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Sample records for classes expressing cholecystokinin

  1. Cholecystokinin expression in tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2016-01-01

    in different neuroendocrine tumors; cerebral gliomas and astrocytomas and specific pediatric tumors. Tumor hypersecretion of CCK was recently reported in a patient with a metastatic islet cell tumor and hypercholecystokininemia resulting in a novel tumor syndrome, the cholecystokininoma syndrome. This review...... presents an overview of the cell-specific biogenesis of CCK peptides, and a description of the CCK expression in tumors and of the cholecystokininoma syndrome. Finally, assays for the diagnosis of CCK-producing tumors are reviewed....

  2. Cholecystokinin expression in tumors: biogenetic and diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2016-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone. CCK is also a complex system of peptides expressed in several molecular forms in enteroendocrine I cells, in cerebral and peripheral neurons, in cardiac myocytes and spermatozoa. CCK gene expression has now been found at protein or peptide level in different neuroendocrine tumors; cerebral gliomas and astrocytomas and specific pediatric tumors. Tumor hypersecretion of CCK was recently reported in a patient with a metastatic islet cell tumor and hypercholecystokininemia resulting in a novel tumor syndrome, the cholecystokininoma syndrome. This review presents an overview of the cell-specific biogenesis of CCK peptides, and a description of the CCK expression in tumors and of the cholecystokininoma syndrome. Finally, assays for the diagnosis of CCK-producing tumors are reviewed.

  3. Terminal Field and Firing Selectivity of Cholecystokinin-Expressing Interneurons in the Hippocampal CA3 Area

    OpenAIRE

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J.; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats ...

  4. Cholecystokinin-2 receptor mediated gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Borup, Rehannah; Marstrand, Troels;

    2007-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is abundantly expressed in the CNS, in which it regulates feeding behavior and long-term memory. Moreover, CCK has been implicated in mental disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Despite its manifest physiological and pathophysiological role, the molecular targets...... could be identified. Comparison with forskolin- and nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC12 cells showed that CCK induced a separate set of target genes. Taken together, we propose that neuronal CCK may have a role in the regulation of the circadian rhythm, the metabolism of cerebral cholesterol...

  5. Terminal field and firing selectivity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons in the hippocampal CA3 area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2011-12-07

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats and compared them with firing of CA3 pyramidal cells. The position of the terminals of individual visualized interneurons was highly diverse, selective, and often spatially coaligned with either the entorhinal or the associational inputs to area CA3. The spike timing in relation to theta and gamma oscillations and sharp waves was correlated with the innervated pyramidal cell domain. Basket and dendritic-layer-innervating interneurons receive entorhinal and associational inputs and preferentially fire on the ascending theta phase, when pyramidal cell assemblies emerge. Perforant-path-associated cells, driven by recurrent collaterals of pyramidal cells fire on theta troughs, when established pyramidal cell assemblies are most active. In the CA3 area, slow and fast gamma oscillations occurred on opposite theta oscillation phases. Perforant-path-associated and some COUP-TFII-positive interneurons are strongly coupled to both fast and slow gamma oscillations, but basket and dendritic-layer-innervating cells are weakly coupled to fast gamma oscillations only. During sharp waves, different interneuron types are activated, inhibited, or remain unaffected. We suggest that specialization in pyramidal cell domain and glutamatergic input-specific operations, reflected in the position of GABAergic terminals, is the evolutionary drive underlying the diversity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons.

  6. Expression profile of cholecystokinin type-A receptor in gallbladder cancer and gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajani Rai; Mallika Tewari; Mohan Kumar; Tej Bali Singh; Hari S Shukla

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatorypeptidereceptorshaveattractedthe interest of oncologists as a new promising approach for cancer pathology, imaging and therapy. Although cholecystokinin (CCK) is a potent modulator of gallbladder contractility and plays a potential role in pancreatic carcinogenesis through CCK type-A receptor (CCKAR), its role in gallbladder cancer (GBC) is still unknown and immunohistochemical detection of CCKAR in the gallbladder has not yet been reported. This novel case-control study aimed to investigate the expression profile of CCKAR in GBC and gallstone disease (GSD). METHODS: This study included 162 samples of gallbladder: 94 fromGBCand68fromGSD.ExpressionofCCKARwasanalyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. The results were statistically correlated with disease history including age, sex, presenceofgallstone,stageanddifferentiation. RESULTS: CCKAR was positive in 30/68 (44.1%) of GSD and 72/94 (76.6%) of GBC samples. Fifty-one of the 72 (70.8%) CCKAR-positive GBC samples showed over-expression. Interestingly, consistent results also appeared in the immuno-blotting study. CONCLUSIONS: CCKARexpressionwassignificantlyincreased in GBC compared to GSD. Moreover, CCKAR expression was associated with the degree of tumor differentiation, i.e., less expression in poorly-differentiated tumors. Thus, it has future prognostic and therapeutic implications in the management of GBC.

  7. Ontogeny expression of ghrelin, neuropeptide Y and cholecystokinin in blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, H-C; Feng, K; Zhang, G-R; Wei, K-J; Zou, G-W; Wang, W-M

    2014-04-01

    Ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) all have important roles in the regulation of feeding in fish and mammals. To better understand the role of the three peptides in appetite regulation in the early developmental stages of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala), partial cDNA sequences of ghrelin, NPY and CCK genes were cloned. And then, real-time quantitative PCR and RT-PCR were used to detect and quantify the mRNA expressions of these genes from zygotes to larvae of 50 days after hatching (DAH). Ghrelin, NPY and CCK were all expressed throughout the embryonic and larval development stages, and the expression levels were higher in larval stages than in embryonic stages. Ghrelin and NPY mRNA expressions were upregulated at 1, 3, 5 DAH, while CCK mRNA expression was reduced significantly at 3 DAH. The mRNA expression levels of three genes in larvae varied significantly until 30 DAH. In adult fish, all three peptides were detected to be expressed in brain and several peripheral tissues. Ghrelin mRNA was mainly expressed in the intestine, whereas NPY and CCK mRNAs were mainly expressed in the brain. Taken together, these results indicate that ghrelin, NPY and CCK may have roles in early development and participate in the regulation of feeding of larvae in blunt snout bream and will be helpful for further investigation into feed intake regulation in adults of this species. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Expression and Regulation of Cholecystokinin Receptor in the Chicken's Immune Organs and Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kassas, Seham; Odemuyiwa, Solomon; Hajishengallis, George; Connell, Terry D; Nashar, Toufic O

    2017-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide that affects growth rate in chickens by regulating appetite. CCK peptides exert their function by binding to two identified receptors, CCKAR and CCKBR in the GI tract and the brain, respectively, as well as in other organs. In mammals, CCK/CCKAR interactions affect a number of immunological parameters, including regulation of lymphocytes and functioning of monocytes. Thus, food intake and growth can potentially be altered by infection and the resulting inflammatory immune response. It is uncertain, however, whether chicken express CCKAR in immune organs and cells, and, if so, whether CCKAR expression is regulated by pathogen derived inflammatory stimuli. Herein, we identify expression of CCKAR protein in chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) including monocytes, and expression of the CCKAR gene in PBMC, thymus, bursa, and spleen, in selected commercial and pure chicken breeds. Further, stimulation with various types of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxins or lipopolysaccharide significantly regulated expression of CCKAR on monocytes in the different breeds. Ligation of CCKAR with antibodies in PBMC induced mobilization of Ca2+, indicating that CCKAR is signal competent. Injection with polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic analogue of double stranded viral RNA that binds Toll-Like Receptor-3 (TLR3), also regulated gene expressions of CCKAR and proinflammatory cytokines, in the different breeds. Interestingly, variations in the expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the different breeds were highly correlated with CCKAR expression levels. Taken together, these findings indicate that the physiological function of CCKAR in the chicken is tightly regulated in immune organs and cells by external inflammatory stimuli, which in turn regulate growth. This is the first report CCKAR expression in immune organs and cells, in any species, and the initial observation that CCKAR is regulated by

  9. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  10. Interaction between the cholecystokinin and endogenous cannabinoid systems in cued fear expression and extinction retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Mallory E; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is thought to develop, in part, from improper inhibition of fear. Accordingly, one of the most effective treatment strategies for PTSD is exposure-based psychotherapy. Ideally, neuroscience would inform adjunct therapies that target the neurotransmitter systems involved in extinction processes. Separate studies have implicated the cholecystokinin (CCK) and endocannabinoid systems in fear; however, there is a high degree of anatomical colocalization between the cannabinoid 1 receptor (Cnr1) and CCK in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region critical for emotion regulation. Although most research has focused on GABA and GABAergic plasticity as the mechanism by which Cnr1 mediates fear inhibition, we hypothesize that a functional interaction between Cnr1 and CCKB receptor (CCKBR) is critical for fear extinction processes. In this study, systemic pharmacological manipulation of the cannabinoid system modulated cued fear expression in C57BL/6J mice after consolidation of auditory fear conditioning. Knockout of the CCKBR, however, had no effect on fear- or anxiety-like behaviors. Nonetheless, administration of a Cnr1 antagonist increased freezing behavior during a cued fear expression test in wild-type subjects, but had no effect on freezing behavior in CCKBR knockout littermates. In addition, we found that Cnr1-positive fibers form perisomatic clusters around CCKBR-positive cell bodies in the BLA. These CCKBR-positive cells comprise a molecularly heterogenous population of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. These findings provide novel evidence that Cnr1 contributes to cued fear expression via an interaction with the CCK system. Dysfunctional Cnr1-CCKBR interactions might contribute to the etiology of, or result from, fear-related psychiatric disease.

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on expression and characterization of cholecystokinin receptors in rat pulmonary interstitial macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-jiang XU; Wei-juan GAO; Bin CONG; Yu-xia YAO; Zhen-yong GU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression and the binding characteristics of cholecystokinin receptors (CCK-R) in rat pulmonary interstitial macrophages (PIMs). METHODS: The PIMs isolated from rat lung tissues were purified by the collagenase digestion method combined with alveolar lavage and pulmonary vessel perfusion. The expression of CCK-R mRNA was detected by RT-PCR and Southern blot analysis and the binding experiments were performed by radioligand binding assay (RBA). RESULTS: CCK-A receptor (CCK-AR) and CCK-B receptor (CCK-BR) mRNA were detected in rat PIMs and their RT-PCR amplified products had a size of approximately 1.37 kb and 480 bp, respectively. The relative expression of CCK-BR mRNA was higher than that of CCK-AR mRNA after incubation with LPS for 0.5, 2, and 6 h. The expression of CCK-R mRNA could be upregulated obviously by LPS. Southern blot analysis of RT-PCR amplified CCK-AR and CCK-BR mRNA products using [γ-32p]ATP 5′-end-labelled probe showed specific hybridization bands. The specific binding of [3H] CCK-8S to rat PIM membranes was detected in the rats administered with LPS for 48 h, but not in normal rats.Scatchard analysis of the saturation curves suggested the presence of CCK-R with a high affinity (Kd=0.68+0.28 nmol/L) and a low binding capacity (Bmax=32.5+2.7 fmol.mg-1 protein) in rat PIMs. The specific binding of [3H] CCK-8S to rat PIM membranes was inhibited by unlabelled CCK-8S (ICs0=2.3±0.8 nmol/L), CCK-AR specific antagonist CR1409 (IC50=0.19±0.06 μrmol/L) and CCK-BR specific antagonist CR2945 (IC50=3.2± 1.1 nmol/L).CONCLUSION: Two types of functional CCK-AR and CCK-BR existed in rat PIMs and their expression could be upregulated by LPS.

  12. Regulation of oxidative stress and somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin gene expressions by ghrelin in stomach of newborn diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Sacan, Ozlem; Karatug, Ayse; Turk, Neslihan; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Bolkent, Sema

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether ghrelin treatment has a protective effect on gene expression and biochemical changes in the stomach of newborn streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. In this study, four groups of Wistar rats were used: control, ghrelin control, diabetic and diabetic+ghrelin. The rats were sacrificed after four weeks of treatment for diabetes. The gene expressions of: somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin and the altered active caspase-3, active caspase-8, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were investigated in the pyloric region of the stomach and antioxidant parameters were measured in all the stomach. Although ghrelin treatment to diabetic rats lowered the stomach lipid peroxidation levels, the stomach glutathione levels were increased. Exogenous ghrelin caused an increased activities of stomach catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in diabetic rats. Numbers of somatostatin, cholecystokinin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactive cells decreased in the diabetic+ghrelin group compared to the diabetic group. Apelin mRNA expressions were remarkably less in the diabetic+ghrelin rats than in diabetic rats. The results may indicate that ghrelin treatment has a protective effect to some extent on the diabetic rats. This protection is possibly accomplished through the antioxidant activity of ghrelin observed in type 2 diabetes. Consequently exogenous ghrelin may be a candidate for therapeutic treatment of diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Homology of the mesopallium in the adult chicken identified by gene expression of the neocortical marker cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoji, Yasuro; Karim, Mohammad Rabiul

    2014-03-06

    Studies of gene expression and fiber connections have suggested that the primary visual (entopallium) and auditory (field L2) centers in the avian telencephalon are homologous to layer 4 of extrastriate and auditory neocortices of mammals, respectively. In addition, it has been proposed that the arcopallium contains neurons homologous to layers 5/6 and that the mesopallium may be homologous to superficial neocortical layers, but gene expression evidence for the latter is lacking in adult birds. In the present study using adult chickens we have examined the gene expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) mRNA, a selective marker for layers 2/3 of mammalian neocortex. CCK mRNA was expressed in neurons of the entire mesopallium, but not in any part of the nidopallium. Together with hodological evidence of connections between the mesopallium and the two primary sensory areas, our results are consistent with the suggestion that the mesopallium is comparable to certain superficial layers of mammalian neocortex.

  14. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained......'s disease and 7 acromegaly with adenomas containing ACTH. The cholecystokinin peptides from the tumors were smaller and less sulfated than cholecystokinin from normal pituitary glands. We conclude that ACTH-producing pituitary cells may also produce an altered form of cholecystokinin....

  15. Cholecystokinin in white sea bream: molecular cloning, regional expression, and immunohistochemical localization in the gut after feeding and fasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Micale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK, secreted by the midgut, plays a key role in digestive physiology of vertebrates including teleosts, by stimulating pancreatic secretion, gut motility, and gallbladder contraction, as well as by delaying gastric emptying. Moreover, CCK is involved in the regulation of food intake and satiation. Secretion of CCK by the hindgut is controversial, and its biological activity remains to be elucidated. The present paper addresses the regional distribution of intestinal CCK in the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus, as well as the possible involvement of hindgut CCK in digestive processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full-lengths mRNAs encoding two CCK isoforms (CCK-1 and CCK-2 were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. CCK gene and protein expression levels in the different gut segments were measured 3 h and 72 h after feeding, by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Moreover, endocrine CCK cells were immunoistochemically detected. Fasting induced a significant decrease in CCK-2 in all intestinal segments, including the hindgut. On the other hand, no significant difference was induced by fasting on hindgut CCK-1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrated two CCK isoforms in the hindgut of D.sargus, one of which (CCK-2 may be involved in the feedback control of uncompleted digestive processes. On the other hand, a functional role alternative to regulation of digestive processes may be inferred for D.sargus CCK-1, since its expression was unaffected by feeding or fasting.

  16. Leptin and cholecystokinin in Schizothorax prenanti: molecular cloning, tissue expression, and mRNA expression responses to periprandial changes and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dengyue; Wang, Tao; Zhou, Chaowei; Lin, Fangjun; Chen, Hu; Wu, Hongwei; Wei, Rongbin; Xin, Zhiming; Li, Zhiqiong

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, full-length cDNA sequences of leptin and cholecystokinin (CCK) were cloned from Schizothorax prenanti (S. prenanti), and applied real-time quantitative PCR to characterize the tissue distribution, and appetite regulatory effects of leptin and CCK in S. prenanti. The S. prenanti leptin and CCK full-length cDNA sequences were 1121 bp and 776 bp in length, encoding the peptide of 171 and 123 amino acid residues, respectively. Tissue distribution analysis showed that leptin mRNA was mainly expressed in the liver of S. prenanti. CCK was widely expressed, with the highest levels of expression in the hypothalamus, myelencephalon, telencephalon and foregut of S. prenanti. The CCK mRNA expression was highly elevated after feeding, whereas the leptin mRNA expression was not affected by single meal. These results suggested that CCK is a postprandial satiety signal in S. prenanti, but leptin might not be. In present study, leptin and CCK gene expression were both decreased after fasting and increased after refeeding, which suggested leptin and CCK might be involved in regulation of appetite in S. prenanti. This study provides an essential groundwork to further elucidate the appetite regulatory systems of leptin and CCK in S. prenanti as well as in other teleosts.

  17. Expression and cell-specific localization of cholecystokinin receptors in rat lung

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Cong; Shu-Jin Li; Yi-Ling Ling; Yu-Xia Yao; Zhen-Yong Gu; Jun-xia Wang; Hong-Yu You

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate whether CCK receptors exist in lung tissues and their precise cellular localization in the lung. METHODS: CCK-AR and CCK-BR mRNA expression andcellular distribution in the rat lung were detected by highly sensitive method of in situ reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and conventional in situ hybridization. RESULTS: CCK-AR and CCK-BR gene positive signals were observed in bronchial epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells,pulmonary macrophages and vascular endothelial cells of the rats' lung byin situ RT-PCR. The hybridization signals of CCK-AR were relatively faint. By in situ hybridization,however, only the signals of CCK-BR but not CCK-AR were detected in the lung, and the positive staining was only found in vascular endothelial cells and macrophages. CONCLUSION: CCK-AR and CCK-BR gene were present in pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, macrophages, bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar epithelial cells, which play an important role in mediating the regulatory actions of CCK-8on these cells.

  18. Molecular cloning of an unusual bicistronic cholecystokinin receptor mRNA expressed in chicken brain: a structural and functional expression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Isabelle B M; Svensson, Samuel P S; Monstein, Hans-Jürg

    2003-06-15

    This report describes the molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of a transiently expressed chicken brain cholecystokinin receptor (CCK-CHR) in COS-7 cells. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based cloning strategy was applied using: (1) an initial PCR with deoxyinosine-containing primers designed to target conserved regions in CCK receptors, followed by (2) rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), and (3) full-length PCR of the CCK-CHR cDNA. The full-length cloned bicistronic CCK-CHR cDNA contained a short upstream open reading frame (uORF) coding for a putative six-amino-acid-long peptide of unknown function, followed by a long open reading frame (lORF) encoding the 436-amino-acid-long CCK-CHR receptor protein. At the amino acid level, the CCK-CHR shared approximately 50% homology with mammalian and Xenopus laevis CCK receptors. The pharmacological profile of CCK-CHR resembled that of CCK-B receptors using agonists (CCK-8, CCK-4, gastrin-17), whereas CCK-CHR showed higher affinity for the CCK-A receptor antagonist, devazepide, than for the CCK-B receptor antagonist, L-365,260. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description and functional expression study of a cloned chicken CCK receptor cDNA.

  19. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained...

  20. Nonsulfated cholecystokinins in cerebral neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap, Mikkel; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Harkany, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a widely expressed neuropeptide system originally discovered in the gut. Both cerebral and peripheral neurons as well as endocrine I-cells in the small intestine process proCCK to tyrosyl-O-sulfated and α-carboxyamidated peptides. Recently, we reported that gut endocrine I...... for nonsulfated CCK-8 with an antibody recognizing both sulfated and nonsulfated CCK. However, nonsulfated CCK immunoreactivity was stronger than that of sulfated CCK in cell bodies and weaker in nerve terminals. We conclude that only a small fraction of neuronal CCK is nonsulfated. The intracellular distribution...... of nonsulfated CCK in neurons suggests that they contribute only modestly to the CCK transmitter activity....

  1. Synaptic cross talk between perisomatic-targeting interneuron classes expressing cholecystokinin and parvalbumin in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karson, Miranda A; Tang, Ai-Hui; Milner, Teresa A; Alger, Bradley E

    2009-04-01

    Cholescystokinin (CCK)- or parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons are the major perisomatic-targeting interneurons in the cerebral cortex, including hippocampus, and are thought to form mutually exclusive networks. We used several techniques to test the alternative hypothesis that CCK and PV cells are coupled by chemical synapses. Triple immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed numerous axosomatic, axodendritic, and axoaxonic contacts stained for CCK, PV, and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. The existence of mutual CCK and PV synapses was supported by dual EM immunolabeling. Paired whole-cell recordings detected unitary GABA(A)ergic synaptic transmission between identified CCK and PV cells, and single CCK cells could transiently inhibit action potential firing of synaptically coupled PV cells. We conclude that the major hippocampal perisomatic-targeting interneurons communicate synaptically. This communication should affect neuronal network activity, including neuronal oscillations, in which the CCK and PV cells have well established roles. The prevalence of CCK and PV networks in other brain regions suggests that internetwork interactions could be generally important.

  2. Expression of messenger RNAs for glutamic acid decarboxylase, preprotachykinin, cholecystokinin, somatostatin, proenkephalin and neuropeptide Y in the adult rat superior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A R; Heavens, R P; Yellachich, L A; Sirinathsinghji, D J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus is an important subcortical integrator of sensorimotor behaviours. It is multi-layered, each layer containing specific neuronal types and possessing distinct input/output relationships. Here we use in situ hybridisation methods to map the distribution of seven neurotransmitters/neuromodulator systems in adult rat superior colliculus. Coronal sections were probed for preprotachykinin, cholecystokinin, somatostatin, proenkephalin, neuropeptide Y and the enzymes glutamic acid decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase, markers for GABA and acetylcholine respectively. Cells expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA were the most abundant, the highest density being found in the superficial layers. Many cells containing proprotachykinin messenger RNA were found in stratum zonale and the upper two-thirds of stratum griseum superficiale; cells were also located in deeper tectal laminae, particularly caudomedially. Most cholecystokinin messenger RNA expressing cells were located in the superficial layers with a prominent band in the middle third of stratum griseum superficiale. Cells expressing moderate to high levels of somatostatin messenger RNA formed a dense band in the lower third of stratum griseum superficiale/upper stratum opticum; two less distinct tiers of labelling were seen in deeper layers. These in situ hybridisation data reveal three distinct sub-laminae in rat stratum griseum superficiale. Cells expressing moderate to low levels of proenkephalin messenger RNA were located in lower stratum griseum superficiale/upper stratum opticum and intermediate laminae. A cluster of enkephalinergic cells was located medially in the deep tectal laminae. Expression of neuropeptide Y messenger RNA was relatively low and mostly confined to cells in stratum griseum superficiale and stratum opticum. No choline acetyltransferase messenger RNA was detected. This in situ analysis of seven different neurotransmitters

  3. Effects of rizatriptan on the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and cholecystokinin in the periaqueductal gray of a rat migraine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gang; Han, Ximei; Hao, Tingting; Huang, Qian; Yu, Tingmin

    2015-02-05

    Triptans are serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B/D agonists that are highly effective in the treatment of migraine. We previously found that rizatriptan can reduce the expression of proenkephalin and P substance in the rat midbrain, suggesting that rizatriptan may exert its analgesic effects by influencing the endogenous pain modulatory system. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are mainly responsible for antagonizing the analgesic effects of opioid peptides in the endogenous pain modulatory system. In this study, we investigated the effects of rizatriptan on the expression of CGRP and CCK in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a key structure of the endogenous pain modulatory system, in a rat migraine model induced by nitroglycerin. We found that the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and CCK in the PAG of migraine rats were significantly increased compared to those in control rats, and these levels were significantly reduced upon treatment with rizatriptan in migraine rats (P<0.05). Our results suggest that the expression of CGRP and CCK in the endogenous pain modulatory system may be increased during migraine attacks, which further antagonizes the analgesic effects of endogenous opioid peptides and induces sustained migraine. Rizatriptan, however, significantly reduces the levels of CGRP and CCK to enhance the inhibition of pain signals via the endogenous pain modulatory system, resulting in effective treatment of migraine.

  4. Expression of cholecystokinin2-receptor in rat and human L cells and the stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by gastrin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; Cao, Xun; Liu, Xiao-Min

    2015-03-01

    Gastrin is a gastrointestinal hormone secreted by G cells. Hypergastrinemia can improve blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. These positive effects are primarily due to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells. In recent years, many receptors that regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) have been identified in enteroendocrine L cell lines. This led us to hypothesize that, in addition to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells, L cells also express cholecystokinin2-receptor (CCK2R), which may regulate GLP-1 secretion and have synergistic effects on glucose homeostasis. Our research provides a preliminary analysis of CCK2R expression and the stimulating effect of gastrin treatment on GLP-1 secretion in a human endocrine L cell line, using RT-PCR, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA analyses. The expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3, which regulate GLP-1 biosynthesis, were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Double immunofluorescence labeling was utilized to assess the intracellular localization of CCK2R and GLP-1 in L cells harvested from rat colon tissue. Our results showed that CCK2R was expressed in both the human L cell line and the rat L cells. We also showed that treatment with gastrin, a CCK2R agonist, stimulated the secretion of GLP-1, and that this effect was likely due to increased expression of proglucagon and PCSK1 (also known as prohormone convertase 3 (PC3 gene)). These results not only provide a basis for the role gastrin may play in intestinal L cells, and may also provide the basis for the development of a method of gastrin-mediated glycemic regulation.

  5. Cholecystokinin expression in the β-cell leads to increased β-cell area in aged mice and protects from streptozotocin-induced diabetes and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Jeremy A; Kibbe, Carly R; Baan, Mieke; Sirinvaravong, Sirinart; Umhoefer, Heidi M; Engler, Kimberly A; Meske, Louise M; Sacotte, Kaitlyn A; Erhardt, Daniel P; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-11-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide hormone produced in the gut and brain with beneficial effects on digestion, satiety, and insulin secretion. CCK is also expressed in pancreatic β-cells, but only in models of obesity and insulin resistance. Whole body deletion of CCK in obese mice leads to reduced β-cell mass expansion and increased apoptosis. We hypothesized that islet-derived CCK is important in protection from β-cell apoptosis. To determine the specific role of β-cell-derived CCK in β-cell mass dynamics, we generated a transgenic mouse that expresses CCK in the β-cell in the lean state (MIP-CCK). Although this transgene contains the human growth hormone minigene, we saw no expression of human growth hormone protein in transgenic islets. We examined the ability of MIP-CCK mice to maintain β-cell mass when subjected to apoptotic stress, with advanced age, and after streptozotocin treatment. Aged MIP-CCK mice have increased β-cell area. MIP-CCK mice are resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes and exhibit reduced β-cell apoptosis. Directed CCK overexpression in cultured β-cells also protects from cytokine-induced apoptosis. We have identified an important new paracrine/autocrine effect of CCK in protection of β-cells from apoptotic stress. Understanding the role of β-cell CCK adds to the emerging knowledge of classic gut peptides in intraislet signaling. CCK receptor agonists are being investigated as therapeutics for obesity and diabetes. While these agonists clearly have beneficial effects on body weight and insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues, they may also directly protect β-cells from apoptosis.

  6. HLA class I expression in bladder carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, T; Pedrajas, G; Cozar, J M; Garrido, A; Vicente, J; Tallada, M; Garrido, F

    2003-10-01

    HLA class I molecules are frequently lost in a large variety of human carcinomas, possibly because of T-cell immune selection of major histocompatibility complex class I deficient tumor variants. We report that this phenomenon is also a frequent event in bladder carcinomas. Of a total of 72 bladder carcinomas, 72% of the tumors had at least one alteration in HLA class I expression. These altered HLA class I phenotypes were classified as total HLA class I loss (25%; phenotype I); HLA-A or/and HLA-B locus-specific loss (12%; phenotype III); and HLA class I allelic loss (35%; phenotype II or IV). Comparison of histopathological parameters with HLA class I expression showed a statistically significant relationship with the degree of differentiation and tumor recurrence.

  7. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Guang Cao; Wan-Chun Wu; Zhen Han; Meng-Ya Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin(CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress.METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA).RFSULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15%vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g,P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g,P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VTP levels between the two groups.CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine.

  8. Common Hepatic Branch of Vagus Nerve-Dependent Expression of Immediate Early Genes in the Mouse Brain by Intraportal L-Arginine: Comparison with Cholecystokinin-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Yamada

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Information from the peripheral organs is thought to be transmitted to the brain by humoral factors and neurons such as afferent vagal or spinal nerves. The common hepatic branch of the vagus (CHBV is one of the main vagus nerve branches, and consists of heterogeneous neuronal fibers that innervate multiple peripheral organs such as the bile duct, portal vein, paraganglia, and gastroduodenal tract. Although, previous studies suggested that the CHBV has a pivotal role in transmitting information on the status of the liver to the brain, the details of its central projections remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the brain regions activated by the CHBV. For this purpose, we injected L-arginine or anorexia-associated peptide cholecystokinin-8 (CCK, which are known to increase CHBV electrical activity, into the portal vein of transgenic Arc-dVenus mice expressing the fluorescent protein Venus under control of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc promotor. The brain slices were prepared from these mice and the number of Venus positive cells in the slices was counted. After that, c-Fos expression in these slices was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method. Intraportal administration of L-arginine increased the number of Venus positive or c-Fos positive cells in the insular cortex. This action of L-arginine was not observed in CHBV-vagotomized Arc-dVenus mice. In contrast, intraportal administration of CCK did not increase the number of c-Fos positive or Venus positive cells in the insular cortex. Intraportal CCK induced c-Fos expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamus, while intraportal L-arginine did not. This action of CCK was abolished by CHBV vagotomy. Intraportal L-arginine reduced, while intraportal CCK increased, the number of c-Fos positive cells in the nucleus tractus solitarii in a CHBV-dependent manner. The present results suggest that the CHBV

  9. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Rehfeld, Jens F; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2010-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal pacemaker driving circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour. Neurons within the SCN express both classical and neuropeptide transmitters which regulate clock functions. Cholecyctokinin (CCK) is a potent neurotransmitter expressed in neurons of the mammalian SCN, but its role in circadian timing is not known. In the present study, CCK was demonstrated in a distinct population of neurons located in the shell region of the SCN and in a few cells in the core region. The CCK neurons did not express vasopressin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. However, CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of cFOS, and did not express the core clock protein PER1. Accordingly, CCK-deficient mice showed normal entrainment and had similar τ, light-induced phase shift and negative masking behaviour as wild-type animals. In conclusion, CCK signalling seems not to be involved directly in light-induced resetting of the clock or in regulating core clock function. The expression of CCK in a subpopulation of neurons, which do not belonging to either the VIP or AVP cells but which have synaptic contacts to both cell types and reverse innervation of CCK neurons from VIP neurons, suggests that the CCK neurons may act in non-photic regulation within the clock and/or, via CCK projections, mediate clock information to hypothalamic nuclei.

  10. Unsulfated cholecystokinin: An overlooked hormone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Agersnap, Mikkel

    2012-01-10

    Tyrosyl O-sulfation is a common posttranslational derivatization of proteins that may also modify regulatory peptides. Among these are members of the cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin family. While sulfation of gastrin peptides is without effect on the bioactivity, O-sulfation is crucial for the cholecystokinetic activity (i.e. gallbladder emptying) of CCK peptides. Accordingly, the purification of CCK as a sulfated peptide was originally monitored by its gallbladder emptying effect. Since then, the dogma has prevailed that CCK peptides are always sulfated. The dogma is correct in a semantic context since the gallbladder expresses only the CCK-A receptor that requires sulfation of the ligand. CCK peptides, however, are also ligands for the CCK-B receptors that do not require ligand sulfation. Consequently, unsulfated CCK peptides may act via CCK-B receptors. Since in vivo occurrence of unsulfated products of proCCK with an intact α-amidated C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-Trp-Met-Asp-PheNH(2)) has been reported, it is likely that unsulfated CCK peptides constitute a separate hormone system that acts via CCK-B receptors. This review discusses the occurrence, molecular forms, and possible physiological as well as pathophysiological significance of unsulfated CCK peptides.

  11. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and cholecystokinin (CCK) in winter skate (Raja ocellata): cDNA cloning, tissue distribution and mRNA expression responses to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Erin; Volkoff, Hélène

    2009-04-01

    cDNAs encoding for neuropeptide Y (NPY), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and cholecystokinin (CCK) were cloned in an elasmobranch fish, the winter skate. mRNA tissue distribution was examined for the three peptides as well as the effects of two weeks of fasting on their expression. Skate NPY, CART and CCK sequences display similarities with sequences for teleost fish but in general the degree of identity is relatively low (50%). All three peptides are present in brain and in several peripheral tissues, including gut and gonads. Within the brain, the three peptides are expressed in the hypothalamus, telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum. Two weeks of fasting induced an increase in telencephalon NPY and an increase in CCK in the gut but had no effects on hypothalamic NPY, CART and CCK, or on telencephalon CART. Our results provide basis for further investigation into the regulation of feeding in winter skate.

  12. Ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) in blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala): cDNA cloning, tissue distribution and mRNA expression changes responding to fasting and refeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Ping, Hai-Chao; Wei, Kai-Jian; Zhang, Gui-Rong; Shi, Ze-Chao; Yang, Rui-Bin; Zou, Gui-Wei; Wang, Wei-Min

    2015-11-01

    Blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala Yih, 1955) is an endemic freshwater fish in China for which the endocrine mechanism of regulation of feeding has never been examined. Ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) play important roles in the regulation of fish feeding. In this study, full-length cDNAs of ghrelin, NPY and CCK were cloned and analyzed from blunt snout bream. Both the ghrelin and NPY genes of blunt snout bream had the same amino acid sequences as grass carp, and CCK also shared considerable similarity with that of grass carp. The three genes were expressed in a wide range of adult tissues, with the highest expression levels of ghrelin in the hindgut, NPY in the hypothalamus and CCK in the pituitary, respectively. Starvation challenge experiments showed that the expression levels of ghrelin and NPY mRNA increased in brain and intestine after starvation, and the expression levels of CCK decreased after starvation. Refeeding could bring the expression levels of the three genes back to the control levels. These results indicated that the feeding behavior of blunt snout bream was regulated by the potential correlative actions of ghrelin, NPY and CCK, which contributed to the defense against starvation. This study will further our understanding of the function of ghrelin, NPY and CCK and the molecular mechanism of feeding regulation in teleosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in gene expression of pancreatitis-associated protein and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors in experimental pancreatitis produced by pancreatic duct occlusion in rats: comparison with gene expression of cholecystokinin and secretin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, A; Miyasaka, K; Jimi, A; Nakamura, E; Teraoka, H

    1995-08-01

    Pancreatic duct occlusion is known to produce a sustained increase in the plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) concentration and to affect the tissue content of CCK in the rat. The tissue content of CCK is correlated with regenerative changes in the pancreas after pancreatic duct occlusion. In the present study, we examined the changes in mRNA levels of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors (PSTIs), pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP), and amylase in the pancreas in comparison with changes in CCK and secretin mRNA levels in the intestine and the histological changes produced by pancreatic duct ligation. Rats with an internal bile fistula and with obstruction of pancreatic flow were prepared and were sacrificed 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 28 days later. Then mRNA levels of CCK, secretin, PSTIs, PAP, and amylase were determined by slot-blot analysis. The CCK mRNA level gradually increased to a peak on day 10, was slightly lower on day 14, and returned to the control level on day 28. The level of secretin mRNA did not change. The mRNA levels of PSTIs increased significantly on day 3 after occlusion. PAP mRNA was detectable on days 1 and 3, being maximal on day 1. The mRNA level of amylase was markedly decreased on days 1 and 3, then remained lower than the control level. Histological examination showed acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas on days 1 and 3 and regenerative changes from day 7. These results suggest that a change in gene expression of PAP reflects acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas most sensitively.

  14. Fluorescent visualisation of the hypothalamic oxytocin neurones activated by cholecystokinin-8 in rats expressing c-fos-enhanced green fluorescent protein and oxytocin-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 fusion transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, A; Shoguchi, K; Matsuoka, H; Yoshimura, M; Ohkubo, J-I; Matsuura, T; Maruyama, T; Ishikura, T; Aritomi, T; Fujihara, H; Hashimoto, H; Suzuki, H; Murphy, D; Ueta, Y

    2014-05-01

    The up-regulation of c-fos gene expression is widely used as a marker of neuronal activation elicited by various stimuli. Anatomically precise observation of c-fos gene products can be achieved at the RNA level by in situ hybridisation or at the protein level by immunocytochemistry. Both of these methods are time and labour intensive. We have developed a novel transgenic rat system that enables the trivial visualisation of c-fos expression using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) tag. These rats express a transgene consisting of c-fos gene regulatory sequences that drive the expression of a c-fos-eGFP fusion protein. In c-fos-eGFP transgenic rats, robust nuclear eGFP fluorescence was observed in osmosensitive brain regions 90 min after i.p. administration of hypertonic saline. Nuclear eGFP fluorescence was also observed in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) 90 min after i.p. administration of cholecystokinin (CCK)-8, which selectively activates oxytocin (OXT)-secreting neurones in the hypothalamus. In double transgenic rats that express c-fos-eGFP and an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fusion gene, almost all mRFP1-positive neurones in the SON and PVN expressed nuclear eGFP fluorescence 90 min after i.p. administration of CCK-8. It is possible that not only a plane image, but also three-dimensional reconstruction image may identify cytoplasmic vesicles in an activated neurone at the same time.

  15. Cholecystokinin hyperresponsiveness in functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ASB Chua; PWN Keeling

    2006-01-01

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a common disorder of yet uncertain etiology. Dyspeptic symptoms are usually meal related and suggest an association to gastrointestinal (GI) sensorimotor dysfunction. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is an established brain-gut peptide that plays an important regulatory role in gastrointestinal function. It inhibits gastric motility and emptying via a capsaicin sensitive vagal pathway. The effects on emptying are via its action on the proximal stomach and pylorus. CCK is also involved in the regulation of food intake. It is released in the gut in response to a meal and acts via vagal afferents to induce satiety. Furthermore CCK has also been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of panic disorder, anxiety and pain. Other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and noradrenaline may be implicated with CCK in the coordination of GI activity. In addition,intravenous administration of CCK has been observed to reproduce the symptoms in FD and this effect can be blocked both by atropine and Ioxiglumide (CCK-A antagonist). It is possible that an altered response to CCK may be responsible for the commonly observed gastric sensorimotor dysfunction, which may then be associated with the genesis of dyspeptic symptoms.

  16. Cholecystokinin Elevates Mouse Plasma Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lichun; Yang, Hong; Lin, Xinghua; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Guo, Zhongmao

    2012-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide hormone that induces bile release into the intestinal lumen which in turn aids in fat digestion and absorption in the intestine. While excretion of bile acids and cholesterol into the feces eliminates cholesterol from the body, this report examined the effect of CCK on increasing plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in mice. Our data demonstrated that intravenous injection of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK at a dose of 50 ng/kg significantly increased plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels by 22 and 31%, respectively, in fasting low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) mice. The same dose of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK induced 6 and 13% increases in plasma triglyceride and cholesterol, respectively, in wild-type mice. However, these particular before and after CCK treatment values did not achieve statistical significance. Oral feeding of olive oil further elevated plasma triglycerides, but did not alter plasma cholesterol levels in CCK-treated mice. The increased plasma cholesterol in CCK-treated mice was distributed in very-low, low and high density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL) with less of an increase in HDL. Correspondingly, the plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B48, B100, apoE and apoAI levels were significantly higher in the CCK-treated mice than in untreated control mice. Ligation of the bile duct, blocking CCK receptors with proglumide or inhibition of Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 transporter with ezetimibe reduced the hypercholesterolemic effect of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK in LDLR−/− mice. These findings suggest that CCK-increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides as a result of the reabsorption of biliary lipids from the intestine. PMID:23300532

  17. Cholecystokinin elevates mouse plasma lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichun Zhou

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK is a peptide hormone that induces bile release into the intestinal lumen which in turn aids in fat digestion and absorption in the intestine. While excretion of bile acids and cholesterol into the feces eliminates cholesterol from the body, this report examined the effect of CCK on increasing plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in mice. Our data demonstrated that intravenous injection of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK at a dose of 50 ng/kg significantly increased plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels by 22 and 31%, respectively, in fasting low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/- mice. The same dose of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK induced 6 and 13% increases in plasma triglyceride and cholesterol, respectively, in wild-type mice. However, these particular before and after CCK treatment values did not achieve statistical significance. Oral feeding of olive oil further elevated plasma triglycerides, but did not alter plasma cholesterol levels in CCK-treated mice. The increased plasma cholesterol in CCK-treated mice was distributed in very-low, low and high density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL with less of an increase in HDL. Correspondingly, the plasma apolipoprotein (apo B48, B100, apoE and apoAI levels were significantly higher in the CCK-treated mice than in untreated control mice. Ligation of the bile duct, blocking CCK receptors with proglumide or inhibition of Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 transporter with ezetimibe reduced the hypercholesterolemic effect of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK in LDLR(-/- mice. These findings suggest that CCK-increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides as a result of the reabsorption of biliary lipids from the intestine.

  18. Feed intake and brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) gene expression in juvenile cobia fed plant-based protein diets with different lysine to arginine ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Van; Jordal, Ann-Elise Olderbakk; Espe, Marit; Buttle, Louise; Lai, Hung Van; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2013-07-01

    Cobia (Rachycentron canadum, Actinopterygii, Perciformes;10.5±0.1g) were fed to satiation with three plant-based protein test diets with different lysine (L) to arginine (A) ratios (LL/A, 0.8; BL/A, 1.1; and HL/A, 1.8), using a commercial diet as control for six weeks. The test diets contained 730 g kg(-1) plant ingredients with 505-529 g protein, 90.2-93.9 g lipid kg(-1) dry matter; control diet contained 550 g protein and 95 g lipid kg(-1) dry matter. Periprandial expression of brain NPY and CCK (npy and cck) was measured twice (weeks 1 and 6). At week one, npy levels were higher in pre-feeding than postfeeding cobia for all diets, except LL/A. At week six, npy levels in pre-feeding were higher than in postfeeding cobia for all diets. cck in pre-feeding cobia did not differ from that in postfeeding for all diets, at either time point. Cobia fed LL/A had lower feed intake (FI) than cobia fed BL/A and control diet, but no clear correlations between dietary L/A ratio and FI, growth and expression of npy and cck were detected. The data suggest that NPY serves as an orexigenic factor, but further studies are necessary to describe links between dietary L/A and regulation of appetite and FI in cobia.

  19. Cholecystokinin receptor-1 mediates the inhibitory effects of exogenous cholecystokinin octapeptide on cellular morphine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Di

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8, the most potent endogenous anti-opioid peptide, has been shown to regulate the processes of morphine dependence. In our previous study, we found that exogenous CCK-8 attenuated naloxone induced withdrawal symptoms. To investigate the precise effect of exogenous CCK-8 and the role of cholecystokinin (CCK 1 and/or 2 receptors in morphine dependence, a SH-SY5Y cell model was employed, in which the μ-opioid receptor, CCK1/2 receptors, and endogenous CCK are co-expressed. Results Forty-eight hours after treating SH-SY5Y cells with morphine (10 μM, naloxone (10 μM induced a cAMP overshoot, indicating that cellular morphine dependence had been induced. The CCK receptor and endogenous CCK were up-regulated after chronic morphine exposure. The CCK2 receptor antagonist (LY-288,513 at 1–10 μM inhibited the naloxone-precipitated cAMP overshoot, but the CCK1 receptor antagonist (L-364,718 did not. Interestingly, CCK-8 (0.1-1 μM, a strong CCK receptor agonist, dose-dependently inhibited the naloxone-precipitated cAMP overshoot in SH-SY5Y cells when co-pretreated with morphine. The L-364,718 significantly blocked the inhibitory effect of exogenous CCK-8 on the cAMP overshoot at 1–10 μM, while the LY-288,513 did not. Therefore, the CCK2 receptor appears to be necessary for low concentrations of endogenous CCK to potentiate morphine dependence in SH-SY5Y cells. An additional inhibitory effect of CCK-8 at higher concentrations appears to involve the CCK1 receptor. Conclusions This study reveals the difference between exogenous CCK-8 and endogenous CCK effects on the development of morphine dependence, and provides the first evidence for the participation of the CCK1 receptor in the inhibitory effects of exogenous CCK-8 on morphine dependence.

  20. HLA class I expression in primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Huang; Mei-Ying Cai; Da-Peng Wei

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether CTL vaccine therapy issuitable for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)from the viewpoint of HLA class I antigens expression.METHODS: The immunocytochemistry, image analysis,flow cytometry, and labeled streptavidin biotin (LSAB)method of immunohistochemistry were appliedrespectively to study 4 HCC cell lines (e.g. Alexander,HepG2, SMMC-7721, and QGY-7703) cultured in vitroand 6 frozen tissue specimens of HCC. RESULTS: The positive control cell line Raji had verystrong positive staining. Most mitotic and nonmitoticcells of the 4 HCC cell lines had various intensity ofHLA class Ⅰ antigens expression. The negative controlcell K562 and the control slides of all the cell lines hadno positive staining. In the 6 HCC specimensimmunohistochemically studied, histological normalhepatocytes had no or very weak positive staining andthe liver sinus had very strong positive staining. MostHCC cells in the sections from the 6 HCC specimenshad strong positive HLA class Ⅰ antigens staining. Thepositive staining was located in the cytoplasm, theperinuclear area, and at the cell membrane of the livercancer cells. Flow cytometry also revealed that Raji andthose 4 HCC cell lines had strong HLA class Ⅰ antigensexpression, which was confirmed quantitatively by theimage analysis. Tt showed that the objective grayscalevalues of Raji and those 4 HCC cell lines weresignificantly different from that of K562 (Raji 124.04+10.94, Alexander 165.97+5.35, HepG2 167.02+12.60,QGY-7703 161.46+7.13, SMMC-7721 165.93+5.21,K562 244.89+4.60, P<0.01). Significant differenceswere also found between Raji and the 4 HCC cell lines.CONCLUSION: HCC cells express HLA class I antigensstrongly. From this point of view, the active specificimmunotherapy of CTL vaccine is suitable andpracticable for HCC.

  1. "Expression" and Verbal Expression: On Communication in an Upper Secondary Dance Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Boel; Sandstrom, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine how dance teachers express themselves verbally in teaching situations where movement training is combined with "expression". The empirical material consists of films and tapes from a 130 min long dance class at upper secondary school, and a taped conversation with the teacher about episodes from the…

  2. Expression of HLA Class I and HLA Class II by Tumor Cells in Chinese Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Xin; van den Berg, Anke; Gao, Zifen; Visser, Lydia; Nolte, Ilja; Vos, Hans; Hepkema, Bouke; Kooistra, Wierd; Poppema, Sibrand; Diepstra, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Background: In Caucasian populations, the tumor cells of Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-positive classical Hodgkin Lymphomas (cHL) patients more frequently express HLA class I and HLA class II molecules compared to EBV-negative cHL patients. HLA expression (in relation to EBV) in Asian cHL patients has no

  3. Axotomy induces MHC class I antigen expression on rat nerve cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Schröder, H D; Klareskog, L;

    1988-01-01

    Immunomorphological staining demonstrates that class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-coded antigen expression can be selectively induced on otherwise class I-negative rat nerve cells by peripheral axotomy. Induction of class I as well as class II antigen expression was simultaneously see...

  4. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-08

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016.

  5. Lipid transport in cholecystokinin knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alexandra; Yang, Qing; Huesman, Sarah; Rider, Therese; Lo, Chunmin C

    2015-11-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is released in response to lipid feeding and regulates pancreatic digestive enzymes vital to the absorption of nutrients. Our previous reports demonstrated that cholecystokinin knockout (CCK-KO) mice fed for 10 weeks of HFD had reduced body fat mass, but comparable glucose uptake by white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that CCK is involved in energy homeostasis and lipid transport from the small intestine to tissues in response to acute treatment with dietary lipids. CCK-KO mice with comparable fat absorption had increased energy expenditure and were resistant to HFD-induced obesity. Using intraduodenal infusion of butter fat and intravenous infusion using Liposyn III, we determined the mechanism of lipid transport from the small intestine to deposition in lymph and adipocytes in CCK-KO mice. CCK-KO mice had delayed secretion of Apo B48-chylomicrons, lipid transport to the lymphatic system, and triglyceride (TG)-derived fatty acid uptake by epididymal fat in response to acute treatment of intraduodenal lipids. In contrast, CCK-KO mice had comparable TG clearance and lipid uptake by white adipocytes in response to TGs in chylomicron-like emulsion. Thus, we concluded that CCK is important for lipid transport and energy expenditure to control body weight in response to dietary lipid feeding.

  6. Expression of a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase genes in transgenic potato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moravcikova, J.; Matusikova, I.; Libantova, J.; Bauer, M.; Mlynarova, L.

    2004-01-01

    The genes encoding for a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase were co-introduced into Slovak potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) breeding line 116/86 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. For both transgenes the number of integrated copies and level of RNA expression wer

  7. Expression of a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase genes in transgenic potato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moravcikova, J.; Matusikova, I.; Libantova, J.; Bauer, M.; Mlynarova, L.

    2004-01-01

    The genes encoding for a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase were co-introduced into Slovak potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) breeding line 116/86 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. For both transgenes the number of integrated copies and level of RNA expression

  8. Cholecystokinin plays a novel protective role in diabetic kidney through anti-inflammatory actions on macrophage: anti-inflammatory effect of cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Satoshi; Shikata, Kenichi; Miyasaka, Kyoko; Okada, Shinichi; Sasaki, Motofumi; Kodera, Ryo; Hirota, Daisho; Kajitani, Nobuo; Takatsuka, Tetsuharu; Kataoka, Hitomi Usui; Nishishita, Shingo; Sato, Chikage; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Nishimori, Hisakazu; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Ogawa, Daisuke; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory process is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In this article, we show that cholecystokinin (CCK) is expressed in the kidney and exerts renoprotective effects through its anti-inflammatory actions. DNA microarray showed that CCK was upregulated in the kidney of diabetic wild-type (WT) mice but not in diabetic intracellular adhesion molecule-1 knockout mice. We induced diabetes in CCK-1 receptor (CCK-1R) and CCK-2R double-knockout (CCK-1R(-/-),-2R(-/-)) mice, and furthermore, we performed a bone marrow transplantation study using CCK-1R(-/-) mice to determine the role of CCK-1R on macrophages in the diabetic kidney. Diabetic CCK-1R(-/-),-2R(-/-) mice revealed enhanced albuminuria and inflammation in the kidney compared with diabetic WT mice. In addition, diabetic WT mice with CCK-1R(-/-) bone marrow-derived cells developed more albuminuria than diabetic CCK-1R(-/-) mice with WT bone marrow-derived cells. Administration of sulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8S) ameliorated albuminuria, podocyte loss, expression of proinflammatory genes, and infiltration of macrophages in the kidneys of diabetic rats. Furthermore, CCK-8S inhibited both expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and chemotaxis in cultured THP-1 cells. These results suggest that CCK suppresses the activation of macrophage and expression of proinflammatory genes in diabetic kidney. Our findings may provide a novel strategy of therapy for the early stage of diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Cannabinoid receptors and cholecystokinin in feeding inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alén, Francisco; Ramírez-López, M Teresa; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Orio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system functions as a potent regulator of feeding behavior and energy balance through complex central and peripheral mechanisms. Recent findings have demonstrated the existence of cooperation between peripheral cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the satiety hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). The two systems have opposing actions in the modulation of feeding: while endocannabinoids such as anandamide promote feeding, CCK controls gastrointestinal motility and appetite suppression. In this review, we examine the individual contribution of endocannabinoids and CCK in the modulation of appetite and explore the interaction between the two systems. We also highlight the potential benefits of simultaneously targeting peripheral CB1 and CCK1 receptors to design new therapies to fight obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of membrane cholecystokinin-2 receptor by agonists enables classification of partial agonists as biased agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Rémi; Masri, Bernard; Escrieut, Chantal; Foucaud, Magali; Cordelier, Pierre; Fourmy, Daniel

    2011-02-25

    Given the importance of G-protein-coupled receptors as pharmacological targets in medicine, efforts directed at understanding the molecular mechanism by which pharmacological compounds regulate their presence at the cell surface is of paramount importance. In this context, using confocal microscopy and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have investigated internalization and intracellular trafficking of the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) in response to both natural and synthetic ligands with different pharmacological features. We found that CCK and gastrin, which are full agonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate production, rapidly and abundantly stimulate internalization. Internalized CCK2R did not rapidly recycle to plasma membrane but instead was directed to late endosomes/lysosomes. CCK2R endocytosis involves clathrin-coated pits and dynamin and high affinity and prolonged binding of β-arrestin1 or -2. Partial agonists and antagonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation did not stimulate CCK2R internalization or β-arrestin recruitment to the CCK2R but blocked full agonist-induced internalization and β-arrestin recruitment. The extreme C-terminal region of the CCK2R (and more precisely phosphorylatable residues Ser(437)-Xaa(438)-Thr(439)-Thr(440)-Xaa(441)-Ser(442)-Thr(443)) were critical for β-arrestin recruitment. However, this region and β-arrestins were dispensable for CCK2R internalization. In conclusion, this study allowed us to classify the human CCK2R as a member of class B G-protein-coupled receptors with regard to its endocytosis features and identified biased agonists of the CCK2R. These new important insights will allow us to investigate the role of internalized CCK2R·β-arrestin complexes in cancers expressing this receptor and to develop new diagnosis and therapeutic strategies targeting this receptor.

  11. The predominant cholecystokinin in human plasma and intestine is cholecystokinin-33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Sun, G; Christensen, T;

    2001-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) occurs in multiple molecular forms; the major ones are CCK-58, -33, -22, and -8. Their relative abundance in human plasma and intestine, however, is debated. To settle the issue, extracts of intestinal biopsies and plasma from 10 human subjects have been examined...... is the second most abundant ( approximately 34% and 30%, respectively). In contrast, CCK-58 is less abundant in human intestines ( approximately 18%) and plasma ( approximately 11%). Its predominance in feline intestines, however, was confirmed. Hence, the results show a significant species variation...

  12. Topical cholecystokinin depresses itch-associated scratching behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Shoko; Mori, Tomoko; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Shiraishi, Noriko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kobayashi, Miwa; Bito, Toshinori; Kabashima, Kenji; Nakamura, Motonobu; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) serves as a gastrointestinal hormone and also functions as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system (CNS). CCK may be a downregulator in the CNS, as represented by its anti-opioid properties. The existence of CCK in the peripheral nervous system has also been reported. We investigated the suppressive effects of various CCKs on peripheral pruritus in mice. The clipped backs of ICR mice were painted with CCK synthetic peptides and injected intradermally with substance P (SP). The frequency of SP-induced scratching was reduced significantly by topical application of sulfated CCK8 (CCK8S) and CCK7 (CCK7S), but not by nonsulfated CCK8, CCK7, or CCK6. Dermal injection of CCK8S also suppressed the scratching frequency, suggesting that dermal cells as well as epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) are the targets of CCKs. As determined using real-time PCR, mRNA for CCK2R, one of the two types of CCK receptors, was expressed highly in mouse fetal skin-derived mast cells (FSMCs) and moderately in ICR mouse KCs. CCK8S decreased in vitro compound 48/80-promoted degranulation of FSMCs with a transient elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration. These findings suggest that CCK may exert an antipruritic effect via mast cells and that topical CCK may be clinically useful for pruritic skin disorders.

  13. Parvalbumin, somatostatin and cholecystokinin as chemical markers for specific GABAergic interneuron types in the rat frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kondo, Satoru

    2002-01-01

    It remains to be clarified how many classes of GABAergic nonpyramidal cells exist in the cortical circuit. We have divided GABA cells in the rat frontal cortex into 3 groups, based on their firing characteristics: fast-spiking (FS) cells, late-spiking (LS) cells, and non-FS cells. Expression of calcium-binding proteins and peptides could be shown in separate groups of GABA cells in layers II/III and V of the frontal cortex: (1) parvalbumin cells, (2) somatostatin cells, (3) calretinin and/or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) cells [partially positive for cholecystokinin (CCK)] and (4) large CCK cells (almost negative for VIP/calretinin). Combining the physiological and chemical properties of morphologically diverse nonpyramidal cells allows division into several groups, including FS basket cells containing parvalbumin, non-FS somatostatin Martinotti cells with ascending axonal arbors, and non-FS large basket cells positive for CCK. These subtypes show characteristic spatial distributions of axon collaterals and the innervation tendency of postsynaptic elements. With synchronized activity induced by cortical excitatory or inhibitory circuits, firing patterns were also found to differ. Subtype-selective occurrence of electrical coupling, finding for potassium channel Kv3.1 proteins, and cholinergic and serotonergic modulation supports our tentative classification. To clarify the functional architecture in the frontal cortex, it is important to reveal the connectional characteristics of GABA cell subtypes and determine whether they are similar to those in other cortical regions.

  14. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules ex...

  15. NLRC5 controls basal MHC class I gene expression in an MHC enhanceosome-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerincx, Andreas; Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A

    2012-05-15

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins play important roles in innate immune responses as pattern-recognition receptors. Although most NLR proteins act in cell autonomous immune pathways, some do not function as classical pattern-recognition receptors. One such NLR protein is the MHC class II transactivator, the master regulator of MHC class II gene transcription. In this article, we report that human NLRC5, which we recently showed to be involved in viral-mediated type I IFN responses, shuttles to the nucleus and activates MHC class I gene expression. Knockdown of NLRC5 in different human cell lines and primary dermal fibroblasts leads to reduced MHC class I expression, whereas introduction of NLRC5 into cell types with very low expression of MHC class I augments MHC class I expression to levels comparable to those found in lymphocytes. Expression of NLRC5 positively correlates with MHC class I expression in human tissues. Functionally, we show that both the N-terminal effector domain of NLRC5 and its C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain are needed for activation of MHC class I expression. Moreover, nuclear shuttling and function depend on a functional Walker A motif. Finally, we identified a promoter sequence in the MHC class I promoter, the X1 box, to be involved in NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene activation. Taken together, this suggested that NLRC5 acts in a manner similar to class II transactivator to drive MHC expression and revealed NLRC5 as an important regulator of basal MHC class I expression.

  16. Role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel, M.J.; Meijers, M.; Garderen-Hoetmer, A. van; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Rovati, L.C.; Sprij-Mooij, D.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated in azaserine-treated rats, using lorglumide, a highly specific cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist. The animals were killed 8 months after the start of treatment. Cholecystokinin, but not dietary unsaturat

  17. Injury-induced class 3 semaphorin expression in the rat spinal cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Winter, F. de; Oudega, M.; Lankhorst, A.J.; Hamers, F.P.; Blits, B.; Ruitenberg, M.J.; Pasterkamp, R.J.; Verhaagen, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the expression of all members of the class 3 semaphorins and their receptor components following complete transection and contusion lesions of the adult rat spinal cord. Following both types of lesions the expression of all class 3 semaphorins is induced in fibroblast in th

  18. Effects of CIITA antisense RNA on the expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the effect of the major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ (MHCⅡ) transactivator (CIITA) antisense RNA on the expression of the human leukemia (HLA) class Ⅱ molecules, 5′ end cDNA sequence of CIITA gene was cloned, and antisense RNA expression vector pcDNA-Ⅱ was constructed. HeLa cells transfected with pcDNA-Ⅱ and pcDNA3 were induced by IFN-g for 3 d. The expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules on HeLa/pcDNA-Ⅱ cells was significantly decreased, while it has no effect on the expression of HLA class Ⅰ molecules. This result suggests that the CIITA antisense RNA can inhibit the expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules in HeLa cells. It also implies a promising approach to generate immune tolerance in graft transplantation.

  19. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed.

  20. Effect of cholecystokinin on experimental neuronal aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Jiang Sun; Qin-Chi Lu; Yan Cai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effect of cholecystokinin (CCK) on lipofusin value, neuronal dendrite and spine ultrastructure, and total cellular protein during the process of experimental neuronal aging.METHODS: Experimental neuronal aging study model was established by NBA2cellular serum-free culture method. By using single irtracellular lipofusin value from microspectrophotometry,morphology of neuronal dendrites and spines from the scanner electron microscopy, and total cellular protein as the indexes of experimental neuronal aging, we observed the effect of CCK8 on the process of experimental neuronal aging.RESULTS: Under the condition of serum-free culture,intracellular fluorescence value (%) increased with the extension of culture time (1 d 8.51±3.43; 5 d 10.12±3.03;10 d 20.54±10.3; 15 d 36.88±10.49; bP<0.01). When CCK was added to serum-free culture medium, intracellular lipofusin value (%) decreased remarkably after consecutive CCK reaction for 10 and 15 d (control 36.88±10.49; 5 d 32.03±10.01; 10 d 14.37±5.55; 15 d 17.31±4.80; bP<0.01).As the time of serum-free culturing was prolonged, the number of neuronal dendrite and spine cells decreased.The later increased in number when CCK8 was added. CCK8 could improve the total cellular protein in the process of experimental neuronal aging.CONCLUSION: CCK8 may prolong the process of experimental neuronal aging by maintaining the structure and the number of neuronal dendrite and spine cells and changing the total cellular protein.

  1. MHC class II expression in human basophils: induction and lack of functional significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid L Voskamp

    Full Text Available The antigen-presenting abilities of basophils and their role in initiating a Th2 phenotype is a topic of current controversy. We aimed to determine whether human basophils can be induced to express MHC Class II and act as antigen presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Isolated human basophils were exposed to a panel of cytokines and TLR-ligands and assessed for MHC Class II expression. MHC Class II was expressed in up to 17% of isolated basophils following incubation with a combination of IL-3, IFN-γ and GM-CSF for 72 hours. Costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86 were expressed at very low levels after stimulation. Gene expression analysis of MHC Class II-positive basophils confirmed up-regulation of HLA-DR, HLA-DM, CD74 and Cathepsin S. However, MHC Class II expressing basophils were incapable of inducing antigen-specific T cell activation or proliferation. This is the first report of significant cytokine-induced MHC Class II up-regulation, at both RNA and protein level, in isolated human basophils. By testing stimulation with relevant T cell epitope peptide as well as whole antigen, the failure of MHC Class II expressing basophils to induce T cell response was shown not to be solely due to inefficient antigen uptake and/or processing.

  2. Downregulation of class II transactivator (CIITA) expression by synthetic cannabinoid CP55,940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Celine; Hose, Stacey; O'Brien, Terrence P; Sinha, Debasish

    2004-01-30

    Cannabinoid receptors are known to be expressed in microglia; however, their involvement in specific aspects of microglial immune function has not been demonstrated. Many effects of cannabinoids are mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, designated CB1 and CB2. We have shown that the CB1 receptor is expressed in microglia that also express MHC class II antigen (J. Neuroimmunol. 82 (1998) 13-21). In our present study, we have analyzed the effect of cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 on MHC class II expression on the surface of IFN-gamma induced microglial cells by flow cytometry. CP55,940 blocked the class II MHC expression induced by IFN-gamma. It has been shown that the regulation of class II MHC genes occurs primarily at the transcriptional level, and a non-DNA binding protein, class II transactivator (CIITA), has been shown to be the master activator for class II transcription. We find that mRNA levels of CIITA are increased in IFN-gamma induced EOC 20 microglial cells and that this increase is almost entirely eliminated by the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940. These data suggests that cannabinoids affect MHC class II expression through actions on CIITA at the transcriptional level.

  3. Postsynaptic Depolarization Enhances GABA Drive to Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Neurons through Somatodendritic Cholecystokinin Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Karen M; Baimoukhametova, Dinara V; Bains, Jaideep S; Pittman, Quentin J

    2015-09-23

    Somatodendritically released peptides alter synaptic function through a variety of mechanisms, including autocrine actions that liberate retrograde transmitters. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide expressed in neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a region implicated in satiety and stress. There are clear demonstrations that exogenous CCK modulates food intake and neuropeptide expression in the DMH, but there is no information on how endogenous CCK alters synaptic properties. Here, we provide the first report of somatodendritic release of CCK in the brain in male Sprague Dawley rats. CCK is released from DMH neurons in response to repeated postsynaptic depolarizations, and acts in an autocrine fashion on CCK2 receptors to enhance postsynaptic NMDA receptor function and liberate the retrograde transmitter, nitric oxide (NO). NO subsequently acts presynaptically to enhance GABA release through a soluble guanylate cyclase-mediated pathway. These data provide the first demonstration of synaptic actions of somatodendritically released CCK in the hypothalamus and reveal a new form of retrograde plasticity, depolarization-induced potentiation of inhibition. Significance statement: Somatodendritic signaling using endocannabinoids or nitric oxide to alter the efficacy of afferent transmission is well established. Despite early convincing evidence for somatodendritic release of neurohypophysial peptides in the hypothalamus, there is only limited evidence for this mode of release for other peptides. Here, we provide the first evidence for somatodendritic release of the satiety peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in the brain. We also reveal a new form of synaptic plasticity in which postsynaptic depolarization results in enhancement of inhibition through the somatodendritic release of CCK.

  4. An electrophysiological investigation of the effects of cholecystokinin entric neurons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, I.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide, which is present in the gastrointestinat tract in endocrine cells and in the enteric nervous system (ENS). A possible function in the control of motility of the small intestine has been attributed to neuronal CCK. The aim of this thesis was  to obtain a fundamenta

  5. Epigenetic priming restores the HLA class-I antigen processing machinery expression in Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Cathrin; Fan, Kaiji; Paschen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive, yet highly immunogenic skin cancer. The latter is due to its viral or UV-associated carcinogenesis. For tumor progression MCC has to escape the host's immuno-surveillance, e.g. by loss of HLA class-I expression. Indeed, a reduced HLA class-I e......-I expression on MCC cells by epigenetic priming is an attractive approach to enhance therapies boosting adaptive immune responses....

  6. EXPRESSION OF HLA-CLASS Ⅱ GENESOF IDDM PATIENTS ON THE SURFACE OF THE LTK- CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王姮; 孙琦

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the function of HLA-class Ⅱ genes in the autoimmune response of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus(DDM),the HLA-class Ⅱ gene of IDDM patients was introd uced into Ltk-cells with pSV2-neo plas-mid,using the calcium phosphate precipitation technique.We obtained a stable cell line expressing the HLA-class Ⅱ gene from lymphocytes of IDDM patients.Expression was identified by direct ox erythocyte-CrCl3-HLA DR monoclonal antibody rosetting.

  7. Gallbladder motor function, plasma cholecystokinin and cholecystokinin receptor of gallbladder in cholesterol stone patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhu; Tian-Quan Han; Sheng Chen; Yu Jiang; Sheng-Dao Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the interactive relationship of gallbladder motor function, plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) and cholecystokinin A receptor (CCK-R) of gallbladder in patients with cholesterol stone disease.METHODS: Gallbladder motility was studied by ultrasonography in 33 patients with gallbladder stone and 10 health subjects as controls. Plasma CCK concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay in fasting status (CCK-f) and in 30 min after lipid test meal (CCK-30).Radioligand method was employed to analyze the amount and activity of CCK-R from 33 gallstone patients having cholecystectomy and 8 persons without gallstone died of severe trauma as controls.RESULTS: The percentage of cholesterol in the gallstone composition was more than 70%. The cholesterol stone type was indicated for the patients with gallbladder stone in this study. Based on the criterion of gallbladder residual fraction of the control group, 33 gallstone patients were divided into two subgroups, contractor group (14 cases)and non-contractor group (19 cases), The concentration of CCK-30 was significantly higher in non-contractor group than that in both contractor group and control group (55.86±3.86 pmol/l vs 37.85±0.88 pmol/l and 37.95±0.74 pmol/L, P<0.01), but there was no difference between contractor group and control group. Meanwhile no significant difference of the concentration of CCK-f could be observed among three groups. The amount of CCK-R was lower in non-contractor group than those in both control group and contractor group (10.27±0.94 fmol/mg vs24.59±2.39 fmol/mg and 22.66±0.55 fmol/mg, P<0.01).The activity of CCK-R shown as KD in non-contractor group decreased compared to that in control group and contractor group. Only was the activity of CCK-R lower in contractor group than that in control group. The ejection fraction correlated closely with the amount of CCK-R (r = 0.9683,P<0.01), and the concentration of CCK-30 correlated negatively with the amount of CCK-R closely (r = -0

  8. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  9. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  10. The subfornical organ: a novel site of action of cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Al-Shaimaa F; Dai, Li; Ho, Winnie; Ferguson, Alastair V; Sharkey, Keith A

    2014-03-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is an important sensory circumventricular organ implicated in the regulation of fluid homeostasis and energy balance. We investigated whether the SFO is activated by the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). CCK₁ and CCK₂ receptors were identified in the SFO by RT-PCR. Dissociated SFO neurons that responded to CCK (40/77), were mostly depolarized (9.2 ± 0.9 mV, 30/77), but some were hyperpolarized (-7.3 ± 1.1 mV, 10/77). We next examined the responses of SFO neurons in vivo to CCK (16 μg/kg ip), in the presence and absence of CCK₁ or CCK₂ receptor antagonists (devazepide; 600 μg/kg and L-365,260; 100 μg/kg, respectively), using the functional activation markers c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-related kinase (p-ERK). The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) served as a control for CCK-induced activity. There was a significant increase in c-Fos expression in the NTS (259.2 ± 20.8 neurons) compared with vehicle (47.5 ± 2.5). Similarly, in the SFO, c-Fos was expressed in 40.5 ± 10.6 neurons in CCK-treated compared with 6.6 ± 2.7 in vehicle-treated rats (P < 0.01). Devazepide significantly reduced the effects of CCK in the NTS but not in SFO. L-365,260 blocked the effects of CCK in both brain regions. CCK increased the number of p-ERK neurons in NTS (27.0 ± 4.0) as well as SFO (18.0 ± 4.0), compared with vehicle (8.0 ± 2.6 and 4.3 ± 0.6, respectively; P < 0.05). Both devazepide and L-365,260 reduced CCK-induced p-ERK in NTS, but only L-365,260 reduced it in the SFO. In conclusion, the SFO represents a novel brain region at which circulating CCK may act via CCK₂ receptors to influence central autonomic control.

  11. Medos infantis, cidade e violência: expressões em diferentes classes sociais Children’s fears, city and violence as expressed in different social classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junia de Vilhena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é ilustrar manifestações do medo infantil, considerando a classe social como um possível balizador. Tomando como eixo condutor uma pesquisa realizada em três escolas na zona sul do Rio de Janeiro, buscamos mostrar o efeito da violência nas produções subjetivas infantis, mais especificamente o medo, em crianças de diferentes classes sociais. Para isto, foi utilizado o desenho como ferramenta de análise. Evidenciaram-se diferentes produções de crianças pertencentes a diferentes classes sociais. Por fim, buscamos, igualmente, ressaltar o papel da mídia como um potente agenciador de subjetividade no tocante ao estímulo a uma cultura do medo.The objective is to illustrate children’s expressions of fear, as far as social classes are concerned. Based on a research conducted in three schools in the southern area of ​​Rio de Janeiro, we show the effects of violence on children’s subjective productions. Using their drawings as a tool of analysis, we enhance the different productions of children belonging to different social classes as far as fear is concerned. We seek also to emphasize the role of media as a powerful agent in the production of subjectivity, encouraging a culture of fear.

  12. INTRAPANCREATIC CHOLECYSTOKININ MEDIATES VAGALLY STIMULATED EXOCRINE SECRETION FROM THE RAT PANCREAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何晓东; MTimothyNelson; HaileTDebas

    1996-01-01

    Although cholecystokinin is localized within neuronal fibres of the pancreas, a physiological role for intrapancreatic cholecystokinin has not been identified. The strategy of this study was to elicit pure vagal stlmulatbx electrically, and to use specific receptor antagonists to idetxtify the mediators of exocrine pancreatic secretion. We conclude that vagal stimulation of the rat pancreas involves ganglionicand neurotransmission and release of acetylcholine and cholecystokinin from intrapanereatic, postganglionic fibres. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a physiological role for intrapancreatic cholecystokinin.

  13. Cholecystokinin and gastrin receptors targeting in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rajani; Chandra, Vishal; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2012-12-01

    Cholecystokinin and Gastrin are amongst the first gastrointestinal hormone discovered. In addition to classical actions (contraction of gallbladder, growth and secretion in the stomach and pancreas), these also act as growth stimulants for gastrointestinal malignancies and cell lines. Growth of these tumours is inhibited by antagonists of the cholecystokinin and gastrin receptors. These receptors provides most promising approach in clinical oncology and several specific radiolabelled ligands have been synthesized for specific tumour targeting and therapy of tumours overexpressing these receptors. Therefore, definition of the molecular structure of the receptor involved in the autocrine/paracrine loop may contribute to novel therapies for gastrointestinal cancer. Hence, this review tries to focus on the role and distribution of these hormones and their receptors in gastrointestinal cancer with a brief talk about the clinical trial using available agonist and antagonist in gastrointestinal cancers.

  14. MHC class I expression dependent on bacterial infection and parental factors in whitefish embryos (Salmonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Emily S; Wilkins, Laetitia G E; Wedekind, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Ecological conditions can influence not only the expression of a phenotype, but also the heritability of a trait. As such, heritable variation for a trait needs to be studied across environments. We have investigated how pathogen challenge affects the expression of MHC genes in embryos of the lake whitefish Coregonus palaea. In order to experimentally separate paternal (i.e. genetic) from maternal and environmental effects, and determine whether and how stress affects the heritable variation for MHC expression, embryos were produced in full-factorial in vitro fertilizations, reared singly, and exposed at 208 degree days (late-eyed stage) to either one of two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens that differ in their virulence characteristics (one increased mortality, while both delayed hatching time). Gene expression was assessed 48 h postinoculation, and virulence effects of the bacterial infection were monitored until hatching. We found no evidence of MHC class II expression at this stage of development. MHC class I expression was markedly down-regulated in reaction to both pseudomonads. While MHC expression could not be linked to embryo survival, the less the gene was expressed, the earlier the embryos hatched within each treatment group, possibly due to trade-offs between immune function and developmental rate or further factors that affect both hatching timing and MHC expression. We found significant additive genetic variance for MHC class I expression in some treatments. That is, changes in pathogen pressures could induce rapid evolution in MHC class I expression. However, we found no additive genetic variance in reaction norms in our study population.

  15. 八肽胆囊收缩素对TNF-α诱导的大鼠滑膜细胞株RSC-364 IL-6的作用及其可能的分子机制%Effects of cholecystokinin octapeptide on TNF- α- induced IL- 6 expression and its possible molecular mechanismin rat synovial cell strain RSC-364

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵占胜; 金玉怀; 丛斌; 李淑瑾; 徐锦荣; 姚玉霞; 凌亦凌

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of sulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK -8 ) on TNF -α induced IL - 6 mRNA expression, NF - κB activation in the rat fibroblast - like synovial cell strain RSC - 364 and its possible receptor mechanisms. METHODS: RSC -364 cells were stimulated with TNF - α( 10 μg/L) in the presence or absence of sCCK- 8( 10-8 - 10-6 mol/L) or/and CCK receptor antagonist proglumide(2 mg/L). IL -6 and CCK receptor A/B (CCK- AR/CCK/BR) mRNA expression were assayed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR) at 3 h after stimulation, and nuclear factor - κB (NF - κB) binding activity was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) at lh after stimulation. At 30 min of stimulation the IκB protein level in cytoplasma was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: Both CCK - AR and CCK - BR were constitutively expressed on RSC - 364. sCCK - 8, at concentrations from 10-8 mol/L to 10 -6 mol/L, significantly increased IL - 6 mRNA expression, CCK - AR and CCK - BR mRNA expression, NF - κB binding activity and IκB protein degradation. The effects of sCCK - 8 on NF - κB activity and IκB degradation level were attenuated by CCK receptor antagonist proglumide. CONCLUSION: sCCK - 8 upregulats TNF - α- induced IL - 6 mRNA expression by NF - κB pathway through its receptor on rat synoviocytes, suggesting its possible regulatory role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.%目的:观察硫酸化八肽胆囊收缩素(sCCK-8)对TNF-α诱导大鼠滑膜细胞株RSC-364IL-6mRNA表达及核因子NF-κB的影响及其可能的受体机制.方法:大鼠滑膜细胞株RSC-364经TNF-α(10μg/L)、sCCK-8(10-8-10-6 mol/L)、CCK受体拮抗剂丙谷胺(2 mg/L)及溶剂单独或联合孵育3 h,用RT-PCR检测细胞IL-6、CCK-AR及CCK-BR mRNA的表达,孵育1 h,用电泳迁移率检测NF-κB活性,孵育30 min,用Western blotting检测胞浆IκB蛋白表达.结果:RSC-364细胞固有表达CCK-A/B受体,sCCK-8(10-8-10-6 mol/L)使IL-6

  16. Epigenetic reprogramming and aberrant expression of PRAME are associated with increased metastatic risk in Class 1 and Class 2 uveal melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Matthew G.; Durante, Michael A.; Decatur, Christina L.; Tarlan, Bercin; Oelschlager, Kristen M.; Stone, John F.; Kuznetsov, Jeffim; Bowcock, Anne M.; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Harbour, J. William

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously identified PRAME as a biomarker for metastatic risk in Class 1 uveal melanomas. In this study, we sought to define a threshold value for positive PRAME expression (PRAME+) in a large dataset, identify factors associated with PRAME expression, evaluate the prognostic value of PRAME in Class 2 uveal melanomas, and determine whether PRAME expression is associated with aberrant hypomethylation of the PRAME promoter. Results Among 678 samples analyzed by qPCR, 498 (73.5%) were PRAME- and 180 (26.5%) were PRAME+. Class 1 tumors were more likely to be PRAME-, whereas Class 2 tumors were more likely to be PRAME+ (P < 0.0001). PRAME expression was associated with shorter time to metastasis and melanoma specific mortality in Class 2 tumors (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). In Class 1 tumors, PRAME expression was directly associated with SF3B1 mutations (P < 0.0001) and inversely associated with EIF1AX mutations (P = 0.004). PRAME expression was strongly associated with hypomethylation at 12 CpG sites near the PRAME promoter. MATERIALS AND METHODS Analyses included PRAME mRNA expression, Class 1 versus Class 2 status, chromosomal copy number, mutation status of BAP1, EIF1AX, GNA11, GNAQ and SF3B1, and genomic DNA methylation status. Analyses were performed on 555 de-identified samples from Castle Biosciences, 123 samples from our center, and 80 samples from the TCGA. Conclusions PRAME is aberrantly hypomethylated and activated in Class 1 and Class 2 uveal melanomas and is associated with increased metastatic risk in both classes. Since PRAME has been successfully targeted for immunotherapy, it may prove to be a companion prognostic biomarker. PMID:27486988

  17. Effects of growth hormone deficiency and recombinant growth hormone therapy on postprandial gallbladder motility and cholecystokinin release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; Twickler, M.; Rehfeld, J.F.; Ooteghem, N.A. van; Castro Cabezas, M.; Portincasa, P.; Berge-Henegouwen, G.P. van; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2004-01-01

    In addition to cholecystokinin, other hormones have been suggested to be involved in regulation of postprandial gallbladder contraction. We aimed to evaluate effects of growth hormone (GH) on gallbladder contractility and cholecystokinin release. Gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound) and

  18. Effects of Duliang capsule on the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and cholecystokinin in the midbrain of a rat migraine model%都梁软胶囊对偏头痛模型大鼠中脑CGRP及CCK 表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩喜梅; 姚刚; 满玉红; 于挺敏

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究都梁软胶囊对偏头痛模型大鼠中脑降钙素基因相关肽(CGRP)和缩胆囊肽(CCK)基因转录水平的影响,探讨其预防治疗偏头痛的作用机制。方法健康Wistar大鼠随机分4组,A为对照组,B为偏头痛组,C为都梁软胶囊对照组,D为都梁软胶囊治疗组。C、D组给予都梁软胶囊0.5g·kg -1·d-1灌胃,A、B组大鼠灌胃给予等量容积的 Tween‐80。灌胃7 d后,将B、D两组大鼠造硝酸甘油型偏头痛模型,造模2 h ,保存中脑标本。实时荧光定量PCR检测CGRP和CCK的转录水平。结果 D组大鼠中脑CGRP转录水平明显低于B组(0.64±0.35和1.61±0.51,P<0.05)。C组大鼠中脑CCK 转录水平明显低于A组(0.32±0.31和1.21±0.38,P<0.05)。结论都梁软胶囊可以干预中脑CGRP和CCK的表达,从而影响内源性痛觉调制系统的功能。%Objective To study the effects of Duliang capsule on the expression of calcitonin gene‐related peptide(CGRP) and cholecystokinin(CCK) in the midbrain of a rat migraine model ,and explored treatment effects and mechanisms of Duliang cap‐sule on rats with migraine .Methods A total of 24 rats were randomly divided into four groups :normal control groups(A) ,migraine model groups(B) ,Duliang capsule control groups(C) and Duliang capsule treatment groups(D) .C and D were intragastrically per‐fused with Duliang capsule(0 .5 g · kg -1 · d-1 ) .After 7 days ,nitroglycerin was subcutaneously injected into the buttocks of the B and D to induce migraine .Two hours after nitroglycerin injection ,the midbrain were isolated CGRP and CCK expression in midbrain were determined using SYBR Green I real‐time quantitative PCR .Results CGRP mRNA expression was significantly lower in mid‐brains of rats in the Duliang capsule treatment groups compared with migraine model groups(P<0 .05) .CCK mRNA expression was significantly lower in midbrains of rats in the

  19. Hepatitis B virus down-regulates expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyan; Cheng, Min; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is associated with a 100-fold high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor recognition is of the most importance during the immune surveillance process that prevents cancer development in humans. In the present study, the expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line HepG2.2.15 were investigated to indicate the possible effects of HBV on the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. It was found that the expressions of MHC class I molecules HLA-ABC, HLA-E and MICA were much lower in HepG2.2.15 cells compared with HepG2 cells. The expressing HBV in human hepatoplastoma cell line significantly down-regulated the expressions of MHC class I molecules. Additionally, it was observed that in murine chronic HBsAg carriers the expression of classical MHC-I molecule on hepatocytes was down-regulated. These results demonstrated that HBV might affect the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma such as the recognition of CD8+ T, NK-CTL and NK cells and prevent the immune surveillance against tumors. However, the effects of HBV down-regulation of MHC class I molecules on the target cells in vivo should be further studied.

  20. Characterization of a novel five-transmembrane domain cholecystokinin-2 receptor splice variant identified in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Claire; Escrieut, Chantal; Clerc, Pascal; Gigoux, Véronique; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Fourmy, Daniel

    2012-02-26

    The cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R), is expressed in cancers where it contributes to tumor progression. The CCK2R is over-expressed in a sub-set of tumors, allowing its use in tumor targeting with a radiolabel ligand. Since discrepancies between mRNA levels and CCK2R binding sites were noticed, we searched for abnormally spliced variants in tumors from various origins having been previously reported to frequently express cholecystokinin receptors, such as medullary thyroid carcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, and gastroenteropancreatic tumors. A variant of the CCK2R coding for a putative five-transmembrane domains receptor has been cloned. This variant represented as much as 6% of CCK2R levels. Ectopic expression in COS-7 cells revealed that this variant lacks biological activity due to its sequestration in endoplasmic reticulum. When co-expressed with the CCK2R, this variant diminished membrane density of the CCK2R and CCK2R-mediated activity (phospholipase-C and ERK activation). In conclusion, a novel splice variant acting as a dominant negative on membrane density of the CCK2R may be of importance for the pathophysiology of certain tumors and for their in vivo CCK2R-targeting.

  1. Functional synergy between cholecystokinin receptors CCKAR and CCKBR in mammalian brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Sayoko; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Ishigame, Keiko; Sestan, Nenad; Günel, Murat; Louvi, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide hormone and one of the most abundant neuropeptides in vertebrate brain, mediates its actions via two G-protein coupled receptors, CCKAR and CCKBR, respectively active in peripheral organs and the central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that the CCK receptors have a dynamic and largely reciprocal expression in embryonic and postnatal brain. Using compound homozygous mutant mice lacking the activity of both CCK receptors, we uncover their additive, functionally synergistic effects in brain development and demonstrate that CCK receptor loss leads to abnormalities of cortical development, including defects in the formation of the midline and corpus callosum, and cortical interneuron migration. Using comparative transcriptome analysis of embryonic neocortex, we define the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects. Thus we demonstrate a developmental, hitherto unappreciated, role of the two CCK receptors in mammalian neocortical development.

  2. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on neurons in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and experimental subacute measles encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogate, N.; Yamabe, Toshio; Verma, L.; Dhib-Jalbut, S. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Lack of major histocompatibility class I antigens on neurons has been implicated as a possible mechanism for viral persistence in the brain since these antigens are required for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition of infected cells. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), measles virus (MV) persists in neurons, resulting in a fatal chronic infection. MHC class I mRNA expression was examined in formalin-fixed brain tissue from 6 SSPE patients by in situ hybridization. In addition MHC class I protein expression in MV-infected neurons was examined in experimental Subacute Measles Encephalitis (SME) by double immunohistochemistry. MHC class I mRNA expression was found to be upregulated in SSPE tissues studied, and in 5 out of 6 cases the expression was definitively seen on neurons. The percentage of neurons expressing MHC class I mRNA ranged between 20 to 84% in infected areas. There was no correlation between the degree of infection and expression of MHC class I molecules on neurons. Importantly, the number of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens was markedly low, varying between 2 to 8%. Similar results were obtained in SME where 20 to 30% of the neurons expressed MHC class I but < 8% co-expressed MHC class I and MV antigens. Perivascular infiltrating cells in the infected regions in SME expressed IFN{gamma} immunoreactivity. The results suggest that MV may not be directly involved in the induction of MHC class I on neurons and that cytokines such as IFN{gamma} may play an important role. Furthermore, the paucity of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens in SSPE and SME suggests that such cells are either rapidly cleared by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), or, alternatively, lack of co-expression of MHC class I on MV infected neurons favors MV persistence in these cells by escaping CTL recognition. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Class 3 semaphorins expression and association with innervation and angiogenesis within the degenerate human intervertebral disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binch, Abbie L A; Cole, Ashley A; Breakwell, Lee M; Michael, Anthony L R; Chiverton, Neil; Creemers, Laura B; Cross, Alison K; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Nerve and blood vessel ingrowth during intervertebral disc degeneration, is thought to be a major cause of low back pain, however the regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the expression and regulation of a subclass of axonal guidance molecules known as the class 3 s

  4. Transcriptomic and behavioural characterisation of a mouse model of burn pain identify the cholecystokinin 2 receptor as an analgesic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kathleen; Deuis, Jennifer R; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Burn injury is a cause of significant mortality and morbidity worldwide and is frequently associated with severe and long-lasting pain that remains difficult to manage throughout recovery. We characterised a mouse model of burn-induced pain using pharmacological and transcriptomic approaches. Mechanical allodynia elicited by burn injury was partially reversed by meloxicam (5 mg/kg), gabapentin (100 mg/kg) and oxycodone (3 and 10 mg/kg), while thermal allodynia and gait abnormalities were only significantly improved by amitriptyline (3 mg/kg) and oxycodone (10 mg/kg). The need for relatively high opioid doses to elicit analgesia suggested a degree of opioid resistance, similar to that shown clinically in burn patients. We thus assessed the gene expression changes in dorsal root ganglion neurons and pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning burn injury-induced pain using a transcriptomic approach. Burn injury was associated with significantly increased expression of genes associated with axon guidance, neuropeptide signalling, behavioural defence response and extracellular signalling, confirming a mixed neuropathic and inflammatory aetiology. Notably, among the pain-related genes that were upregulated post-injury was the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (Cckbr), a G protein-coupled receptor known as a pain target involved in reducing opioid effectiveness. Indeed, the clinically used cholecystokinin receptor antagonist proglumide (30 mg/kg) was effective at reversing mechanical allodynia, with additional analgesia evident in combination with low-dose oxycodone (1 mg/kg), including significant reversal of thermal allodynia. These findings highlight the complex pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning burn injury-induced pain and suggest that cholecystokinin-2 receptor antagonists may be useful clinically as adjuvants to decrease opioid requirements and improve analgesic management.

  5. Increased expression of class III β-tubulin in castration-resistant human prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, S; Ploussard, G.; Allory, Y; Nicolaiew, N; Boissière-Michot, F; Maillé, P; Kheuang, L; Coppolani, E; Ali, A.; Bibeau, F; Culine, S; Buttyan, R; de la Taille, A; Vacherot, F

    2009-01-01

    Background: Class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) is expressed in tissues of neuronal lineage and also in several human malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma, breast and ovarian cancer. Overexpression of βIII-tubulin in these tumours is associated with an unfavourable outcome and resistance to taxane-based therapies. At present, βIII-tubulin expression remains largely uncharacterised in prostate cancer. Methods: In this report, we evaluated the expression of βIII-tubulin in 138 d...

  6. Expression of class Ⅰ MHC molecule, HSP70 and TAP in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ling Deng; Wei Chen; Mei-Ying Cai; Da-Peng Wei

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate whether class Ⅰ MHC molecule,transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), and heat-shock proteion70 (HSP70) expressed in liver cancer cells before the design and construction of CTL vaccine against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: We studied 30 HCC specimens by labeled streptavidin biotin (LSAB) method of immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: The results showed that the majority of HCC cells investigated naturally expressed class Ⅰ MHC and TAP,which were different from other tumor cells. Furthermore,we found that HSP70 expressed not only in cellular cytoplasm, but also on the cell surface in HCC.CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that our understanding about immune escape mechanisms employed by HCC cells may be further improved. It is important to design and construct CTL vaccine against HCC.

  7. Bayesian model accounting for within-class biological variability in Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brentani Helena

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important challenge for transcript counting methods such as Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, "Digital Northern" or Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS, is to carry out statistical analyses that account for the within-class variability, i.e., variability due to the intrinsic biological differences among sampled individuals of the same class, and not only variability due to technical sampling error. Results We introduce a Bayesian model that accounts for the within-class variability by means of mixture distribution. We show that the previously available approaches of aggregation in pools ("pseudo-libraries" and the Beta-Binomial model, are particular cases of the mixture model. We illustrate our method with a brain tumor vs. normal comparison using SAGE data from public databases. We show examples of tags regarded as differentially expressed with high significance if the within-class variability is ignored, but clearly not so significant if one accounts for it. Conclusion Using available information about biological replicates, one can transform a list of candidate transcripts showing differential expression to a more reliable one. Our method is freely available, under GPL/GNU copyleft, through a user friendly web-based on-line tool or as R language scripts at supplemental web-site.

  8. Gene expression profiling in uveal melanoma: technical reliability and correlation of molecular class with pathologic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasseraud, Kristen M; Wilkinson, Jeff K; Oelschlager, Kristen M; Poteet, Trisha M; Cook, Robert W; Stone, John F; Monzon, Federico A

    2017-08-04

    A 15-gene expression profile test has been clinically validated and is widely utilized in newly diagnosed uveal melanoma (UM) patients to assess metastatic potential of the tumor. As most patients are treated with eye-sparing radiotherapy, there is limited tumor tissue available for testing, and technical reliability and success of prognostic testing are critical. This study assessed the analytical performance of the 15-gene expression test for UM and the correlation of molecular class with pathologic characteristics. Inter-assay, intra-assay, inter-instrument/operator, and inter-site experiments were conducted, and concordance of the 15-gene expression profile test results and associated discriminant scores for matched tumor samples were evaluated. Technical success was determined from de-identified clinical reports from January 2010 - May 2016. Pathologic characteristics of enucleated tumors were correlated with molecular class results. Inter-assay concordance on 16 samples run on 3 consecutive days was 100%, and matched discriminant scores were strongly correlated (R(2) = 0.9944). Inter-assay concordance of 46 samples assayed within a one year period was 100%, with an R(2) value of 0.9747 for the discriminant scores. Intra-assay concordance of 12 samples run concurrently in duplicates was 100%; discriminant score correlation yielded an R(2) of 0.9934. Concordance between two sites assessing the same tumors was 100% with an R(2) of 0.9818 between discriminant scores. Inter-operator/instrument concordance was 96% for Class 1/2 calls and 90% for Class 1A/1B calls, and the discriminant scores had a correlation R(2) of 0.9636. Technical success was 96.3% on 5516 samples tested since 2010. Increased largest basal diameter and thickness were significantly associated with Class 1B and Class 2 vs. Class 1A signatures. These results show that the 15-gene expression profile test for UM has robust, reproducible performance characteristics. The technical success rate

  9. The expression of cholecystokinin and prolactin in cerebral cortex of developing rats with seizure induced by acute heat stress%发育期热水浴诱发惊厥大鼠大脑皮层催乳素和胆囊收缩素蛋白表达的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大庆; 倪宏; 水泉祥; 丁振尧; 李上淼

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the distribution of cholecystokinin (CCK) and prolactin (PRL) positive cells in rat' s brain following heat stress (HS) and febrile convulsion ( FC). Methods Acute heat stress model of seizure induced by warm water was developed in this study. Adjacent section immunohistochemical staining method was used to observe expression of CCK and PRL in cerebral cortex. Results (1) There were similar distributions of CCK and PRL positive cells in cerebral cortex of HS group. (2) Both HS and FC rats showed more positive neurons in cerebral cortex than those in control group (P < 0. 01). There were significant more CCK positive neurons in cerebral cortex than that in HS group(P <0. 01) .however,no significant difference of PRL positive neurons was found in piriform cortex and entorhinal cortex between HS and FC group(P>0.05) ,but the difference was significant in perirhinal cortex and parietal cortex. (3)Correlation and regression analysis of the data of CCK and PRL positive units demonstrated that the immunoreactive intensity of CCK and PRL had a positive linear correlation in cerebral cortex of HS group ( Y = 7. 939 +1. 36X, r = 0. 97, P < 0. 01), but no correlation was found in cerebral cortex of FC group ( r = 0. 47, P >0.05). Conclusion (1) CCK may involve in anti-convulsant mechanisms in response to FC. (2) There may be a synergistic action of PRL and CCK in the central control of HS.%目的 探讨急性热应激(HS)和热性惊厥(FC)对大脑皮层胆囊收缩素(CCK)和催乳素(PRL)定位表达的影响.方法 采用热水浴诱导21 日龄大鼠FC模型,应用免疫组织化学技术,对HS和FC大鼠CCK和PRL在大脑皮层的定位表达进行比较分析.结果 (1)HS组CCK和PRL阳性细胞在大脑皮层分布极为相似,免疫染色有共深或共浅的倾向.(2)HS组和FC组大脑皮层CCK、PRL阳性细胞数明显高于对照组(P<0.01).FC组大鼠大脑皮层各区CCK阳性细胞数明显高于HS组(P<0.01).FC组大鼠大

  10. Cholecystokinin: how many functions? Observations in seabreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Valeria; Campo, Salvatore; D'Ascola, Angela; Guerrera, M Cristina; Levanti, M Beatrice; Germanà, Antonino; Muglia, Ugo

    2014-09-01

    A short overview on the regional distribution of the gastro-intestinal peptide hormone cholecystokin (CCK) in fish is presented. In particular, the results of molecular and immunological studies on seabreams, Diplodus puntazzo and Diplodus sargus, are reported, which, by demonstrating CCK in the hindgut, open new questions regarding the functional role of this hormone in that part of the intestine. The putative involvement of hindgut CCK in the feedback control of digestive processes was tested by measuring CCK gene and protein expression in fed and fasted fish. The results of this study led to hypothesize different roles for the two CCK isoforms in D. sargus, one of which related to regulation of digestive processes from pyloric caeca through hindgut. On the other hand, a functional role alternative to regulation of digestive processes may be inferred for the other isoform.

  11. A synthetic peptide derivative that is a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignon, M F; Galas, M C; Rodriguez, M; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1987-05-25

    So far, there are no known peptidic effective receptor antagonists of both peripheral and central effects of cholecystokinin (CCK). Here, we describe a synthetic peptide derivative of CCK, t-butyloxycarbonyl-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-D-Trp-Nle-Asp 2-phenylethyl ester 1 (where Nle is norleucine), which is a potent CCK receptor antagonist. In rat and guinea pig dispersed pancreatic acini, this peptide derivative did not alter amylase secretion, but was able to antagonize the stimulation caused by cholecystokinin-related agonists. It caused a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for the stimulation of amylase secretion with half-maximal inhibition of CCK-8-stimulated amylase release at a concentration of about 0.1 microM. Compound 1 was able to inhibit the binding of labeled CCK-9 (the C-terminal nonapeptide of CCK) to rat and guinea pig pancreatic acini (IC50 = 5 X 10(-8) M) as well as to guinea pig cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 5 X 10(-7) M). These results indicate that Compound 1 is a potent competitive CCK receptor antagonist.

  12. Selective changes in expression of HLA class I polymorphic determinants in human solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, P.G.; Nicotra, M.R.; Bigotti, A.; Venturo, I.; Giacomini, P. (Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)); Marcenaro, L.; Russo, C. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Analysis of surgical biopsies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to framework determinants of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens has shown that malignant transformation is frequently associated with a marked loss of these cell surface molecules. The present study sought to determine whether more selective losses of major histocompatibility complex class I expression occur. Multiple specimens from 13 different types of primary and metastatic tumors were tested utilizing mAb BB7.2, which recognizes a polymorphic HLA-A2 epitope. In each case, expression of HLA-A,B,C molecules was determined by testing with mAb W6/32 directed to a framework HLA class I determinant. The authors have found that in HLA-A2-positive patients, HLA-A2 products are not detectable or are reduced in their expression in 70-80% of endometrial, colorectal, mammary, and renal tumors; in 40-60% of soft-tissue, skin, ovary, urinary bladder, prostate, and stomach tumors; and in 25-30% of melanomas and lung carcinomas tested. All tumors expressed the framework HLA-A,B.C determinant. The HLA-A2 epitope recognized by mAb BB7.2 is located in a portion of the HLA-A2 molecule postulated to react with the T-cell receptor. The selective loss of an HLA class I polymorphic epitope shown in this study may explain the mechanism by which tumor cells escape both T-cell recognition and natural killer cell surveillance.

  13. Regulation of MHC Class II-Peptide Complex Expression by Ubiquitination

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    Kyung Jin eCho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MHC class II (MHC-II molecules are present on antigen presenting cells (APCs and these molecules function by binding antigenic peptides and presenting these peptides to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. APCs continuously generate and degrade MHC-II molecules, and ubiquitination of MHC-II has recently been shown to be a key regulator of MHC-II expression in dendritic cells (DCs. In this mini-review we will examine the mechanism by which the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I regulates MHC-II expression on APCs and will discuss the functional consequences of altering MHC-II ubiquitination.

  14. Contact sensitizers specifically increase MHC class II expression on murine immature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herouet, C; Cottin, M; LeClaire, J; Enk, A; Rousset, F

    2000-01-01

    Contact sensitivity is a T-cell-mediated immune disease that can occur when low-molecular-weight chemicals penetrate the skin. In vivo topical application of chemical sensitizers results in morphological modification of Langerhans cells (LC). Moreover, within 18 h, LC increase their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens expression and migrate to lymph nodes where they present the sensitizer to T lymphocytes. We wanted to determine if such an effect could also be observed in vitro. However, because of the high genetic diversity encountered in humans, assays were performed with dendritic cells (DC) obtained from a Balb/c mouse strain. The capacity of a strong sensitizer, DNBS (2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid), to modulate the phenotype of bone marrow-derived DC in vitro, was investigated. A specific and marked increase of MHC class II molecules expression was observed within 18 h. To eliminate the use of animals in sensitization studies, the XS52 DC line was tested at an immature stage. A 30-min contact with the strong sensitizers DNBS and oxazolone, or the moderate mercaptobenzothiazole, resulted in upregulation of MHC class II molecules expression, analyzed after 18-h incubation. This effect was not observed with irritants (dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium lauryl sulfate) nor with a neutral molecule (sodium chloride). These data suggested the possibility of developing an in vitro model for the identification of the sensitizing potential of chemicals, using a constant and non animal-consuming material.

  15. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

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    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  16. Assessment of cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R) in neoplastic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jyoti; Putt, Karson S; Coppola, Domenico; Leon, Marino E; Khalil, Farah K; Centeno, Barbara A; Clark, Noel; Stark, Valerie E; Morse, David L; Low, Philip S

    2016-03-22

    The expression of cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R, CCKBR or gastrin receptor) has been reported on a diverse range of cancers such as colorectal, liver, lung, pancreatic, ovarian, stomach, thyroid and numerous neuroendocrine/carcinoid tumors. Some cancers of the colorectum, lung, pancreas and thyroid have been shown to overexpress CCK2R in relation to normal matched tissues of the same organ. This reported overexpression has led to the development of a number of CCK2R-ligand targeted imaging and therapeutic agents. However, no comprehensive study comparing the expression of CCK2R in multiple cancers to multiple normal tissues has been performed. Herein, we report the immunohistochemical analysis of cancer samples from gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and thyroid cancer against multiple normal tissue samples from esophagus, liver, lung, pancreas, stomach, spleen and thyroid. These results show that CCK2R expression is present in nearly all cancer and normal samples tested and that none of the cancer samples had expression that was statistically greater than that of all of the normal samples.

  17. 利扎曲普坦对偏头痛大鼠内源性痛觉调制系统缩胆囊肽表达的影响%Rizatriptan effects on the cholecystokinin expression in endogenous pain modulatory system of a rat mi-graine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚刚; 郝婷婷; 黄倩; 于挺敏

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察利扎曲普坦对偏头痛大鼠中脑导水管周围灰质( Periaqueductal gray,PAG)缩胆囊肽( cholecystokinin,CCK)表达的影响,探讨曲普坦类药物对偏头痛发作时内源性痛觉调制系统的干预作用。方法健康Wistar大鼠随机分4组:A组:对照组,B组:偏头痛组,C组:利扎曲普坦对照组,D组:利扎曲普坦治疗组。利扎曲普坦给药组( C、D组)大鼠给予利扎曲普坦1 mg/( kg·d)灌胃。给药7 d后,B、D组大鼠制备硝酸甘油型偏头痛动物模型,造模2 h留取中脑标本。实时定量PCR及免疫组化法检测CCK的表达情况。结果 A、B、C、D组大鼠中脑每250 ng总RNA CCK mRNA拷贝数(×106)分别为:1.25±0.41、1.71±0.93、0.17±0.12、0.22±0.07。 A、B、C、D组大鼠PAG区CCK⁃8免疫反应阳性细胞个数分别为:37.17±12.62、40.17±11.09、27.33±7.71、20.67±7.66。 C组大鼠中脑CCK mRNA拷贝数明显低于A组(P<0.05),D组大鼠中脑CCK mRNA拷贝数明显低于B组(P<0.05);D组大鼠中脑PAG区CCK⁃8免疫反应阳性细胞数少于B组(P<0.05)。结论利扎曲普坦能够下调偏头痛大鼠中脑CCK基因表达,减弱CCK⁃8对内源性阿片肽镇痛效应的抑制作用,从而提高阿片肽镇痛效应,增强内源性痛觉调制系统的镇痛作用。%Objective To assess the influence of Rizatriptan on the cholecystokinin( CCK) expression in periaqueductal gray( PAG) of migraine model rat to investigate the possible mechanism by which Triptans treat mi⁃graine. Methods A total of 24 rats were randomly divided into four groups:normal control groups(A),migraine model groups(B),Rizatriptan control groups(C) and Rizatriptan treatment groups(D).C and D groups were intra⁃gastrically perfused with Rizatriptan,1 mg/kg per day. After 7 days,nitroglycerin was subcutaneously injected into the buttocks of the B and D group to

  18. Neurogliaform and Ivy cells: a major class of nNOS expressing GABAergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caren eArmstrong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurogliaform and Ivy cells are members of an abundant class of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS expressing GABAergic interneurons found in diverse brain regions. These cells have a defining dense local axonal plexus, and display unique synaptic properties, including a biphasic postsynaptic response with both a slow GABAA component, and a GABAB component, following even a single action potential. The type of transmission displayed by these cells has been termed ‘volume transmission,’ distinct from both tonic and classical synaptic transmission. Electrical connections are also notable in that, unlike other classes, neurogliaform family cells will form gap junctions not only with other neurogliaform cells, but also with members of other GABAergic cell classes. In this review we focus on neurogliaform and Ivy cells throughout the hippocampal formation, where recent studies highlight their role in feedforward inhibition, uncover their ability to display a phenomenon called persistent firing, and reveal their modulation by opioids. The unique properties of this class of cells, their abundance, rich connectivity, and modulation by clinically relevant drugs make them an attractive target for future studies in vivo during different behavioral and pharmacological conditions.

  19. [MHC class I antigens, CD4 and CD8 expressions in polymyositis and dermatomyositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Carla Renata; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the frequencies of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigens, and CD4 and CD8 cells in skeletal muscle in polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). This was a retrospective study of 34 PM cases, 8 DM cases, and 29 control patients with non-inflammatory myopathies. MHC-I antigens were expressed in the sarcolemma and/or sarcoplasm in 79.4% of PM cases, 62.5% of DM cases, and 27.6% of controls (CD4 expression was observed in 76.5%, 75%, and 13.8%, respectively). There was a high suspicion of PM/DM (mainly PM) in patients in whom MHC-I antigens and CD4 were co-expressed. In 14.3% of PM/DM cases, we observed MHC-I antigens expression alone, without inflammatory cells. MCH-I antigens expression and CD4 positivity might add to strong diagnostic suspicion of PM/DM. No cellular infiltration was observed in 14.3% of such cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Class I to III histone deacetylases differentially regulate inflammation-induced matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression in primary amnion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Marin; Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2014-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 plays an important role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix in fetal membranes, and pathological activation of MMP-9 can lead to preterm birth. In nongestational tissues, modulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulates MMP-9 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether class I to III HDACs regulate MMP-9 expression and activity in primary amnion cells. Class I and II HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the general class I and II HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I HDACi MS-275, and the class II HDACi MC1568. Class III HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the SIRT1 activators resveratrol and SRT1720 as well as SIRT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Primary amnion epithelial cells were incubated with 1 ng/mL interleukin (IL) 1β in the absence or presence of 0.3 μmol/L TSA, 5 μmol/L SAHA, 2.5 μmol/L MS-275, 2.5 μmol/L MC1568, 50 μmol/L resveratrol, or 10 μmol/L SRT1720 for 20 hours. We found that the class I and II HDACi TSA and SAHA and the class II HDACi MC1568 significantly decreased IL-β-induced MMP-9 gene and pro-MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells. There was, however, no effect of the class I HDACi MS-275 on IL-β-induced MMP-9 expression. On the other hand, inhibition of class III HDAC SIRT1 using siRNA significantly augmented IL-1β-induced MMP-9, and SIRT1 activation using resveratrol and SRT1720 inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP-9 expression. In summary, class I to III HDACs differentially regulate inflammation-induced MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells.

  1. Over one-half billion years of head conservation? Expression of an ems class gene in Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokady, Ofer; Dick, Matthew H.; Lackschewitz, Dagmar; Schierwater, Bernd; Buss, Leo W.

    1998-01-01

    We report the isolation of an empty spiracles class homeodomain-containing gene, Cn-ems, from the hydrozoan Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus, the first gene of this class characterized in a lower metazoan. Cn-ems was found to be expressed in the head of gastrozooids, specifically in endodermal epithelial cells of the taeniolae of the hypostome. Cn-ems is not expressed in gonozooids, which lack taeniolae. Experimental conversion of the posterior region of the planula larva into head structures up-regulates expression of the gene. These findings establish that the association of ems-class genes with head structures preceded the evolution of bilateral symmetry. PMID:9520424

  2. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes B. Fuertes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK cells, CD8+ aßTCR and ?dTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-? secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease- induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis, premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.

  3. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Mercedes B; Rossi, Lucas E; Peralta, Carlos M; Cabrera, Hugo N; Allevato, Miguel A; Zwirner, Norberto W

    2011-01-01

    The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA) is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ abTCR and gdTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-g secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease-induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi) remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples) as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis), premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis) and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.

  4. Probing natural killer cell education by Ly49 receptor expression analysis and computational modelling in single MHC class I mice.

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    Sofia Johansson

    Full Text Available Murine natural killer (NK cells express inhibitory Ly49 receptors for MHC class I molecules, which allows for "missing self" recognition of cells that downregulate MHC class I expression. During murine NK cell development, host MHC class I molecules impose an "educating impact" on the NK cell pool. As a result, mice with different MHC class I expression display different frequency distributions of Ly49 receptor combinations on NK cells. Two models have been put forward to explain this impact. The two-step selection model proposes a stochastic Ly49 receptor expression followed by selection for NK cells expressing appropriate receptor combinations. The sequential model, on the other hand, proposes that each NK cell sequentially expresses Ly49 receptors until an interaction of sufficient magnitude with self-class I MHC is reached for the NK cell to mature. With the aim to clarify which one of these models is most likely to reflect the actual biological process, we simulated the two educational schemes by mathematical modelling, and fitted the results to Ly49 expression patterns, which were analyzed in mice expressing single MHC class I molecules. Our results favour the two-step selection model over the sequential model. Furthermore, the MHC class I environment favoured maturation of NK cells expressing one or a few self receptors, suggesting a possible step of positive selection in NK cell education. Based on the predicted Ly49 binding preferences revealed by the model, we also propose, that Ly49 receptors are more promiscuous than previously thought in their interactions with MHC class I molecules, which was supported by functional studies of NK cell subsets expressing individual Ly49 receptors.

  5. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  6. Cholecystokinin in plasma predicts cardiovascular mortality in elderly females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens P.; Rehfeld, Jens F; Alehagen, Urban

    2016-01-01

    observed a marked difference between the genders, where CCK concentrations in the 4th quartile were associated with a higher 5-year cardiovascular mortality in female patients (HR 8.99, 95% C.I.: 3.49-102.82, p=0.0007) compared to men (1.47, 95% C.I.: 0.7-3.3, p=0.35). In contrast, no significant...... information was obtained from 4th quartile gastrin concentrations on 5-year cardiovascular mortality risk. CONCLUSIONS: CCK in plasma is an independent marker of cardiovascular mortality in elderly female patients. The study thus introduces measurement of plasma CCK in gender-specific cardiovascular risk......BACKGROUND: Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin are related gastrointestinal hormones with documented cardiovascular effects of exogenous administration. It is unknown whether measurement of endogenous CCK or gastrin in plasma contains information regarding cardiovascular mortality. METHODS...

  7. Bacterial expression of an active class Ib chitinase from Castanea sativa cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allona, I; Collada, C; Casado, R; Paz-Ares, J; Aragoncillo, C

    1996-12-01

    Ch3, an endochitinase of 32 kDa present in Castanea sativa cotyledons, showed in vitro antifungal properties when assayed against Trichoderma viride. The characterization of a cDNA clone corresponding to this protein indicated that Ch3 is a class Ib endochitinase that is synthesized as a preprotein with a signal sequence preceding the mature polypeptide. Bacterial expression of mature Ch3 fused to the leader peptide of the periplasmic protein ompT resulted in active Ch3 enzyme. A plate assay was adapted for semi-quantitative determination of chitinase activity secreted from cultured bacteria, which should facilitate the identification of mutants with altered capacity to hydrolyse chitin.

  8. Role of PU.1 in MHC Class II Expression via CIITA Transcription in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryosuke; Kasakura, Kazumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Yashiro, Takuya; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    The cofactor CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and several transcription factors regulating the cell type-specific expression of CIITA have been identified. Although the MHC class II expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is also mediated by CIITA, the transcription factors involved in the CIITA expression in pDCs are largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of a hematopoietic lineage-specific transcription factor, PU.1, in CIITA transcription in pDCs. The introduction of PU.1 siRNA into mouse pDCs and a human pDC cell line, CAL-1, reduced the mRNA levels of MHC class II and CIITA. When the binding of PU.1 to the 3rd promoter of CIITA (pIII) in CAL-1 and mouse pDCs was analyzed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, a significant amount of PU.1 binding to the pIII was detected, which was definitely decreased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected cells. Reporter assays showed that PU.1 knockdown reduced the pIII promoter activity and that three Ets-motifs in the human pIII promoter were candidates of cis-enhancing elements. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, it was confirmed that two Ets-motifs, GGAA (-181/-178) and AGAA (-114/-111), among three candidates, were directly bound with PU.1. When mouse pDCs and CAL-1 cells were stimulated by GM-CSF, mRNA levels of PU.1, pIII-driven CIITA, total CIITA, MHC class II, and the amount of PU.1 binding to pIII were significantly increased. The GM-CSF-mediated up-regulation of these mRNAs was canceled in PU.1 siRNA-introduced cells. Taking these results together, we conclude that PU.1 transactivates the pIII through direct binding to Ets-motifs in the promoter in pDCs.

  9. Endothelial Expression of Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I Protects against Development of Atherosclerosis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris L. Vaisman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI in endothelial cells (EC was examined in several novel transgenic mouse models expressing SR-BI in endothelium of mice with normal C57Bl6/N, apoE-KO, or Scarb1-KO backgrounds. Mice were also created expressing SR-BI exclusively in endothelium and liver. Endothelial expression of the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene had no significant effect on plasma lipoprotein levels in mice on a normal chow diet but on an atherogenic diet, significantly decreased plasma cholesterol levels, increased plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C levels, and protected mice against atherosclerosis. In 8-month-old apoE-KO mice fed a normal chow diet, the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene decreased aortic lesions by 24%. Mice expressing SR-BI only in EC and liver had a 1.5 ± 0.1-fold increase in plasma cholesterol compared to mice synthesizing SR-BI only in liver. This elevation was due mostly to increased HDL-C. In EC culture studies, SR-BI was found to be present in both basolateral and apical membranes but greater cellular uptake of cholesterol from HDL was found in the basolateral compartment. In summary, enhanced expression of SR-BI in EC resulted in a less atherogenic lipoprotein profile and decreased atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible role for endothelial SR-BI in the flux of cholesterol across EC.

  10. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy on Tumor Cell Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class I-Related Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Riddell, Jonah; Bangia, Naveen; Gollnick, Sandra O.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is FDA-approved anti-cancer modality for elimination of early disease and palliation in advanced disease. PDT efficacy depends in part on elicitation of a tumor-specific immune response that is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. The cytolytic potential of CTLs and NK cells is mediated by the ability of these cells to recognize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class I-related molecules. The MHC class I-related molecules MICA and MICB are induced by oxidative stress and have been reported to activate NK cells and co-stimulate CD8+ T cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of PDT on tumor cell expression of MHC classes I and II-related molecules in vivo and in vitro. Study Design/Materials and Methods Human colon carcinoma Colo205 cells and murine CT26 tumors were treated with 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophor-bide-a (HPPH)-PDT at various doses. MHC classes I and I-related molecule expression following treatment of Colo205 cells was temporally examined by flow cytometry using antibodies specific for components of MHC class I molecules and by quantitative PCR using specific primers. Expression of MHC class I-related molecules following HPPH-based PDT (HPPH-PDT) of murine tumors was monitored using a chimeric NKG2D receptor. Results In vitro HPPH-PDT significantly induces MICA in Colo205 cells, but had no effect on MHC class I molecule expression. PDT also induced expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) following in vivo HPPH-PDT of a murine tumor. Induction of MICA corresponded to increased NK killing of PDT-treated tumor cells. Conclusions PDT induction of MICA on human tumor cells and increased expression of NKG2DL by murine tumors following PDT may play a role in PDT induction of anti-tumor immunity. This conclusion is supported by our results demonstrating that tumor cells have increased sensitivity to NK cell lysis following

  11. Sequence and mRNA expression of nonclassical SLA class I genes SLA-7 and SLA-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, Mark D; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Garcia-Borges, Carmen N

    2004-05-01

    Given the prominent position of pig endothelial cells in pig-to-human xenotransplantation and the role of classical and nonclassical MHC class I proteins in T and NK cell recognition, the expression of pig MHC (SLA) class I genes in a pig aortic endothelial cell line (AOC cells) was examined. Using a primer corresponding to a highly conserved region of exon 4, RT-PCR analysis of SLA class I expression in AOC cells revealed not only expression of the classical SLA class I ( SLA-1, -2, and -3) genes, but also SLA class I transcripts corresponding to SLA nonclassical class I (class Ib) genes SLA-6 and SLA-8. Further analysis of SLA class Ib expression in porcine aortic endothelial cells using SLA class I gene-specific primers confirmed SLA-6 and SLA-8 expression and also demonstrated expression of SLA-7. While SLA-6 has been relatively well characterized, no data regarding bona fide SLA-7 and SLA-8 transcripts have been reported. Therefore, cDNAs containing the complete open reading frames of SLA-6, -7, and -8 were obtained. Compared to an SLA-1 protein sequence, the predicted SLA-7 and -8 protein sequences exhibited most sequence divergence in alpha1, alpha2, and cytoplasmic domains. Expression of SLA-6, -7, and -8 was examined by RT-PCR using RNA prepared from a variety of tissues. SLA-6 transcripts were detected in every tissue examined. Except for brain, SLA-8 transcripts were similarly widespread. SLA-7 exhibited more limited tissue distribution.

  12. A Cholecystokinin B Receptor-Specific DNA Aptamer for Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Thomas; Pan, Weihua; Tang, Xiaomeng; Linton, Samuel S.; McGovern, Christopher O.; Loc, Welley S.; Smith, Jill P.; Butler, Peter J.; Kester, Mark; Adair, James H.; Matters, Gail L.

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) constitutively express the G-protein-coupled cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR). In this study, we identified DNA aptamers (APs) that bind to the CCKBR and describe their characterization and targeting efficacy. Using dual SELEX selection against “exposed” CCKBR peptides and CCKBR-expressing PDAC cells, a pool of DNA APs was identified. Further downselection was based on predicted structures and properties, and we selected eight APs for initial characterizations. The APs bound specifically to the CCKBR, and we showed not only that they did not stimulate proliferation of PDAC cell lines but rather inhibited their proliferation. We chose one AP, termed AP1153, for further binding and localization studies. We found that AP1153 did not activate CCKBR signaling pathways, and three-dimensional Confocal microscopy showed that AP1153 was internalized by PDAC cells in a receptor-mediated manner. AP1153 showed a binding affinity of 15 pM. Bioconjugation of AP1153 to the surface of fluorescent NPs greatly facilitated delivery of NPs to PDAC tumors in vivo. The selectivity of this AP-targeted NP delivery system holds promise for enhanced early detection of PDAC lesions as well as improved chemotherapeutic treatments for PDAC patients. PMID:27754762

  13. Peripheral nerve injury causes transient expression of MHC class I antigens in rat motor neurons and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Nennesmo, I; Olsson, A B

    1989-01-01

    After a peripheral nerve lesion (rat facial and sciatic) an induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens class I was detected immunohistochemically in skeletal muscle fibers and motor neurons. This MHC expression was transient after a nerve crush, when regeneration occurred......, but persisted after a nerve cut, when regeneration was prevented. Since the time course of MHC class I expression correlates to that of regeneration a role for this cell surface molecule in regeneration may be considered....

  14. Expression, purification and crystallization of class C acid phosphatases from Francisella tularensis and Pasteurella multocida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkewal; Felts, Richard L.; Ma, Li; Malinski, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Class C nonspecific acid phosphatases are bacterial enzymes that are secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and hydrolyze a variety of phosphomono­esters at acidic pH. These enzymes are of interest for the development of improved vaccines and clinical diagnostic methods. In one case, the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis, the class C phosphatase plays a role in bacterial fitness. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization methods for the class C acid phosphatases from F. tularensis and Pasteurella multocida are reported. Crystals of the F. tularensis enzyme diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with one enzyme molecule in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of the P. multocida enzyme diffracted to 1.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with three molecules in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction patterns from crystals of the P. multocida enzyme exhibited multiple interpenetrating reciprocal-space lattices, indicating epitaxial twinning. Despite this aberrance, autoindexing was robust and the data could be satisfactorily processed to 1.85 Å resolution using MOSFLM and SCALA. PMID:19255471

  15. The antagonism of cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 to the peroxynitrite oxidation on a diabetic cataractal rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Li-na; LING Yi-qun; MAO Qi-yan; LING Yi-ling; HE Shou-zhi

    2006-01-01

    Background Cataracts is considered be formed because of an abnormal glucose metabolic pathway or oxidative stress. We explored the damaging role of ONOO- and antagonism of cholecystokinin octapeptide-8(CCK-8) in diabetic cataractal rat lenses.Methods A diabetic cataractal animal model was established by peritoneal injection of streptozotocine (STZ).Thirty-six normal SD rats were taken as control group; seventy-two were given STZ (45 mg/kg) and then divided into STZ group and CCK-8 group (peritoneal injection CCK-8). STZ induced diabetic rats were treated with CCK-8 for 60 days. Lenses were examined with slit lamp at 20, 40 and 60 days. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot analysis were used for determining nitrotyrosine (NT, a marker for ONOO-). RT-PCR and gene array analysis were used for determining the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase mRNA (iNOS mRNA) in lens epithelium (LEC).Results STZ group rats developed lens opacity by 20 days that reached a high level by 60 days after STZ injection. CCK-8 group rats delayed the cataract formation. There was no distinct expression of NT and iNOS mRNA in control group. In STZ group, there were distinct expression of NT and upregulation of iNOS mRNA;however, CCK-8 group showed weak expression of NT and downregulation of iNOS mRNA.Conclusions NT, which may be a new form of oxidative stress, was expressed in diabetic rat LEC although CCK-8 could reverse NT damage in LEC. The results suggested that CCK-8 might be a useful therapeutic agent against diabetic cataract. The antagonizing mechanism of CCK-8 may be related to direct antagonism of ONOO-as well as its inhibition of the expression of iNOS mRNA for production of NO and therefore decrease in the formation of ONOO-.

  16. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses.

  17. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a functional GSTmu class from the cattle tick Boophilus annulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahein, Yasser Ezzat; El Sayed El-Hakim, Amr; Abouelella, Amira Mohamed Kamal; Hamed, Ragaa Reda; Allam, Shaimaa Abdul-Moez; Farid, Nevin Mahmoud

    2008-03-25

    A full-length cDNA of a glutathione S-transferase (GST) was cloned from a cDNA library of the local Egyptian cattle tick Boophilus annulatus. The 672 bp cloned fragment was sequenced and showed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 223 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with GSTs from other species revealed that the sequence is closely related to the mammalian mu-class GST. The cloned gene was expressed in E. coli under T7 promotor of pET-30b vector, and purified under native conditions. The purified enzyme appeared as a single band on 12% SDS-PAGE and has a molecular weight of 30.8 kDa including the histidine tag of the vector. The purified enzyme was assayed upon the chromogenic substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and the recombinant enzyme showed high level of activity even in the presence of the beta-galactosidase region on its 5' end and showed maximum activity at pH 7.5. The Km values for CDNB and GSH were 0.57 and 0.79 mM, respectively. The over expressed rBaGST showed high activity toward CDNB (121 units/mg protein) and less toward DCNB (29.3 units/mg protein). rBaGST exhibited peroxidatic activity on cumene hydroperoxide sharing this property with GSTs belonging to the GST alpha class. I50 values for cibacron blue and bromosulfophthalein were 0.22 and 8.45 microM, respectively, sharing this property with the mammalian GSTmu class. Immunoblotting revealed the presence of the GST molecule in B. annulatus protein extracts; whole tick, larvae, gut, salivary gland and ovary. Homologues to the GSTmu were also detected in other tick species as Hyalomma dromedarii and Rhipicephalus sp. while in Ornithodoros moubata, GSTmu homologue could not be detected.

  18. Class 3 semaphorins expression and association with innervation and angiogenesis within the degenerate human intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binch, Abbie L A; Cole, Ashley A; Breakwell, Lee M; Michael, Anthony L R; Chiverton, Neil; Creemers, Laura B; Cross, Alison K; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2015-07-30

    Nerve and blood vessel ingrowth during intervertebral disc degeneration, is thought to be a major cause of low back pain, however the regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the expression and regulation of a subclass of axonal guidance molecules known as the class 3 semaphorins, and their receptors; plexins and neuropilins within human NP tissue and their regulation by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly this determined whether semaphorin expression was associated with the presence of nerves and blood vessels in tissues from human intervertebral discs. The study demonstrated that semaphorin3A, 3C, 3D, 3E and 3F and their receptors were expressed by native NP cells and further demonstrated their expression was regulated by IL-1β but to a lesser extent by IL-6 and TNFα. This is the first study to identify sema3C, sema3D and their receptors within the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. Immunopositivity shows significant increases in semaphorin3C, 3D and their receptor neuropilin-2 in degenerate samples which were shown to contain nerves and blood vessels, compared to non-degenerate samples without nerves and blood vessels. Therefore data presented here suggests that semaphorin3C may have a role in promoting innervation and vascularisation during degeneration, which may go on to cause low back pain.

  19. Beta-adrenergic receptors are differentially expressed in distinct interneuron subtypes in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David J; Racca, Claudia; LeBeau, Fiona E N

    2008-08-20

    Noradrenaline (NA) acting via beta-adrenergic receptors (betaARs) plays an important role in the modulation of memory in the hippocampus. betaARs have been shown to be expressed in principal cells, but their distribution across different interneuron classes is unknown. We have used specific interneuron markers including calcium binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin) and neuropeptides (somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, and cholecystokinin) together with either beta1AR or beta2AR to determine the distribution of these receptors in all major subfields of the hippocampus. We found that beta1AR-expressing interneurons were more prevalent in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus than in the dentate gyrus, where they were relatively sparse. beta2AR-expressing interneurons were more uniformly distributed between all three regions of the hippocampus. A high proportion of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the dentate gyrus co-expressed beta2AR. beta1AR labeling was common in interneurons expressing somatostatin and parvalbumin in the CA3 and CA1 regions, particularly in the stratum oriens of these regions. beta2AR labeling was more likely to be found than beta1AR labeling in cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. In contrast, calretinin-containing interneurons were virtually devoid of beta1AR or beta2AR labeling. These regional and interneuron type-specific differences suggest functionally distinct roles for NA in modulating hippocampal activity via activation of betaARs.

  20. HLA class I and II expression in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to tumor HPV status and clinical outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Näsman

    Full Text Available HPV-DNA positive (HPVDNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has better clinical outcome than HPV-DNA negative (HPVDNA- OSCC. Current treatment may be unnecessarily extensive for most HPV+ OSCC, but before de-escalation, additional markers are needed together with HPV status to better predict treatment response. Here the influence of HLA class I/HLA class II expression was explored. Pre-treatment biopsies, from 439/484 OSCC patients diagnosed 2000-2009 and treated curatively, were analyzed for HLA I and II expression, p16(INK4a and HPV DNA. Absent/weak as compared to high HLA class I intensity correlated to a very favorable disease-free survival (DFS, disease-specific survival (DSS and overall survival (OS in HPVDNA+ OSCC, both in univariate and multivariate analysis, while HLA class II had no impact. Notably, HPVDNA+ OSCC with absent/weak HLA class I responded equally well when treated with induction-chemo-radiotherapy (CRT or radiotherapy (RT alone. In patients with HPVDNA- OSCC, high HLA class I/class II expression correlated in general to a better clinical outcome. p16(INK4a overexpression correlated to a better clinical outcome in HPVDNA+ OSCC. Absence of HLA class I intensity in HPVDNA+ OSCC suggests a very high survival independent of treatment and could possibly be used clinically to select patients for randomized trials de-escalating therapy.

  1. The poplar phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri ePégeot

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs, require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around 10 GSTFs, 8 in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles. Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1 possesses peroxidase activity towards cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity towards model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance to analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or MES molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs.

  2. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  3. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 suppresses inhibition of gastric emptying by cholecystokinin (CCK) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Joanne; Kenny, Susan; Dockray, Graham J

    2013-08-10

    The intestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) delays gastric emptying and inhibits food intake by actions on vagal afferent neurons. Recent studies suggest plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 suppresses the effect of CCK on food intake. In this study we asked whether PAI-1 also modulated CCK effects on gastric emptying. Five minute gastric emptying of liquid test meals was studied in conscious wild type mice (C57BL/6) and in transgenic mice over-expressing PAI-1 in gastric parietal cells (PAI-1H/Kβ mice), or null for PAI-1. The effects of exogenous PAI-1 and CCK8s on gastric emptying were studied after ip administration. Intragastric peptone delayed gastric emptying in C57BL/6 mice by a mechanism sensitive to the CCK-1 receptor antagonist lorglumide. Peptone did not delay gastric emptying in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice. Exogenous CCK delayed gastric emptying of a control test meal in C57BL/6 mice and this was attenuated by administration of PAI-1; exogenous CCK had no effect on emptying in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice. Prior administration of gastrin to increase gastric PAI-1 inhibited CCK-dependent effects on gastric emptying in C57BL/6 mice but not in PAI-1 null mice. Thus, both endogenous and exogenous PAI-1 inhibit the effects of CCK (whether exogenous or endogenous) on gastric emptying. The data are compatible with emerging evidence that gastric PAI-1 modulates vagal effects of CCK.

  4. A conserved dopamine-cholecystokinin signaling pathway shapes context-dependent Caenorhabditis elegans behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raja; Touroutine, Denis; Barbagallo, Belinda; Climer, Jason; Lambert, Christopher M; Clark, Christopher M; Alkema, Mark J; Francis, Michael M

    2014-08-01

    An organism's ability to thrive in changing environmental conditions requires the capacity for making flexible behavioral responses. Here we show that, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, foraging responses to changes in food availability require nlp-12, a homolog of the mammalian neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK). nlp-12 expression is limited to a single interneuron (DVA) that is postsynaptic to dopaminergic neurons involved in food-sensing, and presynaptic to locomotory control neurons. NLP-12 release from DVA is regulated through the D1-like dopamine receptor DOP-1, and both nlp-12 and dop-1 are required for normal local food searching responses. nlp-12/CCK overexpression recapitulates characteristics of local food searching, and DVA ablation or mutations disrupting muscle acetylcholine receptor function attenuate these effects. Conversely, nlp-12 deletion reverses behavioral and functional changes associated with genetically enhanced muscle acetylcholine receptor activity. Thus, our data suggest that dopamine-mediated sensory information about food availability shapes foraging in a context-dependent manner through peptide modulation of locomotory output.

  5. Protective effects of cholecystokinin-8 on methamphetamine-induced behavioral changes and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Hongyan; Wen, Di; Ma, Chunling; Li, Ming; Li, Yingmin; Zhang, Wenfang; Liu, Li; Cong, Bin

    2015-04-15

    We investigated whether pretreatment with the neuropeptide cholecystokinin-8 affected methamphetamine (METH)-induced behavioral changes and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in male C57/BL6 mice. CCK-8 pretreatment alone had no effect on locomotion and stereotypic behavior and could not induce behavioral sensitization; however, it attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, hyperlocomotion and behavioral sensitization induced by a low dose of METH (1mg/kg). CCK-8 attenuated METH-induced stereotypic behavior at a dose of 3mg/kg but not at 10mg/kg. CCK-8 pretreatment attenuated METH (10mg/kg)-induced hyperthermia, the decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum, and TH in the substantia nigra. CCK-8 alone had no effect on rectal temperature, TH and DAT expression in the nigrostriatal region. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that pretreatment with CCK-8 inhibited changes typically induced by repeated exposure to METH, such as hyperlocomotion, behavioral sensitization, stereotypic behavior, and dopaminergic neurotoxicity. These findings make CCK-8 a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of multiple symptoms associated with METH abuse.

  6. Heterologous expression and functional characterization of avian mu-class glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, Brett R; Kim, Ji Eun; Croasdell, Amanda; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Reed, Kent M; Coulombe, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    Hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs: EC2.5.1.1.8) catalyze the detoxification of reactive electrophilic compounds, many of which are toxic and carcinogenic intermediates, via conjugation with the endogenous tripeptide glutathione (GSH). Glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated detoxification is a critical determinant of species susceptibility to the toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which in resistant animals efficiently detoxifies the toxic intermediate produced by hepatic cytochrome P450 bioactivation, the exo-AFB1-8,9-epoxide (AFBO). Domestic turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are one of the most sensitive animals known to AFB1, a condition associated with a deficiency of hepatic GST-mediated detoxification of AFBO. We have recently shown that unlike their domestic counterparts, wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris), which are relatively resistant, express hepatic GST-mediated detoxification activity toward AFBO. Because of the importance of GSTs in species susceptibility, and to explore possible GST classes involved in AFB1 detoxification, we amplified, cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the hepatic mu-class GSTs tGSTM3 (GenBank accession no. JF340152), tGSTM4 (JF340153) from domestic turkeys, and a GSTM4 variant (ewGSTM4, JF340154) from Eastern wild turkeys. Predicted molecular masses of tGSTM3 and two tGSTM4 variants were 25.6 and 25.8kDa, respectively. Multiple sequence comparisons revealed four GSTM motifs and the mu-loop in both proteins. tGSTM4 has 89% amino acid sequence identity to chicken GSTM2, while tGSTM3 has 73% sequence identity to human GSTM3 (hGSTM3). Specific activities of Escherichia coli-expressed tGSTM3 toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide were five-fold greater than tGSTM4 while tGSTM4 possessed more than three-fold greater activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB). The two enzymes displayed equal activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA

  7. Class-Specific Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote 11-Beta Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Expression in JEG-3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Togher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to maternal cortisol plays a crucial role in fetal organogenesis. However, fetal overexposure to cortisol has been linked to a range of short- and long-term adverse outcomes. Normally, this is prevented by the expression of an enzyme in the placenta called 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2 which converts active cortisol to its inactive metabolite cortisone. Placental 11β-HSD2 is known to be reduced in a number of adverse pregnancy complications, possibly through an epigenetic mechanism. As a result, a number of pan-HDAC inhibitors have been examined for their ability to promote 11β-HSD2 expression. However, it is not known if the effects of pan-HDAC inhibition are a general phenomenon or if the effects are dependent upon a specific class of HDACs. Here, we examined the ability of pan- and class-specific HDAC inhibitors to regulate 11β-HSD2 expression in JEG3 cells. We find that pan-, class I, or class IIa HDAC inhibition promoted 11β-HSD2 expression and prevented cortisol or interleukin-1β-induced decrease in its expression. These results demonstrate that targeting a specific class of HDACs can promote 11β-HSD2 expression in JEG3 cells. This adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that HDACs may be crucial in maintaining normal fetal development.

  8. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  9. Deriving Association between Student’s Comprehension and Facial expressions using Class Association Rule Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohamed Sathik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study was to discover the association between facial expressions of students in an academic lecture and the level of comprehension shown by their expressions. This study focussed onfinding the relationship between the specific elements of learner’s behaviour for the different emotional states and the relevant expression that could be observed from individual students. The experimentation was done through surveying quantitative observations of the lecturers in the classroom in which the behaviour of students are recorded and were statistically analyzed. The main aim of this paper is to derive association rules that represent relationships between input conditions and results of domain experiments. Hence the relationship between the physical behaviors that are linked to emotional state with the student’s comprehension is being formulated in the form of rules. We present Predictive Apriori algorithm that is able to find all valid class association rules with high accuracy. The rules derived by Predictive Apriori are pruned by objective and subjective measures.

  10. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Hassan, Almosawy Talib

    2014-01-01

    treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells......In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were...... (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar5100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range...

  11. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna La Rocca

    Full Text Available In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal, depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK cells cytotoxic recognition.

  12. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna

    2014-12-26

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  13. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Talib Hassan, Almosawy; Das, Gobind; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Tadepally, Lakshmikanth; Matteucci, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; Mesuraca, Maria; Scumaci, Domenica; Gentile, Francesco; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Ammendolia, Antonio; Gallo, Adriana; Kärre, Klas; Cuda, Giovanni; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1), indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  14. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens as a strategy for the potentiation of immune recognition of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Hayashi, H; Hamada, C; Khoury, G; Jay, G

    1986-11-01

    Like many primary tumors, human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12)-transformed mouse cells express greatly reduced levels of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens and are highly tumorigenic in immunocompetent hosts. Expression of a transfected class I gene by these cells can abrogate their tumorigenicity. Both the K and the L class I genes can suppress the malignant phenotype. Previous studies showed that interferon can induce class I gene expression in certain Ad12-transformed cells and can suppress their tumorigenic phenotype. We now demonstrate that preimmunization of mice with a nontumorigenic dose of interferon-treated Ad12-transformed tumor cells can afford protection against a subsequent challenge by a tumorigenic dose of untreated Ad12-transformed tumor cells. Similar immunity can also be induced by using cells transfected with the K gene, and the observed protection appears specific to Ad12-transformed cells. Significant protection can be achieved even if immunization is provided subsequent to the tumor challenge. Since increasing numbers of human tumors have been found to have reduced levels of MHC class I antigens, the prospect of therapy by immunization with the parental tumor cells that have been manipulated to induce class I gene expression offers an attractive experimental model.

  15. Short ultraconserved promoter regions delineate a class of preferentially expressed alternatively spliced transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Christian; Köhler, Sebastian; Schulz, Marcel H; Manke, Thomas; Bauer, Sebastian; Robinson, Peter N

    2009-11-01

    Ultraconservation has been variously defined to describe sequences that have remained identical or nearly so over long periods of evolution to a degree that is higher than expected for sequences under typical constraints associated with protein-coding sequences, splice sites, or transcription factor binding sites. Most intergenic ultraconserved elements (UCE) appear to be tissue-specific enhancers, whereas another class of intragenic UCEs is involved in regulation of gene expression by means of alternative splicing. In this study we define a set of 2827 short ultraconserved promoter regions (SUPR) in 5 kb upstream regions of 1268 human protein-coding genes using a definition of 98% identity for at least 30 bp in 7 mammalian species. Our analysis shows that SUPRs are enriched in genes playing a role in regulation and development. Many of the genes having a SUPR-containing promoter have additional alternative promoters that do not contain SUPRs. Comparison of such promoters by CAGE tag, EST, and Solexa read analysis revealed that SUPR-associated transcripts show a significantly higher mean expression than transcripts associated with non-SUPR-containing promoters. The same was true for the comparison between all SUPR-associated and non-SUPR-associated transcripts on a genome-wide basis. SUPR-associated genes show a highly significant tendency to occur in regions that are also enriched for intergenic short ultraconserved elements (SUE) in the vicinity of developmental genes. A number of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are overrepresented in SUPRs and SUEs, including those for transcription factors of the homeodomain family, but in contrast to SUEs, SUPRs are also enriched in core-promoter motifs. These observations suggest that SUPRs delineate a distinct class of ultraconserved sequences.

  16. Endogenous elevation of plasma cholecystokinin does not prevent gallstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Rafiq A.; Wang, David Q.-H.; Fee, Brian E.; McCall, Shannon J.; Romac, Joelle M.-J.; Vigna, Steven R.; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular gallbladder contraction reduces bile stasis and prevents gallstone formation. Intraduodenal administration of exogenous pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI-I, also known as monitor peptide) causes cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion. Design We proposed that stimulation of CCK release by PSTI would produce gallbladder contraction and prevent gallstones in mice fed a lithogenic diet. Therefore, we tested the effect of overexpression of rat PSTI-I in pancreatic acinar cells on plasma CCK levels and gallbladder function in a transgenic mouse line (TgN[Psti1]; known hereafter as PSTI-I tg). Results Importantly, PSTI tg mice had elevated fasting and fed plasma CCK levels compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Only mice fed the lithogenic diet developed gallstones. Both fasting and stimulated plasma CCK levels were substantially reduced in both WT and PSTI-I tg mice on the lithogenic diet. Moreover, despite higher CCK levels PSTI-I tg animals developed more gallstones than WT animals. Conclusions Together with the previously observed decrease in CCK-stimulated gallbladder emptying in mice fed a lithogenic diet, our findings suggest that a lithogenic diet causes gallstone formation by impaired CCK secretion in addition to reduced gallbladder sensitivity to CCK. PMID:25641074

  17. Cholecystokinin as a stimulus in drug discrimination learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, P M; Kopman, J A; Riley, A L

    1993-02-01

    Animals were trained to discriminate a relatively low dose of the octapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) from distilled water within the conditioned taste aversion baseline of drug discrimination learning. Specifically, rats were injected with CCK (5.6 micrograms/kg) prior to the presentation of saccharin-LiCl pairings and with the CCK vehicle prior to the presentation of saccharin alone. After 10 conditioning trials (40 days), subjects acquired the discrimination, avoiding saccharin consumption following administration of CCK and consuming the same saccharin solution following the drug vehicle. Once the discrimination was acquired, a generalization function was determined for doses above and below that of the training stimulus. At doses below the training dose of CCK (i.e., 0, 3.2, and 4.2 micrograms/kg), subjects drank at control levels, whereas at the training dose and above (10 micrograms/kg) subjects significantly reduced consumption. That a relatively low dose of CCK can be used as a discriminative stimulus within a drug discrimination design may be important in that the procedure can now be used in the assessment of the pharmacological characteristics of CCK at a dose similar to that used in other behavioral assessments of the compound.

  18. Bovine gallbladder muscularis: Source of a myogenic receptor for cholecystokinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schjoldager, B.; Shaw, M.J.; Powers, S.P.; Schmalz, P.E.; Szurszewski, J.; Miller, L.J. (Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1988-03-01

    Despite being a classic target for the gastrointestinal peptide hormone, cholecystokinin (CCK), the gallbladder CCK receptor is not well characterized. Pharmacological studies of small species suggest that CCK action can be mediated by direct myogenic or by both myogenic and neurogenic receptors. To prepare for the biochemical characterization of a gallbladder CCK receptor and to define the subtype of the receptor being studied. The authors have performed autoradiographic localization and pharmacological characterization of CCK receptors on bovine gallbladder. Autoradiography demonstrated high-affinity specific CCK-binding sites only on the muscularis. CCK-8 stimulated tonic contraction of longitudinal strips of gallbladder muscularis in a concentration-dependent manner. Antagonism at the cholinergic receptor with 1{mu}M atropine or axonal transmission with 1{mu}M tetrodotoxin did not modify CCK-induced contraction, supporting a direct myogenic effect of this hormone. Optimal electrical field stimulation to elicit a neuronal response resulted in muscle strip relaxation, which was abolished with adrenergic blockade. Although acetylcholine administration stimulated contraction, electrical field stimulation did not, even in the presence of phentolamine, propranolol, and/or CCK. Thus, in bovine gallbladder muscularis, there is evidence for a functional CCK receptor only on smooth muscle cells. Demonstration of a single, high-affinity specific CCK-binding site on an enriched plasma membrane preparation of bovine gallbladder muscularis is consistent with this representing a myogenic CCK receptor.

  19. Role of cholecystokinin and central serotonergic receptors in functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew Seng Boon Chua; PWN Keeling; TG Dinan

    2006-01-01

    Symptoms of functional dyspepsia are characterized by upper abdominal discomfort or pain, early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, nausea and vomiting. It is a chronic disorder, with symptoms more than 3 mo per year, and no evidence of organic diseases. Dysfunctional motility, altered visceral sensation, and psychosocial factors have all been identified as major pathophysiological mechanisms. It is believed that these pathophysiological mechanisms interact to produce the observed symptoms.Dyspepsia has been categorized into three subgroups based on dominant symptoms. Dysmotility-like dyspepsia describes a subgroup of patients whose symptom complex is usually related to a gastric sensorimotor dysfunction. The brain-gut peptide cholecystokinin (CCK)and serotonin (5-HT) share certain physiological effects.Both have been shown to decrease gastric emptying and affect satiety. Furthermore the CCK induced anorexia depended on serotonergic functions probably acting via central pathways. We believe that abnormalities of central serotonergic receptors functioning together with a hyper responsiveness to CCK or their interactions may be responsible for the genesis of symptoms in functional dyspepsia (FD).

  20. Cholecystokinin and pancreatic cancer: the chicken or the egg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jill P; Solomon, Travis E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) causes the release of pancreatic digestive enzymes and growth of the normal pancreas. Exogenous CCK administration has been used in animal models to study pancreatitis and also as a promoter of carcinogen-induced or Kras-driven pancreatic cancer. Defining CCK receptors in normal human pancreas has been problematic because of its retroperitoneal location, high concentrations of pancreatic proteases, and endogenous RNase. Most studies indicate that the predominant receptor in human pancreas is the CCK-B type, and CCK-A is the predominant form in rodent pancreas. In pancreatic cancer cells and tumors, the role of CCK is better established because receptors are often overexpressed by these cancer cells and stimulation of such receptors promotes growth. Furthermore, in established cancer, endogenous production of CCK and/or gastrin occurs and their actions stimulate the synthesis of more receptors plus growth by an autocrine mechanism. Initially it was thought that the mechanism by which CCK served to potentiate carcinogenesis was by interplay with inflammation in the pancreatic microenvironment. But with the recent findings of CCK receptors on early PanIN (pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia) lesions and on stellate cells, the question has been raised that perhaps CCK actions are not the result of cancer but an early driving promoter of cancer. This review will summarize what is known regarding CCK, its receptors, and pancreatic cancer, and also what is unknown and requires further investigation to determine which comes first, the chicken or the egg, "CCK or the cancer."

  1. The cholecystokinin-B receptor antagonist CI-988 failed to affect CCK-4 induced symptoms in panic disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanMegen, HJGM; Westenberg, HGM; denBoer, JA; Slaap, B; vanEsRadhakishun, F; Pande, AC

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) receptor antagonist CI-988 on symptoms elicited by the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK4) were studied in DSM-IIIR patients with panic disorder. The study employed a double-blind, two-period incomplete block design. Patients (n = 14) received two differe

  2. Preclinical evaluation of new radioligand of cholecystokinin/gastrin receptors in endocrine tumors xenograft nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillouet, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France) and Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)]. E-mail: brillouet.severine@claudiusregaud.fr; Caselles, O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Dierickx, L.O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Mestre, B. [CNRS, LSPCMIB-UMR5068, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Nalis, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Picard, C. [CNRS, LSPCMIB-UMR5068, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Favre, G. [Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Poirot, M. [Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Silvente-Poirot, S. [Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Courbon, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2007-02-01

    The cholecystokinin(CCK)/gastrin 2 receptors (R-CCK2) are overexpressed in 90% of medullary thyroid cancers (MTC) and in 60% of small cell lung cancers but not or poorly in corresponding healthy tissues. They represent a relevant target for the diagnosis and internal targeted radiotherapy of these tumors. Although previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin to target CCK-2 receptor-expressing tissues in animals and patients, some problems remained unsolved to identify an optimum candidate for in vivo targeting of R-CCK2-expressing tumors. By a rational approach and 'in silico' drug design, we synthesized a new CCK-derivative with high affinity for the R-CCK2. The aim of this study was to achieve the radiolabeling of a new radioligand, to assess its efficacy using a published CCK radioligand ({sup 111}In-DTPA-CCK8) as a control for the R-CCK2 targeting. This new CCK-derivative was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In. Nude mice, bearing the human MTC TT tumors and NIH-3T3 cell line expressing a tumorigenic mutant of the R-CCK2, were injected with this radiolabeled peptide. In vivo planar scintigraphies were acquired. Thereafter, biodistribution studies (%ID/g tissue) were done. The conditions of radiolabelling were optimized to obtain a radiochemical purity >90%. Scintigraphic images of xenograft mice showed significant tumor uptake with a target to nontarget ratio higher than two. These results were confirmed by the biodistribution studies which showed as expected a significant activity in the spleen, the liver and the kidneys. Therefore, this new radiolabeled compound is a promised new candidate for molecular imaging and internal radiotherapy for R-CCK2 tumor targeting.

  3. Leptin resistance in vagal afferent neurons inhibits cholecystokinin signaling and satiation in diet induced obese rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume de Lartigue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK plays an important role in regulating meal size and duration by activating CCK1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons (VAN. Leptin enhances CCK signaling in VAN via an early growth response 1 (EGR1 dependent pathway thereby increasing their sensitivity to CCK. In response to a chronic ingestion of a high fat diet, VAN develop leptin resistance and the satiating effects of CCK are reduced. We tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance in VAN is responsible for reducing CCK signaling and satiation. RESULTS: Lean Zucker rats sensitive to leptin signaling, significantly reduced their food intake following administration of CCK8S (0.22 nmol/kg, i.p., while obese Zucker rats, insensitive to leptin, did not. CCK signaling in VAN of obese Zucker rats was reduced, preventing CCK-induced up-regulation of Y2 receptor and down-regulation of melanin concentrating hormone 1 receptor (MCH1R and cannabinoid receptor (CB1. In VAN from diet-induced obese (DIO Sprague Dawley rats, previously shown to become leptin resistant, we demonstrated that the reduction in EGR1 expression resulted in decreased sensitivity of VAN to CCK and reduced CCK-induced inhibition of food intake. The lowered sensitivity of VAN to CCK in DIO rats resulted in a decrease in Y2 expression and increased CB1 and MCH1R expression. These effects coincided with the onset of hyperphagia in DIO rats. CONCLUSIONS: Leptin signaling in VAN is required for appropriate CCK signaling and satiation. In response to high fat feeding, the onset of leptin resistance reduces the sensitivity of VAN to CCK thus reducing the satiating effects of CCK.

  4. Effect of ghrelin receptor antagonist on meal patterns in cholecystokinin type 1 receptor null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Martin, Elizabeth; Paulino, Gabriel; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-03

    Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express the cholecystokinin (CCK) type 1 receptor (CCK₁R) and, as predicted by the role of CCK in inducing satiation, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingest larger and longer meals. However, after a short fast, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting high fat (HF) diets initiate feeding earlier than wild-type mice. We hypothesized that the increased drive to eat in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice eating HF diet is mediated by ghrelin, a gut peptide that stimulates food intake. The decrease in time to first meal, and the increase in meal size and duration in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ compared to wild-type mice ingesting high fat (HF) diet were reversed by administration of GHSR1a antagonist D-(Lys3)-GHRP-6 (p<0.05). Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist significantly increased expression of the neuropeptide cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in VAN of HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ but not wild-type mice. Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist decreased neuronal activity measured by immunoreactivity for fos protein in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the arcuate nucleus of both HF-fed wild-type and CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice. The data show that hyperphagia in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting HF diet is reversed by blockade of the ghrelin receptor, suggesting that in the absence of the CCK₁R, there is an increased ghrelin-dependent drive to feed. The site of action of ghrelin receptors is unclear, but may involve an increase in expression of CART peptide in VAN in HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice.

  5. Consequences of cytotoxic T lymphocyte interaction with major histocompatibility complex class I-expressing neurons in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Neurons have evolved strategies to evade immune surveillance that include an inability to synthesize the heavy chain of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC), proteins that are necessary for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition of target cells. Multiple viruses have taken advantage of the lack of CTL-mediated recognition and killing of neurons by establishing persistent neuronal infections and thereby escaping attack by antiviral CTL. We have expressed a class I MHC molecule ...

  6. Expression patterns of the murine LIM class homeobox gene lim1 in the developing brain and excretory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Pichel, J G; Taira, M; Toyama, R; Dawid, I B; Westphal, H

    1994-01-01

    We report the cloning, sequence analysis, and developmental expression pattern of lim1, a member of the LIM class homeobox gene family in the mouse. lim1 cDNA encodes a predicted 406 amino acid protein that is 93% identical with the product of the Xenopus LIM class homeobox gene Xlim1. We have characterized lim1 expression from day 8.5 post coitum onward. Northern blot analysis of RNA transcripts indicates that lim1 is expressed both during embryogenesis and in the adult brain. Analysis by whole-mount and section in situ hybridization shows lim1 expression in the central nervous system from the telencephalon through the spinal cord and in the developing excretory system including pronephric region, mesonephros, nephric duct, and metanephros. In the metanephros, lim1 is strongly expressed in renal vesicles and S-shaped bodies, and transcripts are also detected in the ureteric branches.

  7. Expression of mptC of Listeria monocytogenes induces sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnath, Manilduth; Arous, Safia; Gravesen, Anne; Hastings, John W; Héchard, Yann

    2004-08-01

    Sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria was recently associated with the mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) permease, in Listeria monocytogenes. To assess the involvement of this protein complex in class IIa bacteriocin activity, the mptACD operon, encoding, was heterologously expressed in an insensitive species, namely Lactococcus lactis, using the NICE double plasmid system. Upon induction of the cloned operon, the recombinant Lc. lactis became sensitive to leucocin A. Pediocin PA-1 and enterocin A also showed inhibitory activity against Lc. lactis cultures expressing mptACD. Furthermore, the role of the three genes of the mptACD operon was investigated. Derivative plasmids containing various combinations of these three genes were made from the parental mptACD plasmid by divergent PCR. The results showed that expression of mptC alone is sufficient to confer sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins in Lc. lactis.

  8. Control of gallbladder contractions by cholecystokinin through cholecystokinin-A receptors on gallbladder interstitial cells of cajal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Xu; Bao-Ping Yu; He-Sheng Luo; Ling-Dan Chen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To identify the cholecystokinin (CCK)-A receptors (CCK-AR) on the guniea pig gallbladder interstitial cells of cajal (ICC) and to study CCK-8 induced gallbladder muscle strip contractions through the CCK-AR.METHODS: The existence of CCK-AR was examined by immunohistofluorescence on sectioned tissue and cultured cells. In vitro contractile response of guinea pig gallbladder muscle strips and the strips with ICC removed were also studied with CCK-8 receptors added.RESULTS: In tissue sections, intensely CCKARimmunoreactive interstitial cells were found mainly in the muscular layers. In cultured cell sections, distinctive double staining of C-kit and CCK-AR ICCs were found.When we removed the ICC of the gallbladder, CCK-8induced muscle strip contraction dose response curve significantly shifted to the right.CONCLUSION: We proved that both the existence of CCK-AR on the guinea pig gallbladder ICC and CCK evoked contraction are mediated through direct action on CCK-AR on the gallbladder ICC.

  9. Phenotypic impact of deregulated expression of class I histone deacetylases in urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira-Neto, Susana; Vieira, Filipa Q; Montezuma, Diana; Costa, Natália R; Antunes, Luís; Baptista, Tiago; Oliveira, Ana Isabel; Graça, Inês; Rodrigues, Ângelo; Magalhães, José S; Oliveira, Jorge; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Deregulated expression of histone deacetylases (HDACs) has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Herein, we investigated class I HDACs expression in bladder urothelial cell carcinoma (BUCC), its prognostic value and biological significance. Significantly increased transcript levels of all HDACs were found in BUCC compared to 20 normal mucosas, and these were higher in lower grade and stage tumors. Increased HDAC3 levels were associated with improved patient survival. SiRNA experiments showed decrease cell viability and motility, and increased apoptosis. We concluded that class I HDACs play an important role in bladder carcinogenesis through deregulation of proliferation, migration and apoptosis, constituting putative therapeutic targets.

  10. HLA-G and classical HLA class I expression in primary colorectal cancer and associated liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swets, Marloes; König, Marion H; Zaalberg, Anniek; Dekker-Ensink, Neeltje G; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    De novo expression of HLA-G has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer. HLA-G, amongst others, inhibits natural killer cell function, contributing to host immune defense evasion. Another mechanism to escape anti-tumor immunity is loss of HLA class I. Therefore, we determined HLA-G and HLA class I expression on primary colorectal tumors and associated liver metastases, in order to get insight in the metastasizing process regarding escaping anti-tumor immunity. HLA-G expression was evaluated using three mAbs; 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2. In total 81 colorectal cancer patients were evaluated. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of primary tumors and associated liver metastases, were immunohistochemically stained. A concordance between expression or loss/downregulation in the primary tumor and associated liver metastasis regarding HLA class I expression was observed in 80% of the cases. In contrast with the hypothesis of escaping NK cell-killing, we demonstrated for each HLA-G detecting mAbs used in this study, that the majority of the primary tumors that positively stained for HLA-G did not express HLA-G in the associated liver metastasis. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of non-specific binding and in addition we found that the different epitopes of HLA-G detected by 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2 mAbs were expressed differentially in colorectal tumor tissues.

  11. CCK-58 prolongs the intermeal interval, whereas CCK-8 reduces this interval: not all forms of cholecystokinin have equal bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Ayman I; Washington, Martha C; Raboin, Shannon J; Aglan, Amnah H; Reeve, Joseph R

    2014-05-01

    It has been accepted for decades that "all forms of cholecystokinin (CCK) have equal bioactivity," despite accumulating evidence to the contrary. To challenge this concept, we compared two feeding responses, meal size (MS, 10% sucrose) and intermeal interval (IMI), in response to CCK-58, which is the major endocrine form of CCK, and CCK-8, which is the most abundantly utilized form. Doses (0, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 3 and 5 nmol/kg) were administered intraperitoneally over a 210-min test to Sprague Dawley rats that had been food-deprived overnight. We found that (1) all doses of CCK-58, except the lowest dose, and all doses of CCK-8, except the lowest two doses, reduced food intake more than vehicle did; (2) at two doses, 0.75 and 3 nmol/kg, CCK-58 increased the IMI, while CCK-8 failed to alter this feeding response; and (3) CCK-58, at all but the lowest two doses, increased the satiety ratio (IMI between first and second meals (min) divided by first MS (ml)) relative to vehicle, while CCK-8 did not affect this value. These findings demonstrate that the only circulating form of CCK in rats, CCK-58, prolongs the IMI more than CCK-8, the peptide generally utilized in feeding studies. Taken together, these results add to a growing list of functions where CCK-8 and CCK-58 express qualitatively different bioactivities. In conclusion, the hypothesis that "all forms of cholecystokinin (CCK) have equal bioactivity" is not supported.

  12. Effect of peripheral administration of cholecystokinin on food intake in apolipoprotein AIV knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimichi, Go; Lo, Chunmin C; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Ma, Liyun; Lee, Dana M; Begg, Denovan P; Liu, Min; Sakai, Randall R; Woods, Stephen C; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Apolipoprotein AIV (apo AIV) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are satiation factors secreted by the small intestine in response to lipid meals. Apo AIV and CCK-8 has an additive effect to suppress food intake relative to apo AIV or CCK-8 alone. In this study, we determined whether CCK-8 (1, 3, or 5 μg/kg ip) reduces food intake in fasted apo AIV knockout (KO) mice as effectively as in fasted wild-type (WT) mice. Food intake was monitored by the DietMax food system. Apo AIV KO mice had significantly reduced 30-min food intake following all doses of CCK-8, whereas WT mice had reduced food intake only at doses of 3 μg/kg and above. Post hoc analysis revealed that the reduction of 10-min and 30-min food intake elicited by each dose of CCK-8 was significantly larger in the apo AIV KO mice than in the WT mice. Peripheral CCK 1 receptor (CCK1R) gene expression (mRNA) in the duodenum and gallbladder of the fasted apo AIV KO mice was comparable to that in WT mice. In contrast, CCK1R mRNA in nodose ganglia of the apo AIV KO mice was upregulated relative to WT animals. Similarly, upregulated CCK1R gene expression was found in the brain stem of apo AIV KO mice by in situ hybridization. Although it is possible that the increased satiating potency of CCK in apo AIV KO mice is mediated by upregulation of CCK 1R in the nodose ganglia and nucleus tractus solitarius, additional experiments are required to confirm such a mechanism.

  13. Roles of dorsomedial hypothalamic cholecystokinin signaling in the controls of meal patterns and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangjing; Yan, Jianqun; Smith, Wanli W; Moran, Timothy H; Bi, Sheng

    2012-01-18

    A role for dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) cholecystokinin (CCK) signaling in feeding control has been proposed. Administration of CCK into the DMH reduces food intake and OLETF rats lacking CCK1 receptors (CCK1R) become hyperphagic and obese. We hypothesized that site specific replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats would attenuate aspects of their feeding deficits. Recombinant vectors of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated expression of CCK1R (AAVCCK1R) were bilaterally delivered into the DMH of OLETF. OLETF rats with AAVCCK1R injections demonstrated a 65% replenishment of Cck1r mRNA expression in the DMH relative to lean LETO control rats. Although this level of replenishment did not significantly affect overall food intake or body weight through 14 weeks following viral injections, meal patterns were partially normalized in OLETF rats receiving AAVCCK1R with a significant decrease in dark cycle meal size and a small but significant decrease in daily food intake in the meal analysis chambers. Importantly, the elevation in blood glucose level of OLETF rats was attenuated by the AAVCCK1R injections (p=0.03), suggesting a role for DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis. In support of this role, administration of CCK into the DMH of intact rats enhanced glucose tolerance, as this occurred through activation of CCK1R but not CCK2R signaling. In conclusion, partial replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats, although insufficient for altering overall food intake and body weight, normalizes meal pattern changes and reduces blood glucose levels. Our study also shows a novel role of DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis.

  14. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Regulates Cholecystokinin Production in β-Cells to Protect From Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemann, Amelia K; Neuman, Joshua C; Battiola, Therese J; Wisinski, Jaclyn A; Kimple, Michelle E; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-07-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone that is also expressed in the pancreatic islet, where it is highly up-regulated with obesity. Loss of CCK results in increased β-cell apoptosis in obese mice. Similarly, islet α-cells produce increased amounts of another gut peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), in response to cytokine and nutrient stimulation. GLP-1 also protects β-cells from apoptosis via cAMP-mediated mechanisms. Therefore, we hypothesized that the activation of islet-derived CCK and GLP-1 may be linked. We show here that both human and mouse islets secrete active GLP-1 as a function of body mass index/obesity. Furthermore, GLP-1 can rapidly stimulate β-cell CCK production and secretion through direct targeting by the cAMP-modulated transcription factor, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). We find that cAMP-mediated signaling is required for Cck expression, but CCK regulation by cAMP does not require stimulatory levels of glucose or insulin secretion. We also show that CREB directly targets the Cck promoter in islets from obese (Leptin(ob/ob)) mice. Finally, we demonstrate that the ability of GLP-1 to protect β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis is partially dependent on CCK receptor signaling. Taken together, our work suggests that in obesity, active GLP-1 produced in the islet stimulates CCK production and secretion in a paracrine manner via cAMP and CREB. This intraislet incretin loop may be one mechanism whereby GLP-1 protects β-cells from apoptosis.

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Down-Regulates Expressions of MHC Class ⅠMolecules on Hepatoplastoma Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongyan Chen; Min Cheng; ,Zhigang Tian

    2006-01-01

    Chronic HBV infection is associated with a 100-fold high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor recognition is of the most importance during the immune surveillance process that prevents cancer development in humans. In the present study, the expressions of MHC class Ⅰ molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line HepG2.2.15 were investigated to indicate the possible effects of HBV on the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. It was found that the expressions of MHC class Ⅰ molecules HLA-ABC, HLA-E and MICA were much lower in HepG2.2.15 cells compared with HepG2 cells. The expressing HBV in human hepatoplastoma cell line significantly down-regulated the expressions of MHC class Ⅰ molecules. Additionally, it was observed that in murine chronic HBsAg carriers the expression of classical MHC-Ⅰ molecule on hepatocytes was down-regulated. These results demonstrated that HBV might affect the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatoceilular carcinoma such as the recognition of CD8+ T, NK-CTL and NK cells and prevent the immune surveillance against tumors. However, the effects of HBV down-regulation of MHC class Ⅰ molecules on the target cells in vivo should be further studied.

  16. The Multidisciplinary Expression And Relevance Of The Phenomenon Of The Creative Class: Some Insights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renata Urbone

    2015-01-01

      Article investigates the phenomenon of the creative class and its multidisciplinary nature in the Richard Florida's book The Rise of the Creative Class, its translated version to Lithuanian language...

  17. 吗啡对原代培养大鼠海马神经元CCK受体mRNA表达的影响%Effect of expression of cholecystokinin receptor mRNA in primary culturing hippocampus neurons of newborn rat induced by morphine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽; 丛斌; 吴嫒嫒; 李淑瑾; 闫玉仙; 姚玉霞; 倪志宇

    2006-01-01

    目的探讨原代培养大鼠海马神经元上胆囊收缩素(cholecystokinin,CCK)受体CCK-AR及CCK-BR mRNA表达及吗啡对其表达的影响.方法采用新生大鼠海马神经元无血清原代培养技术,用吗啡(100 μmol·L-1培养基)孵育3,6,12,18,24,36,48,72 h,以及采用不同浓度吗啡(10,100,150 μmol·L-1)孵育6、30 h后,RT-PCR及测序方法观察CCK-AR及CCK-BR mRNA表达及吗啡对其表达的影响.结果 RT-PCR结果显示,CCK-AR和CCK-BR mRNA在原代大鼠海马神经元上均有表达;CCK-AR mRNA RT-PCR扩增产物为218 bp, CCK-BR mRNA RT-PCR扩增产物为444 bp,经测序证实结果的可靠性;CCK-BR mRNA的表达量明显高于CCK-AR.吗啡作用后可使2种CCK受体mRNA表达上调.吗啡浓度及作用时间的不同对CCK-AR和CCK-BR mRNA表达的影响不同.结论原代大鼠海马神经元上有CCK-AR和CCK-BR,以CCK-BR为主;吗啡可使2种CCK受体mRNA表达上调.

  18. Cholecystokinin revisited: CCK and the hunger trap in anorexia nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Cuntz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite a number of studies in the past decades, the role of Cholecystokinin (CCK in anorexia nervosa (AN has remained uncertain. In this study a highly specific assay for the biologically active part of CCK was used in patients with bulimic as well as with the restricting type of AN who were followed over the course of weight gain. METHODS: Ten patients with restricting and 13 with bulimic AN were investigated upon admission (T0, after a weight gain of at least 2 kg on two consecutive weighting dates (T1, and during the last week before discharge (T2 from inpatient treatment in a specialized clinic. Blood samples were drawn under fasting conditions and 20 and 60 minutes following a standard meal (250 kcal. Data were compared to those of eight controls matched for sex and age. Gastrointestinal complaints of patients were measured by a questionnaire at each of the follow-up time points. RESULTS: At admission, AN patients exhibited CCK-levels similar to controls both prior to and after a test meal. Pre and post-meal CCK levels increased significantly after an initial weight gain but decreased again with further weight improvement. CCK release was somewhat lower in bulimic than in restricting type AN but both subgroups showed a similar profile. There was no significant association of CCK release to either initial weight or BMI, or their changes, but CCK levels at admission predicted gastrointestinal symptom improvement during therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Normal CCK profiles in AN at admission indicates hormonal responses adapted to low food intake while change of eating habits and weight gain results in initially increased CCK release (counteracting the attempts to alter eating behavior that returns towards normal levels with continuous therapy.

  19. Loss of cholecystokinin-containing terminals in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengsan; Sun, Jianli; Erisir, Alev; Kapur, Jaideep

    2014-02-01

    Altered GABA-mediated inhibition is proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated a loss of somatostatin-containing GABAergic interneurons innervating granule cells in epileptic animals. However, the reorganization of synapses between interneurons and granule cells has not been investigated. We studied synapse organization in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using continuous hippocampal stimulation. The distribution of axon terminals and inhibitory synapses on granule cell dendrites was studied using a combination of immunohistochemistry and pre-embedding electron microscopy techniques. A whole-cell patch-clamp technique was applied to study the functional changes in GABAergic input from different interneurons. In epileptic animals, the density of cholecystokinin (CCK)-immunoreactive (IR) fibers and α2 subunit containing GABAA receptors in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus was reduced. Quantitative immuno-electron microscopy study revealed that the ratio of CCK-containing symmetric synapses to the total symmetric synapses was reduced. The frequency of GABAergic synaptic currents (sIPSC) was decreased and their amplitude was increased. The inhibitory effect of the activation of cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors was also reduced in epileptic animals. Isolation of CCK- and parvalbumin (PV)-containing GABAergic inputs by N- and P/Q-type calcium channel blockers respectively suggested that GABA release from CCK-containing interneurons was selectively reduced in epileptic rats. This study found that there was a loss of CCK-containing GABAergic synapses to granule cells both morphologically and functionally. These studies add to our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to altering GABAergic inhibition of granule cells in TLE.

  20. Cardiovascular and inflammatory response to cholecystokinin during endotoxemic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Bertozi, Giuliana; Mestriner, Fabíola Leslie; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiróz Cunha, Fernando; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2013-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) was first described as a gastrointestinal hormone, but its receptors have been located in cardiac and vascular tissues, as well as in immune cells. Our aims were to investigate the role of CCK on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypotension and its ability to modulate previously reported inflammatory mediators, therefore affecting cardiovascular function. To conduct these experiments, rats had their jugular vein cannulated for drug administration, and also, the femoral artery cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate records. Endotoxemia induced by LPS from Escherichia coli (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.) stimulated the release of CCK, a progressive drop in MAP, and increase in heart rate. Plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), nitrate, vasopressin, and lactate levels were elevated in the endotoxemic rats. The pretreatment with proglumide (nonselective CCK antagonist; 30 mg/kg; i.p.) aggravated the hypotension and also increased plasma TNF-α and lactate levels. On the other hand, CCK (0.4 μg/kg; i.v.) administered before LPS significantly restored MAP, reduced aortic and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production, and elevated plasma vasopressin and IL-10 concentrations; it did not affect TNF-α. Physiological CCK concentration reduced nitrite and iNOS synthesis by peritoneal macrophages, possibly through a self-regulatory IL-10-dependent mechanism. Together, these data suggest a new role for the peptide CCK in modulating MAP, possibly controlling the inflammatory response, stimulating the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and reducing vascular and macrophage iNOS-derived nitric oxide production. Based on these findings, CCK could be used as an adjuvant therapeutic agent to improve cardiovascular function.

  1. Physiological and morphological diversity of immunocytochemically defined parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-positive interneurones in CA1 of the adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelzik, Hannelore; Hughes, David I; Thomson, Alex M

    2002-02-18

    To investigate the electrophysiological properties, synaptic connections, and anatomy of individual parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) and cholecystokinin-immunoreactive (CCK-IR) interneurones in CA1, dual intracellular recordings using biocytin-filled microelectrodes in slices of adult rat hippocampus were combined with fluorescence labelling of PV- and CCK-containing cells. Of 36 PV-IR cells, 29 were basket cells, with most of their axonal arbours in the stratum pyramidale (SP). Six were bistratified cells with axons ramifying throughout stratum oriens (SO) and stratum radiatum (SR). One was a putative axo-axonic cell with an axonal arbour confined to half of the SP and a narrow adjacent region of the SO. Of 27 CCK-IR neurones, 13 were basket cells, with most of their axonal arbours in the SP, and included basket cells with somata in the SP (6), SO (3), and SR (2) and at the border between the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SLM) and the SR (2). In addition, several dendrite-targeting cell classes expressed CCK-IR: 4 of 9 bistratified cells with axons ramifying in the SO and SR; all five Schaffer-associated cells whose axons ramified extensively in the SR; both cells classified as quadrilaminar because their axons ramified in the SO, SP, SR, and SLM; one SO-SO cell whose dendritic and axonal arbours were contained within the SO; and one perforant path-associated cell with axonal and dendritic arbours within the distal SR and SLM. The majority (31 of 36) of PV-IR neurones recorded were fast-spiking, and most fast-spiking cells tested (25 of 29 basket, 1 axo-axonic, and 5 of 6 bistratified cells) were PV-IR. However, 1 of 6 regular-spiking basket, 1 of 4 regular-spiking bistratified, and 3 of 5 burst-firing basket cells were also PV-IR. In contrast, the majority (17 of 27) of the CCK-IR neurones recorded were regular-spiking, 3 were burst-firing, and 7 were fast-spiking. These data confirm that the majority of PV-IR and CCK-IR axon terminals innervate proximal

  2. The two classes of genes for the major potato tuber protein, patatin, are differentially expressed in tubers and roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaard, C S; Brusca, J S; Hannapel, D J; Park, W D

    1987-01-01

    The major potato tuber protein, patatin, is a family of 40kd glycoproteins that constitutes forty per cent of the soluble protein in tubers but is generally undetectable in other tissues. Fused rocket immunoelectro-phoresis was used to detect in roots patatin that is immunologically different from tuber patatin. Western blots of SDS-polyacrylamide gels show root patatin to have a different molecular weight distribution than tuber patatin isoforms, but immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products shows the patatin precursors to be of similar molecular weight in both tissues. This suggests that post-translational processing may differ in tubers and roots. Northern blots show that tuber and root patatin mRNAs are of similar size, but tuber transcripts are about 100-fold more abundant. 5' S1 nuclease and primer extension mapping suggests the class of patatin transcripts expressed in roots (class II transcripts) to be a subset of patatin transcripts expressed in tubers (classes I and II). Class II patatin mRNAs differ from class I transcripts by the presence of a 22 nucleotide insertion just upstream of the initiation codon. These data demonstrate that expression of the patatin multigene family is differentially regulated in tubers and roots. Images PMID:3031583

  3. Expression, purification and crystallization of an atypical class C acid phosphatase from Mycoplasma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2011-10-01

    Class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs) are 25-30 kDa bacterial surface proteins that are thought to function as broad-specificity 5',3'-nucleotidases. Analysis of the newly published complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma bovis PG45 revealed a putative CCAP with a molecular weight of 49.9 kDa. The expression, purification and crystallization of this new family member are described here. Standard purification procedures involving immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography yielded highly pure and crystallizable protein. Crystals were grown in sitting drops at room temperature in the presence of PEG 3350 and HEPES buffer pH 7.5 and diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Analysis of diffraction data suggested a primitive monoclinic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78, b = 101, c = 180 Å, β = 92°. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain six molecules, which are likely to be arranged as three dimers.

  4. Localization of the CB1 type cannabinoid receptor in the rat basolateral amygdala: high concentrations in a subpopulation of cholecystokinin-containing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, A J; Mascagni, F

    2001-01-01

    The neuronal localization of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the rat basolateral amygdala was studied using peroxidase and fluorescence immunohistochemical techniques. All nuclei of the basolateral amygdala contained a large number of lightly stained pyramidal neurons and a small number of more intensely stained non-pyramidal neurons. Most of the latter cells had medium-sized to large multipolar somata and three to four aspiny dendrites, but some exhibited smaller oval somata. The axon initial segments of some of these non-pyramidal neurons exhibited large swollen varicosities in colchicine-injected animals, suggesting that much of the CB1 receptor protein is transported down the axons of these cells. Double-labeling studies using immunofluorescence histochemistry combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the great majority of non-pyramidal neurons with CB1 receptor immunoreactivity belonged to a cholecystokinin-containing subpopulation. Whereas none of the other subpopulations of non-pyramidal neurons (exhibiting immunoreactivity for calretinin, parvalbumin, or somatostatin) expressed high levels of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity, a small percentage of these cells exhibited low levels of immunoreactivity. The results indicate that cannabinoids may modulate the activity of pyramidal projection neurons as well as a subpopulation of cholecystokinin-containing non-pyramidal neurons in the basolateral amygdala. Previous studies indicate that most of the latter are inhibitory interneurons that utilize GABA as a neurotransmitter. The intense staining of the cholecystokinin-containing interneurons and the evidence that large amounts of CB1 receptor protein are transported down the axons of these cells suggests that, as in the hippocampus, cannabinoids may inhibit the release of GABA from the axon terminals of these neurons.

  5. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical.

  6. Using electroretinograms and multi-model inference to identify spectral classes of photoreceptors and relative opsin expression levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lessios

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how individual photoreceptor cells factor in the spectral sensitivity of a visual system is essential to explain how they contribute to the visual ecology of the animal in question. Existing methods that model the absorption of visual pigments use templates which correspond closely to data from thin cross-sections of photoreceptor cells. However, few modeling approaches use a single framework to incorporate physical parameters of real photoreceptors, which can be fused, and can form vertical tiers. Akaike’s information criterion (AICc was used here to select absorptance models of multiple classes of photoreceptor cells that maximize information, given visual system spectral sensitivity data obtained using extracellular electroretinograms and structural parameters obtained by histological methods. This framework was first used to select among alternative hypotheses of photoreceptor number. It identified spectral classes from a range of dark-adapted visual systems which have between one and four spectral photoreceptor classes. These were the velvet worm, Principapillatus hitoyensis, the branchiopod water flea, Daphnia magna, normal humans, and humans with enhanced S-cone syndrome, a condition in which S-cone frequency is increased due to mutations in a transcription factor that controls photoreceptor expression. Data from the Asian swallowtail, Papilio xuthus, which has at least five main spectral photoreceptor classes in its compound eyes, were included to illustrate potential effects of model over-simplification on multi-model inference. The multi-model framework was then used with parameters of spectral photoreceptor classes and the structural photoreceptor array kept constant. The goal was to map relative opsin expression to visual pigment concentration. It identified relative opsin expression differences for two populations of the bluefin killifish, Lucania goodei. The modeling approach presented here will be useful in

  7. Expression of class 5 antigens by meningococcal strains obtained from patients in Brazil and evaluation of two new monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N. De Gaspari

    Full Text Available Determining the profile of antigen expression among meningococci is important for epidemiologic surveillance and vaccine development. To this end, two new mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been derived against Neisseria meningitidis proteins (class 5. The MAbs were reactive against outer membrane antigens and were bactericidal. Selected anti-class 5 MAbs [(5.1-3E6-2; (5.3-3BH4-C7; (5.4-1BG11-C7; (5.5-3DH-F5G9 also 5F1F4-T3(5.c], and the two new monoclonal antibodies C14F10Br2 (5.8 and 7F11B5Br3 (5.9, were then tested against different meningococcal strains, (63 strains of serogroup A, 60 strains of serogroup C (from 1972 to 1974; and 136 strains of serogroup B (from 1992 meningococci. Our results demonstrated that the expression of class 5 proteins in the N. meningitidis B Brazilian strains studied is highly heterogeneous. The serotypes and subtypes of B:4:P1.15, B:4:P1.9, B:4:P1.7, B:4:P1.3, B:4:P1.14, B:4:P1.16, B:4:NT, and B:NT:NT were detected in N. meningitidis B serogroups.The strains C:2a:P1.2 and A:4.21:P1.9 were dominant in the C and A serogroups, respectively. Serogroup B organisms expressed the class 5 epitopes 5.4 (18%, 5.5 (22%, 5.8 (3.6%, 5.9 (8.0% and 5c (38%. Serogroup C expressed class 5 epitopes 5.1 (81%, 5.4 (35%, 5.5 (33% and 5.9 (5.0%; and serogroup A showed reactivity directed at the class 5 protein 5c (47%; and reactivity was present with the new monoclonal antibody, 5.9 (5.5%. We conclude that the two new MAbs are useful in detecting important group B, class 5 antigens, and that a broad selection of serogroup B, class 5 proteins would be required for an effective vaccine based on the class 5 proteins.

  8. Cholecystokinin activation of central satiety centers changes seasonally in a mammalian hibernator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, Jessica P; Raybould, Helen E; Carey, Hannah V

    2011-05-01

    Hibernators that rely on lipids during winter exhibit profound changes in food intake over the annual cycle. The mechanisms that regulate appetite changes in seasonal hibernators remain unclear, but likely consist of complex interactions between gut hormones, adipokines, and central processing centers. We hypothesized that seasonal changes in the sensitivity of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) to the gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) may contribute to appetite regulation in ground squirrels. Spring (SPR), late summer (SUM), and winter euthermic hibernating (HIB) 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) were treated with intraperitoneal CCK (100 μg/kg) or vehicle (CON) for 3h and Fos expression in the NTS was quantified. In CON squirrels, numbers of Fos-positive neurons in HIB were low compared to SPR and SUM. CCK treatment increased Fos-positive neurons in the NTS at the levels of the area postrema (AP) and pre AP during all seasons and at the level of the rostral AP in HIB squirrels. The highest absolute levels of Fos-positive neurons were found in SPR CCK squirrels, but the highest relative increase from CON was found in HIB CCK squirrels. Fold-changes in Fos-positive neurons in SUM were intermediate between SPR and HIB. Thus, CCK sensitivity falls from SPR to SUM suggesting that seasonal changes in sensitivity of NTS neurons to vagally-derived CCK may influence appetite in the active phase of the annual cycle in hibernating squirrels. Enhanced sensitivity to CCK signaling in NTS neurons of hibernators indicates that changes in gut-brain signaling may contribute to seasonal changes in food intake during the annual cycle.

  9. Expressiveness of the Interval Logics of Allen's Relations on the Class of all Linear Orders: Complete Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monica, Dario Della; Goranko, Valentin; Montanari, Angelo;

    2011-01-01

    We compare the expressiveness of the fragments of Halpern and Shoham’s interval logic (HS), i.e., of all interval logics with modal operators associated with Allen’s relations between intervals in linear orders. We establish a complete set of interdefinability equations between these modal operat...... operators, and thus obtain a complete classification of the family of 212 fragments of HS with respect to their expressiveness. Using that result and a computer program, we have found that there are 1347 expressively different such interval logics over the class of all linear orders....

  10. The brain decade in debate: VIII. Peptide hormones and behavior: cholecystokinin and prolactin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Beinfeld

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is a transcription of an electronic symposium held on November 28, 2000 in which active researchers were invited by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC to discuss the advances of the last decade in the peptide field with particular focus on central actions of prolactin and cholecystokinin. The comments in this symposium reflect the diversity of prolactin and cholecystokinin research and demonstrate how the field has matured. Since both peptides play a role in reproductive behaviors, particularly mother-infant interactions, this was the starting point of the discussion. Recent findings on the role of the receptor subtypes as well as interaction with other peptides in this context were also discussed. Another issue discussed was the possible role of these peptides in dopamine-mediated rewarding systems. Both prolactin and cholecystokinin are involved in mechanisms controlling food intake and somatic pain thresholds. The role of peripheral inputs through vagal afferents modulating behavior was stressed. The advent of knockout animals as potential generators of new knowledge in this field was also addressed. Finally, interactions with other neuropeptides and investigation of the role of these peptides in other fields such as immunology were mentioned. Knowledge about the central functions of prolactin and cholecystokinin has shown important advances. The role of these peptides in neurological and psychiatric syndromes such as anorexia, drug abuse and physiological disturbances that lead to a compromised maternal behavior seems relevant.

  11. Gallbladder emptying and cholecystokinin response to fish oil and trioleate ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, C; Hojgaard, L; Madsen, J L

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare gallbladder emptying, gastric emptying and release of cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin and secretin after intragastric administration of fish oil and trioleate. After intravenous injection of 99mTc-HIDA, 30 ml of a lipid labelled with 111In was administer...

  12. An electrophysiological investigation of the effects of cholecystokinin on enteric neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, I.W.M.

    1998-01-01


    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide, which is present in the gastrointestinat tract in endocrine cells and in the enteric nervous system (ENS). A possible function in the control of motility of the small intestine has been attributed to neuronal CCK. The aim of this thesis was to obtain a

  13. An important role for cholecystokinin, a CLOCK target gene, in the development and treatment of manic-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arey, R N; Enwright, J F; Spencer, S M; Falcon, E; Ozburn, A R; Ghose, S; Tamminga, C; McClung, C A

    2014-03-01

    Mice with a mutation in the Clock gene (ClockΔ19) have been identified as a model of mania; however, the mechanisms that underlie this phenotype, and the changes in the brain that are necessary for lithium's effectiveness on these mice remain unclear. Here, we find that cholecystokinin (Cck) is a direct transcriptional target of CLOCK and levels of Cck are reduced in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of ClockΔ19 mice. Selective knockdown of Cck expression via RNA interference in the VTA of wild-type mice produces a manic-like phenotype. Moreover, chronic treatment with lithium restores Cck expression to near wild-type and this increase is necessary for the therapeutic actions of lithium. The decrease in Cck expression in the ClockΔ19 mice appears to be due to a lack of interaction with the histone methyltransferase, MLL1, resulting in decreased histone H3K4me3 and gene transcription, an effect reversed by lithium. Human postmortem tissue from bipolar subjects reveals a similar increase in Cck expression in the VTA with mood stabilizer treatment. These studies identify a key role for Cck in the development and treatment of mania, and describe some of the molecular mechanisms by which lithium may act as an effective antimanic agent.

  14. Cholecystokinin exerts an effect via the endocannabinoid system to inhibit GABAergic transmission in midbrain periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Vanessa A; Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Drew, Geoffrey M; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2011-08-01

    Cholecystokinin modulates pain and anxiety via its functions within brain regions such as the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). The aim of this study was to examine the cellular actions of cholecystokinin on PAG neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat midbrain PAG slices in vitro to examine the postsynaptic effects of cholecystokinin and its effects on synaptic transmission. Sulfated cholecystokinin-(26-33) (CCK-S, 100-300 nM), but not non-sulfated cholecystokinin-(26-33) (CCK-NS, 100-300 nM) produced an inward current in a sub-population of opioid sensitive and insensitive PAG neurons, which did not reverse over a range of membrane potentials. The CCK-S-induced current was abolished by the CCK1 selective antagonist devazepide (100 nM), but not by the CCK2 selective antagonists CI988 (100 nM, 1 μM) and LY225910 (1 μM). CCK-S, but not CCK-NS produced a reduction in the amplitude of evoked GABA(A)-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and an increase in the evoked IPSC paired-pulse ratio. By contrast, CCK-S had little effect on the rate and amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature IPSCs under basal conditions and when external K(+) was elevated. The CCK-S-induced inhibition of evoked IPSCs was abolished by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (3 μM), the mGluR5 antagonist MPEP (10 μM) and the 1, 2-diacylglycerol lipase (DAGLα) inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin (10 μM). In addition, CCK-S produced an increase in the rate of spontaneous non-NMDA-mediated, TTX-dependent excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). These results suggest that cholecystokinin produces direct neuronal depolarisation via CCK1 receptors and inhibits GABAergic synaptic transmission via action potential-dependent release of glutamate and mGluR5-induced endocannabinoid signaling. Thus, cholecystokinin has cellular actions within the PAG that can both oppose and reinforce opioid and cannabinoid modulation of pain and anxiety within this

  15. Effect of cholecystokinin on cytokines during endotoxic shock in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ling Ling; Al-Hong Weng; Xiao-Yun Zhao; Bao-Fn Shan; Jun-Lan Zhang; Xiao-Peng Zhang

    2001-01-01

    AIM To study the effect of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8) on systemic hypotension and cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic shock (ES) rats.``METHODS The changes of blood pressure were observed using physiological record instrument in four groups of rats: LPS (8 mg. kg-1, iv) induced ES; CCK-8 (40 μg.kg- 1 iv) pretreatment 10 min before LPS (8 mg. kg- 1);CCK-8 (40 μg.kg-1, iv) or normal saline (control) groups.Differences in tissue and circulating specificity of the proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-a, IL-l3 and IL-6) were assayed with ELISA kits.``RESULTS CCK-8 reversed LPS-induced decrease of mean artery blood pressure (MABP) in rats. Compared with control, LPS elevated the serum level of IL-6 significantly (3567_-687 ng.L-1 vs 128_+22 ng.L-1, P<0.01), while contents of TNF-a and IL- lβ elevated significantly (277 _± 86ng.L-1 vs not detectable and 43 ± 9 ng.L-1 vs notdetectable, P<0.01) but less extent than IL-6, CCK-8significantly inhibited the LPS-induced increase in serum TNF-a, IL-lβ and IL-6. LPS elevated spleen and lung content of IL-Iβ significantly (5184 ± 85 ng.L-1 vs 1047 ±21 ng.L-1 and 4050 ± 614 ng.L-1 vs not detectable,P<0,01). while levels of TNF-a and IL-6 also rosesignificantly but in less extent than IL-lβ. CCK-8 inhibited the LPS-induced increase of the cytokines in spleen and lung. in the heart, CCK-8 significantly inhibited LPS.induced increase of TNF-a (864 ± 123 ng. L-1 in CCK-8 +LPS group vs 1599_-227 ng-L-1 in LPS group, P<0.01),and IL-lβ (282 ± 93 ng-L-1 in CCK-8 + LPS group vs 621 ±145 ng.L-1 in LPS group, P<0.01).``CONCLUSION CCK-8 reverses ES, which may be relatedto its inhibitory effect on the overproduction of cytokines.``

  16. Mutations in the HLA class II genes leading to loss of expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, ES; Philippo, K; Giphart, MJ; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2003-01-01

    Loss of expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules on tumor cells affects the onset and modulation of the immune response through lack of activation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that the frequent loss of expression of HLA class II in diffuse large B-cell lymphom

  17. Effects of rizatriptan on calcitonin gene-related peptide, proenkephalin and cholecystokinin mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia of a rat migraine model%利扎曲普坦对偏头痛大鼠三叉神经节降钙素基因相关肽和脑啡肽原及缩胆囊肽基因表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚刚; 郝婷婷; 于挺敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study assesses the influence of rizatriptan on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP),proenkephalin (PENK) and cholecystokinin (CCK) mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia of a rat migraine model and investigates the possible mechanisms by which triptans treat migraine.Methods A total of 24 rats were randomly divided into four groups:normal control group (A),migraine model group(B),rizatriptan control group (C) and rizatriptan treatment group(D).Groups C and D were intragastrically perfused with rizatriptan,1 mg/kg per day.After 7 days,nitroglycerin was subcutaneously injected into the buttocks of the groups B and D to induce migraine.Two hours after nitroglycerin injection,the trigeminal ganglia was isolated.CGRP,PENK and CCK mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia were determined using SYBR Green Ⅰ real-time quantitative PCR.Results The copy number of CGRP mRNA (× 107) in 200 ng total RNA of each group was 0.05 ±0.01,1.30 ±0.52,0.23 ±0.12,0.43 ±0.33 ; The copy number of PENK mRNA (× 103) in 200 ng total RNA of each group was 3.30 ± 1.65,0.34 ±0.14,3.91 ± 2.44,0.71 ± 0.13.The copy number of CGRP mRNA in the trigeminal ganglia of group B was significantly higher than that of group A (q =7.854,P < 0.05) ; CGRP mRNA expressions were significantly lower in the trigeminal ganglia of rats in group D compared with group B (q =5.458,P <0.05).Compared with group A,PENK mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia of rats were significantly lower in group B (q =4.478,P < 0.05).PENK mRNA expressions were significantly higher in trigeminal ganglia of rats in group C compared with group D (q =4.838,P < 0.05).CCK mRNA expression in trigeminal ganglia of rats was similar among groups.Conelusions Rizatriptan can decrease the expressions of CGRP in the trigeminal ganglia of the migraine rats and exhibits neurogenic inflammation triggered by CGRP.PENK expressions decrease in the trigeminal ganglia of the migraine rats,weaken the analgesic

  18. Expression and characterization of recombinant single-chain salmon class I MHC fused with beta2-microglobulin with biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Stet, René J M; Skjødt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    antibodies were successfully produced against both the MHC class I heavy chain and beta(2)m, and showed binding to the recombinant molecule. The recombinant complex Sasabeta2mUBA*0301 was expressed and isolated; the production was scaled up by adjusting to its optimal conditions. Subsequently......, the recombinant proteins were purified by affinity chromatography using mAb against beta2m and alpha3. Eluates were analyzed by Western blot and refolded by the removal of denaturant. The correct folding was confirmed by measuring its binding capacity against mAb produced to recognize the native form of MHC...... molecules by biosensor analysis. This production of sufficient amounts of class I MHC proteins may represent a useful tool to study the peptide-binding specificity of MHC class I molecules, in order to design a peptide vaccine against viral pathogens....

  19. The Multidisciplinary Expression and Relevance of the Phenomenon of the Creative Class: Some Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Urbonė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Article investigates the phenomenon of the creative class and its multidisciplinary nature in the Richard Florida’s book The Rise of the Creative Class, its translated version to Lithuanian language. Analysis presented in the article aims to reveal the relevance of one of the basic forces that shapes our economy and culture during past decades – creativity force, and as well its possible application in different science areas, directions with other management topics – intellectual capital management, entrepreneurship and related translation to Lithuanian language dillemas. Creativity is recognized as fundamental economic force, a reason for the rise new class – creative class. It is concluded that ideas related to creativity fostered in Florida’s book are useful for the studies and development of management, economics, architecture, technology science and other areas.

  20. Rasch-based high-dimensionality data reduction and class prediction with applications to microarray gene expression data

    CERN Document Server

    Kastrin, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    Class prediction is an important application of microarray gene expression data analysis. The high-dimensionality of microarray data, where number of genes (variables) is very large compared to the number of samples (obser- vations), makes the application of many prediction techniques (e.g., logistic regression, discriminant analysis) difficult. An efficient way to solve this prob- lem is by using dimension reduction statistical techniques. Increasingly used in psychology-related applications, Rasch model (RM) provides an appealing framework for handling high-dimensional microarray data. In this paper, we study the potential of RM-based modeling in dimensionality reduction with binarized microarray gene expression data and investigate its prediction ac- curacy in the context of class prediction using linear discriminant analysis. Two different publicly available microarray data sets are used to illustrate a general framework of the approach. Performance of the proposed method is assessed by re-randomization s...

  1. In vivo expression of MHC class I genes depends on the presence of a downstream barrier element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helit Cohen

    Full Text Available Regulation of MHC class I gene expression is critical to achieve proper immune surveillance. In this work, we identify elements downstream of the MHC class I promoter that are necessary for appropriate in vivo regulation: a novel barrier element that protects the MHC class I gene from silencing and elements within the first two introns that contribute to tissue specific transcription. The barrier element is located in intergenic sequences 3' to the polyA addition site. It is necessary for stable expression in vivo, but has no effect in transient transfection assays. Accordingly, in both transgenic mice and stably transfected cell lines, truncation of the barrier resulted in transcriptional gene silencing, increased nucleosomal density and decreased histone H3K9/K14 acetylation and H3K4 di-methylation across the gene. Significantly, distinct sequences within the barrier element govern anti-silencing and chromatin modifications. Thus, this novel barrier element functions to maintain transcriptionally permissive chromatin organization and prevent transcriptional silencing of the MHC class I gene, ensuring it is poised to respond to immune signaling.

  2. Transcriptional activation of the cholecystokinin gene by DJ-1 through interaction of DJ-1 with RREB1 and the effect of DJ-1 on the cholecystokinin level in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takuya; Suzui, Sayaka; Kitaura, Hirotake; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation. DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found that the cholecystokinin (CCK) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. CCK is a peptide hormone and plays roles in contraction of the gallbladder and in promotion of secretion of pancreatic fluid. CCK is co-localized with dopamine in the substantia nigra to regulate release of dopamine. Reduced expression of CCK mRNA was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells. The Ras-responsive element (RRE) and Sp1 site were essential for promoter activity, and DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to RRE-binding protein 1 (RREBP1). The complex of DJ-1 with RREB1 but not with Sp1 bound to the RRE. Furthermore, the reduced CCK level in the serum from DJ-1-knockout mice compared to that from wild-type mice was observed. This is the first report showing that DJ-1 participates in peptide hormone synthesis.

  3. Transcriptional Activation of the Cholecystokinin Gene by DJ-1 through Interaction of DJ-1 with RREB1 and the Effect of DJ-1 on the Cholecystokinin Level in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takuya; Suzui, Sayaka; Kitaura, Hirotake; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation. DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found that the cholecystokinin (CCK) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. CCK is a peptide hormone and plays roles in contraction of the gallbladder and in promotion of secretion of pancreatic fluid. CCK is co-localized with dopamine in the substantia nigra to regulate release of dopamine. Reduced expression of CCK mRNA was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells. The Ras-responsive element (RRE) and Sp1 site were essential for promoter activity, and DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to RRE-binding protein 1 (RREBP1). The complex of DJ-1 with RREB1 but not with Sp1 bound to the RRE. Furthermore, the reduced CCK level in the serum from DJ-1-knockout mice compared to that from wild-type mice was observed. This is the first report showing that DJ-1 participates in peptide hormone synthesis. PMID:24348900

  4. Transcriptional activation of the cholecystokinin gene by DJ-1 through interaction of DJ-1 with RREB1 and the effect of DJ-1 on the cholecystokinin level in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Yamane

    Full Text Available DJ-1 is an oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation. DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found that the cholecystokinin (CCK gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. CCK is a peptide hormone and plays roles in contraction of the gallbladder and in promotion of secretion of pancreatic fluid. CCK is co-localized with dopamine in the substantia nigra to regulate release of dopamine. Reduced expression of CCK mRNA was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells. The Ras-responsive element (RRE and Sp1 site were essential for promoter activity, and DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to RRE-binding protein 1 (RREBP1. The complex of DJ-1 with RREB1 but not with Sp1 bound to the RRE. Furthermore, the reduced CCK level in the serum from DJ-1-knockout mice compared to that from wild-type mice was observed. This is the first report showing that DJ-1 participates in peptide hormone synthesis.

  5. Inducible Expression of Mu-Class Glutathione S-Transferases Is Associated with Fenpropathrin Resistance in Tetranychus cinnabarinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Mao Shen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval, is a serious pest on a variety of economically important crops widely distributed in China, and its resistance to acaricides has quickly developed. In this study, we fully sequenced 13 GST genes of T. cinnabarinus (TcGSTs. The phylogenetic tree showed that five of them belonged to the delta class and the other eight belonged to the mu class. The alignment of gene sequences and comparison of gene expressions between a fenpropathrin-resistant strain (FR and a susceptible strain (SS showed that neither point mutation nor overexpression was detected in TcGSTs. However, when challenged by a sublethal dose of fenpropathrin, the mRNA levels of three GSTs from the mu class (TCGSTM2, TCGSTM3, and TCGSTM8 highly increased in FR, while in SS, the expression of these genes was still at the same level under the treatment. In conclusion, specific TcGSTs were identified that were inducible to stimulation by fenpropathrin, and proved that TcGSTs in FR were not constantly expressed at a high level, but could react much more quickly under the stress of fenpropathrin than SS.

  6. Analysis of interaction of phenolic compounds with the cholecystokinin signaling pathway to explain effects on reducing food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-03-01

    Previous animal experiments demonstrated that phenolic compounds can reduce weight and food intake, but the exact mechanism(s) behind these effects remain unknown. For regulation of food intake, the cholecystokinin (CCK) hormone signaling pathway plays an important role as it induces satiety by binding on its specific receptor (CCK1R), hereby reducing food intake. In this study, we investigated the possible interactions of eight phenolic compounds of different classes (tannic acid, gallic acid, benzoic acid, hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, quercetin, kaempferol and resveratrol) with the CCK1R signaling pathway. As major results, the tested phenolic compounds could not activate the CCK1R in a specific cell-based bioassay. In contrast, we observed an anti-CCK1R activity. This antagonistic action might be explained by blocking of the functioning of the CCK1R receptor, although the exact mechanism of interaction remains unknown. For tannic acid, we also measured a sequestration activity of the CCK hormone in vitro. In conclusion, the reported activity of phenolic compounds against food intake and weight is not based on an activation of the CCK1R. Taking into account the complex regulation of food intake, further work is necessary to unravel other essential mechanisms involved to explain the reported effects of phenolic compounds against food intake.

  7. Hypothesis: Targeted Ikkβ deletion upregulates MIF signaling responsiveness and MHC class II expression in mouse hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Koch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Katherine S Koch, Hyam L LeffertHepatocyte Growth Control and Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is causally related to the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease but its hepatocellular mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Scattered reports in the literature hint at functional connections between the expression of MIF and major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class II molecules. Not surprisingly, these relationships have not yet been explored in hepatocytes because MIF and MHC Class II cell surface receptors are commonly expressed by other cell types including various antigen presenting cells of the immune system. On the other hand, mounting evidence suggests that heteromeric MIF receptors share a common molecule with intracellular MHC Class II complexes, viz., CD74, which also serves as the MHC Class II chaperone; and, while it is unclear what cancer-related role(s MHC Class II receptors might play, increasing evidence suggests that MIF and CD74 are also implicated in the biology of hepatocellular carcinoma. These reports are provocative for two reasons: firstly, Ikkβ Δhep mice carrying hepatocyte-targeted deletions of Ikkβ, an IκB kinase complex subunit required for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB, have been shown to display heightened susceptibilities to hepatotoxins and chemical hepatocarcinogens; secondly, microarray profiling observations indicate that Ikkβ Δhep hepatocytes constitutively and “ectopically” overexpress genes, particularly CD74, CD44 (a MIF-receptor subunit and MHC Class II I-A/E β and I-A α chains, and gene families that regulate host immune process and immune defense responses. These findings together suggest that Ikkβ Δhep mice might express functional MIF and MHC Class II receptors, leading to increased hepatocellular sensitivity to

  8. Up-regulation of cholesterol absorption is a mechanism for cholecystokinin-induced hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, LiChun; Yang, Hong; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Guo, Zhongmao

    2014-05-09

    Excessive absorption of intestinal cholesterol is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. This report examines the effect of cholecystokinin (CCK) on plasma cholesterol level and intestinal cholesterol absorption using the in vivo models of C57BL/6 wild-type and low density lipoprotein receptor knock-out (LDLR(-/-)) mice. These data were supported by in vitro studies involving mouse primary intestinal epithelial cells and human Caco-2 cells; both express CCK receptor 1 and 2 (CCK1R and CCK2R). We found that intravenous injection of [Thr(28),Nle(31)]CCK increased plasma cholesterol levels and intestinal cholesterol absorption in both wild-type and LDLR(-/-) mice. Treatment of mouse primary intestinal epithelial cells with [Thr(28),Nle(31)]CCK increased cholesterol absorption, whereas selective inhibition of CCK1R and CCK2R with antagonists attenuated CCK-induced cholesterol absorption. In Caco-2 cells, CCK enhanced CCK1R/CCK2R heterodimerization. Knockdown of both CCK1R and CCK2 or either one of them diminished CCK-induced cholesterol absorption to the same extent. CCK also increased cell surface-associated NPC1L1 (Niemann-Pick C1-like 1) transporters but did not alter their total protein expression. Inhibition or knockdown of NPC1L1 attenuated CCK-induced cholesterol absorption. CCK enhanced phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt phosphorylation and augmented the interaction between NPC1L1 and Rab11a (Rab-GTPase-11a), whereas knockdown of CCK receptors or inhibition of G protein βγ dimer (Gβγ) diminished CCK-induced PI3K and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of PI3K diminished CCK-induced NPC1L1-Rab11a interaction and cholesterol absorption. Knockdown of Rab11a suppressed CCK-induced NPC1L1 translocation and cholesterol absorption. These data imply that CCK enhances cholesterol absorption by activation of a pathway involving CCK1R/CCK2R, Gβγ, PI3K, Akt, Rab11a, and NPC1L.

  9. Presence of CCK-A, B receptors and effect of gastrin and cholecystokinin on growth of pancreatobiliary cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Young Jang; Sun-Whe Kim; Ja-Lok Ku; Yong-Hyun Park; Jae-Gahb Park

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) and their specific antagonists on the growth of pancreatic and biliary tract cancer cell lines.METHODS: Five pancreatic and 6 biliary cancer cell lines with 2 conrtol cells were used in this study. Cell proliferation study was done using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and direct cell count method. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and slot blot hybridization were performed to examine and quantify the expression of hormonal receptors in these cell lines.RESULTS: SNU-308 showed a growth stimulating effect by gastrin-17, as did SNU-478 by both gastrin-17 and CCK-8. The trophic effect of these two hormones was completely blocked by specific antagonists (L-365, 260for gastrin and L-364, 718 for CCK). Other cell lines did not respond to gastrin or CCK. In RT-PCR, the presence of CCK-A receptor and CCK-B/gastrin receptor mRNA was detected in all biliary and pancreatic cancer cell lines. In slot blot hybridization, compared to the cell lines which did not respond to hormones, those that responded to hormones showed high expression of receptor mRNA.CONCLUSION: Gastrin and CCK exert a trophic action on some of the biliary tract cancers.

  10. Comparing Different Classes of Reinforcement to Increase Expressive Language for Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Dale, Stephanie; Kassardjian, Alyne; Tsuji, Kathleen H.; Taubman, Mitchell; McEachin, John J.; Leaf, Ronald B.; Oppenheim-Leaf, Misty L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the basic principles of applied behavior analysis is that behavior change is largely due to that behavior being reinforced. Therefore the use of positive reinforcement is a key component of most behavioral programs for individuals diagnosed with autism. In this study we compared four different classes of reinforcers (i.e., food, praise,…

  11. Integration of clinical chemistry, expression, and metabolite data leads to better toxicological class separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, Jeppe; Brunak, Søren; Frederiksen, K.S.;

    2008-01-01

    the three toxicants alpha-naphthyl-isothiocyanate, dimethylnitrosamine, and N-methylformamide administered to rats. Improved predictive ability of the different classes is seen, suggesting that this approach is a suitable method for data integration and visualization of biological data. Furthermore......, the method allows for correlation of biological parameters between the different data types, which could lead to an improvement in biological interpretation....

  12. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  13. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djidjik, Réda; Messaoudani, Nesrine; Tahiat, Azzedine; Meddour, Yanis; Chaib, Samia; Atek, Aziz; Khiari, Mohammed Elmokhtar; Benhalla, Nafissa Keltoum; Smati, Leila; Bensenouci, Abdelatif; Baghriche, Mourad; Ghaffor, Mohammed

    2012-08-03

    Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26). Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  14. SNP variants associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) correlate with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, Lik-Chin; Chin, Yoon-Ming; Tai, Mei-Chee; Chin, Edmund Fui-Min; Lim, Yat-Yuen; Suthandiram, Sujatha; Chang, Kian-Meng; Ong, Tee-Chuan; Bee, Ping-Chong; Mohamed, Zahurin; Gan, Gin-Gin; Ng, Ching-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Large consortia efforts and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have linked a number of genetic variants within the 6p21 chromosomal region to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Complementing these efforts, we genotyped previously reported SNPs in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (rs6457327) and class II (rs9271100, rs2647012 and rs10484561) regions in a total of 1,145 subjects (567 NHL cases and 578 healthy controls) from two major ethnic groups in Malaysia, the Malays and the Chinese. We identified a NHL-associated (PNHL_add = 0.0008; ORNHL_add = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.37–0.77) and B-cell associated (PBcell_add = 0.0007; ORBcell_add = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.35–0.76) SNP rs2647012 in the Malaysian Malays. In silico cis-eQTL analysis of rs2647012 suggests potential regulatory function of nearby HLA class II molecules. Minor allele rs2647012-T is linked to higher expression of HLA-DQB1, rendering a protective effect to NHL risk. Our findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays an important role in NHL etiology. PMID:28139690

  15. Class A scavenger receptor promotes osteoclast differentiation via the enhanced expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Kenichi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sakashita, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Lei, XiaoFeng; Ohnishi, Koji [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Kodama, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, Hiroshi [Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro, E-mail: takeya@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2010-01-22

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, and their differentiation depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is one of the principal functional molecules of macrophages, and its level of expression declines during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of SR-A in osteoclastogenesis, we examined pathological changes in femoral bone and the expression levels of osteoclastogenesis-related molecules in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. The femoral osseous density of SR-A{sup -/-} mice was higher than that of SR-A{sup +/+} mice, and the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly decreased. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that the differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is impaired in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. Elimination of SR-A did not alter the expression level of the M-CSF receptor, c-fms; however, the expression levels of RANK and RANK-related osteoclast-differentiation molecules such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) significantly decreased. Furthermore, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), an SR-A ligand, significantly increased the expression level of RANK and MITF during osteoclast differentiation. These data indicate that SR-A promotes osteoclastogenesis via augmentation of the expression level of RANK and its related molecules.

  16. Coexpression of cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor and gastrin gene in human gastric tissues and gastric cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jiang Zhou; Man-Ling Chen; Qun-Zhou Zhang; Jian-Kun Hu; Wen-Ling Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the expression patterns of cholecystokininB (CCK-B)/gastrin receptor genes in matched human gastric carcinoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa of patients with gastric cancer, inflammatory gastric mucosa from patients with gastritis, normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients and a gastric carcinoma cell line (SGC-7901), and to explore their relationship with progression to malignancy of human gastric carcinomas.METHODS: RT-PCR and sequencing were employed to detect the mRNA expression levels of CCK-B receptor and gastrin gene in specimens from 30 patients with gastric carcinoma and healthy bordering non-cancerous mucosa, 10 gastritis patients and normal stomachs from 2 autopsied patients as well as SGC-7901. The results were semi-quantified by normalizing it to the mRNA level of β-actin gene using Lab Image software. The sequences were analyzed by BLAST program. RESULTS: CCK-B receptor transcripts were detected in all of human gastric tissues in this study, including normal, inflammatory and malignant tissues and SGC-7901. However, the expression levels of CCK-B receptor in normal gastric tissues were higher than those in other groups (P<0.05),and its expressions did not correlate with the differentiation and metastasis of gastric cancer (P>0.05). On the other hand, gastrin mRNA was detected in SGC-7901 and in specimens obtained from gastric cancer patients (22/30) but not in other gastric tissues, and its expression was highly correlated with the metastases of gastric cancer (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Human gastric carcinomas and gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 cells coexpress CCK-B receptor and gastrin mRNA. Gastrin/CCK-B receptor autocrine or paracrine pathway may possibly play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer.

  17. HLA class I gene expression on human primary tumours and autologous metastases: demonstration of selective losses of HLA antigens on colorectal, gastric and laryngeal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Nevot, M. A.; Esteban, F.; Ferrón, A.; Gutiérrez, J.; Oliva, M. R.; Romero, C.; Huelin, C.; Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F.

    1989-01-01

    The expression of HLA class I antigens was studied in 99 primary tumour (colorectal, gastric and laryngeal carcinomas) and 57 autologous metastases using immunohistological techniques and monoclonal antibodies against class I monomorphic determinants, HLA-B isotypic determinants and HLA polymorphic determinants. Fourteen per cent of colorectal, 9.6% of gastric and 20% of laryngeal carcinomas completely lacked class I molecules. Selective losses of HLA-B antigens were also detected in 8.8, 3.4 and 5.8% of these tumours respectively. Taking into account complete and selective loss of HLA-B the average alteration in the class I molecules expression totalled 21%. The comparison of class I expression between primary tumours and autologous metastases showed differences in 24% of the patients. These differences consisted mainly in a decrease of class I expression by metastases. Nevertheless, four types of divergence were detected in laryngeal carcinomas, namely: +/-, +/+, -/+, -/-. In addition, a clear correlation between degree of differentiation and class I expression was observed in laryngeal tumours. Finally, when class I gene RFLPs were compared with DNA from 15 tumours and autologous normal mucosa or peripheral lymphocytes, no differences were detected between these samples. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2649129

  18. Expression, Purification and Characterization of Ricin vectors used for exogenous antigen delivery into the MHC Class I presentation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Disarmed versions of the cytotoxin ricin can deliver fused peptides into target cells leading to MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation [Smith et al. J Immunol 2002; 169:99-107]. The ricin delivery vector must contain an attenuated catalytic domain to prevent target cell death, and the fused peptide epitope must remain intact for delivery and functional loading to MHC class I molecules. Expression in E. coli and purification by cation exchange chromatography of the fusion protein is described. Before used for delivery, the activity of the vector must be characterized in vitro, via an N-glycosidase assay, and in vivo, by a cytotoxicity assay. The presence of an intact epitope must be confirmed using mass spectrometry by comparing the actual mass with the predicted mass.

  19. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of PEG-10kDa-cholecystokinin-10 in rats after different routes of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Tamariz, Fabián; Verbaeys, Isabelle; Van Boven, Maurits; De Cuyper, Marcel; Buyse, Johan; de Witte, Peter; Verbruggen, Alfons; Cokelaere, Marnix

    2010-04-01

    Cholecystokinin, produced in the proximal small intestine, is a short acting satiating peptide hormone. CCK-10, before and after mono-iodination, was previously coupled to 10kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG). The formed conjugates PEG10kDa-CCK-10 and PEG10kDa-[(127)I]-CCK-10 show after i.p. administration to rats a sustained food intake reduction during 8h in comparison to 2h for free CCK-10. The present study examined the blood pharmacokinetics of this pharmacological interesting molecule by means of PEG10kDa-[(123)I]-CCK-10 following intravenous, intraperitoneal, intramuscular and nasal administration and the biodistribution after i.p. administration. HPLC analysis with radiometric detection allowed the differentiation between inorganic iodide and the intact tracer in blood. Blood kinetics after i.v. injection was fitted to a bi-exponential with a distribution half-life of 15 min and with an elimination half-life of 8 hours for intact PEG10kDa-[(123)I]-CCK-10. The biodistribution studies showed a higher accumulation of the tracer for all administration routes in organs expressing CCK receptors localized in the gastrointestinal tract such as pancreas, duodenum and small intestine. No indication of blood brain barrier crossing for the conjugate could be observed independently of the administration route. Main clearance was via the urinary pathway.

  20. Phospholipase C not protein kinase C is required for the activation of TRPC5 channels by cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisanti, Laurel A; Kurada, Lalitha; Cilz, Nicholas I; Porter, James E; Lei, Saobo

    2012-08-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the brain where it interacts with two G protein-coupled receptors (CCK1 and CCK2). Both types of CCK receptors are coupled to G(q/11) proteins resulting in increased function of phospholipase C (PLC) pathway. Whereas CCK has been suggested to increase neuronal excitability in the brain via activation of cationic channels, the types of cationic channels have not yet been identified. Here, we co-expressed CCK2 receptors and TRPC5 channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and studied the effects of CCK on TRPC5 channels using patch-clamp techniques. Our results demonstrate that activation of CCK2 receptors robustly potentiates the function of TRPC5 channels. CCK-induced activation of TRPC5 channels requires the functions of G-proteins and PLC and depends on extracellular Ca(2+). The activation of TRPC5 channels mediated by CCK2 receptors is independent of IP(3) receptors and protein kinase C. CCK-induced opening of TRPC5 channels is not store-operated because application of thapsigargin to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores failed to alter CCK-induced TRPC5 channel currents significantly. Bath application of CCK also significantly increased the open probability of TRPC5 single channel currents in cell-attached patches. Because CCK exerts extensive effects in the brain, our results may provide a novel mechanism to explain its roles in modulating neuronal excitability.

  1. Grouping and classifying electrophysiologically-defined classes of neocortical neurons by single cell, whole-genome expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Subkhankulova

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of neuronal cell types and how to classify them are perennial questions in neuroscience. The advent of global gene expression analysis raised the possibility that comprehensive transcription profiling will resolve neuronal cell types into groups that reflect some or all aspects of their phenotype. This approach has been successfully used to compare gene expression between groups of neurons defined by a common property. Here we extend this approach to ask whether single neuron gene expression profiling can prospectively resolve neuronal subtypes into groups, independent of any phenotypic information, and whether those groups reflect meaningful biological properties of those neurons. We applied methods we have developed to compare gene expression among single neural stem cells to study global gene expression in 18 randomly picked neurons from layer II/III of the early postnatal mouse neocortex. Cells were selected by morphology and by firing characteristics and electrical properties, enabling the definition of each cell as either fast- or regular-spiking, corresponding to a class of inhibitory interneurons or excitatory pyramidal cells. Unsupervised clustering of young neurons by global gene expression resolved the cells into two groups and those broadly corresponded with the two groups of fast- and regular-spiking neurons. Clustering of the entire, diverse group of 18 neurons of different developmental stages also successfully grouped neurons in accordance with the electrophysiological phenotypes, but with more cells misassigned among groups. Genes specifically enriched in regular spiking neurons were identified from the young neuron expression dataset. These results provide a proof of principle that single-cell gene expression profiling may be used to group and classify neurons in a manner reflecting their known biological properties and may be used to identify cell-specific transcripts.

  2. Differential body weight and feeding responses to high-fat diets in rats and mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jie; Behles, R Ryan; Hyun, Jayson; Kopin, Alan S; Moran, Timothy H

    2007-07-01

    Prior data demonstrated differential roles for cholecystokinin (CCK)1 receptors in maintaining energy balance in rats and mice. CCK1 receptor deficiency results in hyperphagia and obesity of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats but not in mice. To ascertain the role of CCK1 receptors in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity, we compared alterations in food intake, body weight, fat mass, plasma glucose, and leptin levels, and patterns of hypothalamic gene expression in OLETF rats and mice lacking CCK1 receptors in response to a 10-wk exposure to HFD. Compared with Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) control rats, OLETF rats on HFD had sustained overconsumption over the 10-wk period. High fat feeding resulted in greater increases in body weight and plasma leptin levels in OLETF than in LETO rats. In situ hybridization determinations revealed that, while HFD reduced neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA expression in both the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of LETO rats, HFD resulted in decreased NPY expression in the Arc but not in the DMH of OLETF rats. In contrast to these results in OLETF rats, HFD increased food intake and induced obesity to an equal degree in both wild-type and CCK1 receptor(-/-) mice. NPY gene expression was decreased in the Arc in response to HFD, but was not detectable in the DMH in both wild-type and CCK1 receptor(-/-) mice. Together, these data provide further evidence for differential roles of CCK1 receptors in the controls of food intake and body weight in rats and mice.

  3. Peptide motifs of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule explain the striking MHC-determined response to Rous sarcoma virus in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallny, Hans-Joachim; Avila, David; Hunt, Lawrence G.

    2006-01-01

    Compared with the MHC of typical mammals, the chicken MHC is smaller and simpler, with only two class I genes found in the B12 haplotype. We make five points to show that there is a single-dominantly expressed class I molecule that can have a strong effect on MHC function. First, we find only one...

  4. Stress-induced enhancement of fear conditioning activates the amygdalar cholecystokinin system in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ting; Yang, Shengchang; Wen, Di; Sun, Qiming; Li, Yingmin; Ma, Chunling; Cong, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a debilitating psychiatric disease characterized by invasive and persistent fear memories-induced stressful experience, is associated with numerous changes in neuroendocrine function. Here, we investigated whether PTSD-like symptoms are associated with changes in the cholecystokinin (CCK) system in the basolateral amygdala. We developed an animal model of PTSD using multiple foot shocks at 1.1 mA. The resulting conditioned fear response was severe (>80% freezing) and maintained for at least 28 days. The stress-associated neurotransmitters norepinephrine, dopamine, and corticotrophin-releasing hormone were elevated at 1 day after foot shock. CCK immunoreactivity and extracellular concentration as well as the expression of CCK receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) increased progressively for 28 days following foot shock. Taken together, these results suggest that stress-induced activation of the CCK system in the BLA, which may contribute toward the development of PTSD-like symptoms.

  5. Evolution of regeneration and fission in annelids: insights from engrailed- and orthodenticle-class gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bely, A E; Wray, G A

    2001-07-01

    The recent explosion of information on the role of regulatory genes in embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study how these genes participate in post-embryonic developmental processes. We present a detailed comparison of regulatory gene expression during regeneration and asexual reproduction (by fission) in the segmented worm Pristina leidyi (Annelida: Oligochaeta). We isolated three genes from Pristina, one homolog of engrailed and two homologs of orthodenticle, and characterized their expression in different developmental contexts. In situ hybridization studies on worms undergoing normal growth, regeneration and fission demonstrate that in all three processes, Pl-en is expressed primarily in the developing nervous system, and Pl-Otx1 and Pl-Otx2 are expressed primarily in the anterior body wall, foregut and developing nervous system. Our data reveal extensive similarities between expression during regeneration and fission, consistent with the idea that similar developmental processes underlie these two types of development. Thus, we argue that in these annelids fission may have evolved by recruitment of regenerative processes. Furthermore, by comparing our data to existing data from leech embryos, we find evidence that embryonic processes are re-deployed during regeneration and fission.

  6. MARCH1 down-regulation in IL-10-activated B cells increases MHC class II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbas, Tristan; Steimle, Viktor; Lapointe, Réjean; Ishido, Satoshi; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    IL-10 is vastly studied for its anti-inflammatory properties on most immune cells. However, it has been reported that IL-10 activates B cells, up-regulates their MHC class II molecules and prevents apoptosis. As MARCH1 was shown to be responsible for the intracellular sequestration of MHC class II molecules in dendritic cells and monocytes in response to IL-10, we set out to clarify the role of this ubiquitin ligase in B cells. Here, we demonstrate in mice that splenic follicular B cells represent the major cell population that up-regulate MHC II molecules in the presence of IL-10. Activation of these cells through TLR4, CD40 or the IL-10 receptor caused the down-regulation of MARCH1 mRNA. Accordingly, B cells from MARCH1-deficient mice do not up-regulate I-A(b) in response to IL-10. In all, our results demonstrate that IL-10 can have opposite effects on MARCH1 regulation in different cell types.

  7. Characterization and expression pattern ofpouII1,a novel class Ⅱ POU gene in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    POU domain transcription factors that share a conserved DNA-binding domain, POU domain, are important regulators for the development of embryos in various animal species. A novel zebrafish POU domain gene, pouII1has been cloned. The pouII1 cDNA is 2080 kb in length and encodes a putative polypeptide of 596 amino acids. It is placed into class Ⅱ POU family since it shares a high degree of homology with the known members of this family.Northern hybridization identifies a major transcript of approximately 2.1 kb that was present in embryos at the single-cell stage throughout 24 h postfertilizafion. The whole mountin situ hybridization shows thatpouII1 transcripts are present in the single-cell embryos, strongly suggesting that these transcripts are of maternal origin. During early development of the embryos, pouII1 mRNA was ubiquitously distributed in all cells and tissues. The transcripts are gradually limited to brains and become completely undetectable by day 3. To our knowledge, pouII1 is the first class Ⅱ POU gene identified in zebrafish.``

  8. Geometric Feature-Based Facial Expression Recognition in Image Sequences Using Multi-Class AdaBoost and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonwhoan Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions are widely used in the behavioral interpretation of emotions, cognitive science, and social interactions. In this paper, we present a novel method for fully automatic facial expression recognition in facial image sequences. As the facial expression evolves over time facial landmarks are automatically tracked in consecutive video frames, using displacements based on elastic bunch graph matching displacement estimation. Feature vectors from individual landmarks, as well as pairs of landmarks tracking results are extracted, and normalized, with respect to the first frame in the sequence. The prototypical expression sequence for each class of facial expression is formed, by taking the median of the landmark tracking results from the training facial expression sequences. Multi-class AdaBoost with dynamic time warping similarity distance between the feature vector of input facial expression and prototypical facial expression, is used as a weak classifier to select the subset of discriminative feature vectors. Finally, two methods for facial expression recognition are presented, either by using multi-class AdaBoost with dynamic time warping, or by using support vector machine on the boosted feature vectors. The results on the Cohn-Kanade (CK+ facial expression database show a recognition accuracy of 95.17% and 97.35% using multi-class AdaBoost and support vector machines, respectively.

  9. Cloning and expression analysis of an E-class MADS-box gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... As shown by relative–quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction ... mation of higher-order transcription factor complexes with .... synthesized from 2.0 µg RNA using Superscript II RNase- Reverse ..... program (2006BAD01A15), the National Basic Research ... Structure and expression of duplicate.

  10. Genome-wide identification and expression profile of homeodomain-leucine zipper Class I gene family in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Fu, Rao; Li, Qiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2013-12-01

    The HD-Zip proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants. HD-Zip genes have been grouped into four different classes: HD-Zip I to IV. In this study, we described the identification and structural characterization of Class I HD-Zip genes in cucumber. A complete set of 13 HD-Zip I genes were identified in the cucumber genome using Blast search tools and phylogeny. The cucumber HD-Zip I family contained a smaller number of identified genes compared to other higher plants such as Arabidopsis and maize due to the absence of recent gene duplication events. Chromosomal location of these genes revealed that they are distributed unevenly across 5 of 7 chromosomes. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that 13 cucumber HD-Zip I genes were expressed in at least one of the tissues, which suggested that cucumber HD-Zip I genes took part in many cellular processes. The transcript abundance level analysis during abiotic stress conditions (NaCl, ABA and low temperature treatments) identified a group of HD-Zip I genes that responded to one or more treatments.

  11. Identification and expression profile of GbAGL2, a C-class gene from Gossypium barbadense

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiang Liu; Kaijing Zuo; Fei Zhang; Ying Li; Jieting Xu; Lida Zhang; Xiaofen Sun; Kexuan Tang

    2009-12-01

    An AGAMOUS (AG)-like gene, GbAGL2, was isolated from Gossypium barbadense and characterized. Alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that GbAGL2 shared high homology with AG-subfamily genes and belonged to a C-class gene family. DNA gel blot analysis showed that GbAGL2 belonged to a low-copy gene family. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) revealed that GbAGL2 was highly expressed in reproductive tissues including ovules and carpels, but barely expressed in vegetative tissues. In addition, GbAGL2 expression in a cotton cultivar XuZhou142 (wt) (XZ142, G. hirsutum L.) and its fibreless mutant XZ142 (fl) was examined. RNA in situ hybridization analysis indicated that GbAGL2 transcripts were preferentially restricted to outer ovule integuments, carpels and fibres. These expression patterns implied that GbAGL2 might participate in the development of the carpel and ovule. Furthermore, Arabidopsis transformation was performed and modifications occurred in flowers, and the silique length of transgenic plants also increased slightly, suggesting that the GbAGL2 gene may have a positive effect on the development of the ovary or ovule. Our findings suggest that GbAGL2 might not only specify the identity of floral organs but also play a potential key role in ovary or fibre development in cotton.

  12. The expression patterns of three class B genes in two distinctive whorls of petaloid tepals in Alstroemeria ligtu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Masayo; Kamimura, Taichi; Kanno, Akira

    2007-02-01

    Alstroemeria (Liliales) has two layers of petaloid tepals, in which the often spotted narrow inner tepals can be distinguished easily from the wider outer tepals. In order to explore this floral morphology in Alstroemeria, we investigated the tepal morphology and the expression patterns of three class B genes, whose homologs in eudicots have been shown previously to be involved in petal and stamen development. The two DEF-like genes (AlsDEFa and AlsDEFb) and the one GLO-like gene (AlsGLO) of Alstroemeria ligtu were isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization analyses indicated that AlsDEFb and AlsGLO were expressed in whorls 1, 2 and 3 (outer tepals, inner tepals and stamens, respectively), whereas AlsDEFa expression was detected only in whorls 2 and 3. These results suggest that in A. ligtu, AlsDEFb and AlsGLO would participate in determining the organ identity of the two-layered petaloid tepals and stamens, which is in support of the modified ABC model. Additionally, the distinctive expression patterns of AlsDEFa and AlsDEFb might be related to morphological differences between the two-layered tepals.

  13. Activation of human T cells by major histocompatability complex class II expressing neutrophils: proliferation in the presence of superantigen, but not tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Liu, C; Guyre, P M; Wardwell, K; O'Neil, J; Guo, T L; Christian, T P; Mudzinski, S P; Gosselin, E J

    1997-06-01

    The primary function of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in the immune response appears to be acute phagocytic clearance of foreign pathogens and release of inflammatory mediators. Consistent with their assumed lack of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, PMN have not been considered to play a role in antigen presentation and T-cell activation. However, recent reports have shown that human PMN can express MHC class II molecules both in vitro and in vivo after stimulation with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Thus, under appropriate conditions, PMN could play a significant role in immune regulation, including T-cell activation. In this report, we demonstrate that human class II-expressing PMN can serve as accessory cells in superantigen (SAg)-mediated T-cell activation. This accessory activity for SAg presentation was present only after induction of MHC class II expression, and was especially pronounced following culture of PMN with GM-CSF plus IFN-gamma, which acted synergistically to induce MHC class II molecules on PMN. Moreover, the level of MHC class II expression and the magnitude of SAg-induced T-cell responses were found to be highly correlated and distinctly donor dependent, with PMN from some donors repeatedly showing fivefold higher responses than PMN from other donors. On the other hand, culture of PMN with GM-CSF plus IFN-gamma under conditions that resulted in optimal MHC class II expression did not enable them to function as antigen-presenting cells for either intact tetanus toxoid (TT) or for a TT peptide. These results delineate a new pathway for T-cell activation by SAg that may play an important role in the severity of SAg-induced inflammatory responses. They also identify a donor-specific polymorphism for induction of PMN MHC class II expression which may be of significance for therapies involving GM-CSF and IFN-gamma.

  14. Activity-dependent regulation of MHC class I expression in the developing primary visual cortex of the common marmoset monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlumbohm Christina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent studies have highlighted the important role of immunity-related molecules in synaptic plasticity processes in the developing and adult mammalian brains. It has been suggested that neuronal MHCI (major histocompatibility complex class I genes play a role in the refinement and pruning of synapses in the developing visual system. As a fast evolutionary rate may generate distinct properties of molecules in different mammalian species, we studied the expression of MHCI molecules in a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus. Methods and results Analysis of expression levels of MHCI molecules in the developing visual cortex of the common marmoset monkeys revealed a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High levels of expression were detected very early in postnatal development, at a stage when synaptogenesis takes place and ocular dominance columns are formed. To determine whether the expression of MHCI molecules is regulated by retinal activity, animals were subjected to monocular enucleation. Levels of MHCI heavy chain subunit transcripts in the visual cortex were found to be elevated in response to monocular enucleation. Furthermore, MHCI heavy chain immunoreactivity revealed a banded pattern in layer IV of the visual cortex in enucleated animals, which was not observed in control animals. This pattern of immunoreactivity indicated that higher expression levels were associated with retinal activity coming from the intact eye. Conclusions These data demonstrate that, in the nonhuman primate brain, expression of MHCI molecules is regulated by neuronal activity. Moreover, this study extends previous findings by suggesting a role for neuronal MHCI molecules during synaptogenesis in the visual cortex.

  15. Consequences of cytotoxic T lymphocyte interaction with major histocompatibility complex class I-expressing neurons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, G F; Mucke, L; Oldstone, M B

    1995-11-01

    Neurons have evolved strategies to evade immune surveillance that include an inability to synthesize the heavy chain of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC), proteins that are necessary for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition of target cells. Multiple viruses have taken advantage of the lack of CTL-mediated recognition and killing of neurons by establishing persistent neuronal infections and thereby escaping attack by antiviral CTL. We have expressed a class I MHC molecule (Db) in neurons of transgenic mice using the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter to determine the pathogenic consequences of CTL recognition of virally infected, MHC-expressing central nervous system (CNS) neurons. The NSE-Db transgene was expressed in H-2b founder mice, and transgene-derived messenger RNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in transgenic brains from several lines. Purified primary neurons from transgenic but not from nontransgenic mice adhered to coverslips coated with a conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody directed against the Dv molecule and presented viral peptide to CTL in an MHC-restricted manner, indicating that the Db molecule was expressed on transgenic neurons in a functional form. Transgenic mice infected with the neurotropic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and given anti-LCMV, MHC-restricted CTL displayed a high morbidity and mortality when compared with controls receiving MHC-mismatched CTL or expressing alternative transgenes. After CTL transfer, transgenic brains showed an increased number of CD8+ cells compared with nontransgenic controls as well as an increased rate of clearance of infectious virus from the CNS. Additionally, an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was detected during viral clearance in NSE-Db transgenic mice and lasted several months after clearance of virus from neurons. In contrast, LCMV-infected, nontransgenic littermates and mice expressing other gene products from the

  16. Chemotherapeutics and radiation stimulate MHC class I expression through elevated interferon-beta signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wan

    Full Text Available Low doses of anticancer drugs have been shown to enhance antitumor immune response and increase the efficacy of immunotherapy. The molecular basis for such effects remains elusive, although selective depletion of T regulatory cells has been demonstrated. In the current studies, we demonstrate that topotecan (TPT, a topoisomerase I-targeting drug with a well-defined mechanism of action, stimulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression in breast cancer cells through elevated expression/secretion of interferon-β (IFN-β and activation of type I IFN signaling. First, we show that TPT treatment elevates the expression of both total and cell-surface MHC I in breast cancer cells. Second, conditioned media from TPT-treated breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells induce elevated expression of cell-surface MHC I in drug-naïve recipient cells, suggesting the involvement of cytokines and/or other secreted molecules. Consistently, TPT-treated cells exhibit elevated expression of multiple cytokines such as IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. Third, either knocking down the type I interferon receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1 or addition of neutralizing antibody against IFN-β results in reduced MHC I expression in TPT-treated cells. Together, these results suggest that TPT induces increased IFN-β autocrine/paracrine signaling through type I IFN receptor, resulting in the elevated MHC I expression in tumor cells. Studies have also demonstrated that other chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. etoposide, cisplatin, paclitaxel and vinblastine similarly induce increased IFN-β secretion and elevated MHC I expression. In addition, conditioned media from γ-irradiated donor cells are shown to induce IFN-β-dependent MHC I expression in unirradiated recipient cells. In the aggregate, our results suggest that many cancer therapeutics induce elevated tumor antigen presentation through MHC I, which could represent a common mechanism for enhanced antitumor immune response through

  17. An in situ hybridization study of the effects of artificial insemination on the localization of cells expressing MHC class II mRNA in the chicken oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W M; Nishibori, M; Isobe, N; Yoshimura, Y

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of artificial insemination on the localization of antigen-presenting cells expressing MHC class II mRNA in chicken oviducts. Laying hens (35 weeks old) were inseminated with fresh semen or sham-inseminated with saline daily for 3 days. In situ hybridization was performed to detect chicken MHC class II (B-LB21 major gene) mRNA on frozen sections of oviductal infundibulum, uterovaginal junction and vagina by using digoxigenin-labelled PCR probes. Cells expressing MHC class II were observed mainly in the oviductal mucosal stroma and occasionally in the mucosal epithelium. After 24 h, the population of cells expressing MHC class II in the infundibulum was significantly higher in laying hens inseminated with fresh semen than in the control hens sham-inseminated with saline (P artificially inseminated and control hens. These results indicate that anti-sperm immune responses, including the influx of cells expressing MHC class II and enhanced MHC class II mRNA expression, probably occur in the infundibulum after artificial insemination.

  18. Extracellular acidosis promotes neutrophil transdifferentiation to MHC class II-expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliyev, Boris K; Sumarokov, Alexander B; Buriachkovskaia, Lyudmila I; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation in peripheral tissues is usually associated with local acidosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidification enhances GM-CSF- and IFN-γ-induced expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 in human neutrophils (neutrophil transdifferentiation), and potentiates antigen-capturing capacities (both endocytosis and phagocytosis) of the transdifferentiated cells. Furthermore, in acidic conditions the transdifferentiated neutrophils have stronger antigen-presenting capacity, inducing more intense proliferation of autologous T lymphocytes in the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin A. Thus, extracellular acidosis can represent a factor that promotes neutrophil transdifferentiation and potentiates the functional abilities of the transdifferentiated cells in inflammatory foci in vivo.

  19. Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Class Clustering for Gene Expression Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Pan; Jun Zhu; Danfu Han

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid GA (genetic algorithm)-based clustering (HGACLUS) schema, combining merits of the Simulated Annealing, was described for finding an optimal or near-optimal set of medoids. This schema maximized the clustering success by achieving internal cluster cohesion and external cluster isolation. The performance of HGACLUS and other methods was compared by using simulated data and open microarray gene-expression datasets. HGACLUS was generally found to be more accurate and robust than other methods discussed in this paper by the exact validation strategy and the explicit cluster number.

  20. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  1. Involvement of cholecystokinin in the opioid tolerance induced by dipyrone (metamizol) microinjections into the periaqueductal gray matter of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorici, Victor; Nogueira, Lourdes; Aponte, Yexica; Vanegas, Horacio

    2004-11-01

    The analgesic effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is partly due to an action upon the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), which triggers the descending pain control system and thus inhibits nociceptive transmission. This action of NSAIDs engages endogenous opioids at the PAG, the nucleus raphe magnus and the spinal cord. Repeated administration of NSAIDs such as dipyrone (metamizol) and acetylsalicylate thus induces tolerance to these compounds and cross-tolerance to morphine. Since cholecystokinin plays a key role in opioid tolerance, the present study in rats investigated whether PAG cholecystokinin is also responsible for tolerance to PAG-microinjected dipyrone. Microinjection of cholecystokinin (1 ng/0.5 microl) into PAG blocked the antinociceptive effect of a subsequent microinjection of dipyrone (150 microg/0.5 microl) into the same site, as evaluated by the tail flick and hot plate tests. Microinjection of proglumide (0.4 microg/0.5 microl), a non-selective cholecystokinin antagonist, into PAG prevented the development of tolerance to subsequent microinjections of dipyrone, as well as cross-tolerance to microinjection of morphine (5 microg/0.5 microl) into the same site. In rats tolerant to PAG dipyrone, a PAG microinjection of proglumide restored the antinociceptive effect of a subsequent microinjection of dipyrone or morphine. These results suggest that PAG-microinjected dipyrone triggers and/or potentiates local opioidergic circuits leading to descending inhibition of nociception, on the one hand, and to a local antiopioid action by cholecystokinin, on the other. Reiteration of these events would then result in an enhancement of cholecystokinin's antiopioid action and thus tolerance to opioids and dipyrone in the PAG.

  2. Functional expression of a cattle MHC class II DR-like antigen on mouse L cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, D.C.; Craigmile, S.; Campbell, J.D.M. [Roslin Inst., Midlothian (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Cattle DRA and DRB genes, cloned by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, were transfected into mouse L cells. The cattle DR-expressing L-cell transfectant generated was analyzed serologically, biochemically, and functionally. Sequence analysis of the transfected DRB gene clearly showed showed that it was DRB3 allele DRB3*0101, which corresponds to the 1D-IEF-determined allele DRBF3. 1D-IEF analysis of the tranfectant confirmed that the expressed DR product was DRBF3. Functional integrity of the transfected gene products was demonstrated by the ability of the transfectant cell line to present two antigens (the foot-and-mouth disease virus-derived peptide FMDV15, and ovalbumin) to antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cells from both the original animal used to obtain the genes, and also from an unrelated DRBF3{sup +} heterozygous animal. Such transfectants will be invaluable tools, allowing us to dissect the precise contributions each locus product makes to the overall immune response in heterozygous animals, information essential for rational vaccine design. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Impaired intestinal cholecystokinin secretion, a fascinating but overlooked link between coeliac disease and cholesterol gallstone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Helen H; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaodan; Portincasa, Piero; Wang, David Q-H

    2017-04-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic, small intestinal, immune-mediated enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Clinical studies have found that intestinal cholecystokinin secretion and gallbladder emptying in response to a fatty meal are impaired before coeliac patients start the gluten-free diet (GFD). However, it was never really appreciated whether coeliac disease is associated with gallstones because there were very few studies investigating the mechanism underlying the impact of coeliac disease on the pathogenesis of gallstones. We summarize recent progress on the relationship between coeliac disease and gallstones and propose that coeliac disease is an important risk factor for gallstone formation because defective intestinal cholecystokinin secretion markedly increases susceptibility to cholesterol gallstones via a mechanism involving dysmotility of both the gallbladder and the small intestine. Because GFD can significantly improve the coeliac enteropathy, early diagnosis and therapy in coeliac patients is crucial for preventing the long-term impact of cholecystokinin deficiency on the biliary and intestinal consequences. When gluten is reintroduced, clinical and histologic relapse often occurs in coeliac patients. Moreover, some of the coeliac patients do not respond well to GFD. It is imperative to routinely examine by ultrasonography whether gallbladder motility function is preserved in coeliac patients and monitor whether biliary sludge (a precursor of gallstones) appears in the gallbladder, regardless of whether they are under the GFD programme. To prevent gallstones in coeliac patients, it is urgently needed to investigate the prevalence and pathogenesis of gallstones in these patients. © 2017 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  4. A cDNA Cloning of a Novel Alpha-Class Tyrosinase of Pinctada fucata: Its Expression Analysis and Characterization of the Expressed Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryousuke Takgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase plays an important role in the formation of the shell matrix and melanin synthesis in mollusks shells. A cDNA clone encoding a 47 kDa protein was isolated from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. The cDNA was 1,957 base pairs long and encodes a 417 residue protein that has extensive sequence identity with tyrosinase (polyphenol oxidase: EC 1.14.18.1. This tyrosinase-like protein, termed PfTy, contains an N-terminal signal sequence and the two copper-binding domain signatures (CuA and CuB, suggesting that PfTy belongs to the α-subclass of type-3 copper proteins. Enzyme activity of PfTy was examined by a spectrophotometric method using the translation product derived from an S30 T7 high-yield protein expression system. Tyrosinase activity was seen in this recombinant product. RT-PCR analysis showed that PfTy mRNA was expressed in the mantle pallial, but not in the mantle edge. Therefore, PfTy may participate in insoluble shell matrix formation of the nacreous layer. PfTy expression was also observed in the foot, liver, and adductor muscle, suggesting that PfTy participates in the synthesis of melanins, which are effective scavengers of free radicals formed in multiple intracellular oxidative processes. This is the first report of a novel α-class tyrosinase from the pearl oyster P. fucata.

  5. High-risk human papillomavirus E7 expression reduces cell-surface MHC class I molecules and increases susceptibility to natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottley, G; Watherston, O G; Hiew, Y-L

    2007-01-01

    a role for E7 in tumour immune evasion. We show that knockdown of E7 expression in HPV16- and HPV18-transformed cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference increased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I at the cell surface and reduced susceptibility of these cells to natural...... killer (NK) cells. Tetracycline-regulated induction of HPV16 E7 resulted in reduced expression of cell surface MHC class I molecules and increased NK cell killing. Our results suggest that, for HPV-associated malignancies, reduced MHC class I expression is the result of an active immune evasion strategy......High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major causative agent of cervical cancer and the E6 and E7 genes encode the major HPV oncoproteins. The E7 protein from high-risk HPV types alters cell cycle progression and represses genes encoding components of the antigen-presentation pathway, suggesting...

  6. Synthesis and biological activity of some partially modified retro-inverso analogues of cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M; Galas, M C; Lignon, M F; Mendre, C; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1989-10-01

    Syntheses of some partially modified retro-inverso analogues of the C-terminal octa- or heptapeptide of cholecystokinin are described. These analogues (in which the C-terminal carboxamide was deleted or not) were obtained by reverting one or several peptide bonds in the parent molecule. All these compounds were able to inhibit binding of labeled CCK-8 to rat pancreatic acini and guinea pig brain membranes and to stimulate amylase release from rat pancreatic acini with various potencies. Some of these derivatives reproduce only part of the biological response of CCK on amylase release.

  7. Class III/IV POU transcription factors expressed in small cell lung cancer cells are involved in proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Jun; Sato, Hanako; Yazawa, Takuya; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Hiramatsu, Chie; Nakatani, Yukio; Kamma, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    One-third of lung malignancies demonstrate a proneural/neuroendocrine phenotype or type of differentiation. However, it has not been clearly elucidated how proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation is controlled in lung cancers. We recently demonstrated that the POU3F2 gene plays a significant role in proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation of lung cancers. Because class III POU genes (POU3F1, POU3F2, POU3F3, and POU3F4) and class IV POU genes (POU4F1, POU4F2, and POU4F3) share similar properties in neural development, we analyzed the association between class III/IV POU genes and a proneural/neuroendocrine phenotype in lung cancers using seven small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and twelve non-SCLC (NSCLC) cell lines. Class III/IV POU gene expression was generally restricted to SCLC cells. However, the forced expression of class III/IV POU genes in the NSCLC cell lines induced the expression of neuroendocrine-specific markers (neural call adhesion molecule 1, synaptophysin, and chromogranin A) and proneural transcription factors (achaete-scute homolog-like 1, NeuroD1, and thyroid transcription factor 1) in various degrees. Furthermore, each class III/IV POU gene induced other class III/IV POU genes, suggesting the mutual induction of class III/IV POU genes. These findings suggest that the expression of class III/IV POU genes is important for the proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation of lung cancer cells.

  8. Indirect resistance to several classes of antibiotics in cocultures with resistant bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-01-01

    Indirect resistance (IR), the ability of an antibiotic-resistant population of bacteria to protect a susceptible population, has been previously observed for β-lactamase-producing bacteria and associated with antimicrobial treatment failures. Here, we determined whether other resistance determinants could cause IR in the presence of five other classes of antibiotics. A test was designed to detect IR and 14 antibiotic resistance genes were tested in the presence of 13 antibiotics from six classes. A bioassay was used to measure the ability of resistance-causing enzymes to decrease the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium. We confirmed IR in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics (ampicillin and mecillinam) when TEM-1A was expressed. We found that bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes Ere(A), Tet(X2) or CatA1 caused IR in the presence of macrolides (erythromycin and clarithromycin), tetracyclines (tetracycline and tigecycline) and chloramphenicol, respectively. IR was not observed with resistance determinants that did not modify or destroy antibiotics or with enzymes modifying aminoglycosides or degrading fosfomycin. IR was dependent on the resistance enzymes decreasing the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium, hence allowing nearby susceptible bacteria to resume growth once the antibiotic concentration fell below their MIC. IR was not limited to β-lactamase-producing bacteria, but was also caused by resistant bacteria carrying cytoplasmic antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes that catalyse energy-consuming reactions requiring complex cellular cofactors. Our results suggest that IR is common and further emphasizes that coinfecting agents and the human microflora can have a negative impact during antimicrobial therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Sequence-based genotyping of expressed SLA class I alleles by Next Generation Sequencing reveal novel SLA class I haplotypes and alleles in Belgian, Danish and Kenyan fattening pigs and Göttingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz

    The need for typing of the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) is increasing with the expanded use of pigs as models for human diseases and organ-transplantation experiments, their use in infection studies, and for design of veterinary vaccines. Knowledge of SLA sequences is furthermore a prerequisite...... for the prediction of CTL epitopes based on predicted MHC binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds, emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. Here we obtain SLA class I–typing and –expression based on Illumina Mi......Seq Next Generation Sequencing of barcoded PCR amplicons. Universal primers were designed to generate amplicons spanning exon 2 and exon 3 of the SLA class I genes and predicted to resolve 68% to 88% of all known SLA class I alleles dependent on amplicon size. Based on whole blood mRNA we analyzed the c...

  10. Analytical expression for a class of spherically symmetric solutions in Lorentz-breaking massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Li, Xin-zhou; Xi, Ping

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the spherically symmetric solutions in Lorentz-breaking massive gravity. There is an undetermined function { F }(X,{w}1,{w}2,{w}3) in the action of Stückelberg fields {S}φ ={{{Λ }}}4\\int {{{d}}}4x\\sqrt{-g}{ F }, which should be resolved through physical means. In general relativity, the spherically symmetric solution to the Einstein equation is a benchmark and its massive deformation also plays a crucial role in Lorentz-breaking massive gravity. { F } will satisfy the constraint equation {T}01=0 from the spherically symmetric Einstein tensor {G}01=0, if we maintain that any reasonable physical theory should possess the spherically symmetric solutions. The Stückelberg field {φ }i is taken as a ‘hedgehog’ configuration {φ }i=φ (r){x}i/r, whose stability is guaranteed by the topological one. Under this ansätz, {T}01=0 is reduced to d{ F }=0. The functions { F } for d{ F }=0 form a commutative ring {R}{ F }. We obtain an expression of the solution to the functional differential equation with spherical symmetry if { F }\\in {R}{ F }. If { F }\\in {R}{ F } and \\partial { F }/\\partial X=0, the functions { F } form a subring {S}{ F }\\subset {R}{ F }. We show that the metric is Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-AdS or Schwarzschild-dS if { F }\\in {S}{ F }. When { F }\\in {R}{ F } but { F }\

  11. Regulatory polymorphisms modulate the expression of HLA class II molecules and promote autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prithvi; Rai, Ekta; Song, Ran; Khan, Shaheen; Wakeland, Benjamin E; Viswanathan, Kasthuribai; Arana, Carlos; Liang, Chaoying; Zhang, Bo; Dozmorov, Igor; Carr-Johnson, Ferdicia; Mitrovic, Mitja; Wiley, Graham B; Kelly, Jennifer A; Lauwerys, Bernard R; Olsen, Nancy J; Cotsapas, Chris; Garcia, Christine K; Wise, Carol A; Harley, John B; Nath, Swapan K; James, Judith A; Jacob, Chaim O; Tsao, Betty P; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Karp, David R; Li, Quan Zhen; Gaffney, Patrick M; Wakeland, Edward K

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of sixteen SLE risk loci among 1349 Caucasian cases and controls produced a comprehensive dataset of the variations causing susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Two independent disease association signals in the HLA-D region identified two regulatory regions containing 3562 polymorphisms that modified thirty-seven transcription factor binding sites. These extensive functional variations are a new and potent facet of HLA polymorphism. Variations modifying the consensus binding motifs of IRF4 and CTCF in the XL9 regulatory complex modified the transcription of HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 in a chromosome-specific manner, resulting in a 2.5-fold increase in the surface expression of HLA-DR and DQ molecules on dendritic cells with SLE risk genotypes, which increases to over 4-fold after stimulation. Similar analyses of fifteen other SLE risk loci identified 1206 functional variants tightly linked with disease-associated SNPs and demonstrated that common disease alleles contain multiple causal variants modulating multiple immune system genes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12089.001 PMID:26880555

  12. Aberrant Expression of MHC Class II in Melanoma Attracts Inflammatory Tumor-Specific CD4+ T- Cells, Which Dampen CD8+ T-cell Antitumor Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Andersen, Rikke; Kjeldsen, Julie W

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of a local inflammatory response, expression of MHC class II molecules is restricted mainly to hematopoietic cells and thymus epithelium. However, certain tumors, such as melanoma, may acquire aberrant constitutive expression of MHC class II. In a set of primary melanoma cell popul...... mechanism that can be activated by aberrant expression of MHC class II molecules, which by attracting tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells elicit a local inflammatory response dominated by TNF that, in turn, inhibits cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell responses......In the absence of a local inflammatory response, expression of MHC class II molecules is restricted mainly to hematopoietic cells and thymus epithelium. However, certain tumors, such as melanoma, may acquire aberrant constitutive expression of MHC class II. In a set of primary melanoma cell...... were dominated by TNF production. TNF reduced CD8(+) T-cell activation in IFNγ-rich environments resembling a tumor site. Conversely, direct CD4(+) T-cell responses had no influence on either the proliferation or viability of melanoma cells. Taken together, our results illustrate a novel immune escape...

  13. The soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh, M.; Vrugt, J. A.; Gupta, H. V.; Xu, C.

    2016-04-01

    The flow duration curve is a signature catchment characteristic that depicts graphically the relationship between the exceedance probability of streamflow and its magnitude. This curve is relatively easy to create and interpret, and is used widely for hydrologic analysis, water quality management, and the design of hydroelectric power plants (among others). Several mathematical expressions have been proposed to mimic the FDC. Yet, these efforts have not been particularly successful, in large part because available functions are not flexible enough to portray accurately the functional shape of the FDC for a large range of catchments and contrasting hydrologic behaviors. Here, we extend the work of Vrugt and Sadegh (2013) and introduce several commonly used models of the soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve. These soil water retention functions are relatively simple to use, contain between two to three parameters, and mimic closely the empirical FDCs of 430 catchments of the MOPEX data set. We then relate the calibrated parameter values of these models to physical and climatological characteristics of the watershed using multivariate linear regression analysis, and evaluate the regionalization potential of our proposed models against those of the literature. If quality of fit is of main importance then the 3-parameter van Genuchten model is preferred, whereas the 2-parameter lognormal, 3-parameter GEV and generalized Pareto models show greater promise for regionalization.

  14. Effect of cholecystokinin on learning and memory, neuronal proliferation and apoptosis in the rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi, Parham; Ghaedamini, Ali Reza; Golbidi, Mohammad; Shabrang, Moloud; Arabpoor, Zohreh; Rashidi, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cholecystokinin (CCK) has roles in learning and memory, but the cellular mechanism is poorly understood. This study investigated the effect of CCK on spatial learning and memory, neuronal proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampus in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups were control and CCK. The rats received CKK octapeptide sulfated (CCK-8S, 1.6 μg/kg, i.p.) for 14 days. Spatial learning and memory were tested by Morris water maze and finally immunohistochemical study was performed; neurogenesis by Ki-67 method and apoptosis by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) assay in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Results: Cholecystokinin increased Ki-67 positive cells and reduced TUNEL positive cells in the granular layer of hippocampal DG. CCK failed to have a significant effect on spatial learning and memory. Conclusion: Results indicate neuroprotective and proliferative effects of CCK in the hippocampus; however, other factors are probably involved until the newly born neurons achieve necessary integrity for behavioral changes. PMID:26623402

  15. Activation of ERα signaling differentially modulates IFN-γ induced HLA-class II expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Mostafa

    Full Text Available The coordinate regulation of HLA class II (HLA-II is controlled by the class II transactivator, CIITA, and is crucial for the development of anti-tumor immunity. HLA-II in breast carcinoma is associated with increased IFN-γ levels, reduced expression of the estrogen receptor (ER and reduced age at diagnosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that estradiol (E₂ and ERα signaling contribute to the regulation of IFN-γ inducible HLA-II in breast cancer cells. Using a panel of established ER⁻ and ER⁺ breast cancer cell lines, we showed that E₂ attenuated HLA-DR in two ER⁺ lines (MCF-7 and BT-474, but not in T47D, while it augmented expression in ER⁻ lines, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231. To further study the mechanism(s, we used paired transfectants: ERα⁺ MC2 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the wild type ERα gene and ERα⁻ VC5 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the empty vector, treated or not with E₂ and IFN-γ. HLA-II and CIITA were severely reduced in MC2 compared to VC5 and were further exacerbated by E₂ treatment. Reduced expression occurred at the level of the IFN-γ inducible CIITA promoter IV. The anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 and gene silencing with ESR1 siRNA reversed the E2 inhibitory effects, signifying an antagonistic role for activated ERα on CIITA pIV activity. Moreover, STAT1 signaling, necessary for CIITA pIV activation, and selected STAT1 regulated genes were variably downregulated by E₂ in transfected and endogenous ERα positive breast cancer cells, whereas STAT1 signaling was noticeably augmented in ERα⁻ breast cancer cells. Collectively, these results imply immune escape mechanisms in ERα⁺ breast cancer may be facilitated through an ERα suppressive mechanism on IFN-γ signaling.

  16. Effect of cholecystokinin-8 on in vitro cultured rat cortical neurons against apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Liu; Jiangbao Zhou

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholecystokinin (CCK-8) can regulate the synthesis of NO, release of amino acid substance and suppress Ca2+ inflow. It is unknown about neuroprotection of CCK-8 on neuronal apoptosis and its relationship with nerve growth factor (NGF).OBJECTryE: To investigate the protective effect of CCK-8 on in vitro cultured rat cortical neurons against apoptosis induced by glutamate, and explore its effect on expression of NGF in the neurons during apoptosis.DESIGN: Randomized controlled experiment on the basis of cells.SETTING: Children's Research Institute Affiliated to Children Hospital of Chongqing Medical University.MATERIALS: Eighty SD rats of 1-day old; DMEM/F12 culture medium (Biochrom Company, Germany);Fetal bovine serum (TBD Company, Tianjin); CCK-8 (Sigma Company, USA). Glutamate (Bioengineering Company, Shanghai); TUNEL kit and NGF- in situ hybridization kit (Boster Bioengineering Company,Wuhan); anti-NGF polyclonal antibody (Santa-Cluz Company); NGF immunocytochemistry kit (Zhongshan Company, Beijing).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in Children's Research Institute Affiliated to Children Hospital of Chongqing Medical University from December 2004 to September 2005. Primary cultured cortical neurons from SD rats of 1-day oldwere incubated for 7 days. The cultured cells were divided randomly into 3 groups:experimental group, model group and control group. Neurons in experimental groups were added CCK-8 of 1 ×10-6, 1 ×10-7, 1 ×10-8 μ mol/L respectively, and then added 50 μmol/L glutamate solution a hour later. Neurons in model groups were treated with 50 μ mol/L glutamate solution. In the control group, cells were treated with normal medium. Apoptosis of cultured cortical neurons were observed by fluorescent microscope, the expression of NGF protein and mRNA were determined respectively by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, and apoptosis of cortical neurons was detected with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick

  17. Differential surface density and modulatory effects of presynaptic GABAB receptors in hippocampal cholecystokinin and parvalbumin basket cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Sam A; Althof, Daniel; Degro, Claudius E; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kulik, Ákos; Vida, Imre

    2017-05-02

    The perisomatic domain of cortical neurons is under the control of two major GABAergic inhibitory interneuron types: regular-spiking cholecystokinin (CCK) basket cells (BCs) and fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) BCs. CCK and PV BCs are different not only in their intrinsic physiological, anatomical and molecular characteristics, but also in their presynaptic modulation of their synaptic output. Most GABAergic terminals are known to contain GABAB receptors (GABABR), but their role in presynaptic inhibition and surface expression have not been comparatively characterized in the two BC types. To address this, we performed whole-cell recordings from CCK and PV BCs and postsynaptic pyramidal cells (PCs), as well as freeze-fracture replica-based quantitative immunogold electron microscopy of their synapses in the rat hippocampal CA1 area. Our results demonstrate that while both CCK and PV BCs contain functional presynaptic GABABRs, their modulatory effects and relative abundance are markedly different at these two synapses: GABA release is dramatically inhibited by the agonist baclofen at CCK BC synapses, whereas a moderate reduction in inhibitory transmission is observed at PV BC synapses. Furthermore, GABABR activation has divergent effects on synaptic dynamics: paired-pulse depression (PPD) is enhanced at CCK BC synapses, but abolished at PV BC synapses. Consistent with the quantitative differences in presynaptic inhibition, virtually all CCK BC terminals were found to contain GABABRs at high densities, but only 40% of PV BC axon terminals contain GABABRs at detectable levels. These findings add to an increasing list of differences between these two interneuron types, with implications for their network functions.

  18. Vagal afferent-dependent cholecystokinin modulation of visceral pain requires central amygdala NMDA-NR2B receptors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E M; Li, W T; Yan, X J; Chen, X; Liu, Q; Feng, C C; Cao, Z J; Fang, J Y; Chen, S L

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a gut hormone that is released during feeding, exerts gastrointestinal effects in part through vagal pathway. It is reported to be a potential trigger for increased postprandial visceral sensitivity in healthy subjects and, especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. NR2B-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the central amygdala (CeA) participate in pain modulation. Systemically administered CCK activates the CeA-innervating neurons. Here, we investigated whether CCK modulation of visceral sensitivity is mediated through CeA NMDA-NR2B receptors and whether this modulation involves vagal pathway. We first examined the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention (CRD) following i.p. injection of CCK octapeptide (CCK-8) in a rat model. Next, the NR2B antagonist ifenprodil and the NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 were microinjected into the CeA before systemic CCK injection. NR2B phosphorylation was detected by Western blot. To down-regulate NR2B gene expression, NR2B-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into CeA neurons by electroporation. In addition, the effects of functional deafferentation by perivagal application of capsaicin and pretreatment with the CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide were investigated. CCK-8 increased VMR to CRD in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was blunted by intra-CeA administration of ifenprodil (but not NVP-AAM077) and was accompanied by phosphorylation of NR2B subunits in the CeA. CCK failed to increase VMR to CRD in NR2B siRNA-treated rats. Perivagal capsaicin application and pretreatment with devazepide prevented CCK-induced pronociception and CeA NR2B phosphorylation. The pronociception induced by systemic CCK, which is vagal afferent-dependent, requires activation of CeA NMDA-NR2B receptors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycellane Alline do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30-60% following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated.

  20. Largazole, a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Salahuddin, E-mail: Salah.Ahmed@utoledo.edu [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Toledo, OH (United States); Riegsecker, Sharayah; Beamer, Maria; Rahman, Ayesha; Bellini, Joseph V. [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Toledo, OH (United States); Bhansali, Pravin; Tillekeratne, L.M. Viranga [Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect of largazole (LAR), a marine-derived class I HDAC inhibitor, on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. LAR (1–5 μM) had no adverse effect on the viability of RA synovial fibroblasts. Among the different class I HDACs screened, LAR (0.5–5 μM) inhibited the constitutive expression of HDAC1 (0–30%). Surprisingly, LAR increased class II HDAC [HDAC6] by ∼ 220% with a concomitant decrease in HDAC5 [30–58%] expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. SAHA (5 μM), a pan-HDAC inhibitor, also induced HDAC6 expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. Pretreatment of RA synovial fibroblasts with LAR further enhanced TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. However, LAR inhibited TNF-α-induced MMP-2 activity in RA synovial fibroblasts by 35% when compared to the TNF-α-treated group. Further, the addition of HDAC6 specific inhibitor Tubastatin A with LAR suppressed TNF-α + LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and completely blocked MMP-2 activity, suggesting a role of HDAC6 in LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. LAR also enhanced TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-AKT expression, but inhibited the expression of phospho-JNK and nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65 in RA synovial fibroblasts. These results suggest that LAR activates p38 and Akt pathways and influences class II HDACs, in particular HDAC6, to enhance some of the detrimental effects of TNF-α in RA synovial fibroblasts. Understanding the exact role of different HDAC isoenzymes in RA pathogenesis is extremely important in order to develop highly effective HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of RA. - Highlights: • Largazole enhances TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. • Largazole upregulates class II HDAC (HDAC6) in RA synovial fibroblasts. • Largazole also induces the expression of phospho-p38

  1. How do CD4+ T cells detect and eliminate tumor cells that either lack or express MHC class II molecules?

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    Ole Audun Werner Haabeth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor specific antigen by host antigen presenting cells (APCs appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315, where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-g stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed.

  2. Application of high-resolution, massively parallel pyrosequencing for estimation of haplotypes and gene expression levels of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yuki F; Ando, Asako; Tanaka, Keiko; Suzuki, Shingo; Ozaki, Yuki; Uenishi, Hirohide; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Shiina, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    The swine is an important animal model for allo- and xeno-transplantation donor studies, which necessitates an extensive characterization of the expression and sequence variations within the highly polygenic and polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) region. Massively parallel pyrosequencing is potentially an effective new 2ndGen method for simultaneous high-throughput genotyping and detection of SLA class I gene expression levels. In this study, we compared the 2ndGen method using the Roche Genome Sequencer 454 FLX with the conventional method using sub-cloning and Sanger sequencing to genotype SLA class I genes in five pigs of the Clawn breed and four pigs of the Landrace breed. We obtained an average of 10.4 SLA class I sequences per pig by the 2ndGen method, consistent with the inheritance data, and an average of only 6.0 sequences by the conventional method. We also performed a correlation analysis between the sequence read numbers obtained by the 2ndGen method and the relative expression values obtained by quantitative real-time PCR analysis at the allele level. A significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.899, P SLA class I genes SLA-1, SLA-2, and SLA-3, suggesting that the sequence read numbers closely reflect the gene expression levels in white blood cells. Overall, five novel class I sequences, different haplotype-specific expression patterns and a splice variant for one of the SLA class I genes were identified by the 2ndGen method at greater efficiency and sensitivity than the conventional method.

  3. Sinorhizobium meliloti-induced chitinase gene expression in Medicago truncatula ecotype R108-1: a comparison between symbiosis-specific class V and defence-related class IV chitinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Peter; Feddermann, Nadja; Wiemken, Andres; Boller, Thomas; Staehelin, Christian

    2004-08-01

    The Medicago truncatula (Gaertn.) ecotypes Jemalong A17 and R108-1 differ in Sinorhizobium meliloti-induced chitinase gene expression. The pathogen-inducible class IV chitinase gene, Mtchit 4, was strongly induced during nodule formation of the ecotype Jemalong A17 with the S. meliloti wild-type strain 1021. In the ecotype R108-1, the S. meliloti wild types Sm1021 and Sm41 did not induce Mtchit 4 expression. On the other hand, expression of the putative class V chitinase gene, Mtchit 5, was found in roots of M. truncatula cv. R108-1 nodulated with either of the rhizobial strains. Mtchit 5 expression was specific for interactions with rhizobia. It was not induced in response to fungal pathogen attack, and not induced in roots colonized with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Elevated Mtchit 5 gene expression was first detectable in roots forming nodule primordia. In contrast to Mtchit 4, expression of Mtchit 5 was stimulated by purified Nod factors. Conversely, Mtchit 4 expression was strongly elevated in nodules formed with the K-antigen-deficient mutant PP699. Expression levels of Mtchit 5 were similarly increased in nodules formed with PP699 and its parental wild-type strain Sm41. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of Mtchit 5 (calculated molecular weight = 41,810 Da, isoelectric point pH 7.7) and Mtchit 4 (calculated molecular weight 30,527 Da, isoelectric point pH 4.9) revealed that the putative Mtchit 5 chitinase forms a separate clade within class V chitinases of plants, whereas the Mtchit 4 chitinase clusters with pathogen-induced class IV chitinases from other plants. These findings demonstrate that: (i) Rhizobium-induced chitinase gene expression in M. truncatula occurs in a plant ecotype-specific manner, (ii) Mtchit 5 is a putative chitinase gene that is specifically induced by rhizobia, and (iii) rhizobia-specific and defence-related chitinase genes are differentially influenced by rhizobial Nod factors and K antigens.

  4. Learning OWL class expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, J

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of the Semantic Web and Semantic Technologies, ontologies have become one of the most prominent paradigms for knowledge representation and reasoning. However, recent progress in the field faces a lack of well structured ontologies with large amounts of instance data due to the fact that engineering such ontologies requires a considerable investment of resources. Nowadays, knowledge bases often provide large volumes of data without sophisticated schemata. Hence, methods for automated schema acquisition and maintenance are sought. Schema acquisition is closely related to solving

  5. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) class I allele typing of Danish swine herds and the identification of commonly expressed haplotypes using sequence specific low- and high resolution primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Jungersen, Gregers

    The genomic region (SLA) of the swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which bind and present endogenous peptides to circulating T cells of the immune system, is extremely polymorphic comprising high numbers of different alleles, many of which encode a distinct MHC class I molecule. Each SLA...... individual. Therefore analyses of the prevalence of SLA alleles in a population are fundamental to employ pathogen-specific subunits or peptides in novel vaccines or immune diagnostics. In this study we present the use of low- and high-resolution PCR-based typing methods to identify individual and commonly...... expressed SLA class I alleles in Danish outbred swine. A total of 108 animals from eight different production herds were tested, and with low resolution sequence specific primer (SSP)-PCR typing the top five most commonly expressed SLA class I allele groups were found to be SLA-3*04XX, SLA-1*08XX, SLA-1...

  6. Female mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors have compromised neurogenesis, and fewer dopaminergic cells in the olfactory bulb

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    Yi eSui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult rodent brain is largely restricted to the subependymal zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle and subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG. We examined whether cholecystokinin (CCK through actions mediated by CCK1 receptors (CCK1R is involved in regulating neurogenesis. Proliferating cells in the SVZ, measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU injected 2 hours prior to death or by immunoreactivity against Ki67, were reduced by 37% and 42%, respectively, in female (but not male mice lacking CCK1Rs (CCK1R-/- compared to wild-type (WT. Generation of neuroblasts in the SVZ and rostral migratory stream was also affected, since the number of doublecortin (DCX-immunoreactive (ir neuroblasts in these regions decreased by 29%. In the SGZ of female CCK1R-/- mice, BrdU-positive (+ and Ki67-ir cells were reduced by 38% and 56%, respectively, while DCX-ir neuroblasts were down 80%. Subsequently, the effect of reduced SVZ/SGZ proliferation on the generation and survival of mature adult-born cells in female CCK1R-/- mice was examined. In the OB granule cell layer (GCL, the number of neuronal nuclei (NeuN-ir and calretinin-ir cells was stable compared to WT, and 42 days after BrdU injections, the number of BrdU+ cells co-expressing GABA- or NeuN-like immunoreactivity (LI was similar. Compared to WT, the granule cell layer of the DG in female CCK1R-/- mice had a similar number of calbindin-ir cells and BrdU+ cells co-expressing calbindin-LI 42 days after BrdU injections. However, the OB glomerular layer (GL of CCK1R-/- female mice had 11% fewer NeuN-ir cells, 23% less TH-ir cells, and a 38% and 29% reduction in BrdU+ cells that co-expressed TH-LI or GABA-LI, respectively. We conclude that CCK, via CCK1Rs, is involved in regulating the generation of proliferating cells and neuroblasts in the adult female mouse brain, and mechanisms are in place to maintain steady neuronal populations in the OB and DG when the rate of proliferation is

  7. Synthesis and biological activity of 2-phenylethyl ester analogues of C-terminal heptapeptide of cholecystokinin modified in Trp 30 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, M; Rodriguez, M; Lignon, M F; Galas, M C; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1991-08-01

    We have tried to evaluate the significance of the tryptophan side chain residue and of the surrounding peptide bonds in the antagonist activity of cholecystokinin analogues lacking the C-terminal amide function and having a D-tryptophan. In order to perform this study, analogues of the C-terminal heptapeptide of cholecystokinin were synthesized by replacing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue with 2-phenylethyl alcohol and by either replacing the tryptophan residue with an alanine, a norleucine and a phenylalanine residue, or introducing a "reduced peptide bond" in the tryptophan 30 region. Most of these compounds were able to reproduce only part of the response of cholecystokinin in stimulating amylase release from rat pancreatic acini, as was already observed for 2-phenylethyl ester analogues of CCK. These results point out the key role of tryptophan 30 in the biological response of cholecystokinin.

  8. An intron 1 polymorphism in the cholecystokinin-A receptor gene associated with schizophrenia in males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify whether a genetic variation (rs1800857; IVS1-5T>C) in the neuropeptide cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCKAR) gene is a risk factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. METhod: The variation was analysed in a case-control design comprising 508 patients with schizophrenia...... risk allele was associated with an increased risk of 1.74 (Odds Ratio, OR) and homozygosity (CC) was associated with an OR of 3.19. The variation had no impact on protein synthesis of CCKAR. CONCLUSION: This is the first report associating the CCKAR gene variant with schizophrenia specifically in men...... and 1619 control subjects. A possible functional impact of this variant on CCKAR protein synthesis through alterations in splicing was analysed in an exon-trapping assay. RESULTS: In males only, the risk variant, IVS1-5C, was associated with a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia. Carrying one...

  9. Effects of whisky on plasma gastrin and cholecystokinin in young adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, T; Sawai, H; Okada, Y; Funahashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Sato, M; Hayakawa, T; Yamaki, K

    2003-01-01

    Whisky (1 g/kg, 21.5% alcohol) was administered orally to healthy young adult male volunteers, and changes in the plasma concentrations of alcohol, acetaldehyde, gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and serum amylase were measured over time. Values for alcohol and acetaldehyde rapidly reached a peak at 30-45 min after alcohol intake, followed by a gradual decline. The plasma gastrin concentration showed a rapid elevation, while the plasma CCK concentration did not exhibit any significant changes in the early phase after alcohol intake. Elevation of CCK was observed after 75 min, however. These results show that intake of whisky stimulates the secretion of gastrin and is associated with a later increase in CCK.

  10. Adipocytes promote prostate cancer stem cell self-renewal through amplification of the cholecystokinin autocrine loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kai-Dun; Liu, Ji; Jovanovic, Lidija; An, Jiyuan; Hill, Michelle M; Vela, Ian; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Ma, Stephanie; Nelson, Colleen; Russell, Pamela J; Clements, Judith A; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2016-01-26

    Obesity has long been linked with prostate cancer progression, although the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown. Here, we report that adipocytes promote the enrichment of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) through a vicious cycle of autocrine amplification. In the presence of adipocytes, prostate cancer cells actively secrete the peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), which not only stimulates prostate CSC self-renewal, but also induces cathepsin B (CTSB) production of the adipocytes. In return, CTSB facilitates further CCK secretion by the cancer cells. More importantly, inactivation of CCK receptor not only suppresses CTSB secretion by the adipocytes, but also synergizes the inhibitory effect of CTSB inhibitor on adipocyte-promoted prostate CSC self-renewal. In summary, we have uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the mutual interplay between adipocytes and prostate CSCs, which may help explaining the role of adipocytes in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for effective intervention.

  11. Homolateral cerebrocortical changes in neuropeptide and receptor expression after minimal cortical infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bree, L; Zhang, F; Schiffmann, S N; Halleux, P; Mailleux, P; Vanderhaeghen, J J

    1995-12-01

    A cortical infarct of 2 mm diameter was obtained in the parietal cortex after a craniotomy, disruption of the dura mater and topical application of 3 M KCl. It has been shown previously that the presence of a small cortical infarct induces an increase in immediate early gene messenger RNA expression followed by an increase in neuropeptide and glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA expression. Glutamate, acting at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, is held responsible for these changes, since they are blocked by pretreatment with dizocilpine. In the present study, we have analysed the consequences of the dramatic changes in messenger RNA expression on the level of immediate early gene products c-fos and zif 268, and on that of neuropeptides by using immunohistochemistry. After just 1 h, an increase in c-fos- and zif 268-like immunoreactivity is observed in the entire cortical hemisphere homolateral to the infarct, and is no longer detected after 6 h. An increase in cholecystokinin octapeptide-, substance P-, neuropeptide Y- and somatostatin-like immunoreactivity is observed in the entire cortical hemisphere homolateral to the infarct after three days, and is no longer detected after 30 days. To investigate if these dramatic increases in neuropeptide immunoreactivities may have functional consequences, we studied the level of cholecystokinin receptors by autoradiographic binding using [125I]cholecystokinin-8S and in situ hybridization for the detection of cholecystokinin-b receptor messenger RNA. A decrease in cholecystokinin binding sites and cholecystokinin-b receptor messenger RNA is observed in the entire cortical hemisphere homolateral to the infarct after three days, and is no longer detected after nine days. This study shows that a topical stimulation has diffuse effects, reaching regions far from the site of the lesion, and some of them are still strongly present after nine days. The increase in neuropeptide messenger RNAs is followed by an increase in the

  12. Analysis of gene expression data from non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines reveals distinct sub-classes from those identified at the phenotype level.

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    Andrew R Dalby

    Full Text Available Microarray data from cell lines of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC can be used to look for differences in gene expression between the cell lines derived from different tumour samples, and to investigate if these differences can be used to cluster the cell lines into distinct groups. Dividing the cell lines into classes can help to improve diagnosis and the development of screens for new drug candidates. The micro-array data is first subjected to quality control analysis and then subsequently normalised using three alternate methods to reduce the chances of differences being artefacts resulting from the normalisation process. The final clustering into sub-classes was carried out in a conservative manner such that sub-classes were consistent across all three normalisation methods. If there is structure in the cell line population it was expected that this would agree with histological classifications, but this was not found to be the case. To check the biological consistency of the sub-classes the set of most strongly differentially expressed genes was be identified for each pair of clusters to check if the genes that most strongly define sub-classes have biological functions consistent with NSCLC.

  13. Molecular cloning and tissue distribution of cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK-1R) in yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata and its response to feeding and in vitro CCK treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Takahiro; Masumoto, Toshiro; Fukada, Haruhisa

    2013-06-01

    In vertebrates, the peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the most important neuroregulatory digestive hormones. CCK acts via CCK receptors that are classified into two subtypes, CCK-1 receptor (CCK-1R; formally CCK-A) and CCK-2 receptor (formally CCK-B). In particular, the CCK-1R is involved in digestion and is regulated by CCK. However, very little information is known about CCK-1R in fish. Therefore, we performed molecular cloning of CCK-1R cDNA from the digestive tract of yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed a high sequence identity between the cloned yellowtail CCK receptor cDNA and CCK-1R, which belongs to the CCK-1R cluster. Furthermore, the expression of yellowtail CCK receptor mRNA was observed in gallbladder, pyloric caeca, and intestines, similarly to CCK-1R mRNA expression in mammals, suggesting that the cloned cDNA is of CCK-1R from yellowtail. In in vivo experiments, the CCK-1R mRNA levels increased in the gallbladder and pyloric caeca after feeding, whereas in vitro, mRNA levels of CCK-1R and digestive enzymes in cultured pyloric caeca increased by the addition of CCK. These results suggest that CCK-1R plays an important role in digestion stimulated by CCK in yellowtail.

  14. Francisella tularensis elicits IL-10 via a PGE₂-inducible factor, to drive macrophage MARCH1 expression and class II down-regulation.

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    Danielle Hunt

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a bacterial pathogen that uses host-derived PGE₂ to subvert the host's adaptive immune responses in multiple ways. Francisella-induced PGE₂ acts directly on CD4 T cells to blunt production of IFN-γ. Francisella-induced PGE₂ can also elicit production of a >10 kDa soluble host factor termed FTMØSN (F. tularensismacrophage supernatant, which acts on IFN-γ pre-activated MØ to down-regulate MHC class II expression via a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism, blocking antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. Here, we report that FTMØSN-induced down-regulation of MØ class II is the result of the induction of MARCH1, and that MØ expressing MARCH1 "resistant" class II molecules are resistant to FTMØSN-induced class II down-regulation. Since PGE₂ can induce IL-10 production and IL-10 is the only reported cytokine able to induce MARCH1 expression in monocytes and dendritic cells, these findings suggested that IL-10 is the active factor in FTMØSN. However, use of IL-10 knockout MØ established that IL-10 is not the active factor in FTMØSN, but rather that Francisella-elicited PGE₂ drives production of a >10 kDa host factor distinct from IL-10. This factor then drives MØ IL-10 production to induce MARCH1 expression and the resultant class II down-regulation. Since many human pathogens such as Salmonella typhi, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Legionella pneumophila also induce production of host PGE₂, these results suggest that a yet-to-be-identified PGE₂-inducible host factor capable of inducing IL-10 is central to the immune evasion mechanisms of multiple important human pathogens.

  15. A multi-class predictor based on a probabilistic model: application to gene expression profiling-based diagnosis of thyroid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Shinzaburo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although microscopic diagnosis has been playing the decisive role in cancer diagnostics, there have been cases in which it does not satisfy the clinical need. Differential diagnosis of malignant and benign thyroid tissues is one such case, and supplementary diagnosis such as that by gene expression profile is expected. Results With four thyroid tissue types, i.e., papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, follicular adenoma, and normal thyroid, we performed gene expression profiling with adaptor-tagged competitive PCR, a high-throughput RT-PCR technique. For differential diagnosis, we applied a novel multi-class predictor, introducing probabilistic outputs. Multi-class predictors were constructed using various combinations of binary classifiers. The learning set included 119 samples, and the predictors were evaluated by strict leave-one-out cross validation. Trials included classical combinations, i.e., one-to-one, one-to-the-rest, but the predictor using more combination exhibited the better prediction accuracy. This characteristic was consistent with other gene expression data sets. The performance of the selected predictor was then tested with an independent set consisting of 49 samples. The resulting test prediction accuracy was 85.7%. Conclusion Molecular diagnosis of thyroid tissues is feasible by gene expression profiling, and the current level is promising towards the automatic diagnostic tool to complement the present medical procedures. A multi-class predictor with an exhaustive combination of binary classifiers could achieve a higher prediction accuracy than those with classical combinations and other predictors such as multi-class SVM. The probabilistic outputs of the predictor offer more detailed information for each sample, which enables visualization of each sample in low-dimensional classification spaces. These new concepts should help to improve the multi-class classification including that of cancer tissues.

  16. Roles of interleukin-9 in the growth and cholecystokinin-induced intracellular calcium signaling of cultured interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoyao Gong

    Full Text Available Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC are pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal (GI tract and loss of ICC is associated with many GI motility disorders. Previous studies have shown that ICC have the capacity to regenerate or restore, and several growth factors are critical to their growth, maintenance or regeneration. The present study aimed to investigate the roles of interleukin-9 (IL-9 in the growth, maintenance and pacemaker functions of cultured ICC. Here, we report that IL-9 promotes proliferation of ICC, and culturing ICC with IL-9 enhances cholecystokinin-8-induced Ca²⁺ transients, which is probably caused by facilitating maintenance of ICC functions under culture condition. We also show co-localizations of cholecystokinin-1 receptor and IL-9 receptor with c-kit by double-immunohistochemical labeling. In conclusion, IL-9 can promote ICC growth and help maintain ICC functions; IL-9 probably performs its functions via IL-9 receptors on ICC.

  17. Roles of interleukin-9 in the growth and cholecystokinin-induced intracellular calcium signaling of cultured interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yaoyao; Huang, Lei; Cheng, Wenfang; Li, Xueliang; Lu, Jia; Lin, Lin; Si, Xinmin

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and loss of ICC is associated with many GI motility disorders. Previous studies have shown that ICC have the capacity to regenerate or restore, and several growth factors are critical to their growth, maintenance or regeneration. The present study aimed to investigate the roles of interleukin-9 (IL-9) in the growth, maintenance and pacemaker functions of cultured ICC. Here, we report that IL-9 promotes proliferation of ICC, and culturing ICC with IL-9 enhances cholecystokinin-8-induced Ca²⁺ transients, which is probably caused by facilitating maintenance of ICC functions under culture condition. We also show co-localizations of cholecystokinin-1 receptor and IL-9 receptor with c-kit by double-immunohistochemical labeling. In conclusion, IL-9 can promote ICC growth and help maintain ICC functions; IL-9 probably performs its functions via IL-9 receptors on ICC.

  18. High class I HDAC activity and expression are associated with RelA/p65 activation in pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strong association between aberrant HDAC activity and the occurrence of cancer has led to the development of a variety of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs, which emerge as promising new targeted anticancer therapeutics. Methods Due to the pivotal role of RelA/p65 in the tumorigenesis of pancreatic neoplasia we examined the expression of class I HDACs 1, 2 and 3 in a large cohort of human pancreatic carcinomas and correlated our findings with RelA/p65 expression status. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of the HDIs SAHA and VPA on RelA/p65 activity in pancreatic cancer cell culture models. Results Class I HDACs were strongly expressed in a subset of pancreatic adenocarcinomas and high expression was significantly correlated with increased nuclear translocation of RelA/p65 (p = 0.024. The link of HDAC activity and RelA/p65 in this tumor entity was confirmed in vitro, where RelA/p65 nuclear translocation as well as RelA/p65 DNA binding activity could be markedly diminished by HDI treatment. Conclusion The RelA/p65 inhibitory effects of SAHA and VPA in vitro and the close relationship of class I HDACs and RelA/p65 in vivo suggest that treatment with HDIs could serve as a promising approach to suppress NF-κB activity which in turn may lead to enhanced apoptosis and chemosensitization of pancreatic cancers.

  19. Renal cell carcinoma-infiltrating natural killer cells express differential repertoires of activating and inhibitory receptors and are inhibited by specific HLA class I allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleypen, Julia S; Von Geldern, Marion; Weiss, Elisabeth H; Kotzias, Nicole; Rohrmann, Karl; Schendel, Dolores J; Falk, Christine S; Pohla, Heike

    2003-10-10

    Among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) directly isolated from renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), we found substantial numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in most tumor tissues. They could be identified reliably in situ with an antibody directed against the activating receptor (AR) NKp46 that is exclusively expressed by all NK cells. NK-enriched TILs (NK-TILs) showed cytotoxicity against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-negative cell lines. The ability to detect lysis of target cells was dependent on the percentage of NK cells within the TILs, and cytotoxicity was only observed after overnight activation with low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). Infiltrating NK cells were found to express various inhibitory receptors (IRs); among these the CD94/NKG2A receptor complex was overrepresented compared to the autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) population. Other IRs were underrepresented, indicating that NK subpopulations vary in their tumor-infiltrating capacity. IRs expressed by NK-TILs are functional since receptor engagement with MHC class I ligands presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-transfected target cell lines was able to inhibit NK-mediated cytotoxicity. NK-TILs were also able to lyse autologous or allogeneic tumor cell lines in vitro. This activity correlated with low HLA class I surface expression since lysis could be inhibited by interferon (IFN)-gamma-expressing RCC transductants that displayed a higher surface density of HLA class I molecules. Therefore, NK cells infiltrating tumor tissues have an inherent ability to recognize transformed cells, but they require cytokine activation and are sensitive to inhibition by IR ligands.

  20. pbp2229-mediated nisin resistance mechanism in Listeria monocytogenes confers cross-protection to class IIa bacteriocins and affects virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Anne; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Holmstrøm, Kim; Høiby, Poul Erik; Ramnath, Manilduth; Knøchel, Susanne

    2004-03-01

    It was previously shown that enhanced nisin resistance in some mutants was associated with increased expression of three genes, pbp2229, hpk1021, and lmo2487, encoding a penicillin-binding protein, a histidine kinase, and a protein of unknown function, respectively. In the present work, we determined the direct role of the three genes in nisin resistance. Interruption of pbp2229 and hpk1021 eliminated the nisin resistance phenotype. Interruption of hpk1021 additionally abolished the increase in pbp2229 expression. The results indicate that this nisin resistance mechanism is caused directly by the increase in pbp2229 expression, which in turn is brought about by the increase in hpk1021 expression. We also found a degree of cross-protection between nisin and class IIa bacteriocins and investigated possible mechanisms. The expression of virulence genes in one nisin-resistant mutant and two class IIa bacteriocin-resistant mutants of the same wild-type strain was analyzed, and each mutant consistently showed either an increase or a decrease in the expression of virulence genes (prfA-regulated as well as prfA-independent genes). Although the changes mostly were moderate, the consistency indicates that a mutant-specific change in virulence may occur concomitantly with bacteriocin resistance development.

  1. Cholecystokinin like immunoreactivity in the brains of young Meishan and Duroc pigs(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmquist, J K; Ross, L R; Hsu, W; Rothschild, M F; Jacobson, C D

    1993-01-12

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide found in both the gastrointestinal tract and brain, has been shown to be involved in the control of feed intake in a variety of animals including the pig. Chinese breeds of pigs such as the Meishan are noted for slow growth and heavy adipose deposition. In this study we have described the regional cholecystokinin-like immunoreactivity (CCK-IR) concentrations in the brain of young Duroc and Meishan pigs utilizing radioimmunoassay. Brains of days 1, 10, and 20 postnatal pigs from each breed were examined. The CCK-IR increased with age in all three areas examined (cortex, medulla, and hypothalamus). The cortical concentrations rose significantly from days 1 to 10 and from days 10 to 20. The levels in the hypothalamus and medulla increased significantly between days 1 and 20. There were no statistically significant differences in CCK-IR between the breeds at any of the three ages examined. Our results indicate that a rise in CCK-IR in the regions of the brain involved in the control of feed intake may parallel the ability of the young pigs to assimilate nutrients from a solid diet. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Cholecystokinin-ähnliche Immunreaktivität in den Gehirnen junger Meishan- und Durocschweine Das Peptid Cholecystokinin (CCK) wird im Gastrointestinaltrakt und im Gehirn gefunden und beeinflußt Futteraufnahme in einer Reihe von Tieren einschließlich Schwein. Chinesische Rassen wie Meishan sind wegen ihres langsamen Wachstums und der starken Fettablagerung bekannt. In dieser Studie beschreiben wir regionale Cholecystokinin-ähnliche Immunreaktivitäts-(CCK-IR)Konzentrationen im Gehirn junger Duroc- und Meishantiere, mittels Radioimmunassay bestimmt. Gehirne von 1, 10 und 20 Tage alten Ferkeln jeder Rasse wurden untersucht. CCK-IR nahm mit dem Alter in allen drei untersuchten Organen zu (Kortex, Medulla und Hypothalamus). Die kortikalen Spiegel stiegen vom Tag 1 bis 10 und vom Tag 10 bis 20 signifikant, die des Hypothalamus und der Medulla

  2. Expression of mptC of Listeria monocytogenes induces sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins in Lactococcus lactis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramnath, Manilduth; Arous, Safia; Gravesen, Anne; Hastings, John W; Hechard, Yann

    2004-01-01

    ..., Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark Correspondence Yann Héchard yann.hechard{at}univ-poitiers.fr Sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria was recently associated with the mannose phosphotransferase system...

  3. miR-9 modulates the expression of interferon-regulated genes and MHC class I molecules in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Fan, Quan-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Shi, Jun-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Wei [Institute of Comparative Medicine and Laboratory Animal Center, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Zhang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Yong-Liang [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Xu, Kang, E-mail: xukang1995@yahoo.com [Department of General Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Yao, Kai-Tai, E-mail: Yaokaitai@yahoo.com.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Xiao, Dong, E-mail: Xiao_d@hotmail.com [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Institute of Comparative Medicine and Laboratory Animal Center, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-9 can negatively or positively modulate interferon-induced gene expression. ► miR-9 can up-regulate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression. ► miR-9 can down-regulate the expression of interleukin-related genes. -- Abstract: The functions of miR-9 in some cancers are recently implicated in regulating proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis, etc. miR-9 is commonly down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the exact roles of miR-9 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of NPC remains unclear. Therefore, we firstly used miR-9-expressing CNE2 cells to determine the effects of miR-9 overexpression on global gene expression profile by microarray analysis. Microarray-based gene expression data unexpectedly demonstrated a significant number of up- or down-regulated immune- and inflammation-related genes, including many well-known interferon (IFN)-induced genes (e.g., IFI44L, PSMB8, IRF5, PSMB10, IFI27, PSB9{sub H}UMAN, IFIT2, TRAIL, IFIT1, PSB8{sub H}UMAN, IRF1, B2M and GBP1), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (e.g., HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F and HLA-H) and interleukin (IL)-related genes (e.g., IL20RB, GALT, IL7, IL1B, IL11, IL1F8, IL1A, IL6 and IL7R), which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-9 with the miRNA mimics significantly up- or down-regulated the expression of above-mentioned IFN-inducible genes, MHC class I molecules and IL-related genes; on the contrary, miR-9 inhibition by anti-miR-9 inhibitor in CNE2 and 5–8F cells correspondingly decreased or increased the aforementioned immune- and inflammation-related genes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-9 can modulate the expression of IFN-induced genes and MHC class I molecules in human cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of miR-9 in linking inflammation and cancer, which remains to be fully characterized.

  4. Involvement of myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate phosphorylation and translocation in cholecystokinin-induced amylase release in rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keitaro; Narita, Takanori; Katsumata-Kato, Osamu; Sugiya, Hiroshi; Seo, Yoshiteru

    2016-03-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone that induces exocytotic amylase release in pancreatic acinar cells. The activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the CCK-induced pancreatic amylase release. Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) is a ubiquitously expressed substrate of PKC. MARCKS has been implicated in membrane trafficking in several cell types. The phosphorylation of MARCKS by PKC results in the translocation of MARCKS from the membrane to the cytosol. Here, we studied the involvement of MARCKS in the CCK-induced amylase release in rat pancreatic acini. Employing Western blotting, we detected MARCKS protein in the rat pancreatic acini. CCK induced MARCKS phosphorylation. A PKC-δ inhibitor, rottlerin, inhibited the CCK-induced MARCKS phosphorylation and amylase release. In the translocation assay, we also observed CCK-induced PKC-δ activation. An immunohistochemistry study showed that CCK induced MARCKS translocation from the membrane to the cytosol. When acini were lysed by a detergent, Triton X-100, CCK partially induced displacement of the MARCKS from the GM1a-rich detergent-resistant membrane fractions (DRMs) in which Syntaxin2 is distributed. A MARCKS-related peptide inhibited the CCK-induced amylase release. These findings suggest that MARCKS phosphorylation by PKC-δ and then MARCKS translocation from the GM1a-rich DRMs to the cytosol are involved in the CCK-induced amylase release in pancreatic acinar cells.

  5. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    are expressed using virtual classes seem to be very tightly coupled internally. While clients have achieved the freedom to dynamically use one or the other family, it seems that any given family contains a xed set of classes and we will need to create an entire family of its own just in order to replace one......Families of mutually dependent classes that may be accessed polymor- phically provide an advanced tool for separation of concerns, in that it enables client code to use a group of instances of related classes safely without depending on the exact classes involved. However, class families which...... of the members with another class. This paper shows how to express class families in such a manner that the classes in these families can be used in many dierent combinations, still enabling family polymorphism and ensuring type safety....

  6. Genomic Alterations in CIITA Are Frequent in Primary Mediastinal Large B Cell Lymphoma and Are Associated with Diminished MHC Class II Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Mottok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMBCL is an aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, predominantly affecting young patients. We analyzed 45 primary PMBCL tumor biopsies and 3 PMBCL-derived cell lines for the presence of genetic alterations involving the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II transactivator CIITA and found frequent aberrations consisting of structural genomic rearrangements, missense, nonsense, and frame-shift mutations (53% of primary tumor biopsies and all cell lines. We also detected intron 1 mutations in 47% of the cases, and detailed sequence analysis strongly suggests AID-mediated aberrant somatic hypermutation as the mutational mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that genomic lesions in CIITA result in decreased protein expression and reduction of MHC class II surface expression, creating an immune privilege phenotype in PMBCL. In summary, we establish CIITA alterations as a common mechanism of immune escape through reduction of MHC class II expression in PMBCL, with potential implications for future treatments targeting microenvironment-related biology.

  7. Class B CpG ODN stimulation upregulates expression of TLR21 and IFN-γ in chicken Harderian gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrząstek, Klaudia; Borowska, Dominika; Kaiser, Pete; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2014-08-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the response of Harderian gland (HG) cells after in vitro stimulation with class B synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODN) containing CpG motifs. This knowledge is of importance for the development of mucosal vaccines for poultry, such as eye-drop or spray vaccines, to determine if class B CpG ODN can act as an vaccine adjuvant or as a prophylactic treatment mainly against respiratory disease viruses. The relative expression of Toll-like receptor 21 (TLR21), interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 genes were quantified at 1, 3, 6 and 18 h post-stimulation of HG cells from 5-week-old birds. In addition, it was also investigated if expression of these genes was affected by the age of the birds (differences between 5- and 12-week-old birds), concentrations of ODN or cell preparation method used. Class B CpG ODN induced upregulation of TLR21 and IFN-γ mRNA expression levels at 1h post-stimulation depending on concentration of ODN used but only in HG cells isolated from young birds.

  8. Association of high HLA-E expression during acute cellular rejection and numbers of HLA class I leader peptide mismatches with reduced renal allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberina, Hana; Rebmann, Vera; Wagner, Bettina; da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Dziallas, Phillip; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heinemann, Falko M; Witzke, Oliver; Zoet, Yvonne M; Claas, Frans H J; Horn, Peter A; Kribben, Andreas; Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2017-03-01

    Non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E preferentially presents leader peptides derived from classical HLA-class I molecules. HLA-E can trigger opposed immune responses by interacting with inhibitory NKG2A or by activating NKG2C receptors on NK and T-cells. We studied the impact of HLA-E on renal allograft survival during acute cellular rejection. HLA-E expression was up-regulated in acute cellular rejection (ACR) biopsies (n=12) compared to biopsies from 13 renal allografts with no rejection-signs. HLA-E up-regulation was correlated with numbers of HLA-class I leader peptide mismatches (p=0.04). CD8+ and CD56+ infiltrating cells correlated with HLA-E expression (pE-mediated immune activation. Moreover, HLA-E expression correlated with deterioration in renal allograft function (pE along with high numbers of mismatched HLA-class I leader peptides might represent additional targets for immune-activating responses.

  9. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression can be used as a diagnostic tool to differentiate idiopathic inflammatory myopathies from dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Utility of major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class I antigen immunostaining was studied to differentiate idiopathic inflammatory myopathies from dystrophies. Materials and Methods: Forty muscle biopsies including seven dermatomyositis (DM, six polymyositis (PM, two sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM, 20 dystrophies (one Duchenne, three Becker′s, four alpha, one gamma sarcoglycanopathy, nine limb girdle, one myotonic and one fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and five controls were stained with antibody for MHC Class I antigen (Novocastra clone W6/32 HL 1:100 dilution. Results: Polymyositis and sIBM showed MHC class I antigen positivity along sarcolemma of single and small groups of muscle fibers. The regenerating fibers in the perifascicular area in DM showed intense cytoplasmic positivity of MHC class I antigen. Muscle fibers in all dystrophies except regenerating fibers and control normal muscle were negative for MHC. Capillaries and lymphocytes were positive controls. There were no false positives in the study. Conclusion: MHC Class I immunostaining can be used as a complementary diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

  10. A Toxoplasma gondii class XIV myosin, expressed in Sf9 cells with a parasite co-chaperone, requires two light chains for fast motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M; Ward, Gary E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-10-31

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors.

  11. A Toxoplasma gondii Class XIV Myosin, Expressed in Sf9 Cells with a Parasite Co-chaperone, Requires Two Light Chains for Fast Motility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S.; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Ward, Gary E.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:25231988

  12. ZBTB32 is an early repressor of the CIITA and MHC class II gene expression during B cell differentiation to plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Suk; Scharer, Christopher D; Majumder, Parimal; Davis, Carl W; Butler, Royce; Zinzow-Kramer, Wendy; Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M

    2012-09-01

    CIITA and MHC class II expression is silenced during the differentiation of B cells to plasma cells. When B cell differentiation is carried out ex vivo, CIITA silencing occurs rapidly, but the factors contributing to this event are not known. ZBTB32, also known as repressor of GATA3, was identified as an early repressor of CIITA in an ex vivo plasma cell differentiation model. ZBTB32 activity occurred at a time when B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), the regulator of plasma cell fate and suppressor of CIITA, was minimally induced. Ectopic expression of ZBTB32 suppressed CIITA and I-A gene expression in B cells. Short hairpin RNA depletion of ZBTB32 in a plasma cell line resulted in re-expression of CIITA and I-A. Compared with conditional Blimp-1 knockout and wild-type B cells, B cells from ZBTB32/ROG-knockout mice displayed delayed kinetics in silencing CIITA during ex vivo plasma cell differentiation. ZBTB32 was found to bind to the CIITA gene, suggesting that ZBTB32 directly regulates CIITA. Lastly, ZBTB32 and Blimp-1 coimmunoprecipitated, suggesting that the two repressors may ultimately function together to silence CIITA expression. These results introduce ZBTB32 as a novel regulator of MHC-II gene expression and a potential regulatory partner of Blimp-1 in repressing gene expression.

  13. Dynamics of selected MHC class I and II molecule expression in the course of HPV positive CIN treatment with the use of human recombinant IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Marek; Bobek, Malgorzata; Zrubek, HenryK; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2004-03-01

    Studies consistently reveal downregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules or/and selective loss of individual MHC-I alleles and upregulation of MHC-II molecules in the areas of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and in cervical cancers. In vitro studies demonstrated the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) potential of MHC class I and II molecule upregulation followed by increased cytolytic response against some cervical cancer cell lines. In vivo assessment of the correlation between regression/persistence state of CIN and the IFN-gamma-induced changes in both class of selected MHC molecule expression. Seventeen subjects with CIN I/CIN II associated with high-risk HPV infection underwent uniform IFN-gamma treatment (four intracervical injections over 2-day interval for a total dose of 6,000,000 IU). Immunohistochemical staining has been performed within cervical punch biopsy specimens with the use of monoclonal antibody reacting with HLA-DR, HLA-HC and HLA-Bw4, and the mean proportion of given molecules expressing keratinocytes was counted before, immediately after and 2 months after IFN-gamma treatment The analysis revealed a rapid and significant increase of the HLA-Bw4 proportion in response to IFN-gamma, persistent in the group of complete responders (with CIN clearance). No significant changes in the proportion of HLA-HC 10 positive cells in response to IFN-gamma administration was demonstrated, nor a significant increase in HLA-DR positivity; however, the transient trend towards increasing the proportion of HLA-DR immediately after treatment completion was observed. Upregulation of selected MHC class I allele expression, but not necessary MHC class II or heavy chain fragments of MHC-I, induced by IFN-gamma correlates with the resolution of cervical intraepithelial lesions and high-risk HPV DNA clearance in vivo.

  14. Synergistic relationship between the Columbia University Appetitive Behavior Seminar and the satiating effect of cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gerard P

    2013-12-01

    Synergism between the Columbia University Appetitive Behavior Seminar and the research program of Smith and Gibbs on the satiating effect of cholecystokinin during the past 40 years is described. The Seminar was synergistic with the research program in five ways. First, the steady parade of speakers gave us a window on the varied and interesting work going on in the field. Second, the Seminar was the kind of audience for presentations of the work-in-progress on CCK that scientists hope for and rarely find. Criticism by members of the Seminar was relentless and constructive, and ideas for further experiments or new ways to tackle problematic data poured forth. Third, members of the Seminar did experiments that facilitated the experimental success of the research program. Fourth, members of the Seminar tutored us on topics that we wanted to import into the research program on CCK. Fifth, and probably most important, members of the Seminar gave us the encouragement, good humor, and friendship so necessary for coping with the struggles of the scientific life.

  15. Fluorescence characteristics of hydrophobic partial agonist probes of the cholecystokinin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J

    2006-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic studies are powerful tools for the evaluation of receptor structure and the dynamic changes associated with receptor activation. Here, we have developed two chemically distinct fluorescent probes of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor by attaching acrylodan or a nitrobenzoxadiazole moiety to the amino terminus of a partial agonist CCK analogue. These two probes were able to bind to the CCK receptor specifically and with high affinity, and were able to elicit only submaximal intracellular calcium responses typical of partial agonists. The fluorescence characteristics of these probes were compared with those previously reported for structurally-related full agonist and antagonist probes. Like the previous probes, the partial agonist probes exhibited longer fluorescence lifetimes and increased anisotropy when bound to the receptor than when free in solution. The receptor-bound probes were not easily quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that the fluorophores were protected from the extracellular aqueous milieu. The fluorescence characteristics of the partial agonist probes were quite similar to those of the analogous full agonist probes and quite distinct from the analogous antagonist probes. These data suggest that the partially activated conformational state of this receptor is more closely related to its fully active state than to its inactive state.

  16. Taraxacum officinale protects against cholecystokinin-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang-Wan Seo; Hyung-Min Kim; Seung-Heon Hong; Hyun-Na Koo; Hyo-Jin An; Kang-Beom Kwon; Byung-Cheal Lim; Eun-A Seo; Do-Gon Ryu; Goo Moon; Hong-Yeoul Kim

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Taraxacum officinale (TO) has been frequently used as a remedy for inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TO on cholecystokinin (CCK)-octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.METHODS: TO at 10 mg/kg was orally administered, followed by 75 μg/kg CCK octapeptide injected subcutaneously three times after 1, 3 and 5 h. This whole procedure was repeated for 5 d. We determined the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, the levels of pancreatic HSP60 and HSP72, and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Repeated CCK octapeptide treatment resulted in typical laboratory and morphological changes of experimentally-induced pancreatitis.RESULTS: TO significantly decreased the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio in CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis. TO also increased the pancreatic levels of HSP60 and HSP72. Additionally, the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α decreased in the animals treated with TO.CONCLUSION: TO may have a protective effect against CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis.

  17. Effect of weight loss and ketosis on postprandial cholecystokinin and free fatty acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chearskul, Supornpim; Delbridge, Elizabeth; Shulkes, Arthur; Proietto, Joseph; Kriketos, Adamandia

    2008-05-01

    Weight regain after weight loss may not be due primarily to voluntary return to social habits but may be explained by changes in peripheral hormonal signals activating hunger and encouraging feeding behavior. The objective of this study was to investigate physiologic adaptations to weight loss that may encourage weight regain. The study had a within-subject repeated-measure design [12 healthy, obese men, 33-64 y, body mass index (in kg/m(2)) 30-46] and was a clinical intervention investigation of circulating metabolites and hunger-satiety responses before and after weight loss. Measures included anthropometry (bioelectrical impedance, body weight, and waist circumference), concentrations of circulating hormones and metabolites [ketone bodies, free fatty acids (FFAs), insulin, leptin, glucose, and cholecystokinin (CCK)], and measures of hunger and satiety at baseline, 8 wk after weight loss with a very-low-energy diet, and 1 wk after weight maintenance. Weight loss led to a reduction in postprandial CCK secretion (P = 0.016). However, when subjects were ketotic (elevated circulating beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations), CCK secretion was sustained at concentrations before weight loss. After weight loss, there were reduced postprandial FFA concentrations (P = 0.0005). The presence of ketosis sustained FFA to concentrations before weight loss (P = 0.60). Rapid weight loss of approximately 10% of initial body weight results in a reduction in postprandial CCK and FFA concentrations.

  18. Exogenous cholecystokinin-8 reduces vagal efferent nerve activity in rats through CCKA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucinskaite, Violeta; Kurosawa, Mieko; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that the vagus nerve plays a role in mediating cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) effect on such gastric functions as motility, emptying and gastric acid secretion. To examine the contribution of the efferent pathways in realizing these effects, efferent mass activity in the ventral gastric vagal nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats was recorded.Intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (0.1–1 nmol) suppressed the efferent activity. The effect of CCK-8 was significantly reduced in animals with total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy in comparison to those with partial vagotomy.Intravenous infusion of CCKA receptor antagonist L-364,718 (1–100×10−6 g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8, but the CCKB receptor antagonist L-365,260 (1–100×10−6 g) did not in the conditions of either partial or total vagotomy.Intracisternal infusion of L-364,718 (1×10−6 g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8 i.v.Infusion of exogenous CCK-8 did not affect the activity of supradiaphragmatic vagal afferents.The results suggest that the effect of systemically administered CCK-8 on vagal efferent activity is mediated by both peripherally (subdiaphragmatically) and centrally localized CCKA receptors. PMID:10780970

  19. [Protein malnutrition and response of pancreatic acinar cells to stimulation by cholecystokinin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prost, J; Belleville, J

    1988-01-01

    Pancreatic lobules were isolated from 2 groups of male Wistar rats after 23 days of diet. A control group (C) fed on a 20% protein diet (16% gluten + 4% casein) and an experimental group (E) on a 5% protein diet (4% gluten + 1% casein). After isolation, lobules were preincubated 10 min with 10 muCi [3H]-leucine, washed, then incubate within Krebs Ringer bicarbonate Hepes. Basal secretion, then stimulated secretion (50 pM of cholecystokinin (CCK] of radioactive and non-radioactive protein and amylase outputs were measured. During basal secretion, in (E) group, lobules secreted more proteins than (C) one, the same outputs of amylase and radioactive protein were observed in both groups. The stimulated secretion by CCK increased the outputs of non-radioactive protein and amylase of lobules (T) (2-3 fold), but was without effect on lobule (E) outputs. Therefore, a low-protein diet involved a decrease of CCK sensibility on acinar cells, this fact might be mediated by a decreasing number and/or affinity of their CCK receptors.

  20. Sulfated cholecystokinin-8 increases ghrelin secretion but does not affect oxyntomodulin in Holstein steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannaing, Swe; Thidarmyint, Hnin; Zhao, Hongqiong; Thanthan, Sint; Kitagawa, Kouki; Kuwayama, Hideto

    2012-08-01

    The effect of appetite regulatory hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) on the secretions of oxyntomodulin (OXM) and ghrelin, and the effect of ghrelin on the secretions of CCK and OXM were studied in ruminants. Eight Holstein steers, 7 months old, 243 ± 7 kg body weight (BW), were arranged in an incomplete Latin square design (8 animals × 4 treatments × 4 days of sampling). Steers were intravenously injected with 10 µg of sulfated CCK-8/kg BW, 20 µg of acyl ghrelin/kg BW, 100 µg of des-acyl ghrelin/kg BW or vehicle. Blood samples were collected from -60 min to 120 min relative to time of injection. Plasma concentrations of ghrelin, sulfated CCK and OXM were measured by double-antibody radioimmunoassay. Plasma acyl ghrelin was increased to peak level (428.3 ± 6 pg/mL) at 60 min after injection of CCK compared with pre-injected levels (203.3 ± 1 pg/mL). These results showed for the first time, that intravenous bolus injection of CCK increased ghrelin secretion in ruminants. In contrast, injection of ghrelin did not change CCK secretion. Administration of ghrelin or CCK has no effect on plasma OXM concentrations. In conclusion, our results show that administration of CCK increased ghrelin secretion but did not affect OXM release in ruminants. Ghrelin did not affect the secretions of CCK and OXM.

  1. Association analysis of the cholecystokinin type A receptor gene in schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕文天; 张萱; 张铭; 龚守良; 尉军

    2004-01-01

    @@ Schizophrenia is characterized by clinical heterogeneity and genetic heterogeneity. 1 Because dopamine(DA)overactivity has been thought, over the past 40 years, to play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, its receptors and metabolic enzymes have been regarded as potentially involved in schizophrenia. 2 However,disease-causing variants among the genes coding for dopamine receptors and the enzymes related to DA have not been found. Cholecystokinin A receptor (CCK-AR)coexists with DA in the same neurons of the midbrain limbic system, as well as the access to the substantia nigra and the corpus striatum, and it acts as a mediator modulating dopaminergic activity. 3 Two CCK receptors,CCK-AR and CCK B receptor (CCK-BR) have been identified. CCK-AR in the medial posterior nucleus accumbens increases DA release, while CCK-BR in the anterior nucleus accumbens decreases DA release. 4 The former has potential effects on human neuropsychiatric diseases linked to DA, such as schizophrenia. Recently,several studies found that the Pst I polymorphic site present in the boundary between intron 1 and exon 2 of the CCK-AR gene is associated with some symptoms of schizophrenia. This finding is particularly important for uncovering the genetic etiology of schizophrenia, although the mechanism linking this polymorphic site to the disease remains unclear. The present work is an attempt to confirm the genetic association between the CCK-AR gene and schizophrenia.

  2. Gastrointestinal Hormone Cholecystokinin Increases P-Glycoprotein Membrane Localization and Transport Activity in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kentaro; Shimizu, Saori; Tomono, Takumi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2017-09-01

    It was reported that stimulation of taste receptor type 2 member 38 by a bitter substance, phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mRNA level and transport activity via release of the gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) at 9 h. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCK-8 and PTC might also regulate P-gp activity more rapidly via a different mechanism. As a result, we found that the pretreatment of human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells with 10-mM PTC significantly decreased the intracellular accumulation of P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123) compared with the control after 90-min incubation. Moreover, CCK-8 treatments significantly reduced the accumulation of Rho123 within 30 min, compared with the control. On the other hand, when Caco-2 cells were pretreated with PTC, the efflux ratio of Rho123 was significantly increased compared with control. The efflux ratio of Rho123 in CCK-8 treatment cells was also significantly increased compared with control. Furthermore, CCK-8 increased the phosphorylation of the scaffold proteins ezrin, radixin, and moesin, which regulate translocation of P-gp to the plasma membrane. Therefore, our results indicate that PTC induced release of CCK-8, which in turn induced the phosphorylation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin proteins, leading to upregulation of P-gp transport activity via increased membrane localization of P-gp. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Purification and characterization of cholecystokinin from the skin of salamander Tylototriton verrucosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Bin; Hakim, Ma; Luo, Lei; Li, Bo-Wen; Yang, Shi-Long; Song, Yu-Zhu; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiu-Min

    2015-05-18

    As a group of intestinal hormones and neurotransmitters, cholecystokinins (CCKs) regulate and affect pancreatic enzyme secretion, gastrointestinal motility, pain hypersensitivity, digestion and satiety, and generally contain a DYMGWMDFG sequence at the C-terminus. Many CCKs have been reported in mammals. However, only a few have been reported in amphibians, such as Hyla nigrovittata, Xenopus laevis, and Rana catesbeiana, with none reported in urodele amphibians like newts and salamanders. Here, a CCK called CCK-TV was identified and characterized from the skin of the salamander Tylototriton verrucosus. This CCK contained an amino acid sequence of DYMGWMDF-NH2 as seen in other CCKs. A cDNA encoding the CCK precursor containing 129 amino acid residues was cloned from the cDNA library of T. verrucosus skin. The CCK-TV had the potential to induce the contraction of smooth muscle strips isolated from porcine gallbladder, eliciting contraction at a concentration of 5.0 x 10⁻¹¹ mol/L and inducing maximal contraction at a concentration of 2.0 x 10⁻⁶ mol/L. The EC50 was 13.6 nmol/L. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the presence of a CCK in an urodele amphibian.

  4. Ileal interposition attenuates the satiety responses evoked by cholecystokinin-8 and -33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Shannon A; Washington, Martha C; Brown, Thelma A L; Williams, Carol S; Strader, April D; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2011-06-01

    One of the possible mechanisms by which the weight-reducing surgical procedure ileal interposition (II) works is by increasing circulating levels of lower gut peptides that reduce food intake, such as glucagon like peptide-1 and peptide YY. However, since this surgery involves both lower and upper gut segments, we tested the hypothesis that II alters the satiety responses evoked by the classic upper gut peptide cholecystokinin (CCK). To test this hypothesis, we determined meal size (MS), intermeal interval (IMI) and satiety ratio (SR) evoked by CCK-8 and -33 (0, 1, 3, 5nmol/kg, i.p.) in two groups of rats, II and sham-operated. CCK-8 and -33 reduced MS more in the sham group than in the II group; CCK-33 prolonged IMI in the sham group and increased SR in both groups. Reduction of cumulative food intake by CCK-8 in II rats was blocked by devazepide, a CCK(1) receptor antagonist. In addition, as previously reported, we found that II resulted in a slight reduction in body weight compared to sham-operated rats. Based on these observations, we conclude that ileal interposition attenuates the satiety responses of CCK. Therefore, it is unlikely that this peptide plays a significant role in reduction of body weight by this surgery.

  5. The feeding responses evoked by endogenous cholecystokinin are regulated by different gastrointestinal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Martha C; Williams, Kasey; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2016-02-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that cholecystokinin (CCK) A receptor (CCKAR) in areas supplied by the celiac artery (CA), stomach and upper duodenum, and the cranial mesenteric artery (CMA), small and parts of the large intestine, is necessary for reduction of meal size, prolongation of the intermeal interval (time between first and second meal) and increased satiety ratio (intermeal interval/meal size or amount of food consumed during any given unit of time) by the non-nutrient stimulator of endogenous CCK release camostat. Consistent with our previous findings camostat reduced meal size, prolonged the intermeal interval and increased the satiety ratio. Here, we report that blocking CCKAR in the area supplied by the celiac artery attenuated reduction of meal size by camostat more so than the cranial mesenteric artery route. Blocking CCKAR in the area supplied by the cranial mesenteric artery attenuated prolongation of the intermeal interval length and increased satiety ratio by camostat more so than the celiac artery route. Blocking CCKAR in the areas supplied by the femoral artery (control) failed to alter the feeding responses evoked by camostat. These results support the hypothesis that CCKAR in the area supplied by the CA is necessary for reduction of meal size by camostat whereas CCKAR in the area supplied by the CMA is necessary for prolongation of the intermeal interval and increased satiety ratio by this substance. Our results demonstrate that meal size and intermeal interval length by camostat are regulated through different gastrointestinal sites.

  6. Cholecystokinin from the entorhinal cortex enables neural plasticity in the auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Yu, Kai; Zhang, Zicong; Sun, Wenjian; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Jingyu; Chen, Xi; Liu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Haitao; Guo, Yi Ping; He, Jufang

    2014-03-01

    Patients with damage to the medial temporal lobe show deficits in forming new declarative memories but can still recall older memories, suggesting that the medial temporal lobe is necessary for encoding memories in the neocortex. Here, we found that cortical projection neurons in the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices were mostly immunopositive for cholecystokinin (CCK). Local infusion of CCK in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats induced plastic changes that enabled cortical neurons to potentiate their responses or to start responding to an auditory stimulus that was paired with a tone that robustly triggered action potentials. CCK infusion also enabled auditory neurons to start responding to a light stimulus that was paired with a noise burst. In vivo intracellular recordings in the auditory cortex showed that synaptic strength was potentiated after two pairings of presynaptic and postsynaptic activity in the presence of CCK. Infusion of a CCKB antagonist in the auditory cortex prevented the formation of a visuo-auditory association in awake rats. Finally, activation of the entorhinal cortex potentiated neuronal responses in the auditory cortex, which was suppressed by infusion of a CCKB antagonist. Together, these findings suggest that the medial temporal lobe influences neocortical plasticity via CCK-positive cortical projection neurons in the entorhinal cortex.

  7. Serum cholecystokinin concentrations in dogs with naturally acquired pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Sungjun; Kim, Hye-Sun; Chang, Jinhwa; Kang, Ji-Houn; Chang, Dongwoo; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine serum cholecystokinin (CCK) concentrations in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) and to evaluate associations among CCK concentration, PDH, and gallbladder mucocele (GBM). ANIMALS 14 client-owned dogs with PDH and 14 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES Dogs were separated into 4 groups: healthy dogs without gallbladder sludge (group A; n = 7), healthy dogs with gallbladder sludge (group B; 7), dogs with PDH and gallbladder sludge (group C; 8), and dogs with PDH and GBM (group D; 6). Serum CCK concentrations were then measured before and 1, 2, and 4 hours after consumption of a high-fat meal. Concentrations in dogs with PDH were also measured before and after trilostane treatment. Results were compared among groups and assessment points. RESULTS Preprandial serum CCK concentrations in group C were significantly lower than those in groups A, B, and D, but no significant differences in postprandial CCK concentrations were identified among the groups 1, 2, or 4 hours after the meal. With respect to trilostane treatment of dogs with PDH, no significant differences were identified between pre- and post-trilostane serum CCK concentrations in group C or D. Median CCK concentration after trilostane treatment was higher in group D than in group C, but this difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The outcomes in this study did not support the hypothesis that a low circulating CCK concentration affects the development of GBM in dogs with PDH.

  8. Duodenal myotomy blocks reduction of meal size and prolongation of intermeal interval by cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateef, Dalya M; Washington, Martha C; Raboin, Shannon J; Roberson, Allison E; Mansour, Mahmoud M; Williams, Carol S; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2012-02-01

    We have shown that vagotomy (VGX) attenuates the reduction of meal size (MS) produced by cholecystokinin (CCK) -8 and -33 and that celiaco-mesenteric ganglionectomy (CMGX) attenuates the prolongation of the intermeal interval (IMI) produced by CCK-33. Here, we report the following novel data. First, by determining the distribution of CCK(1) receptor messenger RNA, which mediates reduction of MS and prolongation of IMI by CCK, in seven regions of the gastrointestinal tract in the adult rat we found that the duodenum contains the highest concentration of this receptor in the gut. Second, based on the previous finding we performed a unique surgical technique known as duodenal myotomy (MYO), which severs all the nerves of the gut wall in the duodenum including vagus, splanchnic and enteric nerves. Third, we determined MS and IMI in duodenal MYO rats in responses to endogenous CCK-58 released by the non-nutrient, trypsin inhibitor, camostat and CCK-8 to test the possibility that the duodenum is the site of action for reduction of MS and prolongation of IMI. We found that, similar to the previous work reported by using CCK-8 and MS, duodenal MYO also blocked reduction of MS by camostat. Forth, duodenal MYO blocked prolongation of IMI by camostat. As such, our current results suggest that the duodenum is the gut site that communicates both feeding signals of endogenous CCK, MS and IMI, with the brain through vagal and splanchnic afferents.

  9. Flavonoids stimulate cholecystokinin peptide secretion from the enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Ravallec, Rozenn; Van Camp, John; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Animal experiments showed that flavonoids might have the potential for an anti-obesity effect by reducing weight and food intake. However, the exact mechanisms that could be involved in these proposed effects are still under investigation. The complex process of food intake is partially regulated by gastrointestinal hormones. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is the best known gastrointestinal hormone to induce satiety signal that plays a key role in food intake regulation. It is released from the endocrine cells (I cell) in response to the ingestion of nutrients into the small intestine. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, apigenin, rutin and baicalein) on stimulation of CCK release in vitro using enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. In comparison with the control, quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin resulted in a significant increase in CCK secretion with quercetin showing the highest activity. On the other hand, no significant effect was seen by rutin and baicalein. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study the stimulation of CCK peptide hormone secretion from STC-1 cells by quercetin and kaempferol, rutin, apigenin and baicalein. Based on the cell-based results in this work, it can be suggested that the reported activity of flavonoids against food intake and weight could be mediated by stimulation of CCK signal which in turn is responsible for food intake reduction, but future animal and human studies are needed to confirm this conclusion at organism level.

  10. Neuronal network of panic disorder: the role of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanzger, P; Domschke, K; Bradwejn, J

    2012-09-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety and avoidance behavior. Its pathogenesis is complex and includes both neurobiological and psychological factors. With regard to neurobiological underpinnings, anxiety in humans seems to be mediated through a neuronal network, which involves several distinct brain regions, neuronal circuits and projections as well as neurotransmitters. A large body of evidence suggests that the neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) might be an important modulator of this neuronal network. Key regions of the fear network, such as amygdala, hypothalamus, peraqueductal grey, or cortical regions seem to be connected by CCKergic pathways. CCK interacts with several anxiety-relevant neurotransmitters such as the serotonergic, GABA-ergic and noradrenergic system as well as with endocannabinoids, NPY and NPS. In humans, administration of CCK-4 reliably provokes panic attacks, which can be blocked by antipanic medication. Also, there is some support for a role of the CCK system in the genetic pathomechanism of PD with particularly strong evidence for the CCK gene itself and the CCK-2R (CCKBR) gene. Thus, it is hypothesized that genetic variants in the CCK system might contribute to the biological basis for the postulated CCK dysfunction in the fear network underlying PD. Taken together, a large body of evidence suggests a possible role for the neuropeptide CCK in PD with regard to neuroanatomical circuits, neurotransmitters and genetic factors. This review article proposes an extended hypothetical model for human PD, which integrates preclinical and clinical findings on CCK in addition to existing theories of the pathogenesis of PD.

  11. Cholecystokinin receptor antagonism by peptidergic and non-peptidergic agents in rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, A; Jaworek, J; Konturek, P K; Konturek, S J; Warzecha, Z

    1989-01-01

    1. Graded doses of bombesin infused I.V. into conscious rats with chronic pancreatic fistulae induced a dose-dependent stimulation of protein secretion, similar to that obtained with caerulein. This stimulation does not appear to be mediated by cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors because peptidergic (CR-1409) and non-peptidergic (L-364718) CCK antagonists failed to affect protein secretion at a dose range which caused almost complete suppression of caerulein-induced pancreatic secretion. 2. Studies in vitro on isolated rat pancreatic acini revealed that caerulein, pentagastrin and bombesin all showed the same efficacy in their ability to stimulate amylase release. In contrast, CCK antagonists competitively inhibited amylase release induced by caerulein and pentagastrin but not by bombesin or urecholine, indicating that the latter two agents act directly on acinar cells via receptors which are separate from those involved in stimulation induced by caerulein and pentagastrin. 3. DNA synthesis, measured by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, was significantly stimulated by caerulein, soybean trypsin inhibitor (FOY 305), pentagastrin and by bombesin in a dose-dependent manner. CCK receptor antagonists prevented stimulation of DNA synthesis induced by caerulein, FOY 305 and pentagastrin but not by bombesin. 4. This study indicates that bombesin strongly stimulates pancreatic enzyme secretion, with an efficacy similar to that of caerulein, and also exerts a potent growth-promoting action on the pancreas, both effects appearing to be mediated by mechanisms independent of the CCK receptors. PMID:2614728

  12. Action of peripherally administered cholecystokinin on monoaminergic and GABAergic neurons in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneyuki,Takao

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available In an acute study, cholecystokinin octapeptide sulfate (CCK in doses of 1, 10 or 100 micrograms/kg body weight was injected intraperitoneally into rats just prior to the dark cycle. Rats were sacrificed two hours following the CCK injection. Norepinephrine levels were elevated in the dorsal amygdala of rats injected with 10 micrograms of CCK as well as in the septum of rats injected with 1 and 10 micrograms of CCK. The dopamine level in the septum of rats injected with 1 microgram of CCK as well as the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA level in the lateral hypothalamus of rats injected with 10 micrograms of CCK were also elevated. In a chronic study, CCK (1 microgram/kg body weight/h was subcutaneously infused into rats with Alzet osmotic minipump for seven consecutive days. The daily food consumption did not change during the 7 days of CCK infusion. The dopamine turnover in the striatum accelerated and the GABA level increased. On the contrary, dopamine metabolism in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus decreased. Furthermore, the serotonin level in the substantia nigra decreased. Norepinephrine levels decreased in the nucleus paraventricularis, the locus coeruleus and the substantia nigra. The results suggest that peripherally administered CCK may act on the monoaminergic neurons and GABAergic neurons in the brain.

  13. Systemic cholecystokinin amplifies vago-vagal reflex responses recorded in vagal motor neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viard, Edouard; Rogers, Richard C; Hermann, Gerlinda E

    2012-02-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a potent regulator of visceral functions as a consequence of its actions on vago-vagal reflex circuit elements. This paper addresses three current controversies regarding the role of CCK to control gastric function via vago-vagal reflexes. Specifically: (a) whether CNS vs. peripheral (vagal afferent) receptors are dominant, (b) whether the long (58) vs. short (8) isoform is more potent and (c) whether nutritional status impacts the gain or even the direction of vago-vagal reflexes. Our in vivo recordings of physiologically identified gastric vagal motor neurones (gastric-DMN) involved in the gastric accommodation reflex (GAR) show unequivocally that: (a) receptors in the coeliac-portal circulation are more sensitive in amplifying gastric vagal reflexes; (b) in the periphery, CCK8 is more potent than CCK58; and (c) the nutritional status has a marginal effect on gastric reflex control. While the GAR reflex is more sensitive in the fasted rat, CCK amplifies this sensitivity. Thus, our results are in stark contrast to recent reports which have suggested that vago-vagal reflexes are inverted by the metabolic status of the animal and that this inversion could be mediated by CCK within the CNS.

  14. [Changes in the cholecystokinin-synthetizing hypothalamic system during experimental diabetes mellitus in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A V; Kolesnik, Iu M; Trzhetsinskiĭ, S D; Orlovskiĭ, M A

    1998-01-01

    The investigation was performed in 96 Wistar rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by single injection of 50 mg/kg of streptozotocin. Cholecystokinin (CCK) synthesizing neurons were identified in hypothalamic structures using indirect immunofluorescence. In latent period of diabetes (2 wks) number of CCK--immunopositive neurons increases, especially in paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, while in ventrolateral subnucleus of arcuate nucleus and parvicellular subnucleus of paraventricular nucleus areas occupied by immunoreactive material in neurons and their CCK content are reduced. By the end of wk 5 of the disease increase in number of CCK immunopositive neurons was registered only in medial parvicellular subnucleus of paraventricular nucleus whereas in other structures their number was reduced. The administration of CCK to intact animals causes increase of insulin content in endocrinocytes of pancreatic islets, but does not affect the level of hypoglycemia. The administration of the peptide to animals with diabetes leads to destruction of pancreatic islets, decline in endocrinocyte number and insulin content and marked hypoglycemia. Thus, the data obtained indicate the significant role of hypothalamic peptidergic system and CCK in regulation of beta-endocrinocyte function.

  15. Appetite controlled by a cholecystokinin nucleus of the solitary tract to hypothalamus neurocircuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Lyons, David J; Cristiano, Claudia; Burke, Luke K; Madara, Joseph C; Campbell, John N; Garcia, Ana Paula; Land, Benjamin B; Lowell, Bradford B; Dileone, Ralph J; Heisler, Lora K

    2016-03-14

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is a key gateway for meal-related signals entering the brain from the periphery. However, the chemical mediators crucial to this process have not been fully elucidated. We reveal that a subset of NTS neurons containing cholecystokinin (CCK(NTS)) is responsive to nutritional state and that their activation reduces appetite and body weight in mice. Cell-specific anterograde tracing revealed that CCK(NTS) neurons provide a distinctive innervation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), with fibers and varicosities in close apposition to a subset of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R(PVH)) cells, which are also responsive to CCK. Optogenetic activation of CCK(NTS) axon terminals within the PVH reveal the satiating function of CCK(NTS) neurons to be mediated by a CCK(NTS)→PVH pathway that also encodes positive valence. These data identify the functional significance of CCK(NTS) neurons and reveal a sufficient and discrete NTS to hypothalamus circuit controlling appetite.

  16. Complex biallelic IGH rearrangements in IgM-expressing Z-138 cell line : Involvement of downstream immunoglobulin class switch recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Fenton, JAL; de Boer, C; Kleiverda, K; Brink, AATP; Raap, AK; Estrov, Z; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the immunoglobulin (Ig) receptor loci usually disrupt and silence these loci. On the basis of observations in follicular lymphoma (FL) with downstream Ig heavy chain (IGH) class switch recombination (CSR), we hypothesized that downstream CSR-mediated chromosomal

  17. Molecular and functional characterization of cionin receptors in the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis: the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate cholecystokinin/gastrin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Ogasawara, Michio; Satake, Honoo

    2012-04-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin are vertebrate brain-gut peptides featured by a sulfated tyrosine residue and a C-terminally amidated tetrapeptide consensus sequence. Cionin, identified in the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, the closest species to vertebrates, harbors two sulfated tyrosines and the CCK/gastrin consensus tetrapeptide sequence. While a putative cionin receptor, cior, was cloned, the ligand-receptor relationship between cionin and CioR remains unidentified. Here, we identify two cionin receptors, CioR1 and CioR2, which are the aforementioned putative cionin receptor and its novel paralog respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CioRs are homologous to vertebrate CCK receptors (CCKRs) and diverged from a common ancestor in the Ciona-specific lineage. Cionin activates intracellular calcium mobilization in cultured cells expressing CioR1 or CioR2. Monosulfated and nonsulfated cionin exhibited less potent or no activity, indicating that CioRs possess pharmacological features similar to the vertebrate CCK-specific receptor CCK1R, rather than its subtype CCK2R, given that a sulfated tyrosine in CCK is required for binding to CCK1R, but not to CCK2R. Collectively, the present data reveal that CioRs share a common ancestor with vertebrate CCKRs and indicate that CCK and CCK1R form the ancestral ligand-receptor pair in the vertebrate CCK/gastrin system. Cionin is expressed in the neural complex, digestive organs, oral siphon and atrial siphons, whereas the expression of ciors was detected mainly in these tissues and the ovary. Furthermore, cioninergic neurons innervate both of the siphons. These results suggest that cionin is involved in the regulation of siphonal functions.

  18. MHC class II super-enhancer increases surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and affects cytokine production in autoimmune vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Giulio; Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A; Holcomb, Cherie; Rastrou, Melinda; Erlich, Henry; Tengesdal, Isak W; Dagna, Lorenzo; Neff, C Preston; Palmer, Brent E; Spritz, Richard A; Dinarello, Charles A

    2016-02-02

    Genetic risk for autoimmunity in HLA genes is most often attributed to structural specificity resulting in presentation of self-antigens. Autoimmune vitiligo is strongly associated with the MHC class II region. Here, we fine-map vitiligo MHC class II genetic risk to three SNPs only 47 bp apart, located within a predicted super-enhancer in an intergenic region between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1, localized by a genome-wide association study of 2,853 Caucasian vitiligo patients. The super-enhancer corresponds to an expression quantitative trait locus for expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ RNA; we observed elevated surface expression of HLA-DR (P = 0.008) and HLA-DQ (P = 0.02) on monocytes from healthy subjects homozygous for the high-risk SNP haplotype. Unexpectedly, pathogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects homozygous for the high-risk super-enhancer haplotype exhibited greater increase in production of IFN-γ and IL-1β than cells from subjects homozygous for the low-risk haplotype. Specifically, production of IFN-γ on stimulation of dectin-1, mannose, and Toll-like receptors with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 2.5- and 2.9-fold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects, respectively (P = 0.007 and P = 0.01). Similarly, production of IL-1β was fivefold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects (P = 0.02). Increased production of immunostimulatory cytokines in subjects carrying the high-risk haplotype may act as an "adjuvant" during the presentation of autoantigens, tying together genetic variation in the MHC with the development of autoimmunity. This study demonstrates that for risk of autoimmune vitiligo, expression level of HLA class II molecules is as or more important than antigen specificity.

  19. HLA-E: strong association with beta2-microglobulin and surface expression in the absence of HLA class I signal sequence-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Melucci, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Suchànek, Miloslav; Horejsi, Vaclav; Martayan, Aline; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2008-10-15

    The nonclassical class I HLA-E molecule folds in the presence of peptide ligands donated by the signal sequences of permissive class I HLA alleles, with the aid of TAP and tapasin. To identify HLA-E-specific Abs, four monoclonals of the previously described MEM series were screened by isoelectric focusing (IEF) blot and immunoprecipitation/IEF on >30 single-allele class I transfectants and HLA-homozygous B lymphoid cells coexpressing HLA-E and HLA-A, -B, -C, -F, or -G. Despite their HLA-E-restricted reactivity patterns (MEM-E/02 in IEF blot; MEM-E/07 and MEM-E/08 in immunoprecipitation), all of the MEM Abs unexpectedly reacted with beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m)-free and denatured (but not beta(2)m-associated and folded) HLA-E H chains. Remarkably, other HLA-E-restricted Abs were also reactive with free H chains. Immunodepletion, in vitro assembly, flow cytometry, and three distinct surface-labeling methods, including a modified (conformation-independent) biotin-labeling assay, revealed the coexistence of HLA-E conformers with unusual and drastically antithetic features. MEM-reactive conformers were thermally unstable and poorly surface expressed, as expected, whereas beta(2)m-associated conformers were either unstable and weakly reactive with the prototypic conformational Ab W6/32, or exceptionally stable and strongly reactive with Abs to beta(2)m even in cells lacking permissive alleles (721.221), TAP (T2), or tapasin (721.220). Noncanonical, immature (endoglycosidase H-sensitive) HLA-E glycoforms were surface expressed in these cells, whereas mature glycoforms were exclusively expressed (and at much lower levels) in cells carrying permissive alleles. Thus, HLA-E is a good, and not a poor, beta(2)m assembler, and TAP/tapasin-assisted ligand donation is only one, and possibly not even the major, pathway leading to its stabilization and surface expression.

  20. Bone morphogenic protein 6: a member of a novel class of prognostic factors expressed by normal and malignant plasma cells inhibiting proliferation and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckinger, Anja; Meissner, Tobias; Moreaux, Jérôme; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Benner, Axel; Hundemer, Michael; Rème, Thierry; Shaughnessy, John D.; Barlogie, Bart; Bertsch, Uta; Hillengass, Jens; Ho, Anthony D.; Pantesco, Véronique; Jauch, Anna; De Vos, John; Rossi, Jean-François; Möhler, Thomas; Klein, Bernard; Hose, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenesis of multiple myeloma is associated with an aberrant expression of pro-proliferative, pro-angiogenic and bone-metabolism modifying factors by malignant plasma cells. Given the frequently long time-span from diagnosis of early-stage plasma cell dyscrasias to overt myeloma and the mostly low proliferation rate of malignant plasma cells, we hypothesize these likewise to express a novel class of inhibitory factors of potential prognostic relevance. Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) represent possible candidates as they inhibit proliferation, stimulate bone formation, and have impact on the survival of cancer patients. We assessed expression of BMPs and their receptors by Affymetrix DNA-microarrays (n=779) including CD138-purified primary myeloma cell samples (n=635) of previously untreated patients. BMP6 is the only BMP expressed by malignant and normal plasma cells. Its expression is significantly lower in proliferating myeloma cells, myeloma cell lines, or plasmablasts. BMP6 significantly inhibits proliferation of myeloma cell lines, survival of primary myeloma cells, and in vitro angiogenesis. High BMP6-expression in primary myeloma cell samples delineates significantly superior overall survival for patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy independent of conventional prognostic factors (ISS-stage, beta-2-microglobulin). PMID:19718049

  1. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, C; Liu, Zongrang; Scorza, Ralph

    2011-04-01

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with the apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KNOX1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a medium lacking cytokinin. Ectopic expression of KNOX genes retarded shoot growth by suppressing elongation of internodes in transgenic tobacco plants. Expression of each of the three KNOX1 genes induced malformation and extensive lobbing in tobacco leaves. In situ regeneration of adventitious shoots was observed from leaves and roots of transgenic tobacco plants expressing each of the three KNOX genes. In vitro culture of leaf explants and internode sections excised from in vitro grown MdKN1 expressing tobacco shoots regenerated adventitious shoots on MS (Murashige and Skoog 1962) basal medium in the absence of exogenous cytokinin. Transgenic plum plants that expressed the MdKN2 or corn KNOX1 gene grew normally but MdKN1 caused a significant reduction in plant height, leaf shape and size and produced malformed curly leaves. A high frequency of adventitious shoot regeneration (96%) was observed in cultures of leaf explants excised from corn KNOX1-expressing transgenic plum shoots. In contrast to KNOX1-expressing tobacco, leaf and internode explants of corn KNOX1-expressing plum required synthetic cytokinin (thidiazuron) in the culture medium to induce adventitious shoot regeneration. The induction of high-frequency regeneration of adventitious shoots in vitro from leaves and stem internodal sections of plum through the ectopic expression of a KNOX1 gene is the first such report for a woody perennial fruit trees.

  2. Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L. SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of two divergent classes of SUN proteins in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Carl R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear envelope that separates the contents of the nucleus from the cytoplasm provides a surface for chromatin attachment and organization of the cortical nucleoplasm. Proteins associated with it have been well characterized in many eukaryotes but not in plants. SUN (Sad1p/Unc-84 domain proteins reside in the inner nuclear membrane and function with other proteins to form a physical link between the nucleoskeleton and the cytoskeleton. These bridges transfer forces across the nuclear envelope and are increasingly recognized to play roles in nuclear positioning, nuclear migration, cell cycle-dependent breakdown and reformation of the nuclear envelope, telomere-led nuclear reorganization during meiosis, and karyogamy. Results We found and characterized a family of maize SUN-domain proteins, starting with a screen of maize genomic sequence data. We characterized five different maize ZmSUN genes (ZmSUN1-5, which fell into two classes (probably of ancient origin, as they are also found in other monocots, eudicots, and even mosses. The first (ZmSUN1, 2, here designated canonical C-terminal SUN-domain (CCSD, includes structural homologs of the animal and fungal SUN-domain protein genes. The second (ZmSUN3, 4, 5, here designated plant-prevalent mid-SUN 3 transmembrane (PM3, includes a novel but conserved structural variant SUN-domain protein gene class. Mircroarray-based expression analyses revealed an intriguing pollen-preferred expression for ZmSUN5 mRNA but low-level expression (50-200 parts per ten million in multiple tissues for all the others. Cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA for a PM3-type maize gene, ZmSUN4, is described. Peptide antibodies to ZmSUN3, 4 were used in western-blot and cell-staining assays to show that they are expressed and show concentrated staining at the nuclear periphery. Conclusions The maize genome encodes and expresses at least five different SUN-domain proteins, of which the PM3

  3. Phylogenetic characterization of Clonorchis sinensis proteins homologous to the sigma-class glutathione transferase and their differential expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Kong, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferase (GST) is one of the major antioxidant proteins with diverse supplemental activities including peroxidase, isomerase, and thiol transferase. GSTs are classified into multiple classes on the basis of their primary structures and substrate/inhibitor specificity. However, the evolutionary routes and physiological environments specific to each of the closely related bioactive enzymes remain elusive. The sigma-like GSTs exhibit amino acid conservation patterns similar to the prostaglandin D synthases (PGDSs). In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic position of the GSTs of the biocarcinogenic liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis. We also observed induction profile of the GSTs in association with the parasite's maturation and in response to exogenous oxidative stresses, with special attention to sigma-class GSTs and PGDSs. The C. sinensis genome encoded 12 GST protein species, which were separately assigned to cytosolic (two omega-, one zeta-, two mu-, and five sigma-class), mitochondrial (one kappa-class), and microsomal (one membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism-like protein) GST families. Multiple sigma GST (or PGDS) orthologs were also detected in Opisthorchis viverrini. Other trematode species possessed only a single sigma-like GST gene. A phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that one of the sigma GST lineages duplicated in the common ancestor of trematodes were specifically expanded in the opisthorchiids, but deleted in other trematodes. The induction profiles of these sigma GST genes along with the development and aging of C. sinensis, and against various exogenous chemical stimuli strongly suggest that the paralogous sigma GST genes might be undergone specialized evolution to cope with the diverse hostile biochemical environments within the mammalian hepatobiliary ductal system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The physiological effects of IGF-1 (class 1:Ea transgene) over-expression on exercise-induced damage and adaptation in dystrophic muscles of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, James A; Pinniger, Gavin J; Hamer, Peter W; Grounds, Miranda D

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder in which muscle weakness and fragility contribute to ongoing muscle degeneration. Although exercise-induced muscle damage is associated with adaptation that protects normal muscle from further damage, exploiting this process to protect dystrophic muscle has been avoided for fear of inducing excessive muscle degeneration. However, muscle-specific over-expression of the class 1:Ea isoform of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) reduces myofibre necrosis in dystrophic mdx mice (a model for DMD) and, therefore, may enhance the adaptation process in response to eccentric exercise. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of transgenic class 1:Ea IGF-1 over-expression on the susceptibility to muscle damage and subsequent adaptation in 12-week-old dystrophic mdx and non-dystrophic control mice. Experiments were conducted in vivo using a custom-built isokinetic mouse dynamometer to measure the deficit in joint torque (indicating muscle damage) after 20 maximal lengthening (eccentric) contractions. Adaptation to this damaging exercise was evaluated by repeating the protocol 7 days after the initial exercise. The over-expression of IGF-1 significantly increased the normalised joint torque in non-dystrophic mice and appeared to ameliorate the muscle weakness in dystrophic mice. All mice displayed a marked reduction in the susceptibility to muscle damage on day 7; however, this adaptation was unaffected by IGF-1, showing that IGF-1 does not protect the dystrophic muscles of adult mdx mice against damage resulting from maximal lengthening contractions.

  5. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A Los nevos melanocíticos premalignos quiescentes no expresan la molécula MHC class I chain-related protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes B. Fuertes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK cells, CD8+ aßTCR and ?dTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-? secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease- induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis, premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA es una molécula casi ausente en células normales pero sobre-expresada por células tumorales, que promueve el reconocimiento por células citotóxicas naturales (natural killer o NK y por

  6. Expressão da tristeza em camada popular urbana de Salvador, Bahia, Brasil The expression of sadness in a working class bairro in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Alessandra F. da Costa

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo examina as peculiaridades da expressão da emoção em um bairro popular de Salvador, Bahia, o Nordeste de Amaralina. Focalizando nossa exploração na expressão da tristeza, tentamos construir um esquema que possibilite a compreensão de como os informantes percebem, identificam e lidam com esta emoção no curso de suas vidas cotidianas. Perseguindo este objetivo, construímos uma rede semântica que revela a existência de três agrupamentos principais de expressão emocional: um grupo "interior", um "corporal" e outro "interativo". Observamos também as superposições entre o universo da expressão emocional e o conceito de pessoa local.This paper examines the peculiarities of the expression of emotion in a poor neighborhood from Northeastern Brazil, the bairro of Nordeste de Amaralina, in Salvador, Bahia. Focusing on the expression of sadness, we built a scheme in which to understand how the informants perceive, identify, and deal with this emotion in the course of their daily lives. We attempted to reach an understanding of the wavs people in the bairro interpret sadness. In order to accomplish this goal. we built a semantic network which revealed three main clusters of emotional expression: the inner set, the bodily set, and the interactional set. We came to realize the various superpositions benween the universe of emotional expression and the local concept of person.

  7. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor is required for cholecystokinin secretion in response to L-phenylalanine in acutely isolated intestinal I cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Alice P; Sei, Yoshitatsu; Zhao, Xilin; Feng, Jianying; Lu, Xinping; Thomas, Craig; Pechhold, Susanne; Raybould, Helen E; Wank, Stephen A

    2011-04-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has recently been recognized as an L-amino acid sensor and has been implicated in mediating cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion in response to aromatic amino acids. We investigated whether direct detection of L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) by CaSR results in CCK secretion in the native I cell. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of duodenal I cells from CCK-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice demonstrated CaSR gene expression. Immunostaining of fixed and fresh duodenal tissue sections confirmed CaSR protein expression. Intracellular calcium fluxes were CaSR dependent, stereoselective for L-Phe over D-Phe, and responsive to type II calcimimetic cinacalcet in CCK-eGFP cells. Additionally, CCK secretion by an isolated I cell population was increased by 30 and 62% in response to L-Phe in the presence of physiological (1.26 mM) and superphysiological (2.5 mM) extracellular calcium concentrations, respectively. While the deletion of CaSR from CCK-eGFP cells did not affect basal CCK secretion, the effect of L-Phe or cinacalcet on intracellular calcium flux was lost. In fact, both secretagogues, as well as superphysiological Ca(2+), evoked an unexpected 20-30% decrease in CCK secretion compared with basal secretion in CaSR(-/-) CCK-eGFP cells. CCK secretion in response to KCl or tryptone was unaffected by the absence of CaSR. The present data suggest that CaSR is required for hormone secretion in the specific response to L-Phe by the native I cell, and that a receptor-mediated mechanism may inhibit hormone secretion in the absence of a fully functional CaSR.

  8. Protein hydrolysate-induced cholecystokinin secretion from enteroendocrine cells is indirectly mediated by the intestinal oligopeptide transporter PepT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Alice P; Chavez, Diana I; Espero, Elvis; Hao, Shuzhen; Wank, Stephen A; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-01

    Dietary protein is a major stimulant for cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion by the intestinal I cell, however, the mechanism by which protein is detected is unknown. Indirect functional evidence suggests that PepT1 may play a role in CCK-mediated changes in gastric motor function. However, it is unclear whether this oligopeptide transporter directly or indirectly activates the I cell. Using both the CCK-expressing enteroendocrine STC-1 cell and acutely isolated native I cells from CCK-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mice, we aimed to determine whether PepT1 directly activates the enteroendocrine cell to elicit CCK secretion in response to oligopeptides. Both STC-1 cells and isolated CCK-eGFP cells expressed PepT1 transcripts. STC-1 cells were activated, as measured by ERK(1/2) phosphorylation, by both peptone and the PepT1 substrate Cefaclor; however, the PepT1 inhibitor 4-aminomethyl benzoic acid (AMBA) had no effect on STC-1 cell activity. The PepT1-transportable substrate glycyl-sarcosine dose-dependently decreased gastric motility in anesthetized rats but had no affect on activation of STC-1 cells or on CCK secretion by CCK-eGFP cells. CCK secretion was significantly increased in response to peptone but not to Cefaclor, cephalexin, or Phe-Ala in CCK-eGFP cells. Taken together, the data suggest that PepT1 does not directly mediate CCK secretion in response to PepT1 specific substrates. PepT1, instead, may have an indirect role in protein sensing in the intestine.

  9. Expressão de antígenos MHC classe I e de células CD4 e CD8 na polimiosite e dermatomiosite

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Renata Graça; João Aris Kouyoumdjian

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Analisar as frequências de expressão dos antígenos de complexo principal de histocompatibilidade classe I (MHC-I) e células CD4 e CD8 no músculo esquelético na polimiosite (PM) e dermatomiosite (DM). Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de 34 casos de PM, oito casos de DM e 29 controles com miopatias não inflamatórias. Resultados: Os antígenos MHC-I expressaram-se no sarcolema e/ou sarcoplasma em 79,4% dos casos de PM, 62,5% dos casos de DM...

  10. Apelin stimulates both cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 secretions in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattez, Jean-Sébastien; Ravallec, Rozenn; Cudennec, Benoit; Knauf, Claude; Dhulster, Pascal; Valet, Philippe; Breton, Christophe; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Apelin is an enteric peptide that exerts several digestive functions such as stimulation of cell proliferation and cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion. We investigated using murine enteroendocrine cell line (STC-1) and rats if apelin-13 stimulates both CCK and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretions. We demonstrated that, in vitro and in vivo, apelin-13 increases the release of these two hormones in a dose-dependent manner. Present data suggest that apelin may modulate digestive functions, food intake behavior and glucose homoeostasis via apelin-induced release of enteric CCK but also through a new incretin-releasing activity on enteric GLP-1.

  11. 2-Phenylethyl ester and 2-phenylethyl amide derivative analogues of the C-terminal hepta- and octapeptide of cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcrand, P; Rodriguez, M; Galas, M C; Lignon, M F; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1988-11-01

    Syntheses of analogues of the C-terminal octa- and heptapeptide of cholecystokinin are described. These analogues were obtained by replacing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue by 2-phenylethyl alcohol or by 2-phenylethylamine derivatives and by replacing the tryptophan residue by a D-tryptophan. The CCK-derivatives were tested for their ability to inhibit binding of labeled CCK-8 to rat pancreatic acini and to guinea pig brain membranes, and for their action on stimulation of amylase release from rat pancreatic acini. Some of these derivatives appeared to exhibit only part of the CCK-activity on amylase release, the D-Trp analogues behaving as CCK-antagonists.

  12. Synthesis and biological activities of some cholecystokinin analogues substituted in position 29 by a beta-alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M; Rolland, M; Lignon, M F; Galas, M C; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1989-11-01

    Syntheses of analogues of the C-terminal heptapeptide of cholecystokinin are described. These analogues were obtained by replacing glycine 29 by a beta-alanine. The C-terminal phenylalanine amide was in some cases substituted by 2-phenylethyl alcohol and/or residues of the C-terminal tetrapeptide by their D-enantiomers. These compounds were tested for their action on stimulation of amylase release from rat pancreatic acini and for their ability to inhibit binding of labeled CCK to rat pancreatic acini and guinea pig brain membranes. Some of these derivatives behaved as CCK receptor antagonists.

  13. Cholecystokinin-33 acutely attenuates food foraging, hoarding and intake in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubner, Brett J W; Bartness, Timothy J

    2010-04-01

    Neurochemicals that stimulate food foraging and hoarding in Siberian hamsters are becoming more apparent, but we do not know if cessation of these behaviors is due to waning of excitatory stimuli and/or the advent of inhibitory factors. Cholecystokinin (CCK) may be such an inhibitory factor as it is the prototypic gastrointestinal satiety peptide and is physiologically important in decreasing food intake in several species including Siberian hamsters. Systemic injection of CCK-33 in laboratory rats decreases food intake, doing so to a greater extent than CCK-8. We found minimal effects of CCK-8 on food foraging and hoarding previously in Siberian hamsters, but have not tested CCK-33. Therefore, we asked: Does CCK-33 decrease normal levels or food deprivation-induced increases in food foraging, hoarding and intake? Hamsters were housed in a wheel running-based foraging system with simulated burrows to test the effects of peripheral injections of CCK-33 (13.2, 26.4, or 52.8 microg/kg body mass), with or without a preceding 56 h food deprivation. The highest dose of CCK-33 caused large baseline reductions in all three behaviors for the 1st hour post-injection compared with saline; in addition, the intermediate CCK-33 dose was sufficient to curtail food intake and foraging during the 1st hour. In food-deprived hamsters, we used a 52.8 microg/kg body mass dose of CCK-33 which decreased food intake, hoarding, and foraging almost completely compared with saline controls for 1h. Therefore, CCK-33 appears to be a potent inhibitor of food intake, hoarding, and foraging in Siberian hamsters.

  14. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide restored morphine-induced hippocampal long-term potentiation impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Di; Zang, Guoqing; Sun, DongLei; Yu, Feng; Mei, Dong; Ma, Chunling; Cong, Bin

    2014-01-24

    Cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8), which is a typical brain-gut peptide, exerts a wide range of biological activities on the central nervous system. We have previously reported that CCK-8 significantly alleviated morphine-induced amnesia and reversed spine density decreases in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in morphine-treated animals. Here, we investigated the effects of CCK-8 on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the lateral perforant path (LPP)-granule cell synapse of rat dentate gyrus (DG) in acute saline or morphine-treated rats. Population spikes (PS), which were evoked by stimulation of the LPP, were recorded in the DG region. Acute morphine (30mg/kg, s.c.) treatment significantly attenuated hippocampal LTP and CCK-8 (1μg, i.c.v.) restored the amplitude of PS that was attenuated by morphine injection. Furthermore, microinjection of CCK-8 (0.1 and 1μg, i.c.v.) also significantly augmented hippocampal LTP in saline-treated (1ml/kg, s.c.) rats. Pre-treatment of the CCK2 receptor antagonist L-365,260 (10μg, i.c.v) reversed the effects of CCK-8, but the CCK1 receptor antagonist L-364,718 (10μg, i.c.v) did not. The present results demonstrate that CCK-8 attenuates the effect of morphine on hippocampal LTP through CCK2 receptors and suggest an ameliorative function of CCK-8 on morphine-induced memory impairment.

  15. Cholecystokinin facilitates neuronal excitability in the entorhinal cortex via activation of TRPC-like channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouping; Zhang, An-Ping; Kurada, Lalitha; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Lei, Saobo

    2011-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the brain, where it interacts with two G protein-coupled receptors (CCK-1 and CCK-2). Activation of both CCK receptors increases the activity of PLC, resulting in increases in intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) release and activation of PKC. Whereas high density of CCK receptors has been detected in the superficial layers of the entorhinal cortex (EC), the functions of CCK in this brain region have not been determined. Here, we studied the effects of CCK on neuronal excitability of layer III pyramidal neurons in the EC. Our results showed that CCK remarkably increased the firing frequency of action potentials (APs). The effects of CCK on neuronal excitability were mediated via activation of CCK-2 receptors and required the functions of G proteins and PLC. However, CCK-mediated facilitation of neuronal excitability was independent of inositol trisphosphate receptors and PKC. CCK facilitated neuronal excitability by activating a cationic channel to generate membrane depolarization. The effects of CCK were suppressed by the generic, nonselective cationic channel blockers, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate and flufenamic acid, but potentiated by gadolinium ion and lanthanum ion at 100 μM. Depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) also counteracted CCK-induced increases in AC firing frequency. Moreover, CCK-induced enhancement of neuronal excitability was inhibited significantly by intracellular application of the antibody to transient receptor potential channel 5 (TRPC5), suggesting the involvement of TRPC5 channels. Our results provide a cellular and molecular mechanism to help explain the functions of CCK in vivo.

  16. Age and nutritional state influence the effects of cholecystokinin on energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaskó, M; Rostás, I; Füredi, N; Mikó, A; Tenk, J; Cséplő, P; Koncsecskó-Gáspár, M; Soós, S; Székely, M; Pétervári, E

    2013-11-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is anorexic, irrespective whether it is applied intraperitoneally (IP) or intracerebroventricularly (ICV) in male Wistar rats. The metabolic effects depend on the route of administration: by the IP route it elicits hypothermia (presumably by type-1 receptors, CCK1R-s), while ICV administration is followed by fever-like hypermetabolism and hyperthermia via activation of CCK2R-s, which latter response seems to be most important in the postprandial (compensatory) hypermetabolism. The efficacy of the IP injected CCK varies with age: it causes strong anorexia in young adult 4 and 6-months old and again in old rats (aged 18-24 months), but the middle-aged (12-month old) ones seem to be resistant to this effect. Such pattern of effects may contribute to the explanation of age-related obesity observed in middle-aged animals as well as to the aging anorexia and loss of body weight in old ones. Diet-induced obesity accelerates the appearance of CCK-resistance as well as the return of high sensitivity to CCK in further aging, while chronic calorie-restriction prevents the development of resistance, as if the speed of the age-related regulatory changes was altered by the nutritional state. The effects of ICV applied CCK also change with age: the characteristic anorexic and hypermetabolic/hyperthermic effects can be observed in young adult rats, but the effects gradually and monotonically decline with age and disappear by the old age of 24 months. These disparate age-related patterns of CCK efficacy upon peripheral or central administration routes may indicate that although both peripheral and central CCKR-s exert anorexic effects, they may have dissimilar roles in the regulation of overall energy balance.

  17. Serotonin and cholecystokinin mediate nutrient-induced segmentation in guinea pig small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Melina; Chambers, Jordan D; Gwynne, Rachel M; Bornstein, Joel C

    2013-04-15

    Segmentation is an important process in nutrient mixing and absorption; however, the mechanisms underlying this motility pattern are poorly understood. Segmentation can be induced by luminal perfusion of fatty acid in guinea pig small intestine in vitro and mimicked by the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (300 nM) and by cholecystokinin (CCK). Serotonergic and CCK-related mechanisms underlying nutrient-induced segmentation were investigated using selective 5-HT and CCK receptor antagonists on isolated segments of small intestine luminally perfused with 1 mM decanoic acid. Motility patterns were analyzed using video imaging and spatiotemporal maps. Segmenting activity mediated by decanoic acid was depressed following luminal application of the 5-HT receptor antagonists granisetron (5-HT(3), 1 μM) and SB-207266 (5-HT(4), 10 nM) and the CCK receptor antagonists devazepide (CCK-1, 300 nM) and L-365260 (CCK-2, 300 nM), but these antagonists did not further depress segmentation when combined. The P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonate (10 μM) had no effect on activity. Serosal application of 5-HT antagonists had little effect on segmentation in the duodenum but reduced activity in the jejunum when granisetron and SB-207266 were applied together. These results reveal that 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptors, as well as CCK-1 and CCK-2 receptors, are critical in regulating decanoic acid-induced segmentation. Computational simulation indicated that these data are consistent with decanoic acid activating two pathways in the mucosa that converge within the enteric neural circuitry, while contraction-induced release of 5-HT from the mucosa provides feedback into the neural circuit to set the time course of the overall contractile activity.

  18. Differences in the expressed HLA class I alleles effect the differential clustering of HIV type 1-specific T cell responses in infected Chinese and Caucasians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu,XG; Addo,MM; Perkins,BA; Wej,FL; Rathod,A; Geer,SC; Parta,M; Cohen,D; Stone,DR; Russell,CJ; Tanzi,G; Mei,S; Wureel,AG; Frahm,N; Lichterfeld,M; Heath,L; Mullins,JI; Marincola,F; Goulder,PJR; Brander,C; Allen,T; Cao,YZ; Walker,BD; Altfeld,M

    2005-01-01

    China is a region of the world with a rapidly spreading HIV-1 epidemic. Studies providing insights into HIV-1 pathogenesis in infected Chinese are urgently needed to support the design and testing of an effective HIV-1 vaccine for this population. HIV-1-specific T cell responses were characterized in 32 HIV-1-infected individuals of Chinese origin and compared to 34 infected caucasians using 410 overlapping peptides spanning the entire HIV-1 clade B consensus sequence in an IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. All HIV-1 proteins were targeted with similar frequency in both populations and all study subjects recognized at least one overlapping peptide. HIV-1-specific T cell responses clustered in seven different regions of the HIV-1 genome in the Chinese cohort and in nine different regions in the caucasian cohort. The dominant HLA class I alleles expressed in the two populations differed significantly, and differences in epitope clustering pattern were shown to be influenced by differences in class I alleles that restrict immunodominant epitopes. These studies demonstrate that the clustering of HIV-1-specific T cell responses is influenced by the genetic HLA class I background in the study populations. The design and testing of candidate vaccines to fight the rapidly growing HIV-1 epidemic must therefore take the HLA genetics of the population into account as specific regions of the virus can be expected to be differentially targeted in ethnically diverse populations.

  19. Effects of Extracts from Tiaozhi Granule and Its Components on Expression of Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Bao, Rong-Qi; Yu, Jia-Yu; Zhang, Guo-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Sera from the rats with different drug treatments (atorvastatin, Tiaozhi granule, or its extracts) were collected. LO-2 cells or HepG2 cells were pretreated with different sera as the following groups randomly: (1) blank control group, (2) positive control group (atorvastatin group), (3) Tiaozhi granule water extract groups, (4) Tiaozhi granule alcohol extract groups, and (5) alcohol extracts for each component: Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae, Curcuma longa L., and Rhizoma Alismatis. LO-2 cells were cotransfected with plasmid carrying SR-BI and pRL-TK promoter genes. Promoter activity was measured by the luciferase reporter gene assay. The mRNA and protein expressions of SR-BI were examined using real-time PCR and western blot analyses. Our results show that promoter activity and mRNA and protein expression levels of the SR-BI were significantly upregulated by Tiaozhi granules alcohol or water extracts in a dose-dependent manner. Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae alcohol extract with a high dosage could also increase SR-BI activity and expression, but not the extracts from Curcuma longa L. and Rhizoma Alismatis. Both Tiaozhi granule alcohol and water extracts can upregulate SR-BI gene expression. Among the components, Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae are important for the regulatory effect coordinating with Curcuma longa L. and Rhizoma Alismatis. PMID:28050195

  20. Effects of Extracts from Tiaozhi Granule and Its Components on Expression of Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sera from the rats with different drug treatments (atorvastatin, Tiaozhi granule, or its extracts were collected. LO-2 cells or HepG2 cells were pretreated with different sera as the following groups randomly: (1 blank control group, (2 positive control group (atorvastatin group, (3 Tiaozhi granule water extract groups, (4 Tiaozhi granule alcohol extract groups, and (5 alcohol extracts for each component: Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae, Curcuma longa L., and Rhizoma Alismatis. LO-2 cells were cotransfected with plasmid carrying SR-BI and pRL-TK promoter genes. Promoter activity was measured by the luciferase reporter gene assay. The mRNA and protein expressions of SR-BI were examined using real-time PCR and western blot analyses. Our results show that promoter activity and mRNA and protein expression levels of the SR-BI were significantly upregulated by Tiaozhi granules alcohol or water extracts in a dose-dependent manner. Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae alcohol extract with a high dosage could also increase SR-BI activity and expression, but not the extracts from Curcuma longa L. and Rhizoma Alismatis. Both Tiaozhi granule alcohol and water extracts can upregulate SR-BI gene expression. Among the components, Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae are important for the regulatory effect coordinating with Curcuma longa L. and Rhizoma Alismatis.

  1. MHC class I expression in HPV positive and negative tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma in correlation to clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsman, Anders; Andersson, Emilia; Nordfors, Cecilia; Grün, Nathalie; Johansson, Hemming; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Massucci, Giuseppe; Dalianis, Tina; Ramqvist, Torbjörn

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important factor for the development of tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). In addition, patients with HPV-positive TSCC have a better clinical outcome than patients with HPV-negative TSCC. Although, HPV is an important prognostic marker, additional biomarkers are needed to better predict clinical outcome to individualize treatment. Hence, we examined if classical HLA HLA-A,B,C and nonclassical HLA-E,G could serve as such marker. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded TSCC from 150 patients diagnosed 2000-2006, earlier analyzed for HPV DNA and p16(INK4a), and treated with intention to cure were evaluated for the expression of HLA-A,B,C and HLA-E,G by immunohistochemistry. For HPV-positive TSCC a low expression of HLA-A,B,C, whereas for HPV-negative TSCC, a normal expression of HLA-A,B,C was significantly correlated to a favorable clinical outcome. These correlations were more pronounced for membrane staining of HLA-A,B,C when compared with cytoplasmatic staining. No significant correlation was found between HLA-E,G and HPV status or clinical outcome. The unexpected contrasting correlation between HLA-A,B,C expression, and clinical outcome depending on HPV, indicates essential differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative TSCC. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that for both HPV-positive and HPV-negative TSCC, the expression of HLA-A,B,C together with HPV may serve as a useful biomarker for predicting clinical outcome. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. High-Temperature-Induced Defects in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Anther and Pollen Development Are Associated with Reduced Expression of B-Class Floral Patterning Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Lieke; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; de Groot, Peter F. M.; Jansma, Stuart Y.; Mariani, Celestina; Park, Sunghun

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is a critical process in the life-cycle of plants and very sensitive to environmental perturbations. To better understand the effect of high temperature on plant reproduction, we cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants in continuous mild heat. Under this condition we observed a simultaneous reduction in pollen viability and appearance of anthers with pistil-like structures, while in a more thermotolerant genotype, both traits were improved. Ectopic expression of two pistil-specific genes, TRANSMITTING TISSUE SPECIFIC and TOMATO AGAMOUS LIKE11, in the anthers confirmed that the anthers had gained partial pistil identity. Concomitantly, expression of the B-class genes TOMATO APETALA3, TOMATO MADS BOX GENE6 (TM6) and LePISTILLATA was reduced in anthers under continuous mild heat. Plants in which TM6 was partially silenced reacted hypersensitively to temperature elevation with regard to the frequency of pistilloid anthers, pollen viability and pollen quantity. Taken together, these results suggest that high-temperature-induced down-regulation of tomato B-class genes contributes to anther deformations and reduced male fertility. Improving our understanding of how temperature perturbs the molecular mechanisms of anther and pollen development will be important in the view of maintaining agricultural output under current climate changes. PMID:27936079

  3. High-Temperature-Induced Defects in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Anther and Pollen Development Are Associated with Reduced Expression of B-Class Floral Patterning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Florian; Xu, Jiemeng; Kristensen, Lieke; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; de Groot, Peter F M; Jansma, Stuart Y; Mariani, Celestina; Park, Sunghun; Rieu, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is a critical process in the life-cycle of plants and very sensitive to environmental perturbations. To better understand the effect of high temperature on plant reproduction, we cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants in continuous mild heat. Under this condition we observed a simultaneous reduction in pollen viability and appearance of anthers with pistil-like structures, while in a more thermotolerant genotype, both traits were improved. Ectopic expression of two pistil-specific genes, TRANSMITTING TISSUE SPECIFIC and TOMATO AGAMOUS LIKE11, in the anthers confirmed that the anthers had gained partial pistil identity. Concomitantly, expression of the B-class genes TOMATO APETALA3, TOMATO MADS BOX GENE6 (TM6) and LePISTILLATA was reduced in anthers under continuous mild heat. Plants in which TM6 was partially silenced reacted hypersensitively to temperature elevation with regard to the frequency of pistilloid anthers, pollen viability and pollen quantity. Taken together, these results suggest that high-temperature-induced down-regulation of tomato B-class genes contributes to anther deformations and reduced male fertility. Improving our understanding of how temperature perturbs the molecular mechanisms of anther and pollen development will be important in the view of maintaining agricultural output under current climate changes.

  4. A microarray platform-independent classification tool for cell of origin class allows comparative analysis of gene expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Care

    Full Text Available Cell of origin classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL identifies subsets with biological and clinical significance. Despite the established nature of the classification existing studies display variability in classifier implementation, and a comparative analysis across multiple data sets is lacking. Here we describe the validation of a cell of origin classifier for DLBCL, based on balanced voting between 4 machine-learning tools: the DLBCL automatic classifier (DAC. This shows superior survival separation for assigned Activated B-cell (ABC and Germinal Center B-cell (GCB DLBCL classes relative to a range of other classifiers. DAC is effective on data derived from multiple microarray platforms and formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples and is parsimonious, using 20 classifier genes. We use DAC to perform a comparative analysis of gene expression in 10 data sets (2030 cases. We generate ranked meta-profiles of genes showing consistent class-association using ≥6 data sets as a cut-off: ABC (414 genes and GCB (415 genes. The transcription factor ZBTB32 emerges as the most consistent and differentially expressed gene in ABC-DLBCL while other transcription factors such as ARID3A, BATF, and TCF4 are also amongst the 24 genes associated with this class in all datasets. Analysis of enrichment of 12323 gene signatures against meta-profiles and all data sets individually confirms consistent associations with signatures of molecular pathways, chromosomal cytobands, and transcription factor binding sites. We provide DAC as an open access Windows application, and the accompanying meta-analyses as a resource.

  5. Partial plasma cell differentiation as a mechanism of lost major histocompatibility complex class II expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Sarah T; Vanpatten, Kristie A; Fernandez, Diane R; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Garsha, Karl E; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty J; Grogan, Thomas M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Rimsza, Lisa M

    2012-02-09

    Loss of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression is associated with poor patient outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). As MHC II molecules are lost with plasmacytic differentiation in normal cells, we asked whether MHC II loss in DLBCL is associated with an altered differentiation state. We used gene expression profiling, quantum dots, and immunohistochemistry to study the relationship between MHC II and plasma cell markers in DLBCL and plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Results demonstrate that MHC II(-) DLBCL immunophenotypically overlap with PBL and demonstrate an inverse correlation between MHC II and plasma cell markers MUM1, PRDM1/Blimp1, and XBP1s. In addition, MHC II expression is significantly higher in germinal center-DLBCL than activated B cell-DLBCL. A minor subset of cases with an unusual pattern of mislocalized punctate MHC II staining and intermediate levels of mRNA is also described. Finally, we show that PBL is negative for MHC II. The results imply a spectrum of MHC II expression that is more frequently diminished in tumors derived from B cells at the later stages of differentiation (with complete loss in PBL). Our observations provide a possible unifying concept that may contribute to the poor outcome reported in all MHC II(-) B-cell tumors.

  6. Heterotopic expression of B-class floral homeotic genes PISTILLATA/GLOBOSA supports a modified model for crocus (Crocus sativus L.) flower formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, Apostolos; Pasentsis, Konstantinos; Polidoros, Alexios N; Tsaftaris, Athanasios S

    2007-04-01

    For uncovering and understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling flower development in cultivated Crocus sativus and particularly the transformation of sepals in outer whorl (whorl 1) tepals, we have cloned and characterized the expression of a family of five PISTILLATA/GLOBOSA-like (PI/GLO-like) MADS-box genes expressed in the C. sativus flower. The deduced amino acid sequences of the coded proteins indicated high homology with members of the MADS-box family of transcription factors, and particularly with other members of the PI/GLO family of MADS-box proteins that control floral organ identity. PI/GLO expression studies in cultivated C. sativus uncover the presence of PI/GLO transcripts not only in the second and third whorls of flower organs as expected, but also in the outer whorl tepals that are the sepals in most typical flowers. This heterotopic expression of both B-class genes: PI/GLO and AP3/DEF, known to form heterodimers for stamens and petals (petaloid inner whor l-whorl 2-tepals in C. sativus), explains the homeotic transformation of sepals into outer whorl tepals in this species. Analysis of PI/GLO sequences from C. sativus for putative targets to known micro-RNAs (miRNAs) showed that the target site for ath-miRNA167 found in Arabidopsis thaliana PI is not present in C. sativus, however, the PI/GLO sequences may be regulated by an ath-miRNA163.

  7. Expressão de antígenos MHC classe I e de células CD4 e CD8 na polimiosite e dermatomiosite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Renata Graça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar as frequências de expressão dos antígenos de complexo principal de histocompatibilidade classe I (MHC-I e células CD4 e CD8 no músculo esquelético na polimiosite (PM e dermatomiosite (DM. Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de 34 casos de PM, oito casos de DM e 29 controles com miopatias não inflamatórias. Resultados: Os antígenos MHC-I expressaram-se no sarcolema e/ou sarcoplasma em 79,4% dos casos de PM, 62,5% dos casos de DM e 27,6% dos controles (a expressão de CD4 foi observada em 76,5%, 75% e 13,8%, respectivamente. Quando os antígenos de MHC-I foram coexpressados com CD4, houve elevada suspeita de PM/DM (principalmente PM. Em 14,3% dos casos de PM/DM, observou-se a expressão isolada dos antígenos MHC-I, sem células inflamatórias. Conclusão: A expressão dos antígenos MHC-I e a positividade do CD4 podem aumentar a suspeita diagnóstica de PM/DM. Não foi observado infiltrado celular em 14,3% dos casos.

  8. Identification of genes involved in the expression of atypical lipooligosaccharide structures from a second class of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Deborah M B; Munson, Robert S; Baker, Beth; Zhong, Huachun; Bozue, Joel A; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of chancroid. Strain 35000HP has been well characterized and is representative of the majority of H. ducreyi strains. Strain 35000HP produces a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) that contains D-glycero-D-manno-heptose in the main oligosaccharide chain extension; the lbgB gene has been shown to encode the DD-heptosyltransferase. The lbgB gene is found in a gene cluster together with the lbgA gene, which encodes for the galactosyltransferase I. These two genes are flanked by two housekeeping genes, rpmE and xthA, encoding the ribosomal protein L31 and the exonuclease III, respectively. Recently, a second group of H. ducreyi strains have been identified. Strain 33921, a representative of the class II strains, produces an LOS that lacks DD-heptose in the oligosaccharide portion of its LOS. To better understand the biosynthesis of the DD-heptose-deficient 33921 LOS, we cloned and sequenced the corresponding lbgAB genomic region from strain 33921. Similar to strain 35000HP, the 33921 genome contains xthA and rpmE. However, between these two genes we identified genes encoding two putative glycosyltransferases that were not highly homologous to the 35000HP lbgAB genes. In this study, we demonstrate that the product of one of these genes encodes a galactosyltransferase. In addition, dot blot hybridization determined that 3 of 35 strains tested had the atypical transferases present, as did 4 strains characterized as class II strains by other criterion. These data indicate that the lbgAB genes can serve as one indicator of the classification of H. ducreyi strains.

  9. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  10. The dorsomedial hypothalamus mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia and is the source of the pronociceptive peptide cholecystokinin in the rostral ventromedial medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, K M; Roeder, Z; Desrochers, K; Buhler, A V; Heinricher, M M; Cleary, D R

    2013-05-15

    While intense or highly arousing stressors have long been known to suppress pain, relatively mild or chronic stress can enhance pain. The mechanisms underlying stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) are only now being defined. The physiological and neuroendocrine effects of mild stress are mediated by the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), which has documented connections with the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), a brainstem region capable of facilitating nociception. We hypothesized that stress engages both the DMH and the RVM to produce hyperalgesia. Direct pharmacological activation of the DMH increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation in awake animals, confirming that the DMH can mediate behavioral hyperalgesia. A behavioral model of mild stress also produced mechanical hyperalgesia, which was blocked by inactivation of either the DMH or the RVM. The neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) acts in the RVM to enhance nociception and is abundant in the DMH. Using a retrograde tracer and immunohistochemical labeling, we determined that CCK-expressing neurons in the DMH are the only significant supraspinal source of CCK in the RVM. However, not all neurons projecting from the DMH to the RVM contained CCK, and microinjection of the CCK2 receptor antagonist YM022 in the RVM did not interfere with SIH, suggesting that transmitters in addition to CCK play a significant role in this connection during acute stress. While the RVM has a well-established role in facilitation of nociception, the DMH, with its well-documented role in stress, may also be engaged in a number of chronic or abnormal pain states. Taken as a whole, these findings establish an anatomical and functional connection between the DMH and RVM by which stress can facilitate pain.

  11. "Racializing" Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  12. Changes in messenger RNA of pancreatic enzymes and intestinal cholecystokinin after a 7-day bile-pancreatic juice diversion from the proximal small intestine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, H; Ochi, Y; Kasai, T

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated the bile-pancreatic juice (BPJ)-independent stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion in chronic BPJ-diverted rats. Pancreatic and intestinal adaptation to 7-day BPJ diversion was next examined. Pancreatic enzyme mRNA and cholecystokinin mRNA in the jejunal mucosa were measured in rats with BPJ diverted into the ileum (PBD rats) in comparison with the figures for rats with BPJ returned to the duodenum (normal rats) or laparotomized (Intact) rats under well-nourished conditions. Amylase mRNA in the pancreas was lower and trypsinogen plus chymotrypsinogen mRNA was higher in the PBD rats than in the intact rats. The change in pancreatic mRNA was similar to that in the specific activities of the enzymes after a chronic BPJ diversion. This finding suggests that these pancreatic enzymes were regulated by the mRNA level. The portal concentration of cholecystokinin in the postabsorptive period (exogenously non-stimulated status) was 4-fold higher in the PBD group than in the normal and intact groups. Cholecystokinin mRNA in the jejunal mucosa of PBD rats was somewhat higher than that of intact rats. These results suggest that intestinal cholecystokinin was predominantly increased at the translational or later stage by chronic BPJ diversion.

  13. Quantification of the Sulfated Cholecystokinin CCK8 in Hamster Plasma Using Immunoprecipitation-Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and the different molecular forms of CCK are well established as biomarkers for satiety. CCK hormone and the different biologically active and inactive molecular forms have been shown to influence food intake associated with satiety and are predominately secreted from the gut....

  14. An acidic class III chitinase in sugar beet: induction by Cercospora beticola, characterization, and expression in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, K K; Mikkelsen, J D; Kragh, K M; Bojsen, K

    1993-01-01

    An acidic chitinase (SE) was found to accumulate in leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) during infection with Cercospora beticola. Two isoforms, SE1 and SE2, with MW of 29 kDa and pI of approximately 3.0 were purified to homogeneity. SE2 is an endochitinase that also exhibits exochitinase activity, i.e., it is capable of hydrolyzing chito-oligosaccharides, including chitobiose, into N-acetyl-glucosamine. Partial amino acid sequence data for SE2 were used to obtain a cDNA clone by polymerase chain reaction. The clone was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding SE2. The deduced amino acid sequence for SE2 is 58-67% identical to the class III chitinases from cucumber, Arabidopsis, and tobacco. A transient induction of SE2 mRNA during the early stages of infection with C. beticola is much stronger in tolerant plants than in susceptible plants. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants constitutively accumulate SE2 protein in the intercellular space of their leaves. In a preliminary infection experiment, the transgenic plants did not show increase in resistance against C. nicotianae.

  15. Synthesis of Z-CCK-27-32-NH2, Z-Tyr(SO-3)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2, a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist and an inhibitor of gastrin-induced acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briet, C; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1985-09-01

    The synthesis of the hexapeptide Z-Tyr(SO-3)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2, representing the C-terminal sequence of cholecystokinin minus the C-terminal phenylalanyl residue is described. This peptide was shown to be the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist in vitro described to date. It is also able to inhibit gastrin-induced acid secretion in vivo, in the rat and was proved to antagonize the action of the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin in the central nervous system.

  16. Sulfated cholecystokinin-8 activates phospho-mTOR immunoreactive neurons of the paraventricular nucleus in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommelt, Lisa; Inhoff, Tobias; Lommel, Reinhardt; Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette; Grötzinger, Carsten; Bannert, Norbert; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Kobelt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The serin/threonin-kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was detected in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and suggested to play a role in the integration of satiety signals. Since cholecystokinin (CCK) plays a role in the short-term inhibition of food intake and induces c-Fos in PVN neurons, the aim was to determine whether intraperitoneally injected CCK-8S affects the neuronal activity in cells immunoreactive for phospho-mTOR in the PVN. Ad libitum fed male Sprague-Dawley rats received 6 or 10 μg/kg CCK-8S or 0.15 M NaCl ip (n=4/group). The number of c-Fosimmunoreactive (ir) neurons was assessed in the PVN, ARC and in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). CCK-8S increased the number of c-Fos-ir neurons in the PVN (6 μg: 103 ± 13 vs. 10 μg: 165 ± 14 neurons/section; p<0.05) compared to vehicle treated rats (4 ± 1, p<0.05), but not in the ARC. CCK-8S also dose-dependently increased the number of c-Fos neurons in the NTS. Staining for phospho-mTOR and c-Fos in the PVN showed a dose-dependent increase of activated phospho-mTOR neurons (17 ± 3 vs. 38 ± 2 neurons/section; p<0.05), while no activated phospho-mTOR neurons were observed in the vehicle group. Triple staining in the PVN showed activation of phospho-mTOR neurons co-localized with oxytocin, corresponding to 9.8 ± 3.6% and 19.5 ± 3.3% of oxytocin neurons respectively. Our observations indicate that peripheral CCK-8S activates phospho-mTOR neurons in the PVN and suggest that phospho-mTOR plays a role in the mediation of CCK-8S's anorexigenic effects. PMID:20933028

  17. Insulin is necessary for the hypertrophic effect of cholecystokinin-octapeptide following acute necrotizing experimental pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Péter Hegyi; Zoltán Rakonczay Jr; Réka Sári; László Czakó; Norbert Farkas; Csaba Góg; József Németh; János Lonovics; Tamás Takács

    2004-01-01

    AIM: In previous experiments we have demonstrated that by administering low doses of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8), the process of regeneration following L-arginine (Arg)-induced pancreatitis is accelerated. In rats that were also diabetic (induced by streptozotocin, STZ), pancreatic regeneration was not observed. The aim of this study was to deduce whether the administration of exogenous insulin could in fact restore the hypertrophic effect of CCK-8 in diabetic-pancreatitic rats.METHODS: Male Wistar rats were used for the experiments.Diabetes mellitus was induced by administering 60 mg/kg body mass of STZ intraperitoneally (i.p.), then, on d 8,pancreatitis was induced by 200 mg/100 g body mass Arg i.p. twice at an interval of 1 h. The animals were injected subcutaneously twice daily (at 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.) with 1 μg/kg of CCK-8 and/or 2 IU mixed insulin (300 g/L shortaction and 700 g/L intermediate-action insulin) for 14 d after pancreatitis induction. Following this the animals were killed and the serum amylase, glucose and insulin levels as well as the plasma glucagon levels, the pancreatic mass/body mass ratio (pm/bm), the pancreatic contents of DNA, protein, amylase, lipase and trypsinogen were measured. Pancreatic tissue samples were examined by light microscopy on paraffin-embedded sections.RESULTS: In the diabetic-pancreatitic rats treatment with insulin and CCK-8 significantly elevated pw/bm and the pancreatic contents of protein, amylase and lipase vs the rats receiving only CCK-8 treatment. CCK-8 administered in combination with insulin also elevated the number of acinar cells with mitotic activities, whereas CCK-8 alone had no effect on laboratory parameters or the mitotic activities in diabetic-pancreatitic rats.CONCLUSION: Despite the hypertrophic effect of CCK-8 being absent following acute pancreatitis in diabetic-rats,the simultaneous administration of exogenous insulin restored this effect. Our results clearly demonstrate that insulin is

  18. Cholecystokinin enhances visceral pain-related affective memory via vagal afferent pathway in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Bing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain contains both sensory and affective dimensions. Using a rodent visceral pain assay that combines the colorectal distension (CRD model with the conditioned place avoidance (CPA paradigms, we measured a learned behavior that directly reflects the affective component of visceral pain, and showed that perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC activation is critical for memory processing involved in long-term visceral affective state and prediction of aversive stimuli by contextual cue. Progress has been made and suggested that activation of vagal afferents plays a role in the behavioral control nociception and memory storage processes. In human patients, electrical vagus nerve stimulation enhanced retention of verbal learning performance. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK, which is a gastrointestinal hormone released during feeding, has been shown to enhance memory retention. Mice access to food immediately after training session enhanced memory retention. It has been well demonstrated that CCK acting on vagal afferent fibers mediates various physiological functions. We hypothesize that CCK activation of vagal afferent enhances visceral pain-related affective memory. Results In the presented study, infusion of CCK-8 at physiological concentration combining with conditional training significantly increased the CRD-induced CPA scores, and enhanced the pain affective memory retention. In contrast, CCK had no effect on CPA induced by non-nociceptive aversive stimulus (U69,593. The physiological implications were further strengthened by the similar effects observed in the rats with duodenal infusion of 5% peptone, which has been shown to induce increases in plasma CCK levels. CCK-8 receptor antagonist CR-1409 or perivagal application of capsaicin abolished the effect of CCK on aversive visceral pain memory, which was consistent with the notion that vagal afferent modulates affective aspects of visceral pain. CCK does not change

  19. Ligand-induced internalization of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor independent of recognized signaling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawston, Erin E; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Miller, Laurence J

    2012-02-01

    Receptor ligands, identified as antagonists, based on the absence of stimulation of signaling, can rarely stimulate receptor internalization. d-Tyr-Gly-[(Nle(28,31),d-Trp(30))CCK-26-32]-2-phenylethyl ester (d-Trp-OPE) is such a ligand that binds to the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor and stimulates internalization. Here, the molecular basis of this trafficking event is explored, with the assumption that ligand binding initiates conformational change, exposing an epitope to direct endocytosis. Ligand-stimulated internalization was studied morphologically using fluorescent CCK and d-Trp-OPE. d-Trp-OPE occupation of Chinese hamster ovary cell receptors stimulated internalization into the same region as CCK. Arrestin-biased action was ruled out using morphological translocation of fluorescent arrestin 2 and arrestin 3, moving to the membrane in response to CCK, but not d-Trp-OPE. Possible roles of the carboxyl terminus were studied using truncated receptor constructs, eliminating the proline-rich distal tail, the serine/threonine-rich midregion, and the remainder to the vicinal cysteines. None of these constructs disrupted d-Trp-OPE-stimulated internalization. Possible contributions of transmembrane segments were studied using competitive inhibition with peptides that also had no effect. Intracellular regions were studied with a similar strategy using coexpressing cell lines. Peptides corresponding to ends of each loop region were studied, with only the peptide at the carboxyl end of the third loop inhibiting d-Trp-OPE-stimulated internalization but having no effect on CCK-stimulated internalization. The region contributing to this effect was refined to peptide 309-323, located below the recognized G protein-association motif. While a receptor in which this segment was deleted did internalize in response to d-Trp-OPE, it exhibited abnormal ligand binding and did not signal in response to CCK, suggesting an abnormal conformation and possible mechanism of internalization

  20. The Ets-1 transcription factor is required for Stat1-mediated T-bet expression and IgG2a class switching in mouse B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai Vu; Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Luinaud, Romain; Despres, Raymonde; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Arnulf, Bertrand; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-03

    In response to antigens and cytokines, mouse B cells undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. T-bet, a T-box transcription factor that is up-regulated in lymphocytes by IFN-γ or IL-27, was shown to regulate CSR to IgG2a after T cell-independent B-cell stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unclear. In the present study, we show that inactivation of the Ets-1 transcription factor results in a severe decrease in IgG2a secretion in vivo and in vitro. No T-bet expression was observed in Ets-1-deficient (Ets-1(-/-)) B cells stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide, and forced expression of T-bet in these cells rescued IgG2a secretion. Furthermore, we identified a transcriptional enhancer in the T-bet locus with an activity in B cells that relies on ETS-binding sites. After IFN-γ stimulation of Ets-1(-/-) B cells, activated Stat1, which forms a complex with Ets-1 in wild-type cells, no longer binds to the T-bet enhancer or promotes histone modifications at this site. These results demonstrate that Ets-1 is critical for IgG2a CSR and acts as an essential cofactor for Stat1 in the regulation of T-bet expression in B cells.

  1. Vitamin D3 Suppresses Class II Invariant Chain Peptide Expression on Activated B-Lymphocytes: A Plausible Mechanism for Downregulation of Acute Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar K. Danner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Class II invariant chain peptide (CLIP expression has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the regulation of B cell function after nonspecific polyclonal expansion. Several studies have shown vitamin D3 helps regulate the immune response. We hypothesized that activated vitamin D3 suppresses CLIP expression on activated B-cells after nonspecific activation or priming of C57BL/6 mice with CpG. This study showed activated vitamin D3 actively reduced CLIP expression and decreased the number of CLIP+ B-lymphocytes in a dose and formulation dependent fashion. Flow cytometry was used to analyze changes in mean fluorescent intensity (MFI based on changes in concentration of CLIP on activated B-lymphocytes after treatment with the various formulations of vitamin D3. The human formulation of activated vitamin D (calcitriol had the most dramatic reduction in CLIP density at an MFI of 257.3 [baseline of 701.1 (P value = 0.01]. Cholecalciferol and alfacalcidiol had no significant reduction in MFI at 667.7 and 743.0, respectively. Calcitriol seemed to best reduce CLIP overexpression in this ex vivo model. Bioactive vitamin D3 may be an effective compliment to other B cell suppression therapeutics to augment downregulation of nonspecific inflammation associated with many autoimmune disorders. Further study is necessary to confirm these findings.

  2. CHILD’S PLAY AS A MEANS OF expression AND A TEACHING METHOD DURING CLASSES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Martinović

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The child’s play is a basic form of activity aimed at expressing children’s interests and the feeling of pleasure. By playing, children explore the environment and get their first-hand impressions of nature and its inimitable ways, which broadens their knowledge and experience. Throughout the game, as a child matures he develops his senses and emotions, gains independence, self-reliance and social maturity. It enriches his experience base, becoming the child’s inseparable companion throughout the childhood. This paper provides an insight into the influence of elementary games on the psychophysical development of school children, as well as some guidelines for teaching methods as a necessary prerequisite for the successful implementation of elementary games

  3. Regulation of expression and biochemical characterization of a beta-class carbonic anhydrase from the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simarjot; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Tripathi, Anil K

    2009-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; [EC 4.2.1.1]) is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that supports various biochemical and physiological functions. Genome analysis of Azospirillum brasilense, a nonphotosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing, rhizobacterium, revealed an ORF with homology to beta-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Biochemical characteristics of the beta-class CA of A. brasilense, analysed after cloning the gene (designated as bca), overexpressing in Escherichia coli and purifying the protein by affinity purification, revealed that the native recombinant enzyme is a homotetramer, inhibited by the known CA inhibitors. CA activity in A. brasilense cell extracts, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that bca was constitutively expressed under aerobic conditions. Lower beta-galactosidase activity in A. brasilense cells harbouring bca promoter: lacZ fusion during the stationary phase or during growth on 3% CO(2) enriched air or at acidic pH indicated that the transcription of bca was downregulated by the stationary phase, elevated CO(2) levels and acidic pH conditions. These observations were also supported by RT-PCR analysis. Thus, beta-CA in A. brasilense seems to be required for scavenging CO(2) from the ambient air and the requirement of CO(2) hydration seems to be higher for the cultures growing exponentially at neutral to alkaline pH.

  4. Glutathione transferase supergene family in tomato: Salt stress-regulated expression of representative genes from distinct GST classes in plants primed with salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszár, Jolán; Horváth, Edit; Váry, Zsolt; Gallé, Ágnes; Bela, Krisztina; Brunner, Szilvia; Tari, Irma

    2014-05-01

    A family tree of the multifunctional proteins, glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) was created in Solanum lycopersicum based on homology to known Arabidopsis GSTs. The involvement of selected SlGSTs was studied in salt stress response of tomato primed with salicylic acid (SA) or in un-primed plants by real-time qPCR. Selected tau GSTs (SlGSTU23, SlGSTU26) were up-regulated in the leaves, while GSTs from lambda, theta, dehydroascorbate reductase and zeta classes (SlGSTL3, SlGSTT2, SlDHAR5, SlGSTZ2) in the root tissues under salt stress. Priming with SA exhibited a concentration dependency; SA mitigated the salt stress injury and caused characteristic changes in the expression pattern of SlGSTs only at 10(-4) M concentration. SlGSTF4 displayed a significant up-regulation in the leaves, while the abundance of SlGSTL3, SlGSTT2 and SlGSTZ2 transcripts were enhanced in the roots of plants primed with high SA concentration. Unexpectedly, under high salinity the SlDHAR2 expression decreased in primed roots as compared to the salt-stressed plants, however, the up-regulation of SlDHAR5 isoenzyme contributed to the maintenance of DHAR activity in roots primed with high SA. The members of lambda, theta and zeta class GSTs have a specific role in salt stress acclimation of tomato, while SlGSTU26 and SlGSTF4, the enzymes with high glutathione conjugating activity, characterize a successful priming in both roots and leaves. In contrast to low concentration, high SA concentration induced those GSTs in primed roots, which were up-regulated under salt stress. Our data indicate that induction of GSTs provide a flexible tool in maintaining redox homeostasis during unfavourable conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Tobacco class I cytosolic small heat shock proteins are under transcriptional and translational regulations in expression and heterocomplex prevails under the high-temperature stress condition in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Joe, Myung Kuk; Lee, Mi Ok; Koo, Hyun Jo; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-04-01

    Seven genomic clones of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum W38) cytosolic class I small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), probably representing all members in the class, were isolated and found to have 66 to 92% homology between their nucleotide sequences. Even though all seven sHSP genes showed heat shock-responsive accumulation of their transcripts and proteins, each member showed discrepancies in abundance and timing of expression upon high-temperature stress. This was mainly the result of transcriptional regulation during mild stress conditions and transcriptional and translational regulation during strong stress conditions. Open reading frames (ORFs) of these genomic clones were expressed in Escherichia coli and the sHSPs were purified from E. coli. The purified tobacco sHSPs rendered citrate synthase and luciferase soluble under high temperatures. At room temperature, non-denaturing pore exclusion polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on three sHSPs demonstrated that the sHSPs spontaneously formed homo-oligomeric complexes of 200 ∼ 240 kDa. However, under elevated temperatures, hetero-oligomeric complexes between the sHSPs gradually prevailed. Atomic force microscopy showed that the hetero-oligomer of NtHSP18.2/NtHSP18.3 formed a stable oligomeric particle similar to that of the NtHSP18.2 homo-oligomer. These hetero-oligomers positively influenced the revival of thermally inactivated luciferase. Amino acid residues mainly in the N-terminus are suggested for the exchange of the component sHSPs and the formation of dominant hetero-oligomers under high temperatures.

  6. Adjuvant Vaccine Immunotherapy of Resected, Clinically Node-negative Melanoma: Long-Term Outcome and Impact of HLA Class I Antigen Expression on Overall Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, William E.; Unger, Joseph M.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Porter, Mark J.; Thompson, John A.; Kempf, Raymond A.; Othus, Megan; Ribas, Antoni; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Associations between HLA class I antigen expression and efficacy of a melanoma vaccine (Melacine) were initially described in stage IV melanoma. Similar associations were observed in S9035, a phase III adjuvant trial evaluating Melacine for two years versus observation in patients with stage II melanoma. This report provides long-term results. The effects of treatment on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated, and pre-specified analyses investigated associations between treatment and HLA expression. Multivariable analyses were adjusted for tumor thickness, ulceration and site, method of nodal staging and sex. P=.01 was considered significant in subset analyses to account for multiple comparisons. For the entire study population of 689 patients, there were no significant differences in RFS or OS by arm. HLA serotyping was performed on 553 (80%) patients (vaccine 294, observation 259). Among the subpopulation with HLA-A2 and/or HLA-Cw3 serotype, vaccine arm patients (n=178) had marginally improved RFS (adjusted P=.02) and significantly improved OS compared with observation arm patients (n=145), with 10-year OS of 75% and 63%, respectively (hazard ratio 0.62, 99% CI 0.37-1.02, P=.01). There was no impact of HLA-A2 and/or HLA-Cw3 expression among observation arm patients. Analysis of mature data from S9035 indicates a significant OS benefit from adjuvant vaccine therapy for HLA-A2- and/or HLA-Cw3-expressing melanoma patients. The possibility of interactions between HLA type and outcome should be considered in future immunotherapy trials. Further investigations of melanoma-associated antigens present in Melacine and presented by HLA-A2 and HLA-Cw3 may be warranted. PMID:24994597

  7. ANALYSIS OF SEQUENCE POLYMORPHISM OF SCR CLASS I AND II ALLELES AND STUDY REGULATION OF THEIR EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ŽALUDOVÁ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (AI is a widespread mechanism used by flowering plants to prevent inbreeding depression and helps create and maintain genetic diversity within a species. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. and especially its modern varieties are characterized by high level of self-fertility. In an effort to increase the production current breeding is focused on the production of inbred lines for making the F1 hybrids and the self-incompatibility can be an interesting tool for production self- sterile lines. In Brassica napus, we found two recessive alleles of a gene SCR II. Different expression of both alleles does not correspond to phenotypic manifestation of self-incompatibility and we can assume that it is prevailed by repressor gene that does not lie on the S-locus. This is also reason, why the SCR gene cannot serve as a molecular marker of self-incompatibility in Brassica napus, although many authors believe that this gene is essential in AI reaction. Brassica napus belong to plants with complex genetic constitution, is composed by two genomes, A and C, which give the possibility of different interactions and makes it difficult to study compared with diploid B. rapa and B. oleracea. In further study it is therefore important to focus on the interactions between genes SCR, SRK and SLG, and their influence on others, such as supressor gene systems.

  8. The sea urchin stem–loop-binding protein: a maternally expressed protein that probably functions in expression of multiple classes of histone mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Anthony J.; Howard, Jason T.; Dominski, Zbigniew; Schnackenberg, Bradley J.; Sumerel, Jan L.; McCarthy, John J.; Coffman, James A.; Marzluff, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Following the completion of oogenesis and oocyte maturation, histone mRNAs are synthesized and stored in the sea urchin egg pronucleus. Histone mRNAs are the only mRNAs that are not polyadenylated but instead end in a stem–loop which has been conserved in evolution. The 3′ end binds the stem–loop-binding protein (SLBP), and SLBP is required for histone pre-mRNA processing as well as translation of the histone mRNAs. A cDNA encoding a 59 kDa sea urchin SLBP (suSLBP) has been cloned from an oocyte cDNA library. The suSLBP contains an RNA-binding domain that is similar to the RNA-binding domain found in SLBPs from other species, although there is no similarity between the rest of the suSLBP and other SLBPs. The suSLBP is present at constant levels in eggs and for the first 12 h of development. The levels of suSLBP then decline and remain at a low level for the rest of embryogenesis. The suSLBP is concentrated in the egg pronucleus and is released from the nucleus only when cells enter the first mitosis. SuSLBP expressed by in vitro translation does not bind the stem–loop RNA, suggesting that suSLBP is modified to activate RNA binding in sea urchin embryos. PMID:14762208

  9. Targeting of a CCK{sub 2} receptor splice variant with {sup 111}In-labelled cholecystokinin-8 (CCK8) and {sup 111}In-labelled minigastrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Gotthardt, Martin; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PO Box 9101, HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Roosenburg, Susan [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PO Box 9101, HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Park, Jeseong; Hellmich, Mark R. [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Surgery and the Sealy Center for Cancer Cell Biology, Galveston, TX (United States); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutjes, Floris P.J.T.; Delft, Floris L. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    Radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin-derived peptides potentially can be used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Recently, a splice variant version of the CCK2R has been identified, designated CCK2i4svR. Constitutive expression of this receptor has been demonstrated in human colorectal cancer and in pancreatic cancer, but not in normal tissue. So far, it has never been shown whether radiolabelled peptides can target the CCK2i4svR in vivo. In this paper, we investigated the potential of sulfated {sup 111}In-labelled DOTA-CCK8 (sCCK8), a pan-CCKR-binding peptide, and [{sup 111}In]DOTA-minigastrin (MG0), a CCK2R selective peptide, for the targeting of the CCK2i4svR. The receptor binding affinity of [{sup 111}In]DOTA-sCCK8 and [{sup 111}In]DOTA-MG0 for the CCK2R and CCK2i4svR was determined using stably transfected HEK293 cell lines, expressing either CCK2R or CCK2i4svR. Tumour targeting was studied in HEK293-CCK2i4svR tumour-bearing athymic mice. [{sup 111}In]DOTA-sCCK8 as well as [{sup 111}In]DOTA-MG0 specifically bound both CCK2R and CCK2i4svR with affinities in the low nanomolar range. In vivo experiments revealed that accumulation of both peptides in CCK2i4svR-positive tumours was similar (3.21 {+-} 0.77 and 3.01 {+-} 0.67%ID/g, sCCK8 and MG0, respectively, 24 h p.i.). Kidney retention of [{sup 111}In]DOTA-MG0 (32.4 {+-} 7.5%ID/g, 24 h p.i.) was markedly higher than that of [{sup 111}In]DOTA-sCCK8 (2.75 {+-} 0.31%ID/g, 24 h p.i.). We demonstrated that the CCK2i4svR is a potential target for PRRT using a radiolabelled sulfated CCK8 peptide. As this receptor is expressed on colorectal and pancreatic tumours, but not in normal tissue, these tumours are potentially new targets for PRRT with CCK8 and gastrin analogs. (orig.)

  10. Cardiomyocyte expression and cell-specific processing of procholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens P.; Johnsen, Anders H.; Kistorp, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    has only been suggested using transcriptional measures or methods, with the post-translational phase of gene expression unaddressed. In this study, we examined the cardiac expression of the CCK gene in adult mammals and its expression at the protein level. Using quantitative PCR, a library of sequence......Heart muscle cells produce peptide hormones such as natriuretic peptides. Developing hearts also express the gene for the classic intestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) in amounts similar to those in the intestine and brain. However, cardiac expression of peptides other than natriuretic peptides...

  11. An Euler-type formula for the Dirichlet beta function at even values and an exact closed-form expression for a class of rational zeta series

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, F M S

    2009-01-01

    In a recent work [JNT \\textbf{118}, 192 (2006)], Dancs and He found an Euler-type formula for $ \\zeta{(2 n+1)}$, $ n $ being a positive integer, which contains an alternating series that seems not to be reducible to a finite closed-form. This certainly reflects a greater complexity in comparison to $\\zeta(2n)$, which is a rational multiple of $\\pi^{2n}$ according to a well-known formula by Euler. For the Dirichlet beta function, the things are "inverse": $\\beta(2n+1)$ is a rational multiple of $\\pi^{2n+1}$, whereas no closed-form expression is known for the numbers $\\beta(2n)$. Here in this work, I use the Dancs-He strategy for deriving an Euler-type formula for the Dirichlet beta function at even values of the argument, including $\\beta{(2)}$, i.e. the Catalan's constant. This yields a new series representation for these numbers. Finally, by converting the summand of these series into even zeta values and then making use of a formula by Milgran, I derive an exact closed-form expression for an important class...

  12. Molecular characterization of plantain class i chitinase gene and its expression in response to infection by Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee and other abiotic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianming; Wang, Hongbin; Feng, Dongru; Liu, Bin; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Jinfa

    2007-11-01

    We have cloned a chitinase cDNA (MpChi-1) from plantain (Musa paradisiacal L) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) according to a sequence fragment which we had cloned using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique. The MpChi-1 encodes a protein of 326 amino acids and belongs to acidic chitinase class Ib subfamily. MpChi-1 shares high identity with rice endochitinase (XP_468714) and different each other only at three residues. Homology modelling indicated these three substitutions would not change the configuration of the activity site of the enzyme. We have expressed recombinant MpChi-1 and purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and preparative reversed phase HPLC. The recombinant protein could hydrolyse chitin and inhibit the growth of the Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee in vitro. Northern blot revealed that the MpChi-1 transcripts rapidly after inoculation with G. musarum and maximum mRNA accumulation reached at 48 h. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) could induce MpChi-1 expression, while mechanical wounding, silver nitrate and osmotic stress stimulated only a slight accumulation of MpChi-1 transcripts. Abscisic acid (ABA) could induce MpChi-1 transcript. These results suggest the MpChi-1 plays important role in the events of the hypersensitive reaction (HR).

  13. Thylakoids suppress appetite by increasing cholecystokinin resulting in lower food intake and body weight in high-fat fed mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhnke, Rickard; Lindqvist, Andreas; Göransson, Nathanael

    2009-01-01

    affect food intake and body weight during long-term feeding in mice. Female apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were fed a high-fat diet containing 41% of fat by energy with and without thylakoids for 100 days. Mice fed the thylakoid-enriched diet had suppressed food intake, body weight gain and body fat...... fat mass. There was no sign of desensitization in the animals treated with thylakoids. The results suggest that thylakoids are useful to suppress appetite and body weight gain when supplemented to a high-fat food during long-term feeding....... compared with the high-fat fed control mice. Reduced serum glucose, serum triglyceride and serum free fatty acid levels were found in the thylakoid-treated animals. The satiety hormone cholecystokinin was elevated, suggesting this hormone mediates satiety. Leptin levels were reduced, reflecting a decreased...

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin production and signaling in the pancreatic islet as an adaptive response to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemann, Amelia K; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2016-04-01

    Precise control of blood glucose is dependent on adequate β-cell mass and function. Thus, reductions in β-cell mass and function lead to insufficient insulin production to meet demand, and result in diabetes. Recent evidence suggests that paracrine signaling in the islet might be important in obesity, and disruption of this signaling could play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. For example, we recently discovered a novel islet incretin axis where glucagon-like peptide-1 regulates β-cell production of another classic gut hormone, cholecystokinin. This axis is stimulated by obesity, and plays a role in enhancing β-cell survival. In the present review, we place our observations in the wider context of the literature on incretin regulation in the islet, and discuss the potential for therapeutic targeting of these pathways.

  15. The role of cholecystokinin in the induction of aggressive behavior: a focus on the available experimental data (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouni, E; Zarros, A; Skandali, N; Tsakiris, Stylianos; Lappas, D

    2013-12-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide that is (among others) reportedly involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. The excitatory role of CCK in negative affective emotions as well as in aversive reactions, antisocial behaviors and memories, has been indicated by numerous electrophysiological, neurochemical and behavioral methodologies on both animal models for anxiety and human studies. The current review article summarizes the existing experimental evidence with regards to the role of CCK in the induction of aggressive behavior, and: (a) synopsizes the anatomical circuits through which it could potentially mediate all types of aggressive behavior, as well as (b) highlights the potential use of these experimental evidence in the current research quest for the clinical treatment of mood and anxiety disorders.

  16. Cholecystokinin-8 activates myenteric neurons in 21- and 35-day old but not 4- and 14-day old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Martha C; Murry, Candace R; Raboin, Shannon J; Roberson, Allison E; Mansour, Mahmoud M; Williams, Carol S; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2011-02-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) activates the myenteric neurons of adult rats. The goal of this work is to determine the ontogeny of this activation by CCK-8 in the myenteric plexus of the duodenum (2cm immediately following the pyloric sphincter aborally) and compare it with that of the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) - which occurs in 1-day old pups. Despite the existence of both of the CCK receptors, CCK(1) and CCK(2), in 4, 14, 21 and 35 day old rats, CCK-8 (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40μg/kg, i.p.) increased Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI, a marker for neuronal activation) in the myenteric neurons of 21- and 35-day old rats but in the DVC of all age groups. As such, this belated activation of myenteric neurons by CCK-8 compared to the DVC may reflect a delayed role for these neurons in CCK-related functions.

  17. Synthesis of analogues of the Des-Phe-NH2 C-terminal hexapeptide of cholecystokinin showing gastrin antagonist activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laur, J; Rodriguez, M; Aumelas, A; Bali, J P; Martinez, J

    1986-04-01

    Four analogues of Z-CCK-27-32-NH2, Z-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2, a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist have been synthesized by solution methodology. In these analogues, Z-Tyr(SO3-)-Nle-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2 16, Z-Tyr(SO3-)-Nle-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-NH2 17, BOC-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2 24 and Boc-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-NH2 25 methionyl residues were replaced by norleucyl residues. Preliminary biological activity on gastrin-induced acid secretion, in rat, are reported. These derivatives proved to antagonize the action of gastrin, with ED 50 of between 0.5 and 3 mg/kg.

  18. Cholecystokinin-gated currents in neurons of the rat solitary complex in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchereau, P; Champagnat, J; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1993-12-01

    1. Ionic conductances controlled by type A and type B cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors were studied in neurons of the rat nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV), using intracellular and whole-cell patch clamp recordings in current or voltage clamp configuration during bath application of agonists (CCK8, CCK4, BC 264) and antagonists. 2. CCKA receptor-related inhibition was associated with a membrane hyperpolarization and a decrease in input resistance that developed 2-6 min after the arrival of drug into the extracellular medium. These effects were induced by 5 nM CCK8 but not BC 264 and they were blocked by the CCKA antagonist, L-364,718, but not by the CCKB antagonist, L-365,260. 3. CCKA receptor-related inhibition was generated by a potassium current that reversed at a reversal potential E(rev) of -73 +/- 1 (mean +/- SE) mV with bathing potassium concentration [K+]o = 6 mM and at -88 +/- 1 with [K+]o = 3 mM, in agreement with the Nernst equation for potassium ions. 4. CCKB receptor-related excitation was associated with a membrane depolarization and an increase of the input resistance induced by the following agonists at threshold concentrations: CCK8 (0.2 nM) > or = BC 264 (0.4 nM) > CCK4 (10.9 nM). The increase of input resistance was abolished by L-365,260 and was maintained after blockade of the CCKA current by L-364,718. 5. CCKB receptor-related excitation, in the neurons (30% of cases) in which clear response reversal was observed, appeared to be generated by a decrease of a potassium conductance. Responses showed a reversal potential E(rev) of -68 +/- 4 mV with [K+]o = 6 mM and -89 +/- 1 mV with [K+]o = 3 mM, verifying predictions from the Nernst equation applied to potassium ions. However, in 70% of cases, clear reversal was not observed at membrane potentials negative to the theoretical potassium equilibrium potential EK. 6. In voltage clamp studies, CCK8 induced a 181 +/- 17 pA inward current associated with a 26

  19. [Morphological and laminar distribution of cholecystokinin-immunoreactive neurons in cortex of human inferior parietal lobe and their clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskas, Laslo; Draganić-Gajić, Saveta; Malobabić, Slobodan; Puskas, Nela; Krivokuća, Dragan; Stanković, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Cholecystocinine is a neuropeptide whose function in the cortex has not yet been clarified, although its relation with some psychic disorders has been noticed. Previous studies have not provided detailed data about types, or arrangement of neurons that contain those neuropeptide in the cortex of human inferior parietal lobe. The aim of this study was to examine precisely the morphology and typography of neurons containing cholecytocinine in the human cortex of inferior parietal lobule. There were five human brains on which we did the immunocystochemical research of the shape and laminar distribution of cholecystocinine immunoreactive neurons on serial sections of supramarginal gyrus and angular gyrus. The morphological analysis of cholecystocinine-immunoreactive neurons was done on frozen sections using avidin-biotin technique, by antibody to cholecystocinine diluted in the proportion 1:6000 using diamine-benzedine. Cholecystocinine immunoreactive neurons were found in the first three layers of the cortex of inferior parietal lobule, and their densest concentration was in the 2nd and 3rd layer. The following types of neurons were found: bipolar neurons, then its fusiform subtype, Cajal-Retzius neurons (in the 1st layer), reverse pyramidal (triangular) and unipolar neurons. The diameters of some types of neurons were from 15 to 35 microm, and the diameters of dendritic arborization were from 85-207 microm. A special emphasis is put on the finding of Cajal-Retzius neurons that are immunoreactive to cholecystocinine, which demands further research. Bearing in mind numerous clinical studies pointing out the role of cholecystokinine in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, the presence of a great number of cholecystokinine immunoreactive neurons in the cortex of inferior parietal lobule suggests their role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  20. Equine herpesvirus type 4 UL56 and UL49.5 proteins downregulate cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I expression independently of each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Abdelrahman; Azab, Walid; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are critically important in the host defense against various pathogens through presentation of viral peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), a process resulting in the destruction of virus-infected cells. Herpesviruses interfere with CTL-mediated elimination of infected cells by various mechanisms, including inhibition of peptide transport and loading, perturbation of MHC-I trafficking, and rerouting and proteolysis of cell surface MHC-I. In this study, we show that equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) modulates MHC-I cell surface expression through two different mechanisms. First, EHV-4 can lead to a significant downregulation of MHC-I expression at the cell surface through the product of ORF1, a protein expressed with early kinetics from a gene that is homologous to herpes simplex virus 1 UL56. The EHV-4 UL56 protein reduces cell surface MHC-I as early as 4 h after infection. Second, EHV-4 can interfere with MHC-I antigen presentation, starting at 6 h after infection, by inhibition of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) through its UL49.5 protein. Although pUL49.5 has no immediate effect on overall surface MHC-I levels in infected cells, it blocks the supply of antigenic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transport of peptide-loaded MHC-I to the cell surface. Taken together, our results show that EHV-4 encodes at least two viral immune evasion proteins: pUL56 reduces MHC-I molecules on the cell surface at early times after infection, and pUL49.5 interferes with MHC-I antigen presentation by blocking peptide transport in the ER.

  1. Sequence-Based Genotyping of Expressed Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Alleles by Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Novel Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Haplotypes and Alleles in Belgian, Danish, and Kenyan Fattening Pigs and Göttingen Minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz

    2017-01-01

    for the prediction of epitope binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. This study utilizes an SLA class I-typing method based on next-generation sequencing of barcoded PCR...

  2. Birthing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first birth and hope to have a vaginal delivery this time, there is a class for that, too. Choose ... t covered in your birthing class, it’s a good idea to take an individual class on it, especially if you are a first-time mother. The health benefits of breastfeeding your baby ...

  3. Expression and clinical value of the soluble major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A molecule in the serum of patients with renal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y-K; Jia, C-M; Yuan, G-J; Liu, W; Qiu, Y; Zhu, Q-G

    2015-06-29

    We investigated the expression and clinical value of the soluble major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (sMICA) molecule in the serum of patients with renal tumors. Sixty patients diagnosed with renal tumors were enrolled in the experimental group, whereas 20 healthy volunteers served as the control group. The sMICA levels were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the results were analyzed in combination with data from pathol-ogy examination. The experimental group had a statistically significant higher sMICA level (P < 0.05) than the control group. The sMICA level was higher in patients with malignant tumors than in those with be-nign tumors. We also observed a positive relationship among different tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) pathological stages with more advanced diseases exhibiting higher sMICA levels. As a tumor-associated antigen, MICA has a close relationship with renal tumorigenesis and immune es-cape. Our results indicated that sMICA levels were related to tumor pathol-ogy, TNM stage, and metastasis. Therefore, sMICA might be a potential marker for tumor characteristics, prognosis, and recurrence prediction.

  4. Sequence-Based Genotyping of Expressed Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Alleles by Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Novel Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Haplotypes and Alleles in Belgian, Danish, and Kenyan Fattening Pigs and Göttingen Minipigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz; Bishop, Richard; Erbs, Gitte; Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Jungersen, Gregers

    2017-01-01

    The need for typing of the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) is increasing with the expanded use of pigs as models for human diseases and organ-transplantation experiments, their use in infection studies, and for design of veterinary vaccines. Knowledge of SLA sequences is furthermore a prerequisite for the prediction of epitope binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. This study utilizes an SLA class I-typing method based on next-generation sequencing of barcoded PCR amplicons. The amplicons were generated with universal primers and predicted to resolve 68–88% of all known SLA class I alleles dependent on amplicon size. We analyzed the SLA profiles of 72 pigs from four different pig populations; Göttingen minipigs and Belgian, Kenyan, and Danish fattening pigs. We identified 67 alleles, nine previously described haplotypes and 15 novel haplotypes. The highest variation in SLA class I profiles was observed in the Danish pigs and the lowest among the Göttingen minipig population, which also have the highest percentage of homozygote individuals. Highlighting the fact that there are still numerous unknown SLA class I alleles to be discovered, a total of 12 novel SLA class I alleles were identified. Overall, we present new information about known and novel alleles and haplotypes and their prevalence in the tested pig populations. PMID:28670315

  5. Mechanisms of cholecystokinin-induced calcium mobilization in gastric antral interstitial cells of Cajal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-Yao Gong; Xin-Min Si; Lin Lin; Jia Lu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of sulfated cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8S) on calcium mobilization in cultured murine gastric antral interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and its possible mechanisms.METHODS:ICC were isolated from the gastric antrum of mice and cultured.Immunofluorescence staining with a monoclonal antibody for c-Kit was used to identify ICC.The responsiveness of ICC to CCK-8S was measured using Fluo-3/AM based digital microfluorimetric measurement of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i).A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to monitor [Ca2+]i changes.The selective CCK1 receptor antagonist lorglumide,the intracellular Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin,the type Ⅲ inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3) receptor blocker xestospongin C and the L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine were used to examine the mechanisms of [Ca2+]i elevation caused by CCK-8S.Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to determine the regulatory effect of PKC on phosphorylation of type Ⅲ InsP3 receptor (InsP3R3) in ICC.Protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and inhibitor chelerythrine were used to assess the role of PKC in the CCK-8S-evoked [Ca2+]i increment of ICC.RESULTS:ICC were successfully isolated from the gastric antrum of mice and cultured.Cultured ICC were identified by immunofluorescence staining.When given 80 nmol/L or more than 80 nmol/L CCK-8S,the [Ca2+]i in ICC increased and 100 nmol/L CCK-8S significantly increased the mean [Ca2+]i by 59.30% ± 4.85% (P <0.01).Pretreatment of ICC with 5 μmol/L lorglumide inhibited 100 nmol/L CCK-8S-induced [Ca2+]i increment from 59.30% ± 4.85% to 14.97% ± 9.05% (P < 0.01),suggesting a CCK1R-mediated event.Emptying of intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin (5 μmol/L)prevented CCK-8S (100 nmol/L) from inducing a [Ca2+]i increase.Moreover,pretreatment with xestospongin C (1 μmol/L) could also abolish the CCK-8S-induced effect

  6. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-01-01

    , CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of c...

  7. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  8. Assembly and cell surface expression of TAP-independent, chloroquine-sensitive and interferon-gamma-inducible class I MHC complexes in transformed fibroblast cell lines are regulated by tapasin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Sharon Vigodman; Duady-Ben Yaakov, Shirly; Schechter, Chana; Ehrlich, Rachel

    2002-02-01

    Antigen processing and presentation by class I MHC molecules generally require assembly with peptide epitopes generated by the proteasome and transported into the ER by the transporters associated with antigen presentation (TAP). Recently, TAP-independent pathways supporting class I MHC-mediated presentation of exogenous antigens, as well as of endogenously synthesized viral antigens, were described. We now characterize a TAP-independent pathway that is operative in both TAP1- and TAP2-deficient Adenovirus (Ad)-transformed fibroblast cell lines. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the existence of such a pathway has been described in non-infected cells that do not belong to the hematopoietic lineage. We show that this pathway is proteasome-independent and chloroquine-sensitive. Cell surface expression of these TAP-independent class I complexes is modulated by tapasin levels and is enhanced by IFN-gamma. The data imply that IFN-gamma increases the relative level of TAP-independent high affinity class I complexes that exit the ER on their way to the cell surface and to vacuolar compartments where peptide cleavage/exchange might take place before recycling to the cell surface. Since both TAP and tapasin expression are altered in numerous tumors and in virus-infected cells, TAP-independent class I complexes may be a valuable target source for immune responses.

  9. Decreased CD8+ T cell response to Epstein-Barr virus infected B cells in multiple sclerosis is not due to decreased HLA class I expression on B cells or monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csurhes Peter A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS have a decreased frequency of CD8+ T cells reactive to their own Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infected B cells. We have proposed that this might predispose to the development of MS by allowing EBV-infected autoreactive B cells to accumulate in the central nervous system. The decreased CD8+ T cell response to EBV results from a general CD8+ T cell deficiency and also a decreased proportion of EBV-specific T cells within the total CD8+ T cell population. Because decreased HLA class I expression on monocytes and B cells has been reported in MS and could influence the generation and effector function of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells, the present study was undertaken to measure the expression of HLA molecules on B cells and monocytes in patients with MS. Methods We used flow cytometry to determine the proportions of T cells, natural killer cells, B cells and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and to quantify the expression of HLA molecules on T cells, B cells and monocytes of 59 healthy subjects and 62 patients with MS who had not received corticosteroids or immunomodulatory therapy in the previous 3 months. Results The levels of HLA class I and class II molecules expressed on T cells, B cells and monocytes were normal in patients with MS, with the exception of two patients with secondary progressive MS with very low class II expression on B cells. In confirmation of previous studies we also found that the percentage of CD8+ T cells was significantly decreased whereas the percentage of CD4+ T cells and the CD4:CD8 ratio were significantly increased in patients with MS compared to healthy subjects. Conclusions The decreased CD8+ T cell response to EBV-infected B cells in MS patients is not due to decreased HLA class I expression on monocytes or B cells. In a small proportion of patients decreased HLA class II expression on B cells might impair the CD8+ T cell response to EBV by

  10. The dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC is explained by coevolution with the polymorphic peptide transporter (TAP) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Brian A; Hunt, Lawrence G; Sowa, Anna K

    2011-01-01

    In most mammals, the MHC class I molecules are polymorphic and determine the specificity of peptide presentation, whereas the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) heterodimers are functionally monomorphic. In chickens, there are two classical class I genes but only one is expres...

  11. [Study of the Effect of Cholecystokinin-Induced Acute Pancreatitis on the Free-Running Rhythm of Mouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghong; Yang, Xiaoping; Guo, Panpan; Liu, Yanyou; Yan, Hongli; Li, Shuaizhen; Guan, Junwen

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports the effect of pancreatitis induced by cholecystokinin (CCK) on free-running rhythm of locomotor activity of the ICR mice, and analyzes the interaction of inflammatory diseases and acute pancreatitis with circadian rhythm system. In the study, the mice were modeled under different phases of acute pancreatitis in DD status (Double Dark, constant dark condition). By comparing of the inflammatory status and the indicators of rhythm before and after modeling of the running wheel activity group and the rest group, it was observed that the rest group showed more possibility of inflammation than the activity group did in ICR mice model of acute pancreatitis. In the rest phase model, the extension of the period is particularly longer. The results presented indicated that CCK-induced acute pancreatitis impacted free activity rhythm of ICR mice. Also in a free running model under different phase, the inflammation severity was proved significantly different. This study provides possible clues for the research of the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis severe tendency.

  12. Levels of serum leptin, cholecystokinin, plasma lipid and lipoprotein differ between patients with gallstone or/and those with hepatolithiasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Ming Lei; Ming-Xin Ye; Wen-Guang Fu; Yue Chen; Cheng Fang; Jing Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:A signiifcant relationship exists among food intake and nutritional status and cholelithiasis, including gallstone and hepatolithiasis. Leptin is associated with obesity. This study was to investigate the differences in serum leptin levels in patients with gallstone and hepatolithiasis and to evaluate the relationships among leptin, cholecystokinin (CCK), lipid and lipoprotein concentrations. METHODS:Body mass index (BMI), serum leptin, CCK, insulin, lipid and lipoprotein concentrations, and liver function were measured in 382 patients with gallstone (GS group), 83 patients with hepatolithiasis (HS group) and 30 healthy controls (control group). The values of these indices were compared among the groups. In each group, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefifcient among these indices were evaluated. RESULTS:There were notable differences in serum leptin, CCK, total cholesterol, total triglycerides, apolipoprotein-a (APO-a), globulin, direct reacting bilirubin, and BMI between the GS and HS groups (P CONCLUSIONS:Leptin participates in modulating lipid metabolism. There are notable differences in leptin, serum lipid, and CCK between patients with gallstone and those with hepatolithiasis. The role of leptin in the pathophysiological course of cholelithiasis needs further investigation.

  13. Cholecystokinin rapidly stimulates CrkII function in vivo in rat pancreatic acini. Formation of CrkII-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreolotti, Alberto G; Bragado, Maria J; Tapia, Jose A; Jensen, Robert T; Garcia-Marin, Luis J

    2003-12-01

    Crk belongs to a family of adapter proteins whose structure allows interaction with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and is therefore an important modulator of downstream signals, representing a convergence of the actions of numerous stimuli. Recently, it was demonstrated that cholecystokinin (CCK) induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins related to fiber stress formation in rat pancreatic acini. Here, we investigated whether CCK receptor activation signals through CrkII and forms complexes with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in rat pancreatic acini. We demonstrated that CCK promoted the transient formation of CrkII-paxillin and CrkII-p130Cas complexes with maximal effect at 1 min. Additionally, CCK decreased the electrophoretic mobility of CrkII. This decrease was time- and concentration-dependent and inversely related with its function. Carbachol and bombesin also decreased CrkII electrophoretic mobility, whereas epidermal growth factor, vasoactive intestinal peptide, secretin or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide had no effect. CCK-induced CrkII electrophoretic shift was dependent on the Src family of tyrosine kinases and occurred in the intact animal, suggesting a physiological role of CrkII mediating CCK actions in the exocrine pancreas in vivo.

  14. Suppressive effect on food intake of a potato extract (Potein®) involving cholecystokinin release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenya; Hira, Tohru; Nakajima, Shingo; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Tsubata, Masahito; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Hara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We have recently reported that oral gavage of a potato extract (Potein®) suppressed the food intake in rats. The satiating effect of the potato extract was compared in the present study to other protein sources, and the involvement of endogenous cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion was examined. Food consumption was measured in 18-h fasted rats after oral gavage of the potato extract or other protein sources. The CCK-releasing activity of the potato extract was then examined in anesthetized rats with a portal cannula. Oral gavage of the potato extract reduced the food intake in the rats, the effect being greater than with casein and a soybean β-conglycinin hydrolysate. The suppressive effect on appetite of the potato extract was attenuated by treating with a CCK-receptor antagonist (devazepide). The portal CCK concentration was increased after a duodenal administration of the potato extract to anesthetized rats. These results indicate that the potato extract suppressed the food intake in rats through CCK secretion.

  15. Beneficial effect of the bioflavonoid quercetin on cholecystokinin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Heike; Jonas, Ludwig; Wakileh, Michael; Krüger, Burkhard

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is still poorly understood. Thus, a reliable pharmacological therapy is currently lacking. In recent years, an impairment of the energy metabolism of pancreatic acinar cells, caused by Ca(2+)-mediated depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane and a decreased ATP supply, has been implicated as an important pathological event. In this study, we investigated whether quercetin exerts protection against mitochondrial dysfunction. Following treatment with or without quercetin, rat pancreatic acinar cells were stimulated with supramaximal cholecystokinin-8 (CCK). CCK caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP concentration, whereas the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased. Quercetin treatment before CCK application exerted no protection on MMP but increased ATP to a normal level, leading to a continuous decrease in the dehydrogenase activity. The protective effect of quercetin on mitochondrial function was accompanied by a reduction in CCK-induced changes to the cell membrane. Concerning the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of quercetin, an increased AMP/ATP ratio suggests that the AMP-activated protein kinase system may be activated. In addition, quercetin strongly inhibited CCK-induced trypsin activity. The results indicate that the use of quercetin may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing the severity of AP.

  16. Direct demonstration of unique mode of natural peptide binding to the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor using photoaffinity labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maoqing; Miller, Laurence J

    2013-08-01

    Direct analysis of mode of peptide docking using intrinsic photoaffinity labeling has provided detailed insights for the molecular basis of cholecystokinin (CCK) interaction with the type 1 CCK receptor. In the current work, this technique has been applied to the closely related type 2 CCK receptor that also binds the natural full agonist peptide, CCK, with high affinity. A series of photolabile CCK analog probes with sites of covalent attachment extending from position 26 through 32 were characterized, with the highest affinity analogs that possessed full biological activity utilized in photoaffinity labeling. The position 29 probe, incorporating a photolabile benzoyl-phenylalanine in that position, was shown to bind with high affinity and to be a full agonist, with potency not different from that of natural CCK, and to covalently label the type 2 CCK receptor in a saturable, specific and efficient manner. Using proteolytic peptide mapping, mutagenesis, and radiochemical Edman degradation sequencing, this probe was shown to establish a covalent bond with type 2 CCK receptor residue Phe¹²⁰ in the first extracellular loop. This was in contrast to its covalent attachment to Glu³⁴⁵ in the third extracellular loop of the type 1 CCK receptor, directly documenting differences in mode of docking this peptide to these receptors.

  17. Relationship between vulnerability to reinforcing effects of morphine and activity of the endogenous cholecystokinin system in Lewis and Fischer rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Florence; Benturquia, Nadia; Crete, Dominique; Canestrelli, Corinne; Mas Nieto, Magdalena; Wilson, Jodie; Roques, Bernard P

    2012-05-01

    A great number of studies have shown the presence of physiological interactions between brain neurotransmitter systems in behavioural responses. This is the case for opioid, cholecystokinin (CCK) and dopamine systems. However, so far the role that the CCK system may play in vulnerability to consumption of drugs of abuse is not clear. This was investigated in this study using Lewis rats that are more sensitive to the reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse than Fischer rats. The extraneuronal CCK(8) levels and brain CCK(2) receptors were found higher in Fischer than in Lewis rats in the nucleus accumbens, one of the most important structures involved in drug consumption. Moreover, pharmacological modulation of the CCK system by administration of a selective CCK(2) agonist blocked, in the conditioned place preference, the reinforcing effects of morphine in Lewis rats, whereas a selective CCK(2) antagonist revealed reinforcing effects of the alkaloid in Fischer rats. These results obtained following systemic administrations of the CCK ligands were confirmed following microinjection into the nucleus accumbens. Thus, a low level of CCK efflux in the nucleus accumbens could be one of the many factors involved in drug reinforcing effects, whereas a high level of CCK efflux could attenuate it.

  18. Word classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found...... a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective...

  19. Evaluation of the responses of MHC class II molecule-expressing cells and macrophages to epoxy resin-based and 4-META-containing, methacrylate resin-based root canal sealers in rat subcutaneous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yusuke; Shigetani, Yoshimi; Yoshiba, Kunihiko; Kaneko, Tomoatsu; Yoshiba, Nagako; Okiji, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule-expressing cells and macrophages play a pivotal role in mediating the host tissue response to biomaterials. This study investigated the responses of these cells to epoxy resin-based and 4-META-containing, methacrylate resin-based endodontic sealers (AH Plus and MetaSEAL respectively) in rat connective tissue. Silicone tubes loaded with one of the sealers or solid silicone rods (control) were subcutaneously implanted in male Wistar rats for three time periods of 7, 14, or 28 days. Tissue specimens were immunoperoxidase-stained for MHC class II molecules and CD68 (a general macrophage marker). Results showed that AH Plus-implanted tissue displayed significantly more MHC class II-positive cells than the control at 14 and 28 days, whereas MetaSEAL-implanted tissue showed significantly more CD68-positive cells than both AH Plus-implanted tissue and the control at all time periods. It was concluded that the epoxy resin-based sealer induced the infiltration of MHC class II molecule-expressing cells, whereas 4-META-containing, methacrylate resin-based sealer elicited macrophage infiltration.

  20. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...... bias from omitted variables, the preferred IV results indicate considerable negative effects due to larger class sizes and larger numbers of overage-for-grade peers. The latter, driven by the highly prevalent practices of grade repetition and academic redshirting, should be considered an important...

  1. Cancer cells become susceptible to natural killer cell killing after exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors due to glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Søren; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup; Andresen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    We show that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors lead to functional expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) on cancer cells, making them potent targets for natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing through a NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) restricted mechanism. Blocking either...... apoptosis or oxidative stress caused by HDAC inhibitor treatment did not affect MICA/B expression, suggesting involvement of a separate signal pathway not directly coupled to induction of cell death. HDAC inhibitor treatment induced glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity and down-regulation of GSK-3...... by small interfering RNA or by different inhibitors showed that GSK-3 activity is essential for the induced MICA/B expression. We thus present evidence that cancer cells which survive the direct induction of cell death by HDAC inhibitors become targets for NKG2D-expressing cells like NK cells, gammadelta T...

  2. The T box regulatory element controlling expression of the class I lysyl-tRNA synthetase of Bacillus cereus strain 14579 is functional and can be partially induced by reduced charging of asparaginyl-tRNAAsn

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foy, Niall

    2010-07-22

    Abstract Background Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) is unique within the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family in that both class I (LysRS1) and class II (LysRS2) enzymes exist. LysRS1 enzymes are found in Archaebacteria and some eubacteria while all other organisms have LysRS2 enzymes. All sequenced strains of Bacillus cereus (except AH820) and Bacillus thuringiensis however encode both a class I and a class II LysRS. The lysK gene (encoding LysRS1) of B. cereus strain 14579 has an associated T box element, the first reported instance of potential T box control of LysRS expression. Results A global study of 891 completely sequenced bacterial genomes identified T box elements associated with control of LysRS expression in only four bacterial species: B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, Symbiobacterium thermophilum and Clostridium beijerinckii. Here we investigate the T box element found in the regulatory region of the lysK gene in B. cereus strain 14579. We show that this T box element is functional, responding in a canonical manner to an increased level of uncharged tRNALys but, unusually, also responding to an increased level of uncharged tRNAAsn. We also show that B. subtilis strains with T box regulated expression of the endogenous lysS or the heterologous lysK genes are viable. Conclusions The T box element controlling lysK (encoding LysRS1) expression in B. cereus strain 14579 is functional, but unusually responds to depletion of charged tRNALys and tRNAAsn. This may have the advantage of making LysRS1 expression responsive to a wider range of nutritional stresses. The viability of B. subtilis strains with a single LysRS1 or LysRS2, whose expression is controlled by this T box element, makes the rarity of the occurrence of such control of LysRS expression puzzling.

  3. The T box regulatory element controlling expression of the class I lysyl-tRNA synthetase of Bacillus cereus strain 14579 is functional and can be partially induced by reduced charging of asparaginyl-tRNAAsn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conant Gavin C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS is unique within the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family in that both class I (LysRS1 and class II (LysRS2 enzymes exist. LysRS1 enzymes are found in Archaebacteria and some eubacteria while all other organisms have LysRS2 enzymes. All sequenced strains of Bacillus cereus (except AH820 and Bacillus thuringiensis however encode both a class I and a class II LysRS. The lysK gene (encoding LysRS1 of B. cereus strain 14579 has an associated T box element, the first reported instance of potential T box control of LysRS expression. Results A global study of 891 completely sequenced bacterial genomes identified T box elements associated with control of LysRS expression in only four bacterial species: B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, Symbiobacterium thermophilum and Clostridium beijerinckii. Here we investigate the T box element found in the regulatory region of the lysK gene in B. cereus strain 14579. We show that this T box element is functional, responding in a canonical manner to an increased level of uncharged tRNALys but, unusually, also responding to an increased level of uncharged tRNAAsn. We also show that B. subtilis strains with T box regulated expression of the endogenous lysS or the heterologous lysK genes are viable. Conclusions The T box element controlling lysK (encoding LysRS1 expression in B. cereus strain 14579 is functional, but unusually responds to depletion of charged tRNALys and tRNAAsn. This may have the advantage of making LysRS1 expression responsive to a wider range of nutritional stresses. The viability of B. subtilis strains with a single LysRS1 or LysRS2, whose expression is controlled by this T box element, makes the rarity of the occurrence of such control of LysRS expression puzzling.

  4. Synergistic effect of CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide and cholecystokinin on food intake regulation in lean mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Alexander

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide and cholecystokinin (CCK are neuromodulators involved in feeding behavior. This study is based on previously found synergistic effect of leptin and CCK on food intake and our hypothesis on a co-operation of the CART peptide and CCK in food intake regulation and Fos activation in their common targets, the nucleus tractus solitarii of the brainstem (NTS, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN, and the dorsomedial nucleus (DMH of the hypothalamus. Results In fasted C57BL/6 mice, the anorexigenic effect of CART(61-102 in the doses of 0.1 or 0.5 μg/mouse was significantly enhanced by low doses of CCK-8 of 0.4 or 4 μg/kg, while 1 mg/kg dose of CCK-A receptor antagonist devazepide blocked the effect of CART(61-102 on food intake. After simultaneous administration of 0.1 μg/mouse CART(61-102 and of 4 μg/kg of CCK-8, the number of Fos-positive neurons in NTS, PVN, and DMH was significantly higher than after administration of each particular peptide. Besides, CART(61-102 and CCK-8 showed an additive effect on inhibition of the locomotor activity of mice in an open field test. Conclusion The synergistic and long-lasting effect of the CART peptide and CCK on food intake and their additive effect on Fos immunoreactivity in their common targets suggest a co-operative action of CART peptide and CCK which could be related to synergistic effect of leptin on CCK satiety.

  5. Cholecystokinin but not ghrelin stimulates mucosal bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum: independence of feeding status and cholinergic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Markus; Lindqvist, Ramin; Bengtsson, Magnus W; Jedstedt, Gunilla; Flemström, Gunnar

    2013-05-10

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is an important regulator of food digestion but its influence on small intestinal secretion has received little attention. We characterized effects of CCK-8, ghrelin and some related peptides on duodenal HCO3(-) secretion in vivo and demonstrated CCK-induced calcium signaling in acutely isolated enterocytes. A segment of proximal duodenum with intact blood supply was cannulated in situ in anaesthetized rats. Mucosal HCO3(-) secretion was continuously recorded (pH-stat). Peptides were administrated to the duodenum by close intra-arterial infusion. Clusters of duodenal enterocytes were attached to the bottom of a perfusion chamber. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was examined by dual-wavelength imaging. CCK-8 (3.0, 15 and 60 pmol/kg,h) caused dose-dependent increases (psecretion in both overnight fasted and continuously fed animals. The CCK1R-antagonist devazepide but neither the CCK2R-antagonist YMM022 nor the melatonin MT2-selective antagonist luzindole inhibited the rise in secretion. Atropine decreased sensitivity to CCK-8. The appetite-related peptide ghrelin was without effect on the duodenal secretion in fasted as well as fed animals. Superfusion with CCK-8 (1.0-50 nM) induced [Ca(2+)]i signaling in acutely isolated duodenal enterocytes. After an initial peak response, [Ca(2+)]i returned to near basal values within 3-5min. Devazepide but not YMM022 inhibited this [Ca(2+)]i response. Low doses of CCK-8 stimulate duodenal alkaline secretion and induce enterocyte [Ca(2+)]i signaling by an action at CCK1 receptors. The results point to importance of CCK in the rapid postprandial rise in mucosa-protective duodenal secretion.

  6. Presynaptically mediated effects of cholecystokinin-8 on the excitability of area postrema neurons in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeta, Shingo; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Maezawa, Hitoshi; Inoue, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Funahashi, Makoto

    2015-08-27

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a well-known gut hormone that shows anorexigenic effects via action at peripheral and central receptors. CCK is also widely distributed throughout the mammalian brain and appears to function as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. The area postrema is one of the circumventricular organs, located on the dorsal surface of the medulla oblongata at the caudal end of the fourth ventricle. Blood vessels in the area postrema lack a blood brain barrier, offering specific central neural elements unique access to circulating substances. Immunohistochemical studies show CCK-A receptors in the area postrema, and we reported CCK-sensitive area postrema neurons. However, the receptive mechanism of CCK in area postrema neurons still remains unexplained. We investigated the responses of area postrema neurons to agonists and antagonists of CCK receptors using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices. The application of CCK-8 elicited excitatory responses, such as increases in the frequency of mEPSCs (miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents), a shift toward larger amplitude mEPSCs, and increases in the frequency of action potentials. These changes were found mostly in cells not displaying the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), except for small excitatory changes in a minority of Ih-positive neurons. Tonic inward currents or an inhibitory response to CCK-8 were never seen. Analysis of the amplitude of mEPSCs before and after the administration of CCK-8 indicated the responses mediated via the presynaptic receptors. The effect of CCK-8 was abolished in the presence of CNQX (AMPA type glutamate receptor antagonist). In the presence of lorglumide (a selective CCK-A receptor antagonist), CCK-8-induced excitatory responses were inhibited. No cells responded to the administration of non-sulfated CCK-8 (CCK-8NS, a selective CCK-B receptor agonist). We conclude that CCK-8 exerts its action via presynaptic CCK-A receptors

  7. Prefrontal cortical circuit for depression- and anxiety-related behaviors mediated by cholecystokinin: role of ΔFosB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialou, Vincent; Bagot, Rosemary C; Cahill, Michael E; Ferguson, Deveroux; Robison, Alfred J; Dietz, David M; Fallon, Barbara; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Ku, Stacy M; Harrigan, Eileen; Winstanley, Catherine A; Joshi, Tej; Feng, Jian; Berton, Olivier; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-03-12

    Decreased medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neuronal activity is associated with social defeat-induced depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the decreased mPFC activity and its prodepressant role remain unknown. We show here that induction of the transcription factor ΔFosB in mPFC, specifically in the prelimbic (PrL) area, mediates susceptibility to stress. ΔFosB induction in PrL occurred selectively in susceptible mice after chronic social defeat stress, and overexpression of ΔFosB in this region, but not in the nearby infralimbic (IL) area, enhanced stress susceptibility. ΔFosB produced these effects partly through induction of the cholecystokinin (CCK)-B receptor: CCKB blockade in mPFC induces a resilient phenotype, whereas CCK administration into mPFC mimics the anxiogenic- and depressant-like effects of social stress. We previously found that optogenetic stimulation of mPFC neurons in susceptible mice reverses several behavioral abnormalities seen after chronic social defeat stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that optogenetic stimulation of cortical projections would rescue the pathological effects of CCK in mPFC. After CCK infusion in mPFC, we optogenetically stimulated mPFC projections to basolateral amygdala or nucleus accumbens, two subcortical structures involved in mood regulation. Stimulation of corticoamygdala projections blocked the anxiogenic effect of CCK, although no effect was observed on other symptoms of social defeat. Conversely, stimulation of corticoaccumbens projections reversed CCK-induced social avoidance and sucrose preference deficits but not anxiogenic-like effects. Together, these results indicate that social stress-induced behavioral deficits are mediated partly by molecular adaptations in mPFC involving ΔFosB and CCK through cortical projections to distinct subcortical targets.

  8. Peripheral injected cholecystokinin-8S modulates the concentration of serotonin in nerve fibers of the rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engster, Kim-Marie; Frommelt, Lisa; Hofmann, Tobias; Nolte, Sandra; Fischer, Felix; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas; Kobelt, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin and cholecystokinin (CCK) play a role in the short-term inhibition of food intake. It is known that peripheral injection of CCK increases c-Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in rats, and injection of the serotonin antagonist ondansetron decreases the number of c-Fos-IR cells in the NTS. This supports the idea of serotonin contributing to the effects of CCK. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether peripherally injected CCK-8S modulates the concentration of serotonin in brain feeding-regulatory nuclei. Ad libitum fed male Sprague-Dawley rats received 5.2 and 8.7 nmol/kg CCK-8S (n=3/group) or 0.15M NaCl (n=3-5/group) injected intraperitoneally (ip). The number of c-Fos-IR neurons, and the fluorescence intensity of serotonin in nerve fibers were assessed in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), arcuate nucleus (ARC), NTS and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). CCK-8S increased the number of c-Fos-ir neurons in the NTS (mean±SEM: 72±4, and 112±5 neurons/section, respectively) compared to vehicle-treated rats (7±2 neurons/section, Pserotonin-immunoreactivity 90 min after injection of CCK-8S (46±2 and 49±8 pixel/section, respectively) compared to vehicle (81±8 pixel/section, Pserotonin-immunoreactivity were observed in the PVN and ARC. Our results suggest that serotonin is involved in the mediation of CCK-8's effects in the brainstem.

  9. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mixin based class and method combination mechanism with block structure propagation. Traditionally, mixins can be composed to form new classes, possibly merging the implementations of methods (as in CLOS). In our approach, a class or method combination operation may cause any...... number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...... for each member of the class family, and again by propagation implicitly compose each method from its aspects. As opposed to CLOS, this is type-checked statically; and as opposed to other systems for advanced class combination/ merging/weaving, it is integrated directly in the language, ensuring a clear...

  10. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L;

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC ...

  11. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC ...

  12. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce and adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KN1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a tissue medium lacking cytoki...

  13. Latent Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I TAP Inhibitor, BNLF2a, in EBV-Positive Gastric Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Michael J; Laskow, Thomas; Nakhoul, Hani; Blanchard, Eugene; Liu, Yaozhong; Wang, Xia; Baddoo, Melody; Lin, Zhen; Yin, Qinyan; Flemington, Erik K

    2015-10-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BNLF2a gene product provides immune evasion properties to infected cells through inhibition of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-mediated transport of antigen peptides. Although BNLF2a is considered to be a lytic gene, we demonstrate that it is expressed in nearly half of the EBV-associated gastric carcinomas analyzed. Further, we show that BNLF2a expression is dissociated from lytic gene expression. BNLF2a is therefore expressed in this latency setting, potentially helping protect the infected tumor cells from immunosurveillance.

  14. N-glycosylation of asparagine 8 regulates surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) alleles dependent on threonine 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maiken Mellergaard; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    -glycosylation and the retention was rescued by T24A substitution. Our study reveals N-glycosylation as an allele-specific regulatory mechanism important for regulation of surface expression of MICA018 and we pinpoint the residues essential for this N-glycosylation dependency. In addition we show that this regulatory mechanism...... for cell-surface expression and sought to identify the essential residues. We found that a single N-glycosylation site (N8) was important for MICA018 surface expression. The frequently expressed MICA allele 008, with an altered transmembrane and intracellular domain, was not affected by mutation of this N...

  15. High expression of MAGE-A4 and MHC class I antigens in tumor cells and induction of MAGE-A4 immune responses are prognostic markers of CHP-MAGE-A4 cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takuro; Wada, Hisashi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Eiichi; Kageyama, Shinichi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-10-14

    We conducted a cancer vaccine clinical trial with MAGE-A4 protein. Safety, clinical response, and antigen-specific immune responses were analyzed and the prognostic factors by vaccination were investigated. Twenty patients with advanced esophageal, stomach or lung cancer were administered MAGE-A4 vaccine containing 300μg protein subcutaneously once every 2 weeks in six doses. Primary endpoints of this study were safety and MAGE-A4 immune responses. The vaccine was well tolerated. Fifteen of 20 patients completed one cycle of vaccination and two patients showed SD. A MAGE-A4-specific humoral immune response was observed in four patients who had high expression of MAGE-A4 and MHC class I on tumor cells. These four patients showed significantly longer overall survival than patients without an antibody response after vaccination (p=0.009). Patients with tumor cells expressing high MAGE-A4 or MHC class I antigen showed significantly longer overall survival than those with low expression. Induction of CD4 and CD8T cell responses was observed in three and six patients, respectively, and patients with induction of MAGE-A4-specific IFNγ-producing CD8T cells, but not CD4T cells, lived longer than those without induction. The CHP-MAGE-A4 vaccine was safe. Expression of MAGE-A4 and MHC class I in tumor tissue and the induction of a MAGE-A4-specific immune response after vaccination would be feasible prognostic markers for patients vaccinated with MAGE-A4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...... outcomes. This study uses new microdata from East Africa, incorporating test score data for over 250,000 children, to compare the likely efficacy of these two types of interventions. Endogeneity bias is addressed via fixed effects and instrumental variables techniques. Although these may not fully mitigate...

  17. Up-regulation of HLA class-I antigen expression and antigen-specific CTL response in cervical cancer cells by the demethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizano-Soberón Marcela

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation are epigenetic events that contribute to the absence or downregulated expression of different components of the tumor recognition complex. These events affect the processing and presentation of antigenic peptides to CTLs by HLA class-I molecules. In this work evaluated the effect of the DNA hypomethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid, on the expression of HLA class-I molecules and on the antigen-specific immune recognition of cervical cancer cells. Methods Cell lines C33A (HPV-, CaSki (HPV-16+ and MS751 (HPV-18+ were treated with hydralazine and valproic acid to assess the expression of HLA class-I molecules by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Promoter methylation of HLA class-I -A, -B and C, was also evaluated by Methylation-Specific PCR. Primary cervical tumors of four HLA-A*0201 allele patients were typed for HPV and their CTL's stimulated in vitro with the T2 cell line previously loaded with 50 μM of the HPV peptides. Cytotoxicity of stimulated CTL's was assayed against Caski and MS751 cells pre-treated with hydralazine and valproic acid. Results Valproic acid and hydralazine/valproic acid up-regulated the constitutive HLA class-I expression as evaluated by flow cytometry and RT-PCR despite constitutive promoter demethylation at these loci. Hydralazine and valproic acid in combination but no IFN-gamma hyperacetylated histone H4 as evaluated by ChiP assay. The antigenic immune recognition of CaSki and MS751 cells by CTLs specific to HPV-16/18 E6 and E7-derived epitopes, was increased by VA and H/VA and the combination of H/VA/IFN-gamma. Conclusion These results support the potential use of hydralazine and valproic acid as an adjuvant for immune intervention in cervical cancer patients whenever clinical protocols based on tumor antigen recognition is desirable, like in those cases where the application of E6 and E7 based therapeutic vaccines

  18. Vagal afferent neurons in high fat diet-induced obesity; intestinal microflora, gut inflammation and cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lartigue, Guillaume; de La Serre, Claire Barbier; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-11-30

    The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the CNS and influences both GI function and feeding behavior. Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express receptors for many of the regulatory peptides and molecules released from the intestinal wall, pancreas, and adipocytes that influence GI function, glucose homeostasis, and regulate food intake and body weight. As such, they play a critical role in both physiology and pathophysiology, such as obesity, where there is evidence that vagal afferent function is altered. This review will summarize recent findings on changes in vagal afferent function in response to ingestion of high fat diets and explore the hypothesis that changes in gut microbiota and integrity of the epithelium may not only be important in inducing these changes but may be the initial events that lead to dysregulation of food intake and body weight in response to high fat, high energy diets.

  19. [Effects of Yanggan Lidan Granule on rate of gallstone formation and content of plasma cholecystokinin in guinea pigs with induced cholesterol gallstones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-bo; Fang, Bang-jiang

    2008-04-01

    To explore the effects of Yanggan Lidan Granule (YGLDG), a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine for nourishing liver and improving choleresis, on the rate of gallstone formation and content of plasma cholecystokinin in guinea pigs with induced cholesterol gallstones. Eighty guinea pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups, which were normal control group, untreated group, YGLDG-treated group and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)-treated group (n=20). Except the normal control group, gallstones were induced by high-cholesterol diet in the guinea pigs. YGLDG (1.81 g/kg daily) and UDCA (30.12 mg/kg daily) were given orally to guinea pigs in the corresponding group respectively for seven weeks; however, the guinea pigs of normal control group and untreated group were administered with normal saline. The physical signs of the guinea pigs and the rates of gallstone formation were examined, and the content of cholecystokinin (CCK) in the plasma was detected by radio-immunoassay. YGLDG could obviously improve the ethological signs of the guinea pigs. Gallstone formation rate of the untreated group (82.35%) was significantly increased as compared with that of the normal control group (5.26%) (Pgallstone formation rates of the YGLDG-treated group (27.28%) and UDCA-treated group (38.89%) were lower than that of the untreated group (P0.05). YGLDG can significantly decrease the rate of gallstone formation in guinea pigs. It may be related to elevating the content of CCK in the plasma.

  20. Clinical significance of tumor expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A and B (MICA/B) in gastric cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIBEIRO, CAROLINA HAGER; KRAMM, KARINA; GÁLVEZ-JIRÓN, FELIPE; POLA, VÍCTOR; BUSTAMANTE, MARCO; CONTRERAS, HECTOR R.; SABAG, ANDREA; GARRIDO-TAPIA, MACARENA; HERNÁNDEZ, CAROLINA J.; ZÚÑIGA, ROBERTO; COLLAZO, NORBERTO; SOTELO, PABLO HERNÁN; MORALES, CAMILA; MERCADO, LUIS; CATALÁN, DIEGO; AGUILLÓN, JUAN CARLOS; MOLINA, MARÍA CARMEN

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Natural killer cells play an important role in the immune defense against transformed cells. They express the activating receptor NKG2D, whose ligands belong to the MIC and ULBP/RAET family. Although it is well established that these ligands are generally expressed in tumors, the association between their expression in the tumor and gastric mucosa and clinical parameters and prognosis of GC remains to be addressed. In the present study, MICA and MICB expression was analyzed, by flow cytometry, in 23 and 20 pairs of gastric tumor and adjacent non-neoplasic gastric mucosa, respectively. Additionally, ligands expression in 13 tumors and 7 gastric mucosa samples from GC patients were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of MICA in 9 pairs of tumor and mucosa were determined by quantitative PCR. Data were associated with the clinicopathological characteristics and the patient outcome. MICA expression was observed in 57% of tumors (13/23) and 44% of mucosal samples (10/23), while MICB was detected in 50% of tumors (10/20) and 45% of mucosal tissues (9/20). At the protein level, ligand expression was significantly higher in the tumor than in the gastric mucosa. MICA mRNA levels were also increased in the tumor as compared to the mucosa. However, clinicopathological analysis indicated that, in patients with tumors >5 cm, the expression of MICA and MICB in the tumor did not differ from that of the mucosa, and tumors >5 cm showed significantly higher MICA and MICB expression than tumors ≤5 cm. Patients presenting tumors >5 cm that expressed MICA and MICB had substantially shorter survival than those with large tumors that did not express these ligands. Our results suggest that locally sustained expression of MICA and MICB in the tumor may contribute to the malignant progression of GC and that expression of these ligands predicts an unfavorable prognosis in GC patients presenting

  1. In vivo infiltration of mononuclear cells in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck correlates with the ability to expand tumour-infiltrating T cells in vitro and with the expression of MHC class I antigens on tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, J; Rasmussen, N; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1994-01-01

    -peptide-specific T cells in the patients. Eight out of ten expanded tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) cultures showed T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. "Promiscuous" cytotoxic T cell activity against the natural-killer-cell-sensitive K562 target cell line was observed in three out of ten TIL expansion......A series of 18 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, 6 primary and 12 recurrent, were investigated for tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells with monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Our results suggest that the number of T cells at the tumour edge in vivo correlates well...... with their ability to expand in vitro in the presence of high-dose interleukin-2 (2000 U/ml). High MHC class I antigen expression on tumour cells was found to be positively correlated with p53 overexpression, suggesting that p53-derived peptides, wild-type or mutated ones, presented by MHC class I antigens...

  2. Expression of insulin-like growth factor-1in bony class Ⅲ malocclusion%胰岛素样生长因子-1在骨性Ⅲ类错(牙合)畸形中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈允嘉; 李艳; 王豫蓉; 秘双燕; 吴增波; 王强; 颜婕

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the expression of ICF-1 in bony class III malocclusion patients and its relationship with growth of mandible. Methods Twenty-four bony class III malocclusion patients and 27 bony class I malocclusion patients were included in this study. Expression of IGF-1 in mandible tissue was detected by RT-PCR and ELJSA, respectively. Results RT-PCR showed that the expression level of IGF-1 mRNA was significantly higher in bony class M malocclusion patients than in bony class I malocclusion patients (5.541 0 ± 2. 044 7 μg/μl vs 1.282 1 ±0.273 1 μg/μl, P <0. 05) . The regression factor was 0.998, which was calculated according to the correlation curve for IGF-1 optical density value and its concentration. ELISA showed that the expression level of IGF-1 protein was significantly higher in bony class malocclusion patients than in bony class I malocclusion patients (84.125 9 ±29.294 7 ng/L is 22.406 4 ±4.931 2 ng/L, P <0.05). Conclusion The more the mandible grows, the higher the expression level of IGF-1 is, which indicates that IGF-1 plays an important role in growth of mandible condyloid cartilage.%目的 研究在下颌骨发育过度导致的骨性Ⅲ类错(牙合)畸形患者中,胰岛素样生长因子-1(IGF-1)基因的表达,探讨IGF-1基因表达与下颌骨生长的关系.方法 选取骨性Ⅲ类错(牙合)畸形患者27例,骨性Ⅰ类患者(包括个别正常(牙合))27例,应用荧光定量PCR技术和酶联免疫吸附剂测定(ELISA)技术研究下颌骨中IGF-1基因的表达变化.结果 RT-PCR检测结果显示,骨性Ⅲ类错(牙合)畸形组中IGF-1mRNA的表达量为(5.5410±2.044 7)μg/μl,骨性Ⅰ类组中IGF-1mRNA的表达量为(1.2821±0.273 1)μg/μl,2组比较具有统计学差异(P<0.05).根据1GF-1基因光密度值与浓度关系曲线,得回归系数0.998.ELISA检测结果显示,骨性Ⅲ类错(牙合)畸形组中IGF-1蛋白浓度为(84.1259±29.294 7) ng/L,骨性Ⅰ类组中IGF-1蛋白浓度为(22.406 4±4.9312) ng

  3. Structural analysis of DNA binding by C.Csp231I, a member of a novel class of R-M controller proteins regulating gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, M. B.; Streeter, S. D.; Thresh, S.-J.; Swiderska, A.; McGeehan, J. E.; Kneale, G. G., E-mail: geoff.kneale@port.ac.uk [University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The structure of the new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence is presented, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins is discussed. An unusual extended spacer between the dimer binding sites suggests a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers. In a wide variety of bacterial restriction–modification systems, a regulatory ‘controller’ protein (or C-protein) is required for effective transcription of its own gene and for transcription of the endonuclease gene found on the same operon. We have recently turned our attention to a new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) that have quite novel features, including a much larger DNA-binding site with an 18 bp (∼60 Å) spacer between the two palindromic DNA-binding sequences and a very different recognition sequence from the canonical GACT/AGTC. Using X-ray crystallography, the structure of the protein in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence was solved to 1.8 Å resolution, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins was elucidated. An unusual aspect of the promoter sequence is the extended spacer between the dimer binding sites, suggesting a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers when bound to both recognition sites correctly spaced on the DNA. A U-bend model is proposed for this tetrameric complex, based on the results of gel-mobility assays, hydrodynamic analysis and the observation of key contacts at the interface between dimers in the crystal.

  4. Two Novel Class II Hydrophobins from Trichoderma spp. Stimulate Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) when Expressed as Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino-Rammer, Liliana; Ribitsch, Doris; Przylucka, Agnieszka; Marold, Annemarie; Greimel, Katrin J.; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Guebitz, Georg M.; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) can be functionalized and/or recycled via hydrolysis by microbial cutinases. The rate of hydrolysis is however low. Here, we tested whether hydrophobins (HFBs), small secreted fungal proteins containing eight positionally conserved cysteine residues, are able to enhance the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of PET. Species of the fungal genus Trichoderma have the most proliferated arsenal of class II hydrophobin-encoding genes among fungi. To this end, we studied two novel class II HFBs (HFB4 and HFB7) of Trichoderma. HFB4 and HFB7, produced in Escherichia coli as fusions to the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase, exhibited subtle structural differences reflected in hydrophobicity plots that correlated with unequal hydrophobicity and hydrophily, respectively, of particular amino acid residues. Both proteins exhibited a dosage-dependent stimulation effect on PET hydrolysis by cutinase from Humicola insolens, with HFB4 displaying an adsorption isotherm-like behavior, whereas HFB7 was active only at very low concentrations and was inhibitory at higher concentrations. We conclude that class II HFBs can stimulate the activity of cutinases on PET, but individual HFBs can display different properties. The present findings suggest that hydrophobins can be used in the enzymatic hydrolysis of aromatic-aliphatic polyesters such as PET. PMID:23645195

  5. Molecular regulation of MHC class I chain-related protein A expression after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars; Jensen, Helle; Pedersen, Marianne T

    2007-01-01

    /B expression. It was further observed that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were depleted after HDAC treatment. NF-kappaB activity can be induced by HDAC treatment. However, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 was not observed after HDAC treatment of Jurkat T cells and even though we could effectively...... inhibit p65 expression by siRNA, it did not modify MICA/B expression. To identify important elements in MICA regulation, we made a promoter construct consisting of approximately 3 kb of the proximal MICA promoter in front of GFP. Deletion analysis showed that a germinal center-box containing a putative Sp...

  6. Characteristics of the Cholecystokinin-Induced Depolarization of Pacemaking Activity in Cultured Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Murine Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hwa Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In this study, we studied the effects of cholecystokinin (CCK on pacemaker potentials in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs from mouse small intestine using the whole cell patch clamp technique. Methods: ICCs are pacemaker cells that exhibit periodic spontaneous depolarization, which is responsible for the production of slow waves in gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and generate periodic pacemaker potentials in current-clamp mode. Results: Exposure to CCK (100 nM-5 µM decreased the amplitudes of pacemaker potentials and depolarized resting membrane potentials. To identify the type of CCK receptors involved in ICCs, we examined the effects of CCK agonists and found that the addition of CCK1 agonist (A-71323, 1 µM depolarized resting membrane potentials, whereas exposure to CCK2 agonist (gastrin , 1 µM had no effect on pacemaker potentials. To confirm these results, we examined the effects of CCK antagonists and found that pretreatment with CCK1 antagonist (SR 27897, 1 µM blocked CCK-induced effects. However, pretreatment with CCK2 antagonist (LY 225910, 1 µM did not. Furthermore, intracellular GDPβS suppressed CCK-induced effects. To investigate the involvements of phospholipase C (PLC, protein kinase C (PKC, and protein kinase A (PKA in the effects of CCK in cultured ICCs, we used U-73122 (an active PLC inhibitor, chelerythrine (a PKC inhibitor, SQ-22536 (an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, or mPKAI (an inhibitor of myristoylated PKA. All inhibitors blocked the CCK-mediated effects on pacemaker potentials. In addition, we found that transient receptor potential classical 5 (TRPC5 channel was involved in CCK-activated currents in cultured ICCs. Conclusion: These results suggest that the CCK induced depolarization of pacemaking activity occurs in a G-protein-, PLC-, PKC-, and PKA-dependent manner via CCK1 receptor and TRPC5 channel is a candidate for CCK-activated currents in cultured ICCs in murine small intestine

  7. Synthesis of (R)- and (S)-[C-11]L-365,260 for PET studies of brain cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haradahira, T. [Research Development Corporation of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, K.; Inoue, O. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1994-05-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a recognized peptide hormone in the gut and proposed as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Two distinct CCK receptors termed CCK-A and CCK-B have been characterized. CCK-A receptor is primarily distributed in the peripheral tissues including pancreas and gallbladder and also known to be distributed in a few brain regions. CCK-B receptor is widely distributed in the brain and has been proposed to be involved in anxiety, satiety and nociception. To investigate the functional roles of the CCK receptors in the brain by positron emission tomography, we have synthesized an enantiomeric pair of C-11 labeled non-peptide antagonists against the CCK receptors. L-365,260 [3R(+)-N-(2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1H-1,4-benzodiazepine-3-yl)-N`-(3-methylpheny lurea)] is a potent CCK-B selective non-peptide antagonist (CCK-A/CCK-B ratio of IC50, 140), whereas its (S)-enantiomer is selective toward CCK-A receptor (CCK-A/CCK-B ratio of IC50, 0.02). We have synthesized the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of [C-11]-365,260 by N-methylation (50{degrees}C for 5 min) of the racemic desmethyl precursor with [C-11]iodomethane using sodium hydride as a base and subsequent optical resolution with HPLC (column: ChiraSpher, 250 x 10 mm, Merck; eluent: n-hexane / 1,4-dioxane / 2-propanol / triethylamine = 70 / 25 / 5 / 0.1). Radiochemical yields (decay corrected) and optical purities were 34%, 99% for R-enantiomer and 36%, 99% for S-enantiomer, respectively. The total synthesis time was 40 min and specific activity was about 37 GBq/{mu}mol. In PET studies on rhesus monkey (R)-enantiomer showed a high uptake of radioactivity in the cerebral cortex, region known to have a high concentration of CCK-B receptor.

  8. Effects of +G_z exposure on gallbladder emptying function,cholecystokinin,and somatostatin in rabbits with high cholesterol diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-feng XIAO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study explores the effects of +Gz exposure on the gallbladder emptying function,cholecystokinin(CCK,and somatostatin(SS in rabbits with high cholesterol diets and investigates its mechanism in the occurrence of cholecystolithiasis.Methods Twenty-four male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into the high cholesterol diet(control group,n=8 and high cholesterol diet plus +Gz exposure groups.The latter was divided into the four-and six-week +Gz exposure groups(n=8 based on the exposure time.Radioimmunoassay was used to determine the CCK and SS contents of the gallbladder at the end of the experiment in the fourth and sixth weeks and to calculate the gallbladder volume and maximum emptying ratio.A microcomputer biodynamic pressure monitor was used to record the hydrostatic pressure in the gallbladder to measure its capacity.Moreover,the bile properties and formation of concretion were observed with the naked eye,and polarized light microscopy was used to observe cholesterin crystallization on the gallbladder wall.Results The gallbladder capacity increased upon +Gz exposure for four and six weeks,indicating that the maximum emptying ratio(E% decreased,the empty and residual volumes improved,and the pressure increased(P < 0.05.After +Gz exposure for four and six weeks,the CCK contents in the experimental groups were evidently lower than that in the control group and gradually decreased(P < 0.05 as the +Gz exposure time increased.On the other hand,after +Gz exposure for four and six weeks,the SS contents in the experimental groups were higher than that in the control group and gradually improved(P < 0.05 as the +Gz exposure time increased.After +Gz exposure for four and six weeks,bile was turbid and sticky with cholesterol crystals and without visible concretion.Conclusions Therefore,+Gz exposure may cause abnormal gallbladder emptying functions,decrease CCK content,increase SS content,and thus cause bile stasis

  9. The effect of a cholecystokinin agonist on masseter muscle activity in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitthisomwong, P; Weiner, S; Levin, L; Reisman, S; Siegel, A

    2000-10-01

    The CCK(B) agonist, pentagastrin, has been shown to induce anxiety in human subjects. Similarly, in the cat model, pentagastrin facilitates the expression of hypothalamically activated emotional behavior. Because hypothalamically mediated emotional behavior is also accompanied by increased EMG activity in the jaw muscles, these experiments were designed to examine the combined effects of administration of pentagastrin with activation of hypothalamically mediated emotional behavior upon jaw muscle EMG activity. Electrodes were carefully lowered through previously placed guide tubes overlying the hypothalamus until a behavioral site was identified. Following the establishment of a stable threshold current for eliciting an emotional behavioral response, the skin overlying the ipsilateral masseter muscle was shaved and cleaned with alcohol, and surface electrodes were attached. The EMG was recorded, amplified, digitized, and stored in a microcomputer for analysis. Mean power frequencies (MPF) and latencies for behavior were calculated for baseline prior to infusion of all drugs. Following this, the effects of intravenous administration of pentagastrin and the CCK(B) antagonist LY288513 on the MPF were determined. The infusion of the CCK(B) agonist, pentagastrin (0.77, 1.92, and 3.84 microg/kg), decreased MPF in a time-related manner. The effects of pentagastrin 1.92 microg/kg were blocked by the CCK(B) antagonist, LY288513 (6.54 microg/kg). In addition, the infusion of LY288513 alone increased MPF. These results are surprising in that pentagastrin's anxiogenic properties would appear to make it likely to facilitate motor activity, not suppress it.

  10. Genetic Diversity and mRNA Expression of Porcine MHC Class I Chain-Related 2 (SLA-MIC2) Gene and Development of a High-Resolution Typing Method

    OpenAIRE

    Hailu Dadi; MinhThong Le; Hunduma Dinka; DinhTruong Nguyen; Hojun Choi; Hyesun Cho; Minkyeung Choi; Jin-Hoi Kim; Jin-Ki Park; Nagasundarapandian Soundrarajan; Chankyu Park

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure and function of MHC class I chain-related (MIC) genes in the pig genome have not been well characterized, and show discordance in available data. Therefore, we have experimentally characterized the exon-intron structure and functional copy expression pattern of the pig MIC gene, SLA-MIC2. We have also studied the genetic diversity of SLA-MIC2 from seven different breeds using a high-resolution genomic sequence-based typing (GSBT) method. Our results showed that the SLA-M...

  11. Class distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. Catherine

    Typical 101 courses discourage many students from pursuing higher level science and math courses. Introductory classes in science and math serve largely as a filter, screening out all but the most promising students, and leaving the majority of college graduates—including most prospective teachers—with little understanding of how science works, according to a study conducted for the National Science Foundation. Because few teachers, particularly at the elementary level, experience any collegiate science teaching that stresses skills of inquiry and investigation, they simply never learn to use those methods in their teaching, the report states.

  12. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye

    2017-01-01

    -expressed and functional. By analyses of chimeric human/mouse and human/bonobo receptors, bonobo receptor mutants, and the single nucleotide polymorphism database at NCBI, we identify an insertion/deletion variation in the third intracellular loop responsible for the intracellular retention and lack of function...... of the human ortholog. Genetic analyses of the 1000 genome database and the Inter99 cohort of 6,000 Danes establish the distribution of genotypes among ethnic groups, showing that the cell surface-expressed and functional variant is much more prevalent in the African population than in European and Asian...... populations and that this variant is partly linked with a stop codon early in the receptor sequence (rs6907580, amino acid position 57). In conclusion, our data solve a more than decade-old question of why the cloned human GPRC6A receptor is not cell surface-expressed and functional and provide a genetic...

  13. Expression patterns of the rice class I metallothionein gene family in response to lead stress in rice seedlings and functional complementation of its members in lead-sensitive yeast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU YuFeng; ZHOU GongKe; ZHOU Lu; LI YiQin; LIU JinYuan

    2007-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a group of low molecular mass and cysteine-rich proteins that can chelate heavy-metal ions.In this paper, Northern blot analysis was used to investigate the influence of lead stress on the expression patterns of 10 rice class I MT genes (OsMT-Is) in rice seedlings.With the exception of OsMT-I-3b, the data demonstrate dynamic changes of 9 OsMT-I transcripts in response to Pb2+ treatment in rice seedling roots.Of these genes, transcription of OsMT-I-1a, OsMT-I-1b, OsMT-I-2c, OsMT-I-4a, OsMT-I-4b and OsMT-I-4c increased significantly, while transcription of OsMT-I-2a and OsMT-I-3a increased marginally.In contrast, the expression of OsMT-I-2b was inhibited.Pb2+ induced the expression of 6 OsMT-I genes in seedling shoots, but had no obvious effects on the expression of OsMT-I-1a, OsMT-I-1b, OsMT-I-4a and OsMT-I-4b.All the 10 OsMT-Is had enhanced lead tolerance when heterologously expressed in lead-sensitive yeast mutant cells.These results provide an expression profile of the rice MT gene family in response to Pb2+ stress in rice seedlings and demonstrate increased lead tolerance in sensitive yeast mutant cells expressing OsMT-Is.This study lays a foundation for further analysis of the role of the rice MT gene family in respond to Pb2+ stress.

  14. The Pathophysiological Impact of HLA Class Ia and HLA-G Expression and Regulatory T Cells in Malignant Melanoma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Lindholm Johansen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma, a very common type of cancer, is a rapidly growing cancer of the skin with an increase in incidence among the Caucasian population. The disease is seen through all age groups and is very common in the younger age groups. Several studies have examined the risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms of malignant melanoma, which have enlightened our understanding of the development of the disease, but we have still to fully understand the complex immunological interactions. The examination of the interaction between the human leucocyte antigen (HLA system and prognostic outcome has shown interesting results, and a correlation between the down- or upregulation of these antigens and prognosis has been seen through many different types of cancer. In malignant melanoma, HLA class Ia has been seen to influence the effects of pharmaceutical drug treatment as well as the overall prognosis, and the HLA class Ib and regulatory T cells have been correlated with tumor progression. Although there is still no standardized immunological treatment worldwide, the interaction between the human leucocyte antigen (HLA system and tumor progression seems to be a promising focus in the way of optimizing the treatment of malignant melanoma.

  15. 乙醇脱氢酶Ⅰ类基因全长cDNA的克隆与表达%Cloning and Expression of the Full-length cDNAs Encoding Human Class Ⅰ Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文婷; 李景鹏; 崔羽; 张永红; 李世荣

    2007-01-01

    Background & Objective:Background &Objective: The class Ⅰ Alcohol Dehydrogenases (ADH) play a key role in hepatic alcohol catabolism. Human ADH is encoded by at least seven genes, and three class Ⅰ ADH genes-ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3, which encode the α, β, and γ subunit respectively, had been isolated and mapped on chromosome 4q21-q25. This experiment tends to clone the human class Ⅰ ADH and investigate its role in the hepatic alcohol catabolism. Methods: A pair of primers were designed and the full-length cDNAs encoding human Class Ⅰ ADH were cloned at one time. Class Ⅰ ADH cDNAs were amplified with RT-PCR from total RNA extracted from fetal human liver and kidney, and cloned into pGEM-T vector. To identify cDNA segments, a pair of differential primers was designed. By using them, a portion of the ADHs which encodes the segment from -4 to 296 was cloned. These cDNA segments then were detected directly when being digested with Kpn Ⅰ and Pst Ⅰ, respectively. Then all the full-length cDNAs were subcloned in the plasmid pTYB11 and expressed in E. Coli. Stably. Alcohol Dehydrogenase activity of catalyzing alcohol were monitored at 340 nm. Results: Here we had successfully the human class Ⅰ ADH cloned and the full-length cDNAs expressed in E.col.I stably. The relative activity of recombinant enzymes metabolizing ethanol was 0.81 ~1.31 U/mg,0.09 ~0.15 U/mg and 0.76~1.11 U/mg, respectively. Conclusions: In the paper, the full-length cDNAs encoding human class Ⅰ AD H were successfully cloned and expressed and the recombinant enzymes showed the activities similar to the ones isolated from liver.%目的:克隆编码人Ⅰ类乙醇脱氢酶基因,并探讨Ⅰ类乙醇脱氢酶(ADH)在乙醇的肝代谢中的作用.方法:从胎儿肝,肾提取的总RNA;经RT-PCR扩增得到cDNA并克隆至pGEM-T载体.cDNA序列用Kpn Ⅰ和Pst Ⅰ酶切鉴定,并检测其在大肠杆菌中表达活性.通过吸光法检测酶的活性.结果:成功克隆了人Ⅰ类乙

  16. The type 2 CCK/gastrin receptor antagonist YF476 acutely prevents NSAID-induced gastric ulceration while increasing iNOS expression

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Dominic-Luc; Rudholm-Feldreich, Tobias; Gillberg, Linda; Halim, Abdul; Theodorsson, Elvar; Sanger, Gareth J.; Campbell, Colin A.; Boyce, Malcolm; Näslund, Erik; Per M Hellström

    2013-01-01

    YF476 differs from the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole in mode of action by antagonizing the type 2 receptor of cholecystokinin/gastrin (CCK-2R). YF476 protection against diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers was compared to esomeprazole and correlated with plasma levels of hormones related to gastric pH (gastrin, ghrelin, and somatostatin), gastric gene expression of these hormones, their receptors, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). YF476 or esomeprazole pretreatments were fol...

  17. Cellular expression or binding of desLys58-beta2 microglobulin is not dependent on the presence of the tri-molecular MHC class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Corlin, D B; Heegaard, N H H

    2008-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 332-01 is a newly developed antibody which specifically recognizes human desLys58-beta2 microglobulin (dbeta2m). In the present study, we characterized the binding of 332-01 to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), a number of human leukaemic and monocytic cell lines......-exposure to dbeta2m. Binding of 332-01 antibody could not be displaced by addition of high concentrations of native beta2m. In conclusion, our data indicate that dbeta2m - in contrast to native beta2m - binds to a hitherto unknown cell surface receptor independent of classical MHC class I molecules. As beta2m has...... previously been shown to display biological activities such as the induction of both growth promotion and apoptosis, C1 complement activity, shown to mediate cleavage of beta2m, could be involved in these processes....

  18. Influence of class M1 glutathione S-transferase (GST Mu) polymorphism on GST M1 gene expression level and tumor size in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, F P; Kämmerer, P W; Kämmerer, P; Al-Nawas, B; Brieger, J

    2010-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers in oral carcinogenesis. They present a system of polymorphic proteins. Some variants are associated with increased sensitivity to toxic compounds, as it is known for the GSTM1-null variant allele. However, the influence of the GSTM1 allele variant genotype on GSTM1-mRNA quantity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal mucosa as well as the impact on prognosis remains unclear. The genotype for GSTM1 (mutation vs. wild type) was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood from 28 OSCC patients. From the same patients, 28 pairs of OSCC cells and normal oral mucosal cells were obtained by brush biopsy. mRNA was extracted from these paired samples and the expression levels of GSTM1 were examined by real-time reverse transcriptase qPCR (RT-qPCR). The mRNA expression of the OSCC samples was normalized against an external standard, as well as to the corresponding normal mucosa. The coincidence of GSTM1 genotype and GSTM1-mRNA-expression level was examined. In 15 patients (54%), the null genotype GSTM1 was present. In the GSTM1-null allele group, the GSTM1 gene expression level was determined at 1.63 (mean: 3.08; SD 3.4) folds vs. 3.6 (mean: 10.5; SD 14.2) folds in the group with the positive genotype (p=0.06), if calibrated vs. individual normal mucosa. More T3 and T4 OSCCs (+38%), higher UICC stadia (+38%) and more lymphatic metastasis (+28%) were seen in the group with the negative allele. Furthermore, positive GSTM1 genotype and enhanced GSTM1 gene expression was accompanied with increased tumor size, lymphatic metastasis status and UICC stadium. A coincidence of null type GSTM1 and lowered GSTM1 gene expression was observed. The larger tumors and more frequent lymph node metastases in this group could be explained by the insufficient cell protection by GST.

  19. Characterization of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter, and gallbladder in patients with sphincter of Oddi spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, Gerbail T.; Krishnamurthy, Shakuntala [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tuality Community Hospital, 335 SE 8th Avenue, OR 97123, Hillsboro (United States); Watson, Randy D. [Department of Gastroenterology, Tuality Community Hospital, Hillsboro, OR (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The major objectives of this project were to establish the pattern of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous administration of cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter of Oddi, and gallbladder, and to identify reliable parameters for the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS). Eight women with clinically suspected sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS group), ten control subjects (control group), and ten patients who had recently received an opioid (opioid group) were selected for quantitative cholescintigraphy with cholecystokinin. Each patient was studied with 111-185 MBq (3-5 mCi) technetium-99m mebrofenin after 6-8 h of fasting. Hepatic phase images were obtained for 60 min, followed by gallbladder phase images for 30 min. During the gallbladder phase, 10 ng/kg octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK-8) was infused over 3 min through an infusion pump. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, basal hepatic bile flow into the gallbladder, gallbladder ejection fraction, and post-CCK-8 paradoxical filling (>30% of basal counts) were identified. Seven of the patients with SOS were treated with antispasmodics (calcium channel blockers), and one underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Mean ({+-}SD) hepatic bile entry into the gallbladder (versus GI tract) was widely variable: it was lower in SOS patients (32%{+-}31%) than in controls (61%{+-}36%) and the opioid group (61%{+-}25%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, and pattern of bile flow through both intrahepatic and extrahepatic ducts were normal in all three groups. Gallbladder mean ejection fraction was 9%{+-}4% in the opioid group; this was significantly lower (P<0.0001) than the values in the control group (54%{+-}18%) and the SOS group (48%{+-}29%). Almost all of the bile emptied from the gallbladder refluxed into intrahepatic ducts; it reentered the gallbladder after cessation of CCK-8 infusion (paradoxical gallbladder filling

  20. Orlistat inhibition of intestinal lipase acutely increases appetite and attenuates postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide-1, cholecystokinin, and peptide YY concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellrichmann, Mark; Kapelle, Mario; Ritter, Peter R;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intestinal lipase inhibition using tetrahydrolipstatin (Orlistat) has been widely used in the pharmacotherapy of morbid obesity. However, the effects of Orlistat on the secretion of appetite regulating gastrointestinal hormones and appetite sensations are still debated. We addressed...... whether Orlistat alters the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY), and ghrelin as well as postprandial appetite sensations. METHODS: Twenty-five healthy human volunteers were examined with a solid-liquid test meal after the oral administration...... of Orlistat or placebo. Gastric emptying, gallbladder volume and the plasma levels of CCK, PYY, GLP-1, and ghrelin were determined and appetite sensations were measured using visual analogue scales. RESULTS: Gastric emptying was accelerated by Orlistat administration (P

  1. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye; Johansen, Lars Dan; Wellendorph, Petrine; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Jørgensen, Christinna V; Quan, Shi; Rui, Gao; Inoue, Asuka; Linneberg, Allan; Grarup, Niels; Jun, Wang; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-27

    GPRC6A is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by l-amino acids, which, based on analyses of knock-out mice, has been suggested to have physiological functions in metabolism and testicular function. The human ortholog is, however, mostly retained intracellularly in contrast to the cell surface-expressed murine and goldfish orthologs. The latter orthologs are Gq-coupled and lead to intracellular accumulation of inositol phosphates and calcium release. In the present study we cloned the bonobo chimpanzee GPRC6A receptor, which is 99% identical to the human receptor, and show that it is cell surface-expressed and functional. By analyses of chimeric human/mouse and human/bonobo receptors, bonobo receptor mutants, and the single nucleotide polymorphism database at NCBI, we identify an insertion/deletion variation in the third intracellular loop responsible for the intracellular retention and lack of function of the human ortholog. Genetic analyses of the 1000 genome database and the Inter99 cohort of 6,000 Danes establish the distribution of genotypes among ethnic groups, showing that the cell surface-expressed and functional variant is much more prevalent in the African population than in European and Asian populations and that this variant is partly linked with a stop codon early in the receptor sequence (rs6907580, amino acid position 57). In conclusion, our data solve a more than decade-old question of why the cloned human GPRC6A receptor is not cell surface-expressed and functional and provide a genetic framework to study human phenotypic traits in large genome sequencing projects linked with physiological measurement and biomarkers.

  2. Role of protein kinase A and class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase C2β in the downregulation of KCa3.1 channel synthesis and membrane surface expression by lyso-globotriaosylceramide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ju Yeon; Park, Seonghee, E-mail: sp@ewha.ac.kr

    2016-02-19

    The intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) mediates proliferation of many cell types including fibroblasts, and is a molecular target for intervention in various cell proliferative diseases. Our previous study showed that reduction of KCa3.1 channel expression by lyso-globotriaosylceramide (lyso-Gb3) inhibits differentiation into myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis, which might lead to development of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm secondary to Fabry disease. However, how lyso-Gb3 downregulates KCa3.1 channel expression is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of lyso-Gb3-mediated KCa3.1 channel downregulation, focusing on the cAMP signaling pathway. We found that lyso-Gb3 increased the intracellular cAMP concentration by upregulation of adenylyl cyclase 6 and inhibited ERK 1/2 phosphorylation through the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, leading to the inhibition of KCa3.1 channel synthesis, not the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathway. Moreover, lyso-Gb3 suppressed expression of class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase C2β (PI3KC2β) by PKA activation, which reduces the production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P], and the reduced membrane surface expression of KCa3.1 channel was recovered by increasing the intracellular levels of PI(3)P. Consequently, our findings that lyso-Gb3 inhibited both KCa3.1 channel synthesis and surface expression by increasing intracellular cAMP, and controlled surface expression through changes in PI3KC2β-mediated PI(3)P production, suggest that modulation of PKA and PI3KC2β activity to control of KCa3.1 channel expression can be an alternative important target to attenuate ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in Fabry disease. - Highlights: • Lyso-Gb3 causes elevation of intracellular cAMP. • Lyso-Gb3 inhibits the ERK 1/2 phosphorylation through PKA, thereby reducing KCa3.1 channel synthesis. • Lyso-Gb3 reduces PI3KC2

  3. Measurement of nonsulfated cholecystokinins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap, Mikkel; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2014-01-01

    at a defined processing site in proCCK (R₇₅-D₇₆) followed by monospecific RIA-measurement of the then exposed nonsulfated N-terminal sequence of CCK-8 (DYMGW…). The analysis shows that endocrine cells in the gut synthesize nonsulfated CCK peptides (-58, -33, -22, and -8) in the order of 20...

  4. DDX3Y encodes a class I MHC–restricted H-Y antigen that is expressed in leukemic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Kellie V.; Fujii, Nobuharu; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Koo, Kevin K. W.; Xuereb, Suzanne M.; Sala-Torra, Olga; Gibbs, James S.; Radich, Jerald P.; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2008-01-01

    The Y chromosome encodes male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens that stimulate T- and B-lymphocyte responses after sex-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone that recognizes a novel HLA-B*2705–restricted H-Y antigen encoded by the DDX3Y gene was isolated from a male who had received a hematopoietic cell graft from his human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–identical sister. The antigenic peptide is a decamer that differs from the homologous DDX3X-encoded peptide at 4 positions. Expression of DDX3Y and of the H-Y epitope that it encodes was examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by CTL recognition assays. Expression of DDX3Y is detected in all myeloid and lymphoid leukemic cells that carry an intact Y chromosome. Moreover, the DDX3Y-encoded H-Y epitope is presented on the surface of both myeloid and lymphoid leukemic cells from male HLA-B*2705+ patients. DDX3Y-specific CTLs prevent engraftment of human acute leukemia in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immune deficient mice, demonstrating that the DDX3Y-encoded H-Y antigen is also expressed in leukemic stem cells. These results demonstrate that CD8+ T-cell responses against DDX3Y have the potential to contribute to graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity after female into male allogeneic HCT. This study is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00107354. PMID:18299450

  5. DDX3Y encodes a class I MHC-restricted H-Y antigen that is expressed in leukemic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Kellie V; Fujii, Nobuharu; Mito, Jeffrey K; Koo, Kevin K W; Xuereb, Suzanne M; Sala-Torra, Olga; Gibbs, James S; Radich, Jerald P; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Van den Eynde, Benoît J; Riddell, Stanley R; Warren, Edus H

    2008-05-01

    The Y chromosome encodes male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens that stimulate T- and B-lymphocyte responses after sex-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone that recognizes a novel HLA-B*2705-restricted H-Y antigen encoded by the DDX3Y gene was isolated from a male who had received a hematopoietic cell graft from his human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sister. The antigenic peptide is a decamer that differs from the homologous DDX3X-encoded peptide at 4 positions. Expression of DDX3Y and of the H-Y epitope that it encodes was examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by CTL recognition assays. Expression of DDX3Y is detected in all myeloid and lymphoid leukemic cells that carry an intact Y chromosome. Moreover, the DDX3Y-encoded H-Y epitope is presented on the surface of both myeloid and lymphoid leukemic cells from male HLA-B*2705(+) patients. DDX3Y-specific CTLs prevent engraftment of human acute leukemia in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immune deficient mice, demonstrating that the DDX3Y-encoded H-Y antigen is also expressed in leukemic stem cells. These results demonstrate that CD8(+) T-cell responses against DDX3Y have the potential to contribute to graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity after female into male allogeneic HCT. This study is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00107354.

  6. cDNA sequence, gene structure, and in vitro expression of ace-1, the gene encoding acetylcholinesterase of class A in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpagaus, M; Fedon, Y; Cousin, X; Chatonnet, A; Bergé, J B; Fournier, D; Toutant, J P

    1994-04-01

    Three genes, ace-1, ace-2, and ace-3, encode three acetylcholinesterase classes (A, B, and C) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A fragment of genomic DNA was amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerate oligonucleotides based on sequences conserved in the cholinesterase family. This fragment mapped to chromosome X at a position that perfectly matched the location of ace-1 previously determined by genetic methods. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences showed that the open reading frame was interrupted by eight introns. The product of ace-1 (ACE-1, 620 amino acids) presented 42% identity with Torpedo and human acetylcholinesterases, 41% with human butyrylcholinesterase, and 35% with Drosophila acetylcholinesterase. The overall structure of cholinesterases was conserved in ACE-1 as indicated by the conserved sequence positions of Ser-216, His-468, and Glu-346 (S200, H440, E327 in Torpedo (AChE) as components of the catalytic triad, of the six cysteines which form three intrachain disulfide bonds, and of Trp-99(84), a critical side chain in the choline binding site. Spodoptera Sf9 cells were infected by a recombinant baculovirus containing ace-1 cDNA. The secreted enzyme was active and existed as hydrophilic 5 and 11.5 S molecular forms. It hydrolyzed both acetylthiocholine and butyrylthiocholine and was inhibited by acetylthiocholine above 10 mM.

  7. CD40-CD40 ligand (CD154) engagement is required but not sufficient for modulating MHC class I, ICAM-1 and Fas expression and proliferation of human non-small cell lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M; Shiroko, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sugiyama, Y; Egilmez, N K; Chen, F A; Bankert, R B

    2001-05-15

    To determine the possible functional significance of CD40 expression on human non-small cell lung carcinomas and to assess the potential of CD40 as a therapeutic target, 18 lung tumor cell lines were established from biopsy tissues and were monitored for phenotypic changes on the cell surface and alterations in tumor cell proliferation after the ligation of CD40 with a trimeric fusion protein complex of CD40 ligand (CD40Lt). CD40 cross-linking resulted in up to a 6-fold increase in the surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, Fas and intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in a subset of tumors expressing the highest levels of CD40. Suppression of tumor proliferation was seen after the ligation of CD40 on CD40Lt-responsive cell lines. The suppression was dose dependent, reversible and resulted from a delay of the tumor cells entering S-phase. No change in the cell phenotype or in proliferation were observed in CD40-negative tumors or in tumors expressing moderate-to-low levels of CD40 after incubation with CD40Lt. CD40-negative tumors transfected with the CD40 gene expressed high levels of CD40 on their surface, but were also unresponsive to CD40Lt cross-linking of CD40. Our data establish that CD40 is required (but not sufficient) for transducing a signal that results in phenotypic changes in human lung tumors and suppression in their proliferation. We conclude that CD40 on non-small cell lung tumors may represent a potential therapeutic target, but only on a subset of the CD40+ tumors.

  8. Molecular cloning and expression study of pi-class glutathione S-transferase (pi-GST) and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx) transcripts in the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Périne; Bigot, Aurélie; Vasseur, Paule; Rodius, François

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione peroxidases (GPx) are essential components of cellular detoxification systems. We identified GST and GPx transcripts in the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha, their full-length coding sequences were obtained by reverse-transcription PCR using degenerated primers followed by 5' and 3' RACE-PCR (rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR). The cDNA identified encoded proteins of 205 and 243 amino acids corresponding respectively to a pi-class GST and a selenium-dependent GPx. The comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences with GST and GPx from other species showed that the residues essential to the enzymatic function of these two proteins are highly conserved. We studied their expression pattern in the digestive gland, the gills and the excretory system of D. polymorpha. The results showed that pi-GST mRNA expression is higher in the digestive gland than in the gills or the excretory system. Se-GPx transcripts are expressed at high, medium and very low levels in the digestive gland, the excretory system and the gills, respectively.

  9. Indigofera suffruticosa Mill extracts up-regulate the expression of the π class of glutathione S-transferase and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 in rat Clone 9 liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Liu, Chin-San; Li, Chien-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Liu, Te-Chung; Chen, Haw-Wen; Chen, Pei-Yin; Wu, Yu-Ling; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Liu, Kai-Li

    2013-09-01

    Because induction of phase II detoxification enzyme is important for chemoprevention, we study the effects of Indigofera suffruticosa Mill, a medicinal herb, on the expression of π class of glutathione S-transferase (GSTP) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in rat Clone 9 liver cells. Both water and ethanolic extracts of I. suffruticosa significantly increased the expression and enzyme activities of GSTP and NQO1. I. suffruticosa extracts up-regulated GSTP promoter activity and the binding affinity of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) with the GSTP enhancer I oligonucleotide. Moreover, I. suffruticosa extracts increased nuclear Nrf2 accumulation as well as ARE transcriptional activity. The level of phospho-ERK was augmented by I. suffruticosa extracts, and the ERK inhibitor PD98059 abolished the I. suffruticosa extract-induced ERK activation and GSTP and NQO-1 expression. Moreover, I. suffruticosa extracts, especially the ethanolic extract increased the glutathione level in mouse liver and red blood cells as well as Clone 9 liver cells. The efficacy of I. suffruticosa extracts in induction of phase II detoxification enzymes and glutathione content implies that I. suffruticosa could be considered as a potential chemopreventive agent.

  10. Evolutionary dynamics of an expressed MHC class IIβ locus in the Ranidae (Anura) uncovered by genome walking and high-throughput amplicon sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Kevin P.; Cortazar-Chinarro, Maria; Harris, D. James; Crottini, Angelica; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Fleischer, Robert C.; Savage, Anna E.

    2017-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is a genomic region encoding immune loci that are important and frequently used markers in studies of adaptive genetic variation and disease resistance. Given the primary role of infectious diseases in contributing to global amphibian declines, we characterized the hypervariable exon 2 and flanking introns of the MHC Class IIβ chain for 17 species of frogs in the Ranidae, a speciose and cosmopolitan family facing widespread pathogen infections and declines. We find high levels of genetic variation concentrated in the Peptide Binding Region (PBR) of the exon. Ten codons are under positive selection, nine of which are located in the mammal-defined PBR. We hypothesize that the tenth codon (residue 21) is an amphibian-specific PBR site that may be important in disease resistance. Trans-species and trans-generic polymorphisms are evident from exon-based genealogies, and co-phylogenetic analyses between intron, exon and mitochondrial based reconstructions reveal incongruent topologies, likely due to different locus histories. We developed two sets of barcoded adapters that reliably amplify a single and likely functional locus in all screened species using both 454 and Illumina based sequencing methods. These primers provide a resource for multiplexing and directly sequencing hundreds of samples in a single sequencing run, avoiding the labour and chimeric sequences associated with cloning, and enabling MHC population genetic analyses. Although the primers are currently limited to the 17 species we tested, these sequences and protocols provide a useful genetic resource and can serve as a starting point for future disease, adaptation and conservation studies across a range of anuran taxa.

  11. Interdisciplinary class on the asymmetric seasonal march from autumn to the next spring around Japan at Okayama University (Joint activity with art and music expressions on the seasonal feeling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kuranoshin; Kato, Haruko; Akagi, Rikako; Haga, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    There are many stages with rapid seasonal transitions in East Asia, greatly influenced by the considerable phase differences of seasonal cycle among the Asian monsoon subsystems, resulting in the variety of "seasonal feeling" around there. For example, the "wintertime pressure pattern" begins to prevail already from November due to the seasonal development of the Siberian Air mass and the Siberian High. The intermittent rainfall due to the shallow cumulus clouds in such situation is called "Shi-gu-re" in Japanese (consisting of the two Chinese characters which mean for "sometimes" (or intermittent) and "rain", respectively) and is often used for expression of the "seasonal feeling" in the Japanese classic literature (especially we can see in the Japanese classic poems called "Wa-Ka"). However, as presented by Kato et al. (EGU2014-3708), while the appearance frequency of the "wintertime pressure pattern" around November (early winter) and in early March (early spring) is nearly the same as each other, air temperature is rather lower in early spring. The solar radiation, however, is rather stronger in early spring. Such asymmetric seasonal cycle there would result in rather different "seasonal feeling" between early winter and early spring. Inversely, such difference of the "seasonal feelings" might be utilized for deeper understanding of the seasonal cycle of the climate system around Japan. As such, the present study reports the joint activity of the meteorology with music and art on these topics mainly in the class at the Faculty of Education, Okayama University. In that class, the students tried firstly the expression of the both selected stages in early winter and early spring, respectively, by combination of the 6 colors students selected from the 96 colored papers, based on the Johannes Itten's (1888-1967) exercise of the representation of the four seasons. Next, the students' activity on the music expression of what they firstly presented by the colors was

  12. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K

    1985-01-01

    The effect of cloned human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of HLA-ABC antigens (HLA-ABC) and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) on human peripheral lymphoid cells in vivo was studied by cytofluorometry using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein-labelled rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin...

  13. High-throughput protein expression analysis using tissue microarray technology of a large well-characterised series identifies biologically distinct classes of breast cancer confirming recent cDNA expression analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Rehim, Dalia M; Ball, Graham; Pinder, Sarah E; Rakha, Emad; Paish, Claire; Robertson, John F R; Macmillan, Douglas; Blamey, Roger W; Ellis, Ian O

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies on gene molecular profiling using cDNA microarray in a relatively small series of breast cancer have identified biologically distinct groups with apparent clinical and prognostic relevance. The validation of such new taxonomies should be confirmed on larger series of cases prior to acceptance in clinical practice. The development of tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides methodology for high-throughput concomitant analyses of multiple proteins on large numbers of archival tumour samples. In our study, we have used immunohistochemistry techniques applied to TMA preparations of 1,076 cases of invasive breast cancer to study the combined protein expression profiles of a large panel of well-characterized commercially available biomarkers related to epithelial cell lineage, differentiation, hormone and growth factor receptors and gene products known to be altered in some forms of breast cancer. Using hierarchical clustering methodology, 5 groups with distinct patterns of protein expression were identified. A sixth group of only 4 cases was also identified but deemed too small for further detailed assessment. Further analysis of these clusters was performed using multiple layer perceptron (MLP)-artificial neural network (ANN) with a back propagation algorithm to identify key biomarkers driving the membership of each group. We have identified 2 large groups by their expression of luminal epithelial cell phenotypic characteristics, hormone receptors positivity, absence of basal epithelial phenotype characteristics and lack of c-erbB-2 protein overexpression. Two additional groups were characterized by high c-erbB-2 positivity and negative or weak hormone receptors expression but showed differences in MUC1 and E-cadherin expression. The final group was characterized by strong basal epithelial characteristics, p53 positivity, absent hormone receptors and weak to low luminal epithelial cytokeratin expression. In addition, we have identified significant

  14. Genetic Diversity and mRNA Expression of Porcine MHC Class I Chain-Related 2 (SLA-MIC2) Gene and Development of a High-Resolution Typing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadi, Hailu; Le, MinhThong; Dinka, Hunduma; Nguyen, DinhTruong; Choi, Hojun; Cho, Hyesun; Choi, Minkyeung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Jin-Ki; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Park, Chankyu

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure and function of MHC class I chain-related (MIC) genes in the pig genome have not been well characterized, and show discordance in available data. Therefore, we have experimentally characterized the exon-intron structure and functional copy expression pattern of the pig MIC gene, SLA-MIC2. We have also studied the genetic diversity of SLA-MIC2 from seven different breeds using a high-resolution genomic sequence-based typing (GSBT) method. Our results showed that the SLA-MIC2 gene has a similar molecular organization as the human and cattle orthologs, and is expressed in only a few tissues including the small intestine, lung, and heart. A total of fifteen SLA-MIC2 alleles were identified from typing 145 animals, ten of which were previously unreported. Our analysis showed that the previously reported and tentatively named SLA-MIC2*05, 07, and 01 alleles occurred most frequently. The observed heterozygosity varied from 0.26 to 0.73 among breeds. The number of alleles of the SLA-MIC2 gene in pigs is somewhat lower compared to the number of alleles of the porcine MHC class I and II genes; however, the level of heterozygosity was similar. Our results indicate the comprehensiveness of using genomic DNA-based typing for the systemic study of the SLA-MIC2 gene. The method developed for this study, as well as the detailed information that was obtained, could serve as fundamental tools for understanding the influence of the SLA-MIC2 gene on porcine immune responses.

  15. Genetic Diversity and mRNA Expression of Porcine MHC Class I Chain-Related 2 (SLA-MIC2 Gene and Development of a High-Resolution Typing Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailu Dadi

    Full Text Available The genetic structure and function of MHC class I chain-related (MIC genes in the pig genome have not been well characterized, and show discordance in available data. Therefore, we have experimentally characterized the exon-intron structure and functional copy expression pattern of the pig MIC gene, SLA-MIC2. We have also studied the genetic diversity of SLA-MIC2 from seven different breeds using a high-resolution genomic sequence-based typing (GSBT method. Our results showed that the SLA-MIC2 gene has a similar molecular organization as the human and cattle orthologs, and is expressed in only a few tissues including the small intestine, lung, and heart. A total of fifteen SLA-MIC2 alleles were identified from typing 145 animals, ten of which were previously unreported. Our analysis showed that the previously reported and tentatively named SLA-MIC2*05, 07, and 01 alleles occurred most frequently. The observed heterozygosity varied from 0.26 to 0.73 among breeds. The number of alleles of the SLA-MIC2 gene in pigs is somewhat lower compared to the number of alleles of the porcine MHC class I and II genes; however, the level of heterozygosity was similar. Our results indicate the comprehensiveness of using genomic DNA-based typing for the systemic study of the SLA-MIC2 gene. The method developed for this study, as well as the detailed information that was obtained, could serve as fundamental tools for understanding the influence of the SLA-MIC2 gene on porcine immune responses.

  16. Ⅱa类乳酸菌细菌素的异源表达研究进展%Research Advances in Heterologous Expression of Class Ⅱa Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国荣; 孙勇; 李平兰

    2012-01-01

    Ⅱa类乳酸菌细菌素由于其对单核细胞增生李斯特菌的强烈抑菌活性,已成为天然食品防腐剂研究与开发的热点。但是受生物合成调控系统控制,天然细菌素的产量往往很低而且提取过程较为复杂,很难满足相关研究和实际应用的需求。为此,许多研究者进行过Ⅱa类细菌素的异源表达研究,本文对该类细菌素在大肠杆菌、乳酸菌以及酵母菌中的异源表达研究作较为全面系统的综述,并指出目前存在的主要问题及今后的研究方向。%Class Ⅱ a bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria, which have a strong antibacterial activity against Listeria monocytogenes, have become a hot topic in the research and development of natural preservatives. However, the bacteriocins are always produced at very low levels under the control of the biosynthesis regulatory system and their extraction is very complex, which makes it very difficult to meet the demands for relevant studies and practical applications. For this reason, the heterog- enous expression of class Ⅱ a bacteriocins has been widely studied in recent years. This paper summarizes a comprehensive systematic review of recent studies on the heterogenous expression of the bacteriocins in E. coli, lactic acid bacteria and yeast and points out the current main problems and future research directions.

  17. Plasma cholecystokinin in obese patients before and after jejunoileal bypass with 3:1 or 1:3 jejunoileal ratio--no role in the increased risk of gallstone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T I; Toftdahl, D B; Højgaard, L

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Jejunoileal bypass surgery for obesity increases the risk of gallstone formation, and, contrary to expectations, the incidence is greater in patients with a long as compared to a short ileum left in continuity. Impaired gallbladder motility due to reduced cholecystokinin (CCK...... in plasma CCK levels neither explain the increased risk of gallstone formation after bypass surgery nor the higher incidence with a long compared to a short ileum left in continuity in the bypass....

  18. Expression of the P2X2 receptor in different classes of ileum myenteric neurons in the female obese ob/ob mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Márcia Sanae Mizuno; Amanda Rabello Crisma; Primavera Borelli; Patricia Castelucci

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To examine whether the ob/ob mouse model of obesity is accompanied by enteric nervous system abnormalities such as altered motility.METHODS:The study examined the distribution of the P2X2 receptor (P2X2R) in myenteric neurons of female ob/ob mice.Specifically,we used immunohistochemistry to analyze the co-expression of the P2X2R with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS),choline acetyltransferase (ChAT),and calretinin (CalR) in neurons of the small intestine myenteric plexus in ob/ob and control female mice.In these sections,we used scanning confocal microscopy to analyze the co-localization of these markers as well as the neuronal density (cm2) and area profile (μm2) of P2X2R-positive neurons.In addition,enteric neurons were labeled using the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) diaphorase method and analyzed with light microscopy as an alternate means by which to analyze neuronal density and area.RESULTS:In the present study,we observed a 29.6% increase in the body weight of the ob/ob animals (OG)compared to the control group (CG).In addition,the average small intestine area was increased by approximately 29.6% in the OG compared to the CG.Immunoreactivity (IR) for the P2X2R,nNOS,ChAT and CalR was detectable in the myenteric plexus,as well as in the smooth muscle,in both groups.This IR appeared to be mainly cytoplasmic and was also associated with the cell membrane of the myenteric plexus neurons,where it outlined the neuronal cell bodies and their processes.P2X2R-IR was observed to co-localize 100% with that for nNOS,ChAT and CalR in neurons of both groups.In the ob/ob group,however,we observed that the neuronal density (neuron/cm2) of P2X2R-IR cells was increased by 62% compared to CG,while that of NOS-IR and ChAT-IR neurons was reduced by 49% and 57%,respectively,compared to control mice.The neuronal density of CalR-IR neurons was not different between the groups.Morphometric studies further demonstrated that the cell body profile area (

  19. Classe hospitalar: a articulação da saúde e educação como expressão da política de humanização do SUS Hospital class: coordination between health and education as an expression of the NHS' policy of humanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Vanderlei Zombini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A saúde é determinada por condições sociais, econômicas, educacionais, políticas e ambientais, extrapolando, portanto, a dimensão exclusivamente biológica. O presente trabalho tenta estabelecer uma reflexão interpretativa sobre os princípios do SUS e mostrar a interface deles com a proposta da classe hospitalar, uma modalidade de educação especial que estimula a construção de conhecimentos, a capacitação e o ensino de algumas habilidades, contribuindo para o desenvolvimento infantil. Tratase de um exercício de argumentação para o entendimento do papel da classe hospitalar na realização da atenção integral à saúde no Brasil. O desenvolvimento de atividades pedagógico-educacionais em hospitais permite oferecer às crianças e adolescentes hospitalizados a continuidade do seu aprendizado.Health is determined by social, economic, educational, political and environmental conditions and, as such, it ranges well beyond a solely biological dimension. This article attempts to establish an interpretative reflection on the principles of the NHS and to show the interface of such principles with the hospital class proposal, a type of special education that encourages the construction of knowledge, training and the teaching of a set of skills to contribute to development in childhood. This is an exercise of reasoning conceived to understand the role played by the hospital class in the achievement of comprehensive health care in Brazil. Providing educational activities in hospitals allows hospitalized children and adolescents to carry on with their learning processes.

  20. Civility in Classes and Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Civility is a polite or courteous act, expression, or standard of conduct, including the display of respect and tolerance to everyone. Teaching and modeling civility in classes and with sport teams is essential so students and athletes can learn the importance of and demonstrate civility in their interactions with others. Teachers and coaches…

  1. Effects of iodonium-class flavin dehydrogenase inhibitors on growth, reactive oxygen production, cell cycle progression, NADPH oxidase 1 levels, and gene expression in human colon cancer cells and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshow, James H; Gaur, Shikha; Markel, Susan; Lu, Jiamo; van Balgooy, Josephus; Synold, Timothy W; Xi, Bixin; Wu, Xiwei; Juhasz, Agnes

    2013-04-01

    Iodonium-class flavoprotein dehydrogenase inhibitors have been demonstrated to possess antiproliferative potential and to inhibit reactive oxygen production in human tumor cells, although the mechanism(s) that explains the relationship between altered cell growth and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) remains an area of active investigation. Because of the ability of these compounds to inhibit the activity of flavoprotein-containing epithelial NADPH oxidases, we chose to examine the effects of several iodonium-class flavoprotein inhibitors on human colon cancer cell lines that express high, functional levels of a single such oxidase (NADPH oxidase 1, or Nox1). We found that diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), di-2-thienyliodonium (DTI), and iodonium diphenyl inhibited the growth of Caco2, HT-29, and LS-174T colon cancer cells at concentrations (10-250nM for DPI, 0.5-2.5μM for DTI, and 155nM to 10μM for iodonium diphenyl) substantially lower than needed for DU145 human prostate cancer cells, which do not possess functional NADPH oxidase activity. Drug treatment was associated with decreased H2O2 production and diminished intracellular ROS levels, lasting up to 24h, after short-term (1-h) exposure to the iodonium analogs. Decreased tumor cell proliferation was caused, in part, by a profound block in cell cycle progression at the G1/S interface in both LS-174T and HT-29 cells exposed to either DPI or DTI; and the G1 block was produced, for LS-174T cells, by upregulation of p27 and a drug concentration-related decrease in the expression of cyclins D1, A, and E that was partially prevented by exogenous H2O2. Not only did DPI and DTI decrease intracellular ROS, they both also significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of Nox1, potentially contributing to the prolonged reduction in tumor cell reactive oxygen levels. We also found that DPI and DTI significantly decreased the growth of both HT-29 and LS-174T human tumor xenografts, at dose levels that produced

  2. Teachers in Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Jane

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I argue for a closer read of the daily "class work" of teachers, as posited by Reay, 1998. In developing exploratory class portraits of four teachers who occupy distinctive social positions (two from working-class homes now teaching upper-middle-class children and two from upper-middle-class homes now teaching poor children), I…

  3. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganley, Robert P; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C; Boyle, Kieran A; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda; Riddell, John S; Todd, Andrew J

    2015-05-13

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to "unclassified" cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn.

  4. Ol-Prx 3, a member of an additional class of homeobox genes, is unimodally expressed in several domains of the developing and adult central nervous system of the medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, J S; Bourrat, F; Nguyen, V; Chourrout, D

    1997-11-25

    Large-scale genetic screens for mutations affecting early neurogenesis of vertebrates have recently been performed with an aquarium fish, the zebrafish. Later stages of neural morphogenesis have attracted less attention in small fish species, partly because of the lack of molecular markers of developing structures that may facilitate the detection of discrete structural alterations. In this context, we report the characterization of Ol-Prx 3 (Oryzias latipes-Prx 3). This gene was isolated in the course of a large-scale screen for brain cDNAs containing a highly conserved DNA binding region, the homeobox helix-three. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene belongs to another class of homeobox genes, together with a previously isolated mouse ortholog, called OG-12 [Rovescalli, A. C., Asoh, S. & Nirenberg, M. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10691-10696] and with the human SHOX gene [Rao, E., Weiss, B., Fukami, M., Rump, A., Niesler, B., et al. (1997) Nat. Genet. 16, 54-62], thought to be involved in the short-stature phenotype of Turner syndrome patients. These three genes exhibit a moderate level of identity in the homeobox with the other genes of the paired-related (PRX) gene family. Ol-Prx 3, as well as the PRX genes, are expressed in various cartilaginous structures of head and limbs. These genes might thus be involved in common regulatory pathways during the morphogenesis of these structures. Moreover, this paper reports a complex and monophasic pattern of Ol-Prx 3 expression in the central nervous system, which differs markedly from the patterns reported for the PRX genes, Prx 3 excluded: this gene begins to be expressed in a variety of central nervous system territories at late neurula stage. Strikingly, it remains turned on in some of the derivatives of each territory during the entire life of the fish. We hope this work will thus help identify common features for the PRX 3 family of homeobox genes.

  5. Melanocortin-4 receptor expression in a vago-vagal circuitry involved in postprandial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautron, Laurent; Lee, Charlotte; Funahashi, Hisayuki; Friedman, Jeffrey; Lee, Syann; Elmquist, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Vagal afferents regulate energy balance by providing a link between the brain and postprandial signals originating from the gut. In the current study, we investigated melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) expression in the nodose ganglion, where the cell bodies of vagal sensory afferents reside. By using a line of mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the MC4R promoter, we found GFP expression in approximately one-third of nodose ganglion neurons. By using immunohistochemistry combined with in situ hybridization, we also demonstrated that approximately 20% of GFP-positive neurons coexpressed cholecystokinin receptor A. In addition, we found that the GFP is transported to peripheral tissues by both vagal sensory afferents and motor efferents, which allowed us to assess the sites innervated by MC4R-GFP neurons. GFP-positive efferents that co-expressed choline acetyltransferase specifically terminated in the hepatic artery and the myenteric plexus of the stomach and duodenum. In contrast, GFP-positive afferents that did not express cholinergic or sympathetic markers terminated in the submucosal plexus and mucosa of the duodenum. Retrograde tracing experiments confirmed the innervation of the duodenum by GFP-positive neurons located in the nodose ganglion. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in vagal afferents may modulate the activity of fibers sensitive to satiety signals such as cholecystokinin, and that MC4R signaling in vagal efferents may contribute to the control of the liver and gastrointestinal tract.

  6. RxClass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The RxClass Browser is a web application for exploring and navigating through the class hierarchies to find the RxNorm drug members associated with each class....

  7. B类1型清道夫受体表达调控与信号转导通路%Expression Regulation and Signal Transduction of Scavenger Receptor Class B Type 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张青海; 易光辉; 李媛彬; 阮长耿

    2009-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a membrane glycoprotein with multiple biological functions and a high homology to scavenger receptor CD36. A variety of factors may affect SR-B1 expression at the transcription or post-transcriptional level in vivo and in vitro . PPARα/γ agonists, certain LXR agonists, LH/HCG and estrogen up-regulate the SR-B1 expression, whereas vitamin E, INFa, lipopolysaccharide, IGF-1, bile acid, PXR agonist and hyperglycemia down-regulate its expression. Angiotensin II affects regulates the expression of SR-B1 in a bidirectional manner, as the specific mechanism involved is highly complicated. As a multi-ligand-binding membrane receptor, distinct intracellular signaling events and biological effects id mediated by different ligands, for instance, HDL-activated PI3K/Akt and MAPKs signaling pathway is responsible to increase the phosphorylation of eNOS and promote the migration of endothelial cell and endothelial reconstruction. Furthermore, SR-B1 is also involved in LDL-activated p38MAPK pathway, apoptotic cells and serum amyloid. The recent progress on the understanding of SR-B1 expression regulation and signal transduction is reviewed.%B类1型清道夫受体(scavenger receptor class B type 1,SR-B1)是一种与清道夫受体CD36具有高度同源性的膜糖蛋白,其表达相对广泛且有着众多生物学作用.体内外多种因素可从转录或转录后水平对SR-B1表达进行调控:PPARα/γ激动剂、部分LXR激动剂、LH/HCG、雌激素等能上调SR-B1的表达;维生素E、INFα、脂多糖、IGF-1、胆酸、PXR激动剂及高糖水平等能下调SR-B1的表达;而血管紧张素Ⅱ则可对SR-B1的表达进行双向调节,且它们具体的调节机制复杂.SR-B1作为一种具有多配体结合特性的膜受体,不同配体与其结合后可介导细胞内不同信号事件及生物学效应,如介导HDL激活细胞内P13K/Akt及MAPK信号途径,增加内皮型一氧化氮合酶的磷酸化

  8. Interaction between gastric and upper small intestinal hormones in the regulation of hunger and satiety: ghrelin and cholecystokinin take the central stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2011-06-01

    Several peptides are produced and released from endocrine cells scattered within the gastric oxyntic and the small intestinal mucosa. These peptide hormones are crucially involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal functions and food intake by conveying their information to central regulatory sites located in the brainstem as well as in the forebrain, such as hypothalamic nuclei. So far, ghrelin is the only known hormone that is peripherally produced in gastric X/A-like cells and centrally acting to stimulate food intake, whereas the suppression of feeding seems to be much more redundantly controlled by a number of gut peptides. Cholecystokinin produced in the duodenum is a well established anorexigenic hormone that interacts with ghrelin to modulate food intake indicating a regulatory network located at the first site of contact with nutrients in the stomach and upper small intestine. In addition, a number of peptides including leptin, urocortin 2, amylin and glucagon-like peptide 1 interact synergistically with CCK to potentiate its satiety signaling effect. New developments have led to the identification of additional peptides in X/A-like cells either derived from the pro-ghrelin gene by alternative splicing and posttranslational processing (obestatin) or a distinct gene (nucleobindin2/nesfatin-1) which have been investigated for their influence on food intake.

  9. Dietary unsaturated fatty acids increase plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin and may decrease premeal ghrelin in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, B J; Harvatine, K J; Allen, M S

    2008-04-01

    Previous reports have indicated that dietary unsaturated fat can decrease energy intake of lactating dairy cattle. However, the mechanism for this response is unclear. To evaluate the potential role of gut peptides, periprandial concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and ghrelin were measured. From a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square experiment, 4 cows from a single square were selected for analysis of responses to 3 treatments: a control diet (5.5% total fatty acids, 65% unsaturated), a diet with added saturated fat (SAT, 8.3% fatty acids, 47% unsaturated), and a diet with added unsaturated fat (UNS, 7.8% fatty acids, 63% unsaturated). The SAT treatment increased duodenal flow of saturated fatty acids compared with UNS and control and, despite the fact that ruminal biohydrogenation altered fatty acid profiles of digesta, UNS increased duodenal flow of unsaturated fatty acids compared with SAT and control. Blood samples were collected at 8-min intervals through the first 2 meals of the day and analyzed by commercial radioimmunoassays. The UNS treatment increased plasma CCK concentration relative to SAT and control, and increased plasma GLP-1 concentration compared with control. Furthermore, fat treatments tended to suppress the prandial ghrelin surge that was evident for control. Suppression of feed intake by unsaturated fats is likely mediated in part by increased secretion of CCK and GLP-1, and dietary fat may also inhibit ghrelin release before conditioned meals.

  10. Further studies on the role of cholecystokinin-A and B receptors in secretion of anterior pituitary hormones in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuranen, E; Vasar, E; Koks, S; Volke, V; Lang, A; Rauhala, P; Männistö, P T

    1995-01-01

    We compared the effects of unselective cholecystokinin (CCK) agonists (caerulein and CCK-8s) and a CCKB agonist CCK-4 on the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH), growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) in male rats. The subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of caerulein and CCK-8s suppressed dose-dependently TSH and GH levels. In contrast, when given into the 3rd brain ventricle (i.c.v.) caerulein dose-dependently elevated the GH levels. Next the importance of the afferent vagal nerves was studied in the action of caerulein and CCK-4. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy itself decreased cold-stimulated TSH levels but abolished the suppressing effect of intraperitoneal (i.p.), and apparently also that of the i.c.v. caerulein. GH and PRL levels were altered neither by vagotomy nor caerulein. CCK-4 did not affect hormone levels. Atropine and butylscopolamine (i.p.) themselves did not alter TSH, PRL or GH secretion in intact rats. Neither did they reverse the effect of caerulein on TSH. In conclusion, CCKA receptors dominate in TSH and CCKB receptors in GH regulation. CCKA receptors in the gastrointestinal tract, related to the nervus vagus are mediating the inhibitory effect of caerulein upon TSH secretion but inhibition of GH secretion does not depend on the nervus vagus. CCKB receptors in the brain stem or near the 3rd brain ventricle are responsible for stimulation of GH secretion.

  11. Disturbance of response to acute thermal pain in naturally occurring cholecystokinin-a receptor gene knockout Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Kyoko; Nomoto, Shigeki; Ohta, Minoru; Kanai, Setsuko; Kaneko, Takao; Tahara, Shoichi; Funakoshi, Akihiro

    2006-08-01

    Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats lack cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCK-AR) because of a genetic abnormality. We observed that body temperature homeostasis in response to changes in ambient temperature was deteriorated in OLETF rats, while the functions of the signal outputs from the hypothalamus to effectors were not impaired. Deteriorated homeostasis was also seen in CCK-AR deficient (-/-) mice. In the present study, we examined whether the sensory pathway involved in transmitting signals about temperature from the skin to the brain was impaired in OLETF rats. To elucidate the involvement of CCK-AR function, we conducted the same experiment in CCK-AR(-/-) mice. Responses to thermal pain were assessed using the Hargreaves' plantar test apparatus. Shortening of withdrawal latency was observed in OLETF rats compared to control rats, indicating thermal hyperalgesia. Behavioral responses following paw withdrawal were disturbed in OLETF rats. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid contents in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of OLETF rats were significantly higher than in those of the controls. CCK-AR(-/-) mice did not show any differences from wild-type mice. In conclusion, OLETF rats showed thermal hyperalgesia and disturbed responses to thermal pain, and an alteration of 5-HT function might have a role in this disturbance.

  12. Role of Cholecystokinin in Anxiety-related Disorder%胆囊收缩素在焦虑相关障碍中的作用探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑伦; 郑希耕

    2013-01-01

    Cholecystokinin ( CCK ) is an abundant and widely distributed neuropeptide that plays a modulatory role in anxiety - related disorder. CCK is co - localized in cell bodies and terminals with many other neurotransmitters in limbic system, such as dopamine ( DA ) and y - aminobutyric acid ( GABA ) . Of the two CCK receptor subtypes, CCK2 receptors are most implicated in the control of anxiety - related behavior. The activation of the CCK2 receptor causes anxiogenic effects while the blockade of it has anxiolytic effect. CCK2 receptor antagonist may provide important therapeutic strategies to treat anxiety - related disorder.%胆囊收缩素(CCK)是广泛分布于中枢神经系统的神经肽,在焦虑相关障碍中发挥重要的调控作用.CCK与多巴胺(DA)、γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)等经典神经递质在边缘系统共存.在CCK的两种受体亚型中,CCK2受体在焦虑行为的控制中起重要作用,激活CCK2受体具有致焦虑作用,封闭CCK2受体则具有抗焦虑作用.CCK2受体拮抗剂在焦虑障碍的临床治疗中具有重要的应用前景.

  13. Involvement of cholecystokinin (CCK) in the daily pattern of gastrointestinal regulation of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) larvae reared under different feeding regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Guillén, Carmen; Rønnestad, Ivar; Jordal, Ann-Elise Olderbakk; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Yúfera, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is an important regulator of pancreatic enzyme secretion in adult mammals and teleosteans. Although some studies have focused on the interaction between CCK and trypsin in marine fish larvae, little is known about the circadian patterns of the regulatory mechanism involving these two digestive components. In this study, we took advantage of the characteristic change from a diurnal to a nocturnal feeding habit that occurs in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) post-larvae, to conduct an experiment where larvae and postlarvae were submitted to three different feeding regimes from mouth opening: continuous feeding, diurnal feeding and nocturnal feeding. The aim was to establish different daily feeding scenarios to uncover the operating mechanisms of CCK and tryptic enzyme activity over the 24-hourcycle to better understand the regulation of digestion in developing fish larvae. Results show a prevalence of simultaneous and opposing trends of CCK level and tryptic activity as a function of the postprandial time. This finding supports the existence of a regulatory loop between these two digestive components in pre- and post-metamorphic Senegal sole larvae. In addition, CCK level was also modulated by the gut content, tending to be lower when the gut is full and higher when is being emptied. Furthermore, larvae were able to synchronize digestive functions to very different feeding regimes, although it seems to be important having a diurnal feeding phase during pre-metamorphic stages for a proper development.

  14. Capsaicin in adult frogs: effects on nociceptive responses to cutaneous stimuli and on nervous tissue concentrations of immunoreactive substance P, somatostatin and cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéry-Croze, S; Godinot, F; Jourdan, G; Bernard, C; Chayvialle, J A

    1985-11-01

    Adult frogs (Rana esculenta) were given subcutaneous injections of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 mg/kg capsaicin in sequential order over 5 days, or the vehicle only. The nociceptive thresholds to electrical, thermal and chemical stimuli were measured before, and 1, 5 and 24 h after each injection. Capsaicin was followed by a dose-related reduction of nociceptive responses to all stimuli, but these effects lasted for only 1-5 h after the given injection. Water/acetic extracts of undivided brains and spinal cords were prepared at the corresponding time periods for the radioimmunoassay of peptides. Spinal cord concentrations of immunoreactive substance P were essentially unaffected by capsaicin, while those of immunoreactive somatostatin were significantly increased after the second for fourth injections (20, 30 and 50 mg/kg) of capsaicin. Brain extracts showed an increase of somatostatin and substance P concentrations after the dose of 50 mg/kg. In an additional experiment, immunoreactive substance P, somatostatin and cholecystokinin were measured in tissue samples taken at 2 and 10 min, and 1, 5 and 24 h after a single dose of either 50 mg/kg capsaicin or the vehicle. The only significant effect of capsaicin was an increase of immunoreactive somatostatin concentration in brain homogenates at 5 h, while the vehicle in itself elicited major variations of all three peptides in spinal cord and/or brain. These results indicate that capsaicin reduces the nociceptive responses to cutaneous stimuli in adult frogs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Lack of Analgesic Synergy of the Cholecystokinin Receptor Antagonist Proglumide and Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shinsuke; Johanek, Lisa M; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to manage and treat. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has become an established procedure for treating chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to pharmacological therapy. In order to achieve better analgesia, a number of studies have evaluated the effectiveness of combining drug therapy with SCS. Cholecystokinin antagonists, such as proglumide, enhance the analgesic efficacy of endogenous opioids in animal models of pain. We previously reported that both systemic and spinal administration of proglumide enhances analgesia produced by both low- and high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Since SCS produces analgesia through endogenous opioids, we hypothesized that the analgesic effect of SCS would be enhanced through co-administration with proglumide in animals with neuropathic pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) with spared nerve injury were given proglumide (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline prior to treatment with SCS (sham, 4 Hz, and 60 Hz). Mechanical withdrawal thresholds of the paw were measured before and after induction of nerve injury, and after SCS. Physical activity levels were measured after SCS. Both proglumide and SCS when given independently significantly increased withdrawal thresholds two weeks after nerve injury. However, there was no additional effect of combining proglumide and SCS on mechanical withdrawal thresholds or activity levels in animals with nerve injury. Proglumide may be a candidate for achieving analgesia for patients with refractory neuropathic pain conditions, but does not enhance analgesia produced by SCS. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  16. Effects of peripherally administered cholecystokinin-8 and secretin on feeding/drinking and oxytocin-mRFP1 fluorescence in transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motojima, Yasuhito; Kawasaki, Makoto; Matsuura, Takanori; Saito, Reiko; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Ueno, Hiromichi; Maruyama, Takashi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Ohnishi, Hideo; Sakai, Akinori; Ueta, Yoichi

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral administration of cholecystokinin (CCK)-8 or secretin activates oxytocin (OXT)-secreting neurons in the hypothalamus. Although OXT is involved in the regulation of feeding behavior, detailed mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the central OXTergic pathways after intraperitoneally (i.p.) administration of CCK-8 and secretin using male OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) transgenic rats and male Wistar rats. I.p. administration of CCK-8 (50μg/kg) and secretin (100μg/kg) decreased food intake in these rats. While i.p. administration of CCK-8 decreased water intake, i.p. administration of secretin increased water intake. Immunohistochemical study revealed that Fos-Like-Immunoreactive cells were observed abundantly in the brainstem and in the OXT neurons in the dorsal division of the parvocellular paraventricular nucleus (dpPVN). We could observe marked increase of mRFP1 fluorescence, as an indicator for OXT, in the dpPVN and mRFP1-positive granules in axon terminals of the dpPVN OXT neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) after i.p. administration of CCK-8 and secretin. These results provide us the evidence that, at least in part, i.p. administration of CCK-8 or secretin might be involved in the regulation of feeding/drinking via a OXTergic pathway from the dpPVN to the NTS.

  17. A1-adenosine acute withdrawal response and cholecystokinin-8 induced contractures are regulated by Ca(2+)- and ATP-activated K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Maria Grazia; Valeri, Daniela; Tucker, Steven J; Marini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In isolated guinea-pig ileum (GPI), the A1-adenosine acute withdrawal response is under the control of several neuronal signalling systems, including the μ/κ-opioid and the cannabinoid CB1 systems. It is now well established that after the stimulation of the A1-adenosine system, the indirect activation of both μ/κ-opioid and CB1 systems is prevented by the peptide cholecystokinin-8 (CCk-8). In the present study, we have investigated the involvement of the Ca(2+)/ATP-activated K(+) channels in the regulation of both acute A1-withdrawal and CCk-8-induced contractures in the GPI preparation. Interestingly, we found that: (a) the A1-withdrawal contracture is inhibited by voltage dependent Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, Kv, while it is enhanced by the voltage independent Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, SKCa; (b) in the presence of CCk-8, the inhibitory effect of the A1 agonist, CPA, on the peptide induced contracture is significantly enhanced by the voltage independent Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel, SKCa; and (c) the A1-withdrawal contracture precipitated in the presence of CCk-8 is controlled by the ATP-sensitive potassium channels, KATP. Our data suggest, for the first time, that both Ca(2+)- and ATP-activated K(+) channels are involved in the regulation of both A1-withdrawal precipitated and CCk-8 induced contractures.

  18. The peptide hormone cholecystokinin modulates the tonus and compliance of the bulbus arteriosus and pre-branchial vessels of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Henrik; Axelsson, Michael; Gräns, Albin

    2014-12-01

    The bulbus arteriosus is a compliant structure between the ventricle and ventral aorta of teleost fish. It serves as a "wind-kessel" that dampens pressure variations during the cardiac cycle allowing a continuous flow of blood into the gills. The bulbus arteriosus receives sympathetic innervation and is affected by several circulating substances, indicating neurohumoral control. We have previously shown that the peptide hormone, cholecystokinin (CCK), affects the hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by increasing flow pulse amplitude without affecting cardiac output. We hypothesized that this could be explained by an altered tonus or compliance/distensibility of the bulbus arteriosus. Our results show that there is a substantial effect of CCK on the bulbus arteriosus. Concentrations of CCK that altered the cardiac function of in situ perfused hearts also contracted the bulbus arteriosus in vitro. Pressure-volume curves revealed a change in both the tonus and the compliance/distensibility of this structure. Furthermore, the stimulatory (constricting) effect of CCK was also evident in the ventricle and vasculature leading to the gills, but absent in the atrium, efferent branchial arteries and dorsal aorta. In conclusion, CCK alters the mechanical properties of the ventricle, bulbus arteriosus, ventral aorta and afferent gill vasculature, thus maintaining adequate branchial and systemic blood flow and pressure when cardiorespiratory demands change, such as after feeding.

  19. Preparation and application of a novel molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction monolith for selective enrichment of cholecystokinin neuropeptides in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang; Li, Dan; Li, Hua

    2015-08-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolith for highly selective extraction of cholecystokinin (CCK) neuropeptides was prepared in a micropipette tip. The MIPs were synthesized by epitope imprinting technique and the polymerization conditions were investigated and optimized. The synthesized MIPs were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analyzer and scanning electron microscope. A molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction (MI-μ-SPE) method was developed for the extraction of CCK neuropeptides in aqueous solutions. The parameters affecting MI-μ-SPE were optimized. The results indicated that this MIP monolith exhibited specific recognition capability and high enrichment efficiency for CCK neuropeptides. In addition, it showed excellent reusability. This MIP monolith was used for desalting and enrichment of CCK4, CCK5 and CCK8 from human cerebrospinal fluid prior to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, and the results show that this MIP monolith can be a useful tool for effective purification and highly selective enrichment of multiple homologous CCK neuropeptides in cerebrospinal fluid simultaneously. By employing MI-μ-SPE combined with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis, endogenous CCK4 in human cerebrospinal fluid was quantified.

  20. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi demonstrado recentemente que o complexo de histocompatibilidade principal de classe I (MHC I, expresso no sistema nervoso central (SNC, não funciona somente como molécula com papel imunológico, mas também como parte de um mecanismo envolvido na plasticidade sináptica. A expressão de MHC I interfere na intensidade e seletividade da retração de sinapses em contato com neurônios que sofreram lesão e também influencia a reatividade das células gliais próximas a esses neurônios. A intensidade do rearranjo sináptico e resposta glial após lesão, ligadas à expressão de MHC I no SNC, repercute em diferenças na capacidade regenerativa e recuperação funcional em linhagens de camundongos isogênicos. Dessa forma, os novos aspectos sobre a função do MHC I no SNC direcionam futuras pesquisas no sentido de buscar o envolvimento do MHC I em doenças neurológicas e também o desenvolvimento de novas estratégias terapêuticas.El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I, expresado en el sistema nervioso central (SNC, no sólo funciona como una molécula con función inmunológica, sino que es crucial para las respuestas del tejido nervioso en casos de lesiones. El MHC I está involucrado con los procesos de plasticidad sináptica y las células gliales en el microambiente de la médula espinal después de realizada axotomía periférica. La expresión de MHC I interfiere con la intensidad y la forma en que se producen la contracción y la eliminación de sinapsis con relación a las neuronas, cuyos axones se han comprometido, y también influye en la reactividad de las células gliales, cerca de estas neuronas. La intensidad de estos cambios, que responden a la expresión de MHC I en el SNC, implica diferencias en la capacidad de regeneración axonal de las células dañadas por axotomía, por lo que el nivel de expresión de las moléculas MHC I se relaciona con el proceso de regeneración de los axones y, en