WorldWideScience

Sample records for classic dynamical system

  1. Classical dynamics of particles and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Marion, Jerry B

    1965-01-01

    Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems presents a modern and reasonably complete account of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies for physics students at the advanced undergraduate level. The book aims to present a modern treatment of classical mechanical systems in such a way that the transition to the quantum theory of physics can be made with the least possible difficulty; to acquaint the student with new mathematical techniques and provide sufficient practice in solving problems; and to impart to the student some degree of sophistication in handl

  2. Planar dynamical systems selected classical problems

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yirong; Huang, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    This book presents in an elementary way the recent significant developments in the qualitative theory of planar dynamical systems. The subjects are covered as follows: the studies of center and isochronous center problems, multiple Hopf bifurcations and local and global bifurcations of the equivariant planar vector fields which concern with Hilbert's 16th problem. This book is intended for graduate students, post-doctors and researchers in the area of theories and applications of dynamical systems. For all engineers who are interested the theory of dynamical systems, it is also a reasona

  3. Quantum dynamics in open quantum-classical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapral, Raymond

    2015-02-25

    Often quantum systems are not isolated and interactions with their environments must be taken into account. In such open quantum systems these environmental interactions can lead to decoherence and dissipation, which have a marked influence on the properties of the quantum system. In many instances the environment is well-approximated by classical mechanics, so that one is led to consider the dynamics of open quantum-classical systems. Since a full quantum dynamical description of large many-body systems is not currently feasible, mixed quantum-classical methods can provide accurate and computationally tractable ways to follow the dynamics of both the system and its environment. This review focuses on quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, one of several quantum-classical descriptions, and discusses the problems that arise when one attempts to combine quantum and classical mechanics, coherence and decoherence in quantum-classical systems, nonadiabatic dynamics, surface-hopping and mean-field theories and their relation to quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, as well as methods for simulating the dynamics.

  4. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete “Verlet” algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence...

  5. Classical mechanics systems of particles and Hamiltonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, Walter

    2010-01-01

    This textbook Classical Mechanics provides a complete survey on all aspects of classical mechanics in theoretical physics. An enormous number of worked examples and problems show students how to apply the abstract principles to realistic problems. The textbook covers Newtonian mechanics in rotating coordinate systems, mechanics of systems of point particles, vibrating systems and mechanics of rigid bodies. It thoroughly introduces and explains the Lagrange and Hamilton equations and the Hamilton-Jacobi theory. A large section on nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of systems takes Classical Mechanics to newest development in physics. The new edition is completely revised and updated. New exercises and new sections in canonical transformation and Hamiltonian theory have been added.

  6. Information dynamics and open systems classical and quantum approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ingarden, R S; Ohya, M

    1997-01-01

    This book aims to present an information-theoretical approach to thermodynamics and its generalisations On the one hand, it generalises the concept of `information thermodynamics' to that of `information dynamics' in order to stress applications outside thermal phenomena On the other hand, it is a synthesis of the dynamics of state change and the theory of complexity, which provide a common framework to treat both physical and nonphysical systems together Both classical and quantum systems are discussed, and two appendices are included to explain principal definitions and some important aspects of the theory of Hilbert spaces and operator algebras The concept of higher-order temperatures is explained and applied to biological and linguistic systems The theory of open systems is presented in a new, much more general form Audience This volume is intended mainly for theoretical and mathematical physicists, but also for mathematicians, experimental physicists, physical chemists, theoretical biologists, communicat...

  7. Classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Donald T

    1997-01-01

    Graduate-level text for science and technology students provides strong background in the more abstract and intellectually satisfying areas of dynamical theory. Topics include d'Alembert's principle and the idea of virtual work, Hamilton's equations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, canonical transformations, more. Problems and references at chapter ends.

  8. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxvaerd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole J; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2012-06-14

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete "Verlet" algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence of a "shadow Hamiltonian" H [S. Toxvaerd, Phys. Rev. E 50, 2271 (1994)], i.e., a Hamiltonian close to the original H with the property that the discrete positions of the Verlet algorithm for H lie on the analytic trajectories of H. The shadow Hamiltonian can be obtained from H by an asymptotic expansion in the time step length. Here we use the first non-trivial term in this expansion to obtain an improved estimate of the discrete values of the energy. The investigation is performed for a representative system with Lennard-Jones pair interactions. The simulations show that inclusion of this term reduces the standard deviation of the energy fluctuations by a factor of 100 for typical values of the time step length. Simulations further show that the energy is conserved for at least one hundred million time steps provided the potential and its first four derivatives are continuous at the cutoff. Finally, we show analytically as well as numerically that energy conservation is not sensitive to round-off errors.

  9. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics....... The method is also used to investigate higher-order central difference algorithms, which are symplectic and also have shadow Hamiltonians, and for which one can also determine the exact criteria for the limit of stability of a single harmonic mode. A fourth-order central difference algorithm gives...

  10. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  11. Prequantum Classical Statistical Field Theory: Schrödinger Dynamics of Entangled Systems as a Classical Stochastic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-03-01

    The idea that quantum randomness can be reduced to randomness of classical fields (fluctuating at time and space scales which are essentially finer than scales approachable in modern quantum experiments) is rather old. Various models have been proposed, e.g., stochastic electrodynamics or the semiclassical model. Recently a new model, so called prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), was developed. By this model a "quantum system" is just a label for (so to say "prequantum") classical random field. Quantum averages can be represented as classical field averages. Correlations between observables on subsystems of a composite system can be as well represented as classical correlations. In particular, it can be done for entangled systems. Creation of such classical field representation demystifies quantum entanglement. In this paper we show that quantum dynamics (given by Schrödinger's equation) of entangled systems can be represented as the stochastic dynamics of classical random fields. The "effect of entanglement" is produced by classical correlations which were present at the initial moment of time, cf. views of Albert Einstein.

  12. A course in mathematical physics 1 and 2 classical dynamical systems and classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Thirring, Walter

    1992-01-01

    The last decade has seen a considerable renaissance in the realm of classical dynamical systems, and many things that may have appeared mathematically overly sophisticated at the time of the first appearance of this textbook have since become the everyday tools of working physicists. This new edition is intended to take this development into account. I have also tried to make the book more readable and to eradicate errors. Since the first edition already contained plenty of material for a one­ semester course, new material was added only when some of the original could be dropped or simplified. Even so, it was necessary to expand the chap­ ter with the proof of the K-A-M Theorem to make allowances for the cur­ rent trend in physics. This involved not only the use of more refined mathe­ matical tools, but also a reevaluation of the word "fundamental. " What was earlier dismissed as a grubby calculation is now seen as the consequence of a deep principle. Even Kepler's laws, which determine the radii of the ...

  13. Construction of exact complex dynamical invariant of a two-dimensional classical system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fakir Chand; S C Mishra

    2006-12-01

    We present the construction of exact complex dynamical invariant of a two-dimensional classical dynamical system on an extended complex space utilizing Lie algebraic approach. These invariants are expected to play a vital role in understanding the complex trajectories of both classical and quantum systems.

  14. Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this summer school is to provide a set of extended and pedagogical lectures, on the major present-day topics in dynamical systems and statistical mechanics including applications. Some articles are dedicated to chaotic transport in plasma turbulence and to quantum chaos. This document gathers the summaries of some presentations.

  15. Hybrid simulation theory for a classical nonlinear dynamical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Paul L.; Govindjee, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid simulation is an experimental and computational technique which allows one to study the time evolution of a system by physically testing a subset of it while the remainder is represented by a numerical model that is attached to the physical portion via sensors and actuators. The technique allows one to study large or complicated mechanical systems while only requiring a subset of the complete system to be present in the laboratory. This results in vast cost savings as well as the ability to study systems that simply can not be tested due to scale. However, the errors that arise from splitting the system in two requires careful attention, if a valid simulation is to be guaranteed. To date, efforts to understand the theoretical limitations of hybrid simulation have been restricted to linear dynamical systems. In this work we consider the behavior of hybrid simulation when applied to nonlinear dynamical systems. As a model problem, we focus on the damped, harmonically-driven nonlinear pendulum. This system offers complex nonlinear characteristics, in particular periodic and chaotic motions. We are able to show that the application of hybrid simulation to nonlinear systems requires a careful understanding of what one expects from such an experiment. In particular, when system response is chaotic we advocate the need for the use of multiple metrics to characterize the difference between two chaotic systems via Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimensions, as well as correlation exponents. When system response is periodic we advocate the use of L2 norms. Further, we are able to show that hybrid simulation can falsely predict chaotic or periodic response when the true system has the opposite characteristic. In certain cases, we are able to show that control system parameters can mitigate this issue.

  16. Entropic fluctuations in statistical mechanics: I. Classical dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, V.; Pillet, C.-A.; Rey-Bellet, L.

    2011-03-01

    Within the abstract framework of dynamical system theory we describe a general approach to the transient (or Evans-Searles) and steady state (or Gallavotti-Cohen) fluctuation theorems of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Our main objective is to display the minimal, model independent mathematical structure at work behind fluctuation theorems. In addition to its conceptual simplicity, another advantage of our approach is its natural extension to quantum statistical mechanics which will be presented in a companion paper. We shall discuss several examples including thermostated systems, open Hamiltonian systems, chaotic homeomorphisms of compact metric spaces and Anosov diffeomorphisms.

  17. Entropic Fluctuations in Statistical Mechanics I. Classical Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jakšić, Vojkan; Rey-Bellet, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Within the abstract framework of dynamical system theory we describe a general approach to the Transient (or Evans-Searles) and Steady State (or Gallavotti-Cohen) Fluctuation Theorems of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Our main objective is to display the minimal, model independent mathematical structure at work behind fluctuation theorems. Besides its conceptual simplicity, another advantage of our approach is its natural extension to quantum statistical mechanics which will be presented in a companion paper. We shall discuss several examples including thermostated systems, open Hamiltonian systems, chaotic homeomorphisms of compact metric spaces and Anosov diffeomorphisms.

  18. Classical dynamics a modern perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarshan, Ennackal Chandy George

    2016-01-01

    Classical dynamics is traditionally treated as an early stage in the development of physics, a stage that has long been superseded by more ambitious theories. Here, in this book, classical dynamics is treated as a subject on its own as well as a research frontier. Incorporating insights gained over the past several decades, the essential principles of classical dynamics are presented, while demonstrating that a number of key results originally considered only in the context of quantum theory and particle physics, have their foundations in classical dynamics.Graduate students in physics and practicing physicists will welcome the present approach to classical dynamics that encompasses systems of particles, free and interacting fields, and coupled systems. Lie groups and Lie algebras are incorporated at a basic level and are used in describing space-time symmetry groups. There is an extensive discussion on constrained systems, Dirac brackets and their geometrical interpretation. The Lie-algebraic description of ...

  19. Integrating factors and conservation theorem for holonomic nonconservative dynamical systems in generalized classical mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔永芬; 张耀良; 韩广才

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general approach to the construction of conservation laws for generalized classical dynamical systems. Firstly, we give the definition of integrating factors and, secondly, we study in detail the necessary conditions for the existence of conserved quantities. Then we establish the conservation theorem and its inverse for the Hamilton's canonical equations of motion of holonomic nonconservative dynamical systems in generalized classical mechanics. Finally, we give an example to illustrate the application of the results.

  20. Dynamical simulations of classical stochastic systems using matrix product states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T H; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D

    2010-09-01

    We adapt the time-evolving block decimation (TEBD) algorithm, originally devised to simulate the dynamics of one-dimensional quantum systems, to simulate the time evolution of nonequilibrium stochastic systems. We describe this method in detail; a system's probability distribution is represented by a matrix product state (MPS) of finite dimension and then its time evolution is efficiently simulated by repeatedly updating and approximately refactorizing this representation. We examine the use of MPS as an approximation method, looking at parallels between the interpretations of applying it to quantum state vectors and probability distributions. In the context of stochastic systems we consider two types of factorization for use in the TEBD algorithm: non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), which ensures that the approximate probability distribution is manifestly non-negative, and the singular value decomposition (SVD). Comparing these factorizations, we find the accuracy of the SVD to be substantially greater than current NMF algorithms. We then apply TEBD to simulate the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for systems of up to hundreds of lattice sites in size. Using exact analytic results for the TASEP steady state, we find that TEBD reproduces this state such that the error in calculating expectation values can be made negligible even when severely compressing the description of the system by restricting the dimension of the MPS to be very small. Out of the steady state we show for specific observables that expectation values converge as the dimension of the MPS is increased to a moderate size.

  1. Quantum dynamics for classical systems with applications of the number operator

    CERN Document Server

    Bagarello, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics is increasingly applied to classical problems in finance, biology, economics, and elsewhere. Quantum Dynamics for Classical Systems describes how quantum tools—the number operator in particular—can be used to create dynamical systems in which the variables are operator-valued functions and whose results explain the presented model. The book presents mathematical results and their applications to concrete systems and discusses the methods used, results obtained, and techniques developed for the proofs of the results. The central ideas of number operators are illuminated while avoiding excessive technicalities that are unnecessary for understanding and learning the various mathematical applications. The presented dynamical systems address a variety of contexts and offer clear analyses and explanations of concluded results. Additional features in Quantum Dynamics for Classical Systems include: Applications across diverse fields including stock markets and population migration as well as a uniqu...

  2. Effects of barrier fluctuation on the tunneling dynamics in the presence of classical chaos in a mixed quantum-classical system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aparna Saha; Bidhan Chandra Bag; Pranab Sarkar

    2007-03-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the tunneling dynamics of a particle moving in a bistable potential with fluctuating barrier which is coupled to a non-integrable classical system and study the interplay between classical chaos and barrier fluctuation in the tunneling dynamics. We found that the coupling of the quantum system with the classical subsystem decreases the tunneling rate irrespective of whether the classical subsystem is regular or chaotic and also irrespective of the fact that whether the barrier fluctuates or not. Presence of classical chaos always enhances the tunneling rate constant. The effect of barrier fluctuation on the tunneling rate in a mixed quantum-classical system is to suppress the tunneling rate. In contrast to the case of regular subsystem, the suppression arising due to barrier fluctuation is more visible when the subsystem is chaotic.

  3. Quantum chaotic scattering in graphene systems in the absence of invariant classical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Lei; Ying, Lei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-05-01

    Quantum chaotic scattering is referred to as the study of quantum behaviors of open Hamiltonian systems that exhibit transient chaos in the classical limit. Traditionally a central issue in this field is how the elements of the scattering matrix or their functions fluctuate as a system parameter, e.g., the electron Fermi energy, is changed. A tacit hypothesis underlying previous works was that the underlying classical phase-space structure remains invariant as the parameter varies, so semiclassical theory can be used to explain various phenomena in quantum chaotic scattering. There are, however, experimental situations where the corresponding classical chaotic dynamics can change characteristically with some physical parameter. Multiple-terminal quantum dots are one such example where, when a magnetic field is present, the classical chaotic-scattering dynamics can change between being nonhyperbolic and being hyperbolic as the Fermi energy is changed continuously. For such systems semiclassical theory is inadequate to account for the characteristics of conductance fluctuations with the Fermi energy. To develop a general framework for quantum chaotic scattering associated with variable classical dynamics, we use multi-terminal graphene quantum-dot systems as a prototypical model. We find that significant conductance fluctuations occur with the Fermi energy even for fixed magnetic field strength, and the characteristics of the fluctuation patterns depend on the energy. We propose and validate that the statistical behaviors of the conductance-fluctuation patterns can be understood by the complex eigenvalue spectrum of the generalized, complex Hamiltonian of the system which includes self-energies resulted from the interactions between the device and the semi-infinite leads. As the Fermi energy is increased, complex eigenvalues with extremely smaller imaginary parts emerge, leading to sharp resonances in the conductance.

  4. Inference of Planck action constant by a classical fluctuative postulate holding for stable microscopic and macroscopic dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    De Martino, S; Illuminati, F; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of inferring or simulating some aspects of quantum dynamics by adding classical statistical fluctuations to classical mechanics. We introduce a general principle of mechanical stability and derive a necessary condition for classical chaotic fluctuations to affect confined dynamical systems, on any scale, ranging from microscopic to macroscopic domains. As a consequence we obtain, both for microscopic and macroscopic aggregates, dimensional relations defining the minimum unit of action of individual constituents, yielding in all cases Planck action constant.

  5. Geometry of high-lying eigenfunctions in a plane billiard system having mixed type classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, B; Li, Baowen; Robnik, Marko

    1995-01-01

    In this work we study the geometrical properties of the high-lying eigenfunctions (200,000 and above) which are deep in the semiclassical regime. The system we are analyzing is the billiard system inside the region defined by the quadratic (complex) conformal map w = z + \\lambda z^{2} of the unit disk |z| \\le 1 as introduced by Robnik (1983), with the shape parameter value \\lambda = 0.15, so that the billiard is still convex and has KAM-type classical dynamics, where regular and irregular regions of classical motion coexist in the classical phase space. By inspecting 100 and by showing 36 consecutive numerically calculated eigenfunctions we reach the following conclusions: (1) Percival's (1973) conjectured classification in regular and irregular states works well: the mixed type states "living" on regular {\\em and} irregular regions disappear in the semiclassical limit. (2) The irregular (chaotic) states can be strongly localized due to the slow classical diffusion, but become fully extended in the semiclassi...

  6. Theory of linear physical systems theory of physical systems from the viewpoint of classical dynamics, including Fourier methods

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemin, Ernst A

    2013-01-01

    An eminent electrical engineer and authority on linear system theory presents this advanced treatise, which approaches the subject from the viewpoint of classical dynamics and covers Fourier methods. This volume will assist upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in moving from introductory courses toward an understanding of advanced network synthesis. 1963 edition.

  7. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2009-01-01

    This third volume completes the Work Mechanical Systems, Classical Models. The first two volumes dealt with particle dynamics and with discrete and continuous mechanical systems. The present volume studies analytical mechanics. Topics like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the Hamilton-Jacobi method, and a study of systems with separate variables are thoroughly discussed. Also included are variational principles and canonical transformations, integral invariants and exterior differential calculus, and particular attention is given to non-holonomic mechanical systems. The author explains in detail all important aspects of the science of mechanics, regarded as a natural science, and shows how they are useful in understanding important natural phenomena and solving problems of interest in applied and engineering sciences. Professor Teodorescu has spent more than fifty years as a Professor of Mechanics at the University of Bucharest and this book relies on the extensive literature on the subject as well as th...

  8. Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics in quantum and classical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vacchini, Bassano; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the conceptually different definitions used for the non-Markovianity of classical and quantum processes. The well-established definition for non-Markovianity of a classical stochastic process represents a condition on the Kolmogorov hierarchy of the n-point joint probability distributions. Since this definition cannot be transferred to the quantum regime, quantum non-Markovianity has recently been defined and quantified in terms of the underlying quantum dynamical map, using either its divisibility properties or the behavior of the trace distance between pairs of initial states. Here, we investigate and compare these definitions and their relations to the classical notion of non-Markovianity by employing a large class of non-Markovian processes, known as semi-Markov processes, which admit a natural extension to the quantum case. A number of specific physical examples is constructed which allow to study the basic features of the classical and the quantum definitions and to evaluate explicitly the me...

  9. Dynamics of cascade three-level system interacting with the classical and quantized field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mihir Ranjan Nath; Surajit Sen; Gautam Gangopadhyay

    2003-12-01

    We study the exact solutions of the cascade three-level atom interacting with a single mode classical and quantized field with different initial conditions ofthe atom. For the semiclassical model, it is found that if the atom is initially in the middle level, the time-dependent populations of the upper and lower levels are always equal. This dynamical symmetry exhibited by the classical field is spoiled on quantization of the field mode. To reveal this non-classical effect, a Euler matrix formalism is developed to solve the dressed states of the cascade Jaynes–Cummings model (JCM). Possible modification of such an effect on the collapse and revival phenomenon is also discussed by taking the quantized field in a coherent state.

  10. Chaos in effective classical and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Modugno, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Modugno, Michele

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum N-component phi^4 oscillators in presence of an external field. In the large N limit the effective dynamics is described by two-degree-of-freedom classical Hamiltonian systems. In the classical model we observe chaotic orbits for any value of the external field, while in the quantum case chaos is strongly suppressed. A simple explanation of this behaviour is found in the change in the structure of the orbits induced by quantum corrections. Consistently with Heisenberg's principle, quantum fluctuations are forced away from zero, removing in the effective quantum dynamics a hyperbolic fixed point that is a major source of chaos in the classical model.

  11. NATO Advanced Study Institute on International Summer School on Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Collet, P; Métens, S; Neishtadt, A; Zaslavsky, G; Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    2005-01-01

    This book offers a modern updated review on the most important activities in today dynamical systems and statistical mechanics by some of the best experts in the domain. It gives a contemporary and pedagogical view on theories of classical and quantum chaos and complexity in hamiltonian and ergodic systems and their applications to anomalous transport in fluids, plasmas, oceans and atom-optic devices and to control of chaotic transport. The book is issued from lecture notes of the International Summer School on "Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems" held in Cargèse (Corsica) 18th to the 30th August 2003. It reflects the spirit of the School to provide lectures at the post-doctoral level on basic concepts and tools. The first part concerns ergodicity and mixing, complexity and entropy functions, SRB measures, fractal dimensions and bifurcations in hamiltonian systems. Then, models of dynamical evolutions of transport processes in classical and quantum systems have been largely expla...

  12. Dynamics of Non-Classical Interval Exchanges

    CERN Document Server

    Gadre, Vaibhav S

    2009-01-01

    Train tracks with a single vertex are a generalization of interval exchange maps. Here, we consider non-classical interval exchanges: complete train tracks with a single vertex. These can be studied as a dynamical system by considering Rauzy induction in this context. This gives a refinement process on the parameter space similar to Kerckhoff's simplicial systems. We show that the refinement process gives an expansion that has a key dynamical property called uniform distortion. We use uniform distortion to prove normality of the expansion. Consequently we prove an analog of Keane's conjecture: almost every non-classical interval exchange is uniquely ergodic.

  13. Discrete Dynamical Systems Meet the Classic Monkey-and-the-Bananas Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Gerald E.; Martelli, Mario U.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a solution of the three-sailors-and-the-bananas problem and attempts a generalization. Introduces an interesting way of looking at the mathematics with an idea drawn from discrete dynamical systems. (KHR)

  14. Mapping between finite temperature classical and zero temperature quantum systems: Quantum critical jamming and quantum dynamical heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Zohar; Johnson, Patrick; Graf, Matthias J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2013-05-01

    Many electronic systems (e.g., the cuprate superconductors and heavy fermions) exhibit striking features in their dynamical response over a prominent range of experimental parameters. While there are some empirical suggestions of particular increasing length scales that accompany such transitions in some cases, this identification is not universal and in numerous instances no large correlation length is evident. To better understand, as a matter of principle, such behavior in quantum systems, we extend a known mapping (earlier studied in stochastic or supersymmetric quantum mechanics) between finite temperature classical Fokker-Planck systems and related quantum systems at zero temperature to include general nonequilibrium dynamics. Unlike Feynman mappings or stochastic quantization methods in field theories (as well as more recent holographic type dualities), the classical systems that we consider and their quantum duals reside in the same number of space-time dimensions. The upshot of our very broad and rigorous result is that a Wick rotation exactly relates (i) the dynamics in general finite temperature classical dissipative systems to (ii) zero temperature dynamics in the corresponding dual many-body quantum systems. Using this correspondence, we illustrate that, even in the absence of imposed disorder, many continuum quantum fluid systems (and possible lattice counterparts) may exhibit a zero-point “quantum dynamical heterogeneity” wherein the dynamics, at a given instant, is spatially nonuniform. While the static length scales accompanying this phenomenon do not seem to exhibit a clear divergence in standard correlation functions, the length scale of the dynamical heterogeneities can increase dramatically. We further study “quantum jamming” and illustrate how a hard-core bosonic system can undergo a zero temperature quantum critical metal-to-insulator-type transition with an extremely large effective dynamical exponent z>4 that is consistent with

  15. Geometry from dynamics, classical and quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Cariñena, José F; Marmo, Giuseppe; Morandi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    This book describes, by using elementary techniques, how some geometrical structures widely used today in many areas of physics, like symplectic, Poisson, Lagrangian, Hermitian, etc., emerge from dynamics. It is assumed that what can be accessed in actual experiences when studying a given system is just its dynamical behavior that is described by using a family of variables ("observables" of the system).   The book departs from the principle that ''dynamics is first'', and then tries to answer in what sense the sole dynamics determines the geometrical structures that have proved so useful to describe the dynamics in so many important instances. In this vein it is shown that most of the geometrical structures that are used in the standard presentations of classical dynamics (Jacobi, Poisson, symplectic, Hamiltonian, Lagrangian) are determined, though in general not uniquely, by the dynamics alone. The same program is accomplished for the geometrical structures relevant to describe quantum dynamics.  Finall...

  16. Mixed convolved action for classical and fractional-derivative dissipative dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargush, G F

    2012-12-01

    The principle of mixed convolved action provides a new rigorous weak variational formalism for a broad range of initial value problems in mathematical physics and mechanics. Here, the focus is initially on classical single-degree-of-freedom oscillators incorporating either Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell dissipative elements and then, subsequently, on systems that utilize fractional-derivative constitutive models. In each case, an appropriate mixed convolved action is formulated, and a corresponding weak form is discretized in time using temporal shape functions to produce an algorithm suitable for numerical solution. Several examples are considered to validate the mixed convolved action principles and to investigate the performance of the numerical algorithms. For undamped systems, the algorithm is found to be symplectic and unconditionally stable with respect to the time step. In the case of dissipative systems, the approach is shown to be robust and to be accurate with good convergence characteristics for both classical and fractional-derivative based models. As part of the derivations, some interesting results in the calculus of Caputo fractional derivatives also are presented.

  17. Dynamics of Coupled Quantum-Classical Oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei-Zhong; XU Liu-Su; ZOU Feng-Wu

    2004-01-01

    @@ The dynamics of systems consisting of coupled quantum-classical oscillators is numerically investigated. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the quantum oscillator exhibits chaos. When the mass of the classical oscillator increases, the chaos will be suppressed; if the energy of the system and/or the coupling strength between the two oscillators increases, chaotic behaviour of the system appears. This result will be helpful to understand the probability of the emergence of quantum chaos and may be applied to explain the spectra of complex atoms qualitatively.

  18. Quantum dynamical entropies in discrete classical chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, Fabio [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Cappellini, Valerio [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Zertuche, Federico [Instituto de Matematicas, UNAM, Unidad Cuernavaca, AP 273-3, Admon. 3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-01-09

    We discuss certain analogies between quantization and discretization of classical systems on manifolds. In particular, we will apply the quantum dynamical entropy of Alicki and Fannes to numerically study the footprints of chaos in discretized versions of hyperbolic maps on the torus.

  19. Dynamics of the classical planar spin chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Bart De; Raedt, Hans De

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we pay attention to the classical one-dimensional planar spin system and, in particular, to the dynamics of such a model. We use the Monte Carlo method to calculate the static correlation functions, needed to determine the relaxation functions completely. We are then able to give the r

  20. Point vortex dynamics: A classical mathematics playground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan

    2007-01-01

    The idealization of a two-dimensional, ideal flow as a collection of point vortices embedded in otherwise irrotational flow yields a surprisingly large number of mathematical insights and connects to a large number of areas of classical mathematics. Several examples are given including the integr...... participation in the exploration of this intriguing dynamical system from the mathematical physics community.......The idealization of a two-dimensional, ideal flow as a collection of point vortices embedded in otherwise irrotational flow yields a surprisingly large number of mathematical insights and connects to a large number of areas of classical mathematics. Several examples are given including...

  1. Quantum-Classical Correspondence: Dynamical Quantization and the Classical Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-11-12

    In only 150 pages, not counting appendices, references, or the index, this book is one author's perspective of the massive theoretical and philosophical hurdles in the no-man's-land separating the classical and quantum domains of physics. It ends with him emphasizing his own theoretical contribution to this area. In his own words, he has attempted to answer: 1. How can we obtain the quantum dynamics of open systems initially described by the equations of motion of classical physics (quantization process) 2. How can we retrieve classical dynamics from the quantum mechanical equations of motion by means of a classical limiting process (dequantization process). However, this monograph seems overly ambitious. Although the publisher's description refers to this book as an accessible entre, we find that this author scrambles too hastily over the peaks of information that are contained in his large collection of 272 references. Introductory motivating discussions are lacking. Profound ideas are glossed over superficially and shoddily. Equations morph. But no new convincing understanding of the physical world results. The author takes the viewpoint that physical systems are always in interaction with their environment and are thus not isolated and, therefore, not Hamiltonian. This impels him to produce a method of quantization of these stochastic systems without the need of a Hamiltonian. He also has interest in obtaining the classical limit of the quantized results. However, this reviewer does not understand why one needs to consider open systems to understand quantum-classical correspondence. The author demonstrates his method using various examples of the Smoluchowski form of the Fokker--Planck equation. He then renders these equations in a Wigner representation, uses what he terms an infinitesimality condition, and associates with a constant having the dimensions of an action. He thereby claims to develop master equations, such as the Caldeira

  2. Classical mechanics of nonconservative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galley, Chad R

    2013-04-26

    Hamilton's principle of stationary action lies at the foundation of theoretical physics and is applied in many other disciplines from pure mathematics to economics. Despite its utility, Hamilton's principle has a subtle pitfall that often goes unnoticed in physics: it is formulated as a boundary value problem in time but is used to derive equations of motion that are solved with initial data. This subtlety can have undesirable effects. I present a formulation of Hamilton's principle that is compatible with initial value problems. Remarkably, this leads to a natural formulation for the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics of generic nonconservative systems, thereby filling a long-standing gap in classical mechanics. Thus, dissipative effects, for example, can be studied with new tools that may have applications in a variety of disciplines. The new formalism is demonstrated by two examples of nonconservative systems: an object moving in a fluid with viscous drag forces and a harmonic oscillator coupled to a dissipative environment.

  3. Construction of exact dynamical invariants of two-dimensional classical system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Mishra; Fakir Chand

    2006-03-01

    A general method is used for the construction of second constant of motion of fourth order in momenta using the complex coordinates $(z, \\bar{z})$. A fourth-order potential equation is obtained whose solutions directly provide a large class of integrable systems. The potential equation is tested with an interesting example which admits second constants of motion.

  4. Classical and quantum dynamics from classical paths to path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students who want to become familiar with advanced computational strategies in classical and quantum dynamics will find here both the fundamentals of a standard course and a detailed treatment of the time-dependent oscillator, Chern-Simons mechanics, the Maslov anomaly and the Berry phase, to name a few. Well-chosen and detailed examples illustrate the perturbation theory, canonical transformations, the action principle and demonstrate the usage of path integrals. This new edition has been revised and enlarged with chapters on quantum electrodynamics, high energy physics, Green’s functions and strong interaction.

  5. Driven topological systems in the classical limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Callum W.; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Periodically driven quantum systems can exhibit topologically nontrivial behavior, even when their quasienergy bands have zero Chern numbers. Much work has been conducted on noninteracting quantum-mechanical models where this kind of behavior is present. However, the inclusion of interactions in out-of-equilibrium quantum systems can prove to be quite challenging. On the other hand, the classical counterpart of hard-core interactions can be simulated efficiently via constrained random walks. The noninteracting model, proposed by Rudner et al. [Phys. Rev. X 3, 031005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevX.3.031005], has a special point for which the system is equivalent to a classical random walk. We consider the classical counterpart of this model, which is exact at a special point even when hard-core interactions are present, and show how these quantitatively affect the edge currents in a strip geometry. We find that the interacting classical system is well described by a mean-field theory. Using this we simulate the dynamics of the classical system, which show that the interactions play the role of Markovian, or time-dependent disorder. By comparing the evolution of classical and quantum edge currents in small lattices, we find regimes where the classical limit considered gives good insight into the quantum problem.

  6. General linear dynamics - quantum, classical or hybrid

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, H-T; Vallone, F

    2011-01-01

    We describe our recent proposal of a path integral formulation of classical Hamiltonian dynamics. Which leads us here to a new attempt at hybrid dynamics, which concerns the direct coupling of classical and quantum mechanical degrees of freedom. This is of practical as well as of foundational interest and no fully satisfactory solution of this problem has been established to date. Related aspects will be observed in a general linear ensemble theory, which comprises classical and quantum dynamics in the form of Liouville and von Neumann equations, respectively, as special cases. Considering the simplest object characterized by a two-dimensional state-space, we illustrate how quantum mechanics is special in several respects among possible linear generalizations.

  7. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  8. First-order partial differential equations in classical dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Carathèodory's classic work on the calculus of variations explores in depth the connection between ordinary differential equations and first-order partial differential equations. The n second-order ordinary differential equations of a classical dynamical system reduce to a single first-order differential equation in 2n independent variables. The general solution of first-order partial differential equations touches on many concepts central to graduate-level courses in analytical dynamics including the Hamiltonian, Lagrange and Poisson brackets, and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. For all but the simplest dynamical systems the solution requires one or more of these techniques. Three elementary dynamical problems (uniform acceleration, harmonic motion, and cyclotron motion) can be solved directly from the appropriate first-order partial differential equation without the use of advanced methods. The process offers an unusual perspective on classical dynamics, which is readily accessible to intermediate students who are not yet fully conversant with advanced approaches.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of classical stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Paul E; Surh, Michael P; Richards, David F; Graziani, Frank R; Murillo, Michael S

    2013-11-22

    Molecular dynamics can provide very accurate tests of classical kinetic theory; for example, unambiguous comparisons can be made for classical particles interacting via a repulsive 1/r potential. The plasma stopping power problem, of great interest in its own right, provides an especially stringent test of a velocity-dependent transport property. We have performed large-scale (~10(4)-10(6) particles) molecular dynamics simulations of charged-particle stopping in a classical electron gas that span the weak to moderately strong intratarget coupling regimes. Projectile-target coupling is varied with projectile charge and velocity. Comparisons are made with disparate kinetic theories (both Boltzmann and Lenard-Balescu classes) and fully convergent theories to establish regimes of validity. We extend these various stopping models to improve agreement with the MD data and provide a useful fit to our results.

  10. Ensemble simulations with discrete classical dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2013-01-01

    For discrete classical Molecular dynamics (MD) obtained by the "Verlet" algorithm (VA) with the time increment $h$ there exist a shadow Hamiltonian $\\tilde{H}$ with energy $\\tilde{E}(h)$, for which the discrete particle positions lie on the analytic trajectories for $\\tilde{H}$. $\\tilde...

  11. Quantization of soluble classical constrained systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhadi, Z. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie quantique, Faculté des sciences, Université Mouloud Mammeri, BP 17, 15000 Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); Laboratoire de physique théorique, Faculté des sciences exactes, Université de Bejaia, 06000 Bejaia (Algeria); Menas, F. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie quantique, Faculté des sciences, Université Mouloud Mammeri, BP 17, 15000 Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); Ecole Nationale Préparatoire aux Etudes d’ingéniorat, Laboratoire de physique, RN 5 Rouiba, Alger (Algeria); Bérard, A. [Equipe BioPhysStat, Laboratoire LCP-A2MC, ICPMB, IF CNRS No 2843, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex (France); Mohrbach, H., E-mail: herve.mohrbach@univ-lorraine.fr [Equipe BioPhysStat, Laboratoire LCP-A2MC, ICPMB, IF CNRS No 2843, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    The derivation of the brackets among coordinates and momenta for classical constrained systems is a necessary step toward their quantization. Here we present a new approach for the determination of the classical brackets which does neither require Dirac’s formalism nor the symplectic method of Faddeev and Jackiw. This approach is based on the computation of the brackets between the constants of integration of the exact solutions of the equations of motion. From them all brackets of the dynamical variables of the system can be deduced in a straightforward way.

  12. Effective dynamics of a classical point charges

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, Janos

    2013-01-01

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham-Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out.

  13. Separating the regular and irregular energy levels and their statistics in Hamiltonian system with mixed classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, B

    1995-01-01

    We look at the high-lying eigenstates (from the 10,001st to the 13, 000th) in the Robnik billiard (defined as a quadratic conformal map of the unit disk) with the shape parameter \\lambda=0.15. All the 3,000 eigenstates have been numerically calculated and examined in the configuration space and in the phase space which - in comparison with the classical phase space - enabled a clear cut classification of energy levels into regular and irregular. This is the first successful separation of energy levels based on purely dynamical rather than special geometrical symmetry properties. We calculate the fractional measure of regular levels as \\rho_1=0.365\\pm 0.01 which is in remarkable agreement with the classical estimate \\rho_1=0.360\\pm 0.001. This finding confirms the Percival's (1973) classification scheme, the assumption in Berry-Robnik (1984) theory and the rigorous result by Lazutkin (1981,1991). The regular levels obey the Poissonian statistics quite well whereas the irregular sequence exhibits the fractional...

  14. Classical models of the spin 1/2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Lazaro, Carlos H.

    We proposed a Quaternionic mechanical system motivated by the Foucault pendulum as a classical model for the dynamics of the spin ½ system. We showed that this mechanical system contains the dynamics of the spin state of the electron under a uniform magnetic field as it is given by the Schrodinger-Pauli-Equation (SPE). We closed with a characterization of the dynamics of this generalized classical system by showing that it is equivalent with the dynamics of the Schrodinger Pauli Equation as long as the solutions to the generalized classical system are roots of the Lagrangian, that is the condition L = 0 holds.

  15. Classical transport in disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    This thesis reports on the manifestation of structural disorder on molecular transport and it consists of two parts. Part I discusses the relations between classical transport and the underlying structural complexity of the system. Both types of molecular diffusion, namely Gaussian and non- Gaussian are presented and the relevant time regimes are discussed. In addition the concept of structural universality is introduced and connected with the diffusion metrics. One of the most robust techniques for measuring molecular mean square displacements is magnetic resonance. This method requires encoding and subsequently reading out after an experimentally controlled time, a phase φ to the spins using magnetic field gradients. The main limitation for probing short diffusion lengths L(t) ˜ 1micro m with magnetic resonance is the requirement to encode and decode the phase φ in very short time intervals. Therefore, to probe such displacements a special probe was developed equipped with a gradient coil capable of delivering magnetic field gradients of approximately 90 G/cmA . The design of the probe is reported. Part I also includes a discussion of experiments of transport in two qualitatively different disordered phantoms and reports on a direct observation of universality in one-dimension. The results reveal the universal power law scaling of the diffusion coefficient at the long-time regime and illustrate the essence of structural universality by experimentally determining the structure correlation function of the phantoms. In addition, the scaling of the diffusive permeability of the phantoms with respect to the pore size is investigated. Additional work presented includes a detailed study of adsorption of methane gas in Vycor disordered glass. The techniques described in Part I of this thesis are widely used for measuring structural parameters of porous media, such as the surface-to-volume ratio or diffusive permeability. Part II of this thesis discusses the

  16. Strong Analog Classical Simulation of Coherent Quantum Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    A strong analog classical simulation of general quantum evolution is proposed, which serves as a novel scheme in quantum computation and simulation. The scheme employs the approach of geometric quantum mechanics and quantum informational technique of quantum tomography, which applies broadly to cases of mixed states, nonunitary evolution, and infinite dimensional systems. The simulation provides an intriguing classical picture to probe quantum phenomena, namely, a coherent quantum dynamics can be viewed as a globally constrained classical Hamiltonian dynamics of a collection of coupled particles or strings. Efficiency analysis reveals a fundamental difference between the locality in real space and locality in Hilbert space, the latter enables efficient strong analog classical simulations. Examples are also studied to highlight the differences and gaps among various simulation methods. Funding support from NSERC of Canada and a research fellowship at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia are acknowledged

  17. Tensor calculus and analytical dynamics a classical introduction to holonomic and nonholonomic tensor calculus ; and its principal applications to the Lagrangean dynamics of constrained mechanical systems : for engineers, physicists, and mathematicians

    CERN Document Server

    Papastavridis, John G

    1999-01-01

    Tensor Calculus and Analytical Dynamics provides a concise, comprehensive, and readable introduction to classical tensor calculus - in both holonomic and nonholonomic coordinates - as well as to its principal applications to the Lagrangean dynamics of discrete systems under positional or velocity constraints. The thrust of the book focuses on formal structure and basic geometrical/physical ideas underlying most general equations of motion of mechanical systems under linear velocity constraints.

  18. Classical Equations for Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gell-Mann, Murray; Gell-Mann, Murray; Hartle, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the phenomenological deterministic laws that approximately govern the quasiclassical domain of familiar experience is considered in the context of the quantum mechanics of closed systems such as the universe as a whole. We investigate the requirements for coarse grainings to yield decoherent sets of histories that are quasiclassical, i.e. such that the individual histories obey, with high probability, effective classical equations of motion interrupted continually by small fluctuations and occasionally by large ones. We discuss these requirements generally but study them specifically for coarse grainings of the type that follows a distinguished subset of a complete set of variables while ignoring the rest. More coarse graining is needed to achieve decoherence than would be suggested by naive arguments based on the uncertainty principle. Even coarser graining is required in the distinguished variables for them to have the necessary inertia to approach classical predictability in the presence of t...

  19. The transition to chaos conservative classical systems and quantum manifestations

    CERN Document Server

    Reichl, Linda E

    2004-01-01

    This book provides a thorough and comprehensive discussion of classical and quantum chaos theory for bounded systems and for scattering processes Specific discussions include • Noether’s theorem, integrability, KAM theory, and a definition of chaotic behavior • Area-preserving maps, quantum billiards, semiclassical quantization, chaotic scattering, scaling in classical and quantum dynamics, dynamic localization, dynamic tunneling, effects of chaos in periodically driven systems and stochastic systems • Random matrix theory and supersymmetry The book is divided into several parts Chapters 2 through 4 deal with the dynamics of nonlinear conservative classical systems Chapter 5 and several appendices give a thorough grounding in random matrix theory and supersymmetry techniques Chapters 6 and 7 discuss the manifestations of chaos in bounded quantum systems and open quantum systems respectively Chapter 8 focuses on the semiclassical description of quantum systems with underlying classical chaos, and Chapt...

  20. Classical equations for quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell-Mann, M. (Theoretical Astrophysics Group (T-6), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545) (United States) (Santa Fe Institute, 1660 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501); Hartle, J.B. (Department of Physics, University of California enSanta Barbara, Santa Barbara, (California) 93106)

    1993-04-15

    The origin of the phenomenological deterministic laws that approximately govern the quasiclassical domain of familiar experience is considered in the context of the quantum mechanics of closed systems such as the universe as a whole. A formulation of quantum mechanics is used that predicts probabilities for the individual members of a set of alternative coarse-grained histories that [ital decohere], which means that there is negligible quantum interference between the individual histories in the set. We investigate the requirements for coarse grainings to yield decoherent sets of histories that are quasiclassical, i.e., such that the individual histories obey, with high probability, effective classical equations of motion interrupted continually by small fluctuations and occasionally by large ones. We discuss these requirements generally but study them specifically for coarse grainings of the type that follows a distinguished subset of a complete set of variables while ignoring the rest. More coarse graining is needed to achieve decoherence than would be suggested by naive arguments based on the uncertainty principle. Even coarser graining is required in the distinguished variables for them to have the necessary inertia to approach classical predictability in the presence of the noise consisting of the fluctuations that typical mechanisms of decoherence produce. We describe the derivation of phenomenological equations of motion explicitly for a particular class of models.

  1. Mesoscopic systems: classical irreversibility and quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Bernard

    2012-09-28

    Mesoscopic physics is a sub-discipline of condensed-matter physics that focuses on the properties of solids in a size range intermediate between bulk matter and individual atoms. In particular, it is characteristic of a domain where a certain number of interacting objects can easily be tuned between classical and quantum regimes, thus enabling studies at the border of the two. In magnetism, such a tuning was first realized with large-spin magnetic molecules called single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with archetype Mn(12)-ac. In general, the mesoscopic scale can be relatively large (e.g. micrometre-sized superconducting circuits), but, in magnetism, it is much smaller and can reach the atomic scale with rare earth (RE) ions. In all cases, it is shown how quantum relaxation can drastically reduce classical irreversibility. Taking the example of mesoscopic spin systems, the origin of irreversibility is discussed on the basis of the Landau-Zener model. A classical counterpart of this model is described enabling, in particular, intuitive understanding of most aspects of quantum spin dynamics. The spin dynamics of mesoscopic spin systems (SMM or RE systems) becomes coherent if they are well isolated. The study of the damping of their Rabi oscillations gives access to most relevant decoherence mechanisms by different environmental baths, including the electromagnetic bath of microwave excitation. This type of decoherence, clearly seen with spin systems, is easily recovered in quantum simulations. It is also observed with other types of qubits such as a single spin in a quantum dot or a superconducting loop, despite the presence of other competitive decoherence mechanisms. As in the molecular magnet V(15), the leading decoherence terms of superconducting qubits seem to be associated with a non-Markovian channel in which short-living entanglements with distributions of two-level systems (nuclear spins, impurity spins and/or charges) leading to 1/f noise induce τ(1)-like

  2. Quantum-classical hybrid dynamics - a summary

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A summary of a recently proposed description of quantum-classical hybrids is presented, which concerns quantum and classical degrees of freedom of a composite object that interact directly with each other. This is based on notions of classical Hamiltonian mechanics suitably extended to quantum mechanics.

  3. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  4. Classical Solution of a Two-Dimensional Dynamics System for Pure Forest%一个二维纯林发展系统的古典解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐龙封; 吴慧

    2011-01-01

    The research of two-dimensional forest dynamics system model is still open. First, for the peculiarity of two-dimensional forest dynamics systems with initial state depending only on total quantity of forest, and boundary condition depending only on initial state again, boundary of system not satisfying one of 3 kinds common conditions, by introducing a class of special family curves in presence region of " stand age-diameter", the problem of boundary conditions is avoided. Secondly, using the technique of selecting measure dimension of lumber diameter properly, a well-posed two-dimensional forest dynamics system model is propounded. At last, colligating the technique of pulling characteristic curve, a prior estimate, structuring integral equation of initial state, iteration, the existence and uniqueness of the global classical solution are proved for this system.%二维森林发展系统模型的研究还未见到任何结果.针对这类系统初始状态依赖于林木总量,而边界状态又依赖于初始状态,系统的边界不满足通常的三类条件之一的特点,采用在“树龄-直径”存在区域内引进一类特殊的曲线族,避开了提边界条件问题.再利用适当地选择林木直径尺度量纲的技巧,提出了一个适定的二维纯林发展系统模型,最后综合拉特征线、先验估计、构造初始状态积分方程、迭代等技巧证明了这个系统整体古典解的存在唯一性.

  5. Dynamic changes in the numbers of different subsets of peripheral blood NK cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus following classic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongshuang; Zhao, Ling; Jiang, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yanfang; Feng, Li; Ye, Zhuang

    2014-11-01

    Imbalance of natural killer (NK) cells is associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, little is known about the dynamic changes on NK cells following therapy. This study aimed at examining the impact of classic therapies on the numbers of different subsets of NK cells in new-onset SLE patients. The numbers of different subsets of peripheral blood NK cells in 24 new-onset SLE patients before, 4 and 12 weeks post the classic therapies, and 7 healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. The potential correlation between the numbers of NK cells and the values of clinical measures was analyzed. In comparison with that before treatment, the numbers of NK, NKG2C+, and KIR2DL3+ NK cells were significantly increased while the numbers of NKp46+ and NKG2A + NK cells significantly decreased at 4 and/or 12 weeks post the treatment only in the drug well-responding patients, but not in those poor responders (P numbers of NKG2C + NK cells were correlated positively with the levels of serum C3 while the numbers of KIR2DL3+ NK cells were correlated negatively with the scores of SLEDAI in these patients at 4 weeks post the treatment. The classic therapies modulated the numbers of some subsets of NK cells in drug well-responding SLE patients. The changes in the numbers of some subsets of NK cells may serve as biomarkers for evaluating the therapeutic responses of SLE.

  6. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H/sub 2/C/sub 2/ ..-->.. HC/sub 2/H, HNC ..-->.. HCN, and H/sub 2/CO ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I ..-->.. Na /sup +/ + I/sup -/ is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features. (WHM)

  7. Analysis of Slight Discrepancy Between Quantum Dynamics and Classical Statistical Dynamics For Second Order Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Werbos, P J

    2003-01-01

    Quantum Field Theory (QFT) makes predictions by combining two sets of assumptions: (1) quantum dynamics, such as a Schrodinger or Liouville equation; (2) quantum measurement, such as stochastic collapse to an eigenfunction of a measurement operator. A previous paper defined a classical density matrix R encoding the statistical moments of an ensemble of states of classical second-order Hamiltonian field theory. It proved Tr(RQ)=E(Q), etc., for the usual field operators as defined by Weinberg, and it proved that those observables of the classical system obey the usual Heisenberg dynamic equation. However, R itself obeys dynamics different from the usual Liouville equation! This paper derives those dynamics, and calculates the discrepancy between CFT and normal form QFT in predicting general observables g(Q,P). There is some preliminary evidence for the conjecture that the discrepancies disappear in equilibrium states (bound states and scattering states) for finite bosonic field theories. Even if not, they appea...

  8. Generalized fluctuation theorems for classical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, G S

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuation theorems have a very special place in the study of non equilibrium dynamics of physical systems. The form in which it is used most extensively is the Gallavoti-Cohen Fluctuation Theorem which is in terms of the distribution of the work $p(W)/p(-W)=\\exp(\\alpha W)$. We derive the general form of the fluctuation theorems for an arbitrary Gaussian Markov process and find conditions when the parameter $\\alpha$ becomes a universal parameter $1/kT$. As an application we consider fluctuation theorems for classical cyclotron motion of an electron in a parabolic potential. The motion of the electron is described by four coupled Langevin equations and thus is non-trivial. The generalized theorems are equally valid for non-equilibrium steady states.

  9. Classical trajectory simulations of post-transition state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Park, Kyoyeon; Hase, William L.

    Classical chemical dynamics simulations of post-transition state dynamics are reviewed. Most of the simulations involve direct dynamics for which the potential energy and gradient are obtained directly from an electronic structure theory. The chemical reaction attributes and chemical systems presented are product energy partitioning for Cl- ··· CH3Br → ClCH3 + Br- and C2H5F → C2H4 + HF dissociation, non-RRKM dynamics for cyclopropane stereomutation and the Cl- ··· CH3Cl complexes mediating the Cl- + CH3Cl SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction, and non-IRC dynamics for the OH- + CH3F and F- + CH3OOH chemical reactions. These studies illustrate the important role of chemical dynamics simulations in understanding atomic-level reaction dynamics and interpreting experiments. They also show that widely used paradigms and model theories for interpreting reaction kinetics and dynamics are often inaccurate and are not applicable.

  10. Classical and quantum stability of higher-derivative dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaparulin, D S; Sharapov, A A

    2014-01-01

    We observe that a wide class of higher-derivative systems admits a bounded integral of motion that ensures the classical stability of dynamics, while the canonical energy is unbounded. We use the concept of a Lagrange anchor to demonstrate that the bounded integral of motion is connected with the time-translation invariance. A procedure is suggested for switching on interactions in free higher-derivative systems without breaking their stability. We also demonstrate the quantization technique that keeps the higher-derivative dynamics stable at quantum level. The general construction is illustrated by the examples of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator, higher-derivative scalar field model, and the Podolsky electrodynamics. For all these models, the positive integrals of motion are explicitly constructed and the interactions are included such that keep the system stable.

  11. for hybrid dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a unified dynamical systems framework for a general class of systems possessing left-continuous flows; that is, left-continuous dynamical systems. These systems are shown to generalize virtually all existing notions of dynamical systems and include hybrid, impulsive, and switching dynamical systems as special cases. Furthermore, we generalize dissipativity, passivity, and nonexpansivity theory to left-continuous dynamical systems. Specifically, the classical concepts of system storage functions and supply rates are extended to left-continuous dynamical systems providing a generalized hybrid system energy interpretation in terms of stored energy, dissipated energy over the continuous-time dynamics, and dissipated energy over the resetting events. Finally, the generalized dissipativity notions are used to develop general stability criteria for feedback interconnections of left-continuous dynamical systems. These results generalize the positivity and small gain theorems to the case of left-continuous, hybrid, and impulsive dynamical systems.

  12. The free rigid body dynamics: Generalized versus classic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudoran, Rǎzvan M.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we analyze some normal forms of a general quadratic Hamiltonian system defined on the dual of the Lie algebra {o}(K) of real K-skew-symmetric matrices, where K is an arbitrary 3×3 real symmetric matrix. A consequence of the main results is that any first-order autonomous three-dimensional differential equation possessing two independent quadratic constants of motion, which admit a positive/negative definite linear combination, is affinely equivalent to the classical "relaxed" free rigid body dynamics with linear control parameters.

  13. Isomorph invariance of the structure and dynamics of classical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Dan; Olsen, Andreas Elmerdahl; Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk

    2014-01-01

    of a defective fcc crystal is also shown to be isomorph invariant. In contrast, a NaCl crystal model does not exhibit isomorph invariances. Other systems simulated, though in less detail, are the Wahnström binary Lennard-Jones crystal with the MgZn2 Laves crystal structure, monatomic fcc crystals of particles......This paper shows by computer simulations that some crystalline systems have curves in their thermodynamic phase diagrams, so-called isomorphs, along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. The crystals are studied in a classical-mechanical framework......, which is generally a good description except significantly below melting. The existence of isomorphs for crystals is validated by simulations of particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones pair potential arranged into a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystalline structure; the slow vacancy-jump dynamics...

  14. Classical vs Quantum Games: Continuous-time Evolutionary Strategy Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Ming Lam

    2011-01-01

    This paper unifies the concepts of evolutionary games and quantum strategies. First, we state the formulation and properties of classical evolutionary strategies, with focus on the destinations of evolution in 2-player 2-strategy games. We then introduce a new formalism of quantum evolutionary dynamics, and give an example where an evolving quantum strategy gives reward if played against its classical counterpart.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum-Classical Correspondence: Dynamical Quantization and the Classical Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.

    2004-11-01

    In only 150 pages, not counting appendices, references, or the index, this book is one author’s perspective of the massive theoretical and philosophical hurdles in the no-man’s-land separating the classical and quantum domains of physics. It ends with him emphasizing his own theoretical contribution to this area. In his own words, he has attempted to answer: 1. ‘How can we obtain the quantum dynamics of open systems initially described by the equations of motion of classical physics (quantization process)? 2. ‘How can we retrieve classical dynamics from the quantum mechanical equations of motion by means of a classical limiting process (dequantization process)?’ However, this monograph seems overly ambitious. Although the publisher’s description refers to this book as ‘an accessible entrée’, we find that this author scrambles too hastily over the peaks of information that are contained in his large collection of 272 references. Introductory motivating discussions are lacking. Profound ideas are glossed over superficially and shoddily. Equations morph. But no new convincing understanding of the physical world results. The author takes the viewpoint that physical systems are always in interaction with their environment and are thus not isolated and, therefore, not Hamiltonian. This impels him to produce a method of quantization of these stochastic systems without the need of a Hamiltonian. He also has interest in obtaining the classical limit of the quantized results. However, this reviewer does not understand why one needs to consider open systems to understand ‘quantum-classical correspondence’. The author demonstrates his method using various examples of the Smoluchowski form of the Fokker--Planck equation. He then renders these equations in a Wigner representation, uses what he terms ‘an infinitesimality condition’, and associates with a constant having the dimensions of an action. He thereby claims to develop master equations, such as

  16. Classical and quantum dynamics of driven elliptical billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Florian

    2009-12-09

    Subject of this thesis is the investigation of the classical dynamics of the driven elliptical billiard and the development of a numerical method allowing the propagation of arbitrary initial states in the quantum version of the system. In the classical case, we demonstrate that there is Fermi acceleration in the driven billiard. The corresponding transport process in momentum space shows a surprising crossover from sub- to normal diffusion. This crossover is not parameter induced, but rather occurs dynamically in the evolution of the ensemble. The four-dimensional phase space is analyzed in depth, especially how its composition changes in different velocity regimes. We show that the stickiness properties, which eventually determine the diffusion, are intimately connected with this change of the composition of the phase space with respect to velocity. In the course of the evolution, the accelerating ensemble thus explores regions of varying stickiness, leading to the mentioned crossover in the diffusion. In the quantum case, a series of transformations tailored to the elliptical billiard is applied to circumvent the time-dependent Dirichlet boundary conditions. By means of an expansion ansatz, this eventually yields a large system of coupled ordinary differential equations, which can be solved by standard techniques. (orig.)

  17. Ambiguities in Quantizing a Classical System

    CERN Document Server

    Redmount, I H; Young, K; Redmount, Ian; Suen, Wai-Mo; Young, Kenneth

    1999-01-01

    One classical theory, as determined by an equation of motion or set of classical trajectories, can correspond to many unitarily {\\em in}equivalent quantum theories upon canonical quantization. This arises from a remarkable ambiguity, not previously investigated, in the construction of the classical (and hence the quantized) Hamiltonian or Lagrangian. This ambiguity is illustrated for systems with one degree of freedom: An arbitrary function of the constants of motion can be introduced into this construction. For example, the nonrelativistic and relativistic free particles follow identical classical trajectories, but the Hamiltonians or Lagrangians, and the canonically quantized versions of these descriptions, are inequivalent. Inequivalent descriptions of other systems, such as the harmonic oscillator, are also readily obtained.

  18. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzberg, Mark P. [Institute of Cosmology & Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University,Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2016-11-21

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  19. Identifying the Stern-Gerlach force of classical electron dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Meng; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-08-01

    Different classical theories are commonly applied in various branches of physics to describe the relativistic dynamics of electrons by coupled equations for the orbital motion and spin precession. Exemplarily, we benchmark the Frenkel model and the classical Foldy-Wouthuysen model with spin-dependent forces (Stern-Gerlach forces) to the quantum dynamics as predicted by the Dirac equation. Both classical theories can lead to different or even contradicting predictions how the Stern-Gerlach forces modify the electron’s orbital motion, when the electron moves in strong electromagnetic field configurations of emerging high-intensity laser facilities. In this way, one may evaluate the validity and identify the limits of these classical theories via a comparison with possible experiments to provide a proper description of spin-induced dynamics. Our results indicate that the Foldy-Wouthuysen model is qualitatively in better agreement with the Dirac theory than the widely used Frenkel model.

  20. Generalized fluctuation theorems for classical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G. S.; Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2015-11-01

    The fluctuation theorem has a very special place in the study of nonequilibrium dynamics of physical systems. The form in which it is used most extensively is the Gallavoti-Cohen fluctuation theorem which is in terms of the distribution of the work p (W )/p (-W )=exp(α W ) . We derive the general form of the fluctuation theorems for an arbitrary multidimensional Gaussian Markov process. Interestingly, the parameter α is by no means universal, hitherto taken for granted in the case of linear Gaussian processes. As a matter of fact, conditions under which α does become a universal parameter 1 /K T are found to be rather restrictive. As an application we consider fluctuation theorems for classical cyclotron motion of an electron in a parabolic potential. The motion of the electron is described by four coupled Langevin equations and thus is nontrivial. The generalized theorems are equally valid for nonequilibrium steady states and could be especially important in the presence of anisotropic diffusion.

  1. Quasi-classical dynamics of interacting Bose condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Salgueiro, A N; Sampaio, M D; De Toledo di Piza, A F R

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of the composition of uniform Bose condensates involving two species capable of reciprocal interconversion is treated in terms of a collective quasi-spin model. This collective model quickly reduces to classical form towards the thermodynamic limit. Quantum solutions are easily obtained numerically short of this limit which give insight into the dynamically relevant correlation processes.

  2. Quantum and Classical Behavior in Interacting Bosonic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that...

  3. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi [Department of Chemical System Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); CREST, JST, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels.

  4. Classical and quantum particle dynamics in univariate background fields

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzl, Thomas; King, Ben

    2016-01-01

    We investigate deviations from the plane wave model in the interaction of charged particles with strong electromagnetic fields. A general result is that integrability of the dynamics is lost when going from lightlike to timelike or spacelike field dependence. For a special scenario in the classical regime we show how the radiation spectrum in the spacelike (undulator) case becomes well-approximated by the plane wave model in the high energy limit, despite the two systems being Lorentz inequivalent. In the quantum problem, there is no analogue of the WKB-exact Volkov solution. Nevertheless, WKB and uniform-WKB approaches give good approximations in all cases considered. Other approaches that reduce the underlying differential equations from second to first order are found to miss the correct physics for situations corresponding to barrier transmission and wide-angle scattering.

  5. Geometric Integrators for Classical Spin Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, J.E.; Huang, W.; Leimkuhler, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Practical, structure-preserving methods for integrating classical Heisenberg spin systems are discussed. Two new integrators are derived and compared, including (1) a symmetric energy and spin-length preserving integrator based on a Red-Black splitting of the spin sites combined with a staggered tim

  6. Classical and quantum dynamics of the sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasukov, Vladimir; Moldovanova, Evgeniia; Abdrashitova, Maria; Malik, Hitendra; Gorbacheva, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    In Minkowski space, there has been developed the mathematic quantum model of the real particle located on the sphere evolving owing to the negative pressure inside the sphere. The developed model is analogous to the geometrodynamic model of the Lemaitre-Friedmann primordial atom in superspace-time, whose spatial coordinate is the scale factor functioning as a radial coordinate. There is a formulation of quantum geometrodynamics in which the spatial coordinate is an offset of the scale factor and wave function at the same time. With the help of the Dirac procedure for extracting the root from the Hamiltonian operator we have constructed a Dirac quantum dynamics of the sphere with fractional spin.

  7. Formulations of classical and quantum dynamical theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, Gerald

    1969-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank

  8. Dynamics of classical and quantum fields an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Setlur, Girish S

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of Classical and Quantum Fields: An Introduction focuses on dynamical fields in non-relativistic physics. Written by a physicist for physicists, the book is designed to help readers develop analytical skills related to classical and quantum fields at the non-relativistic level, and think about the concepts and theory through numerous problems. In-depth yet accessible, the book presents new and conventional topics in a self-contained manner that beginners would find useful. A partial list of topics covered includes: Geometrical meaning of Legendre transformation in classical mechanics Dynamical symmetries in the context of Noether's theorem The derivation of the stress energy tensor of the electromagnetic field, the expression for strain energy in elastic bodies, and the Navier Stokes equation Concepts of right and left movers in case of a Fermi gas explained Functional integration is interpreted as a limit of a sequence of ordinary integrations Path integrals for one and two quantum particles and for...

  9. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic1 and quantum computing2 devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics3,4, and electrical spin-manipulation4-11. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unraveled12. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets13 on graphene. While the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly-developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum-relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully-coherent, resonant spin tunneling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin-manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

  10. Dynamics of Information Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, Michael J; Murphey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of information and information dynamics has outgrown classical information theory. This book presents the research explaining the importance of information in the evolution of a distributed or networked system. It presents techniques for measuring the value or significance of information within the context of a system

  11. Adding quantum effects to the semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the molecular dynamics (MD) using classical or semi-classical trajectories provides important details for the understanding of many chemical reactions, protein folding, drug design, and solvation effects. MD simulations using trajectories have achieved great successes in the computer simulations of various systems, but it is difficult to incorporate quantum effects in a robust way. Therefore, improving quantum wavepacket dynamics and incorporating nonadiabatic transitions and quantum effects into classical and semi-classical molecular dynamics is critical as well as challenging. In this paper, we present a MD scheme in which a new set of equations of motion (EOM) are proposed to effectively propagate nuclear trajectories while conserving quantum mechanical energy which is critical for describing quantum effects like tunneling. The new quantum EOM is tested on a one-state one-dimensional and a two-state two-dimensional model nonadiabatic systems. The global quantum force experienced by each trajecto...

  12. Methods of scientific calculation applied to classic and quantum description of the vibrational dynamics of chaotic systems. Application to the HO2 system; Metodos de calculo cientifico aplicados a la caracterizacion clasica y cuantica de la dinamica vibracional de sistemas caoticas. Aplicacion al sistema molecular HO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Giralda, C.

    2005-07-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to search for points of correspondence between the classic and quantum behavior of the dynamics of non-rigid molecular system HO2 (Hidroperoxil Radix), and too, the study of the manifestation mode as the regularity than the ergodicity from the point of view of the classical and quantum mechanics laws. (Author)

  13. Isochronous classical systems and quantum systems with equally spaced spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carinena, J F; Perelomov, A M; Ranada, M F [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    We study isoperiodic classical systems, what allows us to find the classical isochronous systems, i.e. having a period independent of the energy. The corresponding quantum analog, systems with an equally spaced spectrum are analysed by looking for possible creation-like differential operators. The harmonic oscillator and the isotonic oscillator are the two main essentially unique examples of such situation.

  14. Classical and Quantum Vibration in a Nonseparable, Nonharmonic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Karen Marie

    Studies of vibrational dynamics have been performed on a two-dimensional model potential surface V(x,z; R), adapted from the ab initio surface previously used in this laboratory to analyze dynamics of the bifluoride ion (FHF) ^-. The model potential has C _{2v} symmetry, but is strongly anharmonic and nonseparable in the dynamical variables (x,z); its character changes as the parameter R is varied. Quantum and classical descriptions of vibrational states in this system are compared with corresponding Self-Consistent Field (SCF) approximations. Insights provided by each approach are assessed. Systematic Fermi resonances appear in the quantum mechanical states (at energies up to approximately 10,000 cm^{-1}) arising from crossings of quantum SCF levels with two quanta of vibration exchanged between x and z modes. The lowest quantum states of each symmetry are well described by the SCF approximation except near such crossings. Calculations using Configuration Interaction were done to obtain accurate eigenstates and examine correlations in the quantum mechanics. The Classical Self-Consistent Field (CSCF) method provides a description of the mechanics similar to that given by its quantum counterpart. Classical bound state methods based on semiclassical quantization of quasiperiodic trajectories are unable to give a corresponding description. At energies as low as the quantum ground state, the true classical dynamics is strongly disturbed by resonant interactions. At higher energies the number and strength of these disruptions is so great that the motion is largely irregular. The most prominent effect is a 1:1 frequency resonance associated with strong reorganization of the classical motion along pronounced valleys of the potential surface lying at +/-26^circ to the x-axis. This phenomenon has been studied by analysis of the true dynamics and by application of classical canonical perturbation theory to the zero-order CSCF description. It is found that the latter gives a

  15. Phonon dynamics in a compressible classical Heisenberg chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fivez, Jan; Raedt, Hans De; Raedt, Bart De

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic properties of the compressible classical Heisenberg chain with bilinear coupling are investigated. The sound velocity is calculated exactly. The Fourier-transformed displacement-displacement correlation function is studied as a function of temperature, wave vector, and the model paramete

  16. Linear $r$-matrix algebra for classical separable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Eilbeck, J C; Kuznetsov, V B; Tsiganov, A V; Kuznetsov, Vadim B.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a hierarchy of the natural type Hamiltonian systems of $n$ degrees of freedom with polynomial potentials separable in general ellipsoidal and general paraboloidal coordinates. We give a Lax representation in terms of $2\\times 2$ matrices for the whole hierarchy and construct the associated linear $r$-matrix algebra with the $r$-matrix dependent on the dynamical variables. A Yang-Baxter equation of dynamical type is proposed. Using the method of variable separation we provide the integration of the systems in classical mechanics conctructing the separation equations and, hence, the explicit form of action variables. The quantisation problem is discussed with the help of the separation variables.

  17. Phase Space Cell in Nonextensive Classical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Quarati

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We calculate the phase space volume Ω occupied by a nonextensive system of N classical particles described by an equilibrium (or steady-state, or long-term stationary state of a nonequilibrium system distribution function, which slightly deviates from Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB distribution in the high energy tail. We explicitly require that the number of accessible microstates does not change respect to the extensive MB case. We also derive, within a classical scheme, an analytical expression of the elementary cell that can be seen as a macrocell, different from the third power of Planck constant. Thermodynamic quantities like entropy, chemical potential and free energy of a classical ideal gas, depending on elementary cell, are evaluated. Considering the fractional deviation from MB distribution we can deduce a physical meaning of the nonextensive parameter q of the Tsallis nonextensive thermostatistics in terms of particle correlation functions (valid at least in the case, discussed in this work, of small deviations from MB standard case.

  18. Global aspects of classical integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cushman, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a uniquely complete description of the geometry of the energy momentum mapping of five classical integrable systems: the 2-dimensional harmonic oscillator, the geodesic flow on the 3-sphere, the Euler top, the spherical pendulum and the Lagrange top. It presents for the first time in book form a general theory of symmetry reduction which allows one to reduce the symmetries in the spherical pendulum and the Lagrange top. Also the monodromy obstruction to the existence of global action angle coordinates is calculated for the spherical pendulum and the Lagrange top. The book addresses professional mathematicians and graduate students and can be used as a textbook on advanced classical mechanics or global analysis.

  19. Information transport in classical statistical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    2016-01-01

    In many materials or equilibrium statistical systems the information of boundary conditions is lost inside the bulk of the material. In contrast, we describe here static classical statistical probability distributions for which bulk properties depend on boundary conditions. Such "static memory materials" can be realized if no unique equilibrium state exists. The propagation of information from the boundary to the bulk is described by a classical wave function or a density matrix, which obey generalized Schr\\"odinger or von Neumann equations. For static memory materials the evolution within a subsector is unitary, as characteristic for the time evolution in quantum mechanics. The space-dependence in static memory materials can be used as an analogue representation of the time evolution in quantum mechanics - such materials are "quantum simulators". For example, an asymmetric Ising model represents the time evolution of relativistic fermions in two-dimensional Minkowski space.

  20. Operational dynamic modeling transcending quantum and classical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Denys I; Cabrera, Renan; Lompay, Robert R; Ivanov, Misha Yu; Rabitz, Herschel A

    2012-11-09

    We introduce a general and systematic theoretical framework for operational dynamic modeling (ODM) by combining a kinematic description of a model with the evolution of the dynamical average values. The kinematics includes the algebra of the observables and their defined averages. The evolution of the average values is drawn in the form of Ehrenfest-like theorems. We show that ODM is capable of encompassing wide-ranging dynamics from classical non-relativistic mechanics to quantum field theory. The generality of ODM should provide a basis for formulating novel theories.

  1. Correlation Functions in Open Quantum-Classical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Hsieh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum time correlation functions are often the principal objects of interest in experimental investigations of the dynamics of quantum systems. For instance, transport properties, such as diffusion and reaction rate coefficients, can be obtained by integrating these functions. The evaluation of such correlation functions entails sampling from quantum equilibrium density operators and quantum time evolution of operators. For condensed phase and complex systems, where quantum dynamics is difficult to carry out, approximations must often be made to compute these functions. We present a general scheme for the computation of correlation functions, which preserves the full quantum equilibrium structure of the system and approximates the time evolution with quantum-classical Liouville dynamics. Several aspects of the scheme are discussed, including a practical and general approach to sample the quantum equilibrium density, the properties of the quantum-classical Liouville equation in the context of correlation function computations, simulation schemes for the approximate dynamics and their interpretation and connections to other approximate quantum dynamical methods.

  2. Classical Boolean logic gates with quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, N; Joachim, C, E-mail: n-renaud@northwestern.edu [Nanoscience Group and MANA Satellite CEMES/CNRS, 29 rue J Marvig, BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-04-15

    An analytical method is proposed to implement any classical Boolean function in a small quantum system by taking the advantage of its electronic transport properties. The logical input, {alpha} = {l_brace}{alpha}{sub 1}, ..., {alpha}{sub N}{r_brace}, is used to control well-identified parameters of the Hamiltonian of the system noted H{sub 0}({alpha}). The logical output is encoded in the tunneling current intensity passing through the quantum system when connected to conducting electrodes. It is demonstrated how to implement the six symmetric two-input/one-output Boolean functions in a quantum system. This system can be switched from one logic function to another by changing its structural parameters. The stability of the logic gates is discussed, perturbing the Hamiltonian with noise sources and studying the effect of decoherence.

  3. Classical limit for semirelativistic Hartree systems

    KAUST Repository

    Aki, Gonca L.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the three-dimensional semirelativistic Hartree model for fast quantum mechanical particles moving in a self-consistent field. Under appropriate assumptions on the initial density matrix as a (fully) mixed quantum state we prove by using Wigner transformation techniques that its classical limit yields the well known relativistic Vlasov-Poisson system. The result holds for the case of attractive and repulsive mean-field interactions, with an additional size constraint in the attractive case. © 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Scalar Field Dynamics Classical, Quantum and in Between

    CERN Document Server

    Salle, M; Vink, Jeroen C

    2000-01-01

    Using a Hartree ensemble approximation, we investigate the dynamics of the \\phi^4 model in 1+1 dimensions. We find that the fields initially thermalize with a Bose-Einstein distribution for the fields. Gradually, however, the distribution changes towards classical equipartition. Using suitable initial conditions quantum thermalization is achieved much faster than the onset of this undesirable equipartition. We also show how the numerical efficiency of our method can be significantly improved.

  5. Statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2006-01-14

    The statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints is formulated rigorously by unifying the classical Dirac bracket and the quantum-classical bracket in matrix form. The resulting Dirac quantum-classical theory, which conserves the holonomic constraints exactly, is then used to formulate time evolution and statistical mechanics. The correct momentum-jump approximation for constrained systems arises naturally from this formalism. Finally, in analogy with what was found in the classical case, it is shown that the rigorous linear-response function of constrained quantum-classical systems contains nontrivial additional terms which are absent in the response of unconstrained systems.

  6. Rovibrational dynamics of the RbCs molecule in static electric fields. Classical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaiz, Pedro F.; Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logroño (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logroño (Spain)

    2012-04-02

    We study the classical dynamics of the RbCs molecule in the presence of a static electric field. Under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, we perform a rovibrational investigation which includes the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. The stability of the equilibrium points and the phase space structure of the system are explored in detail. We find that, for strong electric fields or for energies close to the dissociation threshold, the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics. -- Highlights: ► We study the classical rovibrational dynamics of the alkali polar dimer RbCs. ► In the model we consider the interaction of the field with the molecular polarizability. ► The potential energy surface is studied depending on the electric field strength. ► Using surfaces of section we study the phase space structure. ► We find that the molecular polarizability causes relevant effects on the system dynamics.

  7. Wigner function statistics in classically chaotic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, M; Horvat, Martin; Prosen, Tomaz

    2003-01-01

    We have studied statistical properties of the values of the Wigner function W(x) of 1D quantum maps on compact 2D phase space of finite area V. For this purpose we have defined a Wigner function probability distribution P(w) = (1/V) int delta(w-W(x)) dx, which has, by definition, fixed first and second moment. In particular, we concentrate on relaxation of time evolving quantum state in terms of W(x), starting from a coherent state. We have shown that for a classically chaotic quantum counterpart the distribution P(w) in the semi-classical limit becomes a Gaussian distribution that is fully determined by the first two moments. Numerical simulations have been performed for the quantum sawtooth map and the quantized kicked top. In a quantum system with Hilbert space dimension N (similar 1/hbar) the transition of P(w) to a Gaussian distribution was observed at times t proportional to log N. In addition, it has been shown that the statistics of Wigner functions of propagator eigenstates is Gaussian as well in the...

  8. From Classical Nonlinear Integrable Systems to Quantum Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2016-08-01

    Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that is reduced to a classical nonlinear integrable equation. For a given time-dependent Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is introduced to prevent nonadiabatic transitions. Using the fact that the equation for the dynamical invariant is equivalent to the Lax equation in nonlinear integrable systems, we obtain the counterdiabatic term exactly. The counterdiabatic term is available when the corresponding Lax pair exists and the solvable systems are classified in a unified and systematic way. Multisoliton potentials obtained from the Korteweg-de Vries equation and isotropic X Y spin chains from the Toda equations are studied in detail.

  9. Surface hopping from the perspective of quantum-classical Liouville dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapral, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping is studied in the context of quantum-classical Liouville dynamics. Both approaches are mixed quantum-classical theories that provide a way to describe and simulate the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of many-body systems. Starting from a surface-hopping solution of the quantum-classical Liouville equation, it is shown how fewest-switches dynamics can be obtained by dropping terms that are responsible for decoherence and restricting the nuclear momentum changes that accompany electronic transitions to those events that occur between population states. The analysis provides information on some of the elements that are essential for the construction of accurate and computationally tractable algorithms for nonadiabatic processes.

  10. Classical and quantum dynamics in an inverse square potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaumín-España, Elisa, E-mail: ege@correo.azc.uam.mx [Laboratorio de Sistemas Dinámicos, Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Azcapotzalco CP 02200 D. F. (Mexico); Núñez-Yépez, H. N., E-mail: nyhn@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Iztapalapa CP 09340 D. F. (Mexico); Salas-Brito, A. L., E-mail: asb@correo.azc.uam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (ICN-UNAM), Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México D F (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The classical motion of a particle in a 3D inverse square potential with negative energy, E, is shown to be geodesic, i.e., equivalent to the particle's free motion on a non-compact phase space manifold irrespective of the sign of the coupling constant. We thus establish that all its classical orbits with E < 0 are unbounded. To analyse the corresponding quantum problem, the Schrödinger equation is solved in momentum space. No discrete energy levels exist in the unrenormalized case and the system shows a complete “fall-to-the-center” with an energy spectrum unbounded by below. Such behavior corresponds to the non-existence of bound classical orbits. The symmetry of the problem is SO(3) × SO(2, 1) corroborating previously obtained results.

  11. Classically dynamical behaviour of a nucleon in heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Jianzhong [CCAST World Lab., Beijing, BJ (China)]|[Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing, 100080 (China); Zhao Enguang; Zong Hongshi [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing, 100080 (China); Zhuo Yizhong [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing, 100080 (China)]|[China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 18, Beijing, 102413 (China); Wu Xizhen [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 18, Beijing, 102413 (China)

    1998-06-01

    Within the framework of the two-center shell model the classically dynamical behaviour of a nucleon in heavy nuclei is investigated systematically with the change of nuclear shape parameters for the first time. It is found that as long as the nucleonic energy 0is appreciably higher than the height of the potential barrier there is a good quantum-classical correspondence of nucleonic regular (chaotic) motion. Thus, Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit conjecture is confirmed once again. We find that the difference between the potential barrier for prolate nuclei and that for oblate ones is reponsible for the energy-dependence difference between the nucleonic chaotic dynamics for prolate nuclei and that for oblate ones. In addition, it is suggested that nuclear dissipation is shape-dependent, and strong nuclear dissipation can be expected for medium or large separations in the presence of a considerable neck deformation built on a pronounced octupole-like deformation, which provides us a dynamical understanding of nuclear shape dependence of nuclear dissipation. (orig.) With 5 figs., 22 refs.

  12. Classical and quantum dynamics of a model for atomic-molecular Bose--Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Filho, Gilberto Nascimento; Tonel, Arlei Prestes; Foerster, Angela; Links, Jon(Centre for Mathematical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, 4072, Australia)

    2005-01-01

    We study a model for a two-mode atomic-molecular Bose--Einstein condensate. Starting with a classical analysis we determine the phase space fixed points of the system. It is found that bifurcations of the fixed points naturally separate the coupling parameter space into four regions. The different regions give rise to qualitatively different dynamics. We then show that this classification holds true for the quantum dynamics.

  13. Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yichen

    gapped systems. Note that the ground-state energy of 1D gapless Hamiltonians is computationally intractable even in the presence of translational invariance. It is tempting to extend methods and tools in 1D to two and higher dimensions (2+D), e.g., matrix product states are generalized to tensor network states. Since an area law for entanglement (if formulated properly) implies efficient matrix product state representations in 1D, an interesting question is whether a similar implication holds in 2+D. Roughly speaking, we show that an area law for entanglement (in any reasonable formulation) does not always imply efficient tensor network representations of the ground states of 2+D local Hamiltonians even in the presence of translational invariance. It should be emphasized that this result does not contradict with the common sense that in practice quantum states with more entanglement usually require more space to be stored classically; rather, it demonstrates that the relationship between entanglement and efficient classical representations is still far from being well understood. Excited eigenstates participate in the dynamics of quantum systems and are particularly relevant to the phenomenon of many-body localization (absence of transport at finite temperature in strongly correlated systems). We study the entanglement of excited eigenstates in random spin chains and expect that its singularities coincide with dynamical quantum phase transitions. This expectation is confirmed in the disordered quantum Ising chain using both analytical and numerical methods. Finally, we study the problem of generating ground states (possibly with topological order) in 1D gapped systems using quantum circuits. This is an interesting problem both in theory and in practice. It not only characterizes the essential difference between the entanglement patterns that give rise to trivial and nontrivial topological order, but also quantifies the difficulty of preparing quantum states with a

  14. Classical behaviour of various variables in an open Bose-Hubbard system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikola Buri(c)

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dispersions of various sets of dynamical variables of an open Bose-Hubbard system in a classical limit are studied.To this end,an open system is described in terms of stochastic evolution of its quantum pure states.It is shown that the class of variables that display classical behaviour crucially depends on the type of noise.This is relevant in the mean-field approximation of open Bose-Hubbard dynamics.

  15. Dynamic scaling at classical phase transitions approached through nonequilibrium quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Wei; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Sandvik, Anders W.

    2014-02-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate generic scaling aspects of classical phase transitions approached through a quench (or annealing) protocol where the temperature changes as a function of time with velocity v. Using a generalized Kibble-Zurek ansatz, we demonstrate dynamic scaling for different types of stochastic dynamics (Metropolis, Swendsen-Wang, and Wolff) on Ising models in two and higher dimensions. We show that there are dual scaling functions governing the dynamic scaling, which together describe the scaling behavior in the entire velocity range v ∈[0,∞). These functions have asymptotics corresponding to the adiabatic and diabatic limits, and close to these limits they are perturbative in v and 1/v, respectively. Away from their perturbative domains, both functions cross over into the same universal power-law scaling form governed by the static and dynamic critical exponents (as well as an exponent characterizing the quench protocol). As a by-product of the scaling studies, we obtain high-precision estimates of the dynamic exponent z for the two-dimensional Ising model subject to the three variants of Monte Carlo dynamics: for single-spin Metropolis updates zM=2.1767(5), for Swendsen-Wang multicluster updates zSW=0.297(3), and for Wolff single-cluster updates zW=0.30(2). For Wolff dynamics, we find an interesting behavior with a nonanalytic breakdown of the quasiadiabatic and diabatic scalings, instead of the generic smooth crossover described by a power law. We interpret this disconnect between the two scaling regimes as a dynamic phase transition of the Wolff algorithm, caused by an effective sudden loss of ergodicity at high velocity.

  16. Feedback Control Of Dynamical Instabilities In Classical Lasers And Fels

    CERN Document Server

    Bielawski, S; Szwaj, C

    2005-01-01

    Dynamical instabilities lead to unwanted full-scale power oscillations in many classical lasers and FEL oscillators. For a long time, applications requiring stable operation were typically performed by working outside the problematic parameter regions. A breakthrough occurred in the nineties [1], when emphasis was made on the practical importance of unstable states (stationary or periodic) that coexist with unwanted oscillatory states. Indeed, although not observable in usual experiments, unstable states can be stabilized, using a feedback control involving arbitrarily small perturbations of a parameter. This observation stimulated a set of works leading to successful suppression of dynamical instabilities (initially chaos) in lasers, sometimes with surprisingly simple feedback devices [2]. We will review a set of key results, including in particular the recent works on the stabilization of mode-locked lasers, and of the super-ACO, ELETTRA and UVSOR FELs [3].

  17. High temperature phonon dispersion in graphene using classical molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anees, P., E-mail: anees@igcar.gov.in; Panigrahi, B. K. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Valsakumar, M. C., E-mail: anees@igcar.gov.in [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Phonon dispersion and phonon density of states of graphene are calculated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the dynamical matrix is constructed based on linear response theory by computing the displacement of atoms during the simulations. The computed phonon dispersions show excellent agreement with experiments. The simulations are done in both NVT and NPT ensembles at 300 K and found that the LO/TO modes are getting hardened at the Γ point. The NPT ensemble simulations capture the anharmonicity of the crystal accurately and the hardening of LO/TO modes is more pronounced. We also found that at 300 K the C-C bond length reduces below the equilibrium value and the ZA bending mode frequency becomes imaginary close to Γ along K-Γ direction, which indicates instability of the flat 2D graphene sheets.

  18. System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  19. Markovian Zero-Discord Classicality for Bipartite Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arsenijevic, M; Dugic, M

    2012-01-01

    Recent observation that almost all quantum states bear nonclassical correlations [A. Ferraro et al, Phys. Rev. A 81, 052318 (2010)] distinguishes the zero-discord classicality essentially as a rareness of the Markovian bipartite systems realm. This seems to be in contrast with decoherence-theory established classicality where classical states are robust and unavoidable. Nevertheless, we formally construct such a classical model and its variant that represents a matter-of-principle formal proof, i.e. a sufficient condition for the, otherwise not obvious, existence of the Markovian zero-discord classicality. Rigorous analysis suggests there is no alternative to classical model, aside approximate model which follows from relaxing rigid quantum information constraints on classical model. A need for the more elaborate and more systematic search for the alternative such models (if there any) reveals we are still learning about the very meaning of "classicality" in the realm of open quantum systems.

  20. Dynamic Logics of Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Platzer, André

    2012-01-01

    We survey dynamic logics for specifying and verifying properties of dynamical systems, including hybrid systems, distributed hybrid systems, and stochastic hybrid systems. A dynamic logic is a first-order modal logic with a pair of parametrized modal operators for each dynamical system to express necessary or possible properties of their transition behavior. Due to their full basis of first-order modal logic operators, dynamic logics can express a rich variety of system properties, including safety, controllability, reactivity, liveness, and quantified parametrized properties, even about relations between multiple dynamical systems. In this survey, we focus on some of the representatives of the family of differential dynamic logics, which share the ability to express properties of dynamical systems having continuous dynamics described by various forms of differential equations. We explain the dynamical system models, dynamic logics of dynamical systems, their semantics, their axiomatizations, and proof calcul...

  1. High performance computing for classic gravitational N-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The role of gravity is crucial in astrophysics. It determines the evolution of any system, over an enormous range of time and space scales. Astronomical stellar systems as composed by N interacting bodies represent examples of self-gravitating systems, usually treatable with the aid of newtonian gravity but for particular cases. In this note I will briefly discuss some of the open problems in the dynamical study of classic self-gravitating N-body systems, over the astronomical range of N. I will also point out how modern research in this field compulsorily requires a heavy use of large scale computations, due to the contemporary requirement of high precision and high computational speed.

  2. A NOTE ON THE EXISTENCE AND NONEXISTENCE OF GLOBALLY BOUNDED CLASSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR NONISENTROPIC GAS DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Existence of globally bounded classical solution for nonisentropic gas dynamics system has long been studied, especially in the case of polytropic gas. In [4], Liu claimed that sufficient condition has been established. However, the authors find that the argument he used is not true in general. In this article, the authors give a counter example of his argument. Hence, his claim is not valid. The authors believe that it is difficult to impose general conditions on the initial data to obtain globally bounded classical solution.

  3. Rapid learning dynamics in individual honeybees during classical conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren ePamir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Associative learning in insects has been studied extensively by a multitude of classical conditioning protocols. However, so far little emphasis has been put on the dynamics of learning in individuals. The honeybee is a well-established animal model for learning and memory. We here studied associative learning as expressed in individual behavior based on a large collection of data on olfactory classical conditioning (25 datasets, 3,298 animals. We show that the group-averaged learning curve and memory retention score confound three attributes of individual learning: the ability or inability to learn a given task, the generally fast acquisition of a conditioned response in learners, and the high stability of the conditioned response during consecutive training and memory retention trials. We reassessed the prevailing view that more training results in better memory performance and found that 24h memory retention can be indistinguishable after single-trial and multiple-trial conditioning in individuals. We explain how inter-individual differences in learning can be accommodated within the Rescorla-Wagner theory of associative learning. In both data-analysis and modeling we demonstrate how the conflict between population-level and single-animal perspectives on learning and memory can be disentangled.

  4. Particle physics and dark energy. Beyond classical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias

    2008-10-24

    In this work, quantum corrections to classical equations of motion are investigated for dynamical models of dark energy featuring a time-evolving quintessence scalar field. Employing effective quantum field theory, the robustness of tracker quintessence potentials against quantum corrections as well as their impact on cosmological observables are discussed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a rolling quintessence field can also play an important role for baryogenesis in the early universe. The macroscopic time-evolution of scalar quantum fields can be described from first principles within nonequilibrium quantum field theory based on Kadanoff-Baym equations derived from the 2PI effective action. A framework for the nonperturbative renormalization of Kadanoff-Baym equations is provided. Renormalized Kadanoff-Baym equations are proposed and their finiteness is shown for a special case. (orig.)

  5. Classically induced suppression of energy growth in a chaotic quantum system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harinder Pal; M S Santhanam

    2011-11-01

    Recent experiments with Bose–Einstein condensates (BEC) in traps and speckle potentials have explored the dynamical regime in which the evolving BEC clouds localize due to the influence of classical dynamics. The growth of their mean energy is effectively arrested. This is in contrast with the well-known localization phenomena that originate due to quantum interferences. We show that classically induced localization can also be obtained in a classically chaotic, non-interacting system. In this work, we study the classical and quantum dynamics of non-interacting particles in a double-barrier structure. This is essentially a non-KAM system and, depending on the parameters, can display chaotic dynamics inside the finite well between the barriers. However, for the same set of parameters, it can display nearly regular dynamics above the barriers. We exploit this combination of two qualitatively different classical dynamical features to obtain saturation of energy growth. In the semiclassical regime, this classical mechanism strongly influences the quantum behaviour of the system.

  6. Markovian Classicality from Zero Discord for Bipartite Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arsenijevic, M; Dugic, M

    2012-01-01

    Modern quantum information theory provides new tools for investigating the decoherence-induced "classicality" of open quantum systems. Recent observation that almost all quantum states bear non-classical correlations [A. Ferraro {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 81}, 052318 (2010)] distinguishes the zero-discord classicality essentially as a pathology of the Markovian bipartite-systems realm. Nevertheless, we formally construct such a classical model and its variant that represents a matter-of-principle formal proof, i.e. a sufficient condition for the, otherwise not obvious, existence of the Markovian zero-discord classicality. A need for the more elaborate and more systematic search for the alternative such models reveals we are still learning about the very meaning of "classicality" in the realm of open quantum systems.

  7. Non-classical method of modelling of vibrating mechatronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, K.; Buchacz, A.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents non-classical method of modelling of mechatronic systems by using polar graphs. The use of such a method enables the analysis and synthesis of mechatronic systems irrespective of the type and number of the elements of such a system. The method id connected with algebra of structural numbers. The purpose of this paper is also introduces synthesis of mechatronic system which is the reverse task of dynamics. The result of synthesis is obtaining system meeting the defined requirements. This approach is understood as design of mechatronic systems. The synthesis may also be applied to modify the already existing systems in order to achieve a desired result. The system was consisted from mechanical and electrical elements. Electrical elements were used as subsystem reducing unwanted vibration of mechanical system. The majority of vibration occurring in devices and machines is harmful and has a disadvantageous effect on their condition. Harmful impact of vibration is caused by the occurrence of increased stresses and the loss of energy, which results in faster wear machinery. Vibration, particularly low-frequency vibration, also has a negative influence on the human organism. For this reason many scientists in various research centres conduct research aimed at the reduction or total elimination of vibration.

  8. Projected equations of motion approach to hybrid quantum/classical dynamics in dielectric-metal composites

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, Ryan J; Grüning, Myrta

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a hybrid method for dielectric-metal composites that describes the dynamics of the metallic system classically whilst retaining a quantum description of the dielectric. The time-dependent dipole moment of the classical system is mimicked by the introduction of projected equations of motion (PEOM) and the coupling between the two systems is achieved through an effective dipole-dipole interaction. To benchmark this method, we model a test system (semiconducting quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid). We begin by examining the energy absorption rate, showing agreement between the PEOM method and the analytical rotating wave approximation (RWA) solution. We then investigate population inversion and show that the PEOM method provides an accurate model for the interaction under ultrashort pulse excitation where the traditional RWA breaks down.

  9. Locality and the classical limit of quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, T

    2009-01-01

    I argue that conventional estimates of the criterion for classical behavior of a macroscopic body are incorrect in most circumstances,because they do not take into account the locality of interactions, which characterizes the behavior of all systems described approximately by local quantum field theory. The deviations from classical behavior of a macroscopic body, except for those that can be described as classical uncertainties in the initial values of macroscopic variables,are {\\it exponentially} small as a function of the volume of the macro-system in microscopic units. Conventional estimates are correct only when the internal degrees of freedom of the macrosystem are in their ground state, and the classical motion of collective coordinates is adiabatic. Otherwise, the system acts as its own environment and washes out quantum phase correlations between different classical states of its collective coordinates. I suggest that it is likely that we can only achieve meso-scopic superpositions, for systems which...

  10. Dynamics Underlying the Gaussian Distribution of the Classical Harmonic Oscillator in Zero-Point Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Cheng-Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic electrodynamics (SED predicts a Gaussian probability distribution for a classical harmonic oscillator in the vacuum field. This probability distribution is identical to that of the ground state quantum harmonic oscillator. Thus, the Heisenberg minimum uncertainty relation is recovered in SED. To understand the dynamics that give rise to the uncertainty relation and the Gaussian probability distribution, we perform a numerical simulation and follow the motion of the oscillator. The dynamical information obtained through the simulation provides insight to the connection between the classic double-peak probability distribution and the Gaussian probability distribution. A main objective for SED research is to establish to what extent the results of quantum mechanics can be obtained. The present simulation method can be applied to other physical systems, and it may assist in evaluating the validity range of SED.

  11. Catalyst dynamics: consequences for classical kinetic descriptions of reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Larsen, Jane Hvolbæk; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2001-01-01

    The modelling of catalytic reactions/reactors has undergone great improvements since the introduction of empirical power-law kinetics in chemical reaction engineering and micro-kinetic models based on insight into the nature of elementary steps have appeared for many reactions. However, recent...... of the dynamical behaviour of some catalytic systems and discuss the corresponding Limitations in existing models for catalytic reactions and reactors. Catalytic reactors operated in non-steady-state are becoming more frequent in industry. The additional efforts needed to accurately simulate these types...... of reactors are discussed. Finally, we discuss the role of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a tool for detailed simulation of catalytic reactors....

  12. Classical investigation of long-range coherence in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preto, Jordane

    2016-12-01

    Almost five decades ago, H. Fröhlich [H. Fröhlich, "Long-range coherence and energy storage in biological systems," Int. J. Quantum Chem. 2(5), 641-649 (1968)] reported, on a theoretical basis, that the excitation of quantum modes of vibration in contact with a thermal reservoir may lead to steady states, where under high enough rate of energy supply, only specific low-frequency modes of vibration are strongly excited. This nonlinear phenomenon was predicted to occur in biomolecular systems, which are known to exhibit complex vibrational spectral properties, especially in the terahertz frequency domain. However, since the effects of terahertz or lower-frequency modes are mainly classical at physiological temperatures, there are serious doubts that Fröhlich's quantum description can be applied to predict such a coherent behavior in a biological environment, as suggested by the author. In addition, a quantum formalism makes the phenomenon hard to investigate using realistic molecular dynamics simulations (MD) as they are usually based on the classical principles. In the current paper, we provide a general classical Hamiltonian description of a nonlinear open system composed of many degrees of freedom (biomolecular structure) excited by an external energy source. It is shown that a coherent behaviour similar to Fröhlich's effect is to be expected in the classical case for a given range of parameter values. Thus, the supplied energy is not completely thermalized but stored in a highly ordered fashion. The connection between our Hamiltonian description, carried out in the space of normal modes, and a more standard treatment in the physical space is emphasized in order to facilitate the prediction of the effect from MD simulations. It is shown how such a coherent phenomenon may induce long-range resonance effects that could be of critical importance at the biomolecular level. The present work is motivated by recent experimental evidences of long-lived excited low

  13. Mixed quantum-classical dynamics for charge transport in organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Beljonne, David

    2015-05-21

    Charge transport plays a crucial role in the working principle of most opto-electronic and energy devices. This is especially true for organic materials where the first theoretical models date back to the 1950s and have continuously evolved ever since. Most of these descriptions rely on perturbation theory to treat small interactions in the Hamiltonian. In particular, applying a perturbative treatment to the electron-phonon and electron-electron coupling results in the band and hopping models, respectively, the signature of which is conveyed by a characteristic temperature dependence of mobility. This perspective describes recent progress of studying charge transport in organics using mixed quantum-classical dynamics techniques, including mean field and surface hopping theories. The studies go beyond the perturbation treatments and represent the processes explicitly in the time-domain, as they occur in real life. The challenges, advantages, and disadvantages of both approaches are systematically discussed. Special focus is dedicated to the temperature dependence of mobility, the role of local and nonlocal electron-phonon couplings, as well as the interplay between electronic and electron-phonon interactions.

  14. Supernovae in Binary Systems: An Application of Classical Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitalas, R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents the supernova explosion in a binary system as an application of classical mechanics. This presentation is intended to illustrate the power of the equivalent one-body problem and provide undergraduate students with a variety of insights into elementary classical mechanics. (HM)

  15. Intrinsic Chaoticity in Stable Classical Systems and Quantum Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    De Martino, S; Illuminati, F

    1997-01-01

    We postulate the existence of a universal Keplerian tremor for any stable classical complex system on every scale. Deriving the characteristic unit of action $\\alpha$ for each classical interaction, we obtain in all cases $\\alpha connected to an intrinsic chaoticity needed to assure stability of matter. Introducing temperature, we provide further consistency checks corroborating our hypothesis.

  16. Classical integrable systems and Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov-Bernard equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, G.; Levin, A.; Olshanetsky, M.; Zotov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The results obtained in the works supported in part by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 12-02-00594) are briefly reviewed. We mainly focus on interrelations between classical integrable systems, Painlevé-Schlesinger equations and related algebraic structures such as classical and quantum R-matrices. The constructions are explained in terms of simplest examples.

  17. Classical system boundaries cannot be determined within quantum Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Chris

    Multiple observers who interact with environmental encodings of the states of a macroscopic quantum system S as required by quantum Darwinism cannot demonstrate that they are jointly observing S without a joint a priori assumption of a classical boundary separating S from its environment E. Quantum Darwinism cannot, therefore, be regarded as providing a purely quantum-mechanical explanation of the "emergence" of classicality.

  18. Generating shortcuts to adiabaticity in quantum and classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jarzynski, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counter-diabatic Hamiltonian to stifle non-adiabatic transitions. Here this strategy is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport, leading to a classical analogue: dissipationless classical driving. For the single-particle piston, this approach yields simple and exact expressions for both the classical and quantal counter-diabatic terms. These results are further generalized to even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.

  19. Classicality from zero discord for continuous-variables bipartite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arsenijevic, M; Dugic, M

    2012-01-01

    Quantum information resources quantified by non-zero discord are ubiquitous for the continuous-variables bipartite systems. Complementary to this, we investigate the zero-discord-defined classicality for the different structures (decompositions into subsystems) of such systems. We point out complexity and subtlety of the task and we construct a model-structure closely resembling the classical systems not supporting quantum information processing.

  20. Fate of classical solitons in one-dimensional quantum systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustilnik, M.; Matveev, K. A.

    2015-11-23

    We study one-dimensional quantum systems near the classical limit described by the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The excitations near this limit are the well-known solitons and phonons. The classical description breaks down at long wavelengths, where quantum effects become dominant. Focusing on the spectra of the elementary excitations, we describe analytically the entire classical-to-quantum crossover. We show that the ultimate quantum fate of the classical KdV excitations is to become fermionic quasiparticles and quasiholes. We discuss in detail two exactly solvable models exhibiting such crossover, the Lieb-Liniger model of bosons with weak contact repulsion and the quantum Toda model, and argue that the results obtained for these models are universally applicable to all quantum one-dimensional systems with a well-defined classical limit described by the KdV equation.

  1. Constructing quantum dissipations and their reversible states from classical interacting spin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goderis, D.; Maes, C. (Liege Univ. (BE))

    1991-01-01

    The relation between certain quantum systems and classical stochastic processes - e.g. in the method of functional integration - is formulated on the level of the dynamics for both quantum and classical dissipative time evolutions. An essentially unique quantum dissipation is constructed from a classical interacting spin system, preserving the notion of detailed balance. Translation invariant and reversible infinite volume quantum dynamics are found in this way and the Hamiltonian is recovered from the action of the generator in the GNS-representation of the corresponding groundstate for which a Feynmann-Kac formula holds. Local reversibility of quantum dissipations is shown to give rise to an almost classical characterization of the corresponding quantum states.

  2. Numerical approaches to complex quantum, semiclassical and classical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Gerald

    2008-11-03

    anharmonicity. To this end we consider the linearised semiclassical propagator method, the Wigner-Moyal approach and the recently proposed quantum tomography. Finally, in chapter 4 we calculate the dynamics of a classical many-particle system under the influence of external fields. Considering a low-temperature rf-plasma, we investigate the interplay of the plasma dynamics and the motion of dust particles, immersed into the plasma for diagnostic reasons. (orig.)

  3. Momentum-dependent potentials: Towards the molecular dynamics of fermionlike classical particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, P. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487, Santiago 3 (Chile)); Hernandez, E.S. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1995-03-01

    We investigate classical Hamiltonian models for particles interacting with steep differential repulsive barriers both in coordinate and momentum space. The final aim is to define a classical system of many particles behaving as fermions in many respects. In this paper we examine the appearance of the phase portrait of one- or two-particle systems to skim the essential features that would later be transcribed to the basic rules of a molecular dynamics algorithm. One of the remarkable properties of the phase portrait is the flow from states that start far away with a wide range of momentum towards a narrow region in momentum---a virtual locking of momentum---in the vicinity of the steepest part of the barrier in momentum space. The central ideas are developed through two examples in one and two dimensions.

  4. Rayleigh-Lagrange formalism for classical dissipative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2015-01-01

    It is often believed that the Rayleigh-Lagrange formalism for classical dissipative systems is unable to encompass forces described by nonlinear functions of the velocities. Here we show that this is indeed a misconception.

  5. Second invariant for two-dimensional classical super systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Mishra; Roshan Lal; Veena Mishra

    2003-10-01

    Construction of superpotentials for two-dimensional classical super systems (for ≥ 2) is carried out. Some interesting potentials have been studied in their super form and also their integrability.

  6. A new extension of classical molecular dynamics: An electron transfer algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskovalov, Anton

    2017-05-05

    The molecular dynamics is one of the most widely used methods for the simulation of the properties corresponding to ionic motion. Unfortunately, classical molecular dynamics cannot be applied for electron transfer simulation. Suggested modification of the molecular dynamics allows performing the electron transfer from one particle to another during simulation runtime. All additional data structure and the corresponding algorithms are presented in this article. The method can be applied to the systems with pair Van der Waals and Coulomb interactions. Moreover, it may be extended for many-bodied interatomic interactions. In addition, an algorithm of transference numbers calculation has been designed. This extension is not an independent method but it can be useful for simulating the systems with high concentration of electron donors and acceptors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Entropies and correlations in classical and quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.; Marmo, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    We present a review of entropy properties for classical and quantum systems including Shannon entropy, von Neumann entropy, Rényi entropy, and Tsallis entropy. We discuss known and new entropic and information inequalities for classical and quantum systems, both composite and noncomposite. We demonstrate matrix inequalities associated with the entropic subadditivity and strong subadditivity conditions and give a new inequality for matrix elements of unitary matrices.

  8. Form invariance for systems of generalized classical mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张毅; 梅凤翔

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a form invariance of canonical equations for systems of generalized classical mechanics. According to the invariance of the form of differential equations of motion under the infinitesimal transformations, this paper gives the definition and criterion of the form invariance for generalized classical mechanical systems, and establishes relations between form invariance, Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry. At the end of the paper, an example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  9. Trigonometric version of quantum-classical duality in integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beketov, M; Zabrodin, A; Zotov, A

    2015-01-01

    We extend the quantum-classical duality to the trigonometric (hyperbolic) case. The duality establishes an explicit relationship between the classical N-body trigonometric Ruijsenaars-Schneider model and the inhomogeneous twisted XXZ spin chain on N sites. Similarly to the rational version, the spin chain data fixes a certain Lagrangian submanifold in the phase space of the classical integrable system. The inhomogeneity parameters are equal to the coordinates of particles while the velocities of classical particles are proportional to the eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians (residues of the properly normalized transfer matrix). In the rational version of the duality, the action variables of the Ruijsenaars-Schneider model are equal to the twist parameters with some multiplicities defined by quantum (occupation) numbers. In contrast to the rational version, in the trigonometric case there is a splitting of the spectrum of action variables (eigenvalues of the classical Lax matrix). The limit correspondin...

  10. Comparison of quantum and classical relaxation in spin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, R

    2013-04-01

    The classical Landau-Lifshitz equation with a damping term has been derived from the time evolution of a quantum mechanical wave function under the assumption of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator. Further, the trajectory of a classical spin (S) has been compared with the expectation value of the spin operator (Ŝ). A good agreement between classical and quantum mechanical trajectories can be found for Hamiltonians linear in Ŝ or S, respectively. Quadratic or higher order terms in the Hamiltonian result in a disagreement.

  11. Quantum Dynamics in Classical Time Evolution of Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    1997-01-01

    The time-dependence of correlation functions under the influence of cla= ssical equations of motion is described by an exact evolution equation. For conservative systems thermodynamic equilibrium is a fixed point of these equations. We show that this fixed point is not universally stable, since infinitely many conserved correlation functions obstruct the approach to equilibrium. Equilibrium can therefore be reached at most for suitably av= eraged quantities or for subsystems, similar to quantum statistics. The classica= l time evolution of correlation functions shows many dynamical features of quant= um mechanics.

  12. Wigner Measures Approach to the Classical Limit of the Nelson Model: Convergence of Dynamics and Ground State Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Zied; Falconi, Marco

    2014-10-01

    We consider the classical limit of the Nelson model, a system of stable nucleons interacting with a meson field. We prove convergence of the quantum dynamics towards the evolution of the coupled Klein-Gordon-Schrödinger equation. Also, we show that the ground state energy level of nucleons, when is large and the meson field approaches its classical value, is given by the infimum of the classical energy functional at a fixed density of particles. Our study relies on a recently elaborated approach for mean field theory and uses Wigner measures.

  13. Classical photodissociation dynamics with Bohr quantization: Application to the fragmentation of a van der Waals cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelo-Gonzalez, W., E-mail: wilmer@instec.cu [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Departamento de Fisica General, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Habana 10600 (Cuba); Bonnet, L., E-mail: l.bonnet@ism.u-bordeaux1.fr [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Larregaray, P.; Rayez, J.-C. [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Rubayo-Soneira, J. [Departamento de Fisica General, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Habana 10600 (Cuba)

    2012-05-03

    Graphical abstract: A recent classical description of photodissociation dynamics in a quantum spirit is applied for the first time to a realistic process, the fragmentation of NeBr{sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photo-dissociation of NeBr{sub 2} is studied by means of two approaches. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first is the standard classical one with Gaussian binning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second is a new method applied for the first time to a realistic system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new method leads to exactly the same results as the standard one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer However, it requires about 10 times less trajectories in the present case. - Abstract: The recent classical dynamical approach of photodissociations with Bohr quantization [L. Bonnet, J. Chem. Phys. 133 (2010) 174108] is applied for the first time to a realistic process, the photofragmentation of the van der Waals cluster NeBr{sub 2}. We illustrate the fact that this approach, formally equivalent to the standard one, may be numerically much more efficient.

  14. General explicit solutions of a classical Boussinesq system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张善卿; 徐桂琼; 李志斌

    2002-01-01

    Seeking a travelling wave solution of the classical Boussinesq system and making an ansatz for the solution, we obtain a nonlinear system of algebraic equations. We solve the system using an effective algorithm and then two general explicit solutions are obtained which are of physical interest.

  15. Spin Dynamics simulations of the dynamic properties of classical models for magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Alex; Landau, D. P.

    1998-03-01

    The Spin Dynamics simulation technique, which has had considerable success for the study of critical properties of classical Heisenberg antiferromagnets(A. Bunker, K. Chen, and D. P. Landau Phys. Rev. B) \\underline54, 9259 (1996), has been used to determine more general properties for a wider range of materials. A general spin dynamics program has been developed which can determine the dynamic structure factor, S(q,ω), in the [100], [110], and [111] directions for a wide range of classical magnetic models at any temperature desired. We have simulated the magnetic dynamics in the ordered phase of the isotropic Heisenberg model with both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling on L×L×L BCC and SC lattices. Outside of the critical regime relatively small lattice sizes of L = 12, 24 could be used. From our simulation we have determined the stiffness coefficient and the spin relaxation rate which were compared to both experimental(J. Als-Nielsen in Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena), ed. C. Domb, M. S. Green, Academic Press, (1976) and theoretical results. We have performed the same simulation with anisotropy appropriate for MnF2 and FeF_2. Research supported in part by the NSF

  16. Coulomb crystallization in classical and quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Coulomb crystallization occurs in one-component plasmas when the average interaction energy exceeds the kinetic energy by about two orders of magnitude. A simple road to reach such strong coupling consists in using external confinement potentials the strength of which controls the density. This has been succsessfully realized with ions in traps and storage rings and also in dusty plasma. Recently a three-dimensional spherical confinement could be created [1] which allows to produce spherical dust crystals containing concentric shells. I will give an overview on our recent results for these ``Yukawa balls'' and compare them to experiments. The shell structure of these systems can be very well explained by using an isotropic statically screened pair interaction. Further, the thermodynamic properties of these systems, such as the radial density distribution are discussed based on an analytical theory [3]. I then will discuss Coulomb crystallization in trapped quantum systems, such as mesoscopic electron and electron hole plasmas in coupled layers [4,5]. These systems show a very rich correlation behavior, including liquid and solid like states and bound states (excitons, biexcitons) and their crystals. On the other hand, also collective quantum and spin effects are observed, including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity of bound electron-hole pairs [4]. Finally, I consider Coulomb crystallization in two-component neutral plasmas in three dimensions. I discuss the necessary conditions for crystals of heavy charges to exist in the presence of a light component which typically is in the Fermi gas or liquid state. It can be shown that their exists a critical ratio of the masses of the species of the order of 80 [5] which is confirmed by Quantum Monte Carlo simulations [6]. Familiar examples are crystals of nuclei in the core of White dwarf stars, but the results also suggest the existence of other crystals, including proton or α-particle crystals in dense matter

  17. Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics in quantum time-correlation functions: Matsubara dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hele, Timothy J H; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2015-01-01

    We show that a single change in the derivation of the linearized semiclassical-initial value representation (LSC-IVR or classical Wigner approximation) results in a classical dynamics which conserves the quantum Boltzmann distribution. We rederive the (standard) LSC-IVR approach by writing the (exact) quantum time-correlation function in terms of the normal modes of a free ring-polymer (i.e. a discrete imaginary-time Feynman path), taking the limit that the number of polymer beads $N \\to \\infty$, such that the lowest normal-mode frequencies take their Matsubara values. The change we propose is to truncate the quantum Liouvillian, not explicitly in powers of $\\hbar^2$ at $\\hbar^0$ (which gives back the standard LSC-IVR approximation), but in the normal-mode derivatives corresponding to the lowest Matsubara frequencies. The resulting Matsubara dynamics is inherently classical (since all terms $\\mathcal{O}\\left(\\hbar^{2}\\right)$ disappear from the Matsubara Liouvillian in the limit $N \\to \\infty$), and conserves...

  18. Classical and quantum phases of low-dimensional dipolar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartarius, Florian

    2016-09-22

    In this thesis we present a detailed study of the phase diagram of ultracold bosonic atoms confined along a tight atomic wave guide, along which they experience an optical lattice potential. In this quasi-one dimensional model we analyse the interplay between interactions and quantum fluctuations in (i) determining the non-equilibrium steady state after a quench and (ii) giving rise to novel equilibrium phases, when the interactions combine the s-wave contact interaction and the anisotropic long range dipole-dipole interactions. In detail, in the first part of the thesis we study the depinning of a gas of impenetrable bosons following the sudden switch of of the optical lattice. By means of a Bose-Fermi mapping we infer the exact quantum dynamical evolution and show that in the thermodynamic limit the system is in a non-equilibrium steady state without quasi-long range order. In the second part of the thesis, we study the effect of quantum fluctuations on the linear-zigzag instability in the ground state of ultracold dipolar bosons, as a function of the strength of the transverse confinement. We first analyse the linear-zigzag instability in the classical regime, and then use our results to develop a multi-mode Bose-Hubbard model for the system. We then develop several numerical methods, to determine the ground state.

  19. Experimental non-classicality of an indivisible quantum system

    CERN Document Server

    Lapkiewicz, Radek; Schaeff, Christoph; Langford, Nathan K; Ramelow, Sven; Wiesniak, Marcin; Zeilinger, Anton; 10.1038/nature10119

    2011-01-01

    Quantum theory demands that, in contrast to classical physics, not all properties can be simultaneously well defined. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is a manifestation of this fact. Another important corollary arises that there can be no joint probability distribution describing the outcomes of all possible measurements, allowing a quantum system to be classically understood. We provide the first experimental evidence that even for a single three-state system, a qutrit, no such classical model can exist that correctly describes the results of a simple set of pairwise compatible measurements. Not only is a single qutrit the simplest system in which such a contradiction is possible, but, even more importantly, the contradiction cannot result from entanglement, because such a system is indivisible, and it does not even allow the concept of entanglement between subsystems.

  20. Classical and quantum simulations of many-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murg, Valentin

    2008-04-07

    This thesis is devoted to recent developments in the fields of classical and quantum simulations of many-body systems. We describe new classical algorithms that overcome problems apparent in conventional renormalization group and Monte Carlo methods. These algorithms make possible the detailed study of finite temperature properties of 2-D classical and 1-D quantum systems, the investigation of ground states of 2-D frustrated or fermionic systems and the analysis of time evolutions of 2-D quantum systems. Furthermore, we propose new 'analog' quantum simulators that are able to realize interesting models such as a Tonks-Girardeau gas or a frustrated spin-1/2 XY model on a trigonal lattice. These quantum simulators make use of optical lattices and trapped ions and are technically feasible. In fact, the Tonks-Girardeau gas has been realized experimentally and we provide a detailed comparison between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  1. Trigonometric version of quantum–classical duality in integrable systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beketov, M., E-mail: beketov@phystech.edu [MIPT, Inststitutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Liashyk, A., E-mail: a.liashyk@gmail.com [National Research University Higher School of Economics, Myasnitskaya str. 20, 101000, Moscow (Russian Federation); BITP, Metrolohichna str. 14-b, 03680, Kiev (Ukraine); Zabrodin, A., E-mail: zabrodin@itep.ru [National Research University Higher School of Economics, Myasnitskaya str. 20, 101000, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Biochemical Physics, Kosygina str. 4, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); ITEP, Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zotov, A., E-mail: zotov@mi.ras.ru [Steklov Mathematical Institute, RAS, Gubkina str. 8, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); ITEP, Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); MIPT, Inststitutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    We extend the quantum–classical duality to the trigonometric (hyperbolic) case. The duality establishes an explicit relationship between the classical N-body trigonometric Ruijsenaars–Schneider model and the inhomogeneous twisted XXZ spin chain on N sites. Similarly to the rational version, the spin chain data fixes a certain Lagrangian submanifold in the phase space of the classical integrable system. The inhomogeneity parameters are equal to the coordinates of particles while the velocities of classical particles are proportional to the eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians (residues of the properly normalized transfer matrix). In the rational version of the duality, the action variables of the Ruijsenaars–Schneider model are equal to the twist parameters with some multiplicities defined by quantum (occupation) numbers. In contrast to the rational version, in the trigonometric case there is a splitting of the spectrum of action variables (eigenvalues of the classical Lax matrix). The limit corresponding to the classical Calogero–Sutherland system and quantum trigonometric Gaudin model is also described as well as the XX limit to free fermions.

  2. Trigonometric version of quantum–classical duality in integrable systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beketov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We extend the quantum–classical duality to the trigonometric (hyperbolic case. The duality establishes an explicit relationship between the classical N-body trigonometric Ruijsenaars–Schneider model and the inhomogeneous twisted XXZ spin chain on N sites. Similarly to the rational version, the spin chain data fixes a certain Lagrangian submanifold in the phase space of the classical integrable system. The inhomogeneity parameters are equal to the coordinates of particles while the velocities of classical particles are proportional to the eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians (residues of the properly normalized transfer matrix. In the rational version of the duality, the action variables of the Ruijsenaars–Schneider model are equal to the twist parameters with some multiplicities defined by quantum (occupation numbers. In contrast to the rational version, in the trigonometric case there is a splitting of the spectrum of action variables (eigenvalues of the classical Lax matrix. The limit corresponding to the classical Calogero–Sutherland system and quantum trigonometric Gaudin model is also described as well as the XX limit to free fermions.

  3. Trigonometric version of quantum-classical duality in integrable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketov, M.; Liashyk, A.; Zabrodin, A.; Zotov, A.

    2016-02-01

    We extend the quantum-classical duality to the trigonometric (hyperbolic) case. The duality establishes an explicit relationship between the classical N-body trigonometric Ruijsenaars-Schneider model and the inhomogeneous twisted XXZ spin chain on N sites. Similarly to the rational version, the spin chain data fixes a certain Lagrangian submanifold in the phase space of the classical integrable system. The inhomogeneity parameters are equal to the coordinates of particles while the velocities of classical particles are proportional to the eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians (residues of the properly normalized transfer matrix). In the rational version of the duality, the action variables of the Ruijsenaars-Schneider model are equal to the twist parameters with some multiplicities defined by quantum (occupation) numbers. In contrast to the rational version, in the trigonometric case there is a splitting of the spectrum of action variables (eigenvalues of the classical Lax matrix). The limit corresponding to the classical Calogero-Sutherland system and quantum trigonometric Gaudin model is also described as well as the XX limit to free fermions.

  4. Kuramoto dynamics in Hamiltonian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2014-09-01

    The Kuramoto model constitutes a paradigmatic model for the dissipative collective dynamics of coupled oscillators, characterizing in particular the emergence of synchrony (phase locking). Here we present a classical Hamiltonian (and thus conservative) system with 2N state variables that in its action-angle representation exactly yields Kuramoto dynamics on N-dimensional invariant manifolds. We show that locking of the phase of one oscillator on a Kuramoto manifold to the average phase emerges where the transverse Hamiltonian action dynamics of that specific oscillator becomes unstable. Moreover, the inverse participation ratio of the Hamiltonian dynamics perturbed off the manifold indicates the global synchronization transition point for finite N more precisely than the standard Kuramoto order parameter. The uncovered Kuramoto dynamics in Hamiltonian systems thus distinctly links dissipative to conservative dynamics.

  5. A New Conservation Law Derived from Mei Symmetry for the System of Generalized Classical Mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYi

    2004-01-01

    A new conservation theorem derived directly from Mei symmetry of the generalized classical mechanical system is presented. First, the differential equations of motion of the system are established, and the definition and criterion of Mei symmetry for the system of generalized classical mechanics are given, which are based upon the invariance of dynamical functions under irdinitesimal transformations. Second, the condition under which a Mei symmetry can lead to a new conservation law is obtained and the form of the conservation law is presented. And finadly, an example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  6. A New Conservation Law Derived from Mei Symmetry for the System of Generalized Classical Mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi

    2004-01-01

    A new conservation theorem derived directly from Mei symmetry of the generalized classical mechanical system is presented. First, the differential equations of motion of the system are established, and the definition and criterion of Mei symmetry for the system of generalized classical mechanics are given, which are based upon the invariance of dynamical functions under infinitesimal transformations. Second, the condition under which a Mei symmetry can lead to a new conservation law is obtained and the form of the conservation law is presented. And finally, an example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  7. Dynamics of tripartite quantum entanglement and discord under a classical dephasing random telegraph noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenfack, Lionel Tenemeza; Tchoffo, Martin; Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2017-02-01

    We address the dynamics of quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord of a three-qubit system interacting with a classical pure dephasing random telegraph noise (RTN) in three different physical environmental situations (independent, mixed and common environments). Two initial entangled states of the system are examined, namely the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)- and Werner (W)-type states. The classical noise is introduced as a stochastic process affecting the energy splitting of the qubits. With the help of suitable measures of tripartite entanglement (entanglement witnesses and lower bound of concurrence) and quantum discord (global quantum discord and quantum dissension), we show that the evolution of quantum correlations is not only affected by the type of the system-environment interaction but also by the input configuration of the qubits and the memory properties of the environmental noise. Indeed, depending on the memory properties of the environmental noise and the initial state considered, we find that independent, common and mixed environments can play opposite roles in preserving quantum correlations, and that the sudden death and revival phenomena or the survival of quantum correlations may occur. On the other hand, we also show that the W-type state has strong dynamics under this noise than the GHZ-type ones.

  8. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND EMERGENCE PARAMETER OF CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It was established that the Fermi-Dirac statistics, Bose-Einstein and Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution can be described by a single equation, which follows from Einstein's equations for systems with central symmetry. Emergence parameter of classical and quantum systems composed by the rays of gravitational waves interacting with gravitational field of the universe has been computed

  9. New Approach to Find Exact Solutions to Classical Boussinesq System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Hong-Yan; ZHAO Xue-Qin; ZHANG Hong-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, based on a new system of three Riccati equations, we give a new method to construct more new exact solutions of nonlinear differential equations in mathematical physics. The classical Boussinesq system is chosen to illustrate our method. As a consequence, more families of new exact solutions are obtained, which include solitary wave solutions and periodic solutions.

  10. Semiclassical approach to mesoscopic systems classical trajectory correlations and wave interference

    CERN Document Server

    Waltner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This volume describes mesoscopic systems with classically chaotic dynamics using semiclassical methods which combine elements of classical dynamics and quantum interference effects. Experiments and numerical studies show that Random Matrix Theory (RMT) explains physical properties of these systems well. This was conjectured more than 25 years ago by Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit for the spectral properties. Since then, it has been a challenge to understand this connection analytically.  The author offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. He extends previous semiclassical approaches that treated spectral and conductance properties. He shows that RMT results can in general only be obtained semiclassically when taking into account classical configurations not considered previously, for example those containing multiply traversed periodic orbits. Furthermore, semiclassics is capable of describing effects beyond RMT. In this context he studies the effect of a non-zero Eh...

  11. Breakdown of the classical description of a local system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eran, Kot; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Nielsen, Bo Melholt

    2012-01-01

    We provide a straightforward demonstration of a fundamental difference between classical and quantum mechanics for a single local system: namely, the absence of a joint probability distribution of the position x and momentum p. Elaborating on a recently reported criterion by Bednorz and Belzig...... of the breakdown of a classical description of the underlying state. Most importantly, the criterion used does not rely on quantum mechanics and can thus be used to demonstrate nonclassicality of systems not immediately apparent to exhibit quantum behavior. The criterion is directly applicable to any system...... [ Phys. Rev. A 83 052113 (2011)] we derive a simple criterion that must be fulfilled for any joint probability distribution in classical physics. We demonstrate the violation of this criterion using the homodyne measurement of a single photon state, thus proving a straightforward signature...

  12. Effects of complex parameters on classical trajectories of Hamiltonian systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asiri Nanayakkara; Thilagarajah Mathanaranjan

    2014-06-01

    Anderson et al have shown that for complex energies, the classical trajectories of real quartic potentials are closed and periodic only on a discrete set of eigencurves. Moreover, recently it was revealed that when time is complex $t(t = t_r e^{i_})$, certain real Hermitian systems possess close periodic trajectories only for a discrete set of values of . On the other hand, it is generally true that even for real energies, classical trajectories of non-PT symmetric Hamiltonians with complex parameters are mostly non-periodic and open. In this paper, we show that for given real energy, the classical trajectories of complex quartic Hamiltonians $H = p^2 + ax^4 + bx^k$ (where is real, is complex and = 1 or 2) are closed and periodic only for a discrete set of parameter curves in the complex -plane. It was further found that given complex parameter , the classical trajectories are periodic for a discrete set of real energies (i.e., classical energy gets discretized or quantized by imposing the condition that trajectories are periodic and closed). Moreover, we show that for real and positive energies (continuous), the classical trajectories of complex Hamiltonian $H = p^2 + x^4$, ($= _r$ e$^{i}$) are periodic when $ = 4 \\tan^{−1}$[($n/(2m + n)$)] for $\\forall n$ and $m \\mathbb{Z}$.

  13. Stable classical structures in dissipative quantum chaotic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Raviola, Lisandro A; Rivas, Alejandro M F

    2009-01-01

    We study the stability of classical structures in chaotic systems when a dissipative quantum evolution takes place. We consider a paradigmatic model, the quantum baker map in contact with a heat bath at finite temperature. We analyze the behavior of the purity, fidelity and Husimi distributions corresponding to initial states localized on short periodic orbits (scar functions) and map eigenstates. Scar functions, that have a fundamental role in the semiclassical description of chaotic systems, emerge as very robust against environmental perturbations. This is confirmed by the study of other states localized on classical structures. Also, purity and fidelity show a complementary behavior as decoherence measures.

  14. Classical and quantum proton vibration in a nonharmonic strongly coupled system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. M.; Thorson, W. R.; Choi, J. H.

    1993-09-01

    Classical and quantum descriptions of proton vibration are compared for a coupled nonharmonic model based on an ab initio potential for the bifluoride ion, [FHF]-. Accurate quantum calculations and exact classical dynamics are compared with quantum and classical versions of the self-consistent-field (SCF) approximation. Semiclassical and quantum SCF eigenvalues agree within JWKB-type errors. The SCF scheme closely approximates exact quantum states for the lowest 4-5 vibrational levels of each symmetry, except at avoided crossings where strong CI mixing of SCF levels occurs. True classical motion, however, is mainly irregular except at very low energies, and even where it remains regular it may be strongly reorganized by a 1:1 periodic resonance associated with major potential surface features. Strongly mixed CI states at systematic avoided crossings of SCF levels at higher energies do have classical analogs in the reorganized classical motions seen at low energies; stabilized CI components correspond to a stable periodic 1:1 orbit, destabilized components to an unstable periodic 1:1 elliptical orbit. Canonical perturbation theory is used to study further the sense in which the exactly separable classical SCF Hamiltonian is ``close'' to the true Hamiltonian. Where true motion is modal or SCF-like, first-order perturbed trajectories and second-order perturbed energies describe it very accurately. However since the dynamics can be strongly disturbed even at very low energies, correlation effects are obviously not ``small'' in the sense usually meant in classical dynamics, i.e., that regular trajectories mostly remain regular in the nonseparable perturbed system.

  15. Geometry of dynamics and phase transitions in classical lattice $\\phi^{4}$ theories

    CERN Document Server

    Caiani, L; Clementi, C; Pettini, G; Pettini, M; Gatto, R; Caiani, Lando; Casetti, Lapo; Clementi, Cecilia; Pettini, Giulio; Pettini, Marco; Gatto, Raoul

    1998-01-01

    We perform a microcanonical study of classical lattice phi^4 field models in 3 dimensions with O(n) symmetries. The Hamiltonian flows associated to these systems that undergo a second order phase transition in the thermodynamic limit are here investigated. The microscopic Hamiltonian dynamics neatly reveals the presence of a phase transition through the time averages of conventional thermodynamical observables. Moreover, peculiar behaviors of the largest Lyapunov exponents at the transition point are observed. A Riemannian geometrization of Hamiltonian dynamics is then used to introduce other relevant observables, that are measured as functions of both energy density and temperature. On the basis of a simple and abstract geometric model, we suggest that the apparently singular behaviour of these geometric observables might probe a major topological change of the manifolds whose geodesics are the natural motions.

  16. Classical and quantum dynamics of a perfect fluid scalar-energy dependent metric cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadi, M.; Nozari, K.; Vakili, B.

    2016-05-01

    Inspired from the idea of minimally coupling of a real scalar field to geometry, we investigate the classical and quantum models of a flat energy-dependent FRW cosmology coupled to a perfect fluid in the framework of the scalar-rainbow metric gravity. We use the standard Schutz' representation for the perfect fluid and show that under a particular energy-dependent gauge fixing, it may lead to the identification of a time parameter for the corresponding dynamical system. It is shown that, under some circumstances on the minisuperspace prob energy, the classical evolution of the of the universe represents a late time expansion coming from a bounce instead of the big-bang singularity. Then we go forward by showing that this formalism gives rise to a Schrödinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the quantum-mechanical description of the model under consideration, the eigenfunctions of which can be used to construct the wave function of the universe. We use the resulting wave function in order to investigate the possibility of the avoidance of classical singularities due to quantum effects by means of the many-worlds and Bohmian interpretation of quantum cosmology.

  17. Simulating quantum systems on classical computers with matrix product states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleine, Adrian

    2010-11-08

    In this thesis, the numerical simulation of strongly-interacting many-body quantum-mechanical systems using matrix product states (MPS) is considered. Matrix-Product-States are a novel representation of arbitrary quantum many-body states. Using quantum information theory, it is possible to show that Matrix-Product-States provide a polynomial-sized representation of one-dimensional quantum systems, thus allowing an efficient simulation of one-dimensional quantum system on classical computers. Matrix-Product-States form the conceptual framework of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). After a general introduction in the first chapter of this thesis, the second chapter deals with Matrix-Product-States, focusing on the development of fast and stable algorithms. To obtain algorithms to efficiently calculate ground states, the density-matrix renormalization group is reformulated using the Matrix-Product-States framework. Further, time-dependent problems are considered. Two different algorithms are presented, one based on a Trotter decomposition of the time-evolution operator, the other one on Krylov subspaces. Finally, the evaluation of dynamical spectral functions is discussed, and a correction vector-based method is presented. In the following chapters, the methods presented in the second chapter, are applied to a number of different physical problems. The third chapter deals with the existence of chiral phases in isotropic one-dimensional quantum spin systems. A preceding analytical study based on a mean-field approach indicated the possible existence of those phases in an isotropic Heisenberg model with a frustrating zig-zag interaction and a magnetic field. In this thesis, the existence of the chiral phases is shown numerically by using Matrix-Product-States-based algorithms. In the fourth chapter, we propose an experiment using ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices, which allows a well controlled observation of the spin-charge separation (of

  18. Exact Classical and Quantum Dynamics in Background Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzl, Tom; Ilderton, Anton

    2017-03-01

    Analytic results for (Q)ED processes in external fields are limited to a few special cases, such as plane waves. However, the strong focusing of intense laser fields implies a need to go beyond the plane wave model. By exploiting Poincaré symmetry and superintegrability we show how to construct, and solve without approximation, new models of laser-matter interactions. We illustrate the method with a model of a radially polarized (TM) laser beam, for which we exactly determine the classical orbits and quantum wave functions. Including in this way the effects of transverse field structure should improve predictions and analyses for experiments at intense laser facilities.

  19. Structure and Spectrum of Binary Classic Systems Confined in a Parabolic Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wen; ZENG Zhi

    2009-01-01

    @@ The static and dynamic properties of the two-dimensional classic system of two-species interacting charged par-ticles in a parabolic trap are studied. The ground state energy and configuration for different kinds of binary systems are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and Newton optimization. The spectrum and normal modes vectors can be gained by diagonalizing the dynamical matrix of the system. It is found that the total particle number, particle number and mass-to-charge ratio of each species are decisive factors for the system structure and spectrum. The three intrinsic normal modes of single species Coulomb clusters are inherent, concluded from our numerical simulations and analytical results.

  20. Limits of Gaudin Systems: Classical and Quantum Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chervov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the XXX homogeneous Gaudin system with N sites, both in classical and the quantum case. In particular we show that a suitable limiting procedure for letting the poles of its Lax matrix collide can be used to define new families of Liouville integrals (in the classical case and new ''Gaudin'' algebras (in the quantum case. We will especially treat the case of total collisions, that gives rise to (a generalization of the so called Bending flows of Kapovich and Millson. Some aspects of multi-Poisson geometry will be addressed (in the classical case. We will make use of properties of ''Manin matrices'' to provide explicit generators of the Gaudin Algebras in the quantum case.

  1. Dynamical system synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical System Synchronization (DSS) meticulously presents for the first time the theory of dynamical systems synchronization based on the local singularity theory of discontinuous dynamical systems. The book details the sufficient and necessary conditions for dynamical systems synchronizations, through extensive mathematical expression. Techniques for engineering implementation of DSS are clearly presented compared with the existing techniques.  This book also:  Presents novel concepts and methods for dynamical system synchronization Extends beyond the Lyapunov theory for dynamical system synchronization Introduces companion and synchronization of discrete dynamical systems Includes local singularity theory for discontinuous dynamical systems Covers the invariant domains of synchronization Features more than 75 illustrations Dynamical System Synchronization is an ideal book for those interested in better understanding new concepts and methodology for dynamical system synchronization, local singularity...

  2. An Approach to Some Non-Classical Eigenvalue Problems of Structural Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi Horea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two main shortcomings of common formulations, encountered in the literature concerning the linear problems of structural dynamics are revealed: the implicit, not discussed, postulation, of the use of Kelvin – Voigt constitutive laws (which is often infirmed by experience and the calculation difficulties involved by the attempts to use other constitutive laws. In order to overcome these two categories of shortcomings, the use of the bilateral Laplace – Carson transformation is adopted. Instead of the dependence on time, t, of a certain function f (t, the dependence of its image f# (p on the complex parameter p = χ + iω (ω: circular frequency will occur. This leads to the formulation of associated non-classical eigenvalue problems. The basic relations satisfied by the eigenvalues λr#(p and the eigenvectors vr#(p of dynamic systems are examined (among other, the property of orthogonality of eigenvectors is replaced by the property of pseudo-orthogonality. The case of points p = p’, where multiple eigenvalues occur and where, as a rule, chains of principal vectors are to be considered, is discussed. An illustrative case, concerning a non-classical eigenvalue problem, is presented. Plots of variation along the ω axis, for the real and imaginary components of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, are presented. A brief final discussion closes the paper.

  3. Dynamics of classical particles in oval or elliptic billiards with a dispersing mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Diogo Ricardo da [Instituto de Física da USP, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, Cidade Universitária, CEP 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Departamento de Física, UNESP-Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Dettmann, Carl P. [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Oliveira, Juliano A. de [UNESP-Univ Estadual Paulista, Câmpus de São João da Boa Vista, São João da Boa Vista, SP (Brazil); Leonel, Edson D. [Departamento de Física, UNESP-Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Some dynamical properties for an oval billiard with a scatterer in its interior are studied. The dynamics consists of a classical particle colliding between an inner circle and an external boundary given by an oval, elliptical, or circle shapes, exploring for the first time some natural generalizations. The billiard is indeed a generalization of the annular billiard, which is of strong interest for understanding marginally unstable periodic orbits and their role in the boundary between regular and chaotic regions in both classical and quantum (including experimental) systems. For the oval billiard, which has a mixed phase space, the presence of an obstacle is an interesting addition. We demonstrate, with details, how to obtain the equations of the mapping, and the changes in the phase space are discussed. We study the linear stability of some fixed points and show both analytically and numerically the occurrence of direct and inverse parabolic bifurcations. Lyapunov exponents and generalized bifurcation diagrams are obtained. Moreover, histograms of the number of successive iterations for orbits that stay in a cusp are studied. These histograms are shown to be scaling invariant when changing the radius of the scatterer, and they have a power law slope around −3. The results here can be generalized to other kinds of external boundaries.

  4. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, Cesar D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C. [Ciudad Universitaria, Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA y IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  5. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, César D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, R8402AGP, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C., E-mail: lombardo@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física Juan José Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation.

  6. Classical black holes: the nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Kip S

    2012-08-03

    Numerical simulations have revealed two types of physical structures, made from curved spacetime, that are attached to black holes: tendexes, which stretch or squeeze anything they encounter, and vortexes, which twist adjacent inertial frames relative to each other. When black holes collide, their tendexes and vortexes interact and oscillate (a form of nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime). These oscillations generate gravitational waves, which can give kicks up to 4000 kilometers per second to the merged black hole. The gravitational waves encode details of the spacetime dynamics and will soon be observed and studied by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and its international partners.

  7. Noether-Lie Symmetry of Generalized Classical Mechanical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Wen-Zhi; ZHANG Xiao-Ni; WANG Shun-Jin; FANG Jian-Hui; WANG Peng; DING Ning

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the Noether-Lie symmetry and conserved quantities of generalized classical mechanical system are studied. The definition and the criterion of the Noether Lie symmetry for the system under the general infinitesimal transformations of groups are given. The Noether conserved quantity and the Hojman conserved quantity deduced from the Noether-Lie symmetry are obtained. An example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  8. Symmetries and casimir of an extended classical long wave system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M Tamizhmani; R Ilangovane; B Dubrovin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we derive Lie point, generalized, master and time-dependent symmetries of a dispersionless equation, which is an extension of a classical long wave system. This equation also admits an infinite-dimensional Lie algebraic structure of Virasoro-type, as in the dispersive integrable systems. We discuss the construction of a sequence of negative ranking symmetries through the property of uniformity in rank. More interestingly, we obtain the conserved quantities directly from the casimir of Poisson pencil.

  9. Classical Information Storage in an n-Level Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Péter E.; Weiner, Mihály

    2015-12-01

    A game is played by a team of two—say Alice and Bob—in which the value of a random variable x is revealed to Alice only, who cannot freely communicate with Bob. Instead, she is given a quantum n-level system, respectively a classical n-state system, which she can put in possession of Bob in any state she wishes. We evaluate how successfully they managed to store and recover the value of x by requiring Bob to specify a value z and giving a reward of value f ( x, z) to the team. We show that whatever the probability distribution of x and the reward function f are, when using a quantum n-level system, the maximum expected reward obtainable with the best possible team strategy is equal to that obtainable with the use of a classical n-state system. The proof relies on mixed discriminants of positive matrices and—perhaps surprisingly—an application of the Supply-Demand Theorem for bipartite graphs. As a corollary, we get an infinite set of new, dimension dependent inequalities regarding positive operator valued measures and density operators on complex n-space. As a further corollary, we see that the greatest value, with respect to a given distribution of x, of the mutual information I ( x; z) that is obtainable using an n-level quantum system equals the analogous maximum for a classical n-state system.

  10. Wigner's dynamical transition state theory in phase space : classical and quantum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens, Holger; Schubert, Roman; Wiggins, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    We develop Wigner's approach to a dynamical transition state theory in phase space in both the classical and quantum mechanical settings. The key to our development is the construction of a normal form for describing the dynamics in the neighbourhood of a specific type of saddle point that governs t

  11. Robust Topological and Holographic Degeneracies of Classical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Seyyed Mohammad Sadegh; Nussinov, Zohar; Ortiz, Gerardo

    We challenge the hypothesis that the ground states of a physical system whose degeneracy depends on topology must necessarily realize topological quantum order and display non-local entanglement. To this end, we introduce and study a classical rendition of the Toric Code model embedded on Riemann surfaces of different genus numbers. We find that the minimal ground state degeneracy (and those of all levels) depends on the topology of the embedding surface alone. As the ground states of this classical system may be distinguished by local measurements, a characteristic of Landau orders, this example illustrates that topological degeneracy is not a sufficient condition for topological quantum order. This conclusion is generic and, as shown, it applies to many other models. We also demonstrate that in certain lattice realizations of these models, and other theories, one can find a ground state entropy that is ''holographic'', i.e., extensive in the system's boundary.

  12. Three-stage classical molecular dynamics model for simulation of heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godre Subodh S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage Classical Molecular Dynamics (3S-CMD approach for heavy-ion fusion is developed. In this approach the Classical Rigid-Body Dynamics simulation for heavy-ion collision involving light deformed nucleus is initiated on their Rutherford trajectories at very large initial separation. Collision simulation is then followed by relaxation of the rigid-body constrains for one or both the colliding nuclei at distances close to the barrier when the trajectories of all the nucleons are obtained in a Classical Molecular Dynamics approach. This 3S-CMD approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but also the internal vibrational excitations of one or both the nuclei at distances close to the barrier. The results of the dynamical simulation for 24Mg+208Pb collision show significant modification of the fusion barrier and calculated fusion cross sections due to internal excitations.

  13. Classical molecular dynamics simulation on the dynamical properties of H2 on silicene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casuyac Miqueas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the diffusion of hydrogen molecule physisorbed on the surface of silicene nanoribbon (SiNRusing the classical molecular dynamic (MD simulation in LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator. The interactions between silicon atoms are modeled using the modified Tersoff potential, the Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO potential for hydrogen – hydrogen interaction and the Lennard – Jones potential for the physisorbed H2 on SiNR. By varying the temperatures (60 K Δ 130 K, we observed that the Δxdisplacement of H2 on the surface SiNR shows a Brownian motion on a Lennard-Jones potential and a Gaussian probability distribution can be plotted describing the diffusion of H2. The calculated mean square displacement (MSD was approximately increasing in time and the activation energy barrier for diffusion has been found to be 43.23meV.

  14. Quantum-classical transition in the electron dynamics of thin metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasiak, R; Manfredi, G; Hervieux, P-A [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux, CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg (France); Haefele, M [INRIA Nancy Grand-Est and Institut de Recherche en Mathematiques Avancees, 7 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: Giovanni.Manfredi@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

    2009-06-15

    The quantum electrons dynamics in a thin metal film is studied numerically using the self-consistent Wigner-Poisson equations. The initial equilibrium is computed from the Kohn-Sham equations at finite temperature, and then mapped into the phase-space Wigner function. The time-dependent results are compared systematically with those obtained previously with a classical approach (Vlasov-Poisson equations). It is found that, for large excitations, the quantum and classical dynamics display the same low-frequency oscillations due to ballistic electrons bouncing back and forth on the film surfaces. However, below a certain excitation energy (roughly corresponding to one quantum of plasmon energy {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub p}), the quantum and classical results diverge, and the ballistic oscillations are no longer observed. These results provide an example of a quantum-classical transition that may be observed with current pump-probe experiments on thin metal films.

  15. Supersymmetric quantum spin chains and classical integrable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Zengo; Zabrodin, Anton; Zotov, Andrei

    2015-05-01

    For integrable inhomogeneous supersymmetric spin chains (generalized graded magnets) constructed employing Y( gl( N| M))-invariant R-matrices in finite-dimensional representations we introduce the master T-operator which is a sort of generating function for the family of commuting quantum transfer matrices. Any eigenvalue of the master T-operator is the tau-function of the classical mKP hierarchy. It is a polynomial in the spectral parameter which is identified with the 0-th time of the hierarchy. This implies a remarkable relation between the quantum supersymmetric spin chains and classical many-body integrable systems of particles of the Ruijsenaars-Schneider type. As an outcome, we obtain a system of algebraic equations for the spectrum of the spin chain Hamiltonians.

  16. Supersymmetric quantum spin chains and classical integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuboi, Zengo; Zotov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    For integrable inhomogeneous supersymmetric spin chains (generalized graded magnets) constructed employing Y(gl(N|M))-invariant R-matrices in finite-dimensional representations we introduce the master T-operator which is a sort of generating function for the family of commuting quantum transfer matrices. Any eigenvalue of the master T-operator is the tau-function of the classical mKP hierarchy. It is a polynomial in the spectral parameter which is identified with the 0-th time of the hierarchy. This implies a remarkable relation between the quantum supersymmetric spin chains and classical many-body integrable systems of particles of the Ruijsenaars-Schneider type. As an outcome, we obtain a system of algebraic equations for the spectrum of the spin chain Hamiltonians.

  17. On the classical dynamics of strongly driven anharmonic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, H. P.; Dietz, K.; Holthaus, M.

    1990-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of periodically driven anharmonic oscillators. In particular, we consider values of the coupling strength which are orders of magnitude higher than those required for the overlap of primary resonances. We observe a division of phase space into a regular and a stochastic region. Both regions are separated by a sharp chaos border which sets an upper limit to the stochastic heating of particles; its dependence on the coupling strength is studied. We construct perpetual adiabatic invariants governing regular motion. A bifurcation mechanism leading to the annihilation of resonances is explained.

  18. Note on classical string dynamics on AdS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañados, Máximo; Ritz, Adam

    1999-12-01

    We consider bosonic strings propagating on Euclidean anti-de Sitter space (AdS3), and study in particular the realization of various worldsheet symmetries. We give a proper definition for the Brown-Henneaux asymptotic target space symmetry, when acting on the string action, and derive the Giveon-Kutasov-Seiberg worldsheet contour integral representation simply by using Noether's theorem. We show that making identifications in the target space is equivalent to the insertion of an (exponentiated) graviton vertex operator carrying the corresponding charge. Finally, we point out an interesting relation between 3D gravity and the dynamics of the worldsheet on AdS3. Both theories are described by an SL(2,C)/SU(2) Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) model, and we prove that the reduction conditions determined on one hand by worldsheet diffeomorphism invariance, and on the other by the Brown-Henneaux boundary conditions, are the same.

  19. Environment and initial state engineered dynamics of quantum and classical correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Li, Chun-Xian; Guo, Yu; Lu, Geng-Biao; Ding, Kai-He

    2016-11-01

    Based on an open exactly solvable system coupled to an environment with nontrivial spectral density, we connect the features of quantum and classical correlations with some features of the environment, initial states of the system, and the presence of initial system-environment correlations. Some interesting features not revealed before are observed by changing the structure of environment, the initial states of system, and the presence of initial system-environment correlations. The main results are as follows. (1) Quantum correlations exhibit temporary freezing and permanent freezing even at high temperature of the environment, for which the necessary and sufficient conditions are given by three propositions. (2) Quantum correlations display a transition from temporary freezing to permanent freezing by changing the structure of environment. (3) Quantum correlations can be enhanced all the time, for which the condition is put forward. (4) The one-to-one dependency relationship between all kinds of dynamic behaviors of quantum correlations and the initial states of the system as well as environment structure is established. (5) In the presence of initial system-environment correlations, quantum correlations under local environment exhibit temporary multi-freezing phenomenon. While under global environment they oscillate, revive, and damp, an explanation for which is given.

  20. EFFECTS OF PARAMETRIC VARIATIONS ON SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR NON-CLASSICALLY DAMPED COUPLED SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XU,J.; DEGRASSI,G.

    2000-04-02

    A comprehensive benchmark program was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform an evaluation of state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for performing seismic analyses of coupled systems with non-classical damping. The program, which was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was designed to address various aspects of application and limitations of these state-of-the-art analysis methods to typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) structures with non-classical damping, and was carried out through analyses of a set of representative benchmark problems. One objective was to examine the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled systems. The examination was performed using parametric variations for three simple benchmark models. This paper presents the comparisons and evaluation of the program participants' results to the BNL exact solutions for the applicable ranges of modeling dynamic characteristic parameters.

  1. Classical and quantum dynamics of a perfect fluid scalar-energy dependent metric cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Khodadi, M; Vakili, B

    2016-01-01

    Inspired from the idea of minimally coupling of a real scalar field to geometry, we investigate the classical and quantum models of a flat energy-dependent FRW cosmology coupled to a perfect fluid in the framework of the scalar-rainbow metric gravity. We use the standard Schutz' representation for the perfect fluid and show that under a particular energy-dependent gauge fixing, it may lead to the identification of a time parameter for the corresponding dynamical system. It is shown that, under some circumstances on the minisuperspace prob energy, the classical evolution of the of the universe represents a late time expansion coming from a bounce instead of the big-bang singularity. Then we go forward by showing that this formalism gives rise to a Schr\\"{o}dinger-Wheeler-DeWitt (SWD) equation for the quantum-mechanical description of the model under consideration, the eigenfunctions of which can be used to construct the wave function of the universe. We use the resulting wave function in order to investigate t...

  2. DNA as a Model for Probing Polymer Entanglements: Circular Polymers and Non-Classical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Regan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded DNA offers a robust platform for investigating fundamental questions regarding the dynamics of entangled polymer solutions. The exceptional monodispersity and multiple naturally occurring topologies of DNA, as well as a wide range of tunable lengths and concentrations that encompass the entanglement regime, enable direct testing of molecular-level entanglement theories and corresponding scaling laws. DNA is also amenable to a wide range of techniques from passive to nonlinear measurements and from single-molecule to bulk macroscopic experiments. Over the past two decades, researchers have developed methods to directly visualize and manipulate single entangled DNA molecules in steady-state and stressed conditions using fluorescence microscopy, particle tracking and optical tweezers. Developments in microfluidics, microrheology and bulk rheology have also enabled characterization of the viscoelastic response of entangled DNA from molecular levels to macroscopic scales and over timescales that span from linear to nonlinear regimes. Experiments using DNA have uniquely elucidated the debated entanglement properties of circular polymers and blends of linear and circular polymers. Experiments have also revealed important lengthscale and timescale dependent entanglement dynamics not predicted by classical tube models, both validating and refuting new proposed extensions and alternatives to tube theory and motivating further theoretical work to describe the rich dynamics exhibited in entangled polymer systems.

  3. Computational physics simulation of classical and quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Philipp O J

    2013-01-01

    This textbook presents basic and advanced computational physics in a very didactic style. It contains very-well-presented and simple mathematical descriptions of many of the most important algorithms used in computational physics. Many clear mathematical descriptions of important techniques in computational physics are given. The first part of the book discusses the basic numerical methods. A large number of exercises and computer experiments allows to study the properties of these methods. The second part concentrates on simulation of classical and quantum systems. It uses a rather general concept for the equation of motion which can be applied to ordinary and partial differential equations. Several classes of integration methods are discussed including not only the standard Euler and Runge Kutta method but also multistep methods and the class of Verlet methods which is introduced by studying the motion in Liouville space. Besides the classical methods, inverse interpolation is discussed, together with the p...

  4. Triangleland. I. Classical dynamics with exchange of relative angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2008-01-01

    In Euclidean relational particle mechanics, only relative times, relative angles and relative separations are meaningful. Barbour-Bertotti (1982) theory is of this form and constitutes a recovery of a portion of Newtonian mechanics from relational premises. This is of interest in the absolute versus relative motion debate and also shares a number of features with the geometrodynamical formulation of general relativity, making it suitable for some modelling of the problem of time in quantum gravity. I also study similarity relational particle mechanics (`dynamics of pure shape'), in which only relative times, relative angles and ratios of relative separations are meaningful. This I consider firstly as it is simpler, particularly in 1 and 2 d, for which the configuration space geometry turns out to be well-known, e.g. S^2 for the `triangleland' (3-particle) case considered in detail. Secondly, the similarity model occurs as a submodel within the Euclidean model: that admits a shape-scale split. For harmonic osc...

  5. Self-Supervised Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2003-01-01

    Some progress has been made in a continuing effort to develop mathematical models of the behaviors of multi-agent systems known in biology, economics, and sociology (e.g., systems ranging from single or a few biomolecules to many interacting higher organisms). Living systems can be characterized by nonlinear evolution of probability distributions over different possible choices of the next steps in their motions. One of the main challenges in mathematical modeling of living systems is to distinguish between random walks of purely physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) and those of biological origin. Following a line of reasoning from prior research, it has been assumed, in the present development, that a biological random walk can be represented by a nonlinear mathematical model that represents coupled mental and motor dynamics incorporating the psychological concept of reflection or self-image. The nonlinear dynamics impart the lifelike ability to behave in ways and to exhibit patterns that depart from thermodynamic equilibrium. Reflection or self-image has traditionally been recognized as a basic element of intelligence. The nonlinear mathematical models of the present development are denoted self-supervised dynamical systems. They include (1) equations of classical dynamics, including random components caused by uncertainties in initial conditions and by Langevin forces, coupled with (2) the corresponding Liouville or Fokker-Planck equations that describe the evolutions of probability densities that represent the uncertainties. The coupling is effected by fictitious information-based forces, denoted supervising forces, composed of probability densities and functionals thereof. The equations of classical mechanics represent motor dynamics that is, dynamics in the traditional sense, signifying Newton s equations of motion. The evolution of the probability densities represents mental dynamics or self-image. Then the interaction between the physical and

  6. Quantum and classical dynamics of reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Geert-Jan; Díaz, Cristina

    2016-06-27

    We review the state-of-the art in dynamics calculations on the reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces, which is an important model system of an elementary reaction that is relevant to heterogeneous catalysis. In many applications, quantum dynamics and classical trajectory calculations are performed within the Born-Oppenheimer static surface model. However, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is finding increased use in applications aimed at modeling the effect of surface phonons on the dynamics. Molecular dynamics with electronic friction has been used to model the effect of electron-hole pair excitation. Most applications are still based on potential energy surfaces (PESs) or forces computed with density functional theory (DFT), using a density functional within the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation energy. A new development is the use of a semi-empirical version of DFT (the specific reaction parameter (SRP) approach to DFT). We also discuss the accurate methods that have become available to represent electronic structure data for the molecule-surface interaction in global PESs. It has now become possible to describe highly activated H2 + metal surface reactions with chemical accuracy using the SRP-DFT approach, as has been shown for H2 + Cu(111) and Cu(100). However, chemical accuracy with SRP-DFT has yet to be demonstrated for weakly activated systems like H2 + Ru(0001) and non-activated systems like H2 + Pd(111), for which SRP DFs are not yet available. There is now considerable evidence that electron-hole pair (ehp) excitation does not need to be modeled to achieve the (chemically) accurate calculation of dissociative chemisorption and scattering probabilities. Dynamics calculations show that phonons can be safely neglected in the chemically accurate calculation of sticking probabilities on cold metal surfaces for activated systems, and in the calculation of a number of other observables. However, there is now sufficient

  7. SYMMETRIES AND CONSERVED QUANTITIES FOR SYSTEMS OF GENERALIZED CLASSICAL MECHANICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi; Shang Mei; Mei Feng-xiang

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the symmetries and the conserved quantities for systemsof generalized classical mechanics are studied. First, the generalizedNoether's theorem and the generalized Noether's inverse theorem of thesystems are given, which are based upon the invariant properties of thecanonical action with respect to the action of the infinitesimaltransformation of r-parameter finite group of transformation; second,the Lie symmetries and conserved quantities of the systems are studiedin accordance with the Lie's theory of the invariance of differentialequations under the transformation of infinitesimal groups; and finally,the inner connection between the two kinds of symmetries of systems isdiscussed.

  8. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  9. A fractional generalization of the classical lattice dynamics approach

    CERN Document Server

    Michelitsch, T M; Riascos, A P; Nowakowski, A F; Nicolleau, F C G A

    2016-01-01

    We develop physically admissible lattice models in the harmonic approximation which define by Hamilton's variational principle fractional Laplacian matrices of the forms of power law matrix functions on the n -dimensional periodic and infinite lattice in n=1,2,3,..n=1,2,3,.. dimensions. The present model which is based on Hamilton's variational principle is confined to conservative non-dissipative isolated systems. The present approach yields the discrete analogue of the continuous space fractional Laplacian kernel. As continuous fractional calculus generalizes differential operators such as the Laplacian to non-integer powers of Laplacian operators, the fractional lattice approach developed in this paper generalized difference operators such as second difference operators to their fractional (non-integer) powers. Whereas differential operators and difference operators constitute local operations, their fractional generalizations introduce nonlocal long-range features. This is true for discrete and continuous...

  10. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  11. On classical and quantum dynamics of tachyon-like fields and their cosmological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrijević, Dragoljub D., E-mail: ddrag@pmf.ni.ac.rs; Djordjević, Goran S., E-mail: ddrag@pmf.ni.ac.rs; Milošević, Milan, E-mail: ddrag@pmf.ni.ac.rs [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, University of Niš (Serbia); Vulcanov, Dumitru [Faculty of Physics, West University of Timisoara (Romania)

    2014-11-24

    We consider a class of tachyon-like potentials, motivated by string theory, D-brane dynamics and inflation theory in the context of classical and quantum mechanics. A formalism for describing dynamics of tachyon fields in spatially homogenous and one-dimensional - classical and quantum mechanical limit is proposed. A few models with concrete potentials are considered. Additionally, possibilities for p-adic and adelic generalization of these models are discussed. Classical actions and corresponding quantum propagators, in the Feynman path integral approach, are calculated in a form invariant on a change of the background number fields, i.e. on both archimedean and nonarchimedean spaces. Looking for a quantum origin of inflation, relevance of p-adic and adelic generalizations are briefly discussed.

  12. Analytical Solution of Nonlinear Problems in Classical Dynamics by Means of Lagrange-Ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Mahdavi, S. H; Rabbani, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a powerful analytical method, called Homotopy Analysis Methods (HAM) is coupled with Lagrange method to obtain the exact solution for nonlinear problems in classic dynamics. In this work, the governing equations are obtained by using Lagrange method, and then the nonlinear governing...

  13. Multibody system dynamics, robotics and control

    CERN Document Server

    Gerstmayr, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The volume contains 19 contributions by international experts in the field of multibody system dynamics, robotics and control. The book aims to bridge the gap between the modeling of mechanical systems by means of multibody dynamics formulations and robotics. In the classical approach, a multibody dynamics model contains a very high level of detail, however, the application of such models to robotics or control is usually limited. The papers aim to connect the different scientific communities in multibody dynamics, robotics and control. Main topics are flexible multibody systems, humanoid robots, elastic robots, nonlinear control, optimal path planning, and identification.

  14. Dynamical systems of algebraic origin

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    Although much of classical ergodic theory is concerned with single transformations and one-parameter flows, the subject inherits from statistical mechanics not only its name, but also an obligation to analyze spatially extended systems with multidimensional symmetry groups. However, the wealth of concrete and natural examples which has contributed so much to the appeal and development of classical dynamics, is noticeably absent in this more general theory. The purpose of this book is to help remedy this scarcity of explicit examples by introducing a class of continuous Zd-actions diverse enough to exhibit many of the new phenomena encountered in the transition from Z to Zd, but which nevertheless lends itself to systematic study: the Zd-actions by automorphisms of compact, abelian groups. One aspect of these actions, not surprising in itself but quite striking in its extent and depth nonetheless, is the connection with commutative algebra and arithmetical algebraic geometry. The algebraic framework resulting...

  15. Dynamic density functional theory for nucleation: Non-classical predictions of mesoscopic nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Lutsko, James F.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) for fluids and its dynamic extension (DDFT) provide an appealing mean-field framework for describing equilibrium and dynamics of complex soft matter systems. For a long time, homogeneous nucleation was considered to be outside the limits of applicability of DDFT. However, our recently developed mesoscopic nucleation theory (MeNT) based on fluctuating hydrodynamics, reconciles the inherent randomness of the nucleation process with the deterministic nature of DDFT. It turns out that in the weak-noise limit, the most likely path (MLP) for nucleation to occur is determined by the DDFT equations. We present computations of MLPs for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in colloidal suspensions. For homogeneous nucleation, the MLP obtained is in excellent agreement with the reduced order-parameter description of MeNT, which predicts a multistage nucleation pathway. For heterogeneous nucleation, the presence of impurities in the fluid affects the MLP, but remarkably, the overall qualitative picture of homogeneous nucleation persists. Finally, we highlight the use of DDFT as a simulation tool, which is especially appealing as there are no known applications of MeNT to heterogeneous nucleation. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 and from EPSRC via Grants No. EP/L020564 and EP/L025159.

  16. Nonautonomous dynamical systems in the life sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Pötzsche, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Nonautonomous dynamics describes the qualitative behavior of evolutionary differential and difference equations, whose right-hand side is explicitly time dependent. Over recent years, the theory of such systems has developed into a highly active field related to, yet recognizably distinct from that of classical autonomous dynamical systems. This development was motivated by problems of applied mathematics, in particular in the life sciences where genuinely nonautonomous systems abound. The purpose of this monograph is to indicate through selected, representative examples how often nonautonomous systems occur in the life sciences and to outline the new concepts and tools from the theory of nonautonomous dynamical systems that are now available for their investigation.

  17. Solar System Symphony: Combining astronomy with live classical music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kyle; WorldWide Telescope

    2017-01-01

    Solar System Symphony is an educational outreach show which combines astronomy visualizations and live classical music. As musicians perform excerpts from Holst’s “The Planets” and other orchestral works, visualizations developed using WorldWide Telescope and NASA images and animations are projected on-stage. Between each movement of music, a narrator guides the audience through scientific highlights of the solar system. The content of Solar System Symphony is geared toward a general audience, particularly targeting K-12 students. The hour-long show not only presents a new medium for exposing a broad audience to astronomy, but also provides universities an effective tool for facilitating interdisciplinary collaboration between two divergent fields. The show was premiered at Northwestern University in May 2016 in partnership with Northwestern’s Bienen School of Music and was recently performed at the Colburn Conservatory of Music in November 2016.

  18. Dynamical Systems Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gils, S; Hoveijn, I; Takens, F; Nonlinear Dynamical Systems and Chaos

    1996-01-01

    Symmetries in dynamical systems, "KAM theory and other perturbation theories", "Infinite dimensional systems", "Time series analysis" and "Numerical continuation and bifurcation analysis" were the main topics of the December 1995 Dynamical Systems Conference held in Groningen in honour of Johann Bernoulli. They now form the core of this work which seeks to present the state of the art in various branches of the theory of dynamical systems. A number of articles have a survey character whereas others deal with recent results in current research. It contains interesting material for all members of the dynamical systems community, ranging from geometric and analytic aspects from a mathematical point of view to applications in various sciences.

  19. Semiclassical approach to mesoscopic systems. Classical trajectory correlations and wave interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltner, Daniel [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-07-01

    This volume describes mesoscopic systems with classically chaotic dynamics using semiclassical methods which combine elements of classical dynamics and quantum interference effects. Experiments and numerical studies show that Random Matrix Theory (RMT) explains physical properties of these systems well. This was conjectured more than 25 years ago by Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit for the spectral properties. Since then, it has been a challenge to understand this connection analytically. The author offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. He extends previous semiclassical approaches that treated spectral and conductance properties. He shows that RMT results can in general only be obtained semiclassically when taking into account classical configurations not considered previously, for example those containing multiply traversed periodic orbits. Furthermore, semiclassics is capable of describing effects beyond RMT. In this context he studies the effect of a non-zero Ehrenfest time, which is the minimal time needed for an initially spatially localized wave packet to show interference. He derives its signature on several quantities characterizing mesoscopic systems, e. g. dc and ac conductance, dc conductance variance, n-pair correlation functions of scattering matrices and the gap in the density of states of Andreev billiards. (orig.)

  20. Quantum–classical correspondence in chaotic dynamics of laser-driven atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prants, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    This paper is a review article on some aspects of quantum–classical correspondence in chaotic dynamics of cold atoms interacting with a standing-wave laser field forming an optical lattice. The problem is treated from both (semi)classical and quantum points of view. In both approaches, the interaction of an atomic electic dipole with the laser field is treated quantum mechanically. Translational motion is described, at first, classically (atoms are considered to be point-like objects) and then quantum mechanically as a propagation of matter waves. Semiclassical equations of motion are shown to be chaotic in the sense of classical dynamical chaos. Point-like atoms in an absolutely deterministic and rigid optical lattice can move in a random-like manner demonstrating a chaotic walking with typical features of classical chaos. This behavior is explained by random-like ‘jumps’ of one of the atomic internal variable when atoms cross nodes of the standing wave and occurs in a specific range of the atom-field detuning. When treating atoms as matter waves, we show that they can make nonadiabatic transitions when crossing the standing-wave nodes. The point is that atomic wave packets split at each node in the same range of the atom-field detuning where the classical chaos occurs. The key point is that the squared amplitude of those semiclassical ‘jumps’ equal to the quantum Landau–Zener parameter which defines the probability of nonadiabatic transitions at the nodes. Nonadiabatic atomic wave packets are much more complicated compared to adiabatic ones and may be called chaotic in this sense. A few possible experiments to observe some manifestations of classical and quantum chaos with cold atoms in horizontal and vertical optical lattices are proposed and discussed.

  1. Effective model hierarchies for dynamic and static classical density functional theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majaniemi, S [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PO Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Provatas, N [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S-4L7 (Canada); Nonomura, M, E-mail: maj@fyslab.hut.f [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The origin and methodology of deriving effective model hierarchies are presented with applications to solidification of crystalline solids. In particular, it is discussed how the form of the equations of motion and the effective parameters on larger scales can be obtained from the more microscopic models. It will be shown that tying together the dynamic structure of the projection operator formalism with static classical density functional theories can lead to incomplete (mass) transport properties even though the linearized hydrodynamics on large scales is correctly reproduced. To facilitate a more natural way of binding together the dynamics of the macrovariables and classical density functional theory, a dynamic generalization of density functional theory based on the nonequilibrium generating functional is suggested.

  2. Using Neural Networks to improve classical Operating System Fingerprinting techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Sarraute, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    We present remote Operating System detection as an inference problem: given a set of observations (the target host responses to a set of tests), we want to infer the OS type which most probably generated these observations. Classical techniques used to perform this analysis present several limitations. To improve the analysis, we have developed tools using neural networks and Statistics tools. We present two working modules: one which uses DCE-RPC endpoints to distinguish Windows versions, and another which uses Nmap signatures to distinguish different version of Windows, Linux, Solaris, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and NetBSD systems. We explain the details of the topology and inner workings of the neural networks used, and the fine tuning of their parameters. Finally we show positive experimental results.

  3. Pulse-noise approach for classical spin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Garanin, D A

    2016-01-01

    For systems of classical spins interacting with the bath via damping and thermal noise, the approach is suggested to replace the white noise by a pulse noise acting at regular time intervals $\\Delta t$, within which the system evolves conservatively. The method is working well in the typical underdamped case $\\lambda\\ll1$ and allows a considerable speed-up of computations by using high-order numerical integrators with a large time step $\\delta t$ in most cases when spin precession is important, while keeping $\\delta t\\ll\\Delta t$ to reduce the relative contribution of noise-related operations. In cases when precession can be discarded, one can choose $\\delta t\\propto1/\\lambda$ that leads to a further speed-up, making equilibration speed comparable with that of Metropolis Monte Carlo. The pulse-noise approach is tested on single-spin and multi-spin models.

  4. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  5. Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ By the generalized variational principle of two kinds of variables in general mechanics, it was demonstrated that two Lagrangian classical relationships can be applied to both holonomic systems and nonholonomic systems. And the restriction that two Lagrangian classical relationships cannot be applied to nonholonomic systems for a long time was overcome. Then, one important formula of similar Lagrangian classical relationship called the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship was derived. From Vakonomic model, by two Lagrangian classical relationships and the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship, the result is the same with Chetaev's model, and thus Chetaev's model and Vakonomic model were unified. Simultaneously, the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic system was established. By some representative examples, it was validated that the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems is right.

  6. Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; LiFu

    2007-01-01

    By the generalized variational principle of two kinds of variables in general mechanics, it was demonstrated that two Lagrangian classical relationships can be applied to both holonomic systems and nonholonomic systems. And the restriction that two Lagrangian classical relationships cannot be applied to nonholonomic systems for a long time was overcome. Then, one important formula of similar Lagrangian classical relationship called the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship was derived. From Vakonomic model, by two Lagrangian classical relationships and the popularized Lagrangian classical relationship, the result is the same with Chetaev's model, and thus Chetaev's model and Vakonomic model were unified. Simultaneously, the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic system was established. By some representative examples, it was validated that the Lagrangian theoretical framework of dynamics of nonholonomic systems is right.  ……

  7. Relaxation of a Classical Spin Coupled to a Strongly Correlated Electron System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayad, Mohammad; Rausch, Roman; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    A classical spin which is antiferromagnetically coupled to a system of strongly correlated conduction electrons is shown to exhibit unconventional real-time dynamics which cannot be described by Gilbert damping. Depending on the strength of the local Coulomb interaction U , the two main electronic dissipation channels, namely transport of excitations via correlated hopping and via excitations of correlation-induced magnetic moments, become active on largely different time scales. We demonstrate that correlations can lead to a strongly suppressed relaxation which so far has been observed in purely electronic systems only and which is governed here by proximity to the divergent magnetic time scale in the infinite-U limit.

  8. Gauge fixing and classical dynamical r-matrices in (2+1)-gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfeld, Torsten

    2012-11-20

    We apply the Dirac gauge fixing procedure to the combinatorial description of the moduli space of flat ISO(2,1)-connections. This is motivated by two goals: one originates from physics while the other is of a mathematical nature. The first goal is to investigate the application of gauge fixing in Lorentzian (2+1)-gravity with vanishing cosmological constant, whose phase space is closely related to the moduli space of flat ISO(2,1)-connections. To this end, we first show that specifying gauge fixing conditions amounts to introducing an observer into the theory. Then we determine explicit expressions for the Dirac brackets of specific sets of gauge fixing conditions and give a physical interpretation of the results in terms of the geometry of spacetimes and their effective symmetries. To investigate the mathematical structures underlying the Dirac gauge fixing procedure we then consider general gauge fixing conditions. We first show that the resulting Dirac brackets are in one-to-one correspondence with solutions of the classical dynamical Yang-Baxter equation. We then analyze the relation between the Dirac brackets associated with two different sets of gauge fixing conditions. We find that this relation is given by the action of certain dynamical Poincare transformations which generalize the gauge transformations of classical dynamical r-matrices. Using these transformations, we give a classification of all resulting Dirac brackets and the associated solutions of the classical dynamical Yang-Baxter equation.

  9. Spin dynamics and relaxation in the classical-spin Kondo-impurity model beyond the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayad, Mohammad; Potthoff, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The real-time dynamics of a classical spin in an external magnetic field and local exchange coupled to an extended one-dimensional system of non-interacting conduction electrons is studied numerically. Retardation effects in the coupled electron-spin dynamics are shown to be the source for the relaxation of the spin in the magnetic field. Total energy and spin is conserved in the non-adiabatic process. Approaching the new local ground state is therefore accompanied by the emission of dispersive wave packets of excitations carrying energy and spin and propagating through the lattice with Fermi velocity. While the spin dynamics in the regime of strong exchange coupling J is rather complex and governed by an emergent new time scale, the motion of the spin for weak J is regular and qualitatively well described by the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. Quantitatively, however, the full quantum-classical hybrid dynamics differs from the LLG approach. This is understood as a breakdown of weak-coupling perturbation theory in J in the course of time. Furthermore, it is shown that the concept of the Gilbert damping parameter is ill-defined for the case of a one-dimensional system.

  10. Relation between the Classical Sciences and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, A.

    2012-04-01

    As is already known, in recent years, the use of satellite remote sensing and GIS is a deployable occupation. With their help, we offer the opportunity to acquire knowledge through spatial, temporal, spectral and radiometric resolutions of remote sensing systems and through analysis and incorporation of data Gis. The representation of facts and results of research on the topography and geomorphology sites of archaeological interest, visualization of them with the help of modern software, is growing. The application of innovative technological methods in classical sciences was and is certainly a challenge for scientists, especially when using them to produce results that lead to understanding the history of a place. So far the formulation of conclusions from the archaeologists was with traditional practices, through sources from the extant ancient texts and by archaeological excavations. In some cases lack of data, to find the exact position of the archaeological monument needs to take place science and technology of Geoinformatics methods and techniques that enable the management of various information from anthropogenic and natural geographic area below of a single digital environment. Since that archeology examines the evolution of historical events through the geography, geomorphology, time and culture, the results of archaeological research is rich in spatial information. The Gis is an experienced program to process these large volumes of data, particularly those referred to the geomorphology. Consequently the aim of the paper is to show us that through the help of software can visualize the archaeological monuments of the region through the geomorphologic background mainly. Having as a study area the prefecture of Arcadia owned in the Peloponnese/ Greece shows the direct relation of geomorphology with archeology through the Geographic Information Systems. Keywords: Gis, Classic science, history, geomorphology and archeology

  11. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  12. Citation classics: Top 50 cited articles in 'respiratory system'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Wilson W S; Wong, Eliza L Y; Wong, Faye C Y; Hui, David S C

    2013-01-01

    Identifying citation classics in the field is one of the key methodologies used to conduct a systematic evaluation of research performance. The objective of this study was to determine the most frequently cited articles published in journals that are placed under the 'respiratory system' subject category (Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Journal Citation Reports) and to compare them with the most frequently cited respiratory-related articles published in any journal, regardless of subject category. The authors utilized the ISI Journal Citation Reports: Science Edition 2010 database in April 2012 to determine the most frequently cited articles by respiratory system subject category and by respiratory-related keywords. The top 50 most-cited articles were identified in each category and evaluated according to various characteristics. The majority of these papers originated from the United States. The median numbers of citations for the top 50 cited articles stratified by respiratory system subject category and respiratory-related keywords were 841.5 and 2701, respectively. Half of the top 50 cited articles identified by respiratory-related keywords were published in general medical or basic science journals, whereas only three out of these were published in journals under the respiratory system subject category in ISI Journal Citation Reports. In summary, respiratory-related articles published in general medical or science journals attracted more citations than those published in the specific respiratory journals.

  13. First-principles and classical molecular dynamics study of threshold displacement energy in beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, P. V.; Borodin, V. A.

    2017-02-01

    Beryllium selected as a neutron multiplier material for the tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactor should withstand high doses of fast neutron irradiation. The damage produced by irradiation is usually evaluated assuming that the number of atomic displacements to the threshold displacement energy, Ed, which is considered as an intrinsic material parameter. In this work the value of Ed for hcp beryllium is estimated simultaneously from classical and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Quite similar quantitative pictures of defect production are observed in both simulation types, though the predicted displacement threshold values seem to be approximately two times higher in the first-principles approach. We expect that, after more detailed first-principles investigations, this approach can be used for scaling the damage prediction predictions by classical molecular dynamics, opening a way for more consistent calculations of displacement damage in materials.

  14. Protocol for classical molecular dynamics simulations of nano-junctions in solution

    KAUST Repository

    Gkionis, Konstantinos

    2012-10-19

    Modeling of nanoscale electronic devices in water requires the evaluation of the transport properties averaged over the possible configurations of the solvent. They can be obtained from classical molecular dynamics for water confined in the device. A series of classical molecular dynamics simulations is performed to establish a methodology for estimating the average number of water molecules N confined between two static and semi-infinite goldelectrodes. Variations in key parameters of the simulations, as well as simulations with non-static infinite goldsurfaces of constant area and with anisotropically fluctuating cell dimensions lead to less than 1% discrepancies in the calculated N. Our approach is then applied to a carbon nanotube placed between the goldelectrodes. The atomic density profile along the axis separating the slabs shows the typical pattern of confined liquids, irrespective of the presence of the nanotube, while parallel to the slabs the nanotube perturbs the obtained profile.

  15. Long-Term Dynamics and the Orbital Inclinations of the Classical Kuiper Belt Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchner, M J; Holman, M; Kuchner, Marc J.; Brown, Michael E.; Holman, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    We numerically integrated the orbits of 1458 particles in the region of the classical Kuiper Belt (41 AU < a < 47 AU) to explore the role of dynamical instabilities in sculpting the inclination distribution of the classical Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). We find that the selective removal of low-inclination objects by overlapping secular resonances (nu_17 and nu_18) acts to raise the mean inclination of the surviving population of particles over 4 billion years of interactions with Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, though these long-term dynamical effects do not themselves appear to explain the discovery of KBOs with inclinations near 30 degrees. Our integrations also imply that after 3 billion years of interaction with the massive planets, high inclination KBOs more efficiently supply Neptune-encountering objects, the likely progenitors of short-period comets, Centaurs, and scattered KBOs. The secular resonances at low inclinations may indirectly cause this effect by weeding out objects unprotected by ...

  16. Socio-Cultural Dynamics of Education in the Context of the Post-Non-Classical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ignatova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the interrelations between society, education and culture. Using the comparative analysis of classical approaches to defining the above spheres, the author comes to conclusion that the nature of socio-cultural processes can be explored and described most consistently by applying comprehensive models of the post-non-classical science and considering civilization, education and culture in the context of the unified dynamic flow of socio-cultural genesis. The research investigates the dialectics of socio-cultural processes in the light of systematic synergetic approach, the advancing role of education in socio-cultural dynamics being revealed and substantiated. The author emphasizes its inevitably rising priority due to sustained development of civilization bringing about the new environmentally-oriented meta-culture.The obtained results can be used in pedagogic research methodology, designing and modeling the educational process, its content, technology and organization. 

  17. Socio-Cultural Dynamics of Education in the Context of the Post-Non-Classical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ignatova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the interrelations between society, education and culture. Using the comparative analysis of classical approaches to defining the above spheres, the author comes to conclusion that the nature of socio-cultural processes can be explored and described most consistently by applying comprehensive models of the post-non-classical science and considering civilization, education and culture in the context of the unified dynamic flow of socio-cultural genesis. The research investigates the dialectics of socio-cultural processes in the light of systematic synergetic approach, the advancing role of education in socio-cultural dynamics being revealed and substantiated. The author emphasizes its inevitably rising priority due to sustained development of civilization bringing about the new environmentally-oriented meta-culture.The obtained results can be used in pedagogic research methodology, designing and modeling the educational process, its content, technology and organization. 

  18. ON THE UNIQUENESS THEOREMS FOR THE UNBOUNDED CLASSICAL SOLUTION OF THE MAGNETIC B NARD SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Changxing

    2000-01-01

    In this note we prove two theorems on the uniqueness of unbounded classical solutions of the magnetic Bénard system which includes the classical Navier-Stokes equation, the Boussinesq equation and the magnetohydrodynamic equation as special cases.

  19. Equilibrium properties of the reaction H2 ⇌ 2H by classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpa, Ragnhild; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2014-01-21

    We have developed a classical molecular dynamics model for the hydrogen dissociation reaction, containing two- and three-particle potentials derived by Kohen, Tully and Stillinger. Two fluid densities were investigated for a wide range of temperatures, and 11 fluid densities were considered for one temperature. We report the temperature range where the degree of reaction is significant, and also where a stable molecule dominates the population in the energy landscape. The three-particle potential, which is essential for the reaction model and seldom studied, together with the two-particle interaction lead to a large effective excluded volume diameter of the molecules in the molecular fluid. The three-particle interaction was also found to give a large positive contribution to the pressure of the reacting mixture at high density and/or low temperatures. From knowledge of the dissociation constant of the reaction and the fluid pressure, we estimated the standard enthalpy of the dissociation reaction to be 430 kJ mol(-1) (ρ = 0.0695 g cm(-3)) and 380 kJ mol(-1) (ρ = 0.0191 g cm(-3)). These values are in good agreement with the experimental vaule of 436 kJ mol(-1) under ambient pressure. The model is consistent with a Lennard-Jones model of the molecular fluid, and may facilitate studies of the impact of chemical reactions on transport systems.

  20. Stability of dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Xiaoxin; Yu, P 0

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of developing stability theory is to examine dynamic responses of a system to disturbances as the time approaches infinity. It has been and still is the object of intense investigations due to its intrinsic interest and its relevance to all practical systems in engineering, finance, natural science and social science. This monograph provides some state-of-the-art expositions of major advances in fundamental stability theories and methods for dynamic systems of ODE and DDE types and in limit cycle, normal form and Hopf bifurcation control of nonlinear dynamic systems.ʺ Presents

  1. Geometric approach to chaos in the classical dynamics of abelian lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Pettini, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Pettini, Marco

    1998-01-01

    A Riemannian geometrization of dynamics is used to study chaoticity in the classical Hamiltonian dynamics of a U(1) lattice gauge theory. This approach allows one to obtain analytical estimates of the largest Lyapunov exponent in terms of time averages of geometric quantities. These estimates are compared with the results of numerical simulations, and turn out to be very close to the values extrapolated for very large lattice sizes even when the geometric quantities are computed using small lattices. The scaling of the Lyapunov exponent with the energy density is found to be well described by a quadratic power law.

  2. Geometric approach to chaos in the classical dynamics of Abelian lattice gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti, Lapo [Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia (INFM), Unita di Ricerca del Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Gatto, Raoul [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Pettini, Marco [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, Florence (Italy)

    1999-04-23

    A Riemannian geometrization of dynamics is used to study chaoticity in the classical Hamiltonian dynamics of a U(1) lattice gauge theory. This approach allows one to obtain analytical estimates of the largest Lyapunov exponent in terms of time averages of geometric quantities. These estimates are compared with the results of numerical simulations, and turn out to be very close to the values extrapolated for very large lattice sizes even when the geometric quantities are computed using small lattices. The scaling of the Lyapunov exponent {lambda} with the energy density {epsilon} is found to be well described by the law {lambda}{proportional_to}{epsilon}{sup 2}. (author)

  3. SIMLA: Simulating particle dynamics in intense laser and other electromagnetic fields via classical and quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. G.; Harvey, C. N.

    2015-07-01

    We present the Fortran program SIMLA, which is designed for the study of charged particle dynamics in laser and other background fields. The dynamics can be determined classically via the Lorentz force and Landau-Lifshitz equations or, alternatively, via the simulation of photon emission events determined by strong-field quantum-electrodynamics amplitudes and implemented using Monte-Carlo routines. Multiple background fields can be included in the simulation and, where applicable, the propagation direction, field type (plane wave, focussed paraxial, constant crossed, or constant magnetic), and time envelope of each can be independently specified.

  4. Simulating Entanglement Dynamics of Singlet-Triplet Qubits Coupled to a Classical Transmission Line Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael; Kestner, Jason

    Electrons confined in lateral quantum dots are promising candidates for scalable quantum bits. Particularly, singlet-triplet qubits can entangle electrostatically and offer long coherence times due to their weak interactions with the environment. However, fast two-qubit operations are challenging. We examine the dynamics of singlet triplet qubits capacitively coupled to a classical transmission line resonator driven near resonance. We numerically simulate the dynamics of the von Neumann entanglement entropy and investigate parameters of the coupling element that optimizes the operation time for the qubit.

  5. A new dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking with classically scale invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Kitazawa, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new dynamics of the electroweak symmetry breaking in a classically scale invariant version of the standard model. The scale invariance is broken by the condensations of additional fermions under a strong coupling dynamics. The electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered by negative mass squared of the elementary Higgs doublet, which is dynamically generated through the bosonic seesaw mechanism. We introduce a real pseudo-scalar singlet field interacting with additional fermions and Higgs doublet in order to avoid massless Nambu-Goldstone bosons from the chiral symmetry breaking in a strong coupling sector. We investigate the mass spectra and decay rates of these pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, and show they can decay fast enough without cosmological problems. We further evaluate the energy dependences of the couplings between elementary fields perturbatively, and find that our model is the first one which realizes the flatland scenario with the dimensional transmutation by the strong coupling dynam...

  6. Dynamical systems on 2- and 3-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Grines, Viacheslav Z; Pochinka, Olga V

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the topological classification of smooth structurally stable diffeomorphisms on closed orientable 2- and 3-manifolds.The topological classification is one of the main problems of the theory of dynamical systems and the results presented in this book are mostly for dynamical systems satisfying Smale's Axiom A. The main results on the topological classification of discrete dynamical systems are widely scattered among many papers and surveys. This book presents these results fluidly, systematically, and for the first time in one publication. Additionally, this book discusses the recent results on the topological classification of Axiom A diffeomorphisms focusing on the nontrivial effects of the dynamical systems on 2- and 3-manifolds. The classical methods and approaches which are considered to be promising for the further research are also discussed. < The reader needs to be familiar with the basic concepts of the qualitative theory of dynamical systems which are present...

  7. Shadowing in dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pilyugin, Sergei Yu

    1999-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory of shadowing of approximate trajectories in dynamical systems by exact ones. This is the first book completely devoted to the theory of shadowing. It shows the importance of shadowing theory for both the qualitative theory of dynamical systems and the theory of numerical methods. Shadowing Methods allow us to estimate differences between exact and approximate solutions on infinite time intervals and to understand the influence of error terms. The book is intended for specialists in dynamical systems, for researchers and graduate students in the theory of numerical methods.

  8. The convergence problem for dissipative autonomous systems classical methods and recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Haraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The book investigates classical and more recent methods of study for the asymptotic behavior of dissipative continuous dynamical systems with applications to ordinary and partial differential equations, the main question being convergence (or not) of the solutions to an equilibrium. After reviewing the basic concepts of topological dynamics and the definition of gradient-like systems on a metric space, the authors present a comprehensive exposition of stability theory relying on the so-called linearization method. For the convergence problem itself, when the set of equilibria is infinite, the only general results that do not require very special features of the non-linearities are presently consequences of a gradient inequality discovered by S. Lojasiewicz. The application of this inequality jointly with the so-called Liapunov-Schmidt reduction requires a rigorous exposition of Semi-Fredholm operator theory and the theory of real analytic maps on infinite dimensional Banach spaces, which cannot be found anywh...

  9. Classical-quantum correspondence in bosonic two-mode conversion systems: Polynomial algebras and Kummer shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graefe, Eva-Maria; Korsch, Hans Jürgen; Rush, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Bosonic quantum conversion systems can be modeled by many-particle single-mode Hamiltonians describing a conversion of m molecules of type A into n molecules of type B and vice versa. These Hamiltonians are analyzed in terms of generators of a polynomially deformed su(2) algebra. In the mean-field limit of large particle numbers, these systems become classical and their Hamiltonian dynamics can again be described by polynomial deformations of a Lie algebra, where quantum commutators are replaced by Poisson brackets. The Casimir operator restricts the motion to Kummer shapes, deformed Bloch spheres with cusp singularities depending on m and n . It is demonstrated that the many-particle eigenvalues can be recovered from the mean-field dynamics using a WKB-type quantization condition. The many-particle state densities can be semiclassically approximated by the time periods of periodic orbits, which show characteristic steps and singularities related to the fixed points, whose bifurcation properties are analyzed.

  10. Fractional Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Edelman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the results of the preliminary investigation of fractional dynamical systems based on the results of numerical simulations of fractional maps. Fractional maps are equivalent to fractional differential equations describing systems experiencing periodic kicks. Their properties depend on the value of two parameters: the non-linearity parameter, which arises from the corresponding regular dynamical systems; and the memory parameter which is the order of the fractional derivative in the corresponding non-linear fractional differential equations. The examples of the fractional Standard and Logistic maps demonstrate that phase space of non-linear fractional dynamical systems may contain periodic sinks, attracting slow diverging trajectories, attracting accelerator mode trajectories, chaotic attractors, and cascade of bifurcations type trajectories whose properties are different from properties of attractors in regular dynamical systems. The author argues that discovered properties s...

  11. ON PERIODIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU WENLIAN; CHEN TIANPING

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigate the existence and the global stability of periodic solution for dynamical systems with periodic interconnections, inputs and self-inhibitions. The model is very general, the conditions are quite weak and the results obtained are universal.

  12. Dynamic information theory and information description of dynamic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we develop dynamic statistical information theory established by the author. Starting from the ideas that the state variable evolution equations of stochastic dynamic systems, classical and quantum nonequilibrium statistical physical systems and special electromagnetic field systems can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equations and the definitions of dynamic information and dynamic entropy, we derive the evolution equations of dynamic information and dynamic entropy that describe the evolution laws of dynamic information. These four kinds of evolution equations are of the same mathematical type. They show in unison when information transmits in coordinate space outside the systems that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes, and that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. When space noise can be neglected, an information wave will appear. If we only consider the information change inside the systems, dynamic information evolution equations reduce to information equations corresponding to the dynamic equations which describe evolution laws of the above dynamic systems. This reveals that the evolution laws of respective dynamic systems can be described by information equations in a unified fashion. Hence, the evolution processes of these dynamic systems can be abstracted as the evolution processes of information. Furthermore, we present the formulas for information flow, information dissipation rate, and entropy production rate. We prove that the information production probably emerges in a dynamic system with internal attractive interaction between the elements, and derive a formula for this information

  13. Dynamic control of the space tethered system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashin, A. A.; Smirnov, N. N.; Bryukvina, O. Yu.; Dyakov, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the problem of simultaneous dynamical stabilization and suppression of transverse and longitudinal vibrations of the space tethered system deployed along a certain trajectory. The dynamics of the system is described by a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for the longitudinal and transverse waves and we consider a non-classical version of the problem with one moving boundary. We formulate a mathematical model and perform the analytic and numerical analysis of the boundary control problem based on the Lyapunov method. A scheme of the deployment mechanism is suggested. It includes a control torque and transverse displacement of the boundary and ensures stable deployment of the whole system.

  14. Dynamic performance management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An integrated, efficient and effective performance management system, "dynamic performance management system", is presented, which covers the entire performance management process including measures design, analysis, and dynamic update. The analysis of performance measures using causal loop diagrams, qualitative inference and analytic network process is mainly discussed. A real world case study is carried out throughout the paper to explain how the framework works. A software tool for DPMS, Performance Analyzer, is also introduced.

  15. Reductions in finite-dimensional integrable systems and special points of classical r-matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2016-12-01

    For a given 𝔤 ⊗ 𝔤-valued non-skew-symmetric non-dynamical classical r-matrices r(u, v) with spectral parameters, we construct the general form of 𝔤-valued Lax matrices of finite-dimensional integrable systems satisfying linear r-matrix algebra. We show that the reduction in the corresponding finite-dimensional integrable systems is connected with "the special points" of the classical r-matrices in which they become degenerated. We also propose a systematic way of the construction of additional integrals of the Lax-integrable systems associated with the symmetries of the corresponding r-matrices. We consider examples of the Lax matrices and integrable systems that are obtained in the framework of the general scheme. Among them there are such physically important systems as generalized Gaudin systems in an external magnetic field, ultimate integrable generalization of Toda-type chains (including "modified" or "deformed" Toda chains), generalized integrable Jaynes-Cummings-Dicke models, integrable boson models generalizing Bose-Hubbard dimer models, etc.

  16. From Quantum To Classical Dynamics: A Landau Continuous Phase Transition With Spontaneous Superposition Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, V; Predojevic, M; Krmar, M; Pankovic, Vladan; Hubsch, Tristan; Predojevic, Milan; Krmar, Miodrag

    2004-01-01

    Developing an earlier proposal (Ne'eman, Damnjanovic, etc), we show herein that there is a Landau continuous phase transition from the exact quantum dynamics to the effectively classical one, occurring via spontaneous superposition breaking (effective hiding), as a special case of the corresponding general formalism (Bernstein). Critical values of the order parameters for this transition are determined by Heisenberg's indeterminacy relations, change continuously, and are in excellent agreement with the recent and remarkable experiments with Bose condensation. It is also shown that such a phase transition can sucessfully model self-collapse (self-decoherence), as an effective classical phenomenon, on the measurement device. This then induces a relative collapse (relative decoherence) as an effective quantum phenomenon on the measured quantum object by measurement. We demonstrate this (including the case of Bose-Einstein condensation) in the well-known cases of the Stern-Gerlach spin measurement, Bell's inequal...

  17. Mixed quantum-classical dynamics using collective electronic variables: A better alternative to electronic friction theories

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G

    2016-01-01

    An accurate description of nonadiabatic dynamics of molecular species on metallic surfaces poses a serious computational challenge associated with a multitude of closely-spaced electronic states. We propose a mixed quantum-classical scheme that addresses this challenge by introducing collective electronic variables. These variables are defined through analytic block-diagonalization applied to the time-dependent Hamiltonian matrix governing the electronic dynamics. We compare our scheme with the Ehrenfest approach and with a full-memory electronic friction model on a one-dimensional "adatom + atomic chain" model. Our simulations demonstrate that collective-mode dynamics with only few (2-3) electronic variables is robust and can describe a variety of situations: from a chemisorbed atom on an insulator to an atom on a metallic surface. Our molecular model also reveals that the friction approach is prone to unpredictable and catastrophic failures.

  18. A new dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking with classically scale invariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Haba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new dynamics of the electroweak symmetry breaking in a classically scale invariant version of the standard model. The scale invariance is broken by the condensations of additional fermions under a strong coupling dynamics. The electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered by negative mass squared of the elementary Higgs doublet, which is dynamically generated through the bosonic seesaw mechanism. We introduce a real pseudo-scalar singlet field interacting with additional fermions and Higgs doublet in order to avoid massless Nambu–Goldstone bosons from the chiral symmetry breaking in a strong coupling sector. We investigate the mass spectra and decay rates of these pseudo-Nambu–Goldstone bosons, and show they can decay fast enough without cosmological problems. We further show that our model can make the electroweak vacuum stable.

  19. Scaling of the dynamics of a homogeneous one-dimensional anisotropic classical Heisenberg model with long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, C. R.; Rocha Filho, T. M.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of quasistationary states of long-range interacting systems with N particles can be described by kinetic equations such as the Balescu-Lenard and Landau equations. In the case of one-dimensional homogeneous systems, two-body contributions vanish as two-body collisions in one dimension only exchange momentum and thus cannot change the one-particle distribution. Using a Kac factor in the interparticle potential implies a scaling of the dynamics proportional to Nδ with δ =1 except for one-dimensional homogeneous systems. For the latter different values for δ were reported for a few models. Recently it was shown by Rocha Filho and collaborators [Phys. Rev. E 90, 032133 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.032133 for the Hamiltonian mean-field model that δ =2 provided that N is sufficiently large, while small N effects lead to δ ≈1.7 . More recently, Gupta and Mukamel [J. Stat. Mech. (2011) P03015, 10.1088/1742-5468/2011/03/P03015] introduced a classical spin model with an anisotropic interaction with a scaling in the dynamics proportional to N1.7 for a homogeneous state. We show here that this model reduces to a one-dimensional Hamiltonian system and that the scaling of the dynamics approaches N2 with increasing N . We also explain from theoretical consideration why usual kinetic theory fails for small N values, which ultimately is the origin of noninteger exponents in the scaling.

  20. On Relations between One-Dimensional Quantum and Two-Dimensional Classical Spin Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hutchinson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We exploit mappings between quantum and classical systems in order to obtain a class of two-dimensional classical systems characterised by long-range interactions and with critical properties equivalent to those of the class of one-dimensional quantum systems treated by the authors in a previous publication. In particular, we use three approaches: the Trotter-Suzuki mapping, the method of coherent states, and a calculation based on commuting the quantum Hamiltonian with the transfer matrix of a classical system. This enables us to establish universality of certain critical phenomena by extension from the results in the companion paper for the classical systems identified.

  1. Understanding the Mechanism of Human P450 CYP1A2 Using Coupled Quantum-Classical Simulations in a Dynamical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, E W; Bennion, B; Gygi, F; Lightstone, F

    2006-02-10

    The reaction mechanism of the human P450 CYP1A2 enzyme plays a fundamental role in understanding the effects of environmental carcinogens and mutagens on humans. Despite extensive experimental research on this enzyme system, key questions regarding its catalytic cycle and oxygen activation mechanism remain unanswered. In order to elucidate the reaction mechanism in human P450, new computational methods are needed to accurately represent this system. To enable us to perform computational simulations of unprecedented accuracy on these systems, we developed a dynamic quantum-classical (QM/MM) hybrid method, in which ab initio molecular dynamics are coupled with classical molecular mechanics. This will provide the accuracy needed to address such a complex, large biological system in a fully dynamic environment. We also present detailed calculations of the P450 active site, including the relative charge transfer between iron porphine and tetraphenyl porphyrin.

  2. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Maw

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A mathematical model to understand, predict, control, or even design a real biological system is a central theme in systems biology. A dynamic biological system is always modeled as a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE system. How to simulate the dynamic behavior and dynamic parameter sensitivities of systems described by ODEs efficiently and accurately is a critical job. In many practical applications, e.g., the fed-batch fermentation systems, the system admissible input (corresponding to independent variables of the system can be time-dependent. The main difficulty for investigating the dynamic log gains of these systems is the infinite dimension due to the time-dependent input. The classical dynamic sensitivity analysis does not take into account this case for the dynamic log gains. Results We present an algorithm with an adaptive step size control that can be used for computing the solution and dynamic sensitivities of an autonomous ODE system simultaneously. Although our algorithm is one of the decouple direct methods in computing dynamic sensitivities of an ODE system, the step size determined by model equations can be used on the computations of the time profile and dynamic sensitivities with moderate accuracy even when sensitivity equations are more stiff than model equations. To show this algorithm can perform the dynamic sensitivity analysis on very stiff ODE systems with moderate accuracy, it is implemented and applied to two sets of chemical reactions: pyrolysis of ethane and oxidation of formaldehyde. The accuracy of this algorithm is demonstrated by comparing the dynamic parameter sensitivities obtained from this new algorithm and from the direct method with Rosenbrock stiff integrator based on the indirect method. The same dynamic sensitivity analysis was performed on an ethanol fed-batch fermentation system with a time-varying feed rate to evaluate the applicability of the algorithm to realistic

  3. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  4. Wavepacket dynamics in energy space, RMT and Quantum-Classical correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D; Kottos, T; Cohen, Doron; Izrailev, Felix M.; Kottos, Tsampikos

    1999-01-01

    We apply random-matrix-theory (RMT) to the analysis of evolution of wavepackets in energy space. We study the crossover from ballistic behavior to saturation, the possibility of having an intermediate diffusive behavior, and the feasibility of strong localization effect. Both theoretical considerations and numerical results are presented. Using quantal-classical correspondence (QCC) considerations we question the validity of the emerging dynamical picture. In particular we claim that the appearance of the intermediate diffusive behavior is possibly an artifact of the RMT strategy.

  5. Wave packet dynamics in energy space, random matrix theory, and the quantum-classical correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen; Izrailev; Kottos

    2000-03-06

    We apply random-matrix-theory (RMT) to the analysis of evolution of wave packets in energy space. We study the crossover from ballistic behavior to saturation, the possibility of having an intermediate diffusive behavior, and the feasibility of strong localization effect. Both theoretical considerations and numerical results are presented. Using quantal-classical correspondence considerations we question the validity of the emerging dynamical picture. In particular, we claim that the appearance of the intermediate diffusive behavior is possibly an artifact of the RMT strategy.

  6. Classical Order Parameter Dynamics and the Decay of a Metastable Vacuum State

    CERN Document Server

    Szép, Z

    2000-01-01

    Transition of the ground state of a classical $\\Phi^4$ theory in 2+1 dimensions is studied from a metastable state into the stable equilibrium. The transition occurs in the broken $Z_2$ symmetry phase and is triggered by a vanishingly small amplitude homogeneous external field $h$. A phenomenological theory is proposed in form of an effective equation of the quantitatively accounts for the decay of the false vacuum. The large amplitude transition of the order parameter between the two minima displays characteristics reflecting dynamical aspects of the Maxwell construction.

  7. Dynamic Systems Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Dan ŞANDOR

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available System Dynamics was introduced by Jay W. Forrester in the 1960s. Since then the methodology was adopted in many areas of natural or social sciences. This article tries to present briefly how this methodology works, both as Systems Thinking and as Modelling with Vensim computer software.

  8. Non-Kolmogorovian Approach to the Context-Dependent Systems Breaking the Classical Probability Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Yamato, Ichiro

    2013-07-01

    There exist several phenomena breaking the classical probability laws. The systems related to such phenomena are context-dependent, so that they are adaptive to other systems. In this paper, we present a new mathematical formalism to compute the joint probability distribution for two event-systems by using concepts of the adaptive dynamics and quantum information theory, e.g., quantum channels and liftings. In physics the basic example of the context-dependent phenomena is the famous double-slit experiment. Recently similar examples have been found in biological and psychological sciences. Our approach is an extension of traditional quantum probability theory, and it is general enough to describe aforementioned contextual phenomena outside of quantum physics.

  9. Semipredictable dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with p possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of N layers involving p0, p1, …, pN - 1 dynamical states each, where the pk ∈ N , k ∈ [ 0 , N - 1 ] are divisors of p. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of p this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that N CA working on symbols p0, p1, …, pN - 1 can be composed to create a graded CA rule with N different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop M12(S3, 2).

  10. Dynamic system classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Pumpe, Daniel; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of DSC to oscillation processes with a time dependent frequency {\\omega}(t) and damping factor {\\gamma}(t). Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The {\\omega} and {\\gamma} timelines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiment...

  11. Dynamic system classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω (t ) and damping factor γ (t ) . Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  12. Effects of Atomic Coherence and Injected Classical Field on Chaotic Dynamics of Non-degenerate Cascade Two-Photon Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the cascade two-photon laser dynamic equation derived with the technique of quantum Langevin operators with the considerations of coherently prepared three-level atoms and the classical field injected into the cavity, we numerically study the effects of atomic coherence and classical field on the chaotic dynamics of a two-photon laser. Lyapunov exponent and bifurcation diagram calculations show that the Lorenz chaos and hyperchaos can be induced or inhibited by the atomic coherence and the classical field via crisis or Hopf bifurcations.

  13. Complexity in Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cristopher David

    The study of chaos has shown us that deterministic systems can have a kind of unpredictability, based on a limited knowledge of their initial conditions; after a finite time, the motion appears essentially random. This observation has inspired a general interest in the subject of unpredictability, and more generally, complexity; how can we characterize how "complex" a dynamical system is?. In this thesis, we attempt to answer this question with a paradigm of complexity that comes from computer science, we extract sets of symbol sequences, or languages, from a dynamical system using standard methods of symbolic dynamics; we then ask what kinds of grammars or automata are needed a generate these languages. This places them in the Chomsky heirarchy, which in turn tells us something about how subtle and complex the dynamical system's behavior is. This gives us insight into the question of unpredictability, since these automata can also be thought of as computers attempting to predict the system. In the culmination of the thesis, we find a class of smooth, two-dimensional maps which are equivalent to the highest class in the Chomsky heirarchy, the turning machine; they are capable of universal computation. Therefore, these systems possess a kind of unpredictability qualitatively different from the usual "chaos": even if the initial conditions are known exactly, questions about the system's long-term dynamics are undecidable. No algorithm exists to answer them. Although this kind of unpredictability has been discussed in the context of distributed, many-degree-of -freedom systems (for instance, cellular automata) we believe this is the first example of such phenomena in a smooth, finite-degree-of-freedom system.

  14. Quantum statistics and classical mechanics: real time correlation functions from ring polymer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Ian R; Manolopoulos, David E

    2004-08-22

    We propose an approximate method for calculating Kubo-transformed real-time correlation functions involving position-dependent operators, based on path integral (Parrinello-Rahman) molecular dynamics. The method gives the exact quantum mechanical correlation function at time zero, exactly satisfies the quantum mechanical detailed balance condition, and for correlation functions of the form C(Ax)(t) and C(xB)(t) it gives the exact result for a harmonic potential. It also works reasonably well at short times for more general potentials and correlation functions, as we illustrate with some example calculations. The method provides a consistent improvement over purely classical molecular dynamics that is most apparent in the low-temperature regime.

  15. Interplay of classical and quantum dynamics in a thermal ensemble of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Laskar, Arif Warsi; Mukherjee, Arunabh; Ghosh, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    In a thermal ensemble of atoms driven by coherent fields, how does evolution of quantum superposition compete with classical dynamics of optical pumping and atomic diffusion? Is it optical pumping that first prepares a thermal ensemble, with coherent superposition developing subsequently or is it the other way round: coherently superposed atoms driven to steady state via optical pumping? Using a stroboscopic probing technique, here we experimentally explore these questions. A 100 ns pulse is used to probe an experimentally simulated, closed three-level, lambda-like configuration in rubidium atoms, driven by strong coherent control and incoherent fields. Temporal evolution of probe transmission shows an initial overshoot with turn-on of control, resulting in a scenario akin to lasing without inversion (LWI). The corresponding rise time is dictated by coherent dynamics, with a distinct experimental signature of half-cycle Rabi flop in a thermal ensemble of atoms. Our results indicate that, in fact, optical pump...

  16. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  17. On classical solutions of the relativistic Vlasov-Klein-Gordon system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kunzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a collisionless ensemble of classical particles coupled with a Klein-Gordon field. For the resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations, the relativistic Vlasov-Klein-Gordon system, we prove local-in-time existence of classical solutions and a continuation criterion which says that a solution can blow up only if the particle momenta become large. We also show that classical solutions are global in time in the one-dimensional case.

  18. Semi-Classical Quantization of the Many-Anyon System

    OpenAIRE

    Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the problem of N anyons in harmonic well, and derive the semi-classical spectrum as an exactly solvable limit of the many-anyon Hamiltonian. The relevance of our result to the solution of the anyon-gas model is discussed.

  19. Semi-Classical Quantization of the Many-Anyon System

    CERN Document Server

    Illuminati, F

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the problem of N anyons in harmonic well, and derive the semi-classical spectrum as an exactly solvable limit of the many-anyon Hamiltonian. The relevance of our result to the solution of the anyon-gas model is discussed.

  20. Complexified dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Carl M [Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Holm, Darryl D [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hook, Daniel W [Blackest Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-10

    Many dynamical systems, such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model and the Euler equations for the free rotation of a rigid body, are PT symmetric. The standard and well-known real solutions to such dynamical systems constitute an infinitessimal subclass of the full set of complex solutions. This paper examines a subset of the complex solutions that contains the real solutions, namely those having PT symmetry. The condition of PT symmetry selects out complex solutions that are periodic. (fast track communication)

  1. System dynamics with interaction discontinuity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2015-01-01

    This book describes system dynamics with discontinuity caused by system interactions and presents the theory of flow singularity and switchability at the boundary in discontinuous dynamical systems. Based on such a theory, the authors address dynamics and motion mechanism of engineering discontinuous systems due to interaction. Stability and bifurcations of fixed points in nonlinear discrete dynamical systems are presented, and mapping dynamics are developed for analytical predictions of periodic motions in engineering discontinuous dynamical systems. Ultimately, the book provides an alternative way to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems.

  2. Could a Mobile-Assisted Learning System Support Flipped Classrooms for Classical Chinese Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the researcher aimed to develop a mobile-assisted learning system and to investigate whether it could promote teenage learners' classical Chinese learning through the flipped classroom approach. The researcher first proposed the structure of the Cross-device Mobile-Assisted Classical Chinese (CMACC) system according to the pilot…

  3. On the statistical description of classical open systems with integer variables by the Lindblad equation

    CERN Document Server

    Vol, E D

    2011-01-01

    We propose the consistent statistical approach to consider a wide class of classical open systems whose states are specified by a set of positive integers(occupation numbers).Such systems are often encountered in physics, chemistry, ecology, economics and other sciences.Our statistical method based on ideas of quantum theory of open systems takes into account both discreteness of the system variables and their time fluctuations - two effects which are ignored in usual mean field dynamical approach.The method let one to calculate the distribution function and (or)all moments of the system of interest at any instant.As descriptive examples illustrating the effectiveness of the method we consider some simple models:one relating to nonlinear mechanics,and others taken from population biology .In all this examples the results obtained by the method for large occupation numbers coincide with results of purely dynamical approach but for small numbers interesting differences and new effects arise.The possible observa...

  4. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Domcke, Wolfgang; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    The Landau-Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn-Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent.

  5. Entropy of Fuzzy Partitions and Entropy of Fuzzy Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Markechová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we define three kinds of entropy of a fuzzy dynamical system using different entropies of fuzzy partitions. It is shown that different definitions of the entropy of fuzzy partitions lead to different notions of entropies of fuzzy dynamical systems. The relationships between these entropies are studied and connections with the classical case are mentioned as well. Finally, an analogy of the Kolmogorov–Sinai Theorem on generators is proved for fuzzy dynamical systems.

  6. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  7. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical oil-water systems such as droplets display lifelike properties and may lend themselves to chemical programming to perform useful work, specifically with respect to the built environment. We present Butschli water-in-oil droplets as a model for further investigation into the development...... of a technology with living properties. Otto Butschli first described the system in 1898, when he used alkaline water droplets in olive oil to initiate a saponification reaction. This simple recipe produced structures that moved and exhibited characteristics that resembled, at least superficially, the amoeba. We...... temporal and spatial order in the system with the potential for chemical programmability. The authors propose that the discrete formation of dynamic droplets, characterized by their lifelike behavior patterns, during a variable window of time (from 30 s to 30 min after the addition of alkaline water...

  8. Quantum and quasi-classical collisional dynamics of O2-Ar at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Inga S.; Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2016-06-01

    A hypersonic vehicle traveling at a high speed disrupts the distribution of internal states in the ambient flow and introduces a nonequilibrium distribution in the post-shock conditions. We investigate the vibrational relaxation in diatom-atom collisions in the range of temperatures between 1000 and 10 000 K by comparing results of extensive fully quantum-mechanical and quasi-classical simulations with available experimental data. The present paper simulates the interaction of molecular oxygen with argon as the first step in developing the aerothermodynamics models based on first principles. We devise a routine to standardize such calculations also for other scattering systems. Our results demonstrate very good agreement of vibrational relaxation time, derived from quantum-mechanical calculations with the experimental measurements conducted in shock tube facilities. At the same time, the quasi-classical simulations fail to accurately predict rates of vibrationally inelastic transitions at temperatures lower than 3000 K. This observation and the computational cost of adopted methods suggest that the next generation of high fidelity thermochemical models should be a combination of quantum and quasi-classical approaches.

  9. Multistability in dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R V

    1999-01-01

    In neuroscience, optics and condensed matter there is ample physical evidence for multistable dynamical systems, that is, systems with a large number of attractors. The known mathematical mechanisms that lead to multiple attractors are homoclinic tangencies and stabilization, by small perturbations or by coupling, of systems possessing a large number of unstable invariant sets. A short review of the existent results is presented, as well as two new results concerning the existence of a large number of stable periodic orbits in a perturbed marginally stable dissipative map and an infinite number of such orbits in two coupled quadratic maps working on the Feigenbaum accumulation point.

  10. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  11. Getting excited: Challenges in quantum-classical studies of excitons in polymeric systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bagheri, Behnaz; Karttunen, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    A combination of classical molecular dynamics (MM/MD) and quantum chemical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) was performed to describe conformational properties of diphenylethyne (DPE), methylated-DPE and poly para phenylene ethynylene (PPE). DFT calculations were employed to improve and develop force field parameters for MM/MD simulations. Many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation were utilized to describe excited states of the systems. Reliability of the excitation energies based on the MM/MD conformations was examined and compared to the excitation energies from DFT conformations. The results show an overall agreement between the optical excitations based on MM/MD conformations and DFT conformations. This allows for calculation of excitation energies based on MM/MD conformations.

  12. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Andrey K; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The Landau--Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs the recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Four different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn--Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs; and nearly constant ...

  13. A general solution for classical sequential growth dynamics of Causal Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Varadarajan, M; Rideout, David; Varadarajan, Madhavan

    2006-01-01

    A classical precursor to a full quantum dynamics for causal sets has been forumlated in terms of a stochastic sequential growth process in which the elements of the causal set arise in a sort of accretion process. The transition probabilities of the Markov growth process satisfy certain physical requirements of causality and general covariance, and the generic solution with all transition probabilities non-zero has been found. Here we remove the assumption of non-zero probabilities, define a reasonable extension of the physical requirements to cover the case of vanishing probabilities, and find the completely general solution to these physical conditions. The resulting family of growth processes has an interesting structure reminiscent of an ``infinite tower of turtles'' cosmology.

  14. Regular and chaotic classical dynamics in the U(5)-SU(3) quantum phase transition of the IBM

    CERN Document Server

    Macek, M

    2012-01-01

    We study the classical dynamics in a generic first-order quantum phase transition between the U(5) and SU(3) limits of the interacting boson model. The dynamics is chaotic, of H\\'enon-Heiles type, in the spherical phase and is regular, yet sensitive to local degeneracies, in the deformed phase. Both types of dynamics persist in the coexistence region resulting in a divided phase space.

  15. Classical Stückelberg interferometry of a nanomechanical two-mode system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitner, Maximilian J.; Ribeiro, Hugo; Kölbl, Johannes; Faust, Thomas; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2016-12-01

    Stückelberg interferometry is a phenomenon that has been well established for quantum-mechanical two-level systems. Here, we present classical two-mode interference of a nanomechanical two-mode system, realizing a classical analog of Stückelberg interferometry. Our experiment relies on the coherent energy exchange between two strongly coupled, high-quality factor nanomechanical resonator modes. Furthermore, we discuss an exact theoretical solution for the double-passage Stückelberg problem by expanding the established finite-time Landau-Zener single-passage solution. For the parameter regime explored in the experiment, we find that the Stückelberg return probability in the classical version of the problem formally coincides with the quantum case, which reveals the analogy of the return probabilities in the quantum-mechanical and the classical version of the problem. This result qualifies classical two-mode systems at large to simulate quantum-mechanical interferometry.

  16. Stationary dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Furstenberg, Hillel

    2009-01-01

    Following works of Furstenberg and Nevo and Zimmer we present an outline of a theory of stationary (or m-stationary) dynamical systems for a general acting group G equipped with a probability measure m. Our purpose is two-fold: First to suggest a more abstract line of development, including a simple structure theory. Second, to point out some interesting applications; one of these is a Szemeredi type theorem for SL(2,R).

  17. Blow-up Mechanism of Classical Solutions to Quasilinear Hyperbolic Systems in the Critical Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the blow-up phenomenon, particularly, the geometric blow-up mechanism, of classical solutions to the Cauchy problem for quasilinear hyperbolic systems in the critical case. We prove that it is still the envelope of the same family of characteristics which yields the blowup of classical solutions to the Cauchy problem in the critical case.

  18. A Method for Choosing an Initial Time Eigenstate in Classical and Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Noemí Jiménez-García

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A subject of interest in classical and quantum mechanics is the development of the appropriate treatment of the time variable. In this paper we introduce a method of choosing the initial time eigensurface and how this method can be used to generate time-energy coordinates and, consequently, time-energy representations for classical and quantum systems.

  19. Dynamical systems theory for music dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Boon, J P

    1994-01-01

    Abstract:We show that, when music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, the concepts and tools of dynamical systems theory can be applied to the analysis of {\\it temporal dynamics} in music. (i) Phase space portraits are constructed from the time series wherefrom the dimensionality is evaluated as a measure of the {\\pit global} dynamics of each piece. (ii) Spectral analysis of the time series yields power spectra (\\sim f^{-\

  20. Non-classical large deviations for a noisy system with non-isolated attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Touchette, Hugo

    2012-05-01

    We study the large deviations of a simple noise-perturbed dynamical system having continuous sets of steady states, which mimic those found in some partial differential equations related, for example, to turbulence problems. The system is a two-dimensional nonlinear Langevin equation involving a dissipative, non-potential force, which has the essential effect of creating a line of stable fixed points (attracting line) touching a line of unstable fixed points (repelling line). Using different analytical and numerical techniques, we show that the stationary distribution of this system satisfies, in the low-noise limit, a large deviation principle containing two competing terms: (i) a 'classical' but sub-dominant large deviation term, which can be derived from the Freidlin-Wentzell theory of large deviations by studying the fluctuation paths or instantons of the system near the attracting line, and (ii) a dominant large deviation term, which does not follow from the Freidlin-Wentzell theory, as it is related to fluctuation paths of zero action, referred to as sub-instantons, emanating from the repelling line. We discuss the nature of these sub-instantons, and show how they arise from the connection between the attracting and repelling lines. We also discuss in a more general way how we expect these to arise in more general stochastic systems having connected sets of stable and unstable fixed points, and how they should determine the large deviation properties of these systems.

  1. Abstraction of Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Wisniewski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To enable formal verification of a dynamical system, given by a set of differential equations, it is abstracted by a finite state model. This allows for application of methods for model checking. Consequently, it opens the possibility of carrying out the verification of reachability and timing requirements, which by classical control methods is impossible. We put forward a method for abstracting dynamical systems, where level sets of Lyapunov functions are used to generate the partitioning of the state space. We propose to partition the state space using an entire family of functions. The properties of these functions ensure that the discrete model captures the behaviors of a dynamical system by generating appropriate equivalence classes of the states. These equivalence classes make up the partition of the state space.

  2. Abstraction of Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    requirements, which by classical control methods is impossible. We put forward a method for abstracting dynamical systems, where level sets of Lyapunov functions are used to generate the partitioning of the state space. We propose to partition the state space using an entire family of functions. The properties......To enable formal verification of a dynamical system, given by a set of differential equations, it is abstracted by a finite state model. This allows for application of methods for model checking. Consequently, it opens the possibility of carrying out the verification of reachability and timing...... of these functions ensure that the discrete model captures the behaviors of a dynamical system by generating appropriate equivalence classes of the states. These equivalence classes make up the partition of the state space....

  3. Attractivity and bifurcation for nonautonomous dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Although, bifurcation theory of equations with autonomous and periodic time dependence is a major object of research in the study of dynamical systems since decades, the notion of a nonautonomous bifurcation is not yet established. In this book, two different approaches are developed which are based on special definitions of local attractivity and repulsivity. It is shown that these notions lead to nonautonomous Morse decompositions, which are useful to describe the global asymptotic behavior of systems on compact phase spaces. Furthermore, methods from the qualitative theory for linear and nonlinear systems are derived, and nonautonomous counterparts of the classical one-dimensional autonomous bifurcation patterns are developed.

  4. Quantum-Classical correspondence in nonlinear multidimensional systems: enhanced di usion through soliton wave-particles

    KAUST Repository

    Brambila, Danilo

    2012-05-01

    Quantum chaos has emerged in the half of the last century with the notorious problem of scattering of heavy nuclei. Since then, theoreticians have developed powerful techniques to approach disordered quantum systems. In the late 70\\'s, Casati and Chirikov initiated a new field of research by studying the quantum counterpart of classical problems that are known to exhibit chaos. Among the several quantum-classical chaotic systems studied, the kicked rotor stimulated a lot of enthusiasm in the scientific community due to its equivalence to the Anderson tight binding model. This equivalence allows one to map the random Anderson model into a set of fully deterministic equations, making the theoretical analysis of Anderson localization considerably simpler. In the one-dimensional linear regime, it is known that Anderson localization always prevents the diffusion of the momentum. On the other hand, for higher dimensions it was demonstrated that for certain conditions of the disorder parameter, Anderson localized modes can be inhibited, allowing then a phase transition from localized (insulating) to delocalized (metallic) states. In this thesis we will numerically and theoretically investigate the properties of a multidimensional quantum kicked rotor in a nonlinear medium. The presence of nonlinearity is particularly interesting as it raises the possibility of having soliton waves as eigenfunctions of the systems. We keep the generality of our approach by using an adjustable diffusive nonlinearity, which can describe several physical phenomena. By means of Variational Calculus we develop a chaotic map which fully describes the soliton dynamics. The analysis of such a map shows a rich physical scenario that evidences the wave-particle behavior of a soliton. Through the nonlinearity, we trace a correspondence between quantum and classical mechanics, which has no equivalent in linearized systems. Matter waves experiments provide an ideal environment for studying Anderson

  5. Chaotic dynamics of controlled electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. N.; Trosko, I. U.

    2016-12-01

    The conditions for appearance of chaotic dynamics of electromagnetic and electromechanical processes in energy systems described by the Park-Gorev bilinear differential equations with account for lags of coordinates and restrictions on control have been formulated. On the basis of classical equations, the parameters of synchronous generators and power lines, at which the chaotic dynamics of energy systems appears, have been found. The qualitative and quantitative characteristics of chaotic processes in energy associations of two types, based on the Hopf theorem, and methods of nonstationary linearization and decompositions are given. The properties of spectral characteristics of chaotic processes have been investigated, and the qualitative similarity of bilinear equations of power systems and Lorentz equations have been found. These results can be used for modernization of the systems of control of energy objects. The qualitative and quantitative characteristics for power energy systems as objects of control and for some laws of control with the feedback have been established.

  6. Near periodicity in dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文成

    1995-01-01

    The notion of near periodicity is shown to be equivalent to that of weak near periodicity in dynamical systems. A sufficient condition for the positive near periodicity of a point in dynamical systems is given. The structure of nearly periodic dynamical systems is discussed, and a condition is proved to be necessary and sufficient for a dynamical system on a local compact space to be positively nearly periodic.

  7. Modern Numerical Methods for Classical Sampled System Analysis-SAMSAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAMSAN aids control-system analyst by providing self-consistent set of computer algorithms that support large-order control-system design and evaluation studies, with emphasis placed on sampled system analysis. Program provides set of algorithms readily integrated for solving control-system problems.

  8. Numerical Methods for Classical Sampled-System Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, H. P.; Bauer, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    SAMSAN provides control-system analyst with self-consistent computer algorithms that support large-order control-system design and evaluation studies. Emphasizes sampled-system analysis. SAMSAN reduces burden on analyst by providing set of algorithms well tested and documented and readily integrated for solving control-system problems.

  9. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Dynamical Observables, Quantization and the Time of Arrival Correspondence Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Galapon, E A

    2001-01-01

    We raise the problem of constructing quantum observables that have classical counterparts without quantization. Specifically we seek to define and motivate a solution to the quantum-classical correspondence problem independent from quantization and discuss the general insufficiency of prescriptive quantization, particularly the Weyl quantization. We demonstrate our points by constructing time of arrival operators without quantization and from these recover their classical counterparts.

  10. A new approach to the classical and quantum dynamics of branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavšič, Matej

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that the Dirac-Nambu-Goto brane can be described as a point particle in an infinite-dimensional brane space with a particular metric. This suggests a generalization to brane spaces with arbitrary metric, including the “flat” metric. Then quantization of such a system is straightforward: it is just like quantization of a bunch of noninteracting particles. This leads us to a system of a continuous set of scalar fields. For a particular choice of the metric in the space of fields we find that the classical Dirac-Nambu-Goto brane theory arises as an effective theory of such an underlying quantum field theory. Quantization of branes is important for the brane world scenarios, and thus for “quantum gravity.”

  11. Non-adiabatic holonomy operators in classical and quantum completely integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Giachetta, G; Sardanashvily, G

    2002-01-01

    Given a completely integrable system, we associate to any connection on its invariant tori fibred over a parameter manifold the classical and quantum holonomy operator (generalized Berry's phase factor), without any adiabatic approximation.

  12. Asymmetric 6-vertex model and classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider system of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Liashyk, A; Zabrodin, A; Zotov, A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the correspondence between models solved by Bethe ansatz and classical integrable systems of Calogero type. We illustrate the correspondence by the simplest example of the inhomogeneous asymmetric 6-vertex model parametrized by trigonometric (hyperbolic) functions.

  13. Integrability of dynamical systems algebra and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to systematically state the fundamental theory of integrability and its development of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on the Darboux theory of integrability and local integrability together with their applications. It summarizes the classical results of Darboux integrability and its modern development together with their related Darboux polynomials and their applications in the reduction of Liouville and elementary integrabilty and in the center—focus problem, the weakened Hilbert 16th problem on algebraic limit cycles and the global dynamical analysis of some realistic models in fields such as physics, mechanics and biology. Although it can be used as a textbook for graduate students in dynamical systems, it is intended as supplementary reading for graduate students from mathematics, physics, mechanics and engineering in courses related to the qualitative theory, bifurcation theory and the theory of integrability of dynamical systems.

  14. Comparative merits of the memory function and dynamic local field correction of the classical one-component plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mithen, James P; Gregori, G

    2011-01-01

    The complementarity of the liquid and plasma descriptions of the classical one-component plasma (OCP) is explored by studying wavevector and frequency dependent dynamical quantities: the dynamical structure factor (DSF), and the dynamic local field correction (LFC). Accurate Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to validate/test models of the DSF and LFC. Our simulations, which span the entire fluid regime ($\\Gamma = 0.1 - 175$), show that the DSF is very well represented by a simple and well known memory function model of generalized hydrodynamics. On the other hand, the LFC, which we have computed using MD for the first time, is not well described by existing models.

  15. Dynamics of stochastic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Klyatskin, Valery I

    2005-01-01

    Fluctuating parameters appear in a variety of physical systems and phenomena. They typically come either as random forces/sources, or advecting velocities, or media (material) parameters, like refraction index, conductivity, diffusivity, etc. The well known example of Brownian particle suspended in fluid and subjected to random molecular bombardment laid the foundation for modern stochastic calculus and statistical physics. Other important examples include turbulent transport and diffusion of particle-tracers (pollutants), or continuous densities (''''oil slicks''''), wave propagation and scattering in randomly inhomogeneous media, for instance light or sound propagating in the turbulent atmosphere.Such models naturally render to statistical description, where the input parameters and solutions are expressed by random processes and fields.The fundamental problem of stochastic dynamics is to identify the essential characteristics of system (its state and evolution), and relate those to the input parameters of ...

  16. Cosmological dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, Genly

    2014-01-01

    In this book are studied, from the perspective of the dynamical systems, several Universe models. In chapter 1 we give a bird's eye view on cosmology and cosmological problems. Chapter 2 is devoted to a brief review on some results and useful tools from the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. They provide the theoretical basis for the qualitative study of concrete cosmological models. Chapters 1 and 2 are a review of well-known results. Chapters 3, 4, 5 and 6 are devoted to our main results. In these chapters are extended and settled in a substantially different, more strict mathematical language, several results obtained by one of us in arXiv:0812.1013 [gr-qc]; arXiv:1009.0689 [gr-qc]; arXiv:0904.1577[gr-qc]; and arXiv:0909.3571 [hep-th]. In chapter 6, we provide a different approach to the subject discussed in astro-ph/0503478. Additionally, we perform a Poincar\\'e compactification process allowing to construct a global phase space containing all the cosmological information in both finite and infinite...

  17. Unified treatment of coherent and incoherent electronic energy transfer dynamics using classical electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimanyi, Eric N; Silbey, Robert J

    2010-10-14

    Recent experiments on resonance energy transfer (RET) in photosynthetic systems have found evidence of quantum coherence between the donor and the acceptor. Under these conditions, Förster's theory of RET is no longer applicable and no theory of coherent RET advanced to date rivals the intuitive simplicity of Förster's theory. Here, we develop a framework for understanding RET that is based on classical electrodynamics but still captures the essence of the quantum coherence between the molecules. Our theory requires only a knowledge of the complex polarizabilities of the two molecules participating in the transfer as well as the distance between them. We compare our results to quantum mechanical calculations and show that the results agree quantitatively.

  18. A Comprehensive Study of Hydrogen Adsorbing to Amorphous Water ice: Defining Adsorption in Classical Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, John L.; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-11-01

    Gas-grain and gas-phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas-grain reactions require a substrate (e.g., a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas-grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking probabilities and coefficients. Here, using our new definition of a sticking event, we report sticking probabilities and sticking coefficients for nine different incident kinetic energies of hydrogen atoms [5-400 K] across seven different temperatures of dust grains [10-70 K]. We find that probabilities and coefficients vary both as a function of grain temperature and incident kinetic energy over the range of 0.99-0.22.

  19. Determination of thermal properties pure ThO2 using classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Partha S.; Kaur, Karamvir; Ali, K.; Arya, A.; Dey, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper calculates lattice thermal expansion (LTE), thermal conductivity (TC) and melting temperature (MT) of ThO2 using classical molecular dynamic simulations. In this study we consider two set of interatomic potential consisting of Coulomb-Buckingham (Buck) and Coulomb-Buckingham-Morse-Many body (BMM) potential form. The MD calculated LTE of 10.29 × 10-6 and 10.61 × 10-6 K-1 using BMM and Buck potential, respectively, is slightly higher than the experimentally determined values (9.54 - 9.86 × 10-6 K-1). The MD calculated TC values in the high temperature range (600 to 1200 K) accords very well with the experimental measurements and at the low temperature range (300-500 K) our results are slightly different from experimental results as our presumption that the dominant mechanism for phonon scattering is the Umklapp process. The MD calculated MT of ThO2 using Buck and BMM potential model is 3662.5±12.5 K and 3812.5±12.5 K, respectively, and these values are in reasonable agreement with previous experimental values.

  20. Nucleation of hcp and fcc phases in bcc iron under uniform compression: classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B T; Shao, J L; Zhang, G C; Li, W D; Zhang, P

    2010-11-03

    By classical molecular dynamics simulations employing an embedded atom method potential, we have simulated the bcc to hcp/fcc structural transition in single-crystal iron under uniform compression. Results showed that the transition pressure is different from uniaxial compression and shock loading. The transformation occurs on a picosecond timescale and the transition time decreases along with the increase of pressure. The nucleation and growth of the hcp and fcc phases under constant pressure and temperature are analyzed in detail. The nucleation planes, all belonging to the {110}(bcc) family and parallel to the three compression directions [100], [010], and [001], have been observed. About 20% bcc atoms have transformed to fcc phase under pressure just over the critical point, and under higher pressure the fraction of the fcc phase increases steadily to exceed that of the hcp phase. We have investigated the transition mechanism of iron from initial bcc to hcp/fcc and found that the transition mainly consists of compression, rotation, and shuffle.

  1. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  2. Duality in Dynamic Fuzzy Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    This paper shows the resolvent equation, the maximum principle and the co-balayage theorem for a dynamic fuzzy system. We define a dual system for the dynamic fuzzy system, and gives a duality for Snell's optimal stopping problem by the dual system.

  3. Symmetry of Hamiltonian and conserved quantity for a system of generalized classical mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on a new symmetry of Hamiltonian and its conserved quantity for a system of generalized classical mechanics. The differential equations of motion of the system are established. The definition and the criterion of the symmetry of Hamiltonian of the system are given. A conserved quantity directly derived from the symmetry of Hamiltonian of the generalized classical mechanical system is given. Since a Hamilton system is a special case of the generalized classical mechanics, the results above are equally applicable to the Hamilton system. The results of the paper are the generalization of a theorem known for the existing nonsingular equivalent Lagrangian. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the application of the results.

  4. Solar system dynamics in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the literature has advocated using the Earth-Moon-planetoid Lagrangian points as observables, in order to test general relativity and effective field theories of gravity in the solar system. However, since the three-body problem of classical celestial mechanics is just an approximation of a much more complicated setting, where all celestial bodies in the solar system are subject to their mutual gravitational interactions, while solar radiation pressure and other sources of nongravitational perturbations also affect the dynamics, it is conceptually desirable to improve the current understanding of solar system dynamics in general relativity, as a first step towards a more accurate theoretical study of orbital motion in the weak-gravity regime. For this purpose, starting from the Einstein equations in the de Donder-Lanczos gauge, this paper arrives first at the Levi-Civita Lagrangian for the geodesic motion of celestial bodies, showing in detail under which conditions the effects of internal stru...

  5. Classical Conditioning with Pulsed Integrated Neural Networks: Circuits and System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we investigate on-chip learning for pulsed, integrated neural networks. We discuss the implementational problems the technology imposes on learning systems and we find that abiologically inspired approach using simple circuit structures is most likely to bring success. We develop...... a suitable learning algorithm -- a continuous-time version of a temporal differential Hebbian learning algorithm for pulsed neural systems with non-linear synapses -- as well as circuits for the electronic implementation. Measurements from an experimental CMOS chip are presented. Finally, we use our test...

  6. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  7. SAMSAN- MODERN NUMERICAL METHODS FOR CLASSICAL SAMPLED SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    SAMSAN was developed to aid the control system analyst by providing a self consistent set of computer algorithms that support large order control system design and evaluation studies, with an emphasis placed on sampled system analysis. Control system analysts have access to a vast array of published algorithms to solve an equally large spectrum of controls related computational problems. The analyst usually spends considerable time and effort bringing these published algorithms to an integrated operational status and often finds them less general than desired. SAMSAN reduces the burden on the analyst by providing a set of algorithms that have been well tested and documented, and that can be readily integrated for solving control system problems. Algorithm selection for SAMSAN has been biased toward numerical accuracy for large order systems with computational speed and portability being considered important but not paramount. In addition to containing relevant subroutines from EISPAK for eigen-analysis and from LINPAK for the solution of linear systems and related problems, SAMSAN contains the following not so generally available capabilities: 1) Reduction of a real non-symmetric matrix to block diagonal form via a real similarity transformation matrix which is well conditioned with respect to inversion, 2) Solution of the generalized eigenvalue problem with balancing and grading, 3) Computation of all zeros of the determinant of a matrix of polynomials, 4) Matrix exponentiation and the evaluation of integrals involving the matrix exponential, with option to first block diagonalize, 5) Root locus and frequency response for single variable transfer functions in the S, Z, and W domains, 6) Several methods of computing zeros for linear systems, and 7) The ability to generate documentation "on demand". All matrix operations in the SAMSAN algorithms assume non-symmetric matrices with real double precision elements. There is no fixed size limit on any matrix in any

  8. Modified Boussinesq System with Variable Coefficients: Classical Lie Approach and Exact Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUPTA R.K.; SINGH K.

    2009-01-01

    The Lie-group formalism is applied to investigate the symmetries of the modified Boussinesq system with variable coefficients. We derived the infinitesimals and the admissible forms of the coefficients that admit the classical symmetry group. The reduced systems of ordinary differential equations deduced from the optimal system of subalgebras are further studied and some exact solutions are obtained.

  9. A new type of adiabatic invariants for nonconservative systems of generalized classical mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi

    2006-01-01

    The perturbations to symmetries and adiabatic invariants for nonconservative systems of generalized classical mechanics are studied. The exact invariant in the form of Hojman from a particular Lie symmetry for an undisturbed system of generalized mechanics is given. Based on the concept of high-order adiabatic invariant in generalized mechanics, the perturbation to Lie symmetry for the system under the action of small disturbance is investigated, and a new adiabatic invariant for the nonconservative system of generalized classical mechanics is obtained, which can be called the Hojman adiabatic invariant. An example is also given to illustrate the application of the results.

  10. Field theory and weak Euler-Lagrange equation for classical particle-field systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Burby, Joshua W; Davidson, Ronald C

    2014-10-01

    It is commonly believed as a fundamental principle that energy-momentum conservation of a physical system is the result of space-time symmetry. However, for classical particle-field systems, e.g., charged particles interacting through self-consistent electromagnetic or electrostatic fields, such a connection has only been cautiously suggested. It has not been formally established. The difficulty is due to the fact that the dynamics of particles and the electromagnetic fields reside on different manifolds. We show how to overcome this difficulty and establish the connection by generalizing the Euler-Lagrange equation, the central component of a field theory, to a so-called weak form. The weak Euler-Lagrange equation induces a new type of flux, called the weak Euler-Lagrange current, which enters conservation laws. Using field theory together with the weak Euler-Lagrange equation developed here, energy-momentum conservation laws that are difficult to find otherwise can be systematically derived from the underlying space-time symmetry.

  11. Particle on a torus knot: Constrained dynamics and semi-classical quantization in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Praloy; Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2016-11-01

    Kinematics and dynamics of a particle moving on a torus knot poses an interesting problem as a constrained system. In the first part of the paper we have derived the modified symplectic structure or Dirac brackets of the above model in Dirac's Hamiltonian framework, both in toroidal and Cartesian coordinate systems. This algebra has been used to study the dynamics, in particular small fluctuations in motion around a specific torus. The spatial symmetries of the system have also been studied. In the second part of the paper we have considered the quantum theory of a charge moving in a torus knot in the presence of a uniform magnetic field along the axis of the torus in a semiclassical quantization framework. We exploit the Einstein-Brillouin-Keller (EBK) scheme of quantization that is appropriate for multidimensional systems. Embedding of the knot on a specific torus is inherently two dimensional that gives rise to two quantization conditions. This shows that although the system, after imposing the knot condition reduces to a one dimensional system, even then it has manifested non-planar features which shows up again in the study of fractional angular momentum. Finally we compare the results obtained from EBK (multi-dimensional) and Bohr-Sommerfeld (single dimensional) schemes. The energy levels and fractional spin depend on the torus knot parameters that specifies its non-planar features. Interestingly, we show that there can be non-planar corrections to the planar anyon-like fractional spin.

  12. The dynamics of the H(+) + D(2) reaction: a comparison of quantum mechanical wavepacket, quasi-classical and statistical-quasi-classical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J; Bulut, N; Smith, Sean C; Balint-Kurti, G G; Hankel, M

    2010-02-01

    A detailed study of the proton exchange reaction H(+) + D(2)(v = 0, j = 0) --> HD + D(+) on its ground 1(1)A' potential energy surface has been carried out using 'exact' close-coupled quantum mechanical wavepacket (WP-EQM), quasi-classical trajectory (QCT), and statistical quasi-classical trajectory (SQCT) calculations for a range of collision energies starting from the reaction threshold to 1.3 eV. The WP-EQM calculations include all total angular momenta up to J(max) = 50, and therefore the various dynamical observables are converged up to 0.6 eV. It has been found that it is necessary to include all Coriolis couplings to obtain reliable converged results. Reaction probabilities obtained using the different methods are thoroughly compared as a function of the total energy for a series of J values. Comparisons are also made of total reaction cross sections as function of the collision energy, and rate constants. In addition, opacity functions, integral cross sections (ICS) and differential cross sections (DCS) are presented at 102 meV, 201.3 meV and 524.6 meV collision energy. The agreement between the three sets of results is only qualitative. The QCT calculations fail to describe the overall reactivity and most of the dynamical observables correctly. At low collision energies, the QCT method is plagued by the lack of conservation of zero point energy, whilst at higher collision energies and/or total angular momenta, the appearance of an effective repulsive potential associated with the centrifugal motion "over" the well causes a substantial decrease of the reactivity. In turn, the statistical models overestimate the reactivity over the whole range of collision energies as compared with the WP-EQM method. Specifically, at sufficiently high collision energies the reaction cannot be deemed to be statistical and important dynamical effects seem to be present. In general the WP-EQM results lie in between those obtained using the QCT and SQCT methods. One of the main

  13. PREFACE: IARD 2012: 8th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Land, Martin C.; Gill, Tepper; Lusanna, Luca; Salucci, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored, from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view, since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical relativistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Lindner et al [Physical Review Letters 95 0040401 (2005)] as well as the more recent proposal of Palacios et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)] and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg [Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)] could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular

  14. Net charge changes in the calculation of relative ligand-binding free energies via classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Maria M; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-30

    The calculation of binding free energies of charged species to a target molecule is a frequently encountered problem in molecular dynamics studies of (bio-)chemical thermodynamics. Many important endogenous receptor-binding molecules, enzyme substrates, or drug molecules have a nonzero net charge. Absolute binding free energies, as well as binding free energies relative to another molecule with a different net charge will be affected by artifacts due to the used effective electrostatic interaction function and associated parameters (e.g., size of the computational box). In the present study, charging contributions to binding free energies of small oligoatomic ions to a series of model host cavities functionalized with different chemical groups are calculated with classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Electrostatic interactions are treated using a lattice-summation scheme or a cutoff-truncation scheme with Barker-Watts reaction-field correction, and the simulations are conducted in boxes of different edge lengths. It is illustrated that the charging free energies of the guest molecules in water and in the host strongly depend on the applied methodology and that neglect of correction terms for the artifacts introduced by the finite size of the simulated system and the use of an effective electrostatic interaction function considerably impairs the thermodynamic interpretation of guest-host interactions. Application of correction terms for the various artifacts yields consistent results for the charging contribution to binding free energies and is thus a prerequisite for the valid interpretation or prediction of experimental data via molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis and correction of electrostatic artifacts according to the scheme proposed in the present study should therefore be considered an integral part of careful free-energy calculation studies if changes in the net charge are involved.

  15. Collective dynamics of multicellular systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Maithreye; C Suguna; Somdatta Sinha

    2011-11-01

    We have studied the collective behaviour of a one-dimensional ring of cells for conditions when the individual uncoupled cells show stable, bistable and oscillatory dynamics. We show that the global dynamics of this model multicellular system depends on the system size, coupling strength and the intrinsic dynamics of the cells. The intrinsic variability in dynamics of the constituent cells are suppressed to stable dynamics, or modified to intermittency under different conditions. This simple model study reveals that cell–cell communication, system size and intrinsic cellular dynamics can lead to evolution of collective dynamics in structured multicellular biological systems that is significantly different from its constituent single-cell behaviour.

  16. Chaos for Discrete Dynamical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove that a dynamical system is chaotic in the sense of Martelli and Wiggins, when it is a transitive distributively chaotic in a sequence. Then, we give a sufficient condition for the dynamical system to be chaotic in the strong sense of Li-Yorke. We also prove that a dynamical system is distributively chaotic in a sequence, when it is chaotic in the strong sense of Li-Yorke.

  17. Experimental proposal for testing the Emergence of Environment Induced (EIN) Classical Selection rules with Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Durt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    According to the so-called Quantum Darwinist approach, the emergence of "classical islands" from a quantum background is assumed to obey a (selection) principle of maximal information. We illustrate this idea by considering the coupling of two oscillators (modes). As our approach suggests that the classical limit could have emerged throughout a long and progressive Evolution mechanism, it is likely that primitive living organisms behave in a "more quantum", "less classical" way than more evolved ones. This brings us to seriously consider the possibility to measure departures from classicality exhibited by biological systems. We describe an experimental proposal the aimed at revealing the presence of entanglement in the biophotonic radiation emitted by biological sources.

  18. Generation of a Tunable Environment for the Simulation of Excitonic Transport in Classical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    León-Montiel, R de J; Torres, Juan P

    2014-01-01

    The simulation and modeling of open systems has become an invaluable tool for understanding several processes that take place in physical, chemical and biological systems. An example of paramount importance is photosynthesis, a biological process that involves the transport of energy with a remarkable high efficiency to a reaction center. Recently, it has been shown that classical oscillator systems can be used to model the transport and coherence properties of molecular aggregates, in particular those of light-harvesting complexes. Even though the simulation of coherent evolution of classical oscillator systems can be easily implemented, the question on how to experimentally introduce and control dephasing effects due to a surrounding environment remains open. Here, we put forward a setup that provides an unique tool to generate a tunable environment for classical electrical oscillators. We illustrate the operation of the setup by considering the case of a damped random frequency harmonic oscillator. To demo...

  19. Stabilization and relative phase effects in a dichromatically driven diatomic Morse molecule: interpretation based on nonlinear classical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantoudis, Vassilios; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A

    2005-02-22

    The dissociation dynamics of a dichromatically laser-driven diatomic Morse molecule vibrating in the ground state is investigated by applying tools of the nonlinear theory of classical Hamiltonian systems. Emphasis is placed on the role of the relative phase of the two fields, phi. First, it is found that, just like in quantum mechanics, there is dependence of the dissociation probability on phi. Then, it is demonstrated that addition of the second laser leads to suppression of probability (stabilization), when the intensity of the first laser is kept constant just above or below the single laser dissociation threshold. This "chemical bond hardening" diminishes as phi increases. These effects are investigated and interpreted in terms of modifications in phase space topology. Variations of phi as well as of the intensity of the second laser may cause (i) appearance/disappearance of the stability island corresponding to the common resonance with the lowest energy and (ii) deformation and movement of the region of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser tori that survive from the undriven system. The latter is the main origin in phase space of stabilization and phi dependence. Finally, it is shown that the use of short laser pulses enhances both effects.

  20. A Chemical and Dynamical Link Between Red Centaur Objects and the Cold Classical Kuiper Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Romanishin, William; Consolmagno, Guy

    2015-11-01

    We present new B-V, V-R, and B-R colors for 32 Centaurs objects using the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) near Happy Jack, AZ and the 1.8-meter Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham, AZ. Combining these new colors with our previously reported colors, we now have optical broad-band colors for 58 Centaur objects.Application of the non-parametric Dip Test to our previous sample of only 26 objects showed Centaurs split into gray and red groups at the 99.5% confidence level, and application of the Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test to the same sample showed that red Centaurs have a higher median albedo than gray Centaurs at the 99% confidence level (Tegler et al., 2008, Solar System Beyond Neptune, U Arizona Press, pp. 105-114).Here we report application of the Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test to our sample of 58 Centaurs. We confirm red Centaurs have a higher median albedo than gray Centaurs at the 99.7% level. In addition, we find that red Centaurs have a lower median inclination angle than gray Centaurs at the 99.5% confidence level. Because of their red colors and lower inclination angles, we suggest red Centaurs originate in the cold classical Kuiper belt. We thank the NASA Solar System Observations Program for its support.

  1. Investigating the quartz (1010)/water interface using classical and ab initio molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, A A; Wesolowski, D J; Cummings, P T

    2011-07-19

    Two different terminations of the (1010) surface of quartz (α and β) interacting with water are simulated by classical (CMD) (using two different force fields) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and compared with previously published X-ray reflectivity (XR) experiments. Radial distribution functions between hydroxyl and water show good agreement between AIMD and CMD using the ClayFF force field for both terminations. The Lopes et al. (Lopes, P. E. M.; Murashov, V.; Tazi, M.; Demchuk, E.; MacKerell, A. D. J. Phys. Chem. B2006, 110, 2782-2792) force field (LFF), however, underestimates the extent of hydroxyl-water hydrogen bonding. The β termination is found to contain hydroxyl-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds; the quartz surface hydroxyl hydrogens and oxygens that hydrogen bond with each other exhibit greatly reduced hydrogen bonding to water. Conversely, the hydroxyl hydrogen and oxygens that are not hydrogen bonded to other surface hydroxyls but are connected to those that are show a considerable amount of hydrogen bonding to water. The electron density distribution of an annealed surface of quartz (1010) obtained by XR is in qualitative agreement with electron densities calculated by CMD and AIMD. In all simulation methods, the interfacial water peak appears farther from the surface than observed by XR. Agreement among AIMD, LFF, and XR is observed for the relaxation of the near-surface atoms; however, ClayFF shows a larger discrepancy. Overall, results show that for both terminations of (1010), LFF treats the near-surface structure more accurately whereas ClayFF treats the interfacial water structure more accurately. It is shown that the number of hydroxyl and water hydrogen bonds to the bridging Si-O-Si oxygens connecting the surface silica groups to the rest of the crystal is much greater for the α than the β termination. It is suggested that this may play a role in the greater resistance to dissolution of the β termination than that of the α termination.

  2. Landscape Construction in Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Yuan, Ruoshi; Wang, Gaowei; Ao, Ping

    The idea of landscape has been recently applied to study various of biological problems. We demonstrate that a dynamical structure built into nonlinear dynamical systems allows us to construct such a global optimization landscape, which serves as the Lyapunov function for the ordinary differential equation. We find exact constructions on the landscape for a class of dynamical systems, including a van der Pol type oscillator, competitive Lotka-Volterra systems, and a chaotic system. The landscape constructed provides a new angle for understanding and modelling biological network dynamics.

  3. On Hilbert dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Glasner, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Returning to a classical question in Harmonic Analysis we strengthen an old result of Walter Rudin. We show that there exists a weakly almost periodic function on the group of integers Z which is not in the norm-closure of the algebra B(Z) of Fourier-Stieltjes transforms of measures on the circle, the dual group of Z, and which is recurrent. We also show that there is a Polish monothetic group which is reflexively but not Hilbert representable.

  4. Advances in Galactic Dynamics: Classical Physics in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinski, John

    2007-04-01

    During the past 2 decades, there have been tremendous advances in computational power and algorithmic efficiency in the numerical N-body problem. Despite the vast scale of the universe, the original Newtonian equations of motion along with the inverse-square law of gravity still provide an adequate physical framework for studying many of the complexities of the dynamic universe. The relativistic limit in the macroscopic universe is only reached on the extreme scales of the entire observable universe and the event horizons of black holes. Here I will review some of the recent advances in parallel computational algorithms for application to the collisionless N-body problem with the main applications to the problem of the dynamics of galaxies and cosmological structure formation. The cosmological paradigm of cold dark matter with a cosmological constant is now so well-constrained that in principle detailed predictions of the dynamical behavior of galaxies can be tested against observation. I will describe two recent studies that use realistic, self-consistent N-body models of disk galaxies to study the effects of two cosmological predictions: dark matter halo triaxiality and substructure. The reaction of a stellar disk to these dark matter characteristics leads to triggering of the bar instability at random times in a given galaxy's life history and so can help explain the observed fraction and incidence of bars in the spiral galaxy population. I will also present some recent work on high-resolution computer animation of galactic dynamics that originated as a way to illustrate and develop intuition about dynamical processes but has since developed into a means of artistic expression through the beauty of complex gravitating systems.

  5. Classical integrability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  6. Classical R-matrix theory of dispersionless systems: I. (1+1)-dimension theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaszak, Maciej; Szablikowski, Blazej M [Institute of Physics, A Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2002-12-06

    A systematic way of construction of (1+1)-dimensional dispersionless integrable Hamiltonian systems is presented. The method is based on the classical R-matrix on Poisson algebras of formal Laurent series. Results are illustrated with the known and new (1+1)-dimensional dispersionless systems.

  7. Classical R-matrix theory of dispersionless systems: II. (2+1) dimension theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaszak, Maciej; Szablikowski, Blazej M [Institute of Physics, A Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2002-12-06

    A systematic way of constructing (2+1)-dimensional dispersionless integrable Hamiltonian systems is presented. The method is based on the so-called central extension procedure and classical R-matrix applied to the Poisson algebras of formal Laurent series. Results are illustrated with the known and new (2+1)-dimensional dispersionless systems.

  8. Modelling of nuclear glasses by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics; Modelisation de verres intervenant dans le conditionnement des dechets radioactifs par dynamiques moleculaires classique et ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganster, P

    2004-10-15

    A calcium aluminosilicate glass of molar composition 67 % SiO{sub 2} - 12 % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 21 % CaO was modelled by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics. The size effect study in classical MD shows that the systems of 100 atoms are more ordered than the larger ones. These effects are mainly due to the 3-body terms in the empirical potentials. Nevertheless, these effects are small and the structures generated are in agreement with experimental data. In such kind of glass, we denote an aluminium avoidance and an excess of non bridging oxygens which can be compensated by tri coordinated oxygens. When the dynamics of systems of 100 and 200 atoms is followed by ab initio MD, some local arrangements occurs (bond length, angular distributions). Thus, more realistic vibrational properties are obtained in ab initio MD. The modelling of thin films shows that aluminium atoms extend to the most external part of the surface and they are all tri-coordinated. Calcium atoms are set in the sub layer part of the surface and they produce a depolymerization of the network. In classical MD, tri-coordinated aluminium atoms produce an important electric field above the surface. With non bridging oxygens, they constitute attractive sites for single water molecules. (author)

  9. Non-Equilibrium and Classical Thermodynamics for Practical Systems: Today Closer Together Than Ever Before

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Sieniutycz

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We deal with applications of thermodynamics and availability theory to practical systems where a certain external control is possible in order to achieve improved performance. In particular, results of optimization of endoreversible processes which yield mechanical work are discussed. Equations of dynamics which follow from energy balance and transfer equations are difference constraints for optimizing work. Irreversibilities caused by the energy transport are essential. A model system is developed which incorporates finite heat resistances for an energy conversion process, and may be extended to take into account friction, heat leakage, mixing and other effects decreasing the thermodynamic efficiency. Deviation of efficiencies from their limiting Carnot values are analyzed in terms of the finite heat flux. The variational calculus and optimal control theories are shown to be the basic tools when formulating and solving problems with maximizing work. For a finite-time passage of a resource body between two given temperatures, optimality of an irreversible process manifests itself as a connection between the process duration and an optimal intensity. Extremal performance functions which describe extremal work are found in terms of final states and process duration measured in terms of the number of the heat transfer units. An extended exergy that has an irreversible component and simplifies to the classical thermal exergy in the limit of infinite duration is discussed. With this exergy performance criteria and bounds are defined for real processes occurring in a finite time. Enhanced bounds for the work released from an engine system or added to a heat-pump system are evaluated. A comparison between the optimization in thermodynamics (with exergy and in economics (with costs is made. Examples of exergy analysis to seek the best adjustable parameters of solar collectors, separation processes (distillation and a chemical process with catalyst

  10. Classical spectrum generating algebra of the Kepler–Coulomb system and action-angle variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuru, Ş., E-mail: kuru@science.ankara.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ankara University, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Negro, J., E-mail: jnegro@fta.uva.es [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47071 Valladolid (Spain)

    2012-01-09

    The classical spectrum generating algebra for the one-dimensional Kepler–Coulomb system is computed and a set of two corresponding constants of motion depending explicitly on time is obtained. Such constants supply the solution to the motion in an algebraic way. The connection of the spectrum generating algebra and the action-angle variables of the system is also shown. -- Highlights: ► The spectrum generating algebra for classical (and quantum) 1D Kepler–Coulomb problem is constructed. ► It allows to find constants of motion depending explicitly on time. ► It leads to an algebraic solution of the motion. ► This algebra is related to the action-angle variables of the classical system.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics and quantum entanglement in optomechanical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanglei; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2014-03-21

    To search for and exploit quantum manifestations of classical nonlinear dynamics is one of the most fundamental problems in physics. Using optomechanical systems as a paradigm, we address this problem from the perspective of quantum entanglement. We uncover strong fingerprints in the quantum entanglement of two common types of classical nonlinear dynamical behaviors: periodic oscillations and quasiperiodic motion. There is a transition from the former to the latter as an experimentally adjustable parameter is changed through a critical value. Accompanying this process, except for a small region about the critical value, the degree of quantum entanglement shows a trend of continuous increase. The time evolution of the entanglement measure, e.g., logarithmic negativity, exhibits a strong dependence on the nature of classical nonlinear dynamics, constituting its signature.

  12. Classical evolution of quantum fluctuations in spin-like systems: squeezing and entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A B [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44410, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Espinoza, P [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon 1, 47460, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2005-06-01

    It is shown that the quantum dynamics of spin coherent states governed by quadratic spin-like Hamiltonians, in the large spin limit, is well described in terms of evolution along classical trajectories on the two-dimensional sphere. Two non-linear effects: (a) spin squeezing and (b) spin entanglement are analysed using the Wigner function approach in the quasiclassical limit and numerically compared with the exact solution.

  13. How to interpret the results of medical time series data analysis: Classical statistical approaches versus dynamic Bayesian network modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, Agnieszka; Druzdzel, Marek J.; Austin, R. Marshall

    2016-01-01

    Background: Classical statistics is a well-established approach in the analysis of medical data. While the medical community seems to be familiar with the concept of a statistical analysis and its interpretation, the Bayesian approach, argued by many of its proponents to be superior to the classical frequentist approach, is still not well-recognized in the analysis of medical data. Aim: The goal of this study is to encourage data analysts to use the Bayesian approach, such as modeling with graphical probabilistic networks, as an insightful alternative to classical statistical analysis of medical data. Materials and Methods: This paper offers a comparison of two approaches to analysis of medical time series data: (1) classical statistical approach, such as the Kaplan–Meier estimator and the Cox proportional hazards regression model, and (2) dynamic Bayesian network modeling. Our comparison is based on time series cervical cancer screening data collected at Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center over 10 years. Results: The main outcomes of our comparison are cervical cancer risk assessments produced by the three approaches. However, our analysis discusses also several aspects of the comparison, such as modeling assumptions, model building, dealing with incomplete data, individualized risk assessment, results interpretation, and model validation. Conclusion: Our study shows that the Bayesian approach is (1) much more flexible in terms of modeling effort, and (2) it offers an individualized risk assessment, which is more cumbersome for classical statistical approaches. PMID:28163973

  14. Semiclassical Tunneling Corrections for Classical Dynamics of Unimolecular Reactions in Polyatomic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yue

    Scope and method of study. The tunneling effects in isomerization of HONO and HSiOH have been studied by using classical trajectories with semiclassical tunneling corrections. The potential energy surfaces were constructed by using the available ab initio, spectroscopic and thermodynamic data. A constrained classical trajectory method was employed to study the roles of the various vibrational modes and molecular rotation in intramolecular energy transfer in cis trans HONO. Findings and conclusions. The results show that the rate constants for cisto trans are generally larger than transto cis for HONO isomerizations. Excitations of the OH and N=O stretches yield the smallest rate constants while the N -O stretch excitation gives the largest rate for both cis to trans and transto cis. The rate of energy transfer from bath modes to the torsional mode is found to be a dominant factor for determining the tunneling rate. Similar behaviors are found in the isomerization of HSiOH. The Si-O stretch excitation gives the largest rate constants and the OH stretch excitation yields the smallest rate constants for both cisto trans and transto cis isomerizations. The ratio of the decay rate with tunneling correction to that without tunneling increases with decreasing total energy of the system. Furthermore, the rate difference between the cisto trans and trans to cis decreases with increasing the excitation energy. The values of the effective mass along the tunneling coordinate can facilitate or hinder the tunneling probability. We find that tunneling effects plays an important role in the isomerization of HSiOH. Our results also elucidate that the ONO bending and torsional modes are important for the relaxation of the excited OH stretch. Removing the torsional motion eliminates the influence of rotation on the intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation. The effects of constraining the ONO bending plays a much smaller role than does constraining the HON bending for decreasing

  15. Dynamic system uncertainty propagation using polynomial chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Fenfen; Chen Shishi; Xiong Ying

    2014-01-01

    The classic polynomial chaos method (PCM), characterized as an intrusive methodology, has been applied to uncertainty propagation (UP) in many dynamic systems. However, the intrusive polynomial chaos method (IPCM) requires tedious modification of the governing equations, which might introduce errors and can be impractical. Alternative to IPCM, the non-intrusive polynomial chaos method (NIPCM) that avoids such modifications has been developed. In spite of the frequent application to dynamic problems, almost all the existing works about NIPCM for dynamic UP fail to elaborate the implementation process in a straightforward way, which is important to readers who are unfamiliar with the mathematics of the polynomial chaos theory. Meanwhile, very few works have compared NIPCM to IPCM in terms of their merits and applicability. Therefore, the mathematic procedure of dynamic UP via both methods considering parametric and initial condition uncertainties are comparatively discussed and studied in the present paper. Comparison of accuracy and efficiency in statistic moment estimation is made by applying the two methods to several dynamic UP problems. The relative merits of both approaches are discussed and summarized. The detailed description and insights gained with the two methods through this work are expected to be helpful to engineering designers in solving dynamic UP problems.

  16. Dynamic system uncertainty propagation using polynomial chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Fenfen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The classic polynomial chaos method (PCM, characterized as an intrusive methodology, has been applied to uncertainty propagation (UP in many dynamic systems. However, the intrusive polynomial chaos method (IPCM requires tedious modification of the governing equations, which might introduce errors and can be impractical. Alternative to IPCM, the non-intrusive polynomial chaos method (NIPCM that avoids such modifications has been developed. In spite of the frequent application to dynamic problems, almost all the existing works about NIPCM for dynamic UP fail to elaborate the implementation process in a straightforward way, which is important to readers who are unfamiliar with the mathematics of the polynomial chaos theory. Meanwhile, very few works have compared NIPCM to IPCM in terms of their merits and applicability. Therefore, the mathematic procedure of dynamic UP via both methods considering parametric and initial condition uncertainties are comparatively discussed and studied in the present paper. Comparison of accuracy and efficiency in statistic moment estimation is made by applying the two methods to several dynamic UP problems. The relative merits of both approaches are discussed and summarized. The detailed description and insights gained with the two methods through this work are expected to be helpful to engineering designers in solving dynamic UP problems.

  17. Applications of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Applications of Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamical Systems is a reference on the new field of relativistic optics, examining topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles. Based on 30 years of research, this unique book connects the properties of quantum equations to corresponding classical equations used to calculate the energetic values and the symmetry properties of atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems. In addition, it examines applications for these methods, and for the calculation of

  18. On global classical solutions of the three dimensional relativistic Vlasov-Darwin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuting; Zhang, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    We study the Cauchy problem of the relativistic Vlasov-Darwin system with generalized variables proposed by Sospedra-Alfonso et al. ["Global classical solutions of the relativistic Vlasov-Darwin system with small Cauchy data: the generalized variables approach," Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 205, 827-869 (2012)]. We prove global existence of a non-negative classical solution to the Cauchy problem in three space variables under small perturbation of the initial datum, and as a consequence, we obtain that nearly spherically symmetric solutions with required regularity exist globally in time.

  19. On the Classical Solutions of Two Dimensional Inviscid Rotating Shallow Water System

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Bin

    2009-01-01

    We prove global existence and asymptotic behavior of classical solutions for two dimensional inviscid Rotating Shallow Water system with small initial data subject to the zero-relative-vorticity constraint. One of the key steps is a reformulation of the problem into a symmetric quasilinear Klein-Gordon system, for which the global existence of classical solutions is then proved with combination of the vector field approach and the normal forms. We also probe the case of general initial data and reveal a lower bound for the lifespan that is almost inversely proportional to the size of the initial relative vorticity.

  20. On precise time integration method for non-classically damped MDOF systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mengfu; Zhou Xiyuan

    2006-01-01

    In the complex mode superposition method, the equations of motion for non-classically damped multipledegree-of-freedom (MDOF) discrete systems can be transferred into a combination of some generalized SDOF complex oscillators. Based on the state space theory, a precise recurrence relationship for these complex oscillators is set up; then a delicate general solution of non-classically damped MDOF systems, completely in real value form, is presented in this paper.In the proposed method, no calculation of the matrix exponential function is needed and the algorithm is unconditionally stable. A numerical example is given to demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the proposed method.

  1. Structural dynamics in rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Major issues and recent advances in the structural dynamics of rotating systems are summarized. The objectives and benefits of such systems are briefly discussed. Directions for future research are suggested.

  2. A new hyperchaotic dynamical system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chong-Xin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a new hyperchaotic system is reported. Some basic dynamical properties, such as continuous specare studied. Dynamical behaviours of the new hyperchaotic system are proved by not only numerical simulation and brief theoretical analysis but also an electronic circuit experiment.

  3. Recurrence for random dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Marie, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a first step in the study of the recurrence behavior in random dynamical systems and randomly perturbed dynamical systems. In particular we define a concept of quenched and annealed return times for systems generated by the composition of random maps. We moreover prove that for super-polynomially mixing systems, the random recurrence rate is equal to the local dimension of the stationary measure.

  4. ROLLING MILL SYSTEM DYNAMIC DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is studied how the aluminum foil chatter mark is produced and controlledThe stableness of hydraulic AGC system,fluid vibration of capsule system,and electromechanical coupling of AC/AC VVVF system and dec oupling are also studiedIt is shown that rolling mill design should go to syst em dynamic design from traditional designThe framed drawing of system dynamic design program is presented

  5. Unified analysis of terminal-time control in classical and quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pechen, Alexander; 10.1209/0295-5075/91/60005

    2010-01-01

    Many phenomena in physics, chemistry, and biology involve seeking an optimal control to maximize an objective for a classical or quantum system which is open and interacting with its environment. The complexity of finding an optimal control for maximizing an objective is strongly affected by the possible existence of sub-optimal maxima. Within a unified framework under specified conditions, control objectives for maximizing at a terminal time physical observables of open classical and quantum systems are shown to be inherently free of sub-optimal maxima. This attractive feature is of central importance for enabling the discovery of controls in a seamless fashion in a wide range of phenomena transcending the quantum and classical regimes.

  6. Dynamics of quantum trajectories in chaotic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniacki, D A; Benito, R M

    2003-01-01

    Quantum trajectories defined in the de Broglie--Bohm theory provide a causal way to interpret physical phenomena. In this Letter, we use this formalism to analyze the short time dynamics induced by unstable periodic orbits in a classically chaotic system, a situation in which scars are known to play a very important role. We find that the topologies of the quantum orbits are much more complicated than that of the scarring and associated periodic orbits, since the former have quantum interference built in. Thus scar wave functions are necessary to analyze the corresponding dynamics. Moreover, these topologies imply different return routes to the vicinity of the initial positions, and this reflects in the existence of different contributions in each peak of the survival probability function.

  7. On Causality in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Harnack, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of causal links is fundamental for the analysis of complex systems. In dynamical systems, however, nonlinear interactions may hamper separability of subsystems which poses a challenge for attempts to determine the directions and strengths of their mutual influences. We found that asymmetric causal influences between parts of a dynamical system lead to characteristic distortions in the mappings between the attractor manifolds reconstructed from respective local observables. These distortions can be measured in a model-free, data-driven manner. This approach extends basic intuitions about cause-effect relations to deterministic dynamical systems and suggests a mathematically well defined explanation of results obtained from previous methods based on state space reconstruction.

  8. Ergodic theory and dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coudène, Yves

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is a self-contained and easy-to-read introduction to ergodic theory and the theory of dynamical systems, with a particular emphasis on chaotic dynamics. This book contains a broad selection of topics and explores the fundamental ideas of the subject. Starting with basic notions such as ergodicity, mixing, and isomorphisms of dynamical systems, the book then focuses on several chaotic transformations with hyperbolic dynamics, before moving on to topics such as entropy, information theory, ergodic decomposition and measurable partitions. Detailed explanations are accompanied by numerous examples, including interval maps, Bernoulli shifts, toral endomorphisms, geodesic flow on negatively curved manifolds, Morse-Smale systems, rational maps on the Riemann sphere and strange attractors. Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems will appeal to graduate students as well as researchers looking for an introduction to the subject. While gentle on the beginning student, the book also contains a number of commen...

  9. Simulations of collisions between N-body classical systems in interaction; Simulations de collisions entre systemes classiques a n-corps en interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morisseau, Francois [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de CAEN, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, UFR des Sciences, 6 bd Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2006-05-15

    The Classical N-body Dynamics (CNBD) is dedicated to the simulation of collisions between classical systems. The 2-body interaction used here has the properties of the Van der Waals potential and depends on just a few parameters. This work has two main goals. First, some theoretical approaches assume that the dynamical stage of the collisions plays an important role. Moreover, colliding nuclei are supposed to present a 1. order liquid-gas phase transition. Several signals have been introduced to show this transition. We have searched for two of them: the bimodality of the mass asymmetry and negative heat capacity. We have found them and we give an explanation of their presence in our calculations. Second, we have improved the interaction by adding a Coulomb like potential and by taking into account the stronger proton-neutron interaction in nuclei. Then we have figured out the relations that exist between the parameters of the 2-body interaction and the properties of the systems. These studies allow us to fit the properties of the classical systems to those of the nuclei. In this manuscript the first results of this fit are shown. (author)

  10. Systems approaches to study root architecture dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela eCuesta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant root system is essential for providing anchorage to the soil, supplying minerals and water, and synthesizing metabolites. It is a dynamic organ modulated by external cues such as environmental signals, water and nutrients availability, salinity and others. Lateral roots are initiated from the primary root post-embryonically, after which they progress through discrete developmental stages which can be independently controlled, providing a high level of plasticity during root system formation.Within this review, main contributions are presented, from the classical forward genetic screens to the more recent high-throughput approaches, combined with computer model predictions, dissecting how lateral roots and thereby root system architecture is established and developed.

  11. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  12. Modelling Systems of Classical/Quantum Identical Particles by Focusing on Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Ivan; Fazio, Claudio; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria

    2012-01-01

    A procedure modelling ideal classical and quantum gases is discussed. The proposed approach is mainly based on the idea that modelling and algorithm analysis can provide a deeper understanding of particularly complex physical systems. Appropriate representations and physical models able to mimic possible pseudo-mechanisms of functioning and having…

  13. Beyond the Classical Performance Limitations Controlling Uncertain MIMO Systems: UAV Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    filtering and control, Springer, London, 1997. [18]. I. Horowitz, Synthesis of feedback systems, Academic Press, New York, 1963. [19]. Robert Shorten...and P. J. Enright , Classical feedback control with MATLAB, Marcel Dekker, New York, 2000. [28]. J. W. Glass and M. A. Franchek, “Frequency-based

  14. Global Classical Solutions to Partially Dissipative Quasilinear Hyperbolic Systems with One Weakly Linearly Degenerate Characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng QU; Cunming LIU

    2012-01-01

    For a kind of partially dissipative quasilinear hyperbolic systems without Shizuta-Kawashima condition,in which all the characteristics,except a weakly linearly degenerate one,are involved in the dissipation,the global existence of H2 classical solution to the Cauchy problem with small initial data is obtained.

  15. Propagation of General Wave Packets in Some Classical and Quantum Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qiong-Gui

    2006-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the center of a wave packet is precisely defined as the center of probability. The center-of-probability velocity describes the entire motion of the wave packet. In classical physics there is no precise counterpart to the center-of-probability velocity of quantum mechanics, in spite of the fact that there exist in the literature at least eight different velocities for the electromagnetic wave. We propose a center-of-energy velocity to describe the entire motion of general wave packets in classical physical systems. It is a measurable quantity, and is well defined for both continuous and discrete systems. For electromagnetic wave packets it is a generalization of the velocity of energy transport. General wave packets in several classical systems are studied and the center-of-energy velocity is calculated and expressed in terms of the dispersion relation and the Fourier coefficients. These systems include string subject to an external force, monatomic chain and diatomic chain in one dimension, and classical Heisenberg model in one dimension. In most cases the center-of-energy velocity reduces to the group velocity for quasi-monochromatic wave packets. Thus it also appears to be the generalization of the group velocity. Wave packets of the relativistic Dirac equation are discussed briefly.

  16. Reasoning about Dynamic Normative Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobbout, Max; Dastani, Mehdi; Meyer, John-Jules Charles

    2014-01-01

    The use of normative systems is widely accepted as an effective approach to control and regulate the behaviour of agents in multiagent systems. When norms are added to a normative system, the behaviour of such a system changes. As of yet, there is no clear formal methodology to model the dynamics of

  17. Bianchi I model in terms of non-standard LQC: Classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dzierzak, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological singularities of the Bianchi I universe are analyzed in the setting of loop geometry underlying the loop quantum cosmology. We solve the Hamiltonian constraint of the theory and find the Lie algebra of elementary observables. Physical compound observables are defined in terms of elementary ones. Modification of classical theory by holonomy around a loop removes the singularities. However, our model has a free parameter that cannot be determined within our method. Testing the model by the data of observational cosmology may be possible after quantization of our modified classical theory.

  18. Semi-classical dynamics of superradiant Rayleigh scattering in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J. H.; Witthaut, D.; le Targat, R.; Arlt, J. J.; Polzik, E. S.; Hilliard, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Due to its coherence properties and high optical depth, a Bose-Einstein condensate [BEC] provides an ideal setting to investigate collective atom-light interactions. Superradiant light scattering [SLS] in a BEC is a fascinating example of such an interaction. It is an analogous process to Dicke superradiance, in which an electronically inverted sample decays collectively, leading to the emission of one or more light pulses in a well-defined direction. Through time-resolved measurements of the superradiant light pulses emitted by an end-pumped BEC, we study the close connection of SLS with Dicke superradiance. A 1D model of the system yields good agreement with the experimental data and shows that the dynamics result from the structures that build up in the light and matter-wave fields along the BEC. This paves the way for exploiting the atom-photon correlations generated by the superradiance.

  19. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Atomistic Environments: Harnessing Quantum-Classical Theory with Generalized Quantum Master Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzgraff, William C; Kelly, Aaron; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-12-03

    The development of methods that can efficiently and accurately treat nonadiabatic dynamics in quantum systems coupled to arbitrary atomistic environments remains a significant challenge in problems ranging from exciton transport in photovoltaic materials to electron and proton transfer in catalysis. Here we show that our recently introduced MF-GQME approach, which combines Ehrenfest mean field theory with the generalized quantum master equation framework, is able to yield quantitative accuracy over a wide range of charge-transfer regimes in fully atomistic environments. This is accompanied by computational speed-ups of up to 3 orders of magnitude over a direct application of Ehrenfest theory. This development offers the opportunity to efficiently investigate the atomistic details of nonadiabatic quantum relaxation processes in regimes where obtaining accurate results has previously been elusive.

  20. Semi-classical Dynamics of Superradiant Rayleigh Scattering in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, J H; Targat, R le; Arlt, J J; Polzik, E S; Hilliard, A J

    2016-01-01

    Due to its coherence properties and high optical depth, a Bose-Einstein condensate provides an ideal setting to investigate collective atom-light interactions. Superradiant light scattering in a Bose-Einstein condensate is a fascinating example of such an interaction. It is an analogous process to Dicke superradiance, in which an electronically inverted sample decays collectively, leading to the emission of one or more light pulses in a well-defined direction. Through time-resolved measurements of the superradiant light pulses emitted by an end-pumped BEC, we study the close connection of superradiant light scattering with Dicke superradiance. A 1D model of the system yields good agreement with the experimental data and shows that the dynamics results from the structures that build up in the light and matter-wave fields along the BEC. This paves the way for exploiting the atom-photon correlations generated by the superradiance.

  1. Dynamic Systems and Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Per Grove

    1996-01-01

    A one-dimensional model with axial discretization of engine components has been formulated using tha balance equations for mass energy and momentum and the ideal gas equation of state. ODE's that govern the dynamic behaviour of the regenerator matrix temperatures are included in the model. Known ...

  2. Permutation Complexity in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Amigo, Jose

    2010-01-01

    The study of permutation complexity can be envisioned as a new kind of symbolic dynamics whose basic blocks are ordinal patterns, that is, permutations defined by the order relations among points in the orbits of dynamical systems. Since its inception in 2002 the concept of permutation entropy has sparked a new branch of research in particular regarding the time series analysis of dynamical systems that capitalizes on the order structure of the state space. Indeed, on one hand ordinal patterns and periodic points are closely related, yet ordinal patterns are amenable to numerical methods, while periodicity is not. Another interesting feature is that since it can be shown that random (unconstrained) dynamics has no forbidden patterns with probability one, their existence can be used as a fingerprint to identify any deterministic origin of orbit generation. This book is primarily addressed to researchers working in the field of nonlinear dynamics and complex systems, yet will also be suitable for graduate stude...

  3. VERIFICATION OF TORSIONAL OSCILLATING MECHANICAL SYSTEM DYNAMIC CALCULATION RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    On our department we deal with optimization and tuning of torsional oscillating mechanical systems. When solving these problems we often use results of dynamic calculation. The goal of this article is to compare values obtained by computation and experimentally. For this purpose, a mechanical system built in our laboratory was used. At first, classical HARDY type flexible coupling has been applied into the system, then we used a pneumatic flexible shaft coupling developed by us...

  4. Bohmian trajectory from the "classical" Schrödinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Santanu; Khatua, Munmun; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2014-12-01

    The quantum-classical correspondence is studied for a periodically driven quartic oscillator exhibiting integrable and chaotic dynamics, by studying the Bohmian trajectory of the corresponding "classical" Schrödinger equation. Phase plots and the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy are computed and compared with the classical trajectory as well as the Bohmian trajectory obtained from the time dependent Schrödinger equation. Bohmian mechanics at the classical limit appears to mimick the behavior of a dissipative dynamical system.

  5. Semiclassical Aspects of Quantum Mechanics by Classical Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    De Martino, S; Illuminati, F; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De

    1998-01-01

    Building on a model recently proposed by F. Calogero, we postulate the existence of a coherent, long--range universal tremor affecting any stable and confined classical dynamical system. Deriving the characteristic fluctuative unit of action for each classical interaction, we obtain in all cases its numerical coincidence with the Planck action constant. We therefore suggest that quantum corrections to classical dynamics can be simulated by suitable classical stochastic fluctuations.

  6. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: paul.tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludwig–Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2015-03-14

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online.

  7. Klein-Gordon Transformation sans Extraneous Insertions: the Isomorphic Classical Complement to a Quantum System

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Steven Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The historical Klein-Gordon transformation of complex-valued first-order in time Schroedinger equations iterates these in a naively straightforward way which changes them into complex-valued second-order in time equations that have a plethora of extraneous solutions -- the transformation is an operator-calculus analogue of the squaring of both sides of an algebraic equation. The real and imaginary parts of a Schroedinger equation, however, are well known to be precisely the dynamical equation pair of the real-valued classical Hamiltonian functional which is numerically equal to the expectation value of that Schroedinger equation's Hermitian Hamiltonian operator. The purely real-valued second-order in time Euler-Lagrange equation of the corresponding classical Lagrangian functional is also isomorphic to that Schroedinger equation, and for symmetric Hamiltonians has exactly the same formal appearance as the corresponding naive complex-valued Klein-Gordon equation, but none of the latter's extraneous solutions. ...

  8. Exploring the Altered Dynamics of Mammalian Central Carbon Metabolic Pathway in Cancer Cells: A Classical Control Theoretic Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjyoti Paul

    Full Text Available In contrast with normal cells, most of the cancer cells depend on aerobic glycolysis for energy production in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP bypassing mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, compared to normal cells, cancer cells exhibit higher consumption of glucose with higher production of lactate. Again, higher rate of glycolysis provides the necessary glycolytic intermediary precursors for DNA, protein and lipid synthesis to maintain high active proliferation of the tumor cells. In this scenario, classical control theory based approach may be useful to explore the altered dynamics of the cancer cells. Since the dynamics of the cancer cells is different from that of the normal cells, understanding their dynamics may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies.We have developed a model based on the state space equations of classical control theory along with an order reduction technique to mimic the actual dynamic behavior of mammalian central carbon metabolic (CCM pathway in normal cells. Here, we have modified Michaelis Menten kinetic equation to incorporate feedback mechanism along with perturbations and cross talks associated with a metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we have perturbed the proposed model to reduce the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thereafter, we have connected proportional-integral (PI controller(s with the model for tuning it to behave like the CCM pathway of a cancer cell. This methodology allows one to track the altered dynamics mediated by different enzymes.The proposed model successfully mimics all the probable dynamics of the CCM pathway in normal cells. Moreover, experimental results demonstrate that in cancer cells, a coordination among enzymes catalyzing pentose phosphate pathway and intermediate glycolytic enzymes along with switching of pyruvate kinase (M2 isoform plays an important role to maintain their altered dynamics.

  9. Description of a dissipative quantum spin dynamics with a Landau-Lifshitz/Gilbert like damping and complete derivation of the classical Landau-Lifshitz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Robert

    2015-03-01

    The classical Landau-Lifshitz equation has been derived from quantum mechanics. Starting point is the assumption of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator to take the energy dissipation into account. The corresponding quantum mechanical spin dynamics along with the time dependent Schrödinger, Liouville and Heisenberg equation has been described and the similarities and differences between classical and quantum mechanical spin dynamics have been discussed. Furthermore, a time dependent Schrödinger equation corresponding to the classical Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and two ways to include temperature into the quantum mechanical spin dynamics have been proposed.

  10. Quantum Corrections to Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water and Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Qaiser; Edholm, Olle

    2011-09-13

    Classical simulations of simple water models reproduce many properties of the liquid and ice but overestimate the heat capacity by about 65% at ordinary temperatures and much more for low temperature ice. This is due to the fact that the atomic vibrations are quantum mechanical. The application of harmonic quantum corrections to the molecular motion results in good heat capacities for the liquid and for ice at low temperatures but a successively growing positive deviation from experimental results for ice above 200 K that reaches 15% just below melting. We suggest that this deviation is due to the lack of quantum corrections to the anharmonic motions. For the liquid, the anharmonicities are even larger but also softer and thus in less need of quantum correction. Therefore, harmonic quantum corrections to the classically calculated liquid heat capacities result in agreement with the experimental values. The classical model underestimates the heat of melting by 15%, while the application of quantum corrections produces fair agreement. On the other hand, the heat of vaporization is overestimated by 10% in the harmonically corrected classical model.

  11. On the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formulation of classical dynamics for particles with spin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijgrok, Th.W.; Vlist, H. van der

    1980-01-01

    The classical mechanics of nonrelativistic particles is generalized by also considering the spin components as canonical variables. Poisson-brackets and canonical transformations are discussed. The Lagrangian equations of motion are given and it is shown how rotational invariance leads to well known

  12. System identification based approach to dynamic weighing revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Meller, Michał; Pietrzak, Przemysław

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic weighing, i.e., weighing of objects in motion, without stopping them on the weighing platform, allows one to increase the rate of operation of automatic weighing systems, used in industrial production processes, without compromising their accuracy. Since the classical identification-based approach to dynamic weighing, based on the second-order mass-spring-damper model of the weighing system, does not yield satisfactory results when applied to conveyor belt type checkweighers, several extensions of this technique are examined. Experiments confirm that when appropriately modified the identification-based approach becomes a reliable tool for dynamic mass measurement in checkweighers.

  13. The Quantum-Classical Crossover in the Adiabatic Response of Chaotic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ausländer, O M; Auslaender, Ophir M.; Fishman, Shmuel

    1999-01-01

    The autocorrelation function of the force acting on a slow classical system, resulting from interaction with a fast quantum system is calculated following Berry-Robbins and Jarzynski within the leading order correction to the adiabatic approximation. The time integral of the autocorrelation function is proportional to the rate of dissipation. The fast quantum system is assumed to be chaotic in the classical limit for each configuration of the slow system. An analytic formula is obtained for the finite time integral of the correlation function, in the framework of random matrix theory (RMT), for a specific dependence on the adiabatically varying parameter. Extension to a wider class of RMT models is discussed. For the Gaussian unitary and symplectic ensembles for long times the time integral of the correlation function vanishes or falls off as a Gaussian with a characteristic time that is proportional to the Heisenberg time, depending on the details of the model. The fall off is inversely proportional to time ...

  14. Approximate reduction of dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tabuada, Paulo; Julius, Agung; Pappas, George J

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of dynamical systems has a rich history, with many important applications related to stability, control and verification. Reduction of nonlinear systems is typically performed in an exact manner - as is the case with mechanical systems with symmetry--which, unfortunately, limits the type of systems to which it can be applied. The goal of this paper is to consider a more general form of reduction, termed approximate reduction, in order to extend the class of systems that can be reduced. Using notions related to incremental stability, we give conditions on when a dynamical system can be projected to a lower dimensional space while providing hard bounds on the induced errors, i.e., when it is behaviorally similar to a dynamical system on a lower dimensional space. These concepts are illustrated on a series of examples.

  15. Stabilizability of oscillatory systems: a classical approach supported by symbolic computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bacciotti

    1990-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the stabilization of planar single-input non-linear systems, whose linearization at the origin has purely immaginary eigenvalues. A classical recursive procedure based on polar coordinates transformation is applied to obtain some sufficient conditions. Then we focus on bilinear systems; a complete solution of the problem is given in this case. Explicit statements of the conditions are possible thanks to the use of symbolic computation packages.

  16. Dynamic Ocean Track System Plus -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Dynamic Ocean Track System Plus (DOTS Plus) is a planning tool implemented at the ZOA, ZAN, and ZNY ARTCCs. It is utilized by Traffic Management Unit (TMU) personnel...

  17. Quasi-classical model of dynamic molecular structure and non-destructive wavepacket manipulation by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bryan, W A; King, R B; Nemeth, G R A J; Greenwood, J B; Williams, I D; Newell, W R

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-classical model (QCM) of molecular dynamics in intense femtosecond laser fields has been developed, and applied to a study of the effect of an ultrashort `control' pulse on the vibrational motion of a deuterium molecular ion in its ground electronic state. A nonadiabatic treatment accounts for the initial ionization-induced vibrational population caused by an ultrashort `pump' pulse. In the QCM, the nuclei move classically on the molecular potential as it is distorted by the laser-induced Stark shift and transition dipole. The nuclei then adjust to the modified potential, non-destructively shifting the vibrational population and relative phase. This shift has been studied as a function of control pulse parameters. Excellent agreement is observed with predictions of time-dependent quantum simulations, lending confidence to the validity of the model and permitting new observations to be made. The applicability of the QCM to more complex multi-potential energy surface molecules (where a quantum treatment...

  18. A Comparison of Classical Force-Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Ewen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For the successful development and application of lubricants, a full understanding of their complex nanoscale behavior under a wide range of external conditions is required, but this is difficult to obtain experimentally. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations can be used to yield unique insights into the atomic-scale structure and friction of lubricants and additives; however, the accuracy of the results depend on the chosen force-field. In this study, we demonstrate that the use of an accurate, all-atom force-field is critical in order to; (i accurately predict important properties of long-chain, linear molecules; and (ii reproduce experimental friction behavior of multi-component tribological systems. In particular, we focus on n-hexadecane, an important model lubricant with a wide range of industrial applications. Moreover, simulating conditions common in tribological systems, i.e., high temperatures and pressures (HTHP, allows the limits of the selected force-fields to be tested. In the first section, a large number of united-atom and all-atom force-fields are benchmarked in terms of their density and viscosity prediction accuracy of n-hexadecane using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD simulations at ambient and HTHP conditions. Whilst united-atom force-fields accurately reproduce experimental density, the viscosity is significantly under-predicted compared to all-atom force-fields and experiments. Moreover, some all-tom force-fields yield elevated melting points, leading to significant overestimation of both the density and viscosity. In the second section, the most accurate united-atom and all-atom force-field are compared in confined NEMD simulations which probe the structure and friction of stearic acid adsorbed on iron oxide and separated by a thin layer of n-hexadecane. The united-atom force-field provides an accurate representation of the structure of the confined stearic acid film; however, friction coefficients are

  19. Global Classical Solutions for Partially Dissipative Hyperbolic System of Balance Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiang; Kawashima, Shuichi

    2014-02-01

    The basic existence theory of Kato and Majda enables us to obtain local-in-time classical solutions to generally quasilinear hyperbolic systems in the framework of Sobolev spaces (in x) with higher regularity. However, it remains a challenging open problem whether classical solutions still preserve well-posedness in the case of critical regularity. This paper is concerned with partially dissipative hyperbolic system of balance laws. Under the entropy dissipative assumption, we establish the local well-posedness and blow-up criterion of classical solutions in the framework of Besov spaces with critical regularity with the aid of the standard iteration argument and Friedrichs' regularization method. Then we explore the theory of function spaces and develop an elementary fact that indicates the relation between homogeneous and inhomogeneous Chemin-Lerner spaces (mixed space-time Besov spaces). This fact allows us to capture the dissipation rates generated from the partial dissipative source term and further obtain the global well-posedness and stability by assuming at all times the Shizuta-Kawashima algebraic condition. As a direct application, the corresponding well-posedness and stability of classical solutions to the compressible Euler equations with damping are also obtained.

  20. On non-autonomous dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzaldo-Meneses, A.

    2015-04-01

    In usual realistic classical dynamical systems, the Hamiltonian depends explicitly on time. In this work, a class of classical systems with time dependent nonlinear Hamiltonians is analyzed. This type of problems allows to find invariants by a family of Veronese maps. The motivation to develop this method results from the observation that the Poisson-Lie algebra of monomials in the coordinates and momenta is clearly defined in terms of its brackets and leads naturally to an infinite linear set of differential equations, under certain circumstances. To perform explicit analytic and numerical calculations, two examples are presented to estimate the trajectories, the first given by a nonlinear problem and the second by a quadratic Hamiltonian with three time dependent parameters. In the nonlinear problem, the Veronese approach using jets is shown to be equivalent to a direct procedure using elliptic functions identities, and linear invariants are constructed. For the second example, linear and quadratic invariants as well as stability conditions are given. Explicit solutions are also obtained for stepwise constant forces. For the quadratic Hamiltonian, an appropriated set of coordinates relates the geometric setting to that of the three dimensional manifold of central conic sections. It is shown further that the quantum mechanical problem of scattering in a superlattice leads to mathematically equivalent equations for the wave function, if the classical time is replaced by the space coordinate along a superlattice. The mathematical method used to compute the trajectories for stepwise constant parameters can be applied to both problems. It is the standard method in quantum scattering calculations, as known for locally periodic systems including a space dependent effective mass.

  1. On non-autonomous dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzaldo-Meneses, A., E-mail: answald@ymail.com [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Distrito Federal 02200, México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    In usual realistic classical dynamical systems, the Hamiltonian depends explicitly on time. In this work, a class of classical systems with time dependent nonlinear Hamiltonians is analyzed. This type of problems allows to find invariants by a family of Veronese maps. The motivation to develop this method results from the observation that the Poisson-Lie algebra of monomials in the coordinates and momenta is clearly defined in terms of its brackets and leads naturally to an infinite linear set of differential equations, under certain circumstances. To perform explicit analytic and numerical calculations, two examples are presented to estimate the trajectories, the first given by a nonlinear problem and the second by a quadratic Hamiltonian with three time dependent parameters. In the nonlinear problem, the Veronese approach using jets is shown to be equivalent to a direct procedure using elliptic functions identities, and linear invariants are constructed. For the second example, linear and quadratic invariants as well as stability conditions are given. Explicit solutions are also obtained for stepwise constant forces. For the quadratic Hamiltonian, an appropriated set of coordinates relates the geometric setting to that of the three dimensional manifold of central conic sections. It is shown further that the quantum mechanical problem of scattering in a superlattice leads to mathematically equivalent equations for the wave function, if the classical time is replaced by the space coordinate along a superlattice. The mathematical method used to compute the trajectories for stepwise constant parameters can be applied to both problems. It is the standard method in quantum scattering calculations, as known for locally periodic systems including a space dependent effective mass.

  2. Highly-efficient noise-assisted energy transport in classical oscillator systems

    CERN Document Server

    León-Montiel, R de J

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a biological process that involves the highly-efficient transport of energy captured from the sun to a reaction center, where conversion into useful biochemical energy takes place. Even though one can always use a quantum perspective to describe any physical process, since everything follows the laws of Quantum Mechanics, is the use of quantum theory imperative to explain this high efficiency? Several theoretical studies suggest that the high efficiency can only be understood as a result of the interplay between the quantum coherent evolution of the photosynthetic system, and noise introduced by its surrounding environment. Notwithstanding, we show here that noise-assisted highly-efficient energy transport can be found as well in purely classical systems; therefore, we might conclude that high efficiency energy transfer in photosynthetic systems could also be anticipated by classical models, without the need to resorting to quantum effects. Strikingly, the wider scope of applicability of the...

  3. Maxwell-Lorentz Dynamics for Rigid Charges - Classical Absorber Electrodynamics Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, G; Dürr, D

    2010-01-01

    This is the first part of our mathematical survey on the equations of motion of classical absorber electrodynamics, which shall be introduced and discussed briefly. Its basic equations of motion are the Maxwell-Lorentz (ML) equations of classical electrodynamics excluding the self-interaction term. We briefly explain that it is capable of describing the phenomenon of radiation reaction as well as the irreversible effect of radiation. We provide a global existence and uniqueness result for solutions to the ML equations (with as well as without self-interaction) which allows for finitely many non-rotating, rigid charges with possibly negative masses and a class of infinite energy (i.e. not square-integrable) fields. This result is the foundation of the second part (Part II) where it is applied to prove an existence theorem of the famous Wheeler-Feynman (WF) delay differential equations on finite but arbitrarily large time intervals.

  4. Hydraulics of Reka-Timavo system, Classical Karst (Carso), Slovenia-Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrovsek, Franci; Kaufmann, Georg; Peric, Borut

    2016-04-01

    In tectonically active areas, karst systems continuously adapt to the relatively rapid changes of the structural and boundary conditions. The flow pathways in such systems are characterised by high variability of channel cross-sections and breakdowns, which restrict the flow and cause high fluctuations of groundwater level, particularly if the recharge variations are high. One of the world's most prominent karst systems with such characteristics is the Kras/Carso plateau (Classical Karst), which extends between SW Slovenia and NE Italy. The ground water dynamics is mainly influenced by the allogenic input of Reka river which sinks at the Škocjanske jame (Škocjan caves) and emerges about 40 km north-west at the coast of Adria near Duino in springs of Timavo. The ratio between highest and lowest flow of Reka reaches 1700 with the maximum measured discharge 305 m3/s, and minimum 0.18 m3/s. This work is based on the long-term continuous monitoring of basic physical parameters of underground flow within six active caves of the Reka-Timavo system. Using stage, temperature and specific electric conductivity hydrographs, following questions were addressed: How do different signals (flood pulse, temperature, SEP) propagate through the system? How does the known geometry relate to the recorded hydrographs in caves? Can we infer on the structure of unknown parts of the system from the recorded hydrographs ? Where are the restrictions causing floods in different parts of the system? The data analysis includes heuristic and statistical analysis of the hydrographs and optimisation based hydraulic modelling. The response to recharge events is vigorous; high flow variability causes extreme stage variations along the whole observed system, with more than 100 m difference between the base and highest water levels at rising and recession rates reaching almost 10 m/h. By analysing large recharge events, we show that high floods in the two most upstream caves (Škocjanske jame and Ka

  5. Ion association in concentrated NaCl brines from ambient to supercritical conditions: results from classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collings Matthew D

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly concentrated NaCl brines are important geothermal fluids; chloride complexation of metals in such brines increases the solubility of minerals and plays a fundamental role in the genesis of hydrothermal ore deposits. There is experimental evidence that the molecular nature of the NaCl–water system changes over the pressure–temperature range of the Earth's crust. A transition of concentrated NaCl–H2O brines to a "hydrous molten salt" at high P and T has been argued to stabilize an aqueous fluid phase in the deep crust. In this work, we have done molecular dynamic simulations using classical potentials to determine the nature of concentrated (0.5–16 m NaCl–water mixtures under ambient (25°C, 1 bar, hydrothermal (325°C, 1 kbar and deep crustal (625°C, 15 kbar conditions. We used the well-established SPCE model for water together with the Smith and Dang Lennard-Jones potentials for the ions (J. Chem. Phys., 1994, 100, 3757. With increasing temperature at 1 kbar, the dielectric constant of water decreases to give extensive ion-association and the formation of polyatomic (NanClmn-m clusters in addition to simple NaCl ion pairs. Large polyatomic (NanClmn-m clusters resemble what would be expected in a hydrous NaCl melt in which water and NaCl were completely miscible. Although ion association decreases with pressure, temperatures of 625°C are not enough to overcome pressures of 15 kbar; consequently, there is still enhanced Na–Cl association in brines under deep crustal conditions.

  6. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Hamiltonian Dynamical Systems and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Physical laws are for the most part expressed in terms of differential equations, and natural classes of these are in the form of conservation laws or of problems of the calculus of variations for an action functional. These problems can generally be posed as Hamiltonian systems, whether dynamical systems on finite dimensional phase space as in classical mechanics, or partial differential equations (PDE) which are naturally of infinitely many degrees of freedom. This volume is the collected and extended notes from the lectures on Hamiltonian dynamical systems and their applications that were given at the NATO Advanced Study Institute in Montreal in 2007. Many aspects of the modern theory of the subject were covered at this event, including low dimensional problems as well as the theory of Hamiltonian systems in infinite dimensional phase space; these are described in depth in this volume. Applications are also presented to several important areas of research, including problems in classical mechanics, continu...

  7. Spectrum of quantum transfer matrices via classical many-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsky, A. [ITEP,Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); MIPT,Inststitutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Zabrodin, A. [ITEP,Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); MIPT,Inststitutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Institute of Biochemical Physics,Kosygina str. 4, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics,Myasnitskaya str. 20, 101000, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zotov, A. [ITEP,Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); MIPT,Inststitutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Steklov Mathematical Institute, RAS,Gubkina str. 8, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we clarify the relationship between inhomogeneous quantum spin chains and classical integrable many-body systems. It provides an alternative (to the nested Bethe ansatz) method for computation of spectra of the spin chains. Namely, the spectrum of the quantum transfer matrix for the inhomogeneous gl{sub n}-invariant XXX spin chain on N sites with twisted boundary conditions can be found in terms of velocities of particles in the rational N-body Ruijsenaars-Schneider model. The possible values of the velocities are to be found from intersection points of two Lagrangian submanifolds in the phase space of the classical model. One of them is the Lagrangian hyperplane corresponding to fixed coordinates of all N particles and the other one is an N-dimensional Lagrangian submanifold obtained by fixing levels of N classical Hamiltonians in involution. The latter are determined by eigenvalues of the twist matrix. To support this picture, we give a direct proof that the eigenvalues of the Lax matrix for the classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider model, where velocities of particles are substituted by eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians, calculated through the Bethe equations, coincide with eigenvalues of the twist matrix, with certain multiplicities. We also prove a similar statement for the gl{sub n} Gaudin model with N marked points (on the quantum side) and the Calogero-Moser system with N particles (on the classical side). The realization of the results obtained in terms of branes and supersymmetric gauge theories is also discussed.

  8. Dynamical properties for an ensemble of classical particles moving in a driven potential well with different time perturbation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Diogo Ricardo da, E-mail: drcosta@usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Cidade Universitária, 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Cidade Universitária, 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Leonel, Edson D. [Departamento de Física, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2013-10-30

    We consider dynamical properties for an ensemble of classical particles confined to an infinite box of potential and containing a time-dependent potential well described by different nonlinear functions. For smooth functions, the phase space contains chaotic trajectories, periodic islands and invariant spanning curves preventing the unlimited particle diffusion along the energy axis. Average properties of the chaotic sea are characterised as a function of the control parameters and exponents describing their behaviour show no dependence on the perturbation functions. Given invariant spanning curves are present in the phase space, a sticky region was observed and show to modify locally the diffusion of the particles.

  9. From Classical to Quantum: New Canonical Tools for the Dynamics of Gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höhn, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    In a gravitational context, canonical methods offer an intuitive picture of the dynamics and simplify an identification of the degrees of freedom. Nevertheless, extracting dynamical information from background independent approaches to quantum gravity is a highly non-trivial challenge. In this thesi

  10. The paternal ancestry of Uttarakhand does not imitate the classical caste system of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Neetu; Tamang, Rakesh; Pande, Veena; Sharma, Amrita; Shah, Anish; Reddy, Alla G; Vishnupriya, Satti; Singh, Lalji; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-02-01

    Although, there have been rigorous research on the Indian caste system by several disciplines, it is still one of the most controversial socioscientific topic. Previous genetic studies on the subcontinent have supported a classical hierarchal sharing of genetic component by various castes of India. In the present study, we have used high-resolution mtDNA and Y chromosomal markers to characterize the genetic structuring of the Uttarakhand populations in the context of neighboring regions. Furthermore, we have tested whether the genetic structuring of caste populations at different social levels of this region, follow the classical chaturvarna system. Interestingly, we found that this region showed a high level of variation for East Eurasian ancestry in both maternal and paternal lines of descent. Moreover, the intrapopulation comparison showed a high level of heterogeneity, likely because of different caste hierarchy, interpolated on asymmetric admixture of populations inhabiting on both sides of the Himalayas.

  11. VERIFICATION OF TORSIONAL OSCILLATING MECHANICAL SYSTEM DYNAMIC CALCULATION RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter KAŠŠAY

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On our department we deal with optimization and tuning of torsional oscillating mechanical systems. When solving these problems we often use results of dynamic calculation. The goal of this article is to compare values obtained by computation and experimentally. For this purpose, a mechanical system built in our laboratory was used. At first, classical HARDY type flexible coupling has been applied into the system, then we used a pneumatic flexible shaft coupling developed by us. The main difference of these couplings over conventional flexible couplings is that they can change their dynamic properties during operation, by changing the pressure of the gaseous medium in their flexible elements.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent research results relating to applications of nonlinear dynamics, focusing specifically on four topics of wide interest: heart dynamics, DNA/RNA, cell mobility, and proteins. The book derives from the First BCAM Workshop on Nonlinear Dynamics in Biological Systems, held in June 2014 at the Basque Center of Applied Mathematics (BCAM). At this international meeting, researchers from different but complementary backgrounds, including molecular dynamics, physical chemistry, bio-informatics and biophysics, presented their most recent results and discussed the future direction of their studies using theoretical, mathematical modeling and experimental approaches. Such was the level of interest stimulated that the decision was taken to produce this publication, with the organizers of the event acting as editors. All of the contributing authors are researchers working on diverse biological problems that can be approached using nonlinear dynamics. The book will appeal especially to applied math...

  13. EVOLUTION OF THE CLASSICAL CHARACTER SYSTEM IN THE ANTIUTOPIAN NOVEL "LIVING" BY A. STAROBINETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilinka V. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of the model of the characters system organization in the anti-utopian novel by A. Starobinets "Living" has been analyzed in this article. The typical anti-utopia identifies three types of personages: a tyrant, a rebel and a victim. The evolution of this classical trinity in contemporary antiutopian literature has been investigated by the example of the analysis of the image of the main characters of the novel

  14. Hallucinations in the classical Indian system of Ayurveda: A brief overview

    OpenAIRE

    Balsavar, Anuradha; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2014-01-01

    The ancient Indian system of medicine “Ayurveda” is a compendium of various health related theories and practices and explained the abnormal state of mind, i.e., psychopathology in various contexts. Hallucinations were deemed abnormal. In Ayurvedic classics, hallucinations were called false perceptions (mithyajnana), illusions (maya), infatuations (moha), or confusion (bhrama). Hallucinations were not independent but a symptom of mental disorder (manasa roga). Hallucinations of different sens...

  15. Nonnegative and Compartmental Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Wassim M; Hui, Qing

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive book provides the first unified framework for stability and dissipativity analysis and control design for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems, which play a key role in a wide range of fields, including engineering, thermal sciences, biology, ecology, economics, genetics, chemistry, medicine, and sociology. Using the highest standards of exposition and rigor, the authors explain these systems and advance the state of the art in their analysis and active control design. Nonnegative and Compartmental Dynamical Systems presents the most complete treatment available o

  16. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-12-27

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  17. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-05-31

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  18. Ka-mixing in the unimolecular dissociation of NO 2 studied by classical dynamics calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenshchikov, S. Yu; Flöthmann, H.; Schinke, R.; Bezel, I.; Wittig, C.; Kato, S.

    1998-03-01

    Coriolis and centrifugal vibration-rotation coupling in the unimolecular dissociation of ground electronic state NO 2 has been examined by using classical trajectories. The time evolution of the projection Ka of the rotational angular momentum N in a body-fixed frame is analyzed. The main result is a relation between the decomposition lifetime and the degree of Ka-mixing. For example, less than 30% of the available Ka space becomes populated for an average lifetime of 5 ps. This is consistent with the conclusions, based on time-resolved experiments, that rotation-vibration transfer is slower than reaction except just above the threshold.

  19. Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems discusses the phenomenon of parametric resonance and its occurrence in mechanical systems,vehicles, motorcycles, aircraft and marine craft, and micro-electro-mechanical systems. The contributors provide an introduction to the root causes of this phenomenon and its mathematical equivalent, the Mathieu-Hill equation. Also included is a discussion of how parametric resonance occurs on ships and offshore systems and its frequency in mechanical and electrical systems. This book also: Presents the theory and principles behind parametric resonance Provides a unique collection of the different fields where parametric resonance appears including ships and offshore structures, automotive vehicles and mechanical systems Discusses ways to combat, cope with and prevent parametric resonance including passive design measures and active control methods Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems is ideal for researchers and mechanical engineers working in application fields such as MEM...

  20. Dynamic probabilistic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Ronald A

    2007-01-01

    This book is an integrated work published in two volumes. The first volume treats the basic Markov process and its variants; the second, semi-Markov and decision processes. Its intent is to equip readers to formulate, analyze, and evaluate simple and advanced Markov models of systems, ranging from genetics and space engineering to marketing. More than a collection of techniques, it constitutes a guide to the consistent application of the fundamental principles of probability and linear system theory.Author Ronald A. Howard, Professor of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University

  1. MINI-REVIEW: SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND DEFICIENCIES OF EARLY COMPONENTS OF THE COMPLEMENT CLASSICAL PATHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes eIsaac

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the Classical, Alternative or Lectin Pathways. Biological functions such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in auto-immune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the Classical Pathway is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE - mainly C1q deficiency (93% and C4 deficiency (75%. The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the Classical Pathway (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, C2 proteins in SLE patients.

  2. Designing high availability systems DFSS and classical reliability techniques with practical real life examples

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    A practical, step-by-step guide to designing world-class, high availability systems using both classical and DFSS reliability techniques Whether designing telecom, aerospace, automotive, medical, financial, or public safety systems, every engineer aims for the utmost reliability and availability in the systems he, or she, designs. But between the dream of world-class performance and reality falls the shadow of complexities that can bedevil even the most rigorous design process. While there are an array of robust predictive engineering tools, there has been no single-source guide to understan

  3. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  4. Multibody systems and robot dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Schiehlen, Werner

    1990-01-01

    The method of multibody system has been developed during the last two decades with application to various engineering topics, including robotics and walking machines. On the other hand, special algorithms for robot dynamics are available featuring the high computational efficiency required for control purposes. This paper shows the close relation between both approaches. Essential criteria for the effeciency of dynamics software are the numbers of coordinates used, which should be minimal. Fo...

  5. Molecular dynamics study of two- and three-dimensional classical fluids using double Yukawa potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Pathania; P K Ahluwalla

    2005-09-01

    We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation of two- and three- dimensional double Yukawa fluids near the triple point. We have compared some of the static and dynamic correlation functions with those of Lennard{Jones, when parameters occurring in double Yukawa potential are chosen to fit Lennard-Jones potential. The results are in good agreement. However, when repulsive and attractive parameters occurring in double Yukawa potential are varied, we found distinct differences in static and dynamic correlation functions. We have also compared the two-dimensional correlation functions with those of three-dimensional to study the effect of dimensionality, near the triple point region.

  6. PREFACE: The 9th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, L. P.

    2015-05-01

    The most recent meeting took place at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, on June 9-13, 2014. This meeting forms the basis for the Proceedings that are recorded in this issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Along with the work of some of the founding members of the Association, we were fortunate to have lecturers from application areas that provided strong challenges for further developments in quantum field theory, cosmological problems, and in the dynamics of systems subject to accelerations and the effects of general relativity. Topics treated in this issue include studies of the dark matter problem, rotation curves, and, in particular, for the (relatively accessible) Milky Way galaxy, compact stellar objects, a composite particle model, and the properties of a conformally invariant theory with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The Stueckelberg theory is further investigated for its properties in producing bremsstrahlung and pair production and apparent superluminal effects, and, as mentioned above, the implications of low energy nuclear reactions for such off-shell theories. Other "proper time" theories are investigated as well, and a study of the clock synchronization problem is presented. A mathematical study of to quantum groupo associated with the Toda lattice and its implications for quantum field theory, as well as a phenomenological discussion of supernova mechanics as well as a semiclassical discussion of electron spin and the question of the compatibility of special relativity and the quantum theory. A careful analysis of the covariant Aharonov-Bohm effect is given as well. The quantization of massless fields and the relation to the Maxwell theory is also discussed. We wish to thank the participants who contributed very much through their lectures, personal discussions, and these papers, to the advancement of the subject and our understanding.

  7. Comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the potent synthetic classical cannabinoid ligand AMG3 in solution and at binding site of the CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdagi, Serdar; Reis, Heribert; Papadopoulos, Manthos G; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    The C-1'-dithiolane Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(8)-THC) amphiphilic analogue (-)-2-(6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-6,6,9-trimethylhydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyranyl)-2-hexyl-1,3-dithiolane (AMG3) is considered as one of the most potent synthetic analgesic cannabinoid (CB) ligands. Its structure is characterized by rigid tricyclic and flexible alkyl chain segments. Its conformational properties have not been fully explored. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies on classical CBs showed that the alkyl side chain is the most critical structural part for the receptor activation. However, reported low energy conformers of classical CB analogues vary mainly in the conformation of their alkyl side chain segment. Therefore, comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of low energy conformers of AMG3 were performed in order to investigate its structural and dynamical properties in two different systems. System-I includes ligand and amphoteric solvent DMSO, simulating the biological environment and system-II includes ligand at active site of the homology models of CB1 and CB2 receptors in the solvent. The trajectory analysis results are compared for the systems I and II. In system-I, the dihedral angle defined between aromatic ring and dithiolane ring of AMG3 shows more resistance to be transformed into another torsional angle and the dihedral angle adjacent to dithiolane ring belonging in the alkyl chain has flexibility to adopt gauche+/- and trans dihedral angles. The rest of the dihedral angles within the alkyl chain are all trans. These results point out that wrapped conformations are dynamically less favored in solution than linear conformations. Two possible plane angles defined between the rigid and flexible segments are found to be the most favored and adopting values of approximately 90 degrees and approximately 140 degrees. In system-II, these values are approximately 90 degrees and approximately 120 degrees. Conformers of AMG3 at the CB1 receptor favor to

  8. Classical dynamics of the Bianchi IX model: space-like and time-like singularity cases

    CERN Document Server

    Parnovsky, S L

    2016-01-01

    We present the comparison of the dynamics of the vacuum Bianchi IX model near the space-like and time-like singularities. In both cases there exist oscillatory type solutions with diverging asymptotically curvature invariants. The dynamics of the time-like singularity case includes additionally the singular solutions with diverging volume density, but vanishing curvature invariants. Our numerical results are consistent with qualitative analytical considerations underlying finding the generic singular solutions to general relativity.

  9. Quantum dynamics of bio-molecular systems in noisy environments

    CERN Document Server

    Plenio, M B

    2012-01-01

    We discuss three different aspects of the quantum dynamics of bio-molecular systems and more generally complex networks in the presence of strongly coupled environments. Firstly, we make a case for the systematic study of fundamental structural elements underlying the quantum dynamics of these systems, identify such elements and explore the resulting interplay of quantum dynamics and environmental decoherence. Secondly, we critically examine some existing approaches to the numerical description of system-environment interaction in the non-perturbative regime and present a promising new method that can overcome some limitations of existing methods. Thirdly, we present an approach towards deciding and quantifying the non-classicality of the action of the environment and the observed system-dynamics. We stress the relevance of these tools for strengthening the interplay between theoretical and experimental research in this field.

  10. ON COMPLEX DYNAMIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Daizhan

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents some recent works on the control of dynamic systems, which have certain complex properties caused by singularity of the nonlinear structures, structure-varyings, or evolution process etc. First, we consider the structure singularity of nonlinear control systems. It was revealed that the focus of researches on nonlinear control theory is shifting from regular systems to singular systems. The singularity of nonlinear systems causes certain complexity. Secondly, the switched systems are considered. For such systems the complexity is caused by the structure varying. We show that the switched systems have significant characteristics of complex systems. Finally, we investigate the evolution systems. The evolution structure makes complexity, and itself is a proper model for complex systems.

  11. Classical integrable systems and soliton equations related to eleven-vertex R-matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Levin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In our recent paper we suggested a natural construction of the classical relativistic integrable tops in terms of the quantum R-matrices. Here we study the simplest case – the 11-vertex R-matrix and related gl2 rational models. The corresponding top is equivalent to the 2-body Ruijsenaars–Schneider (RS or the 2-body Calogero–Moser (CM model depending on its description. We give different descriptions of the integrable tops and use them as building blocks for construction of more complicated integrable systems such as Gaudin models and classical spin chains (periodic and with boundaries. The known relation between the top and CM (or RS models allows to rewrite the Gaudin models (or the spin chains in the canonical variables. Then they assume the form of n-particle integrable systems with 2n constants. We also describe the generalization of the top to 1+1 field theories. It allows us to get the Landau–Lifshitz type equation. The latter can be treated as non-trivial deformation of the classical continuous Heisenberg model. In a similar way the deformation of the principal chiral model is described.

  12. Classical integrable systems and soliton equations related to eleven-vertex R-matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, A., E-mail: alevin@hse.ru [NRU HSE, Department of Mathematics, Myasnitskaya str. 20, Moscow, 101000 (Russian Federation); ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Olshanetsky, M., E-mail: olshanet@itep.ru [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); MIPT, Institutskii per. 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Zotov, A., E-mail: zotov@mi.ras.ru [Steklov Mathematical Institute RAS, Gubkina str. 8, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); MIPT, Institutskii per. 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    In our recent paper we suggested a natural construction of the classical relativistic integrable tops in terms of the quantum R-matrices. Here we study the simplest case – the 11-vertex R-matrix and related gl{sub 2} rational models. The corresponding top is equivalent to the 2-body Ruijsenaars–Schneider (RS) or the 2-body Calogero–Moser (CM) model depending on its description. We give different descriptions of the integrable tops and use them as building blocks for construction of more complicated integrable systems such as Gaudin models and classical spin chains (periodic and with boundaries). The known relation between the top and CM (or RS) models allows to rewrite the Gaudin models (or the spin chains) in the canonical variables. Then they assume the form of n-particle integrable systems with 2n constants. We also describe the generalization of the top to 1+1 field theories. It allows us to get the Landau–Lifshitz type equation. The latter can be treated as non-trivial deformation of the classical continuous Heisenberg model. In a similar way the deformation of the principal chiral model is described.

  13. Classical integrable systems and soliton equations related to eleven-vertex R-matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A.; Olshanetsky, M.; Zotov, A.

    2014-10-01

    In our recent paper we suggested a natural construction of the classical relativistic integrable tops in terms of the quantum R-matrices. Here we study the simplest case - the 11-vertex R-matrix and related gl2 rational models. The corresponding top is equivalent to the 2-body Ruijsenaars-Schneider (RS) or the 2-body Calogero-Moser (CM) model depending on its description. We give different descriptions of the integrable tops and use them as building blocks for construction of more complicated integrable systems such as Gaudin models and classical spin chains (periodic and with boundaries). The known relation between the top and CM (or RS) models allows to rewrite the Gaudin models (or the spin chains) in the canonical variables. Then they assume the form of n-particle integrable systems with 2n constants. We also describe the generalization of the top to 1+1 field theories. It allows us to get the Landau-Lifshitz type equation. The latter can be treated as non-trivial deformation of the classical continuous Heisenberg model. In a similar way the deformation of the principal chiral model is described.

  14. Multiparty Quantum Secret Sharing of Classical Message using Cavity Quantum Electrodynamic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Lian-Fang; LIU Yi-Min; ZHANG Zhan-Jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ An experimental feasible scheme of multiparty secret sharing of classical messages is proposed, based on a cavity quantum electrodynamic system. The secret messages are imposed on atomic Bell states initially in the sender's possession by local unitary operations. By swapping quantum entanglement of atomic Bell states, the secret messages are split into several parts and each part is distributed to a separate party. In this case, any subset of the entire party group can not read out the secret message but the entirety via mutual cooperations. In this scheme, to discriminate atomic Bell states, additional classical fields are employed besides the same highly-detuned single-mode cavities used to prepare atomic Bell states. This scheme is insensitive to the cavity decay and the thermal field, and usual joint Bell-state measurements are unnecessary.

  15. From classical genetics to quantitative genetics to systems biology: modeling epistasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Aylor

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression data has been used in lieu of phenotype in both classical and quantitative genetic settings. These two disciplines have separate approaches to measuring and interpreting epistasis, which is the interaction between alleles at different loci. We propose a framework for estimating and interpreting epistasis from a classical experiment that combines the strengths of each approach. A regression analysis step accommodates the quantitative nature of expression measurements by estimating the effect of gene deletions plus any interaction. Effects are selected by significance such that a reduced model describes each expression trait. We show how the resulting models correspond to specific hierarchical relationships between two regulator genes and a target gene. These relationships are the basic units of genetic pathways and genomic system diagrams. Our approach can be extended to analyze data from a variety of experiments, multiple loci, and multiple environments.

  16. Exact closed probability-free kinetic equation for system of classical particles with retarded interactions: towards microscopic foundation of kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    The exact closed equation of motion for microscopic distribution function of classical many-body system with account of interactions retardation between particles is derived. It is shown that interactions retardation leads to irreversible behaviour of many-body systems.

  17. PREFACE: IARD 2010: The 7th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Hu, Bei-Lok; Lee, Da-Shin; Gill, Tepper; Land, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Although the subject of relativistic dynamics has been explored from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view since the work of Einstein and Dirac, its most striking development has been in the framework of quantum field theory. The very accurate calculations of spectral and scattering properties, for example, of the anamolous magnetic moment of the electron and the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, and many qualitative features of the strong and electroweak interactions, demonstrate the very great power of description achieved in this framework. Yet, many fundamental questions remain to be clarified, such as the structure of classical realtivistic dynamical theories on the level of Hamilton and Lagrange in Minkowski space as well as on the curved manifolds of general relativity. There moreover remains the important question of the covariant classical description of systems at high energy for which particle production effects are not large, such as discussed in Synge's book, The Relativistic Gas, and in Balescu's book on relativistic statistical mechanics. In recent years, the study of high energy plasmas and heavy ion collisions has emphasized the importance of developing the techniques of relativistic mechanics. The results of Linder et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 0040401 (2005)) as well as the more recent work of Palacios et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 253001 (2009)) and others, have shown that there must be a quantum theory with coherence in time. Such a theory, manifestly covariant under the transformations of special relativity with an invariant evolution parameter, such as that of Stueckelberg (Helv. Phys. Acta 14 322, 588 (1941); 15 23 (1942); see also R P Feynman Phys. Rev. 80 4401 and J S Schwinger Phys. Rev. 82 664 (1951)) could provide a suitable basis for the study of such questions, as well as many others for which the application of the standard methods of quantum field theory are difficult to manage, involving, in particular, local

  18. On the tomographic description of classical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ibort, A; Man'ko, V I; Marmo, G; Simoni, A; Sudarshan, E C G; Ventriglia, F

    2012-01-01

    After a general description of the tomographic picture for classical systems, a tomographic description of free classical scalar fields is proposed both in a finite cavity and the continuum. The tomographic description is constructed in analogy with the classical tomographic picture of an ensemble of harmonic oscillators. The tomograms of a number of relevant states such as the canonical distribution, the classical counterpart of quantum coherent states and a new family of so called Gauss--Laguerre states, are discussed. Finally the Liouville equation for field states is described in the tomographic picture offering an alternative description of the dynamics of the system that can be extended naturally to other fields.

  19. On the dynamics of a polaron in a classical chain with finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhno, V. D., E-mail: lak@impb.psn.ru; Fialko, N. S., E-mail: fialka@impb.psn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    In today’s literature, polaron states in classical molecular chains are mostly calculated at zero temperature. It is assumed that the properties of these states change little if the temperature is different from zero but is much less than the characteristic energy equal to the depth of the polaron level. By numerical experiments, we demonstrate that the temperature decay of a polaron depends on the chain length. The longer the chain, the lower the critical temperature above which the charge is in a delocalized state, and, conversely, the shorter the chain, the higher the decay temperature of a polaron. The results of numerical experiments lead to a conclusion that, in an indefinitely long chain, polaron states decay at temperatures differing arbitrarily little from zero.

  20. Classical Dynamics of Harmonic Generation of the Hydrogen Molecular Ion Interacting with Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-Hong; DUAN Yi-Wu; Wing-Ki Liu; Jian-Min Yuan

    2001-01-01

    Within Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by using the classical trajectory theory, a description for the high order harmonic generation of the hydrogen molecular ion interacting with ultrashort laser pulses has been pre sented. The Coulomb singularities have been remedied by the regularization. The action-angle variables have been used to generate the initial inversion symmetry microcanonical distribution. Within a proper intensity range, a harmonic plateau with only odd harmonics appears. For a larger intensity, because of the existence of chaos, the harmonic spectra become noisier. For a large enough intensity, the ionization takes place and the harmonics disappear. So the chaos causes the noises, the ionization suppresses the harmonic generation, and the onset of the ionization follows the onset of chaos.

  1. Structural properties of liquid N-methylacetamide via ab initio, path integral, and classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, T. W.; Crain, J.; Martyna, G. J.

    2006-03-01

    In order to better understand the physical interactions that stabilize protein secondary structure, the neat liquid state of a peptidic fragment, N-methylacetamide (NMA), was studied using computer simulation. Three different descriptions of the molecular liquid were examined: an empirical force field treatment with classical nuclei, an empirical force field treatment with quantum mechanical nuclei, and an ab initio density functional theory (DFT) treatment. The DFT electronic structure was evaluated using the BLYP approximate functional and a plane wave basis set. The different physical effects probed by the three models, such as quantum dispersion, many-body polarization, and nontrivial charge distributions on the liquid properties, were compared. Much of the structural ordering in the liquid is characterized by hydrogen bonded chains of NMA molecules. Modest structural differences are present among the three models of liquid NMA. The average molecular dipole in the liquid under the ab initio treatment, however, is enhanced by 60% over the gas phase value.

  2. Noise-spectroscopy of multiqubit systems: Determining all their parameters by applying an external classical noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savel' ev, S., E-mail: S.Saveliev@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Zagoskin, A.M. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Omelyanchouk, A.N. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2010-10-05

    Imagine that you have several sets of two coupled qubits, but you do not know the parameters of their Hamitonians. How to determine these without resorting to the usual spectroscopy approach to the problem? Based on numerical modeling, we show that all the parameters of a system of two coupled qubits can be determined by applying to it an external classical noise and analyzing the Fourier spectrum of the elements of the system's density matrix. In particular, the interlevel spacings as well as the strength and sign of the qubit-qubit coupling can be determined this way.

  3. Field theory and weak Euler-Lagrange equation for classical particle-field systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Hong [PPPL; Burby, Joshua W [PPPL; Davidson, Ronald C [PPPL

    2014-10-01

    It is commonly believed that energy-momentum conservation is the result of space-time symmetry. However, for classical particle-field systems, e.g., Klimontovich-Maxwell and Klimontovich- Poisson systems, such a connection hasn't been formally established. The difficulty is due to the fact that particles and the electromagnetic fields reside on different manifolds. To establish the connection, the standard Euler-Lagrange equation needs to be generalized to a weak form. Using this technique, energy-momentum conservation laws that are difficult to find otherwise can be systematically derived.

  4. Quantum-classical correspondence in multimensional nonlinear systems: Anderson localization and "superdiffusive" solitons

    KAUST Repository

    Brambila, Danilo

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically studied Anderson localization in a 2D+1 nonlinear kicked rotor model. The system shows a very rich dynamical behavior, where the Anderson localization is suppressed and soliton wave-particles undergo a superdiffusive motion.

  5. Orbital free DFT versus single density equation: a perspective through quantum domain behavior of a classically chaotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Kar, Susmita; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2015-12-21

    The orbital free density functional theory and the single density equation approach are formally equivalent. An orbital free density based quantum dynamical strategy is used to study the quantum-classical correspondence in both weakly and strongly coupled van der Pol and Duffing oscillators in the presence of an external electric field in one dimension. The resulting quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion are solved through an implicit Euler type real space method involving a moving weighted least square technique. The Lagrangian framework used here allows the numerical grid points to follow the wave packet trajectory. The associated classical equations of motion are solved using a sixth order Runge-Kutta method and the Ehrenfest dynamics is followed through the solution of the time dependent Schrodinger equation using a time dependent Fourier Grid Hamiltonian technique. Various diagnostics reveal a close parallelism between classical regular as well as chaotic dynamics and that obtained from the Bohmian mechanics.

  6. Disease processes as hybrid dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Liò

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the use of hybrid techniques in complex processes of infectious diseases. Since predictive disease models in biomedicine require a multiscale approach for understanding the molecule-cell-tissue-organ-body interactions, heterogeneous methodologies are often employed for describing the different biological scales. Hybrid models provide effective means for complex disease modelling where the action and dosage of a drug or a therapy could be meaningfully investigated: the infection dynamics can be classically described in a continuous fashion, while the scheduling of multiple treatment discretely. We define an algebraic language for specifying general disease processes and multiple treatments, from which a semantics in terms of hybrid dynamical system can be derived. Then, the application of control-theoretic tools is proposed in order to compute the optimal scheduling of multiple therapies. The potentialities of our approach are shown in the case study of the SIR epidemic model and we discuss its applicability on osteomyelitis, a bacterial infection affecting the bone remodelling system in a specific and multiscale manner. We report that formal languages are helpful in giving a general homogeneous formulation for the different scales involved in a multiscale disease process; and that the combination of hybrid modelling and control theory provides solid grounds for computational medicine.

  7. Spectrum of Quantum Transfer Matrices via Classical Many-Body Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gorsky, A; Zotov, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we clarify the relationship between inhomogeneous quantum spin chains and classical integrable many-body systems. It provides an alternative (to the nested Bethe ansatz) method for computation of spectra of the spin chains. Namely, the spectrum of the quantum transfer matrix for the inhomogeneous ${\\mathfrak g}{\\mathfrak l}_n$-invariant XXX spin chain on $N$ sites with twisted boundary conditions can be found in terms of velocities of particles in the rational $N$-body Ruijsenaars-Schneider model. The possible values of the velocities are to be found from intersection points of two Lagrangian submanifolds in the phase space of the classical model. One of them is the Lagrangian hyperplane corresponding to fixed coordinates of all $N$ particles and the other one is an $N$-dimensional Lagrangian submanifold obtained by fixing levels of $N$ classical Hamiltonians in involution. The latter are determined by eigenvalues of the twist matrix. To support this picture, we give a direct proof that the eige...

  8. Dynamical stability of Hamiltonian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Dynamical stability has become the center of study on Hamiltonian system. In this article we intro-duce the recent development in some areas closely related to this topic, such as the KAM theory, Mather theory, Arnolddiffusion and non-singular collision of n-body problem.

  9. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, A.M., E-mail: kowalski@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Científicas (CIC) (Argentina); Plastino, A., E-mail: plastino@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Argentina' s National Research Council (CONICET) (Argentina); SThAR, EPFL Innovation Park, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-09-16

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt–Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit. - Highlights: • We investigate the classical limit (CL) of a well known semi classical model. • The study is made by reference to the Bandt Pompe symbolic approach. • The number and type of associated symbols changes as one proceeds towards the CL. • We ascertain which symbols pertaining to the quantum zone remain in the CL.

  10. Advanced dynamics of mechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cheli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces a general approach for schematization of mechanical systems with rigid and deformable bodies. It proposes a systems approach to reproduce the interaction of the mechanical system with different force fields such as those due to the action of fluids or contact forces between bodies, i.e., with forces dependent on the system states, introducing the concepts of the stability of motion. In the first part of the text mechanical systems with one or more degrees of freedom with large motion and subsequently perturbed in the neighborhood of the steady state position are analyzed. Both discrete and continuous systems (modal approach, finite elements) are analyzed. The second part is devoted to the study of mechanical systems subject to force fields, the rotor dynamics, techniques of experimental identification of the parameters, and random excitations. The book will be especially valuable for students of engineering courses in Mechanical Systems, Aerospace, Automation, and Energy but will also b...

  11. Controlling dynamics in diatomic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Praveen Kumar; Harjinder Singh

    2007-09-01

    Controlling molecular energetics using laser pulses is exemplified for nuclear motion in two different diatomic systems. The problem of finding the optimized field for maximizing a desired quantum dynamical target is formulated using an iterative method. The method is applied for two diatomic systems, HF and OH. The power spectra of the fields and evolution of populations of different vibrational states during transitions are obtained.

  12. Adaptive, dynamic, and resilient systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suri, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    As the complexity of today's networked computer systems grows, they become increasingly difficult to understand, predict, and control. Addressing these challenges requires new approaches to building these systems. Adaptive, Dynamic, and Resilient Systems supplies readers with various perspectives of the critical infrastructure that systems of networked computers rely on. It introduces the key issues, describes their interrelationships, and presents new research in support of these areas.The book presents the insights of a different group of international experts in each chapter. Reporting on r

  13. Artificial intelligence and dynamic systems for geophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gvishiani, Alexei

    2002-01-01

    The book presents new clustering schemes, dynamical systems and pattern recognition algorithms in geophysical, geodynamical and natural hazard applications. The original mathematical technique is based on both classical and fuzzy sets models. Geophysical and natural hazard applications are mostly original. However, the artificial intelligence technique described in the book can be applied far beyond the limits of Earth science applications. The book is intended for research scientists, tutors, graduate students, scientists in geophysics and engineers

  14. Classical non-linear wave dynamics and gluon spin operator in SU(2) QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Youngman; Tsukioka, Takuya; Zhang, P M

    2016-01-01

    We study various types of classical non-linear wave solutions with mass scale parameters in a pure SU(2) quantum chromodynamics. It has been shown that there are two gauge non-equivalent solutions for non-linear plane waves with a mass parameter. One of them corresponds to embedding \\lambda \\phi^4 theory into the SU(2) Yang-Mills theory, another represents essentially Yang-Mills type solution. We describe a wide class of stationary and non-stationary wave solutions among which kink like solitons and non-linear wave packet solutions have been found. A regular stationary monopole like solution with a finite energy density is proposed. The solution can be treated as a Wu-Yang monopole dressed in off-diagonal gluons. All non-linear wave solutions have common features: presence of a mass scale parameter, non-vanishing projection of the color magnetic field along the propagation direction and a total spin zero. Gauge invariant and Lorentz frame independent definitions of the gluon spin operator are considered.

  15. Classical analogues of a quantum system in spatial and temporal domains: A probability amplitude approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Panchadhyayee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We have simulated the similar features of the well-known classical phenomena in quantum domain under the formalism of probability amplitude method. The identical pattern of interference fringes of a Fabry–Perot interferometer (especially on reflection mode is obtained through the power-broadened spectral line shape of the population distribution in the excited state with careful delineation of a coherently driven two-level atomic model. In a unit wavelength domain, such pattern can be substantially modified by controlling typical spatial field arrangement in one and two dimensions, which is found complementary to the findings of recent research on atom localization in sub-wavelength domain. The spatial dependence of temporal dynamics has also been studied at a particular condition, which is equivalent to that could be obtained under Raman–Nath diffraction controlled by spatial phase.

  16. Highly Efficient Noise-Assisted Energy Transport in Classical Oscillator Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Montiel, R. de J.; Torres, Juan P.

    2013-05-01

    Photosynthesis is a biological process that involves the highly efficient transport of energy captured from the Sun to a reaction center, where conversion into useful biochemical energy takes place. Using a quantum description, Rebentrost et al. [New J. Phys. 11, 033003 (2009)] and Plenio and Huelga [New J. Phys. 10, 113019 (2008)] have explained this high efficiency as the result of the interplay between the quantum coherent evolution of the photosynthetic system and noise introduced by its surrounding environment. Even though one can always use a quantum perspective to describe any physical process, since everything follows the laws of quantum mechanics, is the use of quantum theory imperative to explain this high efficiency? Recently, it has been shown by Eisfeld and Briggs [Phys. Rev. E 85, 046118 (2012)] that a purely classical model can be used to explain main aspects of the energy transfer in photosynthetic systems. Using this approach, we demonstrate explicitly here that highly efficient noise-assisted energy transport can be found as well in purely classical systems. The wider scope of applicability of the enhancement of energy transfer assisted by noise might open new ways for developing new technologies aimed at enhancing the efficiency of a myriad of energy transfer systems, from information channels in microelectronic circuits to long-distance high-voltage electrical lines.

  17. Semi-classical description of matter wave interferometers and hybrid quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Mathias

    2015-02-16

    This work considers the semi-classical description of two applications involving cold atoms. This is, on one hand, the behavior of a BOSE-EINSTEIN condensate in hybrid systems, i.e. in contact with a microscopic object (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, etc.). On the other, the evolution of phase space distributions in matter wave interferometers utilizing ray tracing methods was discussed. For describing condensates in hybrid systems, one can map the GROSS-PITAEVSKII equation, a differential equation in the complex-valued macroscopic wave function, onto a system of two differential equations in density and phase. Neglecting quantum dispersion, one obtains a semiclassical description which is easily modified to incorporate interactions between condensate and microscopical object. In our model, these interactions comprise attractive forces (CASIMIR-POLDER forces) and loss of condensed atoms due to inelastic collisions at the surface of the object. Our model exhibited the excitation of sound waves that are triggered by the object's rapid immersion, and spread across the condensate thereafter. Moreover, local particle loss leads to a shrinking of the bulk condensate. We showed that the total number of condensed particles is decreasing potentially in the beginning (large condensate, strong mean field interaction), while it decays exponentially in the long-time limit (small condensate, mean field inetraction negligible). For representing the physics of matter wave interferometers in phase space, we utilized the WIGNER function. In semi-classical approximation, which again consists in ignoring the quantum dispersion, this representation is subject to the same equation of motion as classical phase space distributions, i.e. the LIOUVILLE equation. This implies that time evolution of theWIGNER function follows a phase space flow that consists of classical trajectories (classical transport). This means, for calculating a time-evolved distribution, one has know the initial

  18. Structure Theory for Extended Kepler-Coulomb 3D Classical Superintegrable Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernie G. Kalnins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The classical Kepler-Coulomb system in 3 dimensions is well known to be 2nd order superintegrable, with a symmetry algebra that closes polynomially under Poisson brackets. This polynomial closure is typical for 2nd order superintegrable systems in 2D and for 2nd order systems in 3D with nondegenerate (4-parameter potentials. However the degenerate 3-parameter potential for the 3D extended Kepler-Coulomb system (also 2nd order superintegrable is an exception, as its quadratic symmetry algebra doesn't close polynomially. The 3D 4-parameter potential for the extended Kepler-Coulomb system is not even 2nd order superintegrable. However, Verrier and Evans (2008 showed it was 4th order superintegrable, and Tanoudis and Daskaloyannis (2011 showed that in the quantum case, if a second 4th order symmetry is added to the generators, the double commutators in the symmetry algebra close polynomially. Here, based on the Tremblay, Turbiner and Winternitz construction, we consider an infinite class of classical extended Kepler-Coulomb 3- and 4-parameter systems indexed by a pair of rational numbers (k_1,k_2 and reducing to the usual systems when k_1=k_2=1. We show these systems to be superintegrable of arbitrarily high order and work out explicitly the structure of the symmetry algebras determined by the 5 basis generators we have constructed. We demonstrate that the symmetry algebras close rationally; only for systems admitting extra discrete symmetries is polynomial closure achieved. Underlying the structure theory is the existence of raising and lowering constants of the motion, not themselves polynomials in the momenta, that can be employed to construct the polynomial symmetries and their structure relations.

  19. Does classical mechanics always adequately describe "classical physical reality"

    CERN Document Server

    Shemi-zadeh, V E

    2002-01-01

    The article is dedicated to discussion of irreversibility and foundation of statistical mechanics "from the first principles". Taking into account infinitesimal and, as it seems, neglectful for classical mechanics fluctuations of the physical vacuum, makes a deterministic motion of unstable dynamic systems is broken ("spontaneous determinism breaking", "spontaneous stochastization"). Vacuum fluctuations play part of the trigger, starting the powerful mechanism of exponent instability. The motion of the dynamic systems becomes irreversible and stochastic. Classical mechanics turns out to be applicable only for a small class of stable dynamic systems with zero Kolmogorov-Sinay entropy $h=0$. For alternative "Stochastic mechanics" there are corresponding equations of motion and Master Equation, describing irreversible evolution of the initial distribution function to equilibrium state.

  20. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  1. Optimal estimation of dynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Crassidis, John L

    2004-01-01

    Most newcomers to the field of linear stochastic estimation go through a difficult process in understanding and applying the theory.This book minimizes the process while introducing the fundamentals of optimal estimation.Optimal Estimation of Dynamic Systems explores topics that are important in the field of control where the signals received are used to determine highly sensitive processes such as the flight path of a plane, the orbit of a space vehicle, or the control of a machine. The authors use dynamic models from mechanical and aerospace engineering to provide immediate results of estim

  2. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  3. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ames, Arlo Leroy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  4. Classical R-matrix theory for bi-Hamiltonian field systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaszak, Maciej [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Szablikowski, Blazej M [Department of Mathematics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QW (United Kingdom)], E-mail: blaszakm@amu.edu.pl, E-mail: b.szablikowski@maths.gla.ac.uk

    2009-10-09

    This is a survey of the application of the classical R-matrix formalism to the construction of infinite-dimensional integrable Hamiltonian field systems. The main point is the study of bi-Hamiltonian structures. Appropriate constructions on Poisson, noncommutative and loop algebras as well as the central extension procedure are presented. The theory is developed for (1 + 1)- and (2 + 1)-dimensional field and lattice soliton systems as well as hydrodynamic systems. The formalism presented contains sufficiently many proofs and important details to make it self-contained and complete. The general theory is applied to several infinite-dimensional Lie algebras in order to construct both dispersionless and dispersive (soliton) integrable field systems.

  5. Fuzzy logic controller versus classical logic controller for residential hybrid solar-wind-storage energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrouazin, A.; Aillerie, M.; Mekkakia-Maaza, N.; Charles, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    Several researches for management of diverse hybrid energy systems and many techniques have been proposed for robustness, savings and environmental purpose. In this work we aim to make a comparative study between two supervision and control techniques: fuzzy and classic logics to manage the hybrid energy system applied for typical housing fed by solar and wind power, with rack of batteries for storage. The system is assisted by the electric grid during energy drop moments. A hydrogen production device is integrated into the system to retrieve surplus energy production from renewable sources for the household purposes, intending the maximum exploitation of these sources over years. The models have been achieved and generated signals for electronic switches command of proposed both techniques are presented and discussed in this paper.

  6. Three Graded Modified Classical Yang-Baxter Equations and Integrable Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Saidi, E H

    1997-01-01

    The $6 = 3\\times 2$ huge Lie algebra $\\Xi$ of all local and non local differential operators on a circle is applied to the standard Adler-Kostant-Symes (AKS) R-bracket sckeme. It is shown in particular that there exist three additional Lie structures, associated to three graded modified classical Yang-Baxter(GMCYB) equations. As we know from the standard case, these structures can be used to classify in a more consitent way a wide class of integrable systems. Other algebraic properties are also presented.

  7. Theory of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamic Systems is intended for scientists and graduate students interested in the foundations of quantum mechanics and applied scientists interested in accurate atomic and molecular models. This is a reference to those working in the new field of relativistic optics, in topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles, and is based on 30 years of research. The novelty of this work consists of accurate connections between the properties of quantum equations and correspon

  8. Dynamics of genuine multipartite correlations in open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grimsmo, Arne L; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture K

    2012-01-01

    We propose a measure for genuine multipartite correlations suited for the study of dynamics in open quantum systems. This measure is contextual in the sense that it depends on how information is read from the environment. It is used to study an interacting collective system of atoms undergoing phase transitions as external parameters are varied. We show that the steady state of the system can have a significant degree of genuine multipartite quantum and classical correlations, and that the proposed measure can serve as a witness of critical behavior in quantum systems.

  9. Screw-matrix method in dynamics of multibody systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanzhu, Liu

    1988-05-01

    In the present paper the concept of screw in classical mechanics is expressed in matrix form, in order to formulate the dynamical equations of the multibody systems. The mentioned method can retain the advantages of the screw theory and avoid the shortcomings of the dual number notation. Combining the screw-matrix method with the tool of graph theory in Roberson/Wittenberg formalism. We can expand the application of the screw theory to the general case of multibody systems. For a tree system, the dynamical equations for each j-th subsystem, composed of all the outboard bodies connected by j-th joint can be formulated without the constraint reaction forces in the joints. For a nontree system, the dynamical equations of subsystems and the kinematical consistency conditions of the joints can be derived using the loop matrix. The whole process of calculation is unified in matrix form. A three-segment manipulator is discussed as an example.

  10. Dynamic detection for computer virus based on immune system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tao

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by biological immune system,a new dynamic detection model for computer virus based on immune system is proposed.The quantitative description of the model is given.The problem of dynamic description for self and nonself in a computer virus immune system is solved,which reduces the size of self set.The new concept of dynamic tolerance,as well as the new mechanisms of gene evolution and gene coding for immature detectors is presented,improving the generating efficiency of mature detectors,reducing the false-negative and false-positive rates.Therefore,the difficult problem,in which the detector training cost is exponentially related to the size of self-set in a traditional computer immune system,is thus overcome.The theory analysis and experimental results show that the proposed model has better time efficiency and detecting ability than the classic model ARTIS.

  11. Formal languages in dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Troll, G

    1993-01-01

    We treat here the interrelation between formal languages and those dynamical systems that can be described by cellular automata (CA). There is a well-known injective map which identifies any CA-invariant subshift with a central formal language. However, in the special case of a symbolic dynamics, i.e. where the CA is just the shift map, one gets a stronger result: the identification map can be extended to a functor between the categories of symbolic dynamics and formal languages. This functor additionally maps topological conjugacies between subshifts to empty-string-limited generalized sequential machines between languages. If the periodic points form a dense set, a case which arises in a commonly used notion of chaotic dynamics, then an even more natural map to assign a formal language to a subshift is offered. This map extends to a functor, too. The Chomsky hierarchy measuring the complexity of formal languages can be transferred via either of these functors from formal languages to symbolic dynamics and p...

  12. Synchronization of nonautonomous dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Kloeden

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The synchronization of two nonautonomous dynamical systems is considered, where the systems are described in terms of a skew-product formalism, i. e., in which an inputed autonomous driving system governs the evolution of the vector field of a differential equation with the passage of time. It is shown that the coupled trajectories converge to each other as time increases for sufficiently large coupling coefficient and also that the component sets of the pullback attractor of the coupled system converges upper semi continuously as the coupling parameter increases to the diagonal of the product of the corresponding component sets of the pullback attractor of a system generated by the average of the vector fields of the original uncoupled systems.

  13. Hidden attractors in dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Jafari, Sajad; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuznetsov, Nikolay V.; Leonov, Gennady A.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2016-06-01

    Complex dynamical systems, ranging from the climate, ecosystems to financial markets and engineering applications typically have many coexisting attractors. This property of the system is called multistability. The final state, i.e., the attractor on which the multistable system evolves strongly depends on the initial conditions. Additionally, such systems are very sensitive towards noise and system parameters so a sudden shift to a contrasting regime may occur. To understand the dynamics of these systems one has to identify all possible attractors and their basins of attraction. Recently, it has been shown that multistability is connected with the occurrence of unpredictable attractors which have been called hidden attractors. The basins of attraction of the hidden attractors do not touch unstable fixed points (if exists) and are located far away from such points. Numerical localization of the hidden attractors is not straightforward since there are no transient processes leading to them from the neighborhoods of unstable fixed points and one has to use the special analytical-numerical procedures. From the viewpoint of applications, the identification of hidden attractors is the major issue. The knowledge about the emergence and properties of hidden attractors can increase the likelihood that the system will remain on the most desirable attractor and reduce the risk of the sudden jump to undesired behavior. We review the most representative examples of hidden attractors, discuss their theoretical properties and experimental observations. We also describe numerical methods which allow identification of the hidden attractors.

  14. Quasiparticle motion in some classical and quantum mechanical systems: Investigations of nanoscale friction and polaron mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Mukesh

    In this thesis, we investigate some topics of transport in classical and quantum systems. The classical system under study is related to friction at the nanoscale. The first model we consider is that of a dimer moving on a 1-dimensional periodic substrate; we study the role of an internal channel of dissipation on the effective damping experienced by the dimer during its motion. With the view that understanding of the processes at the microscopic scale can shed some light on the origin of frictional forces, we undertake a systematic study of the scattering of a free particle by a harmonic oscillator. This study starts from a Hamiltonian description of the system, without any phenomenological damping. The dissipation in this system results from an exchange of energy between the particle and the oscillator when they are in close proximity. This classical scattering problem becomes chaotic as a result of exchange of energy. We present, in detail, a study of the chaotic scattering process for an initially static oscillator. In the case of an initially excited oscillator, extraction of information about the chaotic set requires the construction of Smale horseshoe on an appropriate Poincare surface of section. A discussion on the construction of this chaotic invariant set is also provided in this thesis. Interacting quasiparticle-boson systems form an important part of condensed matter physics. Various approximation schemes are often employed in the study of these systems. In order to understand the response of a quasi-particle to externally applied electric fields, we study in the second part of this thesis, the 2-site quantum dimer under the semiclassical approximation. The role of initial phases and effects of resonance between phonon frequency and the frequency due to the Stark splitting of states is investigated. This thesis also contains discussions regarding the frequency response of both degenerate and nondegenerate adiabatic semiclassical models and self

  15. Mean-field approximation for spacing distribution functions in classical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Diego Luis; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a mean-field method to calculate approximately the spacing distribution functions p(n)(s) in one-dimensional classical many-particle systems. We compare our method with two other commonly used methods, the independent interval approximation and the extended Wigner surmise. In our mean-field approach, p(n)(s) is calculated from a set of Langevin equations, which are decoupled by using a mean-field approximation. We find that in spite of its simplicity, the mean-field approximation provides good results in several systems. We offer many examples illustrating that the three previously mentioned methods give a reasonable description of the statistical behavior of the system. The physical interpretation of each method is also discussed.

  16. Bill2d -- a software package for classical two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems

    CERN Document Server

    Solanpää, Janne; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    We present Bill2d, a modern and efficient C++ package for classical simulations of two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. Bill2d can be used for various billiard and diffusion problems with one or more charged particles with interactions, different external potentials, an external magnetic field, periodic and open boundaries, etc. The software package can also calculate many key quantities in complex systems such as Poincar\\'e sections, survival probabilities, and diffusion coefficients. While aiming at a large class of applicable systems, the code also strives for ease-of-use, efficiency, and modularity for the implementation of additional features. The package comes along with a user guide, a developer's manual, and a documentation of the application program interface (API).

  17. BILL2D - A software package for classical two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanpää, J.; Luukko, P. J. J.; Räsänen, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present BILL2D, a modern and efficient C++ package for classical simulations of two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. BILL2D can be used for various billiard and diffusion problems with one or more charged particles with interactions, different external potentials, an external magnetic field, periodic and open boundaries, etc. The software package can also calculate many key quantities in complex systems such as Poincaré sections, survival probabilities, and diffusion coefficients. While aiming at a large class of applicable systems, the code also strives for ease-of-use, efficiency, and modularity for the implementation of additional features. The package comes along with a user guide, a developer's manual, and a documentation of the application program interface (API).

  18. Communication: dynamical embedding: correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H2O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  19. Time, classical and quantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniello, P.; Ciaglia, F. M.; Di Cosmo, F.; Marmo, G.; Pérez-Pardo, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new point of view regarding the problem of time in quantum mechanics, based on the idea of replacing the usual time operator T with a suitable real-valued function T on the space of physical states. The proper characterization of the function T relies on a particular relation with the dynamical evolution of the system rather than with the infinitesimal generator of the dynamics (Hamiltonian). We first consider the case of classical hamiltonian mechanics, where observables are functions on phase space and the tools of differential geometry can be applied. The idea is then extended to the case of the unitary evolution of pure states of finite-level quantum systems by means of the geometric formulation of quantum mechanics. It is found that T is a function on the space of pure states which is not associated with any self-adjoint operator. The link between T and the dynamical evolution is interpreted as defining a simultaneity relation for the states of the system with respect to the dynamical evolution itself. It turns out that different dynamical evolutions lead to different notions of simultaneity, i.e., the notion of simultaneity is a dynamical notion.

  20. Classical dynamics of the Abelian Higgs model from the critical point and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsimiga, G. C.; Diakonos, F. K.; Maintas, X. N.

    2015-09-01

    We present two different families of solutions of the U(1)-Higgs model in a (1 + 1) dimensional setting leading to a localization of the gauge field. First we consider a uniform background (the usual vacuum), which corresponds to the fully higgsed-superconducting phase. Then we study the case of a non-uniform background in the form of a domain wall which could be relevantly close to the critical point of the associated spontaneous symmetry breaking. For both cases we obtain approximate analytical nodeless and nodal solutions for the gauge field resulting as bound states of an effective Pöschl-Teller potential created by the scalar field. The two scenaria differ only in the scale of the characteristic localization length. Numerical simulations confirm the validity of the obtained analytical solutions. Additionally we demonstrate how a kink may be used as a mediator driving the dynamics from the critical point and beyond.

  1. Classical dynamics of the Abelian Higgs model from the critical point and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. Katsimiga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present two different families of solutions of the U(1-Higgs model in a (1+1 dimensional setting leading to a localization of the gauge field. First we consider a uniform background (the usual vacuum, which corresponds to the fully higgsed-superconducting phase. Then we study the case of a non-uniform background in the form of a domain wall which could be relevantly close to the critical point of the associated spontaneous symmetry breaking. For both cases we obtain approximate analytical nodeless and nodal solutions for the gauge field resulting as bound states of an effective Pöschl–Teller potential created by the scalar field. The two scenaria differ only in the scale of the characteristic localization length. Numerical simulations confirm the validity of the obtained analytical solutions. Additionally we demonstrate how a kink may be used as a mediator driving the dynamics from the critical point and beyond.

  2. Classical integrable systems and soliton equations related to eleven-vertex R-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, A; Zotov, A

    2014-01-01

    In our recent paper we suggested a natural construction of the classical relativistic integrable tops in terms of the quantum $R$-matrices. Here we study the simplest case -- the 11-vertex $R$-matrix and related ${\\rm gl}_2$ rational models. The corresponding top is equivalent to the 2-body Ruijsenaars-Schneider (RS) or the 2-body Calogero-Moser (CM) model depending on its description. We give different descriptions of the integrable tops and use them as building blocks for construction of more complicated integrable systems such as Gaudin models and classical spin chains (periodic and with boundaries). The known relation between the top and CM (or RS) models allows to re-write the Gaudin models (or the spin chains) in the canonical variables. Then they assume the form of $n$-particle integrable systems with $2n$ constants. We also describe the generalization of the top to 1+1 field theories. It allows us to get the Landau-Lifshitz type equation. The latter can be treated as non-trivial deformation of the cla...

  3. Classical probability density distributions with uncertainty relations for ground states of simple non-relativistic quantum-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radożycki, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    The probability density distributions for the ground states of certain model systems in quantum mechanics and for their classical counterparts are considered. It is shown, that classical distributions are remarkably improved by incorporating into them the Heisenberg uncertainty relation between position and momentum. Even the crude form of this incorporation makes the agreement between classical and quantum distributions unexpectedly good, except for the small area, where classical momenta are large. It is demonstrated that the slight improvement of this form, makes the classical distribution very similar to the quantum one in the whole space. The obtained results are much better than those from the WKB method. The paper is devoted to ground states, but the method applies to excited states too.

  4. Dynamical Systems and Motion Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    TASK Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA I WORK UNIT NUMBERS 545 Technology Square . Cambridge, MA 02139 C\\ II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME ANO0 ADDRESS...INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I.Memo No. 1037 April, 1988 Dynamical Systems and Motion Vision Joachim Heel Abstract: In this... Artificial Intelligence L3 Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for the Laboratory’s [1 Artificial Intelligence Research is

  5. Quantum-classical effective-modes dynamics of the pipi* --> npi* decay in 9H-adenine. A quadratic vibronic coupling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, David; Ferrer, Francisco José Avila; Improta, Roberto; Lami, Alessandro; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulation of the internal conversion between the lowest energy pipi* (S(La)) and npi* (S(n)) excited electronic states in adenine in the gas phase, adopting a quadratic vibronic model (QVC), parametrized with the help of PBE0 density functional calculations. Our approach is based on a hierarchical representation of the QVC Hamiltonian and a subsequent treatment of the most relevant coordinates at accurate time-dependent quantum level and of the other 'bath' modes at classical level. We predict an ultrafast transfer (-30 fs) of approximately 75% of the initial population excited on S(La) to S(n). Within an adiabatic picture, on the same timescale the wave packet concentrates almost completely on the lowest S1 state, where however it shows a very broad distribution with different characteristics (due to the different 'diabatic' character). It is shown that the proposed methodology offers a practicable route to describe the quantum dynamics of internal conversion processes in large semi-rigid systems.

  6. Mean dynamical entropy of quantum system tends to infinity in the semiclassical limit

    OpenAIRE

    Slomczynski, Wojciech; Zyczkowski, Karol

    1997-01-01

    We show that the mean dynamical entropy of a quantum map on the sphere is positive and tends logarithmically to infinity in the semiclassical limit. A link between chaotic dynamics of classical systems and the random matrix-like properties of spectra of the corresponding quantum analogues is demonstrated.

  7. Classical molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of chemical-mechanical polishing of amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagarov, Evgueni Anatolievich

    Chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) is a widely accepted process in the semiconductor industry. Despite intense theoretical and experimental research on CMP, there is a serious lack of fundamental understanding of the physical-chemical processes of polishing. The present work is intended to investigate these fundamental processes on an atomistic level. To model CMP on the atomic scale, a model of the amorphous silica is prepared by applying Design of Experiments (DOE) techniques to systematically investigate molecular dynamics preparation. These simulations yield high-quality models of amorphous silica, which are in excellent agreement with experimental results and are defect-free. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the mechanical deformation during CMP of silica for different geometries and relative velocities. The simulations clarify asperity shape evolution during the process of shear and reveal temperature distributions as a function of time. It is found that the ratio of radii of a particle and asperity strongly affects the amount of the material removed whereas the relative velocity has a weaker affect on it. During shear, a significant local temperature increase occurs. This temperature increase lasts for a short time (picoseconds), but it can have a major impact on the amount of material removed. It is found that there could be significant deposition of the material from the particle to the slab, which can fill surface trenches and thereby make the surface smoother. An analytic model is developed for describing the amount of material removed as a function of asperity and particle radii and relative velocity. Density-functional calculations of different surfaces of two silica polymorphs, alpha-quartz and beta-cristobalite, are performed. The surface energies are calculated as a function of oxygen partial pressure for several different surface reconstructions and terminations. The case of hydrogen passivation is investigated to

  8. Dynamical algebra of observables in dissipative quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Sahar; Chruściński, Dariusz; Facchi, Paolo; Marmo, Giuseppe; Pascazio, Saverio; Rezakhani, Ali T.

    2017-02-01

    Dynamics and features of quantum systems can be drastically different from classical systems. Dissipation is understood as a general mechanism through which quantum systems may lose part or all of their quantum aspects. Here we discuss a method to analyze behaviors of dissipative quantum systems in an algebraic sense. This method employs a time-dependent product between system’s observables which is induced by the underlying dissipative dynamics. We argue that the long-time limit of the algebra of observables defined with this product yields a contractive algebra which reflects the loss of some quantum features of the dissipative system, and it bears relevant information about irreversibility. We illustrate this result through several examples of dissipation in various Markovian and non-Markovian systems.

  9. A hydrated ion model of [UO2] 2 + in water: Structure, dynamics, and spectroscopy from classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Conesa, Sergio; Torrico, Francisco; Martínez, José M.; Pappalardo, Rafael R.; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    A new ab initio interaction potential based on the hydrated ion concept has been developed to obtain the structure, energetics, and dynamics of the hydration of uranyl in aqueous solution. It is the first force field that explicitly parameterizes the interaction of the uranyl hydrate with bulk water molecules to accurately define the second-shell behavior. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + presents a first hydration shell U-O average distance of 2.46 Å and a second hydration shell peak at 4.61 Å corresponding to 22 molecules using a coordination number definition based on a multisite solute cavity. The second shell solvent molecules have longer mean residence times than those corresponding to the divalent monatomic cations. The axial regions are relatively de-populated, lacking direct hydrogen bonding to apical oxygens. Angle-solved radial distribution functions as well as the spatial distribution functions show a strong anisotropy in the ion hydration. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + solvent structure may be regarded as a combination of a conventional second hydration shell in the equatorial and bridge regions, and a clathrate-like low density region in the axial region. Translational diffusion coefficient, hydration enthalpy, power spectra of the main vibrational modes, and the EXAFS spectrum simulated from molecular dynamics trajectories agree fairly well with the experiment.

  10. A general theorem on indeterminism in classical particle dynamics: inflationary scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Laraudogoitia, Jon

    2017-01-01

    In the study of systems with an infinite number of particles, the results of indeterminism through deterministic collisions have until now usually made use of the temporal symmetry of mechanics. In this paper we take a more general path. This path furnishes proof that (in such systems) indeterminism based on deterministic collisions is rather more common than is suggested in studies published to date. A detailed analysis is made of what are known as inflationary scenarios, an interesting type of very general situations that display indeterminism.

  11. Dynamic security assessment processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei

    The architecture of dynamic security assessment processing system (DSAPS) is proposed to address online dynamic security assessment (DSA) with focus of the dissertation on low-probability, high-consequence events. DSAPS upgrades current online DSA functions and adds new functions to fit into the modern power grid. Trajectory sensitivity analysis is introduced and its applications in power system are reviewed. An index is presented to assess transient voltage dips quantitatively using trajectory sensitivities. Then the framework of anticipatory computing system (ACS) for cascading defense is presented as an important function of DSAPS. ACS addresses various security problems and the uncertainties in cascading outages. Corrective control design is automated to mitigate the system stress in cascading progressions. The corrective controls introduced in the dissertation include corrective security constrained optimal power flow, a two-stage load control for severe under-frequency conditions, and transient stability constrained optimal power flow for cascading outages. With state-of-the-art computing facilities to perform high-speed extended-term time-domain simulation and optimization for large-scale systems, DSAPS/ACS efficiently addresses online DSA for low-probability, high-consequence events, which are not addressed by today's industrial practice. Human interference is reduced in the computationally burdensome analysis.

  12. Network dynamics and systems biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrell, Johannes A.

    The physics of complex systems has grown considerably as a field in recent decades, largely due to improved computational technology and increased availability of systems level data. One area in which physics is of growing relevance is molecular biology. A new field, systems biology, investigates features of biological systems as a whole, a strategy of particular importance for understanding emergent properties that result from a complex network of interactions. Due to the complicated nature of the systems under study, the physics of complex systems has a significant role to play in elucidating the collective behavior. In this dissertation, we explore three problems in the physics of complex systems, motivated in part by systems biology. The first of these concerns the applicability of Boolean models as an approximation of continuous systems. Studies of gene regulatory networks have employed both continuous and Boolean models to analyze the system dynamics, and the two have been found produce similar results in the cases analyzed. We ask whether or not Boolean models can generically reproduce the qualitative attractor dynamics of networks of continuously valued elements. Using a combination of analytical techniques and numerical simulations, we find that continuous networks exhibit two effects---an asymmetry between on and off states, and a decaying memory of events in each element's inputs---that are absent from synchronously updated Boolean models. We show that in simple loops these effects produce exactly the attractors that one would predict with an analysis of the stability of Boolean attractors, but in slightly more complicated topologies, they can destabilize solutions that are stable in the Boolean approximation, and can stabilize new attractors. Second, we investigate ensembles of large, random networks. Of particular interest is the transition between ordered and disordered dynamics, which is well characterized in Boolean systems. Networks at the

  13. Quantum computing classical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers.

  14. Impact of Mercury(II) on proteinase K catalytic center: investigations via classical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Jarosław J; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Novič, Marjana; Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta

    2011-02-01

    Mercury(II) has a strong affinity for the thiol groups in proteins often resulting in the disruption of their biological functions. In this study we present classical and first-principles, DFT-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a complex of Hg(II) and proteinase K, a well-known serine protease with a very broad and diverse enzymatic activity. It contains a catalytic triad formed by Asp39, His69, and Ser224, which is responsible for its biological activity. It was found previously by X-ray diffraction experiments that the presence of Hg(II) inhibits the enzymatic action of proteinase K by affecting the stereochemistry of the triad. Our simulations predict that (i) the overall structure as well as the protein backbone dynamics are only slightly affected by the mercury cation, (ii) depending on the occupied mercury site, the hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad are either severely disrupted (both bonds for mercury at site 1, and the His69-Ser224 contact for mercury at site 2) or slightly strengthened (the Asp39-His69 bond when mercury is at site 2), (iii) the network of hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad is not static but undergoes constant fluctuations, which are significantly modified by the presence of the Hg(II) cation, influencing in turn the triad's ability to carry out the enzymatic function--these facts explain the experimental findings on the inhibition of proteinase K by Hg(II).

  15. Statistical Mechanics of Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H.; Hata, H.; Horita, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    A statistical-mechanical formalism of chaos based on the geometry of invariant sets in phase space is discussed to show that chaotic dynamical systems can be treated by a formalism analogous to that of thermodynamic systems if one takes a relevant coarse-grained quantity, but their statistical laws are quite different from those of thermodynamic systems. This is a generalization of statistical mechanics for dealing with dissipative and hamiltonian (i.e., conservative) dynamical systems of a few degrees of freedom. Thus the sum of the local expansion rate of nearby orbits along relevant orbit over a long but finite time has been introduced in order to describe and characterize (1) a drastic change of the structure of a chaotic attractor at a bifurcation and anomalous phenomena associated, (2) a critical scaling of chaos in the neighborhood of a critical point for the bifurcation to a nonexotic state, and a self-similar temporal structure of a critical orbit on the critical 2^∞ attractor an the critical golden tori without mixing, (3) the critical KAM torus, diffusion and repeated sticking of a chaotic orbit to a critical torus in hamiltonian systems. Here a q-phase transition, analogous to the ferromagnetic phase transition, plays an important role. They are illustrated numerically and theoretically by treating the driven damped pendulum, the driven Duffing equation, the Henon map, and the dissipative and conservative standard maps. This description of chaos breaks the time-reversal symmetry of hamiltonian dynamical laws analogously to statistical mechanics of irreversible processes. The broken time-reversal symmetry is brought about by orbital instability of chaos.

  16. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures.

  17. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  18. Structural magnetic resonance imaging can identify trigeminal system abnormalities in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle DeSouza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one ofthe most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN.

  19. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Identify Trigeminal System Abnormalities in Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSouza, Danielle D.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Davis, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one of the most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ) by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC) for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN. PMID:27807409

  20. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.