key area of research in which Synthetic Biology has already begun to make significant impacts. Recent work elucidating transcriptional memory devices has paved the way for the creation of bistable genetic switches based on DNA recombination. Attempts to experimentally design and build synthetic systems using recombinases have thus far been hindered by a lack of validated computational models that capture the mechanistic basis of DNA recombination. The predictive capabilities of such models could be exploited by Synthetic Biologists to reduce the number of iterative cycles required to align experimental results with design performance requirements. Here, we develop and validate the first detailed mechanistic model of DNA recombination, with a focus on how efficiently recombination can occur, and the model features required to replicate and predict experimental data.

  6. Self-regulation of recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Nukaga, Yoshio; Saeki, Koji; Akabayashi, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant DNA technology was developed in the United States in the early 1970s. Leading scientists held an international Asilomar Conference in 1975 to examine the self regulation of recombinant DNA technology, followed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health drafting the Recombinant DNA Research Guidelines in 1976. The result of this conference significantly affected many nations, including Japan. However, there have been few historical studies on the self-regulation of recombinant technologies conducted by scientists and government officials in Japan. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the Science Council of Japan, the Ministry of Education, Science adn Culture, and the Science and Technology Agency developed self-regulation policies for recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s. Groups of molecular biologist and geneticists played a key role in establishing guidelines in cooperation with government officials. Our findings suggest that self-regulation policies on recombinant DNA technology have influenced safety management for the life sciences and establishment of institutions for review in Japan.

  7. Differential contributions of mammalian Rad54 paralogs to recombination, DNA damage repair, and meiosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wesoly (Joanna); S. Agarwal (Sheba); S. Sigurdsson (Stefan); W. Bussen (Wendy); S. Komen (Stephen); J. Qin (Jian); H. van Steeg (Harry); J. van Benthem (Jan); E. Wassenaar (Evelyne); W.M. Baarends (Willy); M. Ghazvini (Mehrnaz); A. Tafel (Agnieszka); H. Heath (Helen); N.J. Galjart (Niels); J. Essers (Jeroen); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); N. Arnheim (Norman); O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; P. Sung (Patrick); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHomologous recombination is a versatile DNA damage repair pathway requiring Rad51 and Rad54. Here we show that a mammalian Rad54 paralog, Rad54B, displays physical and functional interactions with Rad51 and DNA that are similar to those of Rad54. While ablation of Rad54 in mouse embryoni

  8. Recombinant DNA Paper Model Simulation: The Genetic Engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes a course for talented high school students that focuses on DNA science and technology. Employs Cold Spring Harbor's DNA Science laboratory manual. Engages students in performing sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia tests in rabbits. (DDR)

  9. Recombinant DNA Paper Model Simulation: The Genetic Engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes a course for talented high school students that focuses on DNA science and technology. Employs Cold Spring Harbor's DNA Science laboratory manual. Engages students in performing sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia tests in rabbits. (DDR)

  10. Waste recombinant DNA: effectiveness of thermo-treatment to manage potential gene pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaohua; Li, Mengnan; Zheng, Guanghong; Le, Yiquan; Wang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Heating at 100 degrees C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating wastewater containing recombinant DNA in many bio-laboratories in China. In this experiment, plasmid pET-28b was used to investigate decay efficiency of waste recombinant DNA during thermo-treatment. The results showed that the decay half-life of the plasmid was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment, and even heating for 30 min the plasmids still retained some transforming activity. Low pH promoted the decay of recombinant DNA, but NaCl, bovine serum albumin and EDTA, which existed in the most wastewater from bio-laboratories, protected DNA from degradation. Thus, the decay half-life of plasmid DNA may be longer than 2.7-4.0 min practically. These results suggest that the effectiveness of heating at 100 degrees C for treating waste recombinant DNA is low and a gene pollution risk remains when those thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the environment. Therefore other simple and effective methods should be developed.

  11. Roles of Homologous Recombination in Processing DNA Lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Tafel (Agnieszka)

    2007-01-01

    textabstract8 9 Scope of the Thesis Scope of the Thesis The abundance of DNA damaging agents poses a constant threat for genome stability. Therefore, cells have evolved multiple mechanisms to repair their DNA. The variety in possible DNA lesions that can occur require specified repair mechanism with

  12. A simplified method for purification of recombinant soluble DnaA proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna M; Kois, Agnieszka; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta

    2006-07-01

    An improved, simplified method for the purification of recombinant, tagged DnaA proteins is described. The presented protocol allowed us to purify soluble DnaA proteins from two different bacterial species: Helicobacter pylori and Streptomyces coelicolor, but it can most likely also be used for the isolation of DnaA proteins from other bacteria, as it was adapted for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA. The isolation procedure consists of protein precipitation with ammonium sulphate followed by affinity chromatography. The composition of the buffers used at each purification step is crucial for the successful isolation of the recombinant DnaA proteins. The universality of the method in terms of its application to differently tagged proteins (His-tagged or GST-tagged) as well as different properties of purified proteins (e.g., highly aggregating truncated forms) makes the protocol highly useful for all studies requiring purified and active DnaA proteins.

  13. Role and regulation of homologous recombination in response to DNA double strand breaks and replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Falcettoni,

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a key pathway to maintain genomic integrity from one generation to another (meiosis) and during ontogenic development in a single organism (DNA repair). Recombination is required for the repair or tolerance of DNA damage and the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks. However, recombination is also potentially dangerous as it can lead to gross chromosomal rearrangements and potentially lethal intermediates. For this reason, recombinational events must...

  14. Rad51 and Rad52 are involved in homologous recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Wei Tang

    Full Text Available Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells.

  15. A mRad51-GFP antimorphic allele affects homologous recombination and DNA damage sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uringa, Evert-Jan; Baldeyron, Céline; Odijk, Hanny; Wassenaar, Evelyne; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Maas, Alex; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Baarends, Willy M; Kanaar, Roland; Essers, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Accurate DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination is essential for preserving genome integrity. Disruption of the gene encoding RAD51, the protein that catalyzes DNA strand exchange during homologous recombination, results in lethality of mammalian cells. Proteins required for homologous recombination, also play an important role during DNA replication. To explore the role of RAD51 in DNA replication and DSB repair, we used a knock-in strategy to express a carboxy-terminal fusion of green fluorescent protein to mouse RAD51 (mRAD51-GFP) in mouse embryonic stem cells. Compared to wild-type cells, heterozygous mRad51(+/wt-GFP) embryonic stem cells showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation and mitomycin C. Moreover, gene targeting was found to be severely impaired in mRad51(+/wt-GFP) embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, we found that mRAD51-GFP foci were not stably associated with chromatin. From these experiments we conclude that this mRad51-GFP allele is an antimorphic allele. When this allele is present in a heterozygous condition over wild-type mRad51, embryonic stem cells are proficient in DNA replication but display defects in homologous recombination and DNA damage repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Thomason

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion.

  17. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. PMID:27624131

  18. A facile method for reversibly linking a recombinant protein to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Russell P; Erben, Christoph M; Malo, Jonathan; Ho, Wei M; McKee, Mireya L; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2009-06-15

    We present a facile method for linking recombinant proteins to DNA. It is based on the nickel-mediated interaction between a hexahistidine tag (His(6)-tag) and DNA functionalized with three nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) groups. The resulting DNA-protein linkage is site-specific. It can be broken quickly and controllably by the addition of a chelating agent that binds nickel. We have used this new linker to bind proteins to a variety of DNA motifs commonly used in the fabrication of nanostructures by DNA self-assembly.

  19. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  20. Engineering cellulosic bioreactors by template assisted DNA shuffling and in vitro recombination (TADSir).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Leroy K

    2014-10-01

    The current study focuses on development of a bioreactor engineering strategy based on exploitation of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Chimeric A. thaliana glycosyl hydrolase (GH) gene libraries were assembled using a novel directed evolution strategy (TADSir: template assisted DNA shuffling and in vitro recombination) that promotes DNA recombination by reassembly of DNA fragments on unique gene templates. TADSir was modeled using a set of algorithms designed to simulate DNA interactions based on nearest neighbor base stacking interactions and Gibb's free energy differences between helical coil and folded DNA states. The algorithms allow for target gene prediction and for in silica analysis of chimeric gene library composition. Further, the study investigated utilization of A. thaliana GH sequence space for bioreactor design by evolving 20 A. thaliana genes representing the GH1, GH3, GH5, GH9 and GH10 gene families. Notably, TADSir achieved streamlined engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and spinach mesophyll protoplast bioreactors capable of processing CM cellulose, Avicel and xylan.

  1. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Eldarov, M. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center for Bioengineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF PATHOGENIC LEPTOSPIRES BY RECOMBINANT DNA PROBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴保民; 肖建国; 沈成义

    1994-01-01

    Early diagnosis of leptospirosis of pulmonary diffuse bernorrhage type (PDH) is of crucial importance in saving patients. To develop a sensitive and specific method for diagnvsis, a genonlic library of the main pathogen of PDH, L. interogans serovar lai strath 017, was constructed with the plasmid vector pUC9. Recmbinant plasmids which have hornologotLq fragments of pathogenic inptospires were screened from the bank. A recombinant plasmid.designated pCX7, could detect 1. 7 kb fragment of strain 017. 9. 0 kb of strain 601 and 30. 0 kb of strain Hebdo-maclis, respectively, without cross hybridization with nonpathogcnic leptospires such as L. biflexa strain Patoc 1 and Leptonema illini. The recombinant plasmid pCX7 could detect pathogenic leptospires which are the main pathogens endemic to Sichuan Province.

  3. Control of helicase loading in the coupled DNA replication and recombination systems of bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Amy M; Klein, Jenny A; Jordan, Christian S; Morrical, Scott W

    2014-01-31

    The Gp59 protein of bacteriophage T4 promotes DNA replication by loading the replicative helicase, Gp41, onto replication forks and recombination intermediates. Gp59 also blocks DNA synthesis by Gp43 polymerase until Gp41 is loaded, ensuring that synthesis is tightly coupled to unwinding. The distinct polymerase blocking and helicase loading activities of Gp59 likely involve different binding interactions with DNA and protein partners. Here, we investigate how interactions of Gp59 with DNA and Gp32, the T4 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, are related to these activities. A previously characterized mutant, Gp59-I87A, exhibits markedly reduced affinity for ssDNA and pseudo-fork DNA substrates. We demonstrate that on Gp32-covered ssDNA, the DNA binding defect of Gp59-I87A is not detrimental to helicase loading and translocation. In contrast, on pseudo-fork DNA the I87A mutation is detrimental to helicase loading and unwinding in the presence or absence of Gp32. Other results indicate that Gp32 binding to lagging strand ssDNA relieves the blockage of Gp43 polymerase activity by Gp59, whereas the inhibition of Gp43 exonuclease activity is maintained. Our findings suggest that Gp59-Gp32 and Gp59-DNA interactions perform separate but complementary roles in T4 DNA metabolism; Gp59-Gp32 interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto D-loops, and other nucleoprotein structures containing clusters of Gp32. Gp59-DNA interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto nascent or collapsed replication forks lacking clusters of Gp32 and to coordinate bidirectional replication from T4 origins. The dual functionalities of Gp59 allow it to promote the initiation or re-start of DNA replication from a wide variety of recombination and replication intermediates.

  4. Immunogenicity analysis following human immunodeficiency virus recombinant DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus Tian Tan prime-boost immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cunxia; Du, Shouwen; Li, Chang; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Xiao; Ren, Dayong; Qin, Yanqing; Ren, Jingqiang; Jin, Ningyi

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed and compared the immunogenicity of various immunization strategies in mice using combinations of recombinant DNA (pCCMp24) and recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan (rddVTT-CCMp24). Intramuscular immunization was performed on days 0 (prime) and 21 (boost). The immunogenicity of the vaccine schedules was determined by measuring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific binding antibody levels and cytokine (interleukin-2 and interleukin-4) concentrations in peripheral blood, analyzing lymphocyte proliferation capacity against HIV epitopes and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio, and monitoring interferon-gamma levels at different times post-immunization. The results showed that pCCMp24, rddVTT-CCMp24 and their prime-boost immunization induced humoral and cellular immune responses. The pCCMp24/rddVTT-CCMp24 immunization strategy increased CD8(+) T cells and induced more IFN-γ-secreting cells compared with single-shot rDNA. The prime-boost immunization strategy also induced the generation of cellular immunological memory to HIV epitope peptides. These results demonstrated that prime-boost immunization with rDNA and rddVTT-CCMp24 had a tendency to induce greater cellular immune response than single-shot vaccinations, especially IFN-γ response, providing a basis for further studies.

  5. The OECD Blue Book on Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations: it's influence on ISBR and EFSA activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemann, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Biosafety regulatory frameworks are intended to serve as mechanisms for ensuring the safe use of biotechnology products without imposing unacceptable risk to human health or the environment, or unintended constraints to technology transfer. The OECD Blue Book on "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations", setting out principles and concepts for handling genetically modified organisms safely outside of contained laboratory conditions, was a milestone in the history of biotechnology. The "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations" definitively became the major resource for the formulation of national regulatory frameworks and international regulations, including the Cartagena Protocol.

  6. Intermolecular DNA ligation activity of eukaryotic toposiomerase II: Potential roles in nucleic acid recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, K.C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Single-stranded [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA was used as a model substrate for topoisomerase II to determine whether double-stranded DNA cleavage observed in vitro reflects the in vivo intermediate in the enzyme's catalytic cycle and to investigate potential mechanisms for topoisomerase II-mediated DNA recombination. As found previously for topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage of double-stranded DNA, the enzyme was covalently linked to the 5[prime]-termini of cleaved [phi]X174 molecules. Optimal reaction conditions were similar for the two substrates. In contrast to results with double-stranded molecules, single-stranded DNA cleavage increased with time, was not reversible, and did not require the presence of SDS. Cleavage products generated in the absence of protein denaturant contained free 3[prime]-OH DNA termini. These results strongly suggest that the covalent topoisomerase II-cleaved DNA complex observed in vitro is the active intermediate in the enzyme's catalytic code. Topoisomerase II is capable of joining cleaved [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA to duplex oligonucleotide acceptor molecules by an intermolecular ligation reaction. Intermolecular DNA ligation proceeded in a time and oligonucleotide concentration dependent fashion. The covalent linkage is between the 5[prime]-phosphate of [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA and the 3[prime]-OH of oligonucleotide acceptor molecules. The reaction was dependent on the presence of a divalent cation, was inhibited by salt, and was not affected by the presence of ATP. The enzyme was capable of ligating [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA to double-stranded oligonucleotides that contained 5[prime]-overhang, 3[prime]-overhang, or blunt ends. Single-stranded, nicked, or gapped oligonucleotides could also be used as acceptor molecules. These results demonstrate that the type II enzyme has an intrinsic ability to mediate illegitimate DNA recombination in vitro and suggests possible roles for topoisomerase II in nucleic acid recombination in vivo.

  7. Analysis of the mycoplasma genome by recombinant DNA technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, C; Frydenberg, J; Christiansen, Gunna

    1984-01-01

    A library of DNA fragments from Mycoplasma sp. strain PG50 has been made in the vector pBR325. Analysis in Escherichia coli minicells of randomly picked clones from this library demonstrated that many plasmids can promote synthesis of mycoplasma protein in the E. coli genetic background. Screening....... The DNA sequence of 16S rRNA and the surrounding control regions has been determined....

  8. FBH1 influences DNA replication fork stability and homologous recombination through ubiquitylation of RAD51

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Wai Kit; Payne, Miranda J; Beli, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Unscheduled homologous recombination (HR) can lead to genomic instability, which greatly increases the threat of neoplastic transformation in humans. The F-box DNA helicase 1 (FBH1) is a 3'-5' DNA helicase with a putative function as a negative regulator of HR. It is the only known DNA helicase...... leads to hyperrecombination, as well as several phenotypes indicative of an altered response to DNA replication stress. These effects are likely to be mediated by the enhanced nuclear matrix association of the ubiquitylation-resistant RAD51. These data are consistent with FBH1 acting as a negative...

  9. Immunogenicity of DNA and Recombinant Sendai Virus Vaccines Expressing the HIV-1 gag Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia FENG; Shuang-qing YU; Tsugumine Shu; Tetsuro Matano; Mamoru Hasegawa; Xiao-li WANG; Hong-tao MA; Hong-xia LI; Yi ZENG

    2008-01-01

    Combinations of DNA and recombinant-viral-vector based vaccines are promising AIDS vaccine methods because of their potential for inducing cellular immune responses. It was found that Gag-specific cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) responses were associated with lowering viremia in an untreated HIV-1 infected cohort. The main objectives of our studies were the construction of DNA and recombinant Sendal virus vector (rSeV) vaccines containing a gag gene from the prevalent Thailand subtype B strain in China and trying to use these vaccines for therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines. The candidate plasmid DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1(+)-gag and recombinant Sendai virus vaccine (rSeV-gag) were constructed separately. It was verified by Western blotting analysis that both DNA and rSeV-gag vaccines expressed the HIV-1 Gag protein correctly and efficiently. Balb/c mice were immunized with these two vaccines in different administration schemes. HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL responses and antibody levels were detected by intracellular cytokine staining assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) respectively. Combined vaccines in a DNA prime/rSeV-gag boost vaccination regimen induced the strongest and most long-lasting Gag-specific CTL and antibody responses. It maintained relatively high levels even 9 weeks post immunization. This data indicated that the prime-boost regimen with DNA and rSeV-gag vaccines may offer promising HIV vaccine regimens.

  10. Construction of Rat Calcineurin A α cDNA Recombinant Adenovirus Vector and Its Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rat calcineurin (CaN) A α isoform (Ppp3ca) cDNA recombinant adenovirus vector was constructed in order to explore the effect of CaN on the myocardium apoptosis induced by ischemiareperfusion injury. Total RNA was isolated from the heart of the adult Wistar rat, and Ppp3ca CDS segment of approximate 1.59 kb size was amplified by reverse transcriptional PCR method. Ppp3ca cDNA segment was cloned into pMD18-T Simple vector for sequencing, and the right clone was named T-Ppp3ca. Ppp3ca cDNA segment obtained from T-Ppp3ca was ligated with pShuttle2-IRES-EGFP to construct a recombinant plasmid pShuttle2-Ppp3ca-IRES-EGFP. Ppp3ca-IRES-EG-FP expression cassette containing CMV, Ppp3ca-IRES-EGFP and SV40 polyA DNA fragment (3.97 kb) obtained from pShuttle2-Ppp3ca-IRES-EGFP was connected with pAdeno-X backbone sequence to construct a recombinant plasmid pAdeno-Ppp3ca. After being identified by PCR and enzyme digestion, recombinant plasmid pAdeno-Ppp3ca was packaged in HEK293 cells. Supernatant of adenovirus from HEK293 cells was collected after a visible cytopathic effect (CPE) appeared.The DNA of the recombinant adenovirus was extracted with the standard method. The presence of the recombinant adenovirus was verified by PCR. The results showed that sequencing results veri fied that the PCR product of Ppp3ca gene was identical to GenBank. Agarose electrophoresis showed the bands of recombined plasmid pAdeno-Ppp3ca and the recombinant adenovirus identified by enzyme digestion and PCR were in the right range corresponding with expectation. It was concluded that the recombinant adenovirus carrying rat calcineurin A α (Ppp3ca) cDNA as well as a report gene-enhancer green fluorescent protein gene was successfully constructed in this experiment.

  11. [Important points in virus research using recombinant DNA technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Takahiko; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2007-06-01

    Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity seeks to protect biological diversity from potential risks posed by living modified organisms (LMOs) resulting from modern biotechnology. This protocol was ratified in Japan after establishing domestic law and regulations for the protocol. In the domestic law, use of LMOs is classified into type 1 use (use without containment measures) and type 2 use (use with containment measures). According to the domestic law, most of experiments using recombinant viruses are required for the approval of the Minister. In this article, we will explain Cartagena Protocol and the Japanese domestic low and indicate an example of application form for the approval of the Minister.

  12. Scaling-up recombinant plasmid DNA for clinical trial: current concern, solution and status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ruzila; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd-Azmi Mohd

    2012-09-07

    Gene therapy and vaccines are rapidly developing field in which recombinant nucleic acids are introduced in mammalian cells for enhancement, restoration, initiation or silencing biochemical function. Beside simplicity in manipulation and rapid manufacture process, plasmid DNA-based vaccines have inherent features that make them promising vaccine candidates in a variety of diseases. This present review focuses on the safety concern of the genetic elements of plasmid such as propagation and expression units as well as their host genome for the production of recombinant plasmid DNA. The highlighted issues will be beneficial in characterizing and manufacturing plasmid DNA for save clinical use. Manipulation of regulatory units of plasmid will have impact towards addressing the safety concerns raised in human vaccine applications. The gene revolution with plasmid DNA by alteration of their plasmid and production host genetics will be promising for safe delivery and obtaining efficient outcomes.

  13. The role of chromatin-associated protein Hbsu in beta-mediated DNA recombination is to facilitate the joining of distant recombination sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J C; Gutierrez, C; Rojo, F

    1995-11-01

    The beta recombinase is unable to mediate in vitro DNA recombination between two directly oriented recombination sites unless a bacterial chromatin-associated protein (Bacillus subtilis Hbsu or Escherichia [correction of Eschrichia] coli HU] is provided. By electron microscopy, we show that the role of Hbsu is to help in joining the recombination sites to form a stable synaptic complex. Some evidence supports the fact that Hbsu works by recognizing and stabilizing a DNA structure at the recombination site, rather than by serving as a bridge between beta recombinase dimers through a protein-protein interaction. We show that the mammalian HMG1 protein, which shares neither sequence nor structural homology with Hbsu, can also stimulate beta-mediated recombination. These chromatin-associated proteins share the property of binding to DNA in a relatively non-specific fashion, bending it, and having a marked preference for altered DNA structures. Hbsu, HU or HMG1 proteins probably bind specifically at the crossing-over region, since at limiting protein-DNA molar ratios they could not be outcompeted by an excess of a DNA lacking the crossing over site. Distamycin, a minor groove binder that induces local distortions in DNA, did not affect the binding of beta protein to DNA, but inhibited the formation of the synaptic complex.

  14. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Northall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops, a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR, which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing.

  15. Measurement of recombination frequencies between two homologous DNA segments embedded in a YAC vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, H; Kurosawa, Y

    1993-07-15

    We measured the frequencies of recombination in a yeast host between two homologous segments of DNA that had been inserted with the same polarity in a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) vector. Three kinds of YAC clones were constructed in which the gene encoding neomycin(Nm) resistance was sandwiched between two homologous segments of DNA, such as the IS3 elements of Escherichia coli or human Alu sequences. Frequencies of homologous recombination in yeast were measured in terms of loss of resistance to Nm. In the case of IS3 fragments, homologous recombination between them did occur at a relatively high frequency (5 x 10(-4). In contrast, recombination between two Alu sequences did not occur at a detectable level during a 30-day incubation. Thus, the frequency was less than 10(-5). These results indicate that the Alu sequences do not sufficiently promote the frequency of recombination between two homologous fragments in yeast as to induce rearrangements of DNA in a substantial fraction of YAC clones in libraries.

  16. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. Bacteriophage homologous recombination systems are widely used for in vivo genetic engineering in bacteria. Single- or double-stranded linear DNA substrates containing short flanking homologies to chromosome targets are used to generate precise and accurate genetic modifications when introduced into bacteria expressing phage recombinases. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these recombination systems will facilitate improvements in the technology. Here, two phage-specific systems are shown to require exposure of complementary single-strand homologous targets for efficient recombination; these single

  17. Selective targeting of homologous DNA recombination repair by gemcitabine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachters, FM; van Putten, JWG; Maring, JG; Zdzienicka, MZ; Groen, HJM; Kampinga, HH

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine, dFdC) is a potent radiosensitizer. The mechanism of dFdC-mediated radiosensitization is yet poorly understood. We recently excluded inhibition of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) as a means of

  18. A Citizen Court in the Recombinant DNA debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, Sheldon

    1978-01-01

    Harvard scientists were planning DNA experiments which required special facilities. A citizen panel was formed to look into the adequacy of federal safety guidelines for the community. Describes the review process and discusses the concept of a citizen court to resolve such technical controversies. (GA)

  19. Recombinant covalently closed circular hepatitis B virus DNA induces prolonged viral persistence in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Li, Gaiyun; Hu, Hao; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leng, Qibin; Xie, Youhua; Yu, Demin; Zhang, Xinxin; Gao, Yueqiu; Lan, Ke; Deng, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    It remains crucial to develop a laboratory model for studying hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection. We hereby produced a recombinant covalently closed circular DNA (rcccDNA) in view of the key role of cccDNA in HBV persistence. A loxP-chimeric intron was engineered into a monomeric HBV genome in a precursor plasmid (prcccDNA), which was excised using Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination into a 3.3-kb rcccDNA in the nuclei of hepatocytes. The chimeric intron was spliced from RNA transcripts without interrupting the HBV life cycle. In cultured hepatoma cells, cotransfection of prcccDNA and pCMV-Cre (encoding Cre recombinase) resulted in accumulation of nuclear rcccDNA that was heat stable and epigenetically organized as a minichromosome. A mouse model of HBV infection was developed by hydrodynamic injection of prcccDNA. In the presence of Cre recombinase, rcccDNA was induced in the mouse liver with effective viral replication and expression, triggering a compromised T-cell response against HBV. Significant T-cell hyporesponsiveness occurred in mice receiving 4 μg prcccDNA, resulting in prolonged HBV antigenemia for up to 9 weeks. Persistent liver injury was observed as elevated alanine transaminase activity in serum and sustained inflammatory infiltration in the liver. Although a T-cell dysfunction was induced similarly, mice injected with a plasmid containing a linear HBV replicon showed rapid viral clearance within 2 weeks. Collectively, our study provides an innovative approach for producing a cccDNA surrogate that established HBV persistence in immunocompetent mice. It also represents a useful model system in vitro and in vivo for evaluating antiviral treatments against HBV cccDNA. Importance: (i) Unlike plasmids that contain a linear HBV replicon, rcccDNA established HBV persistence with sustained liver injury in immunocompetent mice. This method could be a prototype for developing a mouse model of chronic HBV infection. (ii) An exogenous intron was

  20. Selection of LNA-containing DNA aptamers against recombinant human CD73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Ida C; Karlsen, Kasper K; Terp, Mikkel G

    2015-01-01

    tested by surface plasmon resonance. Truncated variants of these aptamers and variants where the LNA nucleotides were substituted for the DNA equivalent also exhibited affinity for the recombinant CD73 in the low nanomolar range. In enzyme inhibition assays with recombinant CD73 the aptamer sequences......LNA-containing DNA aptamers against CD73 (human ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a protein frequently overexpressed in solid tumours, were isolated by SELEX. A pre-defined stem-loop library, containing LNA in the forward primer region, was enriched with CD73 binding sequences through six rounds of SELEX...... with recombinant his-tagged CD73 immobilised on anti-his plates. Enriched pools isolated from rounds one, three and six were subjected to next-generation sequencing and analysed for enrichment using custom bioinformatics software. The software identified aptamer sequences via the primers and then performed several...

  1. Personal reflections on the origins and emergence of recombinant DNA technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Paul; Mertz, Janet E

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of recombinant DNA technology occurred via the appropriation of known tools and procedures in novel ways that had broad applications for analyzing and modifying gene structure and organization of complex genomes. Although revolutionary in their impact, the tools and procedures per se were not revolutionary. Rather, the novel ways in which they were applied was what transformed biology.

  2. Arabidopsis RecQ14A suppresses homologous recombination and modulates DNA damage responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagherieh-Najjar, M.B.; De Vries, O.H.M.; Hille, J.; Dijkwel, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis RecQl4A suppresses homologous recombination and modulates DNA damage responses Authors: Bagherieh-Najjar, Mohammad B.; Vries, Onno M.H.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P. Source: The Plant Journal, Volume 43, Number 6, September 2005 , pp. 789-798(10) Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Abstr

  3. Resolution by unassisted Top3 points to template switch recombination intermediates during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glineburg, M Rebecca; Chavez, Alejandro; Agrawal, Vishesh; Brill, Steven J; Johnson, F Brad

    2013-11-15

    The evolutionarily conserved Sgs1/Top3/Rmi1 (STR) complex plays vital roles in DNA replication and repair. One crucial activity of the complex is dissolution of toxic X-shaped recombination intermediates that accumulate during replication of damaged DNA. However, despite several years of study the nature of these X-shaped molecules remains debated. Here we use genetic approaches and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to show that Top3, unassisted by Sgs1 and Rmi1, has modest capacities to provide resistance to MMS and to resolve recombination-dependent X-shaped molecules. The X-shaped molecules have structural properties consistent with hemicatenane-related template switch recombination intermediates (Rec-Xs) but not Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrate that purified Top3 can resolve a synthetic Rec-X but not a synthetic double HJ in vitro. We also find that unassisted Top3 does not affect crossing over during double strand break repair, which is known to involve double HJ intermediates, confirming that unassisted Top3 activities are restricted to substrates that are distinct from HJs. These data help illuminate the nature of the X-shaped molecules that accumulate during replication of damaged DNA templates, and also clarify the roles played by Top3 and the STR complex as a whole during the resolution of replication-associated recombination intermediates.

  4. Fen-1 facilitates homologous recombination by removing divergent sequences at DNA break ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kikuchi (Koji); H. Koyama (Hideki); M. Jasin (Maria); D.C. van Gent (Dik); S. Takeda (Shiunichi); Y. Taniguchi (Yoshihito); A. Hatanaka (Atsushi); E. Sonoda (Eiichiro); H. Hochegger (Helfrid); N. Adachi (Noritaka)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractHomologous recombination (HR) requires nuclease activities at multiple steps, but the contribution of individual nucleases to the processing of double-strand DNA ends at different stages of HR has not been clearly defined. We used chicken DT40 cells to investigate the r

  5. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... recommendations of the RAC, the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) concluded that more specific guidance... address or by fax at 301-496-9839 or by mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  6. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is updating Appendix B of the NIH Guidelines to specify the risk group (RG...: October 3, 2011. Jacqueline Corrigan-Curay, Acting Director, Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  7. 78 FR 27977 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines) SUMMARY: The NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (NIH OBA) proposes... by mail to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge...

  8. 75 FR 21008 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... the NIH Guidelines. SUMMARY: In March 2009, the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) published... e-mail address or by fax to 301-496-9839 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  9. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for... system has been submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA). The data to be considered... Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, MSC 7985, Bethesda...

  10. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA...). On July 20, 2010 the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) published a proposed action (75 FR... contact OBA by e- mail at oba@od.nih.gov , telephone, 301-496-9838 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology...

  11. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA.... lactis certified host-vector 1 system. In addition, the Office of Biotechnology Activities is updating...: Background documentation and additional information can be obtained from the Office of Biotechnology...

  12. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... transgenic rodent and a non-transgenic rodent). The NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) received a... to the same email address or by fax to 301-496-9839 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities...

  13. Are High School Students Ready for Recombinant DNA?: The UOP Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minch, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a three-week summer college honors course for talented high school juniors with three exams, lab six days a week, a research paper, field trips, and student panel discussions. Presents an overview of the course. Describes the lab which uses "E. coli" for DNA recombination. (MVL)

  14. The "Frankenplasmid" Lab: An Investigative Exercise for Teaching Recombinant DNA Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Derek M.; Wilder, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an investigative laboratory module designed to give college undergraduates strong practical and theoretical experience with recombinant DNA methods within 3 weeks. After deducing restriction enzyme maps for two different plasmids, students ligate the plasmids together in the same reaction, transform "E. coli" with this mixture of…

  15. Government Regulation of the Pursuit of Knowledge: The Recombinant DNA Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    Government regulation of recombinant DNA research is addressed. Issues discussed include the potential of such research; National Institutes of Health guidelines; federal, state, and local regulation; the controversy over self-regulation; first amendment protection for scientific research; and problems in drafting legislation. (JMD)

  16. Recombinant poxvirus boosting of DNA-primed rhesus monkeys augments peak but not memory T lymphocyte responses

    OpenAIRE

    Santra, Sampa; Barouch, Dan H.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Lord, Carol I.; Krivulka, Georgia R.; Yu, Faye; Beddall, Margaret H; Gorgone, Darci A.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Miura, Ayako; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Markham, Phillip D.; Parrish, John; Kuroda, Marcelo J.

    2004-01-01

    Although a consensus has emerged that an HIV vaccine should elicit a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, the characteristics of an effective vaccine-induced T lymphocyte response remain unclear. We explored this issue in the simian human immunodeficiency virus/rhesus monkey model in the course of assessing the relative immunogenicity of vaccine regimens that included a cytokine-augmented plasmid DNA prime and a boost with DNA or recombinant pox vectors. Recombinant vaccinia virus, recombin...

  17. DNA as a Model for Probing Polymer Entanglements: Circular Polymers and Non-Classical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Regan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded DNA offers a robust platform for investigating fundamental questions regarding the dynamics of entangled polymer solutions. The exceptional monodispersity and multiple naturally occurring topologies of DNA, as well as a wide range of tunable lengths and concentrations that encompass the entanglement regime, enable direct testing of molecular-level entanglement theories and corresponding scaling laws. DNA is also amenable to a wide range of techniques from passive to nonlinear measurements and from single-molecule to bulk macroscopic experiments. Over the past two decades, researchers have developed methods to directly visualize and manipulate single entangled DNA molecules in steady-state and stressed conditions using fluorescence microscopy, particle tracking and optical tweezers. Developments in microfluidics, microrheology and bulk rheology have also enabled characterization of the viscoelastic response of entangled DNA from molecular levels to macroscopic scales and over timescales that span from linear to nonlinear regimes. Experiments using DNA have uniquely elucidated the debated entanglement properties of circular polymers and blends of linear and circular polymers. Experiments have also revealed important lengthscale and timescale dependent entanglement dynamics not predicted by classical tube models, both validating and refuting new proposed extensions and alternatives to tube theory and motivating further theoretical work to describe the rich dynamics exhibited in entangled polymer systems.

  18. Quantitation of the residual DNA from rice-derived recombinant human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Dai, Huixia; Liu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Liping; Pang, Jianlei; Ou, Jiquan; Yang, Daichang

    2014-04-01

    Residual DNA in recombinant protein pharmaceuticals can potentially cause safety issues in clinical applications; thus, maximum residual limit has been established by drug safety authorities. Assays for residual DNA in Escherichia coli, yeast, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell expression systems have been established, but no rice residual DNA assay for rice expression systems has been designed. To develop an assay for the quantification of residual DNA that is produced from rice seed, we established a sensitive assay using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on the 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. We found that a 40-cycle qPCR exhibited a linear response when the template concentration was in the range of 2×10(4) to 0.2pg of DNA per reaction in TaqMan and SYBR Green I assays. The amplification efficiency was 103 to 104%, and the amount of residual DNA from recombinant human serum albumin from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA) was less than 3.8ng per dosage, which was lower than that recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Our results indicate that the current purification protocol could efficiently remove residual DNA during manufacturing and processing. Furthermore, this protocol could be viable in other cereal crop endosperm expression systems for developing a residual DNA quantitation assay using the highly conserved 5S rRNA gene of the crops.

  19. Polynucleotide phosphorylase is implicated in homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Sbarufatti, Giulia; Briani, Federica; Dehò, Gianni

    2017-04-04

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase, encoded by pnp) is generally thought of as an enzyme dedicated to RNA metabolism. The pleiotropic effects of PNPase deficiency is imputed to altered processing and turnover of mRNAs and small RNAs, which in turn leads to aberrant gene expression. However, it has long since been known that this enzyme may also catalyze template-independent polymerization of dNDPs into ssDNA and the reverse phosphorolytic reaction. Recently, PNPase has been implicated in DNA recombination, repair, mutagenesis and resistance to genotoxic agents in diverse bacterial species, raising the possibility that PNPase may directly, rather than through control of gene expression, participate in these processes. In this work we present evidence that in Escherichia coli PNPase enhances both homologous recombination upon P1 transduction and error prone DNA repair of double strand breaks induced by zeocin, a radiomimetic agent. Homologous recombination does not require PNPase phosphorolytic activity and is modulated by its RNA binding domains whereas error prone DNA repair of zeocin-induced DNA damage is dependent on PNPase catalytic activity and cannot be suppressed by overexpression of RNase II, the other major enzyme (encoded by rnb) implicated in exonucleolytic RNA degradation. Moreover, E. coli pnp mutants are more sensitive than the wild type to zeocin. This phenotype depends on PNPase phosphorolytic activity and is suppressed by rnb, thus suggesting that zeocin detoxification may largely depend on RNA turnover. Our data suggest that PNPase may participate both directly and indirectly through regulation of gene expression to several aspects of DNA metabolism such as recombination, DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic agents.

  20. Neutralizing antibodies respond to a bivalent dengue DNA vaccine or/and a recombinant bivalent antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Weng, Yu-Wei; Huang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Jian-Ming; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no effective vaccine to prevent dengue infection, despite the existence of multiple studies on potential methods of immunization. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of DNA and/or recombinant protein on levels of neutralizing antibodies. For this purpose, envelope domain IIIs of dengue serotypes 1 and 2 (DEN-1/2)were spliced by a linker (Gly‑Gly‑Ser‑Gly‑Ser)3 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET30a (+) and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The chimeric bivalent protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and one‑step purification by high‑performance liquid chromatography was conducted. Protein expression levels of the DNA plasmid were tested in BHK‑21 cells by indirect immunofluorescent assay. In order to explore a more effective immunization strategy and to develop neutralizing antibodies against the two serotypes, mice were inoculated with recombinant bivalent protein, the DNA vaccine, or the two given simultaneously. Presence of the specific antibodies was tested by ELISA and the presence of the neutralizing antibodies was determined by plaque reduction neutralization test. Results of the analysis indicated that the use of a combination of DNA and protein induced significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies against either DEN‑1 or DEN‑2 (1:64.0 and 1:76.1, respectively) compared with the DNA (1:24.7 and 1:26.9, DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively) or the recombinant protein (1:34.9 and 1:45.3 in DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the combination of recombinant protein and DNA as an immunization strategy may be an effective method for the development of a vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection.

  1. DNA End Resection: Nucleases Team Up with the Right Partners to Initiate Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejka, Petr

    2015-09-18

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination commences by nucleolytic degradation of the 5'-terminated strand of the DNA break. This leads to the formation of 3'-tailed DNA, which serves as a substrate for the strand exchange protein Rad51. The nucleoprotein filament then invades homologous DNA to drive template-directed repair. In this review, I discuss mainly the mechanisms of DNA end resection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which includes short-range resection by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2, as well as processive long-range resection by Sgs1-Dna2 or Exo1 pathways. Resection mechanisms are highly conserved between yeast and humans, and analogous machineries are found in prokaryotes as well.

  2. LEDGF (p75) promotes DNA-end resection and homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Mads; Baude, Annika; Fugger, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    ) by the homologous recombination repair pathway. Depletion of LEDGF impairs the recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP) to DNA DSBs and the subsequent CtIP-dependent DNA-end resection. LEDGF is constitutively associated with chromatin through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain that binds......Lens epithelium-derived growth factor p75 splice variant (LEDGF) is a chromatin-binding protein known for its antiapoptotic activity and ability to direct human immunodeficiency virus into active transcription units. Here we show that LEDGF promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs...... preferentially to epigenetic methyl-lysine histone markers characteristic of active transcription units. LEDGF binds CtIP in a DNA damage-dependent manner, thereby enhancing its tethering to the active chromatin and facilitating its access to DNA DSBs. These data highlight the role of PWWP-domain proteins in DNA...

  3. Failure to induce a DNA repair gene, RAD54, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not affect DNA repair or recombination phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD54 gene is transcriptionally regulated by a broad spectrum of DNA-damaging agents. Induction of RAD54 by DNA-damaging agents is under positive control. Sequences responsible for DNA damage induction (the DRS element) lie within a 29-base-pair region from -99 to -70 from the most proximal transcription start site. This inducible promoter element is functionally separable from a poly(dA-dT) region immediately downstream which is required for constitutive expression. Deletions which eliminate induction of RAD54 transcription by DNA damage but do not affect constitutive expression have no effect on growth or survival of noninducible strains relative to wild-type strains in the presence of DNA-damaging agents. The DRS element is also not required for homothallic mating type switching, transcriptional induction of RAD54 during meiosis, meiotic recombination, or spontaneous or X-ray-induced mitotic recombination. We find no phenotype for a lack of induction of RAD54 message via the damage-inducible DRS, which raises significant questions about the physiology of DNA damage induction in S. cerevisiae.

  4. Recombination-independent recognition of DNA homology for repeat-induced point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2017-06-01

    Numerous cytogenetic observations have shown that homologous chromosomes (or individual chromosomal loci) can engage in specific pairing interactions in the apparent absence of DNA breakage and recombination, suggesting that canonical recombination-mediated mechanisms may not be the only option for sensing DNA/DNA homology. One proposed mechanism for such recombination-independent homology recognition involves direct contacts between intact double-stranded DNA molecules. The strongest in vivo evidence for the existence of such a mechanism is provided by the phenomena of homology-directed DNA modifications in fungi, known as repeat-induced point mutation (RIP, discovered in Neurospora crassa) and methylation-induced premeiotically (MIP, discovered in Ascobolus immersus). In principle, Neurospora RIP can detect the presence of gene-sized DNA duplications irrespectively of their origin, underlying nucleotide sequence, coding capacity or relative, as well as absolute positions in the genome. Once detected, both sequence copies are altered by numerous cytosine-to-thymine (C-to-T) mutations that extend specifically over the duplicated region. We have recently shown that Neurospora RIP does not require MEI-3, the only RecA/Rad51 protein in this organism, consistent with a recombination-independent mechanism. Using an ultra-sensitive assay for RIP mutation, we have defined additional features of this process. We have shown that RIP can detect short islands of homology of only three base-pairs as long as many such islands are arrayed with a periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along a pair of DNA molecules. While the presence of perfect homology is advantageous, it is not required: chromosomal segments with overall sequence identity of only 35-36 % can still be recognized by RIP. Importantly, in order for this process to work efficiently, participating DNA molecules must be able to co-align along their lengths. Based on these findings, we have proposed a model, in which

  5. Retrieval of human DNA from rodent-human genomic libraries by a recombination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, R L; Bruns, G A; Dryja, T P; Kurnit, D M

    1983-09-01

    Human Alu repeat ("BLUR") sequences have been cloned into the mini-plasmid vector piVX. The resulting piBLUR clones have been used to rescue selectively, by recombination, bacteriophage carrying human DNA sequences from genomic libraries constructed using DNA from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. piBLUR clones are able to retrieve human clones from such libraries because at least one Alu family repeat is present on most 15 to 20 kb fragments of human DNA and because of the relative species-specificity of the sequences comprising the Alu family. The rapid, selective plaque purification achieved results in the construction of a collection of recombinant phage carrying diverse human DNA inserts from a specific subset of the human karyotype. Subfragments of two recombinants rescued from a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid containing human chromosomes X, 10, 13, and 22 were mapped to human chromosomes X and 13, respectively, demonstrating the utility of this protocol for the isolation of human chromosome-specific DNA sequences from appropriate somatic cell hybrids.

  6. Purification and characterization of a DNA-binding recombinant PREP1:PBX1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Bruckmann, Chiara; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Human PREP1 and PBX1 are homeodomain transcriptional factors, whose biochemical and structural characterization has not yet been fully described. Expression of full-length recombinant PREP1 (47.6 kDa) and PBX1 (46.6 kDa) in E. coli is difficult because of poor yield, high instability and insufficient purity, in particular for structural studies. We cloned the cDNA of both proteins into a dicistronic vector containing an N-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and co-expressed and co-purified a stable PBX1:PREP1 complex. For structural studies, we produced two C-terminally truncated complexes that retain their ability to bind DNA and are more stable than the full-length proteins through various purification steps. Here we report the production of large amounts of soluble and pure recombinant human PBX1:PREP1 complex in an active form capable of binding DNA.

  7. Potent T cell Responses Induced by Single DNA Vaccine Boosted with Recombinant Vaccinia Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianxing Liu; Chao Qiu; Yang Huang; Jianqing Xu; Yiming Shao

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid DNA,an effective vaccine vector,can induce both cellular and humoral immune responses.However,plasmid DNA raises issues concerning potential genomic integration after injection.This issue should be considered in preclinical studies.Tiantan vaccinia virus (TV) has been most widely utilized in eradicating smallpox in China.This virus has also been considered as a successful vaccine vector against a few infectious diseases.Potent T cell responses through T-cell receptor (TCR) could be induced by three injections of the DNA prime vaccine followed by a single injection of recombinant vaccinia vaccine.To develop a safer immunization strategy,a single DNA prime followed by a single recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTV) AIDS vaccine was used to immunize mice.Our data demonstrated that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen induced mature TCR activation with high functional avidity,preferential T cell Vβ receptor usage and high sensitivity to anti-CD3 antibody stimulation.No differences in T cell responses were observed among one,two or three DNA prime/rTV boost regimens.This study shows that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen is sufficient to induce potent T cell responses against HIV.

  8. Cohesin Is limiting for the suppression of DNA damage-induced recombination between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shay Covo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand break (DSB repair through homologous recombination (HR is an evolutionarily conserved process that is generally error-free. The risk to genome stability posed by nonallelic recombination or loss-of-heterozygosity could be reduced by confining HR to sister chromatids, thereby preventing recombination between homologous chromosomes. Here we show that the sister chromatid cohesion complex (cohesin is a limiting factor in the control of DSB repair and genome stability and that it suppresses DNA damage-induced interactions between homologues. We developed a gene dosage system in tetraploid yeast to address limitations on various essential components in DSB repair and HR. Unlike RAD50 and RAD51, which play a direct role in HR, a 4-fold reduction in the number of essential MCD1 sister chromatid cohesion subunit genes affected survival of gamma-irradiated G(2/M cells. The decreased survival reflected a reduction in DSB repair. Importantly, HR between homologous chromosomes was strongly increased by ionizing radiation in G(2/M cells with a single copy of MCD1 or SMC3 even at radiation doses where survival was high and DSB repair was efficient. The increased recombination also extended to nonlethal doses of UV, which did not induce DSBs. The DNA damage-induced recombinants in G(2/M cells included crossovers. Thus, the cohesin complex has a dual role in protecting chromosome integrity: it promotes DSB repair and recombination between sister chromatids, and it suppresses damage-induced recombination between homologues. The effects of limited amounts of Mcd1and Smc3 indicate that small changes in cohesin levels may increase the risk of genome instability, which may lead to genetic diseases and cancer.

  9. A simple DNA recombination screening method by RT-PCR as an alternative to Southern blot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Eliene; Sbroggiò, Mauro; Martin Gonzalez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), including knock-out (KO) and knock-in (KI) models, often requires genomic screening of many mouse ES cell (mESC) clones by Southern blot. The use of large targeting constructs facilitates the recombination of exogenous DNA in a specific...... that match exons flanking the targeting construct. The detection of the expected modification in this PCR product confirms the integration at the correct genomic location and shows that the mutant mRNA is expressed. This is a simple and sensitive strategy to screen locus-specific recombination of targeting...

  10. Next-Generation DNA Curtains for Single-Molecule Studies of Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soniat, Michael M; Myler, Logan R; Schaub, Jeffrey M; Kim, Yoori; Gallardo, Ignacio F; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a universally conserved DNA double-strand break repair pathway. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging approaches have revealed new mechanistic insights into nearly all aspects of HR. These methods are especially suited for studying protein complexes because multicolor fluorescent imaging can parse out subassemblies and transient intermediates that associate with the DNA substrates on the millisecond to hour timescales. However, acquiring single-molecule datasets remains challenging because most of these approaches are designed to measure one molecular reaction at a time. The DNA curtains platform facilitates high-throughput single-molecule imaging by organizing arrays of DNA molecules on the surface of a microfluidic flowcell. Here, we describe a second-generation UV lithography-based protocol for fabricating flowcells for DNA curtains. This protocol greatly reduces the challenges associated with assembling DNA curtains and paves the way for the rapid acquisition of large datasets from individual single-molecule experiments. Drawing on our recent studies of human HR, we also provide an overview of how DNA curtains can be used for observing facilitated protein diffusion, processive enzyme translocation, and nucleoprotein filament dynamics on single-stranded DNA. Together, these protocols and case studies form a comprehensive introduction for other researchers that may want to adapt DNA curtains for high-throughput single-molecule studies of DNA replication, transcription, and repair. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative genomics of DNA recombination and repair in cyanobacteria: biotechnological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Cassier-Chauvat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are fascinating photosynthetic prokaryotes that are regarded as the ancestors of the plant chloroplast; the purveyors of oxygen and biomass for the food chain; and promising cell factories for an environmentally friendly production of chemicals. In colonizing most waters and soils of our planet, cyanobacteria are inevitably challenged by environmental stresses that generate DNA damages. Furthermore, many strains engineered for biotechnological purposes can use DNA recombination to stop synthesizing the biotechnological product. Hence, it is important to study DNA recombination and repair in cyanobacteria for both basic and applied research. This review reports what is known in a few widely studied model cyanobacteria and what can be inferred by mining the sequenced genomes of morphologically and physiologically diverse strains. We show that cyanobacteria possess many E. coli-like DNA recombination and repair genes, and possibly other genes not yet identified. E. coli-homolog genes are unevenly distributed in cyanobacteria, in agreement with their wide genome diversity. Many genes are extremely well conserved in cyanobacteria (mutMS, radA, recA, recFO, recG, recN, ruvABC, ssb and uvrABCD, even in small genomes, suggesting that they encode the core DNA repair process. In addition to these core genes, the marine Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus strains harbor recBCD (DNA recombination, umuCD (mutational DNA replication, as well as the key SOS genes lexA (regulation of the SOS system and sulA (postponing of cell division until completion of DNA reparation. Hence, these strains could possess an E. coli-type SOS system. In contrast, several cyanobacteria endowed with larger genomes lack typical SOS genes. For examples, the two studied Gloeobacter strains lack alkB, lexA and sulA; and Synechococcus PCC7942 has neither lexA nor recCD. Furthermore, the Synechocystis PCC6803 lexA product does not regulate DNA repair genes. Collectively

  12. A general method to modify BACs to generate large recombinant DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Huang, Yue; Tang, Yi; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) has the capacity to clone DNA fragments in excess of 300 kb. It also has the considerable advantages of stable propagation and ease of purification. These features make BAC suitable in genetic research, such as library construction, transgenic mice production, and gene targeting constructs. Homologous recombination in Escherichia coli, a process named recombineering, has made the modification of BACs easy and reliable. We report here a modified recombineering method that can efficiently mediate the fusion of large DNA fragments from two or more different BACs. With the introduction of kanamycin-resistant gene and proposed rare-cutting restriction endonuclease (RCRE) sites into two BACs, a 82.6-kb DNA fragment containing the inverted human alpha-globin genes (theta, alpha1, alpha2, and zeta) from BAC191K2 and the locus control region (LCR) of human beta-globin gene locus (from the BAC186D7) was reconstructed. This approach for combining different BAC DNA fragments should facilitate many kinds of genomic experiments.

  13. Robotics for recombinant DNA and human genetics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In October of 1989, molecular biologists throughout the world formally embarked on ultimately determining the set of genetic instructions for a human being. Called by some the Manhattan Project'' a molecular biology, pursuit of this goal is projected to require approximately 3000 man years of effort over a 15-year period. The Humane Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort that has the goal of analyzing the structure of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the location of all human genes. The Department of Energy (DOE) has designated three of its national laboratories as centers for the Human Genome Project. These are Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). These laboratories are currently working on different, but complementary technology development areas in support of the Human Genome Project. The robotics group at LANL is currently working at developing the technologies that address the problems associated with physical mapping. This article describes some of these problems and discusses some of the robotics approaches and engineering tolls applicable to their solution. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H; Dominowski, Paul J; Yancey, Robert J; Kievit, Michele S

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (CC-Lys-g) produced in Escherichia coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme-g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect channel catfish against Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Recombinant CC-Lys-g produced in E. coli expression system exhibited significant (P recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (pcDNA-Lys-g) was transfected in channel catfish gill cells G1B, the over-expression of pcDNA-Lys-g offered significant (P DNA injection. Macrophages of fish injected with pcDNA-Lys-g produced significantly (P DNA injection. Taken together, our results suggest that pcDNA-Lys-g could be used as a novel immunostimulant to offer immediate protection to channel catfish against A. hydrophila infection.

  15. A novel three primers PCR (TP-PCR) method to obtain recombinant DNA molecule independent of restriction enzyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this note, we report a novel and efficient three primers PCR (TP-PCR) method to rapidly generate recombinant DNA molecule at precise junction between two arbitrary DNA fragments. TP-PCR method is characterized by its reaction system with two templates and three primers, which can produce a recombinant DNA molecule in one PCR reaction. The main advantages of this method are the independence of sequences at the recombination site, the rapidness, and the easy establishment of adequate conditions. This method has been successfully applied to constructing a fusion protein gene, sck gene.

  16. Tomato protoplast DNA transformation : physical linkage and recombination of exogenous DNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Maarten; Koornneef, Maarten; Zabel, Pim; Hille, Jacques

    1987-01-01

    Tomato protoplasts have been transformed with plasmid DNA's, containing a chimeric kanamycin resistance gene and putative tomato origins of replication. A calcium phosphate-DNA mediated transformation procedure was employed in combination with either polyethylene glycol or polyvinyl alcohol. There

  17. Designed construction of recombinant DNA at the ura3Δ0 locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Tomoaki; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Hirakawa, Yuki; Sakai, Ryota; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Nonklang, Sanom; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant DNAs are traditionally constructed using Escherichia coli plasmids. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromosomal gene targeting is a common technique, implying that the yeast homologous recombination system could be applied for recombinant DNA construction. In an attempt to use a S. cerevisiae chromosome for recombinant DNA construction, we selected the single ura3Δ0 locus as a gene targeting site. By selecting this single locus, repeated recombination using the surrounding URA3 sequences can be performed. The recombination system described here has several advantages over the conventional plasmid system, as it provides a method to confirm the selection of correct recombinants because transformation of the same locus replaces the pre-existing selection marker, resulting in the loss of the marker in successful recombinations. In addition, the constructed strains can serve as both PCR templates and hosts for preparing subsequent recombinant strains. Using this method, several yeast strains that contained selection markers, promoters, terminators and target genes at the ura3Δ0 locus were successfully generated. The system described here can potentially be applied for the construction of any recombinant DNA without the requirement for manipulations in E. coli. Interestingly, we unexpectedly found that several G/C-rich sequences used for fusion PCR lowered gene expression when located adjacent to the start codon.

  18. [An effective scheme to produce recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase of Escherichia coli for PCR diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrochenko, A E; Turiianskaia, O M; Gilep, A A; Usanov, S A; Iantsevich, A V

    2014-01-01

    An effective scheme has been developed to produce recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase of Escherichia coli K12 intended to be used for PCR diagnostics, making it possible to achieve a high yield of the end product using a two-stage purification. The gene encoding this enzyme was cloned into the pCWori vector within the same reading frame with six residues of histidine in the C-erminal sequence. Using this vector and the E. coli DH5alpha, a host-vector expression system has been developed and conditions for protein synthesis have been optimized. To purify the protein, metal affinity chromatography with further dialysis was used to remove imidazole. The enzyme yield was no less than 60 mg of the end protein per 1 L of the culture medium. The concordance between amino acid sequences of the recombinant and native enzymes was proved by peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometry. A rapid test to determine the activity of the enzyme preparation was suggested. It was found that the activity of 1.0 mg of the recombinant protein is no less than 3 x 10(3) units. The recombinant enzyme was most stable at pH 8.0 and an ionic strength of the solution equal to 200 mM; it lost its activity completely for 10 min at 60 degrees C. Storage during 1 h at 20 degrees C resulted in the loss of no more than 30% of activity. In the enzyme preparation, the activity of DNase was absent. The free energy of the unfolding of the protein globule of the recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase is 23.1 +/- 0.2 kJ/mol. The data obtained indicate that the recombinant enzyme may be recommended for use in PCR diagnostics to prevent the appearance of false positive results caused by pollution of the reaction mixture by products of the preceding reactions.

  19. The role of the adenovirus DNA binding protein in DNA replication and recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukelen, B. van

    2003-01-01

    Replication of adenovirus DNA in infected cells is an efficient process that, compared to cellular replication, has the use of a protein primer as a hallmark. The mechanism of this DNA replication process and especially the role of one of the replication proteins, the DNA binding protein DBP, is the

  20. Hands on Group Work Paper Model for Teaching DNA Structure, Central Dogma and Recombinant DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Melek; Nakiboglu Tezer, Mahmure

    2009-01-01

    Understanding life on a molecular level is greatly enhanced when students are given the opportunity to visualize the molecules. Especially understanding DNA structure and function is essential for understanding key concepts of molecular biology such as DNA, central dogma and the manipulation of DNA. Researches have shown that undergraduate…

  1. Progress in recombinant DNA-derived vaccines for Lassa virus and filoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2011-12-01

    Developing vaccines for highly pathogenic viruses such as those causing Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers is a daunting task due to both scientific and logistical constraints. Scientific hurdles to overcome include poorly defined relationships between pathogenicity and protective immune responses, genetic diversity of viruses, and safety in a target population that includes a large number of individuals with compromised immune systems. Logistical obstacles include the requirement for biosafety level-4 containment to study the authentic viruses, the poor public health infrastructure of the endemic disease areas, and the cost of developing these vaccines for use in non-lucrative markets. Recombinant DNA-based vaccine approaches offer promise of overcoming some of these issues. In this review, we consider the status of various recombinant DNA candidate vaccines against Lassa virus and filoviruses which have been tested in animals.

  2. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction.

  3. Induction of homologous recombination following in utero exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karia, Bijal; Martinez, Jo Ann; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2013-11-01

    Much of our understanding of homologous recombination, as well as the development of the working models for these processes, has been derived from extensive work in model organisms, such as yeast and fruit flies, and mammalian systems by studying the repair of induced double strand breaks or repair following exposure to genotoxic agents in vitro. We therefore set out to expand this in vitro work to ask whether DNA-damaging agents with varying modes of action could induce somatic change in an in vivo mouse model of homologous recombination. We exposed pregnant dams to DNA-damaging agents, conferring a variety of lesions at a specific time in embryo development. To monitor homologous recombination frequency, we used the well-established retinal pigment epithelium pink-eyed unstable assay. Homologous recombination resulting in the deletion of a duplicated 70 kb fragment in the coding region of the Oca2 gene renders this gene functional and can be visualized as a pigmented eyespot in the retinal pigment epithelium. We observed an increased frequency of pigmented eyespots in resultant litters following exposure to cisplatin, methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide, bleomycin, and etoposide with a contrasting decrease in the frequency of detectable reversion events following camptothecin and hydroxyurea exposure. The somatic genomic rearrangements that result from such a wide variety of differently acting damaging agents implies long-term potential effects from even short-term in utero exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Selection of LNA-containing DNA aptamers against recombinant human CD73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elle, Ida C; Karlsen, Kasper K; Terp, Mikkel G; Larsen, Niels; Nielsen, Ronni; Derbyshire, Nicola; Mandrup, Susanne; Ditzel, Henrik J; Wengel, Jesper

    2015-05-01

    LNA-containing DNA aptamers against CD73 (human ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a protein frequently overexpressed in solid tumours, were isolated by SELEX. A pre-defined stem-loop library, containing LNA in the forward primer region, was enriched with CD73 binding sequences through six rounds of SELEX with recombinant his-tagged CD73 immobilised on anti-his plates. Enriched pools isolated from rounds one, three and six were subjected to next-generation sequencing and analysed for enrichment using custom bioinformatics software. The software identified aptamer sequences via the primers and then performed several steps including sequence unification, clustering and alignment to identify enriched sequences. Three enriched sequences were synthesised for further analysis, two of which showed sequence similarities. These sequences exhibited binding to the recombinant CD73 with KD values of 10 nM and 3.5 nM when tested by surface plasmon resonance. Truncated variants of these aptamers and variants where the LNA nucleotides were substituted for the DNA equivalent also exhibited affinity for the recombinant CD73 in the low nanomolar range. In enzyme inhibition assays with recombinant CD73 the aptamer sequences were able to decrease the activity of the protein. However, the aptamers exhibited no binding to cellular CD73 by flow cytometry analysis likely since the epitope recognised by the aptamer was not available for binding on the cellular protein.

  5. Construction of an oral recombinant DNA vaccine from H pylori neutrophil activating protein and its immunogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Sun; Zhao-Shen Li; Zhen-Xing Tu; Guo-Ming Xu; Yi-Qi Du

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S.typhimurium) strain harboring the H pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP) gene as an oral recombinant DNA vaccine, and to evaluate its immunogenicity.METHODS: By genetic engineering methods, the genomic DNA of H pylori was extracted as a template. The total length of the HP-NAP gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pBT vector for sequencing and BLAST analysis, then subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pIRES followed by PCR identification and restriction enzyme digestion. The identified recombinant plasmid pIRES-NAP was transfected into COS-7 cells for target fusion protein expression, and its antigenicity was detected by Western blotting. Then the recombinant plasmid was transformed into a live attenuated S. typhimurium strain SL7207 as an oral vaccine strain, and its immunogenicity was evaluated with animal experiments.RESULTS: A 435 bp product was cloned using high homology with HP-NAP gene in GenBank (more than 98%). With identification by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion, a recompinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES-NAP containing the HP-NAP gene of H pylori was successfully constructed. The expressed target protein had a specific reaction with H pylor(i) whole cell antibody and showed a single strip result detected by Western blotting. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant DNA vaccine strain SL7207 (pIRES-NAP) also induced a specific immune response.CONCLUSION: The successful construction of HP-NAP oral DNA vaccine with good immunogenicity may help to further investigate its immunoprotection effects and develop vaccine against H pylori infection.

  6. Identification of a DNA binding protein that recognizes the nonamer recombinational signal sequence of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, B D; Desiderio, S V

    1987-10-01

    Extracts of nuclei from B- and T-lymphoid cells contain a protein that binds specifically to the conserved nonamer DNA sequence within the recombinational signals of immunoglobulin genes. Complexes with DNA fragments from four kappa light-chain joining (J) segments have the same electrophoretic mobility. Nonamer-containing DNA fragments from heavy-chain and light-chain genes compete for binding. Within the 5'-flanking DNA of the J kappa 4 gene segment, the binding site has been localized to a 27-base-pair interval spanning the nonamer region. The binding activity is recovered as a single peak after ion-exchange chromatography. The site of binding of the protein and its presence in nuclei of lymphoid cells suggest that it may function in the assembly of immunoglobulin genes.

  7. Ultrafine anaphase bridges, broken DNA and illegitimate recombination induced by a replication fork barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofueva, Sevil; Osman, Fekret; Lorenz, Alexander; Steinacher, Roland; Castagnetti, Stefania; Ledesma, Jennifer; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Most DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in S- and G2-phase cells are repaired accurately by Rad51-dependent sister chromatid recombination. However, a minority give rise to gross chromosome rearrangements (GCRs), which can result in disease/death. What determines whether a DSB is repaired accurately or inaccurately is currently unclear. We provide evidence that suggests that perturbing replication by a non-programmed protein–DNA replication fork barrier results in the persistence of replication intermediates (most likely regions of unreplicated DNA) into mitosis, which results in anaphase bridge formation and ultimately to DNA breakage. However, unlike previously characterised replication-associated DSBs, these breaks are repaired mainly by Rad51-independent processes such as single-strand annealing, and are therefore prone to generate GCRs. These data highlight how a replication-associated DSB can be predisposed to give rise to genome rearrangements in eukaryotes. PMID:21576223

  8. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettier, Gaëlle; Feng, Q.; Mayolo, A.A. de

    2006-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a source of genomic instability and the loss of heterozygosity in mitotic cells. Since these events pose a severe health risk, it is important to understand the molecular events that cause spontaneous HR. In eukaryotes, high levels of HR are a normal feature...... of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most...... spontaneous mitotic HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by DNA lesions other than DSBs. Specifically, we describe a class of rad52 mutants that are fully proficient in inter- and intra-chromosomal mitotic HR, yet at the same time fail to repair DNA DSBs. The conclusions are drawn from genetic analyses...

  9. Early days of DNA repair: discovery of nucleotide excision repair and homology-dependent recombinational repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, W Dean

    2013-12-13

    The discovery of nucleotide excision repair in 1964 showed that DNA could be repaired by a mechanism that removed the damaged section of a strand and replaced it accurately by using the remaining intact strand as the template. This result showed that DNA could be actively metabolized in a process that had no precedent. In 1968, experiments describing postreplication repair, a process dependent on homologous recombination, were reported. The authors of these papers were either at Yale University or had prior Yale connections. Here we recount some of the events leading to these discoveries and consider the impact on further research at Yale and elsewhere.

  10. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  11. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  12. Evaluation of the efficiency and utility of recombinant enzyme-free seamless DNA cloning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Motohashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Simple and low-cost recombinant enzyme-free seamless DNA cloning methods have recently become available. In vivo Escherichia coli cloning (iVEC can directly transform a mixture of insert and vector DNA fragments into E. coli, which are ligated by endogenous homologous recombination activity in the cells. Seamless ligation cloning extract (SLiCE cloning uses the endogenous recombination activity of E. coli cellular extracts in vitro to ligate insert and vector DNA fragments. An evaluation of the efficiency and utility of these methods is important in deciding the adoption of a seamless cloning method as a useful tool. In this study, both seamless cloning methods incorporated inserting DNA fragments into linearized DNA vectors through short (15–39 bp end homology regions. However, colony formation was 30–60-fold higher with SLiCE cloning in end homology regions between 15 and 29 bp than with the iVEC method using DH5α competent cells. E. coli AQ3625 strains, which harbor a sbcA gene mutation that activates the RecE homologous recombination pathway, can be used to efficiently ligate insert and vector DNA fragments with short-end homology regions in vivo. Using AQ3625 competent cells in the iVEC method improved the rate of colony formation, but the efficiency and accuracy of SLiCE cloning were still higher. In addition, the efficiency of seamless cloning methods depends on the intrinsic competency of E. coli cells. The competency of chemically competent AQ3625 cells was lower than that of competent DH5α cells, in all cases of chemically competent cell preparations using the three different methods. Moreover, SLiCE cloning permits the use of both homemade and commercially available competent cells because it can use general E. coli recA− strains such as DH5α as host cells for transformation. Therefore, between the two methods, SLiCE cloning provides both higher efficiency and better utility than the iVEC method for seamless DNA plasmid

  13. A BAC-bacterial recombination method to generate physically linked multiple gene reporter DNA constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Shiaochin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporter gene mice are valuable animal models for biological research providing a gene expression readout that can contribute to cellular characterization within the context of a developmental process. With the advancement of bacterial recombination techniques to engineer reporter gene constructs from BAC genomic clones and the generation of optically distinguishable fluorescent protein reporter genes, there is an unprecedented capability to engineer more informative transgenic reporter mouse models relative to what has been traditionally available. Results We demonstrate here our first effort on the development of a three stage bacterial recombination strategy to physically link multiple genes together with their respective fluorescent protein (FP reporters in one DNA fragment. This strategy uses bacterial recombination techniques to: (1 subclone genes of interest into BAC linking vectors, (2 insert desired reporter genes into respective genes and (3 link different gene-reporters together. As proof of concept, we have generated a single DNA fragment containing the genes Trap, Dmp1, and Ibsp driving the expression of ECFP, mCherry, and Topaz FP reporter genes, respectively. Using this DNA construct, we have successfully generated transgenic reporter mice that retain two to three gene readouts. Conclusion The three stage methodology to link multiple genes with their respective fluorescent protein reporter works with reasonable efficiency. Moreover, gene linkage allows for their common chromosomal integration into a single locus. However, the testing of this multi-reporter DNA construct by transgenesis does suggest that the linkage of two different genes together, despite their large size, can still create a positional effect. We believe that gene choice, genomic DNA fragment size and the presence of endogenous insulator elements are critical variables.

  14. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as novel carrier for oral DNA vaccines in Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nana; Xu, Kun; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yuwan; Bai, Yichun; Zhang, Xiaohan; Han, Baoquan; Chen, Zhilong; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Oral delivery of DNA vaccines represents a promising vaccinating method for fish. Recombinant yeast has been proved to be a safe carrier for delivering antigen proteins and DNAs to some species in vivo. However, whether recombinant yeast can be used to deliver functional DNAs for vaccination to fish is still unknown. In this study, red crucian carp (Carassius auratus) was orally administrated with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring CMV-EGFP expression cassette. On day 5 post the first vaccination, EGFP expression in the hindgut was detected under fluorescence microscope. To further study whether the delivered gene could induce specific immune responses, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) was used as immunogen, and oral administrations were conducted with recombinant S. cerevisiae harboring pCMV-OVA mammalian gene expression cassette as gene delivery or pADH1-OVA yeast gene expression cassette as protein delivery. Each administration was performed with three different doses, and the OVA-specific serum antibody was detected in all the experimental groups by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA assay also revealed that pCMV-OVA group with lower dose (pCMV-OVA-L) and pADH1-OVA group with moderate dose (pADH1-OVA-M) triggered relatively stronger antibody response than the other two doses. Moreover, the antibody level induced by pCMV-OVA-L group was significantly higher than pADH1-OVA-M group at the same serum dilutions. All the results suggested that recombinant yeast can be used as a potential carrier for oral DNA vaccines and would help to develop more practical strategies to control infectious diseases in aquaculture.

  15. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  16. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  17. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH. A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL, 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL, and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  18. Tomato protoplast DNA transformation : physical linkage and recombination of exogenous DNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Maarten; Koornneef, Maarten; Zabel, Pim; Hille, Jacques

    1987-01-01

    Tomato protoplasts have been transformed with plasmid DNA's, containing a chimeric kanamycin resistance gene and putative tomato origins of replication. A calcium phosphate-DNA mediated transformation procedure was employed in combination with either polyethylene glycol or polyvinyl alcohol. There w

  19. Tomato protoplast DNA transformation : physical linkage and recombination of exogenous DNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Maarten; Koornneef, Maarten; Zabel, Pim; Hille, Jacques

    1987-01-01

    Tomato protoplasts have been transformed with plasmid DNA's, containing a chimeric kanamycin resistance gene and putative tomato origins of replication. A calcium phosphate-DNA mediated transformation procedure was employed in combination with either polyethylene glycol or polyvinyl alcohol. There w

  20. Approach to the classical radiation biology. Ionizing radiation effects and repair mechanism of DNA double strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2000-09-01

    Split-dose recovery has been observed under a variety of experimental conditions in many cell systems and believed to be the recovery of sublethal damage (SLD). It is considered to be one of the most widespread and important cellular responses in clinical radiotherapy. To study the molecular mechanism of this recovery, we analyzed the knockout mutants KU70{sup -/-}, RAD54{sup -/-}, and KU70{sup -/-}/ RAD54{sup -/-} of the chicken B-cell line, DT40. Rad54 participates in the homologous recombinational (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), while Ku proteins are involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Split-dose recovery was observed in the parent DT40 and KU70{sup -/-} cells. Moreover the split-dose survival enhancement had all of the characteristics of SLD recovery that had been demonstrated earlier: e.g., the reappearance of the shoulder of the survival curve with dose fractionation; repair at 25degC; and inhibition by the antibiotic actinomycin D. These results strongly suggest that SLD recovery is due to DSB repair via or mediated by HR, and that these breaks constitute SLD. The tonicity-sensitive potentially lethal damage (PLD) recovery was also found only in DT40 and KU70 {sup -/-} cells. Delayed-plating PLD recovery may be controlled by NHEJ repair that works through the cell cycle. These results lead to the conclusion that the repair of DSBs could explain the classical operational recovery phenomena. We have also investigated RBE/LET using those mutants. (author)

  1. Assembly of nucleosomal arrays from recombinant core histones and nucleosome positioning DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Ryan A; Kalashnikova, Anna A; Muthurajan, Uma M; Porter-Goff, Mary E; Luger, Karolin; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2013-09-10

    Core histone octamers that are repetitively spaced along a DNA molecule are called nucleosomal arrays. Nucleosomal arrays are obtained in one of two ways: purification from in vivo sources, or reconstitution in vitro from recombinant core histones and tandemly repeated nucleosome positioning DNA. The latter method has the benefit of allowing for the assembly of a more compositionally uniform and precisely positioned nucleosomal array. Sedimentation velocity experiments in the analytical ultracentrifuge yield information about the size and shape of macromolecules by analyzing the rate at which they migrate through solution under centrifugal force. This technique, along with atomic force microscopy, can be used for quality control, ensuring that the majority of DNA templates are saturated with nucleosomes after reconstitution. Here we describe the protocols necessary to reconstitute milligram quantities of length and compositionally defined nucleosomal arrays suitable for biochemical and biophysical studies of chromatin structure and function.

  2. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  3. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  4. The effect of thermal dose on hyperthermia-mediated inhibition of DNA repair through homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tempel, Nathalie; Laffeber, Charlie; Odijk, Hanny; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; van Rhoon, Gerard C; Franckena, Martine; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-07-04

    Hyperthermia has a number of biological effects that sensitize tumors to radiotherapy in the range between 40-44 °C. One of these effects is heat-induced degradation of BRCA2 that in turn causes reduced RAD51 focus formation, which results in an attenuation of DNA repair through homologous recombination. Prompted by this molecular insight into how hyperthermia attenuates homologous recombination, we now quantitatively explore time and temperature dynamics of hyperthermia on BRCA2 levels and RAD51 focus formation in cell culture models, and link this to their clonogenic survival capacity after irradiation (0-6 Gy). For treatment temperatures above 41 °C, we found a decrease in cell survival, an increase in sensitization towards irradiation, a decrease of BRCA2 protein levels, and altered RAD51 focus formation. When the temperatures exceeded 43 °C, we found that hyperthermia alone killed more cells directly, and that processes other than homologous recombination were affected by the heat. This study demonstrates that optimal inhibition of HR is achieved by subjecting cells to hyperthermia at 41-43 °C for 30 to 60 minutes. Our data provides a guideline for the clinical application of novel combination treatments that could exploit hyperthermia's attenuation of homologous recombination, such as the combination of hyperthermia with PARP-inhibitors for non-BRCA mutations carriers.

  5. Homologous recombination of exogenous DNA with the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius genome: properties and uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Norio; Grogan, Dennis W

    2005-12-01

    In order to quantify recombination between exogenous DNA and the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius chromosome, we electroporated pyrE (uracil-auxtotrophic) recipient strains with functional pyrE sequences and counted Pyr+ transformants by direct plating. Certain culture and post-electroporation conditions increased the yield of Pyr+ recombinants from non-replicating pyrE plasmid, whereas cognate methylation of SuaI restriction sites in the plasmid decreased it. Recombination of linear DNAs with the S. acidocaldarius genome was proportional to the length of a limiting overlap, but even synthetic oligonucleotides produced reasonable numbers of recombinants with appropriate recipient strains. To investigate uses of this latter property, we electroporated an 18-bp pyrE deletion mutant with mixtures of synthetic oligonucleotides altering glycine-55 of the orotate phosphoribosyl transferase encoded by pyrE. Pyr+ transformants were recovered in which this codon was converted to each of the alternatives encoded by the oligonucleotide mixtures, thereby identifying five amino acid substitutions tolerated at this position of the thermostable enzyme.

  6. Recruitment of RAG1 and RAG2 to Chromatinized DNA during V(D)J Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Keerthi; Schatz, David G

    2015-11-01

    V(D)J recombination is initiated by the binding of the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins to recombination signal sequences (RSSs) that consist of conserved heptamer and nonamer sequences separated by a spacer of either 12 or 23 bp. Here, we used RAG-inducible pro-B v-Abl cell lines in conjunction with chromatin immunoprecipitation to better understand the protein and RSS requirements for RAG recruitment to chromatin. Using a catalytic mutant form of RAG1 to prevent recombination, we did not observe cooperation between RAG1 and RAG2 in their recruitment to endogenous Jκ gene segments over a 48-h time course. Using retroviral recombination substrates, we found that RAG1 was recruited inefficiently to substrates lacking an RSS or containing a single RSS, better to substrates with two 12-bp RSSs (12RSSs) or two 23-bp RSSs (23RSSs), and more efficiently to a substrate with a 12/23RSS pair. RSS mutagenesis demonstrated a major role for the nonamer element in RAG1 binding, and correspondingly, a cryptic RSS consisting of a repeat of CA dinucleotides, which poorly re-creates the nonamer, was ineffective in recruiting RAG1. Our findings suggest that 12RSS-23RSS cooperation (the "12/23 rule") is important not only for regulating RAG-mediated DNA cleavage but also for the efficiency of RAG recruitment to chromatin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of chaperone effects on soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli: effect of free DnaK level on temperature-induced recombinant streptokinase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagurunathan, Balaji; Jayaraman, Guhan

    2008-06-01

    Modeling and analysis of genetic networks have become increasingly important in the investigation of cellular processes. The genetic networks involved in cellular stress response can have a critical effect on the productivity of recombinant proteins. In this work, it was found that the temperature-inducible expression system for the production of soluble recombinant streptokinase in Escherichia coli resulted in a lower productivity compared to the chemically-induced system. To investigate the effect of the induced cellular response due to temperature up-shift a model-based approach is adopted. The role played by the major molecular chaperone teams DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroEL-GroES on the productivity of recombinant streptokinase was experimentally determined. Based on these investigations, a detailed mechanistic mathematical model was developed for the cellular response during the temperature-induced recombinant streptokinase production. The model simulations were found to have a good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The mechanistic mathematical model was validated with the experiments conducted on a sigma(32) mutant strain. Detailed analysis of the parameter sensitivities of the model indicated that the level of free DnaK chaperone in the cell has the major effect on the productivity of recombinant streptokinase during temperature induction. Analysis of the model simulations also shows that down regulation or selective redirection of the heat shock proteins could be a better way of manipulating the cellular stress response than overexpression or deletion. In other words, manipulating the system properties resulting from the interaction of the components is better than manipulating the individual components. Although our results are specific to a recombinant protein (streptokinase) and the expression system (E. coli), we believe that such a systems-biological approach has several advantages over conventional experimental approaches and could be in

  9. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2016-03-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3' single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks.

  10. [The applications of thermostable ligase chain reaction in facilitating DNA recombination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangda, Zhou; Xiao, Song; Cong, Huai; Haiyan, Sun; Hongyan, Chen; Daru, Lu

    2016-02-01

    The traditional Type Ⅱ restriction enzyme-based method is restricted by the purification steps, and therefore, cannot be applied to specific DNA assembly in chaotic system. To solve this problem, Thermostable Ligase Chain Reaction (TLCR) was introduced in the process of DNA assembly and capture. This technique combines the feature of thermostable DNA ligase and sequence specific oligo ligation template, "Helper", to achieve specific assembly of target fragments and exponential increase of products in multiple thermocyclings. Two plasmid construction experiments were carried out in order to test the feasibility and practical performance of TLCR. One was that, TLCR was used to specifically capture a 1.5 kb fragment into vector from an unpurified chaotic system which contained 7 different sizes of fragments. The results showed that the capturing accuracy was around 80%, which proved the feasibility and accuracy of using TLCR to specific assembly of DNA fragments in a complicated mixed system. In the other experiment, TLCR was used to capture two fragments (total length was 27 kb) from Hind Ⅲ digestion of Lambda genome into vector by order. The results also showed an accuracy of around 80%. As demonstrated in the results, TLCR can simplify the process of DNA recombination experiments and is suitable for the assembly of multiple and large DNA fragments. This technique can provide convenience to biological experiments.

  11. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lettier

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is a source of genomic instability and the loss of heterozygosity in mitotic cells. Since these events pose a severe health risk, it is important to understand the molecular events that cause spontaneous HR. In eukaryotes, high levels of HR are a normal feature of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most spontaneous mitotic HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by DNA lesions other than DSBs. Specifically, we describe a class of rad52 mutants that are fully proficient in inter- and intra-chromosomal mitotic HR, yet at the same time fail to repair DNA DSBs. The conclusions are drawn from genetic analyses, evaluation of the consequences of DSB repair failure at the DNA level, and examination of the cellular re-localization of Rad51 and mutant Rad52 proteins after introduction of specific DSBs. In further support of our conclusions, we show that, as in wild-type strains, UV-irradiation induces HR in these rad52 mutants, supporting the view that DNA nicks and single-stranded gaps, rather than DSBs, are major sources of spontaneous HR in mitotic yeast cells.

  12. Effect of DNA binding on geminate CO recombination kinetics in CooA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas; Champion, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CooA proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding to RrCooA. The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes takes place on ultrafast timescales but remains non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the timescale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in RrCooA relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Analysis of our data reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted.

  13. Recombinant expression and purification of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Aliivibrio salmonicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Adele; Pedersen, Hege

    2014-05-01

    The genome of the psychrophilic fish-pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida encodes a putative ATP-dependent DNA ligase in addition to a housekeeping NAD-dependent enzyme. In order to study the structure and activity of the ATP dependent ligase in vitro we have undertaken its recombinant production and purification from an Escherichia coli based expression system. Expression and purification of this protein presented two significant challenges. First, the gene product was moderately toxic to E. coli cells, second it was necessary to remove the large amounts of E. coli DNA present in bacterial lysates without contamination of the protein preparation by nucleases which might interfere with future assaying. The toxicity problem was overcome by fusion of the putative ligase to large solubility tags such as maltose-binding protein (MBP) or Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and DNA was removed by treatment with a nuclease which could be inhibited by reducing agents. As the A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase gene encodes a predicted leader peptide, both the full-length and mature forms of the protein were produced. Both possessed ATP-dependent DNA ligase activity, but the truncated form was significantly more active. Here we detail the first reported production, purification and preliminary characterization of active A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

  14. Using recombinant DNA technology for the development of live-attenuated dengue vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chi; Butler, Michael; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2012-07-15

    Dramatic increases in dengue (DEN) incidence and disease severity have been reported, in great part due to the geographic expansion of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. One result is the expanded co-circulation of all dengue 1-4 serotype viruses (DENV) in urban areas worldwide, especially in South and South-East Asia, and South America. DEN disease severity ranges from asymptomatic infections to febrile dengue fevers (DF) to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). There is an urgent need for a safe and effective tetravalent DEN vaccine. Several live attenuated, tetravalent DEN vaccine candidates have been generated by recombinant DNA technology; these candidates are capable of providing immunity to all four DENV serotypes. In this paper we review (a) recombinant live-attenuated DEN vaccine candidates in terms of deletion, antigen chimerization, and the introduction of adaptive mutations; (b) strategies for improving tetravalent vaccine attenuation; and (c) live-attenuated DENV vaccine development.

  15. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3′ overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. Depletion of TRF2 strongly inhibited HR and delayed the formation of Rad51 foci after γ-irradiation, whereas overexpression of TRF2 stimulated HR. Depletion of TRF2 had no effect on nonhomologous end-joining, and overexpression of TRF2 inhibited nonhomologous end-joining. We propose, based on our results and on the ability of TRF2 to mediate strand invasion, that TRF2 plays an essential role in HR by facilitating the formation of early recombination intermediates. PMID:17670947

  16. RecBCD Enzyme "Chi Recognition" Mutants Recognize Chi Recombination Hotspots in the Right DNA Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Susan K; Sharp, Jake W; Smith, Gerald R

    2016-09-01

    RecBCD enzyme is a complex, three-subunit protein machine essential for the major pathway of DNA double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli Upon encountering a Chi recombination-hotspot during DNA unwinding, RecBCD nicks DNA to produce a single-stranded DNA end onto which it loads RecA protein. Conformational changes that regulate RecBCD's helicase and nuclease activities are induced upon its interaction with Chi, defined historically as 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Chi is thought to be recognized as single-stranded DNA passing through a tunnel in RecC. To define the Chi recognition-domain in RecC and thus the mechanism of the RecBCD-Chi interaction, we altered by random mutagenesis eight RecC amino acids lining the tunnel. We screened for loss of Chi activity with Chi at one site in bacteriophage λ. The 25 recC mutants analyzed thoroughly had undetectable or strongly reduced Chi-hotspot activity with previously reported Chi sites. Remarkably, most of these mutants had readily detectable, and some nearly wild-type, activity with Chi at newly generated Chi sites. Like wild-type RecBCD, these mutants had Chi activity that responded dramatically (up to fivefold, equivalent to Chi's hotspot activity) to nucleotide changes flanking 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Thus, these and previously published RecC mutants thought to be Chi-recognition mutants are actually Chi context-dependence mutants. Our results fundamentally alter the view that Chi is a simple 8-bp sequence recognized by the RecC tunnel. We propose that Chi hotspots have dual nucleotide sequence interactions, with both the RecC tunnel and the RecB nuclease domain.

  17. Immunogenicity of two different dosages (10 and 5 μg) of recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine in healthy neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Del Cancho (R.); P.M. Grosheie (P.); M. Voogd-Schotanus (M.); W. Huisman (Willem); R.A. Heijtink; S.W. Schalm (Solko)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe immunogenicity of a half (5 μg) and a full (10 μg) dosage of recombinant DNA yeast-derived hepatitis B vaccine (HB-Vax-DNA) in healthy neonates was assessed in order to compare two candidate dosages of vaccine. After randomization 174 newborns of HBsAg-negative mothers entered the st

  18. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H. Carrick

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  19. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2015-12-29

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  20. CONSECUTIVE IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT FOWLPOX VIRUS AND PLASMID DNA FOR ENHANCING CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗坤; 金宁一; 郭志儒; 秦云龙; 郭炎; 方厚华; 安汝国; 殷震

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the influence of consecutive immunization on cellular and humoral immunity in mice. Methods: We evaluated a consecutive immunization strategy of priming with recombinant fowlpox virus vUTALG and boosting with plasmid DNA pcDNAG encoding HIV-1 capsid protein Gag. Results: In immunized mice, the number of CD4+ T cells from splenic lymphocytes increased significantly and the proliferation response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS elevated markedly and HIV-1-specific antibody response could be induced. Conclusion: Consecutive immunization could increase cellular and humoral immunity responses in mice.

  1. Ago2 facilitates Rad51 recruitment and DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Min; Wei, Wei; Li, Ming Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions and pose a major threat to genome stability if not properly repaired. We and others have previously shown that a class of DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) is produced from sequences around DSB sites. DiRNAs are associated with Argonaute...... (Ago) proteins and play an important role in DSB repair, though the mechanism through which they act remains unclear. Here, we report that the role of diRNAs in DSB repair is restricted to repair by homologous recombination (HR) and that it specifically relies on the effector protein Ago2 in mammalian...

  2. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier J Becherel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2, plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops, and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  3. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier J Becherel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2, plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops, and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  4. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherel, Olivier J; Yeo, Abrey J; Stellati, Alissa; Heng, Evelyn Y H; Luff, John; Suraweera, Amila M; Woods, Rick; Fleming, Jean; Carrie, Dianne; McKinney, Kristine; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chuxia; Lavin, Martin F

    2013-04-01

    Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  5. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  6. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkx, Patrick M F; Janzen, Thomas; Sørensen, Kim I; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Johansen, Eric

    2014-08-29

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes.

  7. Recombinant poxvirus boosting of DNA-primed rhesus monkeys augments peak but not memory T lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Sampa; Barouch, Dan H; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Lord, Carol I; Krivulka, Georgia R; Yu, Faye; Beddall, Margaret H; Gorgone, Darci A; Lifton, Michelle A; Miura, Ayako; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Markham, Phillip D; Parrish, John; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Schmitz, Jörn E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shiver, John W; Montefiori, David C; Panicali, Dennis; Letvin, Norman L

    2004-07-27

    Although a consensus has emerged that an HIV vaccine should elicit a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, the characteristics of an effective vaccine-induced T lymphocyte response remain unclear. We explored this issue in the simian human immunodeficiency virus/rhesus monkey model in the course of assessing the relative immunogenicity of vaccine regimens that included a cytokine-augmented plasmid DNA prime and a boost with DNA or recombinant pox vectors. Recombinant vaccinia virus, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), and recombinant fowlpox were comparable in their immunogenicity. Moreover, whereas the magnitude of the peak vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses in the recombinant pox virus-boosted monkeys was substantially greater than that seen in the monkeys immunized with plasmid DNA alone, the magnitudes of recombinant pox boosted CTL responses decayed rapidly and were comparable to those of the DNA-alone-vaccinated monkeys by the time of viral challenge. Consistent with these comparable memory T cell responses, the clinical protection seen in all groups of experimentally vaccinated monkeys was similar. This study, therefore, indicates that the steady-state memory, rather than the peak effector vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses, may be the critical immune correlate of protection for a CTL-based HIV vaccine.

  8. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus DNA replicative intermediate forms by recombinant interferon-γ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Khalid Parvez; Deepak Sehgal; Shiv Kumar Sarin; Seemi Farhat Basir; Shahid Jameel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the in vitro anti-HBV activity of recombinant human IFN-γ, alone and in combination with lamivudine.METHODS: A recombinant baculovirus-HBV/HepG2 culture system was developed which could support productive HBV infection in vitro. Expression of HBsAg and HBeAg in infected HepG2 culture medium was detected by commercial enzyme immunoassays. HBV DNA replication intermediates were detected in infected cells by Southern hybridization and viral DNA load was determined by dot hybridization.RESULTS: IFN-γ at 0.1 to 5 μg/L efficiently down regulated HBsAg expression in transduced HepG2 cells.At 5 μg/L, IFN-γ also suppressed HBV DNA replication in these cells. While treatment with a combination of lamivudine and IFN-γ showed no additive effect,sequential treatment first with lamivudine and then IFN-γ was found to be promising. In this culture system the best HBV suppression was observed with a pulse of 2 μmol/L lamivudine for two days, followed by 1 μg/L IFN-γ for another four days. Compared to treatment with lamivudine alone, the sequential use of 0.2 μmol/L lamivudine for two days, followed by 5 μg/L IFN-γ for six days showed a 72% reduction in HBV cccDNA pool.CONCLUSION: This in vitro study warrants further evaluation of a combination of IFN-γ and lamivudine,especially in IFN-α non-responder chronic hepatitis B patients. A reduced duration of lamivudine treatment would also restrict the emergence of drug-resistant HBV mutants.

  10. DNA end resection controls the balance between homologous and illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Ivanković

    Full Text Available Even a partial loss of function of human RecQ helicase analogs causes adverse effects such as a cancer-prone Werner, Bloom or Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, whereas a complete RecQ deficiency in Escherichia coli is not deleterious for a cell. We show that this puzzling difference is due to different mechanisms of DNA double strand break (DSB resection in E. coli and humans. Coupled helicase and RecA loading activities of RecBCD enzyme, which is found exclusively in bacteria, are shown to be responsible for channeling recombinogenic 3' ending tails toward productive, homologous and away from nonproductive, aberrant recombination events. On the other hand, in recB1080/recB1067 mutants, lacking RecBCD's RecA loading activity while preserving its helicase activity, DSB resection is mechanistically more alike that in eukaryotes (by its uncoupling from a recombinase polymerization step, and remarkably, the role of RecQ also becomes akin of its eukaryotic counterparts in a way of promoting homologous and suppressing illegitimate recombination. The sickly phenotype of recB1080 recQ mutant was further exacerbated by inactivation of an exonuclease I, which degrades the unwound 3' tail. The respective recB1080 recQ xonA mutant showed poor viability, DNA repair and homologous recombination deficiency, and very increased illegitimate recombination. These findings demonstrate that the metabolism of the 3' ending overhang is a decisive factor in tuning the balance of homologous and illegitimate recombination in E. coli, thus highlighting the importance of regulating DSB resection for preserving genome integrity. recB mutants used in this study, showing pronounced RecQ helicase and exonuclease I dependence, make up a suitable model system for studying mechanisms of DSB resection in bacteria. Also, these mutants might be useful for investigating functions of the conserved RecQ helicase family members, and congruently serve as a simpler, more defined model system

  11. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  12. Homologous recombination preferentially repairs heat-induced DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Kajihara, Atsuhisa; Kirita, Tadaaki; Pittman, Douglas L; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-11-13

    Heat shock induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the precise mechanism of repairing heat-induced damage is unclear. Here, we investigated the DNA repair pathways involved in cell death induced by heat shock. B02, a specific inhibitor of human RAD51 (homologous recombination; HR), and NU7026, a specific inhibitor of DNA-PK (non-homologous end-joining; NHEJ), were used for survival assays of human cancer cell lines with different p53-gene status. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Lig4 (NHEJ) and/or Rad54 (HR) were used for survival assays and a phosphorylated histone H2AX at Ser139 (γH2AX) assay. MEFs lacking Rad51d (HR) were used for survival assays. SPD8 cells were used to measure HR frequency after heat shock. Human cancer cells were more sensitive to heat shock in the presence of B02 despite their p53-gene status, and the effect of B02 on heat sensitivity was specific to the G2 phase. Rad54-deficient MEFs were sensitive to heat shock and showed prolonged γH2AX signals following heat shock. Rad51d-deficient MEFs were also sensitive to heat shock. Moreover, heat shock-stimulated cells had increased HR. The HR pathway plays an important role in the survival of mammalian cells against death induced by heat shock via the repair of heat-induced DNA DSBs.

  13. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part I. DNA technology and recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical biotechnology has a long tradition and is rooted in the last century, first exemplified by penicillin and streptomycin as low molecular weight biosynthetic compounds. Today, pharmaceutical biotechnology still has its fundamentals in fermentation and bioprocessing, but the paradigmatic change affected by biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences has led to an updated definition. The biotechnology revolution redrew the research, development, production and even marketing processes of drugs. Powerful new instruments and biotechnology related scientific disciplines (genomics, proteomics) make it possible to examine and exploit the behavior of proteins and molecules. Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies (genetic, protein, and metabolic engineering) allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins, and biochemicals from naturally nonproducing cells. This technology, now approximately 25 years old, is becoming one of the most important technologies developed in the 20(th) century. Pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes were the first biotech products on the world market made by means of rDNA. Despite important advances regarding rDNA applications in mammalian cells, yeasts still represent attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review we describe these processes.

  14. Recombinant production of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator and characterization of its DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Krishnan, Gopala; Ng, Ching Ching

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the recombinant production of a biologically active Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator, i.e., Z-encoded broadly reactive activator (ZEBRA), that recognized specific DNA motifs. We used auto-induction for histidine-tagged BZLF1 expression in Escherichia coli and immobilized cobalt affinity membrane chromatography for protein purification under native conditions. We obtained the purified BZLF1 at a yield of 5.4mg per gram of wet weight cells at 75% purity, in which 27% of the recombinant BZLF1 remained biologically active. The recombinant BZLF1 bound to oligonucleotides containing ZEBRA response elements, either AP-1 or ZIIIB, but not a ZIIIB mutant. The recombinant BZLF1 showed a specific DNA-binding activity which could be useful for functional studies.

  15. Use of DNA and recombinant canarypox viral (ALVAC) vectors for equine herpes virus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, J M; Fischer, L; Baudu, Ph; Guigal, P M; Sindle, T; Mumford, J A; Audonnet, J C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, experimental canarypox virus (ALVAC) and plasmid DNA recombinant vaccines expressing the gB, gC and gD glycoproteins of EHV-1 were assessed for their ability to protect conventional ponies against a respiratory challenge with EHV-1. In addition, potential means of enhancing serological responses in horses to ALVAC and DNA vaccination were explored. These included co-administration of the antigen with conventional adjuvants, complexation with DMRIE-DOPE and co-expression of the antigen along with equine GM-CSF. Groups of EHV primed ponies were vaccinated twice intra-muscularly with one dose of the appropriate test vaccine at an interval of 5 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after the second vaccination, ponies were infected intra-nasally with the virulent Ab4 strain of EHV-1 after which they were observed clinically and sampled for virological investigations. The results demonstrated that DNA and ALVAC vaccination markedly reduced virus excretion after challenge in terms of duration and magnitude, but failed to protect against cell-associated viremia. Noteworthy was the almost complete absence of virus excretion in the group of ponies vaccinated with ALVAC-EHV in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant or DNA plasmid formulated with aluminium phosphate. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of GM-CSF and formulated in DMRIE-DOPE and of the ALVAC vaccine in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant significantly improved virus neutralising antibody responses to EHV-1. These findings indicate that DNA and ALVAC vaccination is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, but that more research is needed to identify the immunodominant protective antigens of EHV-1 and their interaction with the equine immune system.

  16. Generation, characterization, and docking studies of DNA-hydrolyzing recombinant F(ab) antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Haggag S; El-Sehemy, Ahmed A; Fares, Mohamed O; ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    Previously we established a series of catalytic antibodies (catAbs) capable of hydrolyzing DNA prepared by hybridoma technology. A group of these catAbs exhibited high reactivity and substrate specificity. To determine the molecular basis for these catAbs, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the variable regions of this group of antibodies as functional F(ab) fragments. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the expressed light chain (Vκ) germline gene assignments confidently belonged to germline family Vκ1A, gene bb1.1 and GenBank accession number EF672207 while heavy chain variable region V(H) genes belonged to V(H) 1/V(H) J558, gene V130.3 and GenBank accession number EF672221. A well-established expression system based on the pARA7 vector was examined for its ability to produce catalytically active antibodies. Recombinant F(ab) (rF(ab) ) fragments were purified and their hydrolyzing activity was analyzed against supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA (scDNA). The study of rF(ab) provides important information about the potential catalytic activities of antibodies whose structure allows us to understand their basis of catalysis. Molecular surface analysis and docking studies were performed on the molecular interactions between the antibodies and poly(dA9), poly(dG9), poly(dT9), and poly(dC9) oligomers. Surface analysis identified the important sequence motifs at the binding sites, and different effects exerted by arginine and tyrosine residues at different positions in the light and heavy chains. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of the protein DNA surrogate in the investigation of the origin of anti-DNA antibodies. These studies may define important features of DNA catAbs.

  17. Smc5–Smc6 mediate DNA double-strand-break repair by promoting sister-chromatid recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cortes-Ledesma, Felipe; Ira, Gregory; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Uhle, Stefan; Farmer, Sarah; Hwang, Ji-Young; Machin, Felix; Ceschia, Audrey; McAleenan, Alexandra; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta; Clemente-Blanco, Andrés; Vilella-Mitjana, Felip; Ullal, Pranav; Jarmuz, Adam; Leitao, Beatriz; Bressan, Debra; Dotiwala, Farokh; Papusha, Alma; Zhao, Xiaolan; Myung, Kyungjae; Haber, James E.; Aguilera, Andrés; Aragón, Luis

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can arise during DNA replication, or after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, and their correct repair is fundamental for cell survival and genomic stability. Here, we show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is recruited to DSBs de novo to support their repair by homologous recombination between sister chromatids. In addition, we demonstrate that Smc5–Smc6 is necessary to suppress gross chromosomal rearrangements. Our findings show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is essential for genome stability as it promotes repair of DSBs by error-free sister-chromatid recombination (SCR), thereby suppressing inappropriate non-sister recombination events. PMID:16892052

  18. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited...... the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology directed recombination repair. We find that RPA is dispensable for checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation...... and that RPA directly binds RAD52 upon replication stress, suggesting a direct role in recombination repair. In addition we show that inhibition of Chk1 with UCN-01 decreases dissociation of RPA from the chromatin and inhibits association of RAD51 and RAD52 with DNA. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role...

  19. Coexistence of minicircular and a highly rearranged mtDNA molecule suggests that recombination shapes mitochondrial genome organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng; Austin, Andrew D; Johnson, Norman F; Dowton, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Recombination has been proposed as a possible mechanism to explain mitochondrial (mt) gene rearrangements, although the issue of whether mtDNA recombination occurs in animals has been controversial. In this study, we sequenced the entire mt genome of the megaspilid wasp Conostigmus sp., which possessed a highly rearranged mt genome. The sequence of the A+T-rich region contained a number of different types of repeats, similar to those reported previously in the nematode Meloidogyne javanica, in which recombination was discovered. In Conostigmus, we detected the end products of recombination: a range of minicircles. However, using isolated (cloned) fragments of the A+T-rich region, we established that some of these minicircles were found to be polymerase chain reaction (PCR) artifacts. It appears that regions with repeats are prone to PCR template switching or PCR jumping. Nevertheless, there is strong evidence that one minicircle is real, as amplification primers that straddle the putative breakpoint junction produce a single strong amplicon from genomic DNA but not from the cloned A+T-rich region. The results provide support for the direct link between recombination and mt gene rearrangement. Furthermore, we developed a model of recombination which is important for our understanding of mtDNA evolution.

  20. Mitochondrial genome rearrangements in glomus species triggered by homologous recombination between distinct mtDNA haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms.AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence,were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigated podiversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity.We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants.

  1. The ATPase activity of Fml1 is essential for its roles in homologous recombination and DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, S; Whitby, MC

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, the DNA helicase Fml1, which is an orthologue of human FANCM, is a key component of the machinery that drives and governs homologous recombination (HR). During the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by HR, it limits the occurrence of potentially deleterious crossover recombinants, whereas at stalled replication forks, it promotes HR to aid their recovery. Here, we have mutated conserved residues in Fml1's Walker A (K99R) and Walker B (D196N) motifs to determine whether its a...

  2. Scaffold functions of 14-3-3 adaptors in B cell immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tonika; Thomas, Lisa M; White, Clayton A; Li, Guideng; Pone, Egest J; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus crucially diversifies antibody biological effector functions. CSR involves the induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression and AID targeting to switch (S) regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. 14-3-3 adaptors specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats, which make up for the core of all IgH locus S regions. They selectively target the upstream and downstream S regions that are set to undergo S-S DNA recombination. We hypothesized that 14-3-3 adaptors function as scaffolds to stabilize CSR enzymatic elements on S regions. Here we demonstrate that all seven 14-3-3β, 14-3-3ε, 14-3-3γ, 14-3-3η, 14-3-3σ, 14-3-3τ and 14-3-3ζ adaptors directly interacted with AID, PKA-Cα (catalytic subunit) and PKA-RIα (regulatory inhibitory subunit) and uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung). 14-3-3 adaptors, however, did not interact with AID C-terminal truncation mutant AIDΔ(180-198) or AIDF193A and AIDL196A point-mutants (which have been shown not to bind to S region DNA and fail to mediate CSR). 14-3-3 adaptors colocalized with AID and replication protein A (RPA) in B cells undergoing CSR. 14-3-3 and AID binding to S region DNA was disrupted by viral protein R (Vpr), an accessory protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), which inhibited CSR without altering AID expression or germline IH-CH transcription. Accordingly, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 directly interact with Vpr, which in turn, also interact with AID, PKA-Cα and Ung. Altogether, our findings suggest that 14-3-3 adaptors play important scaffold functions and nucleate the assembly of multiple CSR factors on S regions. They also show that such assembly can be disrupted by a viral protein, thereby allowing us to hypothesize that small molecule compounds that specifically block 14-3-3 interactions with AID, PKA and/or Ung can be used to inhibit unwanted CSR.

  3. Scaffold functions of 14-3-3 adaptors in B cell immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonika Lam

    Full Text Available Class switch DNA recombination (CSR of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH locus crucially diversifies antibody biological effector functions. CSR involves the induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expression and AID targeting to switch (S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. 14-3-3 adaptors specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats, which make up for the core of all IgH locus S regions. They selectively target the upstream and downstream S regions that are set to undergo S-S DNA recombination. We hypothesized that 14-3-3 adaptors function as scaffolds to stabilize CSR enzymatic elements on S regions. Here we demonstrate that all seven 14-3-3β, 14-3-3ε, 14-3-3γ, 14-3-3η, 14-3-3σ, 14-3-3τ and 14-3-3ζ adaptors directly interacted with AID, PKA-Cα (catalytic subunit and PKA-RIα (regulatory inhibitory subunit and uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung. 14-3-3 adaptors, however, did not interact with AID C-terminal truncation mutant AIDΔ(180-198 or AIDF193A and AIDL196A point-mutants (which have been shown not to bind to S region DNA and fail to mediate CSR. 14-3-3 adaptors colocalized with AID and replication protein A (RPA in B cells undergoing CSR. 14-3-3 and AID binding to S region DNA was disrupted by viral protein R (Vpr, an accessory protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1, which inhibited CSR without altering AID expression or germline IH-CH transcription. Accordingly, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 directly interact with Vpr, which in turn, also interact with AID, PKA-Cα and Ung. Altogether, our findings suggest that 14-3-3 adaptors play important scaffold functions and nucleate the assembly of multiple CSR factors on S regions. They also show that such assembly can be disrupted by a viral protein, thereby allowing us to hypothesize that small molecule compounds that specifically block 14-3-3 interactions with AID, PKA and/or Ung can be used to inhibit unwanted CSR.

  4. Methotrexate induces DNA damage and inhibits homologous recombination repair in choriocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lisha Xie,1,* Tiancen Zhao,1,2,* Jing Cai,1 You Su,1 Zehua Wang,1 Weihong Dong1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital of Wuhan, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of sensitivity to methotrexate (MTX in human choriocarcinoma cells regarding DNA damage response. Methods: Two choriocarcinoma cancer cell lines, JAR and JEG-3, were utilized in this study. An MTX-sensitive osteosarcoma cell line MG63, an MTX-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and an MTX-resistant cervical adenocarcinoma cell line Hela served as controls. Cell viability assay was carried out to assess MTX sensitivity of cell lines. MTX-induced DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the mRNA levels of BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and RAD52. The protein levels of γH2AX, RAD 51 and p53 were analyzed by Western blot. Results: Remarkable DNA strand breaks were observed in MTX-sensitive cell lines (JAR, JEG-3 and MG63 but not in MTX-resistant cancer cells (A2780 and Hela after 48 h of MTX treatment. Only in the choriocarcinoma cells, the expression of homologous recombination (HR repair gene RAD51 was dramatically suppressed by MTX in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied with the increase in p53. Conclusion: The MTX-induced DNA strand breaks accompanied by deficiencies in HR repair may contribute to the hypersensitivity to chemotherapy in choriocarcinoma. Keywords: choriocarcinoma, chemotherapy hypersensitivity, DNA double-strand break, RAD51, p53

  5. DNA as Genetic Material: Revisiting Classical Experiments through an Easy, Practical Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Malagó

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In 1928, Frederick Griffith demonstrated a process of transmission of genetic information by transforming  Pneumococcus. In 1944, Oswald Avery, Colin Munro MacLeod and Maclyn McCarty showed that Griffith´stransformation principle  is DNA. Here, we intend to revisit these classicalexperiments by reproducing them in easier adapted forms, for a practical class given to undergraduate students. The Griffith experiment was reproduced by mixing heat-killed, ampicillin - resistant  E. coliwith live ampicillin -susceptible  E. coli, followed by plating samples in the presence or absence of the antibiotic. Cells were also plated separately as control. Avery’s work was reproduced by pre-treating a purified plasmid harboring the ampicillin resistan ce gene with Dnase I. Treated and untreated plasmids were then used to transform  E. colicells, which were plated in culture media containing ampicillin. The students received a class guide with brief theoretical explanations and protocols to perform the experiments. The original papers by Griffith and Avery  et al. were also provided, along with a list of questions to encourage a discussion on the experimental approach and results obtained. The adapted experiments were successful completed and all expected results were obtained in class. Thus the students effectively revisited the classical experiments which revealed that DNA is the genetic material. Also, the class was very well accepted, as indicated by students’ evaluations. Thus, we presented an inexpens ive, quick class involving important concepts, which can be easily reproduced in any laboratory withminor resources.

  6. Asilomar moments: formative framings in recombinant DNA and solar climate engineering research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Stefan; Low, Sean

    2014-12-28

    We examine the claim that in governance for solar climate engineering research, and especially field tests, there is no need for external governance beyond existing mechanisms such as peer review and environmental impact assessments that aim to assess technically defined risks to the physical environment. By drawing on the historical debate on recombinant DNA research, we show that defining risks is not a technical question but a complex process of narrative formation. Governance emerges from within, and as a response to, narratives of what is at stake in a debate. In applying this finding to the case of climate engineering, we find that the emerging narrative differs starkly from the narrative that gave meaning to rDNA technology during its formative period, with important implications for governance. While the narrative of rDNA technology was closed down to narrowly focus on technical risks, that of climate engineering continues to open up and includes social, political and ethical issues. This suggests that, in order to be legitimate, governance must take into account this broad perception of what constitutes the relevant issues and risks of climate engineering, requiring governance that goes beyond existing mechanisms that focus on technical risks. Even small-scale field tests with negligible impacts on the physical environment warrant additional governance as they raise broader concerns that go beyond the immediate impacts of individual experiments.

  7. Isolation and purification of recombinant proteins, antibodies and plasmid DNA with hydroxyapatite chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite and related stationary phases increasingly play a role in the downstream processing of high-value biological materials, such as recombinant proteins, therapeutic antibodies and pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. Chromatographic hydroxyapatite is an inorganic, ceramic material identical in composition, if not in structure, to calcium phosphate found in human bones and teeth. The interaction of hydroxyapatite with biomacromolecules is complex and highly dynamic, which can make predicting performance difficult, but also allows the design of very selective isolation processes. This review discusses the currently commercially available chromatographic materials, different retention mechanisms supported by these materials and differential exploitation for the design of highly specific isolation procedures. The state of the art of antibody purification by hydroxy- and fluoroapatite is reviewed together with tested routines for method development and implementation. Finally, the isolation of plasmid DNA is discussed, since the purification of DNA therapeutics at a sufficiently large scale is an emerging need in bioprocess development and perhaps the area in bioseparation where apatite chromatography can make its most important contribution to date.

  8. Assessing the function of homologous recombination DNA repair in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M J; Sutton, R E; Forrest, I; Sharrock, R; Lane, M; Kaufmann, A; O'Donnell, R; Edmondson, R J; Wilson, B T; Curtin, N J

    2014-07-08

    Patients with malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) generally have advanced disease with poor survival and few therapeutic options. Cells within MPEs may be used to stratify patients for targeted therapy. Targeted therapy with poly(ADP ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) depends on identifying homologous recombination DNA repair (HRR)-defective cancer cells. We aimed to determine the feasibility of assaying HRR status in MPE cells. A total of 15 MPE samples were collected from consenting patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), mesothelioma and ovarian and breast cancer. Primary cultures were confirmed as epithelial by pancytokeratin, and HRR status was determined by the detection of γH2AX and RAD51 foci following a 24-h exposure to rucaparib, by immunofluorescence microscopy. Massively parallel next-generation sequencing of DNA repair genes was performed on cultured MPE cells. From 15 MPE samples, 13 cultures were successfully established, with HRR function successfully determined in 12 cultures. Four samples - three NSCLC and one mesothelioma - were HRR defective and eight samples - one NSCLC, one mesothelioma, one sarcomatoid, one breast and four ovarian cancers - were HRR functional. No mutations in DNA repair genes were associated with HRR status, but there was probable loss of heterozygosity of FANCG, RPA1 and PARP1. HRR function can be successfully detected in MPE cells demonstrating the potential to stratify patients for targeted therapy with PARPi.

  9. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA prime-protein boost strategy to enhance efficacy of a recombinant pertussis DNA vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-tian LI; Yong-zhang ZHU; Jia-you CHU; Ke DONG; Ping HE; Chun-yan FENG; Bao-yu HU; Shu-min ZHANG; Xiao-kui GUO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate a new strategy to enhance the efficacy of a recombinant pertussis DNA vaccine. The strategy is co-injection with cytokine plasmids as prime, and boosted with purified homologous proteins. Method: A recombinant pertussis DNA vaccine containing the pertussis toxin subunit 1 (PTS1), fragments of the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) gene and pertactin (PRN) gene encoding filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin were constructed. Balb/c mice were immunized with several DNA vaccines and antigen-specific antibodies anti-PTSl, anti-PRN, anti-FHA, cytokines interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IFN-γ, TNF-oc, and spleno-cyte-proliferation assay were used to describe immune responses. Results: The recombinant DNA vaccine could elicit similar immune responses in mice as that of separate plasmids encoding the 3 fragments, respectively. Mice immunized with DNA and boosted with the corresponding protein elicited more antibodies than those that received DNA as boost. In particular, when the mice were co-immunized with murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor plasmids and boosted with proteins, all 4 cytokines and the 3 antigen-specific antibodies were significantly increased compared to the pVAXl group. Anti-PTSl, anti-FHA, IL-4 and TNF-α elicited in the colony stimulating factor (CSF) prime-protein boost group showed significant increase compared to all the other groups. Conclusion: This prime and boost strategy has proven to be very useful in improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against pertussis.

  10. Combined immunity of DNA vector and recombinant vaccinia virus expressing Gag proteins of equine infectious anemia virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Chunming; ZHANG Xiaoyan; WANG Shuhui; LIU Ying; DUAN Danli; SHEN Rongxian; SHAO Yiming

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop a new vaccine candidate for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), gag gene of Chinese donkey leukocyte attenuated strain (EIAV DLV) and its parental virulent strain (EIAV LN) were inserted respectively into the TK region of the Tiantan strain (VV) of vaccinia virus by homologous recombination and the positive clone was confirmed by blue plaque assay. Protein expression was examined by Western blot. Prime and prime-boost procedures were used to immunize mice with two DNA vectors and two recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing EIAV Gag proteins. The results showed that the specific lysis of CTL responses in the DNA+rVV groups was stronger than those in the DNA groups, amounting to 31%. Although the levels of specific antibodies were not significantly different, we could conclude that the recombinant vaccinia virus could boost the cellular responses following DNA vector priming. There was no detectable difference between the immune responses induced by DLV and LN Gag proteins. This data demonstrates that the combined immunity of DNA vector and recombinant vaccinia virus expressing EIAV gag proteins, utilizing the prime-boost procedure, can drive immunized mice to produce powerful cellular responses. These results lay an important foundation for the development of a new EIAV genetic engineering vaccine.

  11. Monitoring the spread of recombinant DNA from field plots with transgenic sugar beet plants by PCR and natural transformation of Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Petra; Wackernagel, Wilfried

    2003-06-01

    Previous studies had shown that recombinant DNA can be detected for several months in soil after the deposition of litter from transgenic (tg) plants. Here we show by PCR monitoring of field releases of tg sugar beet plants that during the growth of the plants the soil close to the plants and also plant material contains recombinant DNA, in the form of extracellular molecules. Surprisingly, the monitoring also revealed the presence of tg DNA in many field plots (30-70%) in which tg plants were never grown. These studies and the further monitoring during other tg sugar beet release experiments by PCR and a novel bioassay (measuring the transforming potential of recombinant DNA for Pseudomonas stutzeri) indicated that recombinant DNA was only detectable in the surface soil of field plots and their vicinity where flowering of the tg beet plants was allowed. Recombinant DNA was found in soil at a distance of 50 m from pollen-producing plants surrounded by a strip with hemp plants as a containment regime. It is concluded that recombinant DNA is deposited in soil during the growth of tg sugar beets and that a major mechanism of recombinant DNA spread in the environment is the dispersal of pollen which allows recombinant DNA to persist in the field plot for at least a year.

  12. Construction of a Plant Transformation-ready Expression cDNA Library for Thellungiella halophila Using Recombination Cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-Song Ni; Zhi-Yong Lei; Xi Chen; David J. Oliver; Cheng-Bin Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Salt cress (Thellungiella halophila), a close relative of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L., is an extremophile that is adapted to harsh saline environments. To mine salt-tolerance genes from this species, we constructed an entry cDNA library from the salt cress plant treated with salt-stress by using a modified cDNA synthesis and an improved recombinationassisted cDNA library construction method that is completely free of manipulations involving restriction enzymes and DNA ligase. This cDNA library construction procedure is significantly simplified and the quality of the cDNA library is improved. This entry cDNA library was subsequently shuttled into the destination binary vector pCB406 designed for plant transformation and expression via recombination-assisted cloning. The library is plant transformation ready and is used to transform Arabidopsis on a large scale in order to create a large collection of transgenic lines for functional gene mining.

  13. SV40 host-substituted variants: a new look at the monkey DNA inserts and recombinant junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Maxine; Winocour, Ernest

    2011-04-10

    The available monkey genomic data banks were examined in order to determine the chromosomal locations of the host DNA inserts in 8 host-substituted SV40 variant DNAs. Five of the 8 variants contained more than one linked monkey DNA insert per tandem repeat unit and in all cases but one, the 19 monkey DNA inserts in the 8 variants mapped to different locations in the monkey genome. The 50 parental DNAs (32 monkey and 18 SV40 DNA segments) which spanned the crossover and flanking regions that participated in monkey/monkey and monkey/SV40 recombinations were characterized by substantial levels of microhomology of up to 8 nucleotides in length; the parental DNAs also exhibited direct and inverted repeats at or adjacent to the crossover sequences. We discuss how the host-substituted SV40 variants arose and the nature of the recombination mechanisms involved.

  14. Transcriptionally active chromatin recruits homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, François; Bugler, Beatrix; Schmidt, Christine K; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Caron, Pierre; Briois, Sébastien; Iacovoni, Jason S; Daburon, Virginie; Miller, Kyle M; Jackson, Stephen P; Legube, Gaëlle

    2014-04-01

    Although both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the mechanisms by which one of these pathways is chosen over the other remain unclear. Here we show that transcriptionally active chromatin is preferentially repaired by HR. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) to analyze repair of multiple DSBs induced throughout the human genome, we identify an HR-prone subset of DSBs that recruit the HR protein RAD51, undergo resection and rely on RAD51 for efficient repair. These DSBs are located in actively transcribed genes and are targeted to HR repair via the transcription elongation-associated mark trimethylated histone H3 K36. Concordantly, depletion of SETD2, the main H3 K36 trimethyltransferase, severely impedes HR at such DSBs. Our study thereby demonstrates a primary role in DSB repair of the chromatin context in which a break occurs.

  15. Changes to DNA methylation and homologous recombination frequency in the progeny of stressed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migicovsky, Zoë; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-02-01

    Plants undergo changes in response to biotic and abiotic stresses that help them adjust and survive. Some of these changes may even be passed on to progeny and eventually lead to adaptive evolution. Transgenerational changes in response to stress include alterations in DNA methylation and changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of plants that were stressed often show elevated HRF as well as genomic hypermethylation, although specific loci that are beneficial in times of stress may be hypomethylated. One of the possible mechanisms responsible for passing the memory to the progeny involves small interfering RNAs; Dicer-like proteins, DCL2 and DCL3, are in part required for this process. However, while epigenetic modifications are often present in the untreated progeny of stressed plants, they are not usually sustained for multiple unexposed generations. Still, transgenerational inheritance of such changes has already begun to provide evidence for an important role of epigenetics in enhancing stress resistance.

  16. Purification, cDNA cloning, and recombinant expression of chymotrypsin C from porcine pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibo Wang; Duoduo Yuan; Rong Xu; Cheng-Wu Chi

    2011-01-01

    Chymotrypsin C is a bifunctional secretory-type serine protease in pancreas; besides proteolytical activity, it also exhibits a calcium-decreasing activity in serum, In this study, we purified activated chymotrypsin C from porcine pancreas, and identified its three active forms. Active chymotrypsin C was found to be different in the length of its 13-residue activation peptide due to carboxydipeptidase (present in the pancreas) degradation or autolysis of the activated chymotrypsin C itself, resulting in the removal of several C-terminus residues from the activation peptide. After limited chymotrypsin C cleavage with endopeptidase Lys C, several purified peptides were partially sequenced, and the entire cDNA sequence for porcine chymotrypsin C was cloned. Recombinant chymotrypsinogen C was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli cells as inclusion bodies. After refolding and activation with trypsin, the comparison of the recombinant chymotrypsin C with the natural form showed that their proteolytic and calcium-decreasing activities were at the same level. The successful expression of chymotrypsin C gene paves the way to further mutagenic structurefunction studies.

  17. A simple DNA recombination screening method by RT-PCR as an alternative to Southern blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Eliene; Sbroggiò, Mauro; Martin-Gonzalez, Javier; Avram, Alexandra; Munk, Stephanie; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J

    2017-01-19

    The generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), including knock-out (KO) and knock-in (KI) models, often requires genomic screening of many mouse ES cell (mESC) clones by Southern blot. The use of large targeting constructs facilitates the recombination of exogenous DNA in a specific genomic locus, but limits the detection of its correct genomic integration by standard PCR methods. Genomic Long Range PCR (LR-PCR), using primers adjacent to the homology arms, has been used as an alternative to radioactive-based Southern blot screenings. However, LR-PCRs are often difficult and render many false positive and false negative results. Here, we propose an alternative screening method based on the detection of a genetic modification at the mRNA level, which we successfully optimized in two mouse models. This screening method consists of a reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) using primers that match exons flanking the targeting construct. The detection of the expected modification in this PCR product confirms the integration at the correct genomic location and shows that the mutant mRNA is expressed. This is a simple and sensitive strategy to screen locus-specific recombination of targeting constructs which can also be useful to screen KO and KI mutant mice or cell lines including those generated by CRISPR/Cas9.

  18. Effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines in blood donors: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petry Andrea

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although various studies have demonstrated efficacy of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines, their effectiveness in health care settings has not been researched adequately. This gap is particularly visible for blood donors, a group of significant importance in the reduction of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B. Methods This is a double cohort study of 1411 repeat blood donors during the period 1998–2002, involving a vaccinated and an unvaccinated cohort, with matching of the two in terms of sex, age and residence. Average follow-up was 3.17 person-years. The outcome measure was infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, defined by testing positive on serologic markers HBsAg or anti-HBC. All blood donors were from the blood bank in Joaçaba, federal state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Results The cohorts did not differ significantly regarding sex, age and marital status but the vaccinated cohort had higher mean number of blood donations and higher proportion of those residing in the county capital Joaçaba. Hepatitis B incidences per 1000 person-years were zero among vaccinated and 2,33 among non-vaccinated, resulting in 100% vaccine effectiveness with 95% confidence interval from 30,1% to 100%. The number of vaccinated persons necessary to avoid one HBV infection in blood donors was estimated at 429 with 95% confidence interval from 217 to 21422. Conclusion The results showed very high effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-HBV vaccines in blood donors. Its considerable variation in this study is likely due to the limited follow-up and the influence of confounding factors normally balanced out in efficacy clinical trials.

  19. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cambridge CD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chino D Cambridge, Shree R Singh, Alain B Waffo, Stacie J Fairley, Vida A DennisCenter for NanoBiotechnology Research (CNBR, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USAAbstract: Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167–250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25–400 µg/mL to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24–72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and

  20. Cooperative recruitment of HMGB1 during V(D)J recombination through interactions with RAG1 and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Alicia J; Corbett, Elizabeth; Ortega, Fabian; Schatz, David G

    2013-03-01

    During V(D)J recombination, recombination activating gene (RAG)1 and RAG2 bind and cleave recombination signal sequences (RSSs), aided by the ubiquitous DNA-binding/-bending proteins high-mobility group box protein (HMGB)1 or HMGB2. HMGB1/2 play a critical, although poorly understood, role in vitro in the assembly of functional RAG-RSS complexes, into which HMGB1/2 stably incorporate. The mechanism of HMGB1/2 recruitment is unknown, although an interaction with RAG1 has been suggested. Here, we report data demonstrating only a weak HMGB1-RAG1 interaction in the absence of DNA in several assays, including fluorescence anisotropy experiments using a novel Alexa488-labeled HMGB1 protein. Addition of DNA to RAG1 and HMGB1 in fluorescence anisotropy experiments, however, results in a substantial increase in complex formation, indicating a synergistic binding effect. Pulldown experiments confirmed these results, as HMGB1 was recruited to a RAG1-DNA complex in a RAG1 concentration-dependent manner and, interestingly, without strict RSS sequence specificity. Our finding that HMGB1 binds more tightly to a RAG1-DNA complex over RAG1 or DNA alone provides an explanation for the stable integration of this typically transient architectural protein in the V(D)J recombinase complex throughout recombination. These findings also have implications for the order of events during RAG-DNA complex assembly and for the stabilization of sequence-specific and non-specific RAG1-DNA interactions.

  1. Drosophila brca2 is required for mitotic and meiotic DNA repair and efficient activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Klovstad

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in the tumor suppressor BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast and other cancers in humans. BRCA2 maintains genome stability in part through the regulation of Rad51-dependent homologous recombination. Much about its precise function in the DNA damage responses is, however, not yet known. We have made null mutations in the Drosophila homolog of BRCA2 and measured the levels of homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining, and single-strand annealing in the pre-meiotic germline of Drosophila males. We show that repair by homologous recombination is dramatically decreased in Drosophila brca2 mutants. Instead, large flanking deletions are formed, and repair by the non-conservative single-strand annealing pathway predominates. We further show that during meiosis, Drosophila Brca2 has a dual role in the repair of meiotic double-stranded breaks and the efficient activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint. The eggshell patterning defects that result from activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint in other meiotic DNA repair mutants can be strongly suppressed by mutations in brca2. In addition, Brca2 co-immunoprecipitates with the checkpoint protein Rad9, suggesting a direct role for Brca2 in the transduction of the meiotic recombination checkpoint signal.

  2. DNA-binding factor CTCF and long-range gene interactions in V(D)J recombination and oncogene activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); R. Stadhouders (Ralph); S. Thongjuea (Supat); E. Soler (Eric); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRegulation of V(D)J recombination events at immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor loci in lymphoid cells is complex and achieved via changes in substrate accessibility. Various studies over the last year have identified the DNA-binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) as

  3. INDUCTION OF ANTIVIRAL IMMUNE-RESPONSES BY IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT-DNA ENCODED AVIAN CORONAVIRUS NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOOTS, AMH; BENAISSATROUW, BJ; HESSELINK, W; RIJKE, E; SCHRIER, C; HENSEN, EJ; Boots, Annemieke

    1992-01-01

    Immune responses to the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) nucleocapsid protein were studied using a recombinant-DNA expression product. In mice, a lymphocyte proliferative response and a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to IBV were induced upon immunization with this nucleocapsid protein. Next

  4. Structure-specific endonucleases Xpf and Mus81 play overlapping but essential roles in DNA repair by homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kikuchi (Koji); T. Narita (Takeo); V.C. Pham (Van Ca); J. Iijima (Junko); T. Hirota (Tomomitsu); I.S. Keka (Islam Shamima); Mohiuddin; K. Okawa (Katsuya); T. Hori (Toshiyuki); T. Fukagawa (Tatsuo); J. Essers (Jeroen); R. Kanaar (Roland); M.C. Whitby (Matthew); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); Y. Taniguchi (Yoshihito); K. Kitagawa; S. Takeda (Shiunichi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand breaks (DSB) occur frequently during replication in sister chromatids and are dramatically increased when cells are exposed to chemotherapeutic agents including camptothecin. Such DSBs are efficiently repaired specifically by homologous recombination (HR) with the intac

  5. Structure-specific endonucleases Xpf and Mus81 play overlapping but essential roles in DNA repair by homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kikuchi (Koji); T. Narita (Takeo); V.C. Pham (Van Ca); J. Iijima (Junko); T. Hirota (Tomomitsu); I.S. Keka (Islam Shamima); Mohiuddin; K. Okawa (Katsuya); T. Hori (Toshiyuki); T. Fukagawa (Tatsuo); J. Essers (Jeroen); R. Kanaar (Roland); M.C. Whitby (Matthew); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); Y. Taniguchi (Yoshihito); K. Kitagawa; S. Takeda (Shiunichi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand breaks (DSB) occur frequently during replication in sister chromatids and are dramatically increased when cells are exposed to chemotherapeutic agents including camptothecin. Such DSBs are efficiently repaired specifically by homologous recombination (HR) with the intac

  6. Advances in recombinant DNA technology : corifollitropin alfa, a hybrid molecule with sustained follicle-stimulating activity and reduced injection frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Mannaerts, B. M. J. L.; Devroey, P.; Leader, A.; Boime, I.; Baird, D. T.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have been used to develop longer-acting therapeutic proteins. One approach is to introduce sequences containing additional glycosylation sites. Using this technique, a new chimeric gene has been developed containing the coding sequences of the FSH beta-subunit and the C-

  7. Advances in recombinant DNA technology : corifollitropin alfa, a hybrid molecule with sustained follicle-stimulating activity and reduced injection frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Mannaerts, B. M. J. L.; Devroey, P.; Leader, A.; Boime, I.; Baird, D. T.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have been used to develop longer-acting therapeutic proteins. One approach is to introduce sequences containing additional glycosylation sites. Using this technique, a new chimeric gene has been developed containing the coding sequences of the FSH beta-subunit and the C-

  8. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  9. Co-expression of Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus completely protects pigs against virulent challenge with classical swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongke; Yang, Yuai; Zheng, Huanli; Xi, Dongmei; Lin, Mingxing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yang, Linfu; Yan, Yulin; Chu, Xiaohui; Bi, Baoliang

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a recombinant adenovirus for future CSFV vaccines used in the pig industry for the reduction of losses involved in CSF outbreaks. The Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), which encode the two main protective glycoproteins from the "Shimen" strain of CSFV, were combined and inserted into the replication-defective human adenovirus type-5 and named the rAd-Erns-E2. Nine pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups (three pigs in each group) including the rAd-Erns-E2, hAd-CMV control and DMEM control. Intramuscular vaccination with 2×10(6) TCID(50) of the rAd-Erns-E2 was administered two times with an interval of 21 days. At 42 days post inoculation, pigs in all groups were challenged with a lethal dose of 1×10(3) TCID(50) CSFV "Shimen" strain. Observation of clinical signs was made and the existence of CSFV RNA was detected. Animals in the hAd-CMV and DMEM groups showed severe clinical CSF symptoms and were euthanized from 7 to 10 days after the challenge. However, no adverse clinical CSF signs were observed in vaccinated pigs after the administration of rAd-Erns-E2 and even after CSFV challenge. Neither CSFV RNA nor pathological changes were detected in the tissues of interest of the above vaccinated pigs. These results implied that the recombination adenovirus carrying the Erns-E2 genes could be used to prevent swine from classical swine fever.

  10. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Recombinant Pfu DNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Qingsong; Bi, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Pfu DNA polymerase (Pfu) is a DNA polymerase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. With its excellent thermostability and high fidelity, Pfu is well known as one of the enzymes widely used in the polymerase chain reaction. In this study, the recombinant plasmid pLysS His6-tagged Pfu-pET28a was constructed. His-tagged Pfu was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) competent cells and then successfully purified with the ÄKTAprime plus compact one-step purification system by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography after optimization of the purification conditions. The authenticity of the purified Pfu was further confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. A bio-assay indicated that its activity in the polymerase chain reaction was equivalent to that of commercial Pfu and its isoelectric point was found to be between 6.85 and 7.35. These results will be useful for further studies on Pfu and its wide application in the future.

  11. DNA annealing by Redβ is insufficient for homologous recombination and the additional requirements involve intra- and inter-molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Erler, Axel; Fu, Jun; Kranz, Andrea; Tang, Jing; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Müller, Daniel; Sattler, Michael; Stewart, A. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) like Redβ initiate homologous recombination by annealing complementary DNA strands. We show that C-terminally truncated Redβ, whilst still able to promote annealing and nucleoprotein filament formation, is unable to mediate homologous recombination. Mutations of the C-terminal domain were evaluated using both single- and double stranded (ss and ds) substrates in recombination assays. Mutations of critical amino acids affected either dsDNA recombination or both ssDNA and dsDNA recombination indicating two separable functions, one of which is critical for dsDNA recombination and the second for recombination per se. As evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, the dsDNA recombination function relates to the Redα-Redβ protein-protein interaction, which requires not only contacts in the C-terminal domain but also a region near the N-terminus. Because the nucleoprotein filament formed with C-terminally truncated Redβ has altered properties, the second C-terminal function could be due to an interaction required for functional filaments. Alternatively the second C-terminal function could indicate a requirement for a Redβ-host factor interaction. These data further advance the model for Red recombination and the proposition that Redβ and RAD52 SSAPs share ancestral and mechanistic roots. PMID:27708411

  12. Study on DNA Immunization by Recombinants Encoding Japanese Encephalitis Virus prME and E Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国和; 赵桂珍; 窦晓光; 乔光彦; 周子文

    2003-01-01

    To study the expression characteristic of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) prME and E proteins and the efficacy of DNA immunization by different recombinant plasmids containing JEV prME (2001 bp) and E (1500 bp) genes, tworecombinants ( pJME and pJE) containing JEV prME and E genes fused with FLAG were constructed and then transfected into HepG2 and COS-1 cells by lipnsome fusion. The expression feature of FLAG-prME (about 72 kDa) and FLAG-E (about 54 kDa) proteins in transfected cells were analyzed by Western blot and two antibody systems (anti-FLAG and anti-E).BALB/c mice were immunized with 100 μg of two kinds of recombinants by intramuscular injection, and JEV JaGAr-01strains ( 105 PFU/100 μl)were given to BALB/c mice by intraperioneal injection 3 wk after twice DNA immunization by a lethal virus challenge. BALB/c mice were observed for 21 days after challenge. 80% plaque reduction neutralization test was performed to titrate neutralization antibody before and after viral challenge. It was found that the expression of proteins associated with pJME and pJE was determined in transfected cells with anti-FLAG and a new protein of 11 kDa was detected inHepG2 and COS-1 cells transfected with pJME. Only E (53 kDa) protein was identified as transfected with pJME using antiE. Higher level of neutralization antibodies and the efficacy of protective immunity were induced with pJME immunization,and were similar to those induced by inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine, but were better than those induced with pJE.It concludes that the expression level from prM to E proteins of JEV is different in vitro, and the in vitro expression efficiency of pJME was better than that of piE. FLAG-prME protein expressed by pJME could be cleaved by peptidase from host.The efficacy of DNA immunization is correlated to the expression characterization of related proteins expressed in vitro.

  13. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuaki Tsuruyama

    Full Text Available It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  14. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  15. SERBP1 affects homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair by regulation of CtIP translation during S phase

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jang-Won; Kim, Sunjik; Na, Wooju; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Min, Keehong; Yeom, Jeonghun; Kwak, Hoyun; JEONG, SUNJOO; Lee, Cheolju; Kim, Seon-Young; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most severe type of DNA damage and are primarily repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) in the G1 and S/G2 phase, respectively. Although CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP) is crucial in DNA end resection during HR following DSBs, little is known about how CtIP levels increase in an S phase-specific manner. Here, we show that Serpine mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1) regulates CtIP expression at the translational level...

  16. The ATPase activity of Fml1 is essential for its roles in homologous recombination and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Saikat; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, the DNA helicase Fml1, which is an orthologue of human FANCM, is a key component of the machinery that drives and governs homologous recombination (HR). During the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by HR, it limits the occurrence of potentially deleterious crossover recombinants, whereas at stalled replication forks, it promotes HR to aid their recovery. Here, we have mutated conserved residues in Fml1’s Walker A (K99R) and Walker B (D196N) motifs to determine whether its activities are dependent on its ability to hydrolyse ATP. Both Fml1K99R and Fml1D196N are proficient for DNA binding but totally deficient in DNA unwinding and ATP hydrolysis. In vivo both mutants exhibit a similar reduction in recombination at blocked replication forks as a fml1Δ mutant indicating that Fml1’s motor activity, fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, is essential for its pro-recombinogenic role. Intriguingly, both fml1K99R and fml1D196N mutants exhibit greater sensitivity to genotoxins and higher levels of crossing over during DSB repair than a fml1Δ strain. These data suggest that without its motor activity, the binding of Fml1 to its DNA substrate can impede alternative mechanisms of repair and crossover avoidance. PMID:22844101

  17. A recombinant DNA vaccine encoding C. andersoni oocyst wall protein induces immunity against experimental C. parvum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Ren, Wenzhi; Pan, Qingshan; Wang, Qiuyue; Elhag, I A Elfaki; Li, Jianhua; Li, Mingying; Gong, Pengtao; Liu, Yingli; Zhang, Xichen

    2011-06-30

    Cryptosporidium andersoni parasited in the abomasum has been demonstrated as a cause of reduction of milk production in dairy cow. In this study, a novel chimeric DNA vaccine pVAX1-AB was constructed and the efficacy against Cryptosporidium parvum was determined. BALB/c mice were divided into 3 groups and immunized with DNA vaccine expressing the oocyst wall protein, AB protein of C. andersoni, the recombinant plasmid containing the AB gene, respectively. After inoculation of 1 × 10(6) oocysts of C. parvum, the humoral and cellular immune responses were detected. Experimental results showed that the recombinant plasmid can induce corresponding specific antibody response, simultaneously influenced cellular immune responses, and provided greater protection rate (48.6%) than the other groups. These results indicated that chimeric DNA vaccine has a potential in Cryptosporidium vaccine development.

  18. Mechanisms of assembly of the enzyme-ssDNA complexes required for recombination-dependent DNA synthesis and repair in bacteriophage T4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrical, S.; Hempstead, K.; Morrical, M. [Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    During late stages of bacteriophage T4 infection in E. coli, the initiation of phage DNA replication is dependent on the homologous recombination activity of the T4 uvsX protein. In vitro, uvsX protein initiates DNA synthesis on a duplex template by inserting the 3{prime} end of a homologous ssDNA molecule into the duplex. The resulting D-loop structure serves as a primer-template junction for the assembly of the T4 replication fork. Two key steps in this initiation process are (A) the assembly of uvsX-ssDNA complexes necessary for recombination activity and for the priming of lead-strand DNA synthesis, and (B) the assembly of the T4 primosome (gp41 helicase/gp61 primase complex) onto the single-stranded template for lagging-strand synthesis. Our laboratory is focusing on the mechanisms of these two different but related enzyme-ssDNA assembly processes. In this extended abstract, we describe recent efforts in our laboratory to elucidate the mechanism by which the gp41 helicase enzyme is assembled onto gp32-covered ssDNA, a process requiring the activity of a special helicase assembly factor, the T4 gp59 protein.

  19. Efficient detection of unpaired DNA requires a member of the rad54-like family of homologous recombination proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Dilini A; Sauls, Pegan A; Sharp, Kevin J; Smith, Zachary J; Xiao, Hua; Groskreutz, Katie M; Malone, Tyler L; Boone, Erin C; Edwards, Kevin A; Shiu, Patrick K T; Larson, Erik D; Hammond, Thomas M

    2014-11-01

    Meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD) is a process that detects unpaired regions between homologous chromosomes and silences them for the duration of sexual development. While the phenomenon of MSUD is well recognized, the process that detects unpaired DNA is poorly understood. In this report, we provide two lines of evidence linking unpaired DNA detection to a physical search for DNA homology. First, we have found that a putative SNF2-family protein (SAD-6) is required for efficient MSUD in Neurospora crassa. SAD-6 is closely related to Rad54, a protein known to facilitate key steps in the repair of double-strand breaks by homologous recombination. Second, we have successfully masked unpaired DNA by placing identical transgenes at slightly different locations on homologous chromosomes. This masking falls apart when the distance between the transgenes is increased. We propose a model where unpaired DNA detection during MSUD is achieved through a spatially constrained search for DNA homology. The identity of SAD-6 as a Rad54 paralog suggests that this process may be similar to the searching mechanism used during homologous recombination. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge, Chino D; Singh, Shree R; Waffo, Alain B; Fairley, Stacie J; Dennis, Vida A

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP) and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP) using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167-250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25-400 μg/mL) to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24-72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and expression of DMOMP in vitro and in mice. Further investigations of the nanoencapsulated DMCNP vaccine formulation against C. trachomatis in mice are warranted.

  1. The pol3-t Hyperrecombination Phenotype and DNA Damage-Induced Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is RAD50 Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Galli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA polymerase δ (POL3/CDC2 allele pol3-t of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has previously been shown to be sensitive to methylmethanesulfonate (MMS and has been proposed to be involved in base excision repair. Our results, however, show that the pol3-t mutation is synergistic for MMS sensitivity with MAG1, a known base excision repair gene, but it is epistatic with rad50Δ, suggesting that POL3 may be involved not only in base excision repair but also in a RAD50 dependent function. We further studied the interaction of pol3-t with rad50Δ by examining their effect on spontaneous, MMS-, UV-, and ionizing radiation-induced intrachromosomal recombination. We found that rad50Δ completely abolishes the elevated spontaneous frequency of intrachromosomal recombination in the pol3-t mutant and significantly decreases UV- and MMS-induced recombination in both POL3 and pol3-t strains. Interestingly, rad50Δ had no effect on γ-ray-induced recombination in both backgrounds between 0 and 50 Gy. Finally, the deletion of RAD50 had no effect on the elevated frequency of homologous integration conferred by the pol3-t mutation. RAD50 is possibly involved in resolution of replication forks that are stalled by mutagen-induced external DNA damage, or internal DNA damage produced by growing the pol3-t mutant at the restrictive temperature.

  2. Two DNA repair and recombination genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, are induced during meiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Schild, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1989-07-01

    The DNA repair and recombination genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, were transcriptionally induced approximately 10- to 15-fold in sporulating MATa/{alpha} cells. Congenic MATa/a cells, which did not sporulate, did not show similar increases. Assays of {beta}-galactosidase activity in strains harboring either a RAD52- or RAD54-lacZ gene fusion indicated that this induction occurred at a time concomitant with a commitment to meiotic recombination, as measured by prototroph formation from his1 heteroalleles.

  3. uv induced enhancement of recombination among lambda bacteriophages: relation with replication of irradiated DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordone, L.; Sperandeo-Mineo, R.M.; Mannino, S.

    1975-07-01

    Experimental results are reported showing the dependence of the uv induced enhancement of recombinants on the presence of the functional O gene product. This fact is tentatively interpreted as a replication dependence of the uv induced recombination.

  4. Meiotic recombination breakpoints are associated with open chromatin and enriched with repetitive DNA elements in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiotic recombination provides the framework for the genetic variation in natural and artificial populations of eukaryotes through the creation of novel haplotypes. Thus, determining the molecular characteristics of meiotic recombination remains essential for future plant breeding efforts, which hea...

  5. Alternative end-joining repair pathways are the ultimate backup for abrogated classical non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair: Implications for the formation of chromosome translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliakis, George; Murmann, Tamara; Soni, Aashish

    2015-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are the most deleterious lesions for the integrity of the genome, as their misrepair can lead to the formation of chromosome translocations. Cells have evolved two main repair pathways to suppress the formation of these genotoxic lesions: homology-dependent, error-free homologous recombination repair (HRR), and potentially error-prone, classical, DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (c-NHEJ). The most salient feature of c-NHEJ, speed, will largely suppress chromosome translocation formation, while sequence alterations at the junction remain possible. It is now widely accepted that when c-NHEJ is inactivated, globally or locally, an alternative form of end-joining (alt-EJ) removes DSBs. Alt-EJ operates with speed and fidelity markedly lower than c-NHEJ, causing thus with higher probability chromosome translocations, and generating more extensive sequence alterations at the junction. Our working hypothesis is that alt-EJ operates as a backup to c-NHEJ. Recent results show that alt-EJ can also backup abrogated HRR in G2 phase cells, again at the cost of elevated formation of chromosome translocations. These observations raise alt-EJ to a global rescuing mechanism operating on ends that have lost their chromatin context in ways that compromise processing by HRR or c-NHEJ. While responsible for eliminating from the genome highly cytotoxic DNA ends, alt-EJ provides this function at the price of increased translocation formation. Here, we analyze recent literature on the mechanisms of chromosome translocation formation and propose a functional hierarchy among DSB processing pathways that makes alt-EJ the global backup pathway. We discuss possible ramifications of this model in cellular DSB management and pathway choice, and analyze its implications in radiation carcinogenesis and the design of novel therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Widely Conserved Recombination Patterns among Single-Stranded DNA Viruses ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The combinatorial nature of genetic recombination can potentially provide organisms with immediate access to many more positions in sequence space than can be reached by mutation alone. Recombination features particularly prominently in the evolution of a diverse range of viruses. Despite rapid progress having been made in the characterization of discrete recombination events for many species, little is currently known about either gross patterns of recombination across related virus families...

  7. Alleles of the homologous recombination gene, RAD59, identify multiple responses to disrupted DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Lauren C; Manthey, Glenn M; Owens, Shannon N; Fu, Becky X H; Bailis, Adam M

    2013-10-14

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad59 is required for multiple homologous recombination mechanisms and viability in DNA replication-defective rad27 mutant cells. Recently, four rad59 missense alleles were found to have distinct effects on homologous recombination that are consistent with separation-of-function mutations. The rad59-K166A allele alters an amino acid in a conserved α-helical domain, and, like the rad59 null allele diminishes association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles alter amino acids in the same domain and have genetically similar effects on homologous recombination. The rad59-Y92A allele alters a conserved amino acid in a separate domain, has genetically distinct effects on homologous recombination, and does not diminish association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. In this study, rad59 mutant strains were crossed with a rad27 null mutant to examine the effects of the rad59 alleles on the link between viability, growth and the stimulation of homologous recombination in replication-defective cells. Like the rad59 null allele, rad59-K166A was synthetically lethal in combination with rad27. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles were not synthetically lethal in combination with rad27, had effects on growth that coincided with decreased ectopic gene conversion, but did not affect mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The rad59-Y92A allele was not synthetically lethal when combined with rad27, stimulated ectopic gene conversion and heteroallelic recombination independently from rad27, and was mutually epistatic with srs2. Unlike rad27, the stimulatory effect of rad59-Y92A on homologous recombination was not accompanied by effects on growth rate, cell cycle distribution, mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The synthetic lethality conferred by rad59 null and rad59-K166A alleles correlates with their inhibitory effect on association

  8. Generation and Efficacy Evaluation of a Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus Variant Expressing the E2 Protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Yuan, Jin; Cong, Xin; Qin, Hua-Yang; Wang, Chun-Hua; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important infectious disease of pigs caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Pseudorabies (PR), which is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), is another important infectious disease of pigs and other animals. Coinfections of pigs with PRV and CSFV occur occasionally in the field. The modified live vaccine Bartha-K61 strain has played an important role in the control of PR in many countries, including China. Since late 2011, however, increasing PR outbreaks caused by an emerging PRV variant have been reported in Bartha-K61-vaccinated swine populations on many farms in China. Previously, we generated a gE/gI-deleted PRV (rPRVTJ-delgE) based on this PRV variant, which was shown to be safe and can provide rapid and complete protection against lethal challenge with the PRV variant in pigs. Here, we generated a new recombinant PRV variant expressing the E2 gene of CSFV (rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2) and evaluated its immunogenicity and efficacy in pigs. The results showed that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 was safe for pigs, induced detectable anti-PRV and anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies, and provided complete protection against the lethal challenge with either the PRV TJ strain or the CSFV Shimen strain. The data indicate that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 is a promising candidate bivalent vaccine against PRV and CSFV coinfections.

  9. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  10. Activation of homologous recombination DNA repair in human skin fibroblasts continuously exposed to X-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Grekhova, Anna; Pustovalova, Margarita; Ozerov, Ivan V; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Lazareva, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-09-29

    Molecular and cellular responses to protracted ionizing radiation exposures are poorly understood. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we studied the kinetics of DNA repair foci formation in normal human fibroblasts exposed to X-rays at a dose rate of 4.5 mGy/min for up to 6 h. We showed that both the number of γH2AX foci and their integral fluorescence intensity grew linearly with time of irradiation up to 2 h. A plateau was observed between 2 and 6 h of exposure, indicating a state of balance between formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, the number and intensity of foci formed by homologous recombination protein RAD51 demonstrated a continuous increase during 6 h of irradiation. We further showed that the enhancement of the homologous recombination repair was not due to redistribution of cell cycle phases. Our results indicate that continuous irradiation of normal human cells triggers DNA repair responses that are different from those elicited after acute irradiation. The observed activation of the error-free homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair pathway suggests compensatory adaptive mechanisms that may help alleviate long-term biological consequences and could potentially be utilized both in radiation protection and medical practices.

  11. Points of recombination in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) strain P3HR-1-derived heterogeneous DNA as indexes to EBV DNA recombinogenic events in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Kazufumi; Srinivas, Shamala K; Schacker, Tim; Miyagi, Jun-ichi; Scott, Rona S; Sixbey, John W

    2008-12-01

    Deletions and rearrangements in the genome of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) strain P3HR-1 generate subgenomic infectious particles that, unlike defective interfering particles in other viral systems, enhance rather than restrict EBV replication in vitro. Reports of comparable heterogeneous (het) DNA in EBV-linked human diseases, based on detection of an abnormal juxtaposition of EBV DNA fragments BamHI W and BamHI Z that disrupts viral latency, prompted us to determine at the nucleotide level all remaining recombination joints formed by the four constituent segments of P3HR-1-derived het DNA. Guided by endonuclease restriction maps, we chose PCR primer pairs that approximated and framed junctions creating the unique BamHI M/B1 and E/S fusion fragments. Sequencing of PCR products revealed points of recombination that lacked regions of extensive homology between constituent fragments. Identical recombination junctions were detected by PCR in EBV-positive salivary samples from human immunodeficiency virus-infected donors, although the W/Z rearrangement that induces EBV reactivation was frequently found in the absence of the other two. In vitro infection of lymphoid cells similarly indicated that not all three het DNA rearrangements need to reside on a composite molecule. These results connote a precision in the recombination process that dictates both composition and regulation of gene segments altered by genomic rearrangement. Moreover, the apparent frequency of het DNA at sites of EBV replication in vivo is consistent with a likely contribution to the pathogenesis of EBV reactivation.

  12. Mixed infection of Sida jamaicensis in Jamaica reveals the presence of three recombinant begomovirus DNA A components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cheryl; Kon, Tatsuya; Rojas, Maria; Graham, André; Martin, Darren; Gilbertson, Robert; Roye, Marcia

    2014-09-01

    Begomoviruses impose serious constraints on agriculture throughout the temperate, tropical and subtropical regions. Previously, we characterised a sida golden yellow vein virus isolate, SiGYVV-[JM:Lig2:08] (HQ009519-20) from a symptomatic Sida jamaicensis plant. With the aim of establishing whether it was hosting a mixed infection that could facilitate recombination, PCR-RFLP was done on DNA extracted from this plant, and the results suggested the presence of two additional genetically distinct DNA-A molecules. Sequence analysis of these two DNA-A molecules (relying on BLAST searches and the CLUSTAL V algorithm within the DNASTAR MegAlign module) revealed that they belonged to novel species, and we have tentatively named these viruses sida golden mosaic Braco virus-[Jamaica:Liguanea:2008] and sida golden mosaic Liguanea virus-[Jamaica:1:2008]. Using RDP4 (recombination detection program), we determined that all three viruses were recombinant, with bases ~10 to ~440 of both SiGMLigV-[JM:Lig:08] and SiGYVV-[JM:Lig2:08] having been derived from a relative of SiGMBV-[JM:Lig:08] (Precombination detection methods). SiGMBV-[JM:Lig:08] was itself a product of recombination, deriving bases ~490-1195 from a virus that was ~92% similar to malvastrum yellow mosaic Helshire virus. Phylogenetically, these DNA-A components are most closely related to those of malvaceous weed-infecting begomoviruses from Jamaica, Cuba, Florida and Mexico. The SiGMBV DNA-A was able to elicit symptomatic infection in N. benthamiana.

  13. Plant molecular biology and biotechnology research in the post-recombinant DNA era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Khurana, Jitendra P

    2003-01-01

    After the beginning of the recombinant DNA era in the mid-1970s, researchers in India started to make use of the new technology to understand the structure of plant genes and regulation of their expression. The outcome started to appear in print in early the 1980s and genes for histones, tubulin, photosynthetic membrane proteins, phototransduction components, organelles and those regulated differentially by developmental and extrinsic signals were sequenced and characterized. Some genes of biotechnological importance like those encoding an interesting seed protein and the enzyme glyoxalase were also isolated. While work on the characterization of genome structure and organization was started quite early, it remained largely focused on the identification of DNA markers and genetic variability. In this context, the work on mustard, rice and wheat is worth mentioning. In the year 2000, India became a member of the international consortium to sequence entire rice genome. Several laboratories have also given attention to regulated expression of plastid and nuclear genes as well as to isolate target-specific promoters or design promoters with improved potential. Simultaneously, transgenic systems for crops like mustard, rice, wheat, cotton, legumes and several vegetables have been established. More recently, genes of agronomic importance like those for insect resistance, abiotic stress tolerance, nutritional improvement and male sterility, isolated in India or abroad, have been utilized for raising transgenics for crop improvement. Some of these transgenics have already shown their potential in containment facility or limited field trials conducted under the stipulated guidelines. Plant molecular biology and biotechnology are thus clearly poised to make an impact on research in basic biology and agriculture in the near future.

  14. Nascent DNA synthesis during homologous recombination is synergistically promoted by the rad51 recombinase and DNA homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundia, Maureen M; Desai, Vatsal; Magwood, Alissa C; Baker, Mark D

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we exploited a plasmid-based assay that detects the new DNA synthesis (3' extension) that accompanies Rad51-mediated homology searching and strand invasion steps of homologous recombination to investigate the interplay between Rad51 concentration and homology length. Mouse hybridoma cells that express endogenous levels of Rad51 display an approximate linear increase in the frequency of 3' extension for homology lengths of 500 bp to 2 kb. At values below ∼500 bp, the frequency of 3' extension declines markedly, suggesting that this might represent the minimal efficient processing segment for 3' extension. Overexpression of wild-type Rad51 stimulated the frequency of 3' extension by ∼3-fold for homology lengths homology was >2 kb, 3' extension frequency increased by as much as 10-fold. Excess wild-type Rad51 did not increase the average 3' extension tract length. Analysis of cell lines expressing N-terminally FLAG-tagged Rad51 polymerization mutants F86E, A89E, or F86E/A89E established that the 3' extension process requires Rad51 polymerization activity. Mouse hybridoma cells that have reduced Brca2 (Breast cancer susceptibility 2) due to stable expression of small interfering RNA show a significant reduction in 3' extension efficiency; expression of wild-type human BRCA2, but not a BRCA2 variant devoid of BRC repeats 1-8, rescues the 3' extension defect in these cells. Our results suggest that increased Rad51 concentration and homology length interact synergistically to promote 3' extension, presumably as a result of enhanced Brca2-mediated Rad51 polymerization.

  15. Cancer, viruses, and mass migration: Paul Berg's venture into eukaryotic biology and the advent of recombinant DNA research and technology, 1967-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Doogab

    2008-01-01

    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal invention in the history of recombinant DNA technology, investigates the development of recombinant DNA technology in its full scientific context. I do so by focusing on Stanford biochemist Berg's research on the genetic regulation of higher organisms. As I hope to demonstrate, Berg's new venture reflected a mass migration of biomedical researchers as they shifted from studying prokaryotic organisms like bacteria to studying eukaryotic organisms like mammalian and human cells. It was out of this boundary crossing from prokaryotic to eukaryotic systems through virus model systems that recombinant DNA technology and other significant new research techniques and agendas emerged. Indeed, in their attempt to reconstitute 'life' as a research technology, Stanford biochemists' recombinant DNA research recast genes as a sequence that could be rewritten thorough biochemical operations. The last part of this paper shifts focus from recombinant DNA technology's academic origins to its transformation into a genetic engineering technology by examining the wide range of experimental hybridizations which occurred as techniques and knowledge circulated between Stanford biochemists and the Bay Area's experimentalists. Situating their interchange in a dense research network based at Stanford's biochemistry department, this paper helps to revise the canonized history of genetic engineering's origins that emerged during

  16. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  17. Construction of a trivalent candidate vaccine against Shigella species with DNA recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王恒樑; 冯尔玲; 林云; 廖翔; 金明; 黄留玉; 苏国富; 黄翠芬

    2002-01-01

    In this work asd gene of Shigella flexneri 2a strain T32 was replaced by Vibrio cholerae toxin B subunit (ctxB) gene with DNA recombination in vivo and in vitro. The resulting derivative of T32, designed as FWL01, could stably express CtxB, but its growth in LB medium depended on the presence of diaminopimelic acid (DAP). Then form I plasmid of Shigella sonnei strain S7 was labeled with strain T32 asd gene and mobilized into FWL01. Thus a trivalent candidate oral vaccine strain, designed as FSW01, was constructed. In this candidate strain, a balanced-lethal system was constituted between the host strain and the form I plasmid expressing S. sonnei O antigen. Therefore the candidate strain can express stably not only its own O antigen but also CtxB and O antigen of S. sonnei in the absence of any antibiotic. Experiments showed that FSW01 did not invade HeLa cells or cause keratoconjunctivitis in guinea pigs. However, rabbits immunized FSW01 can elicit significant immune responses. In mice and rhesus monkey models, vaccinated animals were protected against the challenges of wild S. flexneri 2a strain 2457T and S. sonnei strain S9.

  18. Characterization of Recombinant Thermococcus kodakaraensis (KOD) DNA Polymerases Produced Using Silkworm-Baculovirus Expression Vector System

    KAUST Repository

    Yamashita, Mami

    2017-05-08

    The KOD DNA polymerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tkod-Pol) has been preferred for PCR due to its rapid elongation rate, extreme thermostability and outstanding fidelity. Here in this study, we utilized silkworm-baculovirus expression vector system (silkworm-BEVS) to express the recombinant Tkod-Pol (rKOD) with N-terminal (rKOD-N) or C-terminal (rKOD-C) tandem fusion tags. By using BEVS, we produced functional rKODs with satisfactory yields, about 1.1 mg/larva for rKOD-N and 0.25 mg/larva for rKOD-C, respectively. Interestingly, we found that rKOD-C shows higher thermostability at 95 °C than that of rKOD-N, while that rKOD-N is significantly unstable after exposing to long period of heat-shock. We also assessed the polymerase activity as well as the fidelity of purified rKODs under various conditions. Compared with commercially available rKOD, which is expressed in E. coli expression system, rKOD-C exhibited almost the same PCR performance as the commercial rKOD did, while rKOD-N did lower performance. Taken together, our results suggested that silkworm-BEVS can be used to express and purify efficient rKOD in a commercial way.

  19. Analysis of mammalian cis-regulatory DNA elements by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiering, S; Bender, M A; Groudine, M

    1999-01-01

    The use of homologous recombination to modify and thereby functionally analyze cis-regulatory DNA elements in mammalian cells has become an important approach in mammalian gene expression research. We have emphasized the necessity of designing a system that allows the removal of selectable markers used in targeting and facilitates the further modification of the region under study. To perform these tasks, we presently favor making an initial HR-mediated replacement of the entire element under study with an active positive selectable marker in combination with either an inactive second positive selectable marker or an active negative selectable marker. The plug and socket system, in which an inactive selectable marker is complemented by HR, is the most dependable and well-characterized option for making secondary modifications. However, the double-replacement system has certain advantages, and the recently developed RMCE approach, which allows replacement of a negative selectable marker by site-specific recombinase-mediated insertion without using a positive selectable marker, will likely prove very valuable in future experiments. Each of the systems, or combinations thereof, should be considered in light of the specifics of any given experiment to select the most appropriate option. Although the emphasis of this article has been the analysis of cis-acting regulatory elements involved in transcription, these same approaches can be used to analyze other regulatory elements (e.g., origins of replication) and to make multiple subtle mutations in polypeptides.

  20. Construction of recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine expressing H pylori ureB and IL-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu; Zhao-Shen Li; Yi-Qi Du; Yan-Fang Gong; Hua Yang; Bo Sun; Jing Jin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine encoding H pylori ureB gene and mouse IL-2 gene and to detect its immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo.METHODS: H pylori ureB and mouse IL-2 gene fragments were amplified by potymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pUCmT vector. DNA sequence of the amplified ureB and IL-2 genes was assayed, then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES through enzyme digestion and ligation reactions resulting in pIRES-ureB and pIRES-ureB-IL-2. The recombinant plasmids were used to transform competent E. Coli DH5a, and the positive clones were screened by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. Then, the recombinant pIRES-ureB and pIRES-ureB-IL-2 were used to transform LB5000 and the recombinant plasmids extracted from LB5000 were finally introduced into the final host SL7207. After that, recombinant strains were grown in vitro repeatedly. In order to detect the immunogenicity of the vaccine in vitro, pIRES-ureB and pIRES-ureB-IL-2 were transfected to COS-7 cells using Lipofectamine TM 2000, the immunogenicity of expressed UreB and IL-2 proteins was assayed with SDS-PAGE and Western blot. C57BL/6 mice were orally immunized with 1 x 108 recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine. Four weeks after vaccination, mice were challenged with 1 x 107 CFU of live Hpylori SSI. Mice were sacrificed and the stomach was isolated for examination of H pylori 4 wk post-challenge.RESULTS: The 1700 base pair ureB gene fragment amplified from the genomic DNA was consistent with the sequence of H pylori ureB by sequence analysis. The amplified 510 base pair fragment was consistent with the sequence of mouse IL-2 in gene bank. It was confirmed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion that H pylori ureB and mouse IL-2 genes were inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES. The experiments in vitro snowed that stable recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying

  1. Novel recombinant DNA vaccine candidates for human respiratory syncytial virus: Preclinical evaluation of immunogenicity and protection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M; Öhlschläger, Peter; Hamad, Maaweya E; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2017-03-08

    The development of safe and potent vaccines for human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is still a challenge for researchers worldwide. DNA-based immunization is currently a promising approach that has been used to generate human vaccines for different age groups. In this study, novel HRSV DNA vaccine candidates were generated and preclinically tested in BALB/c mice. Three different versions of the codon-optimized HRSV fusion (F) gene were individually cloned into the pPOE vector. The new recombinant vectors either express full-length (pPOE-F), secretory (pPOE-TF), or M282-90 linked (pPOE-FM2) forms of the F protein. Distinctive expression of the F protein was identified in HEp-2 cells transfected with the different recombinant vectors using ELISA and immunofluorescence. Mice immunization verified the potential for recombinant vectors to elicit significant levels of neutralizing antibodies and CD8(+) T-cell lymphocytes. pPOE-TF showed higher levels of gene expression in cell culture and better induction of the humoral and cellular immune responses. Following virus challenge, mice that had been immunized with the recombinant vectors were able to control virus replication and displayed lower inflammation compared with mice immunized with empty pPOE vector or formalin-inactivated HRSV vaccine. Moreover, pulmonary cytokine profiles of mice immunized with the 3 recombinant vectors were similar to those of the mock infected group. In conclusion, recombinant pPOE vectors are promising HRSV vaccine candidates in terms of their safety, immunogenicity and protective efficiency. These data encourage further evaluation in phase I clinical trials.

  2. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  3. A heuristic Bayesian method for segmenting DNA sequence alignments and detecting evidence for recombination and gene conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierska, Anna; Husmeier, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    We propose a heuristic approach to the detection of evidence for recombination and gene conversion in multiple DNA sequence alignments. The proposed method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a sliding window is moved along the DNA sequence alignment, and phylogenetic trees are sampled from the conditional posterior distribution with MCMC. To reduce the noise intrinsic to inference from the limited amount of data available in the typically short sliding window, a clustering algorithm based on the Robinson-Foulds distance is applied to the trees thus sampled, and the posterior distribution over tree clusters is obtained for each window position. While changes in this posterior distribution are indicative of recombination or gene conversion events, it is difficult to decide when such a change is statistically significant. This problem is addressed in the second stage of the proposed algorithm, where the distributions obtained in the first stage are post-processed with a Bayesian hidden Markov model (HMM). The emission states of the HMM are associated with posterior distributions over phylogenetic tree topology clusters. The hidden states of the HMM indicate putative recombinant segments. Inference is done in a Bayesian sense, sampling parameters from the posterior distribution with MCMC. Of particular interest is the determination of the number of hidden states as an indication of the number of putative recombinant regions. To this end, we apply reversible jump MCMC, and sample the number of hidden states from the respective posterior distribution.

  4. Novel human testis-specific cDNA: molecular cloning, expression and immunobiological effects of the recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, R; Naz, R K

    2001-09-01

    A differential display-polymerase chain reaction was employed to obtain a testis-specific cDNA fragment. On screening the human testis-(lambda)gt10-cDNA library with testis-specific cDNA fragment, a novel cDNA encoding for a sperm antigen, designated TSA-1, was obtained. It has a novel open reading frame (ORF) of 471 base pairs encoding for 156 amino acids. The computer generated translated protein has a calculated molecular mass of 17.4 kDa and contains a potential N-glycosylation site at amino acids 122-124. The hydrophilicity analysis of the amino acid sequence suggested that this protein is a membrane-anchored peptide. Extensive analysis for tissue-specificity by Northern blots and RT-PCR-Southern blot procedures using various human tissues indicated that TSA-1 was specifically expressed only in the human testis. Based on the results of in vitro transcription and translation experiments, the TSA-1 (ORF) was subcloned into pGEX-6P-3 vector and expressed using the glutathione S-transferase gene fusion system. Antibodies (Ab) against the purified recombinant protein specifically recognized the approximately 17 kDa recombinant TSA-1, and a approximately 24 kDa band in human sperm extract in the Western blot procedure. The recombinant TSA-1 Ab recognized the acrosomal, equatorial, mid-piece, and tail regions of human sperm cell in indirect immunofluorescence, bound to live human sperm in the immunobeads binding technique (IBT) and caused a significant concentration-dependent inhibition of human sperm acrosome reaction. These findings indicate that the novel sperm-specific recombinant TSA-1 has a role in sperm function and may have applications in the development of a contraceptive vaccine, and in the specific diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  5. Rapid in vitro splicing of coding sequences from genomic DNA by isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxuan Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloning of coding sequence (CDS is an important step for gene function research. Here, we reported a simple and efficient strategy for assembling multiple-exon into an intron-free CDS from genomic DNA (gDNA by an isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR (IRR-PCR method. As an example, a 2067-bp full-length CDS of the anther-specific expression gene OsABCG15, which is composed of seven exons and six introns, was generated by IRR-PCR using genomic DNA of rice leaf as the template. Actually, this approach can be wildly applied to any DNA sequences assembly to achieve CDS cloning, gene fusion and multiple site-directed mutagenesis in functional genomics studies in vitro.

  6. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent...... recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes...... at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity....

  7. Cloning of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor cDNA and expression of recombinant soluble TNF-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, P W; Barrett, K; Chantry, D; Turner, M.; Feldmann, M

    1990-01-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNF alpha with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surf...

  8. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arenhart

    Full Text Available Abstract The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3. The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome.

  9. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenhart, Sandra; Silva, José Valter Joaquim; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; Weiblen, Rudi; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3). The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Loop L1 governs the DNA-binding specificity and order for RecA-catalyzed reactions in homologous recombination and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Takeshi; Ikawa, Shukuko; Iwasaki, Wakana; Hiraki, Toshiki; Hikima, Takaaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Arai, Naoto; Kamiya, Nobuo; Shibata, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms, RecA-family recombinases catalyze homologous joint formation in homologous genetic recombination, which is essential for genome stability and diversification. In homologous joint formation, ATP-bound RecA/Rad51-recombinases first bind single-stranded DNA at its primary site and then interact with double-stranded DNA at another site. The underlying reason and the regulatory mechanism for this conserved binding order remain unknown. A comparison of the loop L1 structures in a DNA-free RecA crystal that we originally determined and in the reported DNA-bound active RecA crystals suggested that the aspartate at position 161 in loop L1 in DNA-free RecA prevented double-stranded, but not single-stranded, DNA-binding to the primary site. This was confirmed by the effects of the Ala-replacement of Asp-161 (D161A), analyzed directly by gel-mobility shift assays and indirectly by DNA-dependent ATPase activity and SOS repressor cleavage. When RecA/Rad51-recombinases interact with double-stranded DNA before single-stranded DNA, homologous joint-formation is suppressed, likely by forming a dead-end product. We found that the D161A-replacement reduced this suppression, probably by allowing double-stranded DNA to bind preferentially and reversibly to the primary site. Thus, Asp-161 in the flexible loop L1 of wild-type RecA determines the preference for single-stranded DNA-binding to the primary site and regulates the DNA-binding order in RecA-catalyzed recombinase reactions. PMID:25561575

  11. Redundant function of DNA ligase 1 and 3 in alternative end-joining during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masani, Shahnaz; Han, Li; Meek, Katheryn; Yu, Kefei

    2016-02-02

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammals and resolves the DSBs generated during both V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes and class switch recombination (CSR) in antigen-stimulated B cells. In contrast to the absolute requirement for NHEJ to resolve DSBs associated with V(D)J recombination, DSBs associated with CSR can be resolved in NHEJ-deficient cells (albeit at a reduced level) by a poorly defined alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway. Deletion of DNA ligase IV (Lig4), a core component of the NHEJ pathway, reduces CSR efficiency in a mouse B-cell line capable of robust cytokine-stimulated CSR in cell culture. Here, we report that CSR levels are not further reduced by deletion of either of the two remaining DNA ligases (Lig1 and nuclear Lig3) in Lig4(-/-) cells. We conclude that in the absence of Lig4, Lig1, and Lig3 function in a redundant manner in resolving switch region DSBs during CSR.

  12. Direct and indirect control of the initiation of meiotic recombination by DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Argunhan

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination plays an essential role in the proper segregation of chromosomes at meiosis I in many sexually reproducing organisms. Meiotic recombination is initiated by the scheduled formation of genome-wide DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. The timing of DSB formation is strictly controlled because unscheduled DSB formation is detrimental to genome integrity. Here, we investigated the role of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in the control of meiotic DSB formation using budding yeast. By using recombination defective mutants in which meiotic DSBs are not repaired, the effect of DNA damage checkpoint mutations on DSB formation was evaluated. The Tel1 (ATM pathway mainly responds to unresected DSB ends, thus the sae2 mutant background in which DSB ends remain intact was employed. On the other hand, the Mec1 (ATR pathway is primarily used when DSB ends are resected, thus the rad51 dmc1 double mutant background was employed in which highly resected DSBs accumulate. In order to separate the effect caused by unscheduled cell cycle progression, which is often associated with DNA damage checkpoint defects, we also employed the ndt80 mutation which permanently arrests the meiotic cell cycle at prophase I. In the absence of Tel1, DSB formation was reduced in larger chromosomes (IV, VII, II and XI whereas no significant reduction was found in smaller chromosomes (III and VI. On the other hand, the absence of Rad17 (a critical component of the ATR pathway lead to an increase in DSB formation (chromosomes VII and II were tested. We propose that, within prophase I, the Tel1 pathway facilitates DSB formation, especially in bigger chromosomes, while the Mec1 pathway negatively regulates DSB formation. We also identified prophase I exit, which is under the control of the DNA damage checkpoint machinery, to be a critical event associated with down-regulating meiotic DSB formation.

  13. Ongoing in vivo immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination in chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Andrea; Zan, Hong; Kim, Edmund C; Shah, Shefali; Schattner, Elaine J; Schaffer, András; Casali, Paolo

    2002-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) results from the expansion of malignant CD5(+) B cells that usually express IgD and IgM. These leukemic cells can give rise in vivo to clonally related IgG(+) or IgA(+) elements. The requirements and modalities of this process remain elusive. Here we show that leukemic B cells from 14 of 20 CLLs contain the hallmarks of ongoing Ig class switch DNA recombination (CSR), including extrachromosomal switch circular DNAs and circle transcripts generated by direct S micro -->Sgamma, S micro -->Salpha, and S micro -->Sepsilon as well as sequential Sgamma-->Salpha and Sgamma-->Sepsilon CSR. Similar CLL B cells express transcripts for activation-induced cytidine deaminase, a critical component of the CSR machinery, and contain germline I(H)-C(H) and mature V(H)DJ(H)-C(H) transcripts encoded by multiple Cgamma, Calpha, and Cepsilon genes. Ongoing CSR occurs in only a fraction of the CLL clone, as only small proportions of CD5(+)CD19(+) cells express surface IgG or IgA and lack IgM and IgD. In vivo class-switching CLL B cells down-regulate switch circles and circle transcripts in vitro unless exposed to exogenous CD40 ligand and IL-4. In addition, CLL B cells that do not class switch in vivo activate the CSR machinery and secrete IgG, IgA, or IgE upon in vitro exposure to CD40 ligand and IL-4. These findings indicate that in CLL at least some members of the malignant clone actively differentiate in vivo along a pathway that induces CSR. They also suggest that this process is elicited by external stimuli, including CD40 ligand and IL-4, provided by bystander immune cells.

  14. DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination during cell cycle in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Bozzella, Michael; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that can lead to potentially oncogenic genomic rearrangements or cell death. The two major pathways for repair of DSBs are nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ is an intrinsically error-prone pathway while HR results in accurate repair. To understand the origin of genomic instability in human cells it is important to know the contribution of each DSB repair pathway. Studies of rodent cells and human cancer cell lines have shown that the choice between NHEJ or HR pathways depends on cell cycle stage. Surprisingly, cell cycle regulation of DSB repair has not been examined in normal human cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints. Here we measured the efficiency of NHEJ and HR at different cell cycle stages in hTERT-immortalized diploid human fibroblasts. We utilized cells with chromosomally-integrated fluorescent reporter cassettes, in which a unique DSB is introduced by a rare-cutting endonuclease. We show that NHEJ is active throughout the cell cycle, and its activity increases as cells progress from G1 to G2/M (G1

  15. In vivo importance of homologous recombination DNA repair for mouse neural stem and progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rousseau (Laure); O. Etienne (Olivier); T. Roque (Telma); C. Desmaze (Chantal); C. Haton (Céline); M.-A. Mouthon (Marc-André.); J. Bernardino-Sgherri (Jacqueline); J. Essers (Jeroen); R. Kanaar (Roland); F.D. Boussin (François)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical developm

  16. Cross-talk between nucleotide excision and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in the mechanism of action of antitumor trabectedin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Ana B; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Marco, Esther; Gago, Federico; Moreno, Sergio

    2006-08-15

    Trabectedin (Yondelis) is a potent antitumor drug that has the unique characteristic of killing cells by poisoning the DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The basis for the NER-dependent toxicity has not yet been elucidated but it has been proposed as the major determinant for the drug's cytotoxicity. To study the in vivo mode of action of trabectedin and to explore the role of NER in its cytotoxicity, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model system. Treatment of S. pombe wild-type cells with trabectedin led to cell cycle delay and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, indicating that the drug causes DNA damage in vivo. DNA damage induced by the drug is mostly caused by the NER protein, Rad13 (the fission yeast orthologue to human XPG), and is mainly repaired by homologous recombination. By constructing different rad13 mutants, we show that the DNA damage induced by trabectedin depends on a 46-amino acid region of Rad13 that is homologous to a DNA-binding region of human nuclease FEN-1. More specifically, an arginine residue in Rad13 (Arg961), conserved in FEN1 (Arg314), was found to be crucial for the drug's cytotoxicity. These results lead us to propose a model for the action of trabectedin in eukaryotic cells in which the formation of a Rad13/DNA-trabectedin ternary complex, stabilized by Arg961, results in cell death.

  17. DNA and heparin chaperone the refolding of purified recombinant replication protein A subunit 1 from Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, C B B; Gui, K E; Perez, A M; da Silveira, R C V; Gava, L M; Ramos, C H I; Cano, M I N

    2009-02-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has been implicated in DNA metabolism and telomere maintenance. Subunit 1 of RPA from Leishmania amazonensis (LaRPA-1) has previously been affinity-purified on a column containing a G-rich telomeric DNA. LaRPA-1 binds and co-localizes with parasite telomeres in vivo. Here we describe the purification and characterization of native recombinant LaRPA-1 (rLaRPA-1). The protein was initially re-solubilized from inclusion bodies by using urea. After dialysis, rLaRPA-1 was soluble but contaminated with DNA, which was removed by an anion-exchange chromatography of the protein solubilized in urea. However, rLaRPA-1 precipitated after dialysis to remove urea. To investigate whether the contaminating DNA was involved in chaperoning the refolding of rLaRPA-1, salmon sperm DNA or heparin was added to the solution before dialysis. The addition of either of these substances prevented the precipitation of rLaRPA-1. The resulting rLaRPA-1 was soluble, correctly folded, and able to bind telomeric DNA. This is the first report showing the characterization of rLaRPA1 and of the importance of additives in chaperoning the refolding of this protein. The availability of rLaRPA-1 should be helpful in assessing the importance of this protein as a potential drug target.

  18. cDNA cloning and recombinant expression of the general odorant binding protein Ⅱ from Spodoptera litura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the general odorant binding protein Ⅱ(GOBP Ⅱ) was isolated from the antennae of Spodoptera litura(SlGOBP Ⅱ,GenBank Accession No.EU086371) by homologous cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE).Sequencing and structural analyses revealed that the open reading frame(ORF) of SlGOBP Ⅱ was 489 bp,encoding 162 amino acids with a predicted MW of 18.2 kD and pI of 5.72.SlGOPB Ⅱ shared typical structural features of odorant binding proteins with other insects,including the six conservative cysteine residues.The deduced amino acid sequence of SlGOPB Ⅱ shared significant identity with the GOBP Ⅱ from S.frugiperda and S.exigua.RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses showed that SlGOBP Ⅱ was specifically expressed in the antennae.cDNA encoding SlGOBP Ⅱ was constructed into the pET-32a vector and the recombinant protein was highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) after induction with IPTG.SDS electrophoresis and Western blot analysis confirmed the molecular weight of the recombinant SIGOBPⅡ i.e,32 kD,which has a 6×His tag at the N-terminus.The recombinant SlGOBP Ⅱ was purified by single-step Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and used to raise antiserum in rabbits.ELISA showed that the titer of antiserum was 1:12800,while Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant SlGOBP Ⅱ was recognized as anti-SlGOBP Ⅱ antiserum.

  19. cDNA cloning and recombinant expression of the gen-eral odorant binding protein Ⅱ from Spodoptera litura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN FengLiang; DONG XiaoLin; XU XiaoXia; REN ShunXiang

    2009-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the general odorant binding protein Ⅱ (GOBP Ⅱ) was isolated from the antennae of Spodoptera fitura (SiGOBP Ⅱ, GenBank Accession No. EU086371) by homologous cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Sequencing and structural analyses revealed that the open reading frame (ORF) of SIGOBP Ⅱ was 489 bp, encoding 162 amino acids with a predicted MW of 18.2 kD and pl of 5.72. SIGOPB Ⅱ shared typical structural features of odorant binding proteins with other insects, including the six conservative cysteine residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of SIGOPB Ⅱ shared significant identity with the GOBP Ⅱ from S. frugiperda and S. exigua. RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses showed that SIGOBP Ⅱ was specifically expressed in the antennae, cDNA encoding SIGOBP Ⅱ was constructed into the pET-32a vector and the recombinant protein was highly expressed in Es-cherichia coil BL21 (DE3) after induction with IPTG. SDS electrophoresis and Western blot analysis confirmed the molecular weight of the recombinant SIGOBPⅡ i.e, 32 kD, which has a 6xHis tag at the N-terminus. The recombinant SIGOBP U was purified by single-step Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and used to raise antiserum in rabbits. ELISA showed that the titer of antiserum was 1 : 12800, while Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant SIGOBP Ⅱ was recognized as anti-SiGOBP Ⅱ an-tiserum.

  20. Dpb11/TopBP1 plays distinct roles in DNA replication, checkpoint response and homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Østergaard, Vibe Hallundbæk; Haas, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    displays altered rates of heteroallelic and direct-repeat recombination, sensitivity to DSB-inducing drugs as well as delayed kinetics of mating-type switching with a defect in the DNA synthesis step thus implicating Dpb11 in homologous recombination. We conclude that Dpb11/TopBP1 plays distinct roles......DPB11/TopBP1 is an essential evolutionarily conserved gene involved in initiation of DNA replication and checkpoint signaling. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dpb11 forms nuclear foci that localize to sites of DNA damage in G1, S and G2 phase, a recruitment that is conserved for its...... and Tel1, and of the checkpoint mediator Rad9. In a site-directed mutagenesis screen, we identify a separation-of-function mutant, dpb11-PF, that is sensitive to DSB-inducing agents yet remains proficient for DNA replication and the S-phase checkpoint at the permissive temperature. The dpb11-PF mutant...

  1. DNA as Genetic Material: Revisiting Classical Experiments through an Easy, Practical Class

    OpenAIRE

    W. J. Malagó; A. Soares-Costa; F. Henrique-Silva

    2009-01-01

    In 1928, Frederick Griffith demonstrated a process of transmission of genetic information by transforming  Pneumococcus. In 1944, Oswald Avery, Colin Munro MacLeod and Maclyn McCarty showed that Griffith´stransformation principle  is DNA. Here, we intend to revisit these classicalexperiments by reproducing them in easier adapted forms, for a practical class given to undergraduate students. The Griffith experiment was reproduced by mixing heat-killed, ampicillin - resistant  E. coliwith live a...

  2. Evidence for the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG helicase in DNA repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Roshan S; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Somyajit, Kumar; Jain, Akshatha; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Muniyappa, Kalappa; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2013-04-01

    In order to survive and replicate in a variety of stressful conditions during its life cycle, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must possess mechanisms to safeguard the integrity of the genome. Although DNA repair and recombination related genes are thought to play key roles in the repair of damaged DNA in all organisms, so far only a few of them have been functionally characterized in the tubercle bacillus. In this study, we show that M. tuberculosis RecG (MtRecG) expression was induced in response to different genotoxic agents. Strikingly, expression of MtRecG in Escherichia coli ∆recG mutant strain provided protection against mitomycin C, methyl methane sulfonate and UV induced cell death. Purified MtRecG exhibited higher binding affinity for the Holliday junction (HJ) compared with a number of canonical recombinational DNA repair intermediates. Notably, although MtRecG binds at the core of the mobile and immobile HJs, and with higher binding affinity for the immobile HJ, branch migration was evident only in the case of the mobile HJ. Furthermore, immobile HJs stimulate MtRecG ATPase activity less efficiently than mobile HJs. In addition to HJ substrates, MtRecG exhibited binding affinity for a variety of branched DNA structures including three-way junctions, replication forks, flap structures, forked duplex and a D-loop structure, but demonstrated strong unwinding activity on replication fork and flap DNA structures. Together, these results support that MtRecG plays an important role in processes related to DNA metabolism under normal as well as stress conditions. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  3. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  4. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  5. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  6. Recombination frequency in plasmid DNA containing direct repeats--predictive correlation with repeat and intervening sequence length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Lemos, Francisco; Monteiro, Gabriel A; Prazeres, Duarte M F

    2008-09-01

    In this study, a simple non-linear mathematical function is proposed to accurately predict recombination frequencies in bacterial plasmid DNA harbouring directly repeated sequences. The mathematical function, which was developed on the basis of published data on deletion-formation in multicopy plasmids containing direct-repeats (14-856 bp) and intervening sequences (0-3872 bp), also accounts for the strain genotype in terms of its recA function. A bootstrap resampling technique was used to estimate confidence intervals for the correlation parameters. More than 92% of the predicted values were found to be within a pre-established +/-5-fold interval of deviation from experimental data. The correlation does not only provide a way to predict, with good accuracy, the recombination frequency, but also opens the way to improve insight into these processes.

  7. Detection of DNA-recombinant human epoetin-alfa as a pharmacological ergogenic aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Randall L

    2002-01-01

    The use of DNA-recombinant human epoetin-alfa (rhEPO) as a pharmacological ergogenic aid for the enhancement of aerobic performance is estimated to be practised by at least 3 to 7% of elite endurance sport athletes. rhEPO is synthesised from Chinese hamster ovary cells, and is nearly identical biochemically and immunologically to endogenous epoetin-alfa (EPO). In a clinical setting, rhEPO is used to stimulate erythrocyte production in patients with end-stage renal disease and anaemia. A limited number of human studies have suggested that rhEPO provides a significant erythropoietic and ergogenic benefit in trained individuals as evidenced by increments in haemoglobin, haematocrit, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and exercise endurance time. The purpose of this review is to summarise the various technologies and methodologies currently available for the detection of illicit use of rhEPO in athletes. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) banned the use of rhEPO as an ergogenic aid in 1990. Since then a number of methods have been proposed as potential techniques for detecting the illegal use of rhEPO. Most of these techniques use indirect markers to detect rhEPO in blood samples. These indirect markers include macrocytic hypochromatic erythrocytes and serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfr) concentration. Another indirect technique uses a combination of 5 markers of enhanced erythropoiesis (haematocrit, reticulocyte haematocrit, percentage of macrocytic red blood cells, serum EPO, sTfr) to detect rhEPO. The electrophoretic mobility technique provides a direct measurement of urine and serum levels of rhEPO, and is based on the principle that the rhEPO molecule is less negatively charged versus the endogenous EPO molecule. Isoelectric patterning/focusing has emerged recently as a potential method for the direct analysis of rhEPO in urine. Among these various methodologies, the indirect technique that utilises multiple markers of enhanced erythropoiesis appears to

  8. Removal of nonhomologous DNA ends in double-strand break recombination: The role of the yeast ultraviolet repair gene RAD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishman-Lobell, J.; Habert, J.E. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States))

    1992-10-15

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be repaired by gene conversions or by deletions resulting from single-strand annealing between direct repeats of homologous sequences. Although rad1 mutants are resistant to x-rays and can complete DSB-mediated mating-type switching, they could not complete recombination when the ends of the break contained approximately 60 base pairs of nonhomology. Recombination was restored when the ends of the break were made homologous to donor sequences. Additionally, the absence of RAD1 led to the frequent appearance of a previously unobserved type of recombination product. These data suggest RAD1 is required to remove nonhomologous DNA from the 3{prime} ends of recombining DNA, a process analogous to the excision of photodimers during repair of ultraviolet-damaged DNA.

  9. Temporal Control of Cre Recombinase-mediated in Vitro DNA Recombination by Tet-on Gene Expression System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Min GUO; Kang XU; Ying YUE; Bing HUANG; Xin-Yan DENG; Nü-Qi ZHONG; Xun HONG; Xi-Gu CHEN; Dong XIAO

    2005-01-01

    Conditional gene expression and gene deletion are important experimental approaches for examining the functions of particular gene products in mouse models. These strategies exploiting Cre-mediated site-specific DNA recombination have been incorporated into transgenic and gene-targeting procedures to allow in vivo manipulation of DNA in embryonic stem cells (ES cells) or living animals. The Cre/lox P system has become widely used in conditional gene targeting, conditional gene repair and activation, inducible chromosome translocation, and chromosome engineering. In this project, we have employed the universal transgenic system and the liver-specific promoter system for tightly temporal and liver-specific control of Cre gene expression in mice that (1) integrates the advantages of the Tet-on gene expression system and Cre/lox P site-mediated gene activation, and (2) simplifies the scheme of animal crosses through a combination of two control elements in a single transgene. A liver-specific apoE promoter was inserted into the promoter cloning site upstream of the rtTA cassette of pCore construct to generate the transgene construct pApoErtTAtetO-Cre, followed by demonstrating stringent regulation of doxycycline (Dox)-induced Cre-mediated recombination in the lox P-flanked transcription STOP cassette-modified BEL-7402 cells. That is to say, in the absence of Dox, the Cre gene is not expressed and will not induce site-specific recombination between two lox P sites, whereas on exposure to Dox, the Cre gene will be expressed and the recombination will occur.Together, these data indicate that the Tet-on gene expression system is able to successfully and stringently control Cre expression in vitro, which lays a solid foundation for efficient and spatio-temporal Cre gene activation in transgenic mice.

  10. DNA polymerase kappa from Trypanosoma cruzi localizes to the mitochondria, bypasses 8-oxoguanine lesions and performs DNA synthesis in a recombination intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajão, M A; Passos-Silva, D G; DaRocha, W D; Franco, G R; Macedo, A M; Pena, S D J; Teixeira, S M; Machado, C R

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase kappa (Pol kappa) is a low-fidelity polymerase that has the ability to bypass several types of lesions. The biological role of this enzyme, a member of the DinB subfamily of Y-family DNA polymerases, has remained elusive. In this report, we studied one of the two copies of Pol kappa from the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (TcPol kappa). The role of this TcPol kappa copy was investigated by analysing its subcellular localization, its activities in vitro, and performing experiments with parasites that overexpress this polymerase. The TcPOLK sequence has the N-terminal extension which is present only in eukaryotic DinB members, but its C-terminal region is more similar to prokaryotic and archaeal counterparts since it lacks C(2)HC motifs and PCNA interaction domain. Our results indicate that in contrast to its previously described orthologues, this polymerase is localized to mitochondria. The overexpression of TcPOLK increases T. cruzi resistance to hydrogen peroxide, and in vitro polymerization assays revealed that TcPol kappa efficiently bypasses 8-oxoguanine lesions. Remarkably, our results also demonstrate that the DinB subfamily of polymerases can participate in homologous recombination, based on our findings that TcPol kappa increases T. cruzi resistance to high doses of gamma irradiation and zeocin and can catalyse DNA synthesis within recombination intermediates.

  11. Human SLX4 is a Holliday junction resolvase subunit that binds multiple DNA repair/recombination endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekairi, Samira; Scaglione, Sarah; Chahwan, Charly; Taylor, Ewan R; Tissier, Agnès; Coulon, Stéphane; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ruse, Cristian; Yates, John R; Russell, Paul; Fuchs, Robert P; McGowan, Clare H; Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L

    2009-07-10

    Structure-specific endonucleases resolve DNA secondary structures generated during DNA repair and recombination. The yeast 5' flap endonuclease Slx1-Slx4 has received particular attention with the finding that Slx4 has Slx1-independent key functions in genome maintenance. Although Slx1 is a highly conserved protein in eukaryotes, no orthologs of Slx4 were reported other than in fungi. Here we report the identification of Slx4 orthologs in metazoa, including fly MUS312, essential for meiotic recombination, and human BTBD12, an ATM/ATR checkpoint kinase substrate. Human SLX1-SLX4 displays robust Holliday junction resolvase activity in addition to 5' flap endonuclease activity. Depletion of SLX1 and SLX4 results in 53BP1 foci accumulation and H2AX phosphorylation as well as cellular hypersensitivity to MMS. Furthermore, we show that SLX4 binds the XPF(ERCC4) and MUS81 subunits of the XPF-ERCC1 and MUS81-EME1 endonucleases and is required for DNA interstrand crosslink repair. We propose that SLX4 acts as a docking platform for multiple structure-specific endonucleases.

  12. Overview of post Cohen-Boyer methods for single segment cloning and for multisegment DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Bryan; Brent, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In 1973, Cohen and coworkers published a foundational paper describing the cloning of DNA fragments into plasmid vectors. In it, they used DNA segments made by digestion with restriction enzymes and joined these in vitro with DNA ligase. These methods established working recombinant DNA technology and enabled the immediate start of the biotechnology industry. Since then, "classical" recombinant DNA technology using restriction enzymes and DNA ligase has matured. At the same time, researchers have developed numerous ways to generate large, complex, multisegment DNA constructions that offer advantages over classical techniques. Here, we provide an overview of "post-Cohen-Boyer" techniques used for cloning single segments into vectors (T/A, Topo cloning, Gateway and Recombineering) and for multisegment DNA assembly (Biobricks, Golden Gate, Gibson, Yeast homologous recombination in vivo, and Ligase Cycling Reaction). We compare and contrast these methods and also discuss issues that researchers should consider before choosing a particular multisegment DNA assembly method.

  13. RNA:DNA complex formation upon transcription of immunoglobulin switch regions: implications for the mechanism and regulation of class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G A; Lieber, M R

    1995-01-01

    Central the regulation and mechanism of class switch recombination is the understanding of the relationship between transcription and DNA recombination. We demonstrated previously, using mini-chromosome substrates, that physiologically oriented transcription is required for recombination to occur between switch regions. In this report, we demonstrate the formation of an RNA:DNA complex under in vitro transcription conditions for these same and other switch DNA fragments. We find that cell-free transcription of repetitive murine switch regions (Smu, S gamma 2b and S gamma 3) leads to altered DNA mobility on agarose gels. These altered mobilities are resistant to RNase A but sensitive to RNase H. Transcription in the presence of labeled ribonucleotides demonstrates the stable physical association of the RNA with the DNA. Importantly, complex formation only occurs upon transcription in the physiologic orientation. Reaban and Griffin [1990 Nature, 348, 342-344] found an RNA:DNA hybrid structure that was limited to an atypical 143 nucleotide purine region within a 2.3 kb S alpha segment. Here we demonstrate RNA:DNA hybrid formation in more typical switch sequences (lacking the atypical 143 nucleotide purine tract) from a variety of switch regions that are only 60-70% purine on the non-template strand. These results suggest a general model involving an RNA:DNA complex as an intermediate during class switch recombination. Images PMID:8559658

  14. The role of Candida albicans homologous recombination factors Rad54 and Rdh54 in DNA damage sensitivity

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    White Theodore C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungal pathogen Candida albicans is frequently seen in immune suppressed patients, and resistance to one of the most widely used antifungals, fluconazole (FLC, can evolve rapidly. In recent years it has become clear that plasticity of the Candida albicans genome contributes to drug resistance through loss of heterozygosity (LOH at resistance genes and gross chromosomal rearrangements that amplify gene copy number of resistance associated genes. This study addresses the role of the homologous recombination factors Rad54 and Rdh54 in cell growth, DNA damage and FLC resistance in Candida albicans. Results The data presented here support a role for homologous recombination in cell growth and DNA damage sensitivity, as Candida albicans rad54Δ/rad54Δ mutants were hypersensitive to MMS and menadione, and had an aberrant cell and nuclear morphology. The Candida albicans rad54Δ/rad54Δ mutant was defective in invasion of Spider agar, presumably due to the altered cellular morphology. In contrast, mutation of the related gene RDH54 did not contribute significantly to DNA damage resistance and cell growth, and deletion of either Candida albicans RAD54 or Candida albicans RDH54 did not alter FLC susceptibility. Conclusions Together, these results support a role for homologous recombination in genome stability under nondamaging conditions. The nuclear morphology defects in the rad54Δ/rad54Δ mutants show that Rad54 performs an essential role during mitotic growth and that in its absence, cells arrest in G2. The viability of the single mutant rad54Δ/rad54Δ and the inability to construct the double mutant rad54Δ/rad54Δ rdh54Δ/rdh54Δ suggests that Rdh54 can partially compensate for Rad54 during mitotic growth.

  15. How-to-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Made Easy II. Gene, Gene, Who's Got the Gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an activity in which students are able to determine that DNA can be transferred between bacteria and should be able to predict the type of DNA transferred. Methods, materials, and results are discussed. (CW)

  16. Involvement of Caveolin-1 in repair of DNA damage through both homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caveolin-1 (Cav-1, the major component of caveolae, is a 21-24 kDa integral membrane protein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules. By acting as a scaffolding protein, Cav-1 plays crucial roles in the regulation of various physiologic and patho-physiologic processes including oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis, and tumor invasion and metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we sought to explore the role of Cav-1 in response to DNA damage and the mechanism involved. We found that the level of Cav-1 was up-regulated rapidly in cells treated with ionizing radiation. The up-regulation of Cav-1 following DNA damage occurred only in cells expressing endogenous Cav-1, and was associated with the activation of DNA damage response pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the expression of Cav-1 protected cells against DNA damage through modulating the activities of both the homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair systems, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of the Cav-1-targeted siRNA on cell survival, HR frequency, phosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK, and nuclear translocation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR following DNA damage, and by the stimulatory effect of the forced expression of Cav-1 on NHEJ frequency. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Cav-1 may play a critical role in sensing genotoxic stress and in orchestrating the response of cells to DNA damage through regulating the important molecules involved in maintaining genomic integrity.

  17. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  18. Detection and prognostic value of recurrent exportin 1 mutations in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Vincent; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Mareschal, Sylvain; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Bohers, Elodie; Dubois, Sydney; Picquenot, Jean Michel; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Bertrand, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Tallon-Simon, Valérie; Becker, Stéphanie; Veresezan, Liana; Frebourg, Thierry; Vera, Pierre; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common lymphomas and shares clinical and genetic features with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the recurrent hotspot mutation of the exportin 1 (XPO1, p.E571K) gene, previously identified in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, in biopsies and plasma circulating cell-free DNA from patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma using a highly sensitive digital PCR technique. A total of 94 patients were included in the present study. This widely expressed XPO1 E571K mutation is present in one quarter of classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients (24.2%). Mutated and wild-type classical Hodgkin lymphomas were similar regarding the main clinical features. Patients with a detectable XPO1 mutation at the end of treatment displayed a tendency toward shorter progression-free survival, as compared to patients with undetectable mutation in plasma cell-free DNA (2-year progression-free survival: 57.1%, 95% confidence interval: 30.1-100% versus 2-year progression-free survival: 90.5%, 95% confidence interval: 78.8-100%, respectively, P=0.0601). To conclude, the detection of the XPO1 E571K mutation in biopsy and plasma cell-free DNA by digital PCR may be used as a novel biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma for both diagnosis and minimal residual disease, and pinpoints a crucial role of XPO1 in classical Hodgkin lymphoma pathogenesis. The detection of somatic mutation in the plasma cell-free DNA of patients represents a major technological advance in the context of liquid biopsies and noninvasive management of classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

  19. Detection and prognostic value of recurrent exportin 1 mutations in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Vincent; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Mareschal, Sylvain; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Bohers, Elodie; Dubois, Sydney; Picquenot, Jean Michel; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Bertrand, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Tallon-Simon, Valérie; Becker, Stéphanie; Veresezan, Liana; Frebourg, Thierry; Vera, Pierre; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common lymphomas and shares clinical and genetic features with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the recurrent hotspot mutation of the exportin 1 (XPO1, p.E571K) gene, previously identified in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, in biopsies and plasma circulating cell-free DNA from patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma using a highly sensitive digital PCR technique. A total of 94 patients were included in the present study. This widely expressed XPO1 E571K mutation is present in one quarter of classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients (24.2%). Mutated and wild-type classical Hodgkin lymphomas were similar regarding the main clinical features. Patients with a detectable XPO1 mutation at the end of treatment displayed a tendency toward shorter progression-free survival, as compared to patients with undetectable mutation in plasma cell-free DNA (2-year progression-free survival: 57.1%, 95% confidence interval: 30.1–100% versus 2-year progression-free survival: 90.5%, 95% confidence interval: 78.8–100%, respectively, P=0.0601). To conclude, the detection of the XPO1 E571K mutation in biopsy and plasma cell-free DNA by digital PCR may be used as a novel biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma for both diagnosis and minimal residual disease, and pinpoints a crucial role of XPO1 in classical Hodgkin lymphoma pathogenesis. The detection of somatic mutation in the plasma cell-free DNA of patients represents a major technological advance in the context of liquid biopsies and noninvasive management of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27479820

  20. Evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of the thermo-treatment process to dispose of recombinant DNA waste from biological research laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Nan; Zheng, Guang-Hong; Wang, Lei; Xiao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Hua; Le, Yi-Quan; Ren, Da-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The discharge of recombinant DNA waste from biological laboratories into the eco-system may be one of the pathways resulting in horizontal gene transfer or "gene pollution". Heating at 100 degrees C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating recombinant DNA waste in biological research laboratories in China. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and the safety of the thermo-treatment method in the disposal of recombinant DNA waste. Quantitative PCR, plasmid transformation and electrophoresis technology were used to evaluate the decay/denaturation efficiency during the thermo-treatment process of recombinant plasmid, pET-28b. Results showed that prolonging thermo-treatment time could improve decay efficiency of the plasmid, and its decay half-life was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment at 100 degrees C. However, after 30 min of thermo-treatment some transforming activity remained. Higher ionic strength could protect recombinant plasmid from decay during the treatment process. These results indicate that thermo-treatment at 100 degrees C cannot decay and inactivate pET-28b completely. In addition, preliminary results showed that thermo-treated recombinant plasmids were not degraded completely in a short period when they were discharged into an aquatic environment. This implies that when thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the eco-system, they may have enough time to re-nature and transform, thus resulting in gene diffusion.

  1. Applications of Recombinant DNA Technology in Gastrointestinal Medicine and Hepatology: Basic Paradigms of Molecular Cell Biology. Part A: Eukaryotic Gene Structure and DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Wild

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the basic sciences of cell and molecular biology has provided an exciting dimension that has translated into clinically relevant information in every medical subspecialty. Importantly, the application of recombinant DNA technology has played a major role in unravelling the intricacies related to the molecular pathophysiology of disease. This series of review articles constitutes a framework for the integration of the database of new information into the core knowledge base of concepts related to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disorders and liver disease. The goal of this series of three articles is to review the basic principles of eukaryotic gene expression. The first article examines the role of DNA in directing the flow of genetic information in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Detection of genomic variations and DNA polymorphisms and impact on analysis of meiotic recombination and genetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ji; Chen, Yamao; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Ma, Hong

    2014-07-08

    DNA polymorphisms are important markers in genetic analyses and are increasingly detected by using genome resequencing. However, the presence of repetitive sequences and structural variants can lead to false positives in the identification of polymorphic alleles. Here, we describe an analysis strategy that minimizes false positives in allelic detection and present analyses of recently published resequencing data from Arabidopsis meiotic products and individual humans. Our analysis enables the accurate detection of sequencing errors, small insertions and deletions (indels), and structural variants, including large reciprocal indels and copy number variants, from comparisons between the resequenced and reference genomes. We offer an alternative interpretation of the sequencing data of meiotic products, including the number and type of recombination events, to illustrate the potential for mistakes in single-nucleotide polymorphism calling. Using these examples, we propose that the detection of DNA polymorphisms using resequencing data needs to account for nonallelic homologous sequences.

  3. Overexpression of a Rrp1 transgene reduces the somatic mutation and recombination frequency induced by oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakmary, A; Huang, S M; Chang, D T; Beachy, P A; Sander, M

    1996-02-20

    Recombination repair protein 1 (Rrp1) includes a C-terminal region homologous to several DNA repair proteins, including Escherichia coli exonuclease III and human APE, that repair oxidative and alkylation damage to DNA. The nuclease activities of Rrp1 include apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, 3'-phosphodiesterase, 3'-phosphatase, and 3'-exonuclease. As shown previously, the C-terminal nuclease region of Rrp1 is sufficient to repair oxidative- and alkylation-induced DNA damage in repair-deficient E. coli mutants. DNA strand-transfer and single-stranded DNA renaturation activities are associated with the unique N-terminal region of Rrp1, which suggests possible additional functions that include recombinational repair or homologous recombination. By using the Drosophila w/w+ mosaic eye system, which detects loss of heterozygosity as changes in eye pigmentation, somatic mutation and recombination frequencies were determined in transgenic flies overexpressing wild-type Rrp1 protein from a heat-shock-inducible transgene. A large decrease in mosaic clone frequency is observed when Rrp1 overexpression precedes treatment with gamma-rays, bleomycin, or paraquat. In contrast, Rrp1 overexpression does not alter the spot frequency after treatment with the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate or methyl nitrosourea. A reduction in mosaic clone frequency depends on the expression of the Rrp1 transgene and on the nature of the induced DNA damage. These data suggest a lesion-specific involvement of Rrp1 in the repair of oxidative DNA damage.

  4. A novel virus genome discovered in an extreme environment suggests recombination between unrelated groups of RNA and DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diemer Geoffrey S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses are known to be the most abundant organisms on earth, yet little is known about their collective origin and evolutionary history. With exceptionally high rates of genetic mutation and mosaicism, it is not currently possible to resolve deep evolutionary histories of the known major virus groups. Metagenomics offers a potential means of establishing a more comprehensive view of viral evolution as vast amounts of new sequence data becomes available for comparative analysis. Results Bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic sequences derived from a hot, acidic lake revealed a circular, putatively single-stranded DNA virus encoding a major capsid protein similar to those found only in single-stranded RNA viruses. The presence and circular configuration of the complete virus genome was confirmed by inverse PCR amplification from native DNA extracted from lake sediment. The virus genome appears to be the result of a RNA-DNA recombination event between two ostensibly unrelated virus groups. Environmental sequence databases were examined for homologous genes arranged in similar configurations and three similar putative virus genomes from marine environments were identified. This result indicates the existence of a widespread but previously undetected group of viruses. Conclusions This unique viral genome carries implications for theories of virus emergence and evolution, as no mechanism for interviral RNA-DNA recombination has yet been identified, and only scant evidence exists that genetic exchange occurs between such distinct virus lineages. Reviewers This article was reviewed by EK, MK (nominated by PF and AM. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  5. Top3 processes recombination intermediates and modulates checkpoint activity after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2006-01-01

    Mutation of TOP3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes poor growth, hyperrecombination, and a failure to fully activate DNA damage checkpoints in S phase. Here, we report that overexpression of a dominant-negative allele of TOP3, TOP3(Y356F), which lacks the catalytic (decatenation) activity of Top3......, causes impaired S-phase progression and the persistence of abnormal DNA structures (X-shaped DNA molecules) after exposure to methylmethanesulfonate. The impaired S-phase progression is due to a persistent checkpoint-mediated cell cycle delay and can be overridden by addition of caffeine. Hence......, the catalytic activity of Top3 is not required for DNA damage checkpoint activation, but it is required for normal S-phase progression after DNA damage. We also present evidence that the checkpoint-mediated cell cycle delay and persistence of X-shaped DNA molecules resulting from overexpression of TOP3(Y356F...

  6. Transcriptional profile of the homologous recombination machinery and characterization of the EhRAD51 recombinase in response to DNA damage in Entamoeba histolytica

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    López-Camarillo César

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, homologous recombination is an accurate mechanism to generate genetic diversity, and it is also used to repair DNA double strand-breaks. RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in recombinational DNA repair, including mre11, rad50, nsb1/xrs2, rad51, rad51c/rad57, rad51b/rad55, rad51d, xrcc2, xrcc3, rad52, rad54, rad54b/rdh54 and rad59 genes, have been studied in human and yeast cells. Notably, the RAD51 recombinase catalyses strand transfer between a broken DNA and its undamaged homologous strand, to allow damaged region repair. In protozoan parasites, homologous recombination generating antigenic variation and genomic rearrangements is responsible for virulence variation and drug resistance. However, in Entamoeba histolytica the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, DNA repair and homologous recombination mechanisms are still unknown. Results In this paper, we initiated the study of the mechanism for DNA repair by homologous recombination in the primitive eukaryote E. histolytica using UV-C (150 J/m2 irradiated trophozoites. DNA double strand-breaks were evidenced in irradiated cells by TUNEL and comet assays and evaluation of the EhH2AX histone phosphorylation status. In E. histolytica genome, we identified genes homologous to yeast and human RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in DNA double strand-breaks repair by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the E. histolytica RAD52 epistasis group related genes were differentially expressed before and after UV-C treatment. Next, we focused on the characterization of the putative recombinase EhRAD51, which conserves the typical architecture of RECA/RAD51 proteins. Specific antibodies immunodetected EhRAD51 protein in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Moreover, after DNA damage, EhRAD51 was located as typical nuclear foci-like structures in E. histolytica trophozoites. Purified recombinant EhRAD51 exhibited DNA binding

  7. DNA cleavage is independent of synapsis during Streptomyces phage phiBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Jin; Ou, Xijun; Zhao, Guoping; Ding, Xiaoming

    2010-10-01

    Bacteriophage-encoded serine recombinases have great potential in genetic engineering but their catalytic mechanisms have not been adequately studied. Integration of ϕBT1 and ϕC31 via their attachment (att) sites is catalyzed by integrases of the large serine recombinase subtype. Both ϕBT1 and ϕC31 integrases were found to cleave single-substrate att sites without synaptic complex formation, and ϕBT1 integrase relaxed supercoiled DNA containing a single integration site. Systematic mutation of the central att site dinucleotide revealed that cleavage was independent of nucleotide sequence, but rejoining was crucially dependent upon complementarity of the cleavage products. Recombination between att sites containing dinucleotides with antiparallel complementarity led to antiparallel recombination. Integrase-substrate pre-incubation experiments revealed that the enzyme can form an attP-integrase tetramer complex that then captures naked attB DNA, and suggested that two alternative assembly pathways can lead to synaptic complex formation.

  8. DNA double-strand breaks, recombination and synapsis: the timing of meiosis differs in grasshoppers and flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Alberto; Santos, Juan L; Page, Jesús; Parra, M Teresa; Calvente, Adela; Cifuentes, Marta; Gómez, Rocío; Lira, Renee; Suja, José A; Rufas, Julio S

    2004-01-01

    The temporal and functional relationships between DNA events of meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation are a matter of discussion within the meiotic field. To analyse this subject in grasshoppers, organisms that have been considered as models for meiotic studies for many years, we have studied the localization of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), which marks the sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs), in combination with localization of cohesin SMC3 and recombinase Rad51. We show that the loss of γ-H2AX staining is spatially and temporally linked to synapsis, and that in grasshoppers the initiation of recombination, produced as a consequence of DSB formation, precedes synapsis. This result supports the idea that grasshoppers display a pairing pathway that is not present in other insects such as Drosophila melanogaster, but is similar to those reported in yeast, mouse and Arabidopsis. In addition, we have observed the presence of γ-H2AX in the X chromosome from zygotene to late pachytene, indicating that the function of H2AX phosphorylation during grasshopper spermatogenesis is not restricted to the formation of γ-H2AX foci at DNA DSBs. PMID:15105829

  9. In vivo importance of homologous recombination DNA repair for mouse neural stem and progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Rousseau

    Full Text Available We characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical development without exogenous stress, but it dramatically enhanced the radiation sensitivity of neural stem and progenitor cells. This resulted in the death of all cells irradiated during S or G2, whereas the viability of cells irradiated in G1 or G0 was not affected by Rad54 disruption. Apoptosis occurred after long arrests at intra-S and G2/M checkpoints. This concerned every type of neural stem and progenitor cells, showing that the importance of Rad54 for radiation response was linked to the cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation and not to the differentiation state. In the developing brain, RAD54-dependent homologous recombination appeared absolutely required for the repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation during S and G2 phases, but not for the repair of endogenous damages in normal conditions. Altogether our data support the existence of RAD54-dependent and -independent homologous recombination pathways.

  10. Identification of defective illegitimate recombinational repair of oxidatively-induced DNA double-strand breaks in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M. E.; Winters, T. A.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal-recessive lethal human disease. Homozygotes suffer from a number of neurological disorders, as well as very high cancer incidence. Heterozygotes may also have a higher than normal risk of cancer, particularly for the breast. The gene responsible for the disease (ATM) has been cloned, but its role in mechanisms of the disease remain unknown. Cellular A-T phenotypes, such as radiosensitivity and genomic instability, suggest that a deficiency in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may be the primary defect; however, overall levels of DSB rejoining appear normal. We used the shuttle vector, pZ189, containing an oxidatively-induced DSB, to compare the integrity of DSB rejoining in one normal and two A-T fibroblast cells lines. Mutation frequencies were two-fold higher in A-T cells, and the mutational spectrum was different. The majority of the mutations found in all three cell lines were deletions (44-63%). The DNA sequence analysis indicated that 17 of the 17 plasmids with deletion mutations in normal cells occurred between short direct-repeat sequences (removing one of the repeats plus the intervening sequences), implicating illegitimate recombination in DSB rejoining. The combined data from both A-T cell lines showed that 21 of 24 deletions did not involve direct-repeats sequences, implicating a defect in the illegitimate recombination pathway. These findings suggest that the A-T gene product may either directly participate in illegitimate recombination or modulate the pathway. Regardless, this defect is likely to be important to a mechanistic understanding of this lethal disease.

  11. Expression in Escherichia coli of cDNA encoding barley beta-amylase and properties of recombinant beta-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshigi, N; Okada, Y; Sahara, H; Koshino, S

    1994-06-01

    To express the cloned beta-amylase cDNA in Escherichia coli under control of the tac promoter, a plasmid pBETA92 was constructed. The plasmid consisted of 6312 bp. An extract of E. coli JM109 harboring pBETA92 had beta-amylase activity that produced beta-maltose from soluble starch. The enzyme production started in the logarithmic phase, increased linearly, and reached a maximum after 12 h. The recombinant barley beta-amylase gave two major (pI 5.43 and 5.63) and four minor (pI 5.20, 5.36, 5.80, and 6.13) activity bands on isoelectric focusing, and their pIs didn't change throughout the incubation. But Western blot analysis found that one beta-amylase having a molecular weight of about 56,000 was synthesized. The recombinant beta-amylase was purified from the cells by consecutive column chromatography. The purified enzyme gave a single band of protein on SDS-PAGE but showed heterogeneity on isoelectric focusing. The N-terminal amino acid sequence showed that the recombinant beta-amylase lacked four amino acids at positions 2-5 (Glu-Val-Asn-Val) when compared with the presumed amino acid sequence of barley beta-amylase. Therefore, the recombinant beta-amylase consisted of 531 amino acids, and its molecular weight was calculated to be 59,169. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the recombinant beta-amylase and the nucleotide sequence of the junction position in plasmid pBETA92 indicated that GTG (Val-5 in the case of barley beta-amylase) at positions 27-29 from the SD sequence (AGGA) was the translation initiation codon. The properties of the recombinant beta-amylase were almost the same as those of barley beta-amylase except for the pI and the Km values for maltohexaose and maltoheptaose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Protective immune response induced by co-immunization with the Trichinella spiralis recombinant Ts87 protein and a Ts87 DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaping; Yang, Xiaodi; Gu, Yuan; Wang, Yunyun; Zhao, Xi; Zhu, Xinping

    2013-05-20

    Ts87 is an immunodominant antigen that induces protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis larval challenge in mice. To determine if a combination of recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA induces a stronger immune response in female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 100 μg of recombinant Ts87 protein plus its coding DNA cloned in vector pVAX1, or the same amount of recombinant protein or DNA only. Mouse subclass IgG responses showed that both co-immunized and single-immunized mice produced a balanced IgG2a/IgG1 (Th1/Th2) response. T-cell proliferation in co-immunized animals was significantly higher than in single-immunized mice. Cytokine profiling in the co-immunization group showed a significant increase in the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ in the splenocytes of mice upon stimulation with the recombinant Ts87 protein; however, the expression of IL-17 was down-regulated. Challenge results showed that mice immunized with the recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA produced reduced the muscle larval burden to a greater extent (43.8%) than the groups immunized with only the protein (39.7%) or the DNA (9.7%). A better Th1/Th2 immune response and consequent protection induced by co-immunization with the recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA may result from an adjuvant effect of DNA and a specific persistent expression of Ts87.

  13. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine; Wiegant, Wouter W; van den Heuvel, Diana; Boonen, Rick A; Couturier, Anthony M; Mullenders, Leon H; Masson, Jean-Yves; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent suppression is relieved in S/G2 cells, allowing PALB2-driven HR to occur. With the inhibitory impact of RIF1 relieved, it remains unclear how RNF168-induced ubiquitylation influences HR. Here, we uncover that RNF168 links the HR machinery to H2A ubiquitylation in S/G2 cells. We show that PALB2 indirectly recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20922.001 PMID:28240985

  14. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    for assaying recombination using tetrad analysis in a higher eukaryotic system (6). This system enabled the measurement of the frequency and distribution of recombination events at a genome wide level in wild type Arabidopsis (7), construction of genetic linkage maps which include positions for each centromere (8), and modeling of the strength and pattern of interference (9). This proposal extends the use of tetrad analysis in Arabidopsis by using it as the basis for assessing the phenotypes of mutants in genes important for recombination and the regulation of crossover interference and performing a novel genetic screen. In addition to broadening our knowledge of a classic genetic problem - the regulation of recombination by crossover interference - this proposal also provides broader impact by: generating pedagogical tools for use in hands-on classroom experience with genetics, building interdisciplinary collegial partnerships, and creating a platform for participation by junior scientists from underrepresented groups. There are three specific aims: (1) Isolate mutants in Arabidopsis MUS81 homologs using T-DNA and TILLING (2) Characterize recombination levels and interference in mus81 mutants (3) Execute a novel genetic screen, based on tetrad analysis, for genes that regulate meiotic recombination

  15. Role of Human and Mouse Rad54 in DNA Recombination and Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) which can be induced by endogenously produced radicals or by ionizing radiation are among the most genotoxic DNA lesions. Repair of DSBs is of cardinal importance for the prevention of chromosomal fragmentation, translocations, and deletions. The genetic i

  16. Recombinant DNA technology for melanoma immunotherapy: anti-Id DNA vaccines targeting high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, A; Capitani, M; Cesca, M; Tomassoni, D; Kazmi, U; Concetti, F; Vincenzetti, L; Concetti, A; Venanzi, F M

    2014-11-01

    Anti-idiotypic MK2-23 monoclonal antibody (anti-Id MK2-23 mAb), which mimics the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), has been used to implement active immunotherapy against melanoma. However, due to safety and standardization issues, this approach never entered extensive clinical trials. In the present study, we investigated the usage of DNA vaccines as an alternative to MK2-23 mAb immunization. MK2-23 DNA plasmids coding for single chain (scFv) MK2-23 antibody were constructed via the insertion of variable heavy (V H) and light (V L) chains of MK2-23 into the pVAC-1mcs plasmids. Two alternative MK2-23 plasmids format V H/V L, and V L/V H were assembled. We demonstrate that both polypeptides expressed by scFv plasmids in vitro retained the ability to mimic HMW-MAA antigen, and to elicit specific anti-HMW-MAA humoral and cellular immunoresponses in immunized mice. Notably, MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines impaired the onset and growth of transplantable B16 melanoma cells not engineered to express HMW-MAA. This pilot study suggests that optimized MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines could potentially provide a safer and cost-effective alternative to anti-Id antibody immunization, for melanoma immunotherapy.

  17. Recombinant human MDM2 oncoprotein shows sequence composition selectivity for binding to both RNA and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challen, Christine; Anderson, John J; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Lunec, John

    2012-03-01

    MDM2 is a 90 kDa nucleo-phosphoprotein that binds p53 and other proteins contributing to its oncogenic properties. Its structure includes an amino proximal p53 binding site, a central acidic domain and a carboxy region which incorporates Zinc and Ring Finger domains suggestive of nucleic acid binding or transcription factor function. It has previously been reported that a bacculovirus expressed MDM2 protein binds RNA in a sequence-specific manner through the Ring Finger domain, however, its ability to bind DNA has yet to be examined. We report here that a bacterially expressed human MDM2 protein binds both DNA as well as the previously defined RNA consensus sequence. DNA binding appears selective and involves the carboxy-terminal domain of the molecule. RNA binding is inhibited by an MDM2 specific antibody, which recognises an epitope within the carboxy region of the protein. Selection cloning and sequence analysis of MDM2 DNA binding sequences, unlike RNA binding sequences, revealed no obvious DNA binding consensus sequence, but preferential binding to oligopurine:pyrimidine-rich stretches. Our results suggest that the observed preferential DNA binding may occur through the Zinc Finger or in a charge-charge interaction through the Ring Finger, thereby implying potentially different mechanisms for DNA and RNA MDM2 binding.

  18. Intrachromosomal recombination between highly diverged DNA sequences is enabled in human cells deficient in Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Li, Shen; Smith, Krissy; Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Waldman, Alan S

    2016-05-01

    Mutation of Bloom helicase (BLM) causes Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare human genetic disorder associated with genome instability, elevation of sister chromatid exchanges, and predisposition to cancer. Deficiency in BLM homologs in Drosophila and yeast brings about significantly increased rates of recombination between imperfectly matched sequences ("homeologous recombination," or HeR). To assess whether BLM deficiency provokes an increase in HeR in human cells, we transfected an HeR substrate into a BLM-null cell line derived from a BS patient. The substrate contained a thymidine kinase (tk)-neo fusion gene disrupted by the recognition site for endonuclease I-SceI, as well as a functional tk gene to serve as a potential recombination partner for the tk-neo gene. The two tk sequences on the substrate displayed 19% divergence. A double-strand break was introduced by expression of I-SceI and repair events were recovered by selection for G418-resistant clones. Among 181 events recovered, 30 were accomplished via HeR with the balance accomplished by nonhomologous end-joining. The frequency of HeR events in the BS cells was elevated significantly compared to that seen in normal human fibroblasts or in BS cells complemented for BLM expression. We conclude that BLM deficiency enables HeR in human cells.

  19. Medical devices; general and plastic surgery devices; classification of absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-03

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology into class II (special controls). The special control that will apply to the device is the guidance document entitled "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Absorbable Poly(hydroxybutyrate) Surgical Suture Produced by Recombinant DNA Technology." The agency is classifying these devices into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for this device.

  20. Homologous and non-homologous recombination differentially affect DNA damage repair in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); H. van Steeg (Harry); J. de Wit (Jan); M. Vermeij (Marcel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIonizing radiation and interstrand DNA crosslinking compounds provide important treatments against cancer due to their extreme genotoxicity for proliferating cells. Both the efficacies of such treatments and the mutagenic potential of these agents are modulated by the a

  1. How-To-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Made Easy: I. "Jumping Genes."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    Presents as part I of a two-part series a study involving the intercellular transfer of bacterial DNA that codes for the resistance to antibiotics. Demonstrates to students that such transfers occur. Discusses laboratory procedures, materials and results. (CW)

  2. Search for genes essential for pneumococcal transformation: the RADA DNA repair protein plays a role in genomic recombination of donor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghout, Peter; Bootsma, Hester J; Kloosterman, Tomas G; Bijlsma, Jetta J E; de Jongh, Christa E; Kuipers, Oscar P; Hermans, Peter W M

    2007-09-01

    We applied a novel negative selection strategy called genomic array footprinting (GAF) to identify genes required for genetic transformation of the gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Genome-wide mariner transposon mutant libraries in S. pneumoniae strain R6 were challenged by transformation with an antibiotic resistance cassette and growth in the presence of the corresponding antibiotic. The GAF screen identified the enrichment of mutants in two genes, i.e., hexA and hexB, and the counterselection of mutants in 21 different genes during the challenge. Eight of the counterselected genes were known to be essential for pneumococcal transformation. Four other genes, i.e., radA, comGF, parB, and spr2011, have previously been linked to the competence regulon, and one, spr2014, was located adjacent to the essential competence gene comFA. Directed mutants of seven of the eight remaining genes, i.e., spr0459-spr0460, spr0777, spr0838, spr1259-spr1260, and spr1357, resulted in reduced, albeit modest, transformation rates. No connection to pneumococcal transformation could be made for the eighth gene, which encodes the response regulator RR03. We further demonstrated that the gene encoding the putative DNA repair protein RadA is required for efficient transformation with chromosomal markers, whereas transformation with replicating plasmid DNA was not significantly affected. The radA mutant also displayed an increased sensitivity to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. Hence, RadA is considered to have a role in recombination of donor DNA and in DNA damage repair in S. pneumoniae.

  3. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  4. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF A NOVEL HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE 16 L1/E6-E7 CHIMERIC RECOMBINANT DNA VACCINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑瑾; 马军; 张福萍; 杨筱凤; 董小平; 司履生; 王一理

    2004-01-01

    Objective Preparations of HPV16 L1/E6 and L1/E7 prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines. Methods The nucleotides within HPV16 E6 and E7 genes, which are responsible for viral transforming activity, were mutated by mage primer site-directed mutagenesis method. The correctly mutated E6 and E7 fragments were separately cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1, together with HPV16 L1 gene, generating chimeric recombinants plasmids 1MpVAX1-L1E6, 2MpVAX1-L1E6, 1MpVAX1-L1E7, 2MpVAX1-L1E7 and 3MpVAX1-L1E7. CHO cells were transiently transfected with the individual DNA vaccines by calcium phosphate method. Target protein expressions in the extracts of the transfected cell lines were measured by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, with HPV16 L1 and E6 specific monoclonal antibodies. Results ELISA assays showed the P/N ratios in the cell extracts transfected with L1E6 and L1E7 plasmids were more than 2.1. Immunohistochemistry revealed brownish precipitant signal in cytoplasm and nuclei of the transfected cells. Conclusion Successful constructions of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccine plasmids lay solid foundation for future animal experiment and clinical trial.

  5. A recombinant DNA vaccine protects mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor against lethal challenge with Usutu virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus whose circulation had been confined to Africa since it was first detected in 1959. However, in the last decade USUV has emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and sporadic severe neuroinvasive infections in humans. Remarkably, adult laboratory mice exhibit limited susceptibility to USUV infection, which has impaired the analysis of the immune responses, thus complicating the evaluation of virus-host interactions and of vaccine candidates against this pathogen. In this work, we showed that mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFNAR (-/-) mice) were highly susceptible to USUV infection and provided a lethal challenge model for vaccine testing. To validate this infection model, a plasmid DNA vaccine candidate encoding the precursor of membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of USUV was engineered. Transfection of cultured cells with this plasmid resulted in expression of USUV antigens and the assembly and secretion of small virus-like particles also known as recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). A single intramuscular immunization with this plasmid was sufficient to elicit a significant level of protection against challenge with USUV in IFNAR (-/-) mice. The characterization of the humoral response induced revealed that DNA vaccination primed anti-USUV antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. Overall, these results probe the suitability of IFNAR (-/-) mice as an amenable small animal model for the study of USUV host virus interactions and vaccine testing, as well as the feasibility of DNA-based vaccine strategies for the control of this pathogen.

  6. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  7. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  8. Eimeria maxima microneme protein 2 delivered as DNA vaccine and recombinant protein induces immunity against experimental homogenous challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Menghui; Song, Xiaokai; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-10-01

    E. maxima is one of the seven species of Eimeria that infects chicken. Until now, only a few antigenic genes of E. maxima have been reported. In the present study, the immune protective effects against E. maxima challenge of recombinant protein and DNA vaccine encoding EmMIC2 were evaluated. Two-week-old chickens were randomly divided into five groups. The experimental group of chickens was immunized with 100 μg DNA vaccine pVAX1-MIC2 or 200 μg rEmMIC2 protein while the control group of chickens was injected with pVAX1 plasmid or sterile PBS. The results showed that the anti-EmMIC2 antibody titers of both rEmMIC2 protein and pVAX1-MIC2 groups were significantly higher as compared to PBS and pVAX1 control (Precombinant protein and the DNA vaccine could obviously alleviate jejunum lesions, body weight loss, increase oocyst, decrease ratio and provide ACIs of more than 165. All the above results suggested that immunization with EmMIC2 was effective in imparting partial protection against E. maxima challenge and it could be an effective antigen candidate for the development of new vaccines against E. maxima.

  9. The beyond 12/23 restriction is imposed at the nicking and pairing steps of DNA cleavage during V(D)J recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drejer-Teel, Anna H; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Schatz, David G

    2007-09-01

    The beyond 12/23 (B12/23) rule ensures inclusion of a Dbeta gene segment in the assembled T-cell receptor (TCR) beta variable region exon and is manifest by a failure of direct Vbeta-to-Jbeta gene segment joining. The restriction is enforced during the DNA cleavage step of V(D)J recombination by the recombination-activating gene 1 and 2 (RAG1/2) proteins and the recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking the TCRbeta gene segments. Nothing is known about the step(s) at which DNA cleavage is defective or how TCRbeta locus sequences contribute to these defects. To address this, we examined the steps of DNA cleavage by the RAG proteins using TCRbeta locus V, D, and J RSS oligonucleotide substrates. The results demonstrate that the B12/23 rule is enforced through slow nicking of Jbeta substrates and to some extent through poor synapsis of Vbeta and Jbeta substrates. Nicking is controlled largely by the coding flank and, unexpectedly, the RSS spacer, while synapsis is controlled primarily by the RSS nonamer. The results demonstrate that different Jbeta substrates are crippled at different steps of cleavage by distinct combinations of defects in the various DNA elements and strongly suggest that the DNA nicking step of V(D)J recombination can be rate limiting in vivo.

  10. Visualization of recombinant DNA and protein complexes using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Shannon, Morgan; Goertz, John

    2011-07-18

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the visualizing of individual proteins, DNA molecules, protein-protein complexes, and DNA-protein complexes. On the end of the microscope's cantilever is a nano-scale probe, which traverses image areas ranging from nanometers to micrometers, measuring the elevation of macromolecules resting on the substrate surface at any given point. Electrostatic forces cause proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids to loosely attach to the substrate in random orientations and permit imaging. The generated data resemble a topographical map, where the macromolecules resolve as three-dimensional particles of discrete sizes (Figure 1). Tapping mode AFM involves the repeated oscillation of the cantilever, which permits imaging of relatively soft biomaterials such as DNA and proteins. One of the notable benefits of AFM over other nanoscale microscopy techniques is its relative adaptability to visualize individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in aqueous buffers, including near-physiologic buffered conditions, in real-time, and without staining or coating the sample to be imaged. The method presented here describes the imaging of DNA and an immunoadsorbed transcription factor (i.e. the glucocorticoid receptor, GR) in buffered solution (Figure 2). Immunoadsorbed proteins and protein complexes can be separated from the immunoadsorbing antibody-bead pellet by competition with the antibody epitope and then imaged (Figure 2A). This allows for biochemical manipulation of the biomolecules of interest prior to imaging. Once purified, DNA and proteins can be mixed and the resultant interacting complex can be imaged as well. Binding of DNA to mica requires a divalent cation, such as Ni(2+) or Mg(2+), which can be added to sample buffers yet maintain protein activity. Using a similar approach, AFM has been utilized to visualize individual enzymes, including RNA polymerase and a repair enzyme, bound to individual DNA strands. These experiments provide

  11. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  12. Analysis of branched DNA replication and recombination intermediates from prokaryotic cells by two-dimensional (2D) native-native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules are generated by the essential processes of replication and recombination. Owing to their distinctive extended shapes, these intermediates migrate differently from linear double-stranded DNA under certain electrophoretic conditions. However, these branched species exist in the cell at much low abundance than the bulk linear DNA. Consequently, branched molecules cannot be visualized by conventional electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. Two-dimensional native-native agarose electrophoresis has therefore been developed as a method to facilitate the separation and visualization of branched replication and recombination intermediates. A wide variety of studies have employed this technique to examine branched molecules in eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial cells, providing valuable insights into how DNA is duplicated and repaired in all three domains of life.

  13. DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination, But Not by Nonhomologous End Joining, Is Elevated in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Mao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant double-stranded break (DSB repair leads to genomic instability, which is a hallmark of malignant cells. Double-stranded breaks are repaired by two pathways: homologous recombination (HR and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ. It is not known whether these repair pathways are affected in sporadic breast tumors. Here, we examined the efficiency of HR and NHEJ repair in a panel of sporadic breast cancer cell lines and tested whether the efficiency of HR or NHEJ correlates with radioresistance. Homologous recombination and NHEJ in breast cancer cells were analyzed using in vivo fluorescent assays. Unexpectedly, our analysis revealed that the efficiency of HR is significantly elevated in breast cancer cells compared with normal mammary epithelial cells. In contrast, the efficiency of NHEJ in breast cancer cells is not different from normal cells. Overall, breast cancer cells were more sensitive to radiation than normal cells, but the levels of resistance did not correlate with either HR or NHEJ efficiency. Thus, we demonstrate that sporadic breast cancers are not associated with a deficiency in DSB repair, but rather with upregulation of the HR pathway. Our finding of elevated HR in sporadic breast cancer cell lines suggests that therapies directed against the components of HR will be highly tumor-specific.

  14. DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination, But Not by Nonhomologous End Joining, Is Elevated in Breast Cancer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Xiang; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant double-stranded break (DSB) repair leads to genomic instability, which is a hallmark of malignant cells. Double-stranded breaks are repaired by two pathways: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ). It is not known whether these repair pathways are affected in sporadic breast tumors. Here, we examined the efficiency of HR and NHEJ repair in a panel of sporadic breast cancer cell lines and tested whether the efficiency of HR or NHEJ correlates with radioresistance. Homologous recombination and NHEJ in breast cancer cells were analyzed using in vivo fluorescent assays. Unexpectedly, our analysis revealed that the efficiency of HR is significantly elevated in breast cancer cells compared with normal mammary epithelial cells. In contrast, the efficiency of NHEJ in breast cancer cells is not different from normal cells. Overall, breast cancer cells were more sensitive to radiation than normal cells, but the levels of resistance did not correlate with either HR or NHEJ efficiency. Thus, we demonstrate that sporadic breast cancers are not associated with a deficiency in DSB repair, but rather with upregulation of the HR pathway. Our finding of elevated HR in sporadic breast cancer cell lines suggests that therapies directed against the components of HR will be highly tumor-specific. PMID:19568413

  15. Specific targeted gene repair using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides at an endogenous locus in mammalian cells uses homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Jennifer; Fernandez, Serena; Helleday, Thomas; Bryant, Helen E

    2009-12-03

    The feasibility of introducing point mutations in vivo using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssON) has been demonstrated but the efficiency and mechanism remain elusive and potential side effects have not been fully evaluated. Understanding the mechanism behind this potential therapy may help its development. Here, we demonstrate the specific repair of an endogenous non-functional hprt gene by a ssON in mammalian cells, and show that the frequency of such an event is enhanced when cells are in S-phase of the cell cycle. A potential barrier in using ssONs as gene therapy could be non-targeted mutations or gene rearrangements triggered by the ssON. Both the non-specific mutation frequencies and the frequency of gene rearrangements were largely unaffected by ssONs. Furthermore, we find that the introduction of a mutation causing the loss of a functional endogenous hprt gene by a ssON occurred at a similarly low but statistically significant frequency in wild type cells and in cells deficient in single strand break repair, nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. However, this mutation was not induced in XRCC3 mutant cells deficient in homologous recombination. Thus, our data suggest ssON-mediated targeted gene repair is more efficient in S-phase and involves homologous recombination.

  16. Rtt107 phosphorylation promotes localisation to DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs and recombinational repair between sister chromatids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Ullal

    Full Text Available Efficient repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSB requires a coordinated response at the site of lesion. Nucleolytic resection commits repair towards homologous recombination, which preferentially occurs between sister chromatids. DSB resection promotes recruitment of the Mec1 checkpoint kinase to the break. Rtt107 is a target of Mec1 and serves as a scaffold during repair. Rtt107 plays an important role during rescue of damaged replication forks, however whether Rtt107 contributes to the repair of DSBs is unknown. Here we show that Rtt107 is recruited to DSBs induced by the HO endonuclease. Rtt107 phosphorylation by Mec1 and its interaction with the Smc5-Smc6 complex are both required for Rtt107 loading to breaks, while Rtt107 regulators Slx4 and Rtt101 are not. We demonstrate that Rtt107 has an effect on the efficiency of sister chromatid recombination (SCR and propose that its recruitment to DSBs, together with the Smc5-Smc6 complex is important for repair through the SCR pathway.

  17. [Serologic response to a DNA recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B in natives of the Peruvian Amazonian jungle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colichón, A; Vildósola, H; Sjogren, M; Cantella, R; Rojas, C

    1990-01-01

    Large areas of the Amazon basin in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and in the nonoriental region of the peruvian jungle have been found to be hyperendemic to Hepatitis B with high prevalence of asymptomatic carriers (11 to 25%) and, in more selected areas, Hepatitis Delta has been also reported. In the present report, we have studied 108 volunteers from six different Jivaroes communities living in a hyperendemic Hepatitis B area. They received 2 doses of DNA recombinant yeast derivated HBV vaccine. All the selected persons were HBsAb negatives, but many (80%) had antibodies to HBc. Following immunization schedule, 80% responded with the formation of HBsAb; a better seroconversion was achieved in those negatives to anticore IgG compared with those having HBcAb. We obtained 90% of seroconversion in spite of the fact that our vaccination schedule was prolonged up to 10 months from the one recommended by the manufacturer. The vaccination schedule 0,4, 14 months, and the schedule 0,4 months, had 76 and 29% of seroconversion, respectively. We want to point out three observations: 1) It is quite possible that many of the Anti-core positives, that did not respond to vaccination were carriers of HBsAg undetectable by the conventional EIA test carried out; 2) The seroconversion rate in these natives was low (up to six months after the vaccination schedule); and 3) Many of the HBcAb were false positives and many of them were recently infected. We conclude: A) It is highly important to assess the anti-HBs hyperendemic areas before attempting vaccinations; B) All persons negative to anti-HBs should be vaccinated in spite to anticore antibodies; C) Areas with difficult access could be vaccinated even until 10 months without affecting good results, and D) DNA recombinant vaccine (ENGERIX B) was well tolerated. No side effects were observed.

  18. The study on space-flight induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana using the related homologous recombination reporter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiao; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Li, Huasheng

    Usually, phenotype changes of plants were used to analayze the responding genetic damages. However, this method is time-consuming, laborious and needs a long period. Here, we developed an Arabidopsis thaliana homologous recombination reporter system, in which HR frequency and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level were used as mutagenic end points. Based on the system, effect of DNA damage by space-flight during the Shenzhou-9 mission was investigated. In this study, an Arabidopsis thaliana-line transgenic for GUS recombination substrates (R3L66, AtRAD54promoter:: GFP + GUS) was used to study the mutagenicity of space-flight, and the results showed that 13 days space-flight exposure of seedlings induced a significant increase in HRF compared with its ground-base three-dimensional clinostat (generally called a random positioning machine or RPM, an effective simulator of microgravity) controls and ground 1g controls. We also observed three-dimensional clinostat induced a significant increase in HRF and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level compared with ground 1g controls. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of simulated microgravity on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the simulated microgravity mutagenic effects in plants. In order to understand the combined effects of radiation and microgravity (the main factors in space environment) on DNA damage, we further investigated the effects of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) n vivo in A. thaliana plants using the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. The results showed that the modeled microgravity significantly inhibited the up-regulated expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander aerial plants after root irradiation, suggesting a repressive effect of microgravity on RIBE.

  19. Prime-boost therapeutic vaccination in mice with DNA/DNA or DNA/Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing the Human Papilloma Virus type 16 E6 and E7 mutated proteins fused to the coat protein of Potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiano, Elena; Bissa, Massimiliano; Paolini, Francesca; Zanotto, Carlo; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Franconi, Rosella; Radaelli, Antonia; Venuti, Aldo

    2016-10-02

    The therapeutic antitumor potency of a prime-boost vaccination strategy was explored, based on the mutated, nontransforming forms of the E6 (E6F47R) and E7 (E7GGG) oncogenes of Human Papilloma Virus type 16 (HPV16), fused to the Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP) sequence. Previous data showed that CP fusion improves the immunogenicity of tumor-associated antigens and may thus increase their efficacy. After verifying the correct expression of E6F47RCP and E7GGGCP inserted into DNA and Fowlpox virus recombinants by Western blotting and immunofluorescence, their combined use was evaluated for therapy in a pre-clinical mouse model of HPV16-related tumorigenicity. Immunization protocols were applied using homologous (DNA/DNA) or heterologous (DNA/Fowlpox) prime-boost vaccine regimens. The humoral immune responses were determined by ELISA, and the therapeutic efficacy evaluated by the delay in tumor appearance and reduced tumor volume after inoculation of syngeneic TC-1* tumor cells. Homologous DNA/DNA genetic vaccines were able to better delay tumor appearance and inhibit tumor growth when DNAE6F47RCP and DNAE7GGGCP were administered in combination. However, the heterologous DNA/Fowlpox vaccination strategy was able to delay tumor appearance in a higher number of animals when E6F47RCP and in particular E7GGGCP were administered alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R.; Guerrero, Justin A.; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S–S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52+/+ counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52−/− B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S–S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S–S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52−/− versus Rad52+/+ B cells on Ku86 knockdown. PMID:28176781

  1. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R; Guerrero, Justin A; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-02-08

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S-S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52(+/+) counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52(-/-) B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S-S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S-S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52(-/-) versus Rad52(+/+) B cells on Ku86 knockdown.

  2. Immune responses elicited by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant antigens and DNA constructs with potential for use in vaccination against porcine enzootic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Gonchoroski, Taylor; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Schuck, Desirée Cigaran; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2014-10-07

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia (PEP) and causes major economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Commercially available vaccines provide only partial protection and are relatively expensive. In this study, we assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses to three recombinant antigens of M. hyopneumoniae. Immune responses to selected domains of the P46, HSP70 and MnuA antigens (P46102-253, HSP70212-601 and MnuA182-378), delivered as recombinant subunit or DNA vaccines, were evaluated in BALB/c mice. All purified recombinant antigens and two DNA vaccines, pcDNA3.1(+)/HSP70212-601 and pcDNA3.1(+)/MnuA182-378, elicited a strong humoral immune response, indicated by high IgG levels in the serum. The cellular immune response was assessed by detection of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 in splenocyte culture supernatants. The recombinant subunit and DNA vaccines induced Th1-polarized immune responses, as evidenced by increased levels of IFN-γ. All recombinant subunit vaccines and the pcDNA3.1(+)/MnuA182-378 vaccine also induced the secretion of IL-10, a Th2-type cytokine, in large quantities. The mixed Th1/Th2-type response may elicit an effective immune response against M. hyopneumoniae, suggesting that P46102-253, HSP70212-601 and MnuA182-378 are potential novel and promising targets for the development of vaccines against PEP.

  3. How-To-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Technology in the High School Biology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a basic biotechnology investigation that includes restriction and ligation of plasmid DNA, transformation of bacteria and cloning of these bacterial cells. Discusses laboratory procedures and another activity in the identification of unknown plasmids by studying agarose gel electrophoresis photographs. (CW)

  4. Human DNA Helicase B Functions in Cellular Homologous Recombination and Stimulates Rad51-Mediated 5′-3′ Heteroduplex Extension In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjian; Yan, Peijun; Fanning, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is involved in the repair of DNA damage and collapsed replication fork, and is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Its process involves a network of proteins with different enzymatic activities. Human DNA helicase B (HDHB) is a robust 5′-3′ DNA helicase which accumulates on chromatin in cells exposed to DNA damage. HDHB facilitates cellular recovery from replication stress, but its role in DNA damage response remains unclear. Here we report that HDHB silencing results in reduced sister chromatid exchange, impaired homologous recombination repair, and delayed RPA late-stage foci formation induced by ionizing radiation. Ectopically expressed HDHB colocalizes with Rad51, Rad52, RPA, and ssDNA. In vitro, HDHB stimulates Rad51-mediated heteroduplex extension in 5′-3′ direction. A helicase-defective mutant HDHB failed to promote this reaction. Our studies implicate HDHB promotes homologous recombination in vivo and stimulates 5′-3′ heteroduplex extension during Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro. PMID:25617833

  5. Comparative Immunization in BALB/c Mice with Recombinant Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vector and DNA Plasmid Expressing a SARS-CoV Nucleocapsid Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Ma; Kun Yao; Feng Zhou; Minsheng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate immunogenicity in the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-N gene recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vector, rAd-N, was generated and immunized BALB/c mice in a pcDNA3.1-N prime-rAd-N boost regimen. After humoral and cellular immune response detection, different levels of SARS-CoV N protein specific antibodies and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion are shown compared to controls. The humoral immune response was induced more effectively by the DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boosting regimen. There is a significant difference between heterogeneous and homologous vaccinations. The heterogeneous combinations were all higher than those of the homologous combinations in the induction of anti-N antibody response. Among the three heterogeneous combinations, pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/rAd-N induced the strongest antibody response. In the induction of IFN-γ production, the homologous combination of rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd- N was significantly stronger than that of pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3. 1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N, but was relatively weaker than the heterogeneous combination of pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/rAd-N. This combination was a most efficient immunization regimen in induction of SARS-CoV-N-specific (IFN-γ) secretion just as the antibody response. These results suggest that DNA immunization followed by recombinant adenovirus boosting could be used as a potential SARS-CoV vaccine.

  6. Extended minus-strand DNA as template for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer in recombinational rescue of primer binding site-modified retroviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Dybkaer, K

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated recombinational rescue of primer binding site (PBS)-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors involving initial priming on endogenous viral sequences and template switching during cDNA synthesis to obtain PBS complementarity in second-strand transfer...... of reverse transcription (Mikkelsen et al., J. Virol. 70:1439-1447, 1996). By use of the same forced recombination system, we have now found recombinant proviruses of different structures, suggesting that PBS knockout vectors may be rescued through initial priming on endogenous virus RNA, read......-through of the mutated PBS during minus-strand synthesis, and subsequent second-strand transfer mediated by the R-U5 complementarity of the plus strand and the extended minus-strand DNA acceptor template. Mechanisms for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer and its possible role in retrovirus replication and evolution...

  7. Feline and canine coronaviruses are released from the basolateral side of polarized epithelial LLC-PK1 cells expressing the recombinant feline aminopeptidase-N cDNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Kouame, J; Goedheer, A J; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    2001-01-01

    In this study feline (FECV and FIPV) and canine (CCoV) coronavirus entry into and release from polarized porcine epithelial LLC-PK1 cells, stably expressing the recombinant feline aminopeptidase-N cDNA, were investigated. Virus entry appeared to occur preferentially through the apical membrane, simi

  8. Assembly and dynamics of the bacteriophage T4 homologous recombination machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrical Scott W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Homologous recombination (HR, a process involving the physical exchange of strands between homologous or nearly homologous DNA molecules, is critical for maintaining the genetic diversity and genome stability of species. Bacteriophage T4 is one of the classic systems for studies of homologous recombination. T4 uses HR for high-frequency genetic exchanges, for homology-directed DNA repair (HDR processes including DNA double-strand break repair, and for the initiation of DNA replication (RDR. T4 recombination proteins are expressed at high levels during T4 infection in E. coli, and share strong sequence, structural, and/or functional conservation with their counterparts in cellular organisms. Biochemical studies of T4 recombination have provided key insights on DNA strand exchange mechanisms, on the structure and function of recombination proteins, and on the coordination of recombination and DNA synthesis activities during RDR and HDR. Recent years have seen the development of detailed biochemical models for the assembly and dynamics of presynaptic filaments in the T4 recombination system, for the atomic structure of T4 UvsX recombinase, and for the roles of DNA helicases in T4 recombination. The goal of this chapter is to review these recent advances and their implications for HR and HDR mechanisms in all organisms.

  9. Nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in integration mutagenesis in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maassen, Nicole; Freese, Stefan; Schruff, Barbara; Passoth, Volkmar; Klinner, Ulrich

    2008-08-01

    Pichia stipitis integrates linear homologous DNA fragments mainly ectopically. High rates of randomly occurring integration allow tagging mutagenesis with high efficiency using simply PCR amplificates of suitable selection markers from the P. stipitis genome. Linearization of an autonomously replicating vector caused a distinct increase of the transformation efficiency compared with the circular molecule. Cotransformation of a restriction endonuclease further enhanced the transformation efficiency. This effect was also observed with integrative vector DNA. In most cases vector integration in chromosomal targets did not depend on microhomologies, indicating that restriction-enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) does not play an essential role in P. stipitis. Small deletions were observed at the ends of the integrated vectors and in the target sites. Disruption of the PsKU80 gene increased the frequency of homologous integration considerably but resulted in a remarkable decrease of the transformation efficiency. These results suggest that in P. stipitis the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway obviously predominates the homologous recombination pathway of double-strand break repair.

  10. Research in Undergraduate Instruction: A Biotech Lab Project for Recombinant DNA Protein Expression in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Mark; Ordman, Alfred B.; Campbell, A. Malcolm

    1996-06-01

    In the sophomore-level Molecular Biology and Biotechnology course at Beloit College, students learn basic methods in molecular biology in the context of pursuing a semester-long original research project. We are exploring how DNA sequence affects expression levels of proteins. A DNA fragment encoding all or part of the guanylate monokinase (gmk) sequence is cloned into pSP73 and expressed in E. coli. A monoclonal antibody is made to gmk. The expression level of gmk is determined by SDS gel elctrophoresis, a Western blot, and an ELISA assay. Over four years, an increase in enrollment in the course from 9 to 34 students, the 85% of majors pursuing advanced degrees, and course evaluations all support the conclusion that involving students in research during undergraduate courses encourages them to pursue careers in science.

  11. TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination Produces Site-Directed DNA Base Change and Herbicide-Resistant Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Chen, Chih Ying; Yang, Bing

    2016-05-20

    Over the last decades, much endeavor has been made to advance genome editing technology due to its promising role in both basic and synthetic biology. The breakthrough has been made in recent years with the advent of sequence-specific endonucleases, especially zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) guided nucleases (e.g., Cas9). In higher eukaryotic organisms, site-directed mutagenesis usually can be achieved through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair to the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the exogenously applied nucleases. However, site-specific gene replacement or genuine genome editing through homologous recombination (HR) repair to DSBs remains a challenge. As a proof of concept gene replacement through TALEN-based HR in rice (Oryza sativa), we successfully produced double point mutations in rice acetolactate synthase gene (OsALS) and generated herbicide resistant rice lines by using TALENs and donor DNA carrying the desired mutations. After ballistic delivery into rice calli of TALEN construct and donor DNA, nine HR events with different genotypes of OsALS were obtained in T0 generation at the efficiency of 1.4%-6.3% from three experiments. The HR-mediated gene edits were heritable to the progeny of T1 generation. The edited T1 plants were as morphologically normal as the control plants while displayed strong herbicide resistance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TALEN-mediated genome editing in rice and provide useful information for further genome editing by other nuclease-based genome editing platforms.

  12. Evaluation of immunogenicity and reactogenicity of recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine produced in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahid Hussain; Syed S Ali; Syed A Husain; Mohammad Raish; Deepika R Sharma; Premashis Kar

    2005-01-01

    AIM: (1) To gain information on immune responses to an accelerated schedule of 0, 1, and 2 mo in paramedical staff and BDS students who are at an increased risk of getting hepatitis B infection and come under high risk groups. (2) To assess the efficacy and safety of EnivacHB in different age groups, using genetically modified yeast strain Pichia pastoris, a new recombinant hepatitis B vaccine developed and manufactured in India.METHODS: A prospective, comparative, and single blinded trial of rapid (0, 1, and 2 mo) hepatitis B immunization schedulewas reported. A total of three hundred and seven (212 females and 95 males) healthy volunteers divided into three age groups (18-29, 30-39,and 40-49) were enrolled after screening for markers of hepatitis B. All the volunteers received 20 mg of the vaccine intramuscularly at 0, 1, and 2 mo.RESULTS: Geometric mean titers were calculated pre and post vaccination. Before immunization the GMT was 0.0124 mIU/mL. One month after the administration of the third dose of recombinant vaccine 296/307 (96.5%)subjects achieved seroprotective levels of anti-HBs. The geometric mean anti-HBs titers achieved after one month of the third dose was 2 560.0 mIU/mL. The geometric mean anti-HBs titer of males was 2 029.0 mIU/mL, while that of the females was 2 759.0 mIU/mL. In the age group of 18-29 years, anti-HBs titer was 3 025.0 mIU/mL, while that in the age group of 30-39 years was 2096.0 mIU/mL. In third age group of 40-49 years, antiHBs titer was 1 592.0 mIU/mL. Hyper-responses (antiHBs≥100 mIU/mL) were shown in 88.0% (271/307) of subjects. Eleven (3.5%) subjects responded poorly to the vaccine in the age group of 40-49 years. There was only mild pain at the site of injection otherwise there were no other adverse drug reactions (ADRs).CONCLUSION: This vaccine (Enivac-HB) is safe and efficacious, providing significant protection after the third dose and rapid hepatitis B immunization schedule of 0, 1, and 2 mo can be recommended

  13. Opposing Roles for Two Molecular Forms of Replication Protein A in Rad51-Rad54-Mediated DNA Recombination in Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial RecA protein and its eukaryotic homologue Rad51 play a central role in the homologous DNA strand exchange reaction during recombination and DNA repair. Previously, our lab has shown that PfRad51, the Plasmodium falciparum homologue of Rad51, exhibited ATPase activity and promoted DNA strand exchange in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the catalytic functions of PfRad51 in the presence of putative interacting partners, especially P. falciparum homologues of Rad54 and r...

  14. Conditions for gene disruption by homologous recombination of exogenous DNA into the Sulfolobus solfataricus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja-Verena Albers

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of directed gene deletion mutants is an essential tool in molecular biology that allows functional studies on the role of genes in their natural environment. For hyperthermophilic archaea, it has been difficult to obtain a reliable system to construct such mutants. However, during the past years, systems have been developed for Thermococcus kodakarensis and two Sulfolobus species, S. acidocaldarius and derivatives of S. solfataricus 98/2. Here we describe an optimization of the method for integration of exogenous DNA into S. solfataricus PBL 2025, an S. solfataricus 98/2 derivative, based on lactose auxotrophy that now allows for routine gene inactivation.

  15. Discrimination of Recombinant from Natural Human Growth Hormone Using DNA Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Detection of athletes who use synthetic human growth hormone (hGH; or somatotropin) to enhance physical strength and obtain an advantage in competitive sports is a formidable problem, as rhGH is virtually identical to the natural pituitary hormone. However, some post-translational and other modifications have been documented by chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry (MS) in a small percentage of rhGH. In the present work, development of DNA aptamers against research-grade rhGH and n...

  16. Characterisation of a new reporter system allowing high throughput in planta screening for recombination events before and after controlled DNA double strand break induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrkamp-Richter, Sophie; Degroote, Fabienne; Laffaire, Jean-Baptiste; Paul, Wyatt; Perez, Pascual; Picard, Georges

    2009-04-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are created either by DNA damaging reagents or in a programmed manner, for example during meiosis. Homologous recombination (HR) can be used to repair DSBs, a process vital both for cell survival and for genetic rearrangement during meiosis. In order to easily quantify this mechanism, a new HR reporter gene that is suitable for the detection of rare recombination events in high-throughput screens was developed in Arabidopsis thaliana. This reporter, pPNP, is composed of two mutated Pat genes and has also one restriction site for the meganuclease I-SceI. A functional Pat gene can be reconstituted by an HR event giving plants which are resistant to the herbicide glufosinate. The basal frequency of intra-chromosomal recombination is very low (10(-5)) and can be strongly increased by the expression of I-SceI which creates a DSB. Expression of I-SceI under the control of the 35S CaMV promoter dramatically increases HR frequency (10,000 fold); however the measured recombinant events are in majority somatic. In contrast only germinal recombination events were measured when the meganuclease was expressed from a floral-specific promoter. Finally, the reporter was used to test a dexamethasone inducible I-SceI which could produce up to 200x more HR events after induction. This novel inducible I-SceI should be useful in fundamental studies of the mechanism of repair of DSBs and for biotechnological applications.

  17. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  18. cDNA cloning,sequence analysis,and recombinant expression of akitonin beta,a C-type lectin-like protein from Agkistrodon acutus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-dong ZHA; Jing LIU; Kang-sen XU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone the cDNA of a new member of snake venom C-type lectin-like proteins, to study its structurefunction relationships and to achieve its recombinant production. METHODS: PCR primers were designed based on the homology and cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR using total RNA from snake venom gland as the template.The PCR products were cloned into the plasmid pGEM-T and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence was analyzed with some bioinformatic programs. A recombinant expression plasmid was constructed using pBADTOPO as vector and transformed into E. coli TOP10 competent cells. RESULTS: A novel cDNA sequence encoding akitonin β was found and accepted by GenBank (accession number AF387100). Akitonin β consists of a typical carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of C-type lectins, and it is homologous with other snake venom C-type lectin-like proteins. It was predicted to be a platelet antagonist. Upon induction with arabinose rAkitonin β expressing in E coli was achieved at a high level (superior to 150 mg/L). The recombinant fusion protein exhibited inhibitory activities on rat platelet aggregation in vitro. CONCLUSION: A new member of snake venom C-type lectin-like proteins was discovered and characterized, and an efficient recombinant expression system was established for its production.

  19. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  20. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  1. Organization of DNA partners and strand exchange mechanisms during Flp site-specific recombination analyzed by difference topology, single molecule FRET and single molecule TPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chien-Hui; Liu, Yen-Ting; Savva, Christos G; Rowley, Paul A; Cannon, Brian; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Russell, Rick; Holzenburg, Andreas; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2014-02-20

    Flp site-specific recombination between two target sites (FRTs) harboring non-homology within the strand exchange region does not yield stable recombinant products. In negatively supercoiled plasmids containing head-to-tail sites, the reaction produces a series of knots with odd-numbered crossings. When the sites are in head-to-head orientation, the knot products contain even-numbered crossings. Both types of knots retain parental DNA configuration. By carrying out Flp recombination after first assembling the topologically well defined Tn3 resolvase synapse, it is possible to determine whether these knots arise by a processive or a dissociative mechanism. The nearly exclusive products from head-to-head and head-to-tail oriented "non-homologous" FRT partners are a 4-noded knot and a 5-noded knot, respectively. The corresponding products from a pair of native (homologous) FRT sites are a 3-noded knot and a 4-noded catenane, respectively. These results are consistent with non-homology-induced two rounds of dissociative recombination by Flp, the first to generate reciprocal recombinants containing non-complementary base pairs and the second to produce parental molecules with restored base pairing. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) analysis of geometrically restricted FRTs, together with single molecule tethered particle motion (smTPM) assays of unconstrained FRTs, suggests that the sites are preferentially synapsed in an anti-parallel fashion. This selectivity in synapse geometry occurs prior to the chemical steps of recombination, signifying early commitment to a productive reaction path. The cumulative topological, smFRET and smTPM results have implications for the relative orientation of DNA partners and the directionality of strand exchange during recombination mediated by tyrosine site-specific recombinases.

  2. Evaluation of attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated inhibin recombinant DNA vaccine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, F M; Meng, C L; Guo, N N; Yang, L G; Shi, F X; Mao, D G

    2014-08-07

    DNA vaccination has been studied intensively as a potential vaccine technology. We evaluated the effect of an attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated inhibin DNA vaccine in rats. First, 15 rats were treated with different doses of an inhibin vaccine to evaluate vaccine safety. Next, 30 rats were divided into 3 groups and injected intramuscularly with the inhibin vaccine two (T1) or three times (T2) or with control bacteria (Con) at 4-week intervals. The inhibin antibody levels increased [positive/negative well (P/N) value: T1 vs Con = 2.39 ± 0.01 vs 1.08 ± 0.1; T2 vs Con = 2.36 ± 0.1 vs 1.08 ± 0.1, P < 0.05] at week 2 and were maintained at a high level in T1 and T2 until week 8, although a small decrease in T2 was observed at week 10. Rats in the T1 group showed more corpora lutea compared with the Con group (10.50 ± 0.87 vs 7.4 ± 0.51, P < 0.05). Estradiol (0.439 ± 0.052 vs 0.719 ± 0.063 ng/mL, P < 0.05) and progesterone (1.315 ± 0.2 vs 0.737 ± 0.11 ng/mL, P < 0.05) levels differed significantly at metestrus after week 10 between rats in the T1 and Con groups. However, there were no significant differences in body, ovary, uterus weights, or pathological signs in the ovaries after immunization, indicating that this vaccine is safe. In conclusion, the attenuated S. choleraesuis-mediated inhibin vaccine may be an alternative to naked inhibin plasmids for stimulating ovarian follicular development to increase the ovulation rate in rats.

  3. Expression of a chimeric human/salmon calcitonin gene integrated into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using rDNA sequences as recombination sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hengyi; Zang, Xiaonan; Liu, Yuantao; Cao, Xiaofei; Wu, Fei; Huang, Xiaoyun; Jiang, Minjie; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin participates in controlling homeostasis of calcium and phosphorus and plays an important role in bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to endow an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the ability to express chimeric human/salmon calcitonin (hsCT) without the use of antibiotics. To do so, a homologous recombination plasmid pUC18-rDNA2-ura3-P pgk -5hsCT-rDNA1 was constructed, which contains two segments of ribosomal DNA of 1.1 kb (rDNA1) and 1.4 kb (rDNA2), to integrate the heterologous gene into host rDNA. A DNA fragment containing five copies of a chimeric human/salmon calcitonin gene (5hsCT) under the control of the promoter for phosphoglycerate kinase (P pgk ) was constructed to express 5hsCT in S. cerevisiae using ura3 as a selectable auxotrophic marker gene. After digestion by restriction endonuclease HpaI, a linear fragment, rDNA2-ura3-P pgk -5hsCT-rDNA1, was obtained and transformed into the △ura3 mutant of S. cerevisiae by the lithium acetate method. The ura3-P pgk -5hsCT sequence was introduced into the genome at rDNA sites by homologous recombination, and the recombinant strain YS-5hsCT was obtained. Southern blot analysis revealed that the 5hsCT had been integrated successfully into the genome of S. cerevisiae. The results of Western blot and ELISA confirmed that the 5hsCT protein had been expressed in the recombinant strain YS-5hsCT. The expression level reached 2.04 % of total proteins. S. cerevisiae YS-5hsCT decreased serum calcium in mice by oral administration and even 0.01 g lyophilized S. cerevisiae YS-5hsCT/kg decreased serum calcium by 0.498 mM. This work has produced a commercial yeast strain potentially useful for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  4. Rad3-Cds1 mediates coupling of initiation of meiotic recombination with DNA replication. Mei4-dependent transcription as a potential target of meiotic checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Keiko; Masai, Hisao

    2006-01-20

    Premeiotic S-phase and meiotic recombination are known to be strictly coupled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the checkpoint pathway regulating this coupling has been largely unknown. In fission yeast, Rad3 is known to play an essential role in coordination of DNA replication and cell division during both mitotic growth and meiosis. Here we have examined whether the Rad3 pathway also regulates the coupling of DNA synthesis and recombination. Inhibition of premeiotic S-phase with hydroxyurea completely abrogates the progression of meiosis, including the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSB formation is restored in rad3 mutant even in the presence of hydroxyurea, although repair of DSBs does not take place or is significantly delayed, indicating that the subsequent recombination steps may be still inhibited. Examination of the roles of downstream checkpoint kinases reveals that Cds1, but not Chk1 or Mek1, is required for suppression of DSB in the presence of hydroxyurea. Transcriptional induction of some rec+ genes essential for DSB occurs at a normal timing and to a normal level in the absence of DNA synthesis in both the wild-type and cds1delta cells. On the other hand, the transcriptional induction of the mei4+ transcription factor and cdc25+ phosphatase, which is significantly suppressed by hydroxyurea in the wild-type cells, occurs almost to a normal level in cds1delta cells even in the presence of hydroxyurea. These results show that the Rad3-Cds1 checkpoint pathway coordinates initiation of meiotic recombination and meiotic cell divisions with premeiotic DNA synthesis. Because mei4+ is known to be required for DSB formation and cdc25+ is required for activation of meiotic cell divisions, we propose an intriguing possibility that the Rad3-Cds1 meiotic checkpoint pathway may target transcription of these factors.

  5. Effect of dietary phytase transgenic corn on physiological characteristics and the fate of recombinant plant DNA in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunqi; Ma, Qiugang; Zhao, Lihong; Zhang, Jianyun; Ji, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the potential effects of feeding with phytase transgenic corn (PTC) on organ weight, serum biochemical parameters and nutrient digestibility, and to determine the fate of the transgenic DNA in laying hens. A total of 144 50-week-old laying hens were grouped randomly into 2 treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 9 hens per replicate. Each treatment group of hens was fed with diets containing 62.4% non-transgenic conventional corn (CC) or PTC for 16 weeks. The phytase activity for CC was 37 FTU/kg of DM, whereas the phytase activity for PTC was 8,980 FTU/kg of DM. We observed that feeding PTC to laying hens had no adverse effect on organ weight or serum biochemical parameters (p>0.05). A fragment of a poultry-specific ovalbumin gene (ov) was amplified from all tissues of hens showing that the DNA preparations were amenable to PCR amplification. Neither the corn-specific invertase gene (ivr) nor the transgenic phyA2 gene was detected in the breast muscle, leg muscle, ovary, oviduct and eggs. The digestibility data revealed no significant differences between the hens that received the CC- and PTC-based diets in the digestibility of DM, energy, nitrogen and calcium (p>0.05). Phosphorus digestibility of hens fed the PTC-based diet was greater than that of hens fed the CC-based diet (58.03% vs 47.42%, phens. No recombinant phyA2 gene was detected in muscle tissues and reproductive organs of laying hens. The novel plant phytase was efficacious in improving the phosphorus digestibility of laying hens.

  6. Mutation of the mouse Rad17 gene leads to embryonic lethality and reveals a role in DNA damage-dependent recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzowska, Magda; Jaspers, Iris; Essers, Jeroen; de Waard, Harm; van Drunen, Ellen; Hanada, Katsuhiro; Beverloo, Berna; Hendriks, Rudolf W; de Klein, Annelies; Kanaar, Roland; Hoeijmakers, Jan H; Maas, Alex

    2004-09-01

    Genetic defects in DNA repair mechanisms and cell cycle checkpoint (CCC) genes result in increased genomic instability and cancer predisposition. Discovery of mammalian homologs of yeast CCC genes suggests conservation of checkpoint mechanisms between yeast and mammals. However, the role of many CCC genes in higher eukaryotes remains elusive. Here, we report that targeted deletion of an N-terminal part of mRad17, the mouse homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad17 checkpoint clamp-loader component, resulted in embryonic lethality during early/mid-gestation. In contrast to mouse embryos, embryonic stem (ES) cells, isolated from mRad17(5'Delta/5'Delta) embryos, produced truncated mRad17 and were viable. These cells displayed hypersensitivity to various DNA-damaging agents. Surprisingly, mRad17(5'Delta/5'Delta) ES cells were able to arrest cell cycle progression upon induction of DNA damage. However, they displayed impaired homologous recombination as evidenced by a strongly reduced gene targeting efficiency. In addition to a possible role in DNA damage-induced CCC, based on sequence homology, our results indicate that mRad17 has a function in DNA damage-dependent recombination that may be responsible for the sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents.

  7. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urushihara, Yusuke [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kobayashi, Junya [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yoshihisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Komatsu, Kenshi [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi, E-mail: mitani@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan)

    2012-12-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after {gamma}-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci after {gamma}-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after {gamma}-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the

  8. Who owns what? Private ownership and the public interest in recombinant DNA technology in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Doogab

    2011-09-01

    This essay analyzes how academic institutions, government agencies, and the nascent biotech industry contested the legal ownership of recombinant DNA technology in the name of the public interest. It reconstructs the way a small but influential group of government officials and university research administrators introduced a new framework for the commercialization of academic research in the context of a national debate over scientific research's contributions to American economic prosperity and public health. They claimed that private ownership of inventions arising from public support would provide a powerful means to liberate biomedical discoveries for public benefit. This articulation of the causal link between private ownership and the public interest, it is argued, justified a new set of expectations about the use of research results arising from government or public support, in which commercialization became a new public obligation for academic researchers. By highlighting the broader economic and legal shifts that prompted the reconfiguration of the ownership of public knowledge in late twentieth-century American capitalism, the essay examines the threads of policy-informed legal ideas that came together to affirm private ownership of biomedical knowledge as germane to the public interest in the coming of age of biotechnology and genetic medicine.

  9. A Moraxella bovis pili vaccine produced by recombinant DNA technology for the prevention of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, A W; Elleman, T C; Hoyne, P A; Lehrbach, P R; Atwell, J L; Schwartzkoff, C L; Egerton, J R; Tennent, J M

    1993-07-01

    Pili (fimbriae) were prepared from Moraxella bovis strain Dalton 2d (Dal2d) and from a derivative of Pseudomonas aeruginosa K/2PfS that contained a plasmid-borne Dal2d pilin gene and produced pili having serogroup-specific identity to Dal2d. Nine calves were vaccinated with two doses each of 30 micrograms authentic M. bovis Dal2d pili in oil adjuvant and 10 calves were vaccinated with a similar dose of P. aeruginosa-derived Dal2d pili in the same formulation. All 19 calves and 10 non-vaccinated controls were challenged by instillation of 1 x 10(9) virulent M. bovis Dal2d cells into both conjunctival sacs 19 days after the second vaccine dose. The serological response to vaccination and the degree of protection against experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) were assessed. None of the nine calves vaccinated with authentic M. bovis Dal2d pili developed IBK while two of those vaccinated with P. aeruginosa-derived Dal2d pili developed lesions which accounted for a mean group lesion score of 0.3. In contrast, 9 of the 10 non-vaccinated calves developed IBK lesions, the majority of which were progressive, required early treatment and accounted for a mean group lesion score of 1.5. These results demonstrate the potential of a relatively low dose of pili produced by recombinant DNA technology for development of an effective vaccine against IBK.

  10. Ca2+ improves organization of single-stranded DNA bases in human Rad51 filament, explaining stimulatory effect on gene recombination.

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H

    2012-02-22

    Human RAD51 protein (HsRad51) catalyses the DNA strand exchange reaction for homologous recombination. To clarify the molecular mechanism of the reaction in vitro being more effective in the presence of Ca(2+) than of Mg(2+), we have investigated the effect of these ions on the structure of HsRad51 filament complexes with single- and double-stranded DNA, the reaction intermediates. Flow linear dichroism spectroscopy shows that the two ionic conditions induce significantly different structures in the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA complex, while the HsRad51/double-stranded DNA complex does not demonstrate this ionic dependence. In the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA filament, the primary intermediate of the strand exchange reaction, ATP/Ca(2+) induces an ordered conformation of DNA, with preferentially perpendicular orientation of nucleobases relative to the filament axis, while the presence of ATP/Mg(2+), ADP/Mg(2+) or ADP/Ca(2+) does not. A high strand exchange activity is observed for the filament formed with ATP/Ca(2+), whereas the other filaments exhibit lower activity. Molecular modelling suggests that the structural variation is caused by the divalent cation interfering with the L2 loop close to the DNA-binding site. It is proposed that the larger Ca(2+) stabilizes the loop conformation and thereby the protein-DNA interaction. A tight binding of DNA, with bases perpendicularly oriented, could facilitate strand exchange.

  11. Discrimination of recombinant from natural human growth hormone using DNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, John G; Carrillo, Maria P; Phillips, Taylor; Edge, Allison

    2011-04-01

    Detection of athletes who use synthetic human growth hormone (hGH; or somatotropin) to enhance physical strength and obtain an advantage in competitive sports is a formidable problem, as rhGH is virtually identical to the natural pituitary hormone. However, some post-translational and other modifications have been documented by chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry (MS) in a small percentage of rhGH. In the present work, development of DNA aptamers against research-grade rhGH and natural hGH with adsorption of the rhGH aptamers against natural hGH was shown to produce a small family of aptamer sequences that bound consistently with greater affinity to rhGH over a low nanogram-to-microgram range in ELISA-like microplate assays. This collection of rhGH discriminatory aptamer sequences shared some short sequence segments and secondary structural features. The top rhGH discriminatory aptamers also appeared to cross-react with human myoglobin and BSA but not with bone collagen peptides and an unrelated viral envelope peptide. The cross-reactivity results suggested several strings of up to five consecutive amino acids that might serve as common epitopes for aptamer binding. SDS-PAGE revealed that the rhGH existed largely as a 45-kDa dimer, and the natural hGH was almost exclusively monomeric. The existence of the rhGH dimer suggests that a discontinuous "bridge" epitope may exist on the rhGH, which spans the subunits, thereby accounting somewhat for the difference in detection. Overall, these results suggest that aptamers might be useful for routine, presumptive laboratory screening to identify athletes who are potentially cheating by administration of rhGH.

  12. Head-to-Head Comparison of Three Vaccination Strategies Based on DNA and Raw Insect-Derived Recombinant Proteins against Leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, María del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories –the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines– is a practical and cost-effective way for potential “off the shelf” supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  13. Head-to-head comparison of three vaccination strategies based on DNA and raw insect-derived recombinant proteins against Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todolí, Felicitat; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Núñez, María Del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M; Alberola, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories -the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines- is a practical and cost-effective way for potential "off the shelf" supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  14. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage is differently repaired during the cell cycle by non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Campos-Nebel

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II (Top2 is a nuclear enzyme involved in several metabolic processes of DNA. Chemotherapy agents that poison Top2 are known to induce persistent protein-mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSB. In this report, by using knock down experiments, we demonstrated that Top2alpha was largely responsible for the induction of gammaH2AX and cytotoxicity by the Top2 poisons idarubicin and etoposide in normal human cells. As DSB resulting from Top2 poisons-mediated damage may be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homologous recombination (HR, we aimed to analyze both DNA repair pathways. We found that DNA-PKcs was rapidly activated in human cells, as evidenced by autophosphorylation at serine 2056, following Top2-mediated DNA damage. The chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs by wortmannin and vanillin resulted in an increased accumulation of DNA DSB, as evaluated by the comet assay. This was supported by a hypersensitive phenotype to Top2 poisons of Ku80- and DNA-PKcs- defective Chinese hamster cell lines. We also showed that Rad51 protein levels, Rad51 foci formation and sister chromatid exchanges were increased in human cells following Top2-mediated DNA damage. In support, BRCA2- and Rad51C- defective Chinese hamster cells displayed hypersensitivity to Top2 poisons. The analysis by immunofluorescence of the DNA DSB repair response in synchronized human cell cultures revealed activation of DNA-PKcs throughout the cell cycle and Rad51 foci formation in S and late S/G2 cells. Additionally, we found an increase of DNA-PKcs-mediated residual repair events, but not Rad51 residual foci, into micronucleated and apoptotic cells. Therefore, we conclude that in human cells both NHEJ and HR are required, with cell cycle stage specificity, for the repair of Top2-mediated reversible DNA damage. Moreover, NHEJ-mediated residual repair events are more frequently associated to irreversibly damaged cells.

  15. Integration-free reprogramming of human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) without viral vectors, recombinant DNA, and genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are envisaged to be integral components of multicellular systems engineered for therapeutic applications. The reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via recombinant expression of a limited number of transcription factors, which was first achieved by Yamanaka and colleagues in 2007, heralded a major breakthrough in the stem cell field. Since then, there has been rapid progress in the field of iPSC generation, including the identification of various small molecules that can enhance reprogramming efficiency and reduce the number of different transcription factors required for reprogramming. Nevertheless, the major obstacles facing clinical applications of iPSCs are safety concerns associated with the use of viral vectors and recombinant DNA for expressing the appropriate transcription factors during reprogramming. In particular, permanent genetic modifications to newly reprogrammed iPSCs have to be avoided in order to meet stringent safety requirements for clinical therapy. These safety challenges can be overcome by new technology platforms that enable cellular reprogramming to iPSCs without the need to utilize either recombinant DNA or viral vectors. The use of recombinant cell-penetrating peptides and direct transfection of synthetic mRNA encoding appropriate transcription factors have both been shown to successfully reprogram somatic cells to iPSCs. It has also been shown more recently that the direct transfection of certain miRNA species can reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency without the need for any of the transcription factors commonly utilized for iPSC generation. This chapter describes protocols for iPSC generation with these new techniques, which would obviate the use of recombinant DNA and viral vectors in cellular reprogramming, thus avoiding permanent genetic modification to the reprogrammed cells.

  16. A mechanistic dissection of polyethylenimine mediated transfection of CHO cells: to enhance the efficiency of recombinant DNA utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, Olivia L; Thompson, Ben C; Fernandez-Martell, Alejandro; James, David C

    2014-01-01

    cytotoxicity. The combination of propyl-PEI and Clone 4 doubled the efficiency of recombinant DNA utilization and reporter protein production. These data show that for maximal efficacy, strategies to increase polyplex internalization into cells must be used in concert with strategies to offset the inherent cytotoxicity of this process.

  17. A deletion distinct from the classical homologous recombination of juvenile nephronophthisis type 1 (NPH1) allows exact molecular definition of deletion breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, E; Betz, R; Rensing, C; Schätzle, S; Kuntzen, T; Vetsi, T; Imm, A; Hildebrandt, F

    2000-09-01

    Juvenile nephronophthisis, an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease, is the most common genetic cause of end-stage renal disease in children and young adults. We recently identified by positional cloning the causative gene, NPHP1. Its gene product nephrocystin may play a role in focal adhesion and adherens junction signaling. Approximately 80% of all patients with NPH1 carry large homozygous deletions, which contain the NPHP1 gene. These common deletions are positioned within a complex arrangement of large inverted and direct repeats, suggesting unequal recombination as a potential cause for their origin. In this study we have characterized the deletion breakpoints in a family with juvenile nephronophthisis that bears a unique maternal deletion of the NPHP1 gene, which is not the result of an event of homologous recombination. We molecularly characterized the centromeric and telomeric deletion breakpoints by extensive genomic sequencing, Southern blot analysis, and cloning and sequencing of the junction fragment. We were able to exactly localize the breakpoints at the position of two guanines. The centromeric breakpoint was positioned within intron 2 of the NPHP1 gene 360 bp downstream of the 5' end of a complete LINE-1 element. Multiple topoisomerase I and II consensus sequences were found at the breakpoint sites, suggesting the involvement of topoisomerase II in the deletion mechanism. These findings provide the first data on a potential mechanism for a deletion of the NPHP1 gene, that most likely is not the result of an event of homologous recombination and thereby distinct from the known common deletions. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. A new set of rDNA-NTS-based multiple integrative cassettes for the development of antibiotic-marker-free recombinant yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hye Yun; Lee, Dong Wook; Sim, Gyu Hun; Kim, Hong-Jin; Hwang, Jee Youn; Kwon, Mun-Gyeong; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong Man; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2016-09-10

    The traditional yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used as a host system to produce recombinant proteins and metabolites of great commercial value. To engineer recombinant yeast that stably maintains expression cassettes without an antibiotic resistance gene, we developed new multiple integration cassettes by exploiting the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in combination with defective selection markers. The 5' and 3'-fragments of rDNA-NTS2 were used as flanking sequences for the expression cassettes carrying a set of URA3, LEU2, HIS3, and TRP1 selection markers with truncated promoters of different lengths. The integration numbers of NTS-based expression cassettes, ranging from one to ∼30 copies, showed a proportional increase with the extent of decreased expression of the auxotrophic markers. The NTS-based cassettes were used to construct yeast strains expressing the capsid protein of red-spotted grouper necrosis virus (RG-NNVCP) in a copy number-dependent manner. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast, harboring ∼30 copies of the integrated RG-NNVCP cassettes, provoked efficient immune responses in mice. In contrast, for the NTS cassettes expressing a truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, the integrant carrying only 4 copies was screened as the highest producer of squalene, showing a 150-fold increase compared to that of the wild-type strain. The multiple integrated cassettes were stably retained under prolonged nonselective conditions. Altogether, our results strongly support that rDNA-NTS integrative cassettes are useful tools to construct recombinant yeasts carrying optimal copies of a desired expression cassette without an antibiotic marker gene, which are suitable as oral vaccines or feed additives for animal and human consumption.

  19. The PCNA interaction protein box sequence in Rad54 is an integral part of its ATPase domain and is required for efficient DNA repair and recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Sebesta, Marek; Sisakova, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Rad54 is an ATP-driven translocase involved in the genome maintenance pathway of homologous recombination (HR). Although its activity has been implicated in several steps of HR, its exact role(s) at each step are still not fully understood. We have identified a new interaction between Rad54...... and the replicative DNA clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). This interaction was only mildly weakened by the mutation of two key hydrophobic residues in the highly-conserved PCNA interaction motif (PIP-box) of Rad54 (Rad54-AA). Intriguingly, the rad54-AA mutant cells displayed sensitivity to DNA damage...

  20. Exploring the 5'-UTR DNA region as a target for optimizing recombinant gene expression from the strong and inducible Pm promoter in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Laila; Kucharova, Veronika; Bakke, Ingrid; Valla, Svein; Brautaset, Trygve

    2012-04-30

    By using the strong and inducible Pm promoter as a model, we recently reported that the β-lactamase production (encoded by bla) can be stimulated up to 20-fold in Escherichia coli by mutating the DNA region corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of mRNA (UTR). One striking observation was the unexpected large stimulatory effect some of these UTR variants had on the bla transcript production level. We here demonstrate that such UTR variants can also be used to improve the expression level of the alternative genes celB (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and inf-α2b (encoding human cytokine interferon α2b), which both can be expressed to high levels even with the wild-type Pm UTR DNA sequence. Our data indicated some degree of context dependency between the UTR DNA and concomitant recombinant gene sequences. By constructing and using a synthetic operon, we demonstrated that UTR variants optimized for high-level expression of probably any recombinant gene can be efficiently selected from large UTR mutant libraries. The stimulation affected both the transcript production and translational level, and such modified UTR sequences therefore clearly have a significant applied potential for improvement of recombinant gene expression processes.

  1. NIH oversight of human gene transfer research involving retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated virus vectors and the role of the NIH recombinant DNA advisory committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Marina; Shipp, Allan; Rosenthal, Eugene; Jambou, Robert; Shih, Tom; Montgomery, Maureen; Gargiulo, Linda; Patterson, Amy; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    In response to public and scientific concerns regarding human gene transfer research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a transparent oversight system that extends to human gene transfer protocols that are either conducted with NIH funding or conducted at institutions that receive NIH funding for recombinant DNA research. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) has been the primary advisory body to NIH regarding the conduct of this research. Human gene transfer research proposals that are subject to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) must be submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA), and protocols that raise novel scientific, safety, medical, ethical, or social issues are publicly discussed at the RAC's quarterly public meetings. OBA also convenes gene transfer safety symposia and policy conferences to provide a public forum for scientific experts to discuss emerging issues in the field. This transparent system of review promotes the rapid exchange of important scientific information and dissemination of data. The goal is to optimize the conduct of individual research protocols and to advance gene transfer research generally. This process has fostered the development of retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vector mediated gene delivery.

  2. Therapeutic targeting of liver cancer with a recombinant DNA vaccine containing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of Newcastle disease virus via apoptotic-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Gang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Zheng, Tang-Hui; Chen, Xu; Li, Ping; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2016-11-01

    A total of ~38.6 million mortalities occur due to liver cancer annually, worldwide. Although a variety of therapeutic methods are available, the efficacy of treatment at present is extremely limited due to an increased risk of malignancy and inherently poor prognosis of liver cancer. Gene therapy is considered a promising option, and has shown notable potential for the comprehensive therapy of liver cancer, in keeping with advances that have been made in the development of cancer molecular biology. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of the abilities of the hemagglutinin neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the pro-apoptotic factor apoptin from chicken anaemia virus, and the interferon-γ inducer interleukin-18 (IL-18) in antagonizing liver cancer. Therefore, a recombinant DNA plasmid expressing the three exogenous genes, VP3, IL-18 and hemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN), was constructed. Flow cytometry, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and analysis of caspase-3 activity were performed in H22 cell lines transfected with the recombinant DNA plasmid. In addition, 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were used to establish a H22 hepatoma-bearing mouse model. Mice tumor tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the present study revealed that the recombinant DNA vaccine containing the VP3, IL-18 and HN genes inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy via the mitochondrial pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  3. A recombinant plasmid of composite cysteine proteinase inhibitor/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of periodic Brugia malayi functions on DNA immunity in the host

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    Z Fang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Both cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH play important roles in the pathogenesis of parasites and their relationship with the hosts. We constructed a new eukaryotic recombinant expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH of periodic Brugia malayi for investigation of the DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses. Materials and Methods: We cloned a gene encoding the CPIs and GAPDH from periodic B. malayi into vector pcDNA3.1. The composited plasmid or the control was injected into the tibialis anterior muscle of the hind leg in BALB/c mice, respectively. The target genes were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in muscle tissues. The stimulation index (SI of T-lymphocyte proliferation and the levels of interferon-gamma (INF-g and interleukin-4 ( IL-4 in serum were detected by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: The pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH was amplified from muscle tissues of the mice after immunisation. The SI of the immunised group was significantly higher than that of the two control groups (P < 0.05. The levels of INF-g and IL-4 of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH group were both higher than those of the two control groups (P < 0.05. The level of INF-g of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH group was significantly higher than that of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/CpG group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: We conclude that the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH could elicit specific humoural and cellular immune responses in mice.

  4. [Nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility and the state of mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA regions in alloplasmic recombinant and introgressive lines (H. vulgare)-T. aestivum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, L A; Trubacheva, N V; Sinyavskaya, M G; Devyatkina, E P; Kravtsova, L A

    2014-10-01

    Alloplasmic lines combining alien nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes are convenient models for studying the mechanisms of nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility/incompatibility. In the.present study, we have investigated the correlation between the characters and state of mitochondrial (mt) and chloroplast (cp) DNA regions in alloplasmic recombinant common wheat lines with barley cytoplasm characterized by partial or total fertility. Fertility restoration in the studied lines (Hordeum vulgare)-Triticum aestivum is determined by different ratios of the genetic material of common wheat variety Pyrotrix 28, which is a fertility restorer in the cytoplasm of barley, and varietySaratovskaya 29, which is a fixer of sterility. In partially fertile lines with nuclear genomes dominated by the genetic material of Saratovskaya 29, plant growth and development are suppressed. In these lines we have identified the barley homoplasmy of cpDNA regions infA and rpoB and the heteroplasmy of the 18S/5S mt repeat and the cpDNA ycf5 region. Nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in lines with reduced fertility (the genetic material of Pyrotrix 28 predominates in their nuclear genomes) is associated with restoration of normal plant growth and development and the changes in thestate of the studied cpDNA and mtDNA regions towards the wheat type. Thus, in fertile lines, the cpDNA regions (infA, rpoB) and the 18S/5S mt repeat were identified in the homoplasmic wheat state; though the cpDNAycf5 region was in the heteroplasmic state, it was dominated by the wheat type of the copies. The nuclearicytoplasmic compatibility is not broken as a result of introgression of the alien genetic material into the nuclear genome of one of the fertile lines; the plants of introgressive lines are fertile and normally developed, and the states of the cpDNA and mtDNA regions correspond to their states in fertile recombinant lines.

  5. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

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    Olga Mestre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  6. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  7. DNA elution from buccal cells stored on Whatman FTA Classic Cards using a modified methanol fixation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Helene C; Hyland, Valentine; Wicking, Carol; Sturm, Richard A

    2009-04-01

    We describe here a method for DNA elution from buccal cells and whole blood both collected onto Whatman FTA technology, using methanol fixation followed by an elution PCR program. Extracted DNA is comparable in quality to published Whatman FTA protocols, as judged by PCR-based genotyping. Elution of DNA from the dried sample is a known rate-limiting step in the published Whatman FTA protocol; this method enables the use of each 3-mm punch of sample for several PCR reactions instead of the standard, one PCR reaction per sample punch. This optimized protocol therefore extends the usefulness and cost effectiveness of each buccal swab sample collected, when used for nucleic acid PCR and genotyping.

  8. Heteroduplex DNA position defines the roles of the Sgs1, Srs2, and Mph1 helicases in promoting distinct recombination outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, Katrina; Lehner, Kevin; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of the Sgs1, Mph1, and Srs2 DNA helicases during mitotic double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast were investigated using a gap-repair assay. A diverged chromosomal substrate was used as a repair template for the gapped plasmid, allowing mismatch-containing heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) formed during recombination to be monitored. Overall DSB repair efficiencies and the proportions of crossovers (COs) versus noncrossovers (NCOs) were determined in wild-type and helicase-defective strains, allowing the efficiency of CO and NCO production in each background to be calculated. In addition, the products of individual NCO events were sequenced to determine the location of hDNA. Because hDNA position is expected to differ depending on whether a NCO is produced by synthesis-dependent-strand-annealing (SDSA) or through a Holliday junction (HJ)-containing intermediate, its position allows the underlying molecular mechanism to be inferred. Results demonstrate that each helicase reduces the proportion of CO recombinants, but that each does so in a fundamentally different way. Mph1 does not affect the overall efficiency of gap repair, and its loss alters the CO-NCO by promoting SDSA at the expense of HJ-containing intermediates. By contrast, Sgs1 and Srs2 are each required for efficient gap repair, strongly promoting NCO formation and having little effect on CO efficiency. hDNA analyses suggest that all three helicases promote SDSA, and that Sgs1 and Srs2 additionally dismantle HJ-containing intermediates. The hDNA data are consistent with the proposed role of Sgs1 in the dissolution of double HJs, and we propose that Srs2 dismantles nicked HJs.

  9. Heteroduplex DNA position defines the roles of the Sgs1, Srs2, and Mph1 helicases in promoting distinct recombination outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Mitchel

    Full Text Available The contributions of the Sgs1, Mph1, and Srs2 DNA helicases during mitotic double-strand break (DSB repair in yeast were investigated using a gap-repair assay. A diverged chromosomal substrate was used as a repair template for the gapped plasmid, allowing mismatch-containing heteroduplex DNA (hDNA formed during recombination to be monitored. Overall DSB repair efficiencies and the proportions of crossovers (COs versus noncrossovers (NCOs were determined in wild-type and helicase-defective strains, allowing the efficiency of CO and NCO production in each background to be calculated. In addition, the products of individual NCO events were sequenced to determine the location of hDNA. Because hDNA position is expected to differ depending on whether a NCO is produced by synthesis-dependent-strand-annealing (SDSA or through a Holliday junction (HJ-containing intermediate, its position allows the underlying molecular mechanism to be inferred. Results demonstrate that each helicase reduces the proportion of CO recombinants, but that each does so in a fundamentally different way. Mph1 does not affect the overall efficiency of gap repair, and its loss alters the CO-NCO by promoting SDSA at the expense of HJ-containing intermediates. By contrast, Sgs1 and Srs2 are each required for efficient gap repair, strongly promoting NCO formation and having little effect on CO efficiency. hDNA analyses suggest that all three helicases promote SDSA, and that Sgs1 and Srs2 additionally dismantle HJ-containing intermediates. The hDNA data are consistent with the proposed role of Sgs1 in the dissolution of double HJs, and we propose that Srs2 dismantles nicked HJs.

  10. Recombinant methods and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roizman, B.; Post, L.E.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a method for stably effecting the insertion or deletion of a selected DNA sequence at a specific site in a viral genome. The method consists of: (1) isolating from the genome a linear DNA fragment comprising both (a) the specific site determined for insertion or deletion of selected DNA sequence and (b) flanking DNA sequences normally preceding and following the site; (2) preparing first and second altered genome fragments from the fragment isolated in step (1). (a) the first altered fragment comprising the fragment comprising a thymidine kinase gene in a position intermediate the ends of the fragment, and (b) the second altered fragment comprising the fragment having the selected DNA sequence inserted therein or deleted therefrom; (3) contacting the genome with the first altered fragment under conditions permitting recombination at sites of DNA sequence homology, selecting for a recombinant genome comprising the thymidine kinase gene, and isolating the recombinant genome; and (4) contacting the recombinant genome isolated in step (3) with the second altered fragment under conditions permitting recombination at sites of DNA sequence homology, selecting for a recombinant genome lacking the thymidine kinase gene, and isolating the recombinant genome product.

  11. Production and characterization of novel recombinant adeno-associated virus replicative-form genomes: a eukaryotic source of DNA for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Li

    Full Text Available Conventional non-viral gene transfer uses bacterial plasmid DNA containing antibiotic resistance genes, cis-acting bacterial sequence elements, and prokaryotic methylation patterns that may adversely affect transgene expression and vector stability in vivo. Here, we describe novel replicative forms of a eukaryotic vector DNA that consist solely of an expression cassette flanked by adeno-associated virus (AAV inverted terminal repeats. Extensive structural analyses revealed that this AAV-derived vector DNA consists of linear, duplex molecules with covalently closed ends (termed closed-ended, linear duplex, or "CELiD", DNA. CELiD vectors, produced in Sf9 insect cells, require AAV rep gene expression for amplification. Amounts of CELiD DNA produced from insect cell lines stably transfected with an ITR-flanked transgene exceeded 60 mg per 5 × 10(9 Sf9 cells, and 1-15 mg from a comparable number of parental Sf9 cells in which the transgene was introduced via recombinant baculovirus infection. In mice, systemically delivered CELiD DNA resulted in long-term, stable transgene expression in the liver. CELiD vectors represent a novel eukaryotic alternative to bacterial plasmid DNA.

  12. Production and characterization of novel recombinant adeno-associated virus replicative-form genomes: a eukaryotic source of DNA for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lina; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Yang, Yu; Li, Juan; Yuan, Zhenhua; Qiao, Chunping; Beley, Cyriaque; Smith, Richard H; Garcia, Luis; Kotin, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Conventional non-viral gene transfer uses bacterial plasmid DNA containing antibiotic resistance genes, cis-acting bacterial sequence elements, and prokaryotic methylation patterns that may adversely affect transgene expression and vector stability in vivo. Here, we describe novel replicative forms of a eukaryotic vector DNA that consist solely of an expression cassette flanked by adeno-associated virus (AAV) inverted terminal repeats. Extensive structural analyses revealed that this AAV-derived vector DNA consists of linear, duplex molecules with covalently closed ends (termed closed-ended, linear duplex, or "CELiD", DNA). CELiD vectors, produced in Sf9 insect cells, require AAV rep gene expression for amplification. Amounts of CELiD DNA produced from insect cell lines stably transfected with an ITR-flanked transgene exceeded 60 mg per 5 × 10(9) Sf9 cells, and 1-15 mg from a comparable number of parental Sf9 cells in which the transgene was introduced via recombinant baculovirus infection. In mice, systemically delivered CELiD DNA resulted in long-term, stable transgene expression in the liver. CELiD vectors represent a novel eukaryotic alternative to bacterial plasmid DNA.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of heteroduplex DNA in mismatch repair-deficient yeast cells reveals novel properties of meiotic recombination pathways.

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    Emmanuelle Martini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs initiate crossover (CO recombination, which is necessary for accurate chromosome segregation, but DSBs may also repair as non-crossovers (NCOs. Multiple recombination pathways with specific intermediates are expected to lead to COs and NCOs. We revisited the mechanisms of meiotic DSB repair and the regulation of CO formation, by conducting a genome-wide analysis of strand-transfer intermediates associated with recombination events. We performed this analysis in a SK1 × S288C Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrid lacking the mismatch repair (MMR protein Msh2, to allow efficient detection of heteroduplex DNAs (hDNAs. First, we observed that the anti-recombinogenic activity of MMR is responsible for a 20% drop in CO number, suggesting that in MMR-proficient cells some DSBs are repaired using the sister chromatid as a template when polymorphisms are present. Second, we observed that a large fraction of NCOs were associated with trans-hDNA tracts constrained to a single chromatid. This unexpected finding is compatible with dissolution of double Holliday junctions (dHJs during repair, and it suggests the existence of a novel control point for CO formation at the level of the dHJ intermediate, in addition to the previously described control point before the dHJ formation step. Finally, we observed that COs are associated with complex hDNA patterns, confirming that the canonical double-strand break repair model is not sufficient to explain the formation of most COs. We propose that multiple factors contribute to the complexity of recombination intermediates. These factors include repair of nicks and double-stranded gaps, template switches between non-sister and sister chromatids, and HJ branch migration. Finally, the good correlation between the strand transfer properties observed in the absence of and in the presence of Msh2 suggests that the intermediates detected in the absence of Msh2 reflect normal intermediates.

  14. Stable antigen is most effective for eliciting CD8+ T-cell responses after DNA vaccination and infection with recombinant vaccinia virus in vivo.

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    Schliehe, Christopher; Bitzer, Annegret; van den Broek, Maries; Groettrup, Marcus

    2012-09-01

    The induction of strong CD8(+) T-cell responses against infectious diseases and cancer has remained a major challenge. Depending on the source of antigen and the infectious agent, priming of CD8(+) T cells requires direct and/or cross-presentation of antigenic peptides on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, both pathways show distinct preferences concerning antigen stability. Whereas direct presentation was shown to efficiently present peptides derived from rapidly degraded proteins, cross-presentation is dependent on long-lived antigen species. In this report, we analyzed the role of antigen stability on DNA vaccination and recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) infection using altered versions of the same antigen. The long-lived nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) can be targeted for degradation by N-terminal fusion to ubiquitin or, as we show here, to the ubiquitin-like modifier FAT10. Direct presentation by cells either transfected with NP-encoding plasmids or infected with recombinant VV in vitro was enhanced in the presence of short-lived antigens. In vivo, however, the highest induction of NP-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses was achieved in the presence of long-lived NP. Our experiments provide evidence that targeting antigens for proteasomal degradation does not improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines and recombinant VVs. Rather, it is the long-lived antigen that is superior for the efficient activation of MHC class I-restricted immune responses in vivo. Hence, our results suggest a dominant role for antigen cross-priming in DNA vaccination and recombinant VV infection.

  15. Efficient sequence-specific isolation of DNA fragments and chromatin by in vitro enChIP technology using recombinant CRISPR ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-04-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system is widely used for various biological applications, including genome editing. We developed engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) using CRISPR to isolate target genomic regions from cells for their biochemical characterization. In this study, we developed 'in vitro enChIP' using recombinant CRISPR ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to isolate target genomic regions. in vitro enChIP has the great advantage over conventional enChIP of not requiring expression of CRISPR complexes in cells. We first showed that in vitro enChIP using recombinant CRISPR RNPs can be used to isolate target DNA from mixtures of purified DNA in a sequence-specific manner. In addition, we showed that this technology can be used to efficiently isolate target genomic regions, while retaining their intracellular molecular interactions, with negligible contamination from irrelevant genomic regions. Thus, in vitro enChIP technology is of potential use for sequence-specific isolation of DNA, as well as for identification of molecules interacting with genomic regions of interest in vivo in combination with downstream analysis.

  16. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

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    Anson Donald S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques

  17. Evaluation on the efficacy and immunogenicity of recombinant DNA plasmids expressing spike genes from porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fandan; Ren, Yudong; Suo, Siqingaowa; Sun, Xuejiao; Li, Xunliang; Li, Pengchong; Yang, Wei; Li, Guangxing; Li, Lu; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PDEV) can cause severe diarrhea in pigs. Development of effective vaccines against TGEV and PEDV is one of important prevention measures. The spike (S) protein is the surface glycoprotein of TGEV and PEDV, which can induce specific neutralization antibodies and is a candidate antigen for vaccination attempts. In this study, the open reading frames of the TGEV S1 protein and in addition of the S or S1 proteins of PEDV were inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector, pIRES, resulting in recombinant plasmids, pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S1) and pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S). Subsequently, 6-8 weeks old Kunming mice were inoculated with both DNA plasmids. Lymphocyte proliferation assay, virus neutralization assay, IFN-γ assay and CTL activity assay were performed. TGEV/PEDV specific antibody responses as well as kinetic changes of T lymphocyte subgroups of the immunized mice were analyzed. The results showed that the recombinant DNA plasmids increased the proliferation of T lymphocytes and the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte subgroups. In addition, the DNA vaccines induced a high level of IFN-γ in the immunized mice. The specific CTL activity in the pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S) group became significant at 42 days post-immunization. At 35 days post-immunization, the recombinant DNA plasmids bearing full-length S genes of TGEV and PEDV stimulated higher levels of specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice.

  18. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure.

  19. GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist in IVF/ICSI cycles with recombinant LH supplementation: DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorato, Heloisa L; Oliveira, Joao Batista A; Petersen, Claudia G; Vagnini, Laura; Mauri, Ana L; Cavagna, Mario; Baruffi, Ricardo L R; Franco, Jose G

    2012-11-01

    To compare the level of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation in the human granulosa cell (GC) layer exposed to an agonist or antagonist of GnRH in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles supplemented with recombinant LH (rLH). Patients without ovulatory dysfunction, aged ≤37 years and in their first ICSI cycle were prospectively randomised to receive either a long GnRH agonist protocol or a multi-dose antagonist protocol. In both groups, recombinant FSH supplemented with rLH was used for ovarian stimulation, and the GCs were collected during oocyte denudation. The GCs were then analysed for DNA fragmentation by TUNEL assay and for apoptosis using the annexin-V assay. The outcomes were given as the percentage of GCs with DNA fragmentation and apoptosis out of the total number of GCs analysed. Comparison of the agonist versus the antagonist group was performed using the Mann-Whitney test. DNA fragmentation: 32 patients were included in either the GnRH agonist group (n=16) or the antagonist group (n=16). The percentage of GCs with positive DNA fragmentation did not differ significantly (P=0.76) between the agonist group (15.5 ± 9.4%) and the antagonist group (18.8 ± 13.3%). Apoptosis: 28 patients were included in either the GnRH agonist group (n=14) or the antagonist group (n=14). The percentage of GCs positive for apoptosis did not differ significantly (P=0.78) between the agonist group (34.6 ± 14.7%) and the antagonist group (36.5 ± 22%). The results suggest that therapy with either an agonist or antagonist of GnRH is associated with comparable levels of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in granulosa cells in ICSI cycles supplemented with rLH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA vaccine encoding Der p 2 allergen generates immunologic protection in recombinant Der p 2 allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation mice model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-ping; LIU Zhi-gang; QIU Jing; RAN Pi-xin; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2005-01-01

    Background DNA immunization is a promising novel type of immunotherapy against allergy. An estimated 79.2% patients with asthma, wheezing and/or rhinitis suffer from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 (Der p 2) allegen. The aim of the present study was to determine whether DNA vaccine encoding Der p 2 could generate immunologic protection in recombinant Der p 2 (rDer p 2) allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation mice model and to understand the role of DNA vaccination in specific-allergen immunotherapy for asthma. Methods After DNA vaccination, BALB/c mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection (i.p) and challenged by intranasal instillation of rDer p 2. The lung tissues were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin. Mucus-producing goblet cells were identifed using periodic acid-Schiff(PAS)/alcian blue. The total cell number and composition of bronchoalveolar lavage samples were determined. The levels of the cytokines IL-4 and IFN-γ, as well as IgE and IgG2a in the serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Allergen-specific IL-4 and IFN-γ production by spleen cells were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in splenocytes were determined by Western blot. Results DNA vaccine encoding Der p 2 allergen inhibited extensive infiltration of inflammatory cells and production of mucin induced by allergen. The influx of eosinophils into the lung interstitium was significantly reduced after administration of DNA vaccine. Significant reductions of IL-4 and increase in levels of IFN-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were observed. The allergen-specific IgE was markedly decreased in mice receiving DNA vaccination. Allergen could induce higher IFN-γ, weaker IL-4 in cultured spleen cells from mice receiving DNA vaccine. DNA vaccination inhibited STAT6 expression of spleen cells induced by allergen. Conclusion These results indicated that DNA vaccine encoding

  1. 应用体外DNA同源重组技术构建pcDNA3.1-NGF和pcDNA3.1-TrkA%Application of homologous recombination in vitro to construct pcDNA3.1-NGF and pcDNA3.1-TrkA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张严; 龚爱华; 金洁; 邵根宝; 彭琬昕

    2011-01-01

    目的:利用体外DNA 同源重组的方法分别构建含神经生长因子(NGF)和神经生长因子受体(TrkA)基因的真核表达载体.方法:在引物5′加上一段与载体克隆位点两端碱基序列相同的序列,PCR扩增目的基因NGF和TrkA,线性载体片段和目的基因片段经T4 DNA 聚合酶的外切产生互补的单链DNA,然后37℃退火实现体外同源重组,转化并鉴定;将重组质粒转染293A细胞,免疫印迹鉴定目的基因的表达情况.结果:成功构建真核载体pcDNA3.1-NGF和pcDNA3.1-TrkA,转染细胞后的表达产物相对分子质量分别是31×103和140×103.结论:与常规重组技术相比,体外DNA 同源重组技术是一种高效的DNA 重组方法,且不需考虑目的片段的限制性酶切位点.%Objective: In this study, we use the DNA homologous recombination in vitro to construct NGF and tyrosine kinase A (TrkA) eukaryotic expression vector. Methods: PCR primers for inserts were designed to contain appropriate 5' extension sequences. For the cloning reaction we generated the vector by cleavage with double restriction enzyme and generated the inserts TrkA and NGF by PCR. We treated both the vector and the inserts with T4 DNA polymerase to generate overhangs, then incubated vector and insert to promote recombination, and transformed the products into E. Coli and identified. Transfect the recombination DNA into 293A and identify the gene expression. Results: The expression vector pcDNA3. 1-NGF and pcDNA3.1-TrkA were constructed successfully by homologous recombination. Western blot showed TrkA protein expression in infected 293A cells was 140 x 103 and NGF was 31 x 103. Conclusion: Compared with conventional recombination technology, homologous recombination in vitro was a kind of high efficient DNA recombination method, and with no need for considering the restriction enzymes' site.

  2. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  3. Tn7-mediated Introduction of DNA into Bacmid-cloned Pseudorabies Virus Genome for Rapid Construction of Recombinant Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    lacZα-mini-attTn7 was inserted into the intergenic region between the gG and gD genes in a PRV bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) by homologous recombination in E. coli. The resulting recombinant BAC (pBeckerZF1) was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was then transposed into pBeckerZF1 by transposon Tn7 to generate pBeckerZF2. Recombinant viruses vBeckerZF1 and vBeckerZF2 were generated by transfection with the corresponding BAC pBeckerZF1 or pBeckerZF2. The titers and cytopathic effect (CPE) observed for by vBeckerZF1 and vBeckerZF2 was comparable to that of the parental virus vBecker3. vBeckerZF2 was serial passaged for five rounds in cell culture, and the mini-Tn7 insertion was stably maintained in viral genome. These results show that recombinant viruses can be rapidly and reliably created by Tn7-mediated transposition. This technology should accelerate greatly the pace at which recombinant PRV can be generated and, thus, facilitate the use of recombinant viruses for detailed mutagenic studies.

  4. Polyomavirus JC in the Context of Immunosuppression: A Series of Adaptive, DNA Replication-Driven Recombination Events in the Development of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus JC (JCV is the etiological agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a demyelinating infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. PML, a frequently fatal opportunistic infection in AIDS, has also emerged as a consequence of treatment with several new immunosuppressive therapeutic agents. Although nearly 80% of adults are seropositive, JCV attains an ability to infect glial cells in only a minority of people. Data suggest that JCV undergoes sequence alterations that accompany this ability, and these changes can be derived from an archetype strain by mutation, deletion, and duplication. While the introductory source and primary tissue reservoir of JCV remain unknown, lymphoid cells have been identified as potential intermediaries in progression of JCV to the brain. This review is focused on sequence changes in the noncoding control region (NCCR of the virus. We propose an adaptive mechanism that involves a sequential series of DNA replication-driven NCCR recombination events involving stalled DNA replication forks at NCCR palindromic secondary structures. We shall describe how the NCCR sequence changes point to a model in which viral DNA replication drives NCCR recombination, allowing JCV adaptation to different cell types in its progression to neurovirulence.

  5. Protective effect of a prime-boost strategy with plasmid DNA followed by recombinant adenovirus expressing TgAMA1 as vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Longzheng; Yamagishi, Junya; Zhang, Shoufa; Jin, Chunmei; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Zhang, Houshuang; Zhang, Guohong; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2012-09-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy with priming plasmid DNA followed by recombinant virus expressing relevant antigens is known to stimulate protective immunity against intracellular parasites. In this study, we have evaluated a heterologous prime-boost strategy for immunizing mice against Toxoplasma gondii infection. Our results revealed that the prime-boost strategy using both plasmid DNA and adenoviral vector encoding TgAMA1 may stimulate both humoral and Th1/Th2 cellular immune responses specific for TgAMA1. Moreover, C57BL/6 mice immunized with the pAMA1/Ad5Null, pNull/Ad5AMA1, and pAMA1/Ad5AMA1 constructs showed survival rates of 12.5%, 37.5%, and 50%, respectively. In contrast, all the pNull/Ad5Null immunized mice died after infection with the PLK-GFP strain of T. gondii. Brain cyst burden was reduced by 23% in mice immunized with pAMA1/Ad5AMA1 compared with the pNull/Ad5AMA1 immunized mice. These results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy may provide protective immunity against T. gondii infection.

  6. Classical antiparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors). 13 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Classical antiparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Costella, J P; Rawlinson, A A; Costella, John P.; Kellar, Bruce H. J. Mc; Rawlinson, Andrew A.

    1997-01-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain.

  8. Nucleotide excision repair and recombination are engaged in repair of trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal adducts to DNA bases in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Janowska, Marek Komisarski, Paulina Prorok, Beata Sokołowska, Jarosław Kuśmierek, Celina Janion, Barbara Tudek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major products of lipid peroxidation is trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE. HNE forms highly mutagenic and genotoxic adducts to all DNA bases. Using M13 phage lacZ system, we studied the mutagenesis and repair of HNE treated phage DNA in E. coli wild-type or uvrA, recA, and mutL mutants. These studies revealed that: (i nucleotide excision and recombination, but not mismatch repair, are engaged in repair of HNE adducts when present in phage DNA replicating in E. coli strains; (ii in the single uvrA mutant, phage survival was drastically decreased while mutation frequency increased, and recombination events constituted 48 % of all mutations; (iii in the single recA mutant, the survival and mutation frequency of HNE-modified M13 phage was slightly elevated in comparison to that in the wild-type bacteria. The majority of mutations in recA- strain were G:C → T:A transversions, occurring within the sequence which in recA+ strains underwent RecA-mediated recombination, and the entire sequence was deleted; (iv in the double uvrA recA mutant, phage survival was the same as in the wild-type although the mutation frequency was higher than in the wild-type and recA single mutant, but lower than in the single uvrA mutant. The majority of mutations found in the latter strain were base substitutions, with G:C → A:T transitions prevailing. These transitions could have resulted from high reactivity of HNE with G and C, and induction of SOS-independent mutations.

  9. Construction of Recombinant Plasmids by Random Ligation of Blunt-Ended DNA%平末端DNA随机连接构建重组质粒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查向东; 刘杨; 吴敌; 卢颖虎; 梁琳; 陈青峰

    2012-01-01

    目的:拼接DNA片段并克隆.方法:用T4 DNA连接酶将DNA片段以平末端随机连接,随后用限制性内切酶切割,琼脂糖电泳分离酶切产物,挑选特定片段纯化回收,与线性化的载体质粒连接,转化大肠杆菌感受态细胞.结果:通过以上步骤,成功拼接了不同DNA片段,构建了含有目的拼接片段的重组质粒.结论:该方法简便、易行、可靠,可作为拼接、克隆DNA的备选方案,在分子生物学研究和基因工程中应用.%Objective: To join different DNA fragments and clone the joint DNA. Methods: We randomly ligated the blunt-ended DNA fragments with T4 DNA ligase,cleaved the ligated molecules with the restriction endonucleas-es,then separated the hydrolysed products by agarose gel electrophoresis. We identified the specific band on the agarose gel,from which the DNA molecules were recovered,integrated into the linearized vector plasmid and trans-formed into the competent E.coli cells. Results: In this way we successfully joined the different DNA fragments and constructed the recombinant plasmids haboring the joint DNA. Conclusion: The stragety is simple,convenient and reliable,providing an alternative procedure for joining and cloning DNA which can be used in molecular biology research and gene engenering.

  10. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks that require a Rad51-mediated homologous recombination for repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Kangil; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik; Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2014-10-15

    Non-thermal plasma generated under atmospheric pressure produces a mixture of chemically reactive molecules and has been developed for a number of biomedical applications. Recently, plasma jet has been proposed as novel cancer therapies based on the observation that free radicals generated by plasma jet induce mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. We show here that air plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in yeast chromosomes leading to genomic instability and loss of viability, which are alleviated by Rad51, the yeast homolog of Escherichiacoli RecA recombinase, through DNA damage repair by a homologous recombination (HR) process. Hypersensitivity of rad51 mutant to air plasma was not restored by antioxidant treatment unlike sod1 mutant that was highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenge, suggesting that plasma jet induces DSB-mediated cell death independent of ROS generation. These results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of air plasma jet-induced cell death.

  11. Release of Ku and MRN from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is required for homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Langerak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN protein complex recruits ATM/Tel1 checkpoint kinase and CtIP/Ctp1 homologous recombination (HR repair factor to double-strand breaks (DSBs. HR repair commences with the 5'-to-3' resection of DNA ends, generating 3' single-strand DNA (ssDNA overhangs that bind Replication Protein A (RPA complex, followed by Rad51 recombinase. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX complex is critical for DSB resection, although the enigmatic ssDNA endonuclease activity of Mre11 and the DNA-end processing factor Sae2 (CtIP/Ctp1 ortholog are largely unnecessary unless the resection activities of Exo1 and Sgs1-Dna2 are also eliminated. Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1/CtIP are essential for DSB repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. To investigate DNA end resection in Schizo. pombe, we adapted an assay that directly measures ssDNA formation at a defined DSB. We found that Mre11 and Ctp1 are essential for the efficient initiation of resection, consistent with their equally crucial roles in DSB repair. Exo1 is largely responsible for extended resection up to 3.1 kb from a DSB, with an activity dependent on Rqh1 (Sgs1 DNA helicase having a minor role. Despite its critical function in DSB repair, Mre11 nuclease activity is not required for resection in fission yeast. However, Mre11 nuclease and Ctp1 are required to disassociate the MRN complex and the Ku70-Ku80 nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ complex from DSBs, which is required for efficient RPA localization. Eliminating Ku makes Mre11 nuclease activity dispensable for MRN disassociation and RPA localization, while improving repair of a one-ended DSB formed by replication fork collapse. From these data we propose that release of the MRN complex and Ku from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is a critical step required to expose ssDNA for RPA localization and ensuing HR repair.

  12. Potent functional antibody responses elicited by HIV-I DNA priming and boosting with heterologous HIV-1 recombinant MVA in healthy Tanzanian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agricola Joachim

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA virus boosting (HIVIS03. The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK cells from PBMC (p=0.006, indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development.Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080.

  13. Cell encoding recombinant human erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A.K.; Withy, R.M.; Zabrecky, J.R.; Masiello, N.C.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes a C127 cell transformed with a recombinant DNA vector. It comprises: a DNA sequence encoding human erythropoietin, the transformed cell being capable of producing N-linked and O-linked glycosylated human erythropoietin.

  14. DNA replication arrest in XP variant cells after UV exposure is diverted into an Mre11-dependent recombination pathway by the kinase inhibitor wortmannin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limoli, C.L.; Laposa, R.; Cleaver, J.E

    2002-12-29

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation produces DNA photoproducts that are blocks to DNA replication by normal replicative polymerases. A specialized, damage-specific, distributive polymerase, Pol H or Pol h, that is the product of the hRad30A gene, is required for replication past these photoproducts. This polymerase is absent from XP variant (XP-V) cells that must employ other mechanisms to negotiate blocks to DNA replication. These mechanisms include the use of alternative polymerases or recombination between sister chromatids. Replication forks arrested by UV damage in virus transformed XP-V cells degrade into DNA double strand breaks that are sites for recombination, but in normal cells arrested forks may be protected from degradation by p53 protein. These breaks are sites for binding a protein complex, hMre11/hRad50/Nbs1, that colocalizes with H2AX and PCNA, and can be visualized as immunofluorescent foci. The protein complexes need phosphorylation to activate their DNA binding capacity. Incubation of UV irradiated XP-V cells with the irreversible kinase inhibitor wortmannin, however, increased the yield of Mre11 focus-positive cells. One interpretation of this observation is that two classes of kinases are involved after UV irradiation. One would be a wortmannin-resistant kinase that phosphorylates the Mre11 complex. The other would be a wortmannin-sensitive kinase that phosphorylates and activates the p53/large T in SV40 transformed XP-V cells. The sensitive class corresponds to the PI3-kinases of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK, but the resistant class remains to be identified. Alternatively, the elevated yield of Mre11 foci positive cells following wortmannin treatment may reflect an overall perturbation to the signaling cascades regulated by wortmannin-sensitive PI3 related kinases. In this scenario, wortmannin could compromise damage inducible-signaling pathways that maintain the stability of stalled forks, resulting in a further destabilization of stalled forks that then

  15. Non-canonical uracil processing in DNA gives rise to double-strand breaks and deletions: relevance to class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Kallenberger, Lia; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2016-04-01

    During class switch recombination (CSR), antigen-stimulated B-cells rearrange their immunoglobulin constant heavy chain (CH) loci to generate antibodies with different effector functions. CSR is initiated by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines in switch (S) regions, repetitive sequences flanking the CH loci, to uracils. Although U/G mispairs arising in this way are generally efficiently repaired to C/Gs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG)-initiated base excision repair (BER), uracil processing in S-regions of activated B-cells occasionally gives rise to double strand breaks (DSBs), which trigger CSR. Surprisingly, genetic experiments revealed that CSR is dependent not only on AID and UNG, but also on mismatch repair (MMR). To elucidate the role of MMR in CSR, we studied the processing of uracil-containing DNA substrates in extracts of MMR-proficient and -deficient human cells, as well as in a system reconstituted from recombinant BER and MMR proteins. Here, we show that the interplay of these repair systems gives rise to DSBs in vitro and to genomic deletions and mutations in vivo, particularly in an S-region sequence. Our findings further suggest that MMR affects pathway choice in DSB repair. Given its amenability to manipulation, our system represents a powerful tool for the molecular dissection of CSR.

  16. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for group A Streptococcal anti-DNase B in human sera, using recombinant proteins - Comparison to the DNA methyl green micromethod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sarita; Dileepan, T; Johnson, D R; Kaplan, E L; Patrick Cleary, P

    2017-09-19

    Among the four known Streptococcal nucleases comprising of DNase A, B, C and D; DNase B is the most common, and determination of the levels of antibody to DNase B (ADB) is often used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes/group A Streptococcal (GAS) infection. The commonly used assays for antibodies that neutralize DNase B or streptolysin O activity use partially purified antigens that often fail to detect antibody changes subsequent to culture documented infections. Therefore, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed employing his-tagged recombinant DNase B as plate antigen for comparison to the commonly used DNA methyl green micromethod (DMGM). DNAs from various Streptococcal species were screened for presence of dnaseB gene by PCR. Measurements of ADB in sera collected from subjects belonging to different ages, and ethnic groups were used to compare the two methods. dnaseB was not detected by PCR in DNA samples isolated from different strains of group B (GBS), C (GCS) and G (GGS) Streptococci. The ADB based ELISA proved to be highly sensitive and more responsive to changes in antibody concentration than DMGM. Use of recombinant DNase B eliminates the variability associated with the enzyme, partially purified from Streptococcal culture supernatants from various commercial sources and may provide a more reliable source of antigen to a wider group of laboratories concerned with GAS diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Construction and immune protection evaluation of recombinant polyvalent OmpAs derived from genetically divergent ompA by DNA shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Chu, Xiao; Li, Dan; Zeng, Zao-Hai; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2016-02-01

    A wide variety of bacterial infections is a major challenge in aquaculture. Development of polyvalent vaccines that can fight against as many pathogens as possible is especially necessary. The present study uses DNA shuffling to create a new hybrid OmpA with improved cross-protection against Vibrio alginolyticus and Edwardsiella tarda through the recombination of six OmpA genes from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, E. tarda and Escherichia coli. Out of the 43 recombinant chimeras genes constructed using VA0764 primers, EompAs-19 was demonstrated as an ideal polyvalent vaccine against infections caused V. alginolyticus and E. tarda. Compared with VA0764, OmpAs-19 had three mutations, which may be a molecular basis of EompAs-19 as an efficient polyvalent vaccine against both V. alginolyticus and E. tarda infections. These results develop a polyvalent vaccine that prevents the infections caused by extracellular and intracellular bacteria. Thus, the present study highlights the way to develop polyvalent vaccines against microbial infections by DNA shuffling.

  18. Cloning of human and mouse genes homologous to RAD52, a yeast gene involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F.R. Muris; O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; K. Vreeken; A.S. Balajee; C.J. Osgood; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Ostermann; H. Schmidt (Henning); A.T. Natarajan; J.C.J. Eeken; P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); A. Pastink (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD52 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. Using degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved amino acid sequences of RAD52 and rad22, its counterpart from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, RAD52 homologs from man and mouse were

  19. Multi-gene gateway clone design for expression of multiple heterologous genes in living cells: modular construction of multiple cDNA expression elements using recombinant cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Takefumi; Yahata, Kazuhide; Sasaki, Yukari; Hotta, Junko; Kishine, Hiroe; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Imamoto, Fumio

    2008-09-10

    Much attention has been focused on manipulating multiple genes in living cells for analyzing protein function. In order to perform high-throughput generation of multi-gene expression clones, gateway cloning technology (which represents a high-throughput DNA transfer from vector to vector) can be anticipated. In the conventional strategy for gateway cloning, the construction of two or more expression elements into tandem elements on a single plasmid requires the recombination of multiple entry clones with a destination vector in a single reaction mixture. Use of increasing numbers of entry clones in a single reaction is inefficient due to the difficulty in successfully recognizing multiple pairs of matched att signals simultaneously. To address this problem, a "Modular Destination" vector has been devised and constructed, whereby cDNA inserts are sequentially introduced, resulting in a tandem structure with multiple inserts. Whereas the standard destination vector contains only Cm(R) and ccdB genes flanked by two attR signals, this destination vector contains, in addition, one or two cDNA expression elements. Here, we show the rapid construction of expression vectors containing three or four tandemly arrayed cDNA expression elements and their expression in mammalian cells.

  20. Impact of two DNA repair pathways, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, on bacterial spore inactivation under simulated martian environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2011-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis were used as a model system to study the impact of the two major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms [homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)] on the survivability of air-dried mono- and multilayers of bacterial spores under a simulated martian environment; i.e., an environment with low temperature (-10 °C), pure CO 2 atmosphere (99.99% CO 2), 200-1100 nm UV-VIS-NIR radiation, and 0.69 kPa pressure. Spores in multilayers exhibited low inactivation rates compared to monolayers, mainly due to shadowing effects of overlying spores. Simulated martian UV irradiation reduced dramatically spore viability, whereas when shielded from martian UV radiation, spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to simulated martian environmental conditions than were wild-type spores. In addition, NHEJ-deficient spores were consistently more sensitive than HR-deficient spores to simulated Mars environmental conditions, suggesting that DSBs were an important type of DNA damage. The results indicated that both HR and NHEJ provide an efficient set of DNA repair pathways ensuring spore survival after exposure to simulated martian environmental conditions.

  1. Downregulation of homologous recombination DNA repair genes by HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer is mediated through the E2F1 transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant K Kachhap

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC

  2. The Bipolar Filaments Formed by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 SSB/Recombination Protein (ICP8) Suggest a Mechanism for DNA Annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhov, A.M.; Simon, M.; Sen, A.; Yu, X.; Griffith, J. D.; Egelman, E. H.

    2009-02-20

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 encodes a multifunctional protein, ICP8, which serves both as a single-strand binding protein and as a recombinase, catalyzing reactions involved in replication and recombination of the viral genome. In the presence of divalent ions and at low temperature, previous electron microscopic studies showed that ICP8 will form long left-handed helical filaments. Here, electron microscopic image reconstruction reveals that the filaments are bipolar, with an asymmetric unit containing two subunits of ICP8 that constitute a symmetrical dimer. This organization of the filament has been confirmed using scanning transmission electron microscopy. The pitch of the filaments is {approx} 250 {angstrom}, with {approx} 6.2 dimers per turn. Docking of a crystal structure of ICP8 into the reconstructed filament shows that the C-terminal domain of ICP8, attached to the body of the subunit by a flexible linker containing {approx} 10 residues, is packed into a pocket in the body of a neighboring subunit in the crystal in a similar manner as in the filament. However, the interactions between the large N-terminal domains are quite different in the filament from that observed in the crystal. A previously proposed model for ICP8 binding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), based upon the crystal structure, leads to a model for a continuous strand of ssDNA near the filament axis. The bipolar nature of the ICP8 filaments means that a second strand of ssDNA would be running through this filament in the opposite orientation, and this provides a potential mechanism for how ICP8 anneals complementary ssDNA into double-stranded DNA, where each strand runs in opposite directions.

  3. A high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) gene from Chlamys farreri and the DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity of its recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Zhi; Yi, Qilin; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2014-02-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a highly conserved DNA binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. In the present research, a cDNA of 1268 bp for the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri HMGB1 (designed as CfHMGB1) was cloned via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique and expression sequence tag (EST) analysis. The complete cDNA sequence of CfHMGB1 contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 648 bp, which encoded a protein of 215 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1 shared 53-57% similarity with other identified HMGB1s. There were two HMG domains, two low complexity regions and a conserved acidic tail in the amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1. The mRNA transcripts of CfHMGB1 were constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, including haemocytes, muscle, mantle, gill, hepatopancreas, kidney and gonad, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. The mRNA expression profiles of CfHMGB1 in haemocytes after the stimulation with different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and glucan (Glu), were similar with an up-regulation in the early stage and then recovered to the original level. The recombinant CfHMGB1 protein could bind double-stranded DNA and induce the release of TNF-α activity in mixed primary culture of scallop haemocytes. These results collectively indicated that CfHMGB1, with DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity, could play an important role in the immune response of scallops.

  4. Cell biology of mitotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules...... of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect...... as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics...

  5. Rapid evolution of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Xylose fermentation through formation of extra-chromosomal circular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeke, Mekonnen M; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M

    2015-03-01

    Circular DNA elements are involved in genome plasticity, particularly of tandem repeats. However, amplifications of DNA segments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reported so far involve pre-existing repetitive sequences such as ribosomal DNA, Ty elements and Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs). Here, we report the generation of an eccDNA, (extrachromosomal circular DNA element) in a region without any repetitive sequences during an adaptive evolution experiment. We performed whole genome sequence comparison between an efficient D-xylose fermenting yeast strain developed by metabolic and evolutionary engineering, and its parent industrial strain. We found that the heterologous gene XylA that had been inserted close to an ARS sequence in the parent strain has been amplified about 9 fold in both alleles of the chromosomal locus of the evolved strain compared to its parent. Analysis of the amplification process during the adaptive evolution revealed formation of a XylA-carrying eccDNA, pXI2-6, followed by chromosomal integration in tandem arrays over the course of the evolutionary adaptation. Formation of the eccDNA occurred in the absence of any repetitive DNA elements, probably using a micro-homology sequence of 8 nucleotides flanking the amplified sequence. We isolated the pXI2-6 eccDNA from an intermediate strain of the evolutionary adaptation process, sequenced it completely and showed that it confers high xylose fermentation capacity when it is transferred to a new strain. In this way, we have provided clear evidence that gene amplification can occur through generation of eccDNA without the presence of flanking repetitive sequences and can serve as a rapid means of adaptation to selection pressure.

  6. Homology requirements for recombination in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, V M; Ingles, C J; Urdea, M S; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence homology required for recombination in Escherichia coli has been determined by measuring the recombination frequency between insulin DNA in a miniplasmid pi VX and a homologous sequence in a bacteriophage lambda vector. A minimum of approximately equal to 20 base pairs in a completely homologous segment is required for significant recombination. There is an exponential increase in the frequency of recombination when the length of homologous DNA is increased from 20 base pairs...

  7. DNA Replication Origins in Immunoglobulin Switch Regions Regulate Class Switch Recombination in an R-Loop-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Eva-Maria; Peycheva, Mihaela; Pavri, Rushad

    2016-12-13

    Class switch recombination (CSR) at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus generates antibody isotypes. CSR depends on double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Although DSB formation and repair machineries are active in G1 phase, efficient CSR is dependent on cell proliferation and S phase entry; however, the underlying mechanisms are obscure. Here, we show that efficient CSR requires the replicative helicase, the Mcm complex. Mcm proteins are enriched at IgH switch regions during CSR, leading to assembly of facultative replication origins that require Mcm helicase function for productive CSR. Assembly of CSR-associated origins is facilitated by R loops and promotes the physical proximity (synapsis) of recombining switch regions, which is reduced by R loop inhibition or Mcm complex depletion. Thus, R loops contribute to replication origin specification that promotes DSB resolution in CSR. This suggests a mechanism for the dependence of CSR on S phase and cell division.

  8. Classics Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Dee L.

    1995-01-01

    Appraises several databases devoted to classical literature. Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) contains the entire extant corpus of ancient Greek literature, including works on lexicography and historiography, extending into the 15th century. Other works awaiting completion are the Database of Classical Bibliography and a CD-ROM pictorial dictionary…

  9. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Goettel; Joachim Messing

    2009-01-01

    An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal int...

  10. Classical integrability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  11. Recombinant Helicobacter pylori catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Jin; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant strain which highly expresses catalase of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and assay the activity of H. pylori catalase.METHODS: The catalase DNA was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA with PCR techniques and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), and then was transformed into the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain which expressed catalase recombinant protein. The activity of H.pylori catalase was assayed by the Beers & Sizers.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed that the sequence of catalase DNA was the same as GenBank's research. The catalase recombinant protein amounted to 24.4 % of the total bacterial protein after induced with IPTG for 3 hours at 37 ℃ and the activity of H. pylori catalase was high in the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain.CONCLUSION: A clone expressing high activity H. pylori catalase is obtained, laying a good foundation for further studies.

  12. Immunization with recombinant DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors delivering PSCA and STEAP1 antigens inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Magdalena; Canamero, Marta; Gomez, Carmen E; Najera, Jose L; Gil, Jesus; Esteban, Mariano

    2011-02-04

    Despite recent advances in early detection and improvement of conventional therapies, there is an urgent need for development of additional approaches for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, and the use of immunotherapeutic modalities, such as cancer vaccines, is one of the most promising strategies. In this study, we evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of an active immunization protocol against prostate cancer associated antigens mPSCA and mSTEAP1 in experimental prostate cancer. Two antigen delivery platforms, recombinant DNA and MVA vectors, both encoding either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 were used in diversified DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination protocol. Antitumour activity was evaluated in TRAMP-C1 subcutaneous syngeneic tumour model and TRAMP mice. DNA prime/MVA boost immunization against either mPSCA or mSTEAP1, delayed tumour growth in TRAMP-C1 cells-challenged mice. Furthermore, simultaneous vaccination with both antigens produced a stronger anti-tumour effect against TRAMP-C1 tumours than vaccination with either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 alone. Most importantly, concurrent DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimen with those antigens significantly decreased primary tumour burden in TRAMP mice without producing any apparent adverse effects. Histopathological analysis of prostate tumours from vaccinated and control TRAMP mice revealed also that mPSCA/mSTEAP1 based-vaccination was effective at reducing the severity of prostatic lesions and incidence of high-grade poorly differentiated prostate cancer. Suppression of the disease progression in TRAMP mice was correlated with decreased proliferation index and increased infiltration of T-cells in prostate tissue. Active immunization against PSCA and STEAP1 using DNA prime/MVA boost strategy is a promising approach for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer.

  13. [A novel immunization strategy to induce strong humoral responses against HIV-1 using combined DNA, recombinant vaccinia virus and protein vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Shu-hui; Ren, Li; Hao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the immunization strategy against HIV-1, a DNA vaccine was combined with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rTV) vaccine and a protein vaccine. Immune responses against HIV-1 were detected in 30 female guinea pigs divided into six groups. Three groups of guinea pigs were primed with HIV-1 DNA vaccine three times, boosted with rTV at week 14, and then boosted with gp140 protein at intervals of 4, 8 or 12 weeks. Simultaneously, the other three groups of animals were primed with rTV vaccine once, and then boosted with gp140 after 4, 8 or 12 weeks. The HIV-1 specific binding antibody and neutralizing antibody, in addition to the relative affinity of these antibodies, were detected at different time points after the final administration of vaccine in each group. The DNA-rTV-gp140 immune regimen induced higher titers and affinity levels of HIV-1 gp120/gp140 antibodies and stronger V1V2-gp70 antibodies than the rTV-gp140 regimen. In the guinea pigs that underwent the DNA-rTV-gp140 regimen, the highest V1V2-gp70 antibody was induced in the 12-week-interval group. However, the avidity of antibodies was improved in the 4-week-interval group. Using the rTV-gp140 immunization strategy, guinea pigs boosted at 8 or 12 weeks after rTV priming elicited stronger humoral responses than those boosted at 4 weeks after priming. In conclusion, this study shows that the immunization strategy of HIV-1 DNA vaccine priming, followed by rTV and protein vaccine boosting, could strengthen the humoral response against HIV-1. Longer intervals were better to induce V1V2-gp70-specific antibodies, while shorter intervals were more beneficial to enhance the avidity of antibodies.

  14. Priming immunization with DNA augments immunogenicity of recombinant adenoviral vectors for both HIV-1 specific antibody and T-cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Koup

    Full Text Available Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies.The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5 boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination.rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127(+ central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition.Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654.

  15. Molecular architecture of the recombinant human MCM2-7 helicase in complex with nucleotides and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskovic, Jasminka; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Saligram Prabhakar, Bhargrav; Yefimenko, Igor; Martínez-Gago, Jaime; Muñoz, Sergio; Méndez, Juan; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-09-16

    DNA replication is a key biological process that involves different protein complexes whose assembly is rigorously regulated in a successive order. One of these complexes is a replicative hexameric helicase, the MCM complex, which is essential for the initiation and elongation phases of replication. After the assembly of a double heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex at replication origins in G1, the 2 heterohexamers separate from each other and associate with Cdc45 and GINS proteins in a CMG complex that is capable of unwinding dsDNA during S phase. Here, we have reconstituted and characterized the purified human MCM2-7 (hMCM2-7) hexameric complex by co-expression of its 6 different subunits in insect cells. The conformational variability of the complex has been analyzed by single particle electron microscopy in the presence of different nucleotide analogs and DNA. The interaction with nucleotide stabilizes the complex while DNA introduces conformational changes in the hexamer inducing a cylindrical shape. Our studies suggest that the assembly of GINS and Cdc45 to the hMCM2-7 hexamer would favor conformational changes on the hexamer bound to ssDNA shifting the cylindrical shape of the complex into a right-handed spiral conformation as observed in the CMG complex bound to DNA.

  16. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  17. Enhancing cellular immune response to HBV M DNA vaccine in mice by codelivery of interleukin-18 recombinant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建忠; 朱海红; 刘克洲; 陈智

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of interleukin-18 (IL-18) on immune response induced by plasmid encoding hepatitis B virus middle protein antigen and to explore new strategies for prophylactic and therapeutic HBV DNA vaccines.Methods:BALB/c mice were immunized with pCMV-M alone or co-immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M and then their sera were collected for analysing anti-HBsAg antibody by ELISA;splenocytes were isolated for detecting specific CTL response and cytokine assay in vitro.Results:The anti-HBs antibody level of mice co-immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M was slightly higher than that of mice immunized with pCMV-M alone,but there was not significantly different (P>0.05).Compared with mice injected with pCMV-M, the specific CTL cytotoxity activity of mice immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M was significantly enhanced (P0.05).Conclusion:The plasmid encoding IL-18 together with HBV M gene DNA vaccines may enhance specific TH1 cells and CTL cellular immune response induced in mice, so that IL-18 is a promising immune adjuvant.

  18. New vaccine strategies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: II: Enhanced systemic and secreted antibody responses against the CFA/I fimbriae by priming with DNA and boosting with a live recombinant Salmonella vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Lásaro

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The induction of systemic (IgG and mucosal (IgA antibody responses against the colonization factor I antigen (CFA/I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC was evaluated in mice primed with an intramuscularly delivered CFA/I-encoding DNA vaccine followed by two oral immunizations with a live recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain expressing the ETEC antigen. The booster effect induced by the oral immunization was detected two weeks and one year after the administration of the DNA vaccine. The DNA-primed/Salmonella-boosted vaccination regime showed a synergistic effect on the induced CFA/I-specific systemic and secreted antibody levels which could not be attained by either immunization strategy alone. These results suggest that the combined use of DNA vaccines and recombinant Salmonella vaccine strains can be a useful immunization strategy against enteric pathogens.

  19. The XPD subunit of TFIIH is required for transcription-associated but not DNA double-strand break-induced recombination in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, Linda; Cassel, Tobias; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Mutations in the XPD gene can give rise to three phenotypically distinct disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), trichothiodystrophy (TTD) or combined XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS) (XP/CS). The role of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group D protein (XPD) in nucleotide excision repair explains the increased risk of skin cancer in XP patients but not all the clinical phenotypes found in XP/CS or TTD patients. Here, we describe that the XPD-defective UV5 cell line is impaired in transcription-associated recombination (TAR), which can be reverted by the introduction of the wild-type XPD gene expressed from a vector. UV5 cells are defective in TAR, despite having intact transcription and homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Interestingly, we find reduced spontaneous HR in XPD-defective cells, suggesting that transcription underlies a portion of spontaneous HR events. We also report that transcription-coupled repair (TCR)-defective cells, mutated in the Cockayne syndrome B (CSB) protein, have a defect in TAR, but not in DSB-induced HR. However, the TAR defect may be associated with a general transcription defect in CSB-deficient cells. In conclusion, we show a novel role for the XPD protein in TAR, linking TAR with TCR.

  20. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for identification and intraspecific molecular typing of bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and its comparative analysis with ribosomal DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aundy Kumar; Thekkan Puthiyaveedu Prameela; Rajamma Suseelabhai

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal gene sequences are a popular choice for identification of bacterial species and, often, for making phylogenetic interpretations. Although very popular, the sequences of 16S rDNA and 16-23S intergenic sequences often fail to differentiate closely related species of bacteria. The availability of complete genome sequences of bacteria, in the recent years, has accelerated the search for new genome targets for phylogenetic interpretations. The recently published full genome data of nine strains of R. solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt of crop plants, has provided enormous genomic choices for phylogenetic analysis in this globally important plant pathogen. We have compared a gene candidate recN, which codes for DNA repair and recombination function, with 16S rDNA/16-23S intergenic ribosomal gene sequences for identification and intraspecific phylogenetic interpretations in R. solanacearum. recN gene sequence analysis of R. solanacearum revealed subgroups within phylotypes (or newly proposed species within plant pathogenic genus, Ralstonia), indicating its usefulness for intraspecific genotyping. The taxonomic discriminatory power of recN gene sequence was found to be superior to ribosomal DNA sequences. In all, the recN-sequence-based phylogenetic tree generated with the Bayesian model depicted 21 haplotypes against 15 and 13 haplotypes obtained with 16S rDNA and 16-23S rDNA intergenic sequences, respectively. Besides this, we have observed high percentage of polymorphic sites (S 23.04%), high rate of mutations (Eta 276) and high codon bias index (CBI 0.60), which makes the recN an ideal gene candidate for intraspecific molecular typing of this important plant pathogen.

  1. Molecular architecture of the recombinant human MCM2-7 helicase in complex with nucleotides and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boskovic, Jasminka; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Saligram Prabhakar, Bhargav

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is a key biological process that involves different protein complexes whose assembly is rigorously regulated in a successive order. One of these complexes is a replicative hexameric helicase, the MCM complex, which is essential for the initiation and elongation phases of replication....... After the assembly of a double heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex at replication origins in G1, the 2 heterohexamers separate from each other and associate with Cdc45 and GINS proteins in a CMG complex that is capable of unwinding dsDNA during S phase. Here, we have reconstituted and characterized...... the purified human MCM2-7 (hMCM2-7) hexameric complex by co-expression of its 6 different subunits in insect cells. The conformational variability of the complex has been analyzed by single particle electron microscopy in the presence of different nucleotide analogs and DNA. The interaction with nucleotide...

  2. Improved recombinant antibody production by CHO cells using a production enhancer DNA element with repeated transgene integration at a predetermined chromosomal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Inao, Takanori; Komatsu, Shodai; Huang, Guan; Ito, Akira; Omasa, Takeshi; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2017-03-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are one of the most useful host cell lines for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins. Although a series of production processes have been refined to improve protein productivity and cost performance, establishing producer cells is still time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recombinase-mediated site-specific gene integration into a predetermined chromosomal locus may enable predictable protein expression, reducing the laborious process of cell screening. We previously developed an accumulative site-specific gene integration system (AGIS) using Cre recombinase and mutated loxP sites for transgene integration and amplification in the CHO cell genome. Epigenetic modifier elements such as insulators are effective DNA cis-regulatory elements for stabilizing transgene expression. Here, we attempted to enhance transgene expression in recombinant CHO cells generated by AGIS using a production enhancer DNA element (PE) derived from the CHO genome. The PE was introduced into an expression unit for a recombinant scFv-Fc antibody. The effect on scFv-Fc productivity of PE position and orientation within the transgene was evaluated, while keeping the background chromosomal structure constant. For the optimal PE arrangement, scFv-Fc productivity was enhanced 2.6-fold compared with an expression unit without a PE. The enhancing effect of the PE on transgene expression was also observed when two or three PE-flanked expression units were inserted as tandem repeats. These results indicate that AGIS using the PE-flanked expression unit is a promising approach for establishing producer cell lines for biopharmaceutical protein production.

  3. 重组Taq DNA聚合酶的表达和纯化鉴定%Expression, Purification and Identification of Recombinant Taq DNA Polymerase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘钦松; 刘孟刚; 张丛丛; 张程; 许彤

    2012-01-01

    [目的] 表达、纯化Taq DNA聚合酶,并检测其扩增性能.[方法] 活化含Taq DNA聚合酶基因的菌株JM109,IPTG诱导表达.目的蛋白利用AKTA蛋白纯化系统,依次过Affi - Gel Blue Sepharose,Heparin Sepharnse Fast Flow,Q - Sepharose Fast Flow,经SDS - PAGE分析,以国外进口Taq酶为标准,采用对比法初略测定酶活性,验证产品质量.[结果] 制备的Taq DNA聚合酶具有扩增效率高、纯度高、特异性强、无核酸酶污染、活性稳定等优点.[结论] 成功表达纯化Taq DNA聚合酶,其扩增性能达到甚至超过国外同类产品.%In order to express and purify Taq DNA polymerase, and detect its amplification performance, E. coli strain JM109 containing the gene of Taq DNA polymerase was activated, and the gene was expressed under the inducement of IPTG. The expressed protein was purified by AKTA protein purification system through passing Affi - Gel Blue Sepharose, Heparin Sepharose Fast Flow and Q - Sepharose Fast Flow in turn- Taking Taq enzyme imported from abroad as the standard, the enzyme activity was roughly determined through antitheses and SDS - PAGE analysis, and the product quality was verified finally. The results revealed that the prepared Taq DNA polymerase had the following good characteristics: high amplification efficiency, high purity, strong specificity, no nuclease pollution and stable activity. In conclusion, the recombinant Taq DNA polymerase was successfully expressed and purified, and its amplification performance could reach or exceed that of the similar products imported from abroad.

  4. Mucosal vaccination with a live recombinant rhinovirus followed by intradermal DNA administration elicits potent and protective HIV-specific immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Wesselingh, Steve; Suhrbier, Andreas; Gowans, Eric J.; Grubor-Bauk, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal immunity is deemed crucial to control sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Herein we report the efficacy of a mucosal HIV vaccine strategy comprising intranasal (IN) vaccination with a cocktail of live recombinant human rhinoviruses (HRVs) encoding overlapping fragments of HIV Gag and full length Tat (rHRV-Gag/Tat) followed by intradermal (ID) vaccination with DNA vaccines encoding HIV Gag and Tat (pVAX-Gag-Tat). This heterologous prime-boost strategy will be referred to hereafter as rHRV-DNA. As a control, IN vaccination with wild type (wt)-HRV-A1 followed by a single ID dose of pVAX (wt-HRV-A1/pVAX vaccination) was included. rHRV-DNA vaccination elicited superior multi-functional CD8+T cell responses in lymphocytes harvested from mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens, and higher titres of Tat-specific antibodies in blood and vaginal lavages, and reduced the viral load more effectively after challenge with EcoHIV, a murine HIV challenge model, in peritoneal macrophages, splenocytes and blood compared compared with wt-HRV-A1/pVAX vaccination or administration of 3 ID doses of pVAX-Gag-Tat (3X pVAX-Gag-Tat vaccination). These data provide the first evidence that a rHRV-DNA vaccination regimen can induce HIV-specific immune responses in the gut, vaginal mucosa and systemically, and supports further testing of this regimen in the development of an effective mucosally-targeted HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:27853256

  5. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Johannes S; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y; Becerra, Juan C; Anderson, Chase T M; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L; Forthal, Donald N; Deeks, Steven G; Wilkin, Timothy J; Casazza, Joseph P; Koup, Richard A; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L; Achenbach, Chad J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the in